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Sample records for cholera epidemic years

  1. Cholera surveillance during the Haiti epidemic--the first 2 years.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, Ezra J; Schaad, Nicolas; Magloire, Roc; Mung, Kam S; Boncy, Jacques; Dahourou, Georges A; Mintz, Eric D; Steenland, Maria W; Vertefeuille, John F; Tappero, Jordan W

    2013-02-14

    In October 2010, nearly 10 months after a devastating earthquake, Haiti was stricken by epidemic cholera. Within days after detection, the Ministry of Public Health and Population established a National Cholera Surveillance System (NCSS). The NCSS used a modified World Health Organization case definition for cholera that included acute watery diarrhea, with or without vomiting, in persons of all ages residing in an area in which at least one case of Vibrio cholerae O1 infection had been confirmed by culture. Within 29 days after the first report, cases of V. cholerae O1 (serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor) were confirmed in all 10 administrative departments (similar to states or provinces) in Haiti. Through October 20, 2012, the public health ministry reported 604,634 cases of infection, 329,697 hospitalizations, and 7436 deaths from cholera and isolated V. cholerae O1 from 1675 of 2703 stool specimens tested (62.0%). The cumulative attack rate was 5.1% at the end of the first year and 6.1% at the end of the second year. The cumulative case fatality rate consistently trended downward, reaching 1.2% at the close of year 2, with departmental cumulative rates ranging from 0.6% to 4.6% (median, 1.4%). Within 3 months after the start of the epidemic, the rolling 14-day case fatality rate was 1.0% and remained at or below this level with few, brief exceptions. Overall, the cholera epidemic in Haiti accounted for 57% of all cholera cases and 53% of all cholera deaths reported to the World Health Organization in 2010 and 58% of all cholera cases and 37% of all cholera deaths in 2011. A review of NCSS data shows that during the first 2 years of the cholera epidemic in Haiti, the cumulative attack rate was 6.1%, with cases reported in all 10 departments. Within 3 months after the first case was reported, there was a downward trend in mortality, with a 14-day case fatality rate of 1.0% or less in most areas.

  2. Cholera epidemics, war and disasters around Goma and Lake Kivu: an eight-year survey.

    PubMed

    Bompangue, Didier; Giraudoux, Patrick; Piarroux, Martine; Mutombo, Guy; Shamavu, Rick; Sudre, Bertrand; Mutombo, Annie; Mondonge, Vital; Piarroux, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    During the last eight years, North and South Kivu, located in a lake area in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, have been the site of a major volcano eruption and of numerous complex emergencies with population displacements. These conditions have been suspected to favour emergence and spread of cholera epidemics. In order to assess the influence of these conditions on outbreaks, reports of cholera cases were collected weekly from each health district of North Kivu (4,667,699 inhabitants) and South Kivu (4,670,121 inhabitants) from 2000 through 2007. A geographic information system was established, and in each health district, the relationships between environmental variables and the number of cholera cases were assessed using regression techniques and time series analysis. We further checked for a link between complex emergencies and cholera outbreaks. Finally, we analysed data collected during an epidemiological survey that was implemented in Goma after Nyiragongo eruption. A total of 73,605 cases and 1,612 deaths of cholera were reported. Time series decomposition showed a greater number of cases during the rainy season in South Kivu but not in North Kivu. Spatial distribution of cholera cases exhibited a higher number of cases in health districts bordering lakes (Odds Ratio 7.0, Confidence Interval range 3.8-12.9). Four epidemic reactivations were observed in the 12-week periods following war events, but simulations indicate that the number of reactivations was not larger than that expected during any random selection of period with no war. Nyiragongo volcanic eruption was followed by a marked decrease of cholera incidence. Our study points out the crucial role of some towns located in lakeside areas in the persistence of cholera in Kivu. Even if complex emergencies were not systematically followed by cholera epidemics, some of them enabled cholera spreading.

  3. Cholera Epidemics, War and Disasters around Goma and Lake Kivu: An Eight-Year Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bompangue, Didier; Giraudoux, Patrick; Piarroux, Martine; Mutombo, Guy; Shamavu, Rick; Sudre, Bertrand; Mutombo, Annie; Mondonge, Vital; Piarroux, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    Background During the last eight years, North and South Kivu, located in a lake area in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, have been the site of a major volcano eruption and of numerous complex emergencies with population displacements. These conditions have been suspected to favour emergence and spread of cholera epidemics. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to assess the influence of these conditions on outbreaks, reports of cholera cases were collected weekly from each health district of North Kivu (4,667,699 inhabitants) and South Kivu (4,670,121 inhabitants) from 2000 through 2007. A geographic information system was established, and in each health district, the relationships between environmental variables and the number of cholera cases were assessed using regression techniques and time series analysis. We further checked for a link between complex emergencies and cholera outbreaks. Finally, we analysed data collected during an epidemiological survey that was implemented in Goma after Nyiragongo eruption. A total of 73,605 cases and 1,612 deaths of cholera were reported. Time series decomposition showed a greater number of cases during the rainy season in South Kivu but not in North Kivu. Spatial distribution of cholera cases exhibited a higher number of cases in health districts bordering lakes (Odds Ratio 7.0, Confidence Interval range 3.8–12.9). Four epidemic reactivations were observed in the 12-week periods following war events, but simulations indicate that the number of reactivations was not larger than that expected during any random selection of period with no war. Nyiragongo volcanic eruption was followed by a marked decrease of cholera incidence. Conclusion/Significance Our study points out the crucial role of some towns located in lakeside areas in the persistence of cholera in Kivu. Even if complex emergencies were not systematically followed by cholera epidemics, some of them enabled cholera spreading. PMID:19436726

  4. [Cholera++ epidemic in Kenya].

    PubMed

    Paugam, H

    1999-03-01

    A cholera epidemic in 1997 followed on the heels of the 1992 epidemic that claimed thousands of victims in Kenya. This time, it emerged in the Migori district near the Tanzanian border, when a woman who had married in Tanzania brought her five-month-old baby to visit her parents. The infant, who contracted serious diarrhea and vomiting, died before the mother could reach a dispensary. During the funeral, a perfect opportunity for the disease to spread, those attending observed the traditional ritual of touching the corpse, and then ate and drank with the next of kin. Many developed symptoms of cholera, and several died in the next few days, even before first aid could be administered. At the Public Health Laboratory in Nairobi, analyses confirmed the presence of the Ogawa strain of Vibrio cholerae. Given the global reputation of Médecins Sans Frontières [Doctors Without Borders] in the field of cholera, the head of public health for Homa Bay District issued a call for help in August 1997, asking the team to provide preventive solutions and assess the gravity of the situation. Despite intense logistical, technical and health initiatives, the epidemic spread like wildfire. Five months after the initial outbreak, in February 1998, two Canadian nurses working for MSF in Homa Bay hurriedly surveyed the situation in Nyanza Province, which has a population of three million. The author accompanied one of these nurses, Joceline Roy, a Quebecer in her forties, on a tour that lasted more than 15 hours. Roy worked conscientiously, with great precision and energy. This narrative conveys much more than the fatigue and hazards of travel in the developing world; it tells the story of an important, but little publicized, aspect of nursing.

  5. Recurrent epidemic cholera with high mortality in Cameroon: persistent challenges 40 years into the seventh pandemic.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, E J; Patel, M K; Mbopi-Keou, F X; Ayers, T; Haenke, B; Wagenaar, B H; Mintz, E; Quick, R

    2013-10-01

    Cameroon has experienced recurrent cholera epidemics with high mortality rates. In September 2009, epidemic cholera was detected in the Far North region of Cameroon and the reported case-fatality rate was 12%. We conducted village-, healthcare facility- and community-level surveys to investigate reasons for excess cholera mortality. Results of this investigation suggest that cholera patients who died were less likely to seek care, receive rehydration therapy and antibiotics at a healthcare facility, and tended to live further from healthcare facilities. Furthermore, use of oral rehydration salts at home was very low in both decedents and survivors. Despite the many challenges inherent to delivering care in Cameroon, practical measures could be taken to reduce cholera mortality in this region, including the timely provision of treatment supplies, training of healthcare workers, establishment of rehydration centres, and promotion of household water treatment and enhanced handwashing with soap.

  6. Epidemic cholera spreads like wildfire.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manojit; Zinck, Richard D; Bouma, Menno J; Pascual, Mercedes

    2014-01-15

    Cholera is on the rise globally, especially epidemic cholera which is characterized by intermittent and unpredictable outbreaks that punctuate periods of regional disease fade-out. These epidemic dynamics remain however poorly understood. Here we examine records for epidemic cholera over both contemporary and historical timelines, from Africa (1990-2006) and former British India (1882-1939). We find that the frequency distribution of outbreak size is fat-tailed, scaling approximately as a power-law. This pattern which shows strong parallels with wildfires is incompatible with existing cholera models developed for endemic regions, as it implies a fundamental role for stochastic transmission and local depletion of susceptible hosts. Application of a recently developed forest-fire model indicates that epidemic cholera dynamics are located above a critical phase transition and propagate in similar ways to aggressive wildfires. These findings have implications for the effectiveness of control measures and the mechanisms that ultimately limit the size of outbreaks.

  7. Epidemic cholera spreads like wildfire

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Manojit; Zinck, Richard D.; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is on the rise globally, especially epidemic cholera which is characterized by intermittent and unpredictable outbreaks that punctuate periods of regional disease fade-out. These epidemic dynamics remain however poorly understood. Here we examine records for epidemic cholera over both contemporary and historical timelines, from Africa (1990–2006) and former British India (1882–1939). We find that the frequency distribution of outbreak size is fat-tailed, scaling approximately as a power-law. This pattern which shows strong parallels with wildfires is incompatible with existing cholera models developed for endemic regions, as it implies a fundamental role for stochastic transmission and local depletion of susceptible hosts. Application of a recently developed forest-fire model indicates that epidemic cholera dynamics are located above a critical phase transition and propagate in similar ways to aggressive wildfires. These findings have implications for the effectiveness of control measures and the mechanisms that ultimately limit the size of outbreaks. PMID:24424273

  8. Epidemic cholera spreads like wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Zinck, Richard D.; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is on the rise globally, especially epidemic cholera which is characterized by intermittent and unpredictable outbreaks that punctuate periods of regional disease fade-out. These epidemic dynamics remain however poorly understood. Here we examine records for epidemic cholera over both contemporary and historical timelines, from Africa (1990-2006) and former British India (1882-1939). We find that the frequency distribution of outbreak size is fat-tailed, scaling approximately as a power-law. This pattern which shows strong parallels with wildfires is incompatible with existing cholera models developed for endemic regions, as it implies a fundamental role for stochastic transmission and local depletion of susceptible hosts. Application of a recently developed forest-fire model indicates that epidemic cholera dynamics are located above a critical phase transition and propagate in similar ways to aggressive wildfires. These findings have implications for the effectiveness of control measures and the mechanisms that ultimately limit the size of outbreaks.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Cholera during the First Year of the Epidemic in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Gaudart, Jean; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Barrais, Robert; Boncy, Jacques; Faucher, Benoit; Piarroux, Martine; Magloire, Roc; Thimothe, Gabriel; Piarroux, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Background In October 2010, cholera importation in Haiti triggered an epidemic that rapidly proved to be the world's largest epidemic of the seventh cholera pandemic. To establish effective control and elimination policies, strategies rely on the analysis of cholera dynamics. In this report, we describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of cholera and the associated environmental factors. Methodology/Principal findings Cholera-associated morbidity and mortality data were prospectively collected at the commune level according to the World Health Organization standard definition. Attack and mortality rates were estimated and mapped to assess epidemic clusters and trends. The relationships between environmental factors were assessed at the commune level using multivariate analysis. The global attack and mortality rates were 488.9 cases/10,000 inhabitants and 6.24 deaths/10,000 inhabitants, respectively. Attack rates displayed a significantly high level of spatial heterogeneity (varying from 64.7 to 3070.9 per 10,000 inhabitants), thereby suggesting disparate outbreak processes. The epidemic course exhibited two principal outbreaks. The first outbreak (October 16, 2010–January 30, 2011) displayed a centrifugal spread of a damping wave that suddenly emerged from Mirebalais. The second outbreak began at the end of May 2011, concomitant with the onset of the rainy season, and displayed a highly fragmented epidemic pattern. Environmental factors (river and rice fields: p<0.003) played a role in disease dynamics exclusively during the early phases of the epidemic. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that the epidemic is still evolving, with a changing transmission pattern as time passes. Such an evolution could have hardly been anticipated, especially in a country struck by cholera for the first time. These results argue for the need for control measures involving intense efforts in rapid and exhaustive case tracking. PMID:23593516

  10. Environmental factors influencing epidemic cholera.

    PubMed

    Jutla, Antarpreet; Whitcombe, Elizabeth; Hasan, Nur; Haley, Bradd; Akanda, Ali; Huq, Anwar; Alam, Munir; Sack, R Bradley; Colwell, Rita

    2013-09-01

    Cholera outbreak following the earthquake of 2010 in Haiti has reaffirmed that the disease is a major public health threat. Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to aquatic environment, hence, it cannot be eradicated but hydroclimatology-based prediction and prevention is an achievable goal. Using data from the 1800s, we describe uniqueness in seasonality and mechanism of occurrence of cholera in the epidemic regions of Asia and Latin America. Epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. This causal mechanism is markedly different from endemic cholera where tidal intrusion of seawater carrying bacteria from estuary to inland regions, results in outbreaks.

  11. Environmental Factors Influencing Epidemic Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Jutla, Antarpreet; Whitcombe, Elizabeth; Hasan, Nur; Haley, Bradd; Akanda, Ali; Huq, Anwar; Alam, Munir; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cholera outbreak following the earthquake of 2010 in Haiti has reaffirmed that the disease is a major public health threat. Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to aquatic environment, hence, it cannot be eradicated but hydroclimatology-based prediction and prevention is an achievable goal. Using data from the 1800s, we describe uniqueness in seasonality and mechanism of occurrence of cholera in the epidemic regions of Asia and Latin America. Epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. This causal mechanism is markedly different from endemic cholera where tidal intrusion of seawater carrying bacteria from estuary to inland regions, results in outbreaks. PMID:23897993

  12. Prediction of epidemic cholera due to Vibrio cholerae O1 in children younger than 10 years using climate data in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Ishimura, S; Wagatsuma, Y; Higashi, T; Hayashi, T; Faruque, A S G; Sack, D A; Nishibuchi, M

    2008-01-01

    To determine if a prediction of epidemic cholera using climate data can be made, we performed autoregression analysis using the data recorded in Dhaka City, Bangladesh over a 20-year period (1983-2002) comparing the number of children aged <10 years who were infected with Vibrio cholerae O1 to the maximum and minimum temperatures and rainfall. We formulated a simple autoregression model that predicts the monthly number of patients using earlier climate variables. The monthly number of patients predicted by this model agreed well with the actual monthly number of patients where the Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.95. Arbitrarily defined, 39.4% of the predicted numbers during the study period were within 0.8-1.2 times the observed numbers. This prediction model uses the climate data recorded 2-4 months before. Therefore, our approach may be a good basis for establishing a practical early warning system for epidemic cholera.

  13. [The history of cholera epidemics in Israel].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Eli; Bar-El, Dan; Schur, Natan

    2005-05-01

    During the years 1831-1918 Israel (Palestine at that time) suffered from repeated cholera epidemics. The cholera epidemics were the major cause of severe health crisis among the population. The epidemics were transmitted by returening pilgrims returning from Mecca and, during the first world War, by the Turkish soldiers crossing the country. The disease caused panic amongst the population due to its high mortality rate. Quarantine which was the major measure taken by the government at that time was repeatedly broken by people trying to escape from the affected area. During the epidemic of 1902, patients were even reluctant to be treated by physicians as they were blamed for causing death. On the other hand, cholera was a major trigger for maintaining a better sanitation and establishing social relief systems within the communities. Most of the epidemics occurred in the old cities such as Jerusalem, Tiberia and Jaffa where infrastructure was inadequate. Cholera outbreaks were the trigger to build outside the old cities as in case of Jerusalem in which after the 1865 outbreak the city was expanded outside the walls. Since the end of the Ottoman period in Israel, cholera epidemics ceased, and except for very small occeasional small outbreaks, cholera is not seen here more.

  14. Molecular Analyses of Vibrio cholerae O1 Clinical Strains, Including New Nontoxigenic Variants Isolated in Mexico during the Cholera Epidemic Years between 1991 and 2000▿

    PubMed Central

    Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial Leonardo; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2009-01-01

    We studied the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the 1991 to 2000 cholera epidemic in Mexico by biochemical, serological, and molecular characterization of strains collected during this period. Strains were divided into toxigenic and nontoxigenic groups according to the presence or absence of genes encoding cholera toxin. As previously reported, we characterized two populations among toxigenic strains, which were present from the first year of the epidemic. BglI rRNA analysis revealed that these strains had ribotype profiles, denoted M5 and M6 in our study, that were identical to those previously designated Koblavi B5 or Popovic 5 and Popovic 6a or Tamayo B21a, respectively. Ribotype M5 was isolated between 1991 and 1993. This ribotype had a low level of genetic variation as detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ribotype M6 persisted from 1991 to 2000. However, PFGE profiles suggested that two epidemiologically unrelated strains coexisted within this single ribotype from 1995 until the end of the epidemic. We identified three new BglI ribotypes, Mx1, Mx2, and Mx3, from nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains isolated between 1998 and 2000; one of them grouped strains positive for the toxin-coregulated pilus island. They differed from nontoxigenic clones isolated in Latin America and on the U.S. Gulf Coast and are probably autochthonous Mexican V. cholerae O1 variants. Most of these new variants were isolated from states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, where the highest incidence of cholera in the country was recorded. Thus, the Mexican Gulf Coast, like the U.S. Gulf Coast, may act as an environmental reservoir of V. cholerae O1. PMID:19213700

  15. Molecular analyses of Vibrio cholerae O1 clinical strains, including new nontoxigenic variants isolated in Mexico during the Cholera epidemic years between 1991 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial Leonardo; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2009-05-01

    We studied the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the 1991 to 2000 cholera epidemic in Mexico by biochemical, serological, and molecular characterization of strains collected during this period. Strains were divided into toxigenic and nontoxigenic groups according to the presence or absence of genes encoding cholera toxin. As previously reported, we characterized two populations among toxigenic strains, which were present from the first year of the epidemic. BglI rRNA analysis revealed that these strains had ribotype profiles, denoted M5 and M6 in our study, that were identical to those previously designated Koblavi B5 or Popovic 5 and Popovic 6a or Tamayo B21a, respectively. Ribotype M5 was isolated between 1991 and 1993. This ribotype had a low level of genetic variation as detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ribotype M6 persisted from 1991 to 2000. However, PFGE profiles suggested that two epidemiologically unrelated strains coexisted within this single ribotype from 1995 until the end of the epidemic. We identified three new BglI ribotypes, Mx1, Mx2, and Mx3, from nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains isolated between 1998 and 2000; one of them grouped strains positive for the toxin-coregulated pilus island. They differed from nontoxigenic clones isolated in Latin America and on the U.S. Gulf Coast and are probably autochthonous Mexican V. cholerae O1 variants. Most of these new variants were isolated from states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, where the highest incidence of cholera in the country was recorded. Thus, the Mexican Gulf Coast, like the U.S. Gulf Coast, may act as an environmental reservoir of V. cholerae O1.

  16. Understanding the cholera epidemic, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Piarroux, Renaud; Barrais, Robert; Faucher, Benoit; Haus, Rachel; Piarroux, Martine; Gaudart, Jean; Magloire, Roc; Raoult, Didier

    2011-07-01

    After onset of a cholera epidemic in Haiti in mid-October 2010, a team of researchers from France and Haiti implemented field investigations and built a database of daily cases to facilitate identification of communes most affected. Several models were used to identify spatiotemporal clusters, assess relative risk associated with the epidemic's spread, and investigate causes of its rapid expansion in Artibonite Department. Spatiotemporal analyses highlighted 5 significant clusters (p<0.001): 1 near Mirebalais (October 16-19) next to a United Nations camp with deficient sanitation, 1 along the Artibonite River (October 20-28), and 3 caused by the centrifugal epidemic spread during November. The regression model indicated that cholera more severely affected communes in the coastal plain (risk ratio 4.91) along the Artibonite River downstream of Mirebalais (risk ratio 4.60). Our findings strongly suggest that contamination of the Artibonite and 1 of its tributaries downstream from a military camp triggered the epidemic.

  17. Stochastic dynamics of cholera epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaele, Sandro; Maritan, Amos; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    We describe the predictions of an analytically tractable stochastic model for cholera epidemics following a single initial outbreak. The exact model relies on a set of assumptions that may restrict the generality of the approach and yet provides a realm of powerful tools and results. Without resorting to the depletion of susceptible individuals, as usually assumed in deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered models, we show that a simple stochastic equation for the number of ill individuals provides a mechanism for the decay of the epidemics occurring on the typical time scale of seasonality. The model is shown to provide a reasonably accurate description of the empirical data of the 2000/2001 cholera epidemic which took place in the Kwa Zulu-Natal Province, South Africa, with possibly notable epidemiological implications.

  18. Stochastic dynamics of cholera epidemics.

    PubMed

    Azaele, Sandro; Maritan, Amos; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    We describe the predictions of an analytically tractable stochastic model for cholera epidemics following a single initial outbreak. The exact model relies on a set of assumptions that may restrict the generality of the approach and yet provides a realm of powerful tools and results. Without resorting to the depletion of susceptible individuals, as usually assumed in deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered models, we show that a simple stochastic equation for the number of ill individuals provides a mechanism for the decay of the epidemics occurring on the typical time scale of seasonality. The model is shown to provide a reasonably accurate description of the empirical data of the 2000/2001 cholera epidemic which took place in the Kwa Zulu-Natal Province, South Africa, with possibly notable epidemiological implications.

  19. Understanding the Cholera Epidemic, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Barrais, Robert; Faucher, Benoît; Haus, Rachel; Piarroux, Martine; Gaudart, Jean; Magloire, Roc; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    After onset of a cholera epidemic in Haiti in mid-October 2010, a team of researchers from France and Haiti implemented field investigations and built a database of daily cases to facilitate identification of communes most affected. Several models were used to identify spatiotemporal clusters, assess relative risk associated with the epidemic’s spread, and investigate causes of its rapid expansion in Artibonite Department. Spatiotemporal analyses highlighted 5 significant clusters (p<0.001): 1 near Mirebalais (October 16–19) next to a United Nations camp with deficient sanitation, 1 along the Artibonite River (October 20–28), and 3 caused by the centrifugal epidemic spread during November. The regression model indicated that cholera more severely affected communes in the coastal plain (risk ratio 4.91) along the Artibonite River downstream of Mirebalais (risk ratio 4.60). Our findings strongly suggest that contamination of the Artibonite and 1 of its tributaries downstream from a military camp triggered the epidemic. PMID:21762567

  20. [Cholera epidemics in Mali between 1995 and 2004].

    PubMed

    Dao, Sounkalo; Konaté, Issa; Oumar, Aboubacar Alassane; Sacko, Massambou; Maiga, Ibrahim; Toure, Kandioura; Diarra, Seydou; Bougoudogo, Flabou

    2009-01-01

    Cholera represents a public health problem in developing countries like Mali. This work aims to describe the characteristics of the cholera epidemics which occurred in Mali between 1995 and 2004. A retrospective survey was conducted within the Division of the fight against the diseases of epidemic potential and the Institute of Public Health and Research of the Ministry of Health of Mali. Individual medical records tracking the follow-up of patients as well as the registers of these structures were used as sources to collect data for the study. There were 12,176 cases of cholera recorded, including 1,406 deaths, from 1995 to 2004. Cholera outbreaks in Mali have been a regular occurrence every year since 2001. The regions of Mopti and Segou seem to be the most impacted by these epidemics. The lethal rates were higher than 1% at the time of each of these epidemics during this period. Vibrio cholerae O: 1, biotype El Tor were responsible for the epidemics, and the serotype Ogawa was prevalent. Cholera epidemics have been constant in Mali since the beginning of the 21st century in spite of the efforts which have been made to prevent and control them. A rigorous analysis of the factors which support this persistence and appropriate measures are essential to reverse cholera in this country.

  1. [Djibouti, history of 2 epidemics of cholera: 1993-1994].

    PubMed

    Morillon, M; De Pina, J J; Husser, J A; Baudet, J M; Bertherat, E; Martet, G

    1998-01-01

    When two cholera epidemics broke out in Djibouti, respectively in 1993 and 1994, Bioforce was obliged to intervene. The first time, three goals were pursued: setting up a rehydration centre in a tent, organizing epidemiological surveillance and training local personnel in treatment and diagnosis techniques. The next year, the epidemic followed serious flooding. The epidemiological analysis showed that cholera had become endemic in the poor neighbourhoods of the town and that epidemic break-outs were favoured by contaminated surface water and disturbances in the distribution of drinking water. The epidemic of 1997, likewise following flooding, only confirmed this point of view.

  2. Environmental signatures associated with cholera epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Murtugudde, Raghu; Sapiano, Mathew R. P.; Nizam, Azhar; Brown, Christopher W.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Yunus, Mohammad; Nair, G. Balakrish; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Calkins, John; Manna, Byomkesh; Rajendran, Krishnan; Bhattacharya, Mihir Kumar; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, has been shown to be autochthonous to riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters along with its host, the copepod, a significant member of the zooplankton community. Temperature, salinity, rainfall and plankton have proven to be important factors in the ecology of V. cholerae, influencing the transmission of the disease in those regions of the world where the human population relies on untreated water as a source of drinking water. In this study, the pattern of cholera outbreaks during 1998–2006 in Kolkata, India, and Matlab, Bangladesh, and the earth observation data were analyzed with the objective of developing a prediction model for cholera. Satellite sensors were used to measure chlorophyll a concentration (CHL) and sea surface temperature (SST). In addition, rainfall data were obtained from both satellite and in situ gauge measurements. From the analyses, a statistically significant relationship between the time series for cholera in Kolkata, India, and CHL and rainfall anomalies was determined. A statistically significant one month lag was observed between CHL anomaly and number of cholera cases in Matlab, Bangladesh. From the results of the study, it is concluded that ocean and climate patterns are useful predictors of cholera epidemics, with the dynamics of endemic cholera being related to climate and/or changes in the aquatic ecosystem. When the ecology of V. cholerae is considered in predictive models, a robust early warning system for cholera in endemic regions of the world can be developed for public health planning and decision making. PMID:19001267

  3. Pursuing Justice in Haiti's Cholera Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Weinmeyer, Richard

    2016-07-01

    In 2010, the nation of Haiti was leveled by a shattering earthquake that killed thousands and devastated its already fragile infrastructure. During relief efforts to aid Haiti's suffering population, the United Nations sent troops to Haiti to assist the rebuilding of country's most basic services. But those troops unknowingly carried with them the bacteria that cause cholera, and through the UN's negligent actions, it triggered a horrifying cholera epidemic that continues to harm the Haitian people. Those injured by the cholera epidemic have sought relief in the US federal court system to obtain justice for those killed or sickened by the cholera outbreak. The UN has declared legal immunity for causing the epidemic, yet the litigation on this matter is ongoing. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. ISSN 2376-6980.

  4. Epidemic risk from cholera introductions into Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean M; Shannon, Kerry L; Zelaya, Carla E; Azman, Andrew S; Lessler, Justin

    2014-02-21

    Stemming from the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti, cholera transmission in Hispaniola continues with over 40,000 cases in 2013. The presence of an ongoing cholera outbreak in the region poses substantial risks to countries throughout the Americas, particularly in areas with poor infrastructure. Since September 9, 2013 nearly 200 cholera cases have been reported in Mexico, as a result of introductions from Hispaniola or Cuba. There appear to have been multiple introductions into Mexico resulting in outbreaks of 2 to over 150 people. Using publicly available data, we attempt to estimate the reproductive number (R) of cholera in Mexico, and thereby assess the potential of continued introductions to establish a sustained epidemic. We estimate R for cholera in Mexico to be between 0.8 to 1.1, depending on the number of introductions, with the confidence intervals for the most plausible estimates crossing 1. These results suggest that the efficiency of cholera transmission in some regions of Mexico is near that necessary for a large epidemic. Intensive surveillance, evaluation of water and sanitation infrastructure, and planning for rapid response are warranted steps to avoid potential large epidemics in the region.

  5. Mortality Rates during Cholera Epidemic, Haiti, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Luquero, Francisco J; Rondy, Marc; Boncy, Jacques; Munger, André; Mekaoui, Helmi; Rymshaw, Ellen; Page, Anne-Laure; Toure, Brahima; Degail, Marie Amelie; Nicolas, Sarala; Grandesso, Francesco; Ginsbourger, Maud; Polonsky, Jonathan; Alberti, Kathryn P; Terzian, Mego; Olson, David; Porten, Klaudia; Ciglenecki, Iza

    2016-03-01

    The 2010 cholera epidemic in Haiti was one of the largest cholera epidemics ever recorded. To estimate the magnitude of the death toll during the first wave of the epidemic, we retrospectively conducted surveys at 4 sites in the northern part of Haiti. Overall, 70,903 participants were included; at all sites, the crude mortality rates (19.1-35.4 deaths/1,000 person-years) were higher than the expected baseline mortality rate for Haiti (9 deaths/1,000 person-years). This finding represents an excess of 3,406 deaths (2.9-fold increase) for the 4.4% of the Haiti population covered by these surveys, suggesting a substantially higher cholera mortality rate than previously reported.

  6. Mortality Rates during Cholera Epidemic, Haiti, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, Marc; Boncy, Jacques; Munger, André; Mekaoui, Helmi; Rymshaw, Ellen; Page, Anne-Laure; Toure, Brahima; Degail, Marie Amelie; Nicolas, Sarala; Grandesso, Francesco; Ginsbourger, Maud; Polonsky, Jonathan; Alberti, Kathryn P.; Terzian, Mego; Olson, David; Porten, Klaudia; Ciglenecki, Iza

    2016-01-01

    The 2010 cholera epidemic in Haiti was one of the largest cholera epidemics ever recorded. To estimate the magnitude of the death toll during the first wave of the epidemic, we retrospectively conducted surveys at 4 sites in the northern part of Haiti. Overall, 70,903 participants were included; at all sites, the crude mortality rates (19.1–35.4 deaths/1,000 person-years) were higher than the expected baseline mortality rate for Haiti (9 deaths/1,000 person-years). This finding represents an excess of 3,406 deaths (2.9-fold increase) for the 4.4% of the Haiti population covered by these surveys, suggesting a substantially higher cholera mortality rate than previously reported. PMID:26886511

  7. The role of immunity and seasonality in cholera epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Rosângela P; Ferreira, Claudia P; Kraenkel, Roberto A

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for cholera epidemics which comprises seasonality, loss of host immunity, and control mechanisms acting to reduce cholera transmission. A collection of data related to cholera disease allows us to show that outbreaks in endemic areas are subject to a resonant behavior, since the intrinsic oscillation period of the disease (∼1 year) is synchronized with the annual contact rate variation. Moreover, we argue that the short period of the host immunity may be associated to secondary peaks of incidence observed in some regions (a bimodal pattern). Finally, we explore some possible mechanisms of cholera control, and analyze their efficiency. We conclude that, besides mass vaccination--which may be impracticable--improvements in sanitation system and food/personal hygiene are the most effective ways to prevent an epidemic.

  8. Recurrent cholera epidemics in Kano--northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Usman, A; Sarkinfada, F; Mufunda, J; Nyarango, P; Mansur, K; Daiyabu, T M

    2005-01-01

    The study examined the factors associated with recurrent cholera epidemics in Kano State of Northern Nigeria, the management of the epidemics and health outcomes. Using epidemiological data from the Public Health Department of the Kano State Ministry of Health, the study examined the frequency and geographical distribution of the epidemics for the period 1995 to 2001; procedures for detection; control measures as well as results of biological and bacteriological testing of water from different sources. Mapping and testing for significance of faecal contamination of water sources were done. The number of cholera cases in the city was 2 630; 847 and 2 347 in 1995/6, 1997 and 1999 respectively. The State Epidemiological Unit which is responsible for surveillance detected epidemics using set thresholds and activated multi-sectoral emergency responses. Control measures encompassed accurate diagnosis at the reference laboratory, Kaduna; registration of cases; case management and public health measures targeting personal hygiene and water treatment. The cholera epidemics attracted worldwide attention with emergency responses from many agencies including WHO, UNICEF and Medicens Sand Frontiers (MSF). Case fatality rates decreased from 15% in 1995/6 to 5% in 1997 and 2% in 1999. The organism responsible for all the outbreaks was Vibrio cholerae, el-tor of inaba serotype. Water contamination of all sources was the principal cause of the epidemics. There were statistically significant differences in levels of faecal contamination of water sources, wells being most affected, followed by piped water, chi2 = 11.556, (p < 0.02). Bore holes were relatively safer sources of water. Point source epidemics always started from Kano City before fanning out to the rest of the State. Multi-sectoral Epidemic Preparedness and Response (EPR) approaches have contributed to the reduction in case fatality rates over the years and should be sustained. However, in order to prevent future cholera

  9. Relationship between Distinct African Cholera Epidemics Revealed via MLVA Haplotyping of 337 Vibrio cholerae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sandra; Miwanda, Berthe; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Thefenne, Hélène; Jeddi, Fakhri; Rebaudet, Stanislas; de Boeck, Hilde; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Depina, Jean-Jacques; Bompangue, Didier; Abedi, Aaron Aruna; Koivogui, Lamine; Keita, Sakoba; Garnotel, Eric; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Ruimy, Raymond; Thomson, Nicholas; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Since cholera appeared in Africa during the 1970s, cases have been reported on the continent every year. In Sub-Saharan Africa, cholera outbreaks primarily cluster at certain hotspots including the African Great Lakes Region and West Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied MLVA (Multi-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis) typing of 337 Vibrio cholerae isolates from recent cholera epidemics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zambia, Guinea and Togo. We aimed to assess the relationship between outbreaks. Applying this method, we identified 89 unique MLVA haplotypes across our isolate collection. MLVA typing revealed the short-term divergence and microevolution of these Vibrio cholerae populations to provide insight into the dynamics of cholera outbreaks in each country. Our analyses also revealed strong geographical clustering. Isolates from the African Great Lakes Region (DRC and Zambia) formed a closely related group, while West African isolates (Togo and Guinea) constituted a separate cluster. At a country-level scale our analyses revealed several distinct MLVA groups, most notably DRC 2011/2012, DRC 2009, Zambia 2012 and Guinea 2012. We also found that certain MLVA types collected in the DRC persisted in the country for several years, occasionally giving rise to expansive epidemics. Finally, we found that the six environmental isolates in our panel were unrelated to the epidemic isolates. Conclusions/Significance To effectively combat the disease, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of cholera emergence and diffusion in a region-specific manner. Overall, these findings demonstrate the relationship between distinct epidemics in West Africa and the African Great Lakes Region. This study also highlights the importance of monitoring and analyzing Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:26110870

  10. Relationship between Distinct African Cholera Epidemics Revealed via MLVA Haplotyping of 337 Vibrio cholerae Isolates.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sandra; Miwanda, Berthe; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Thefenne, Hélène; Jeddi, Fakhri; Rebaudet, Stanislas; de Boeck, Hilde; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Depina, Jean-Jacques; Bompangue, Didier; Abedi, Aaron Aruna; Koivogui, Lamine; Keita, Sakoba; Garnotel, Eric; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Ruimy, Raymond; Thomson, Nicholas; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Since cholera appeared in Africa during the 1970s, cases have been reported on the continent every year. In Sub-Saharan Africa, cholera outbreaks primarily cluster at certain hotspots including the African Great Lakes Region and West Africa. In this study, we applied MLVA (Multi-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis) typing of 337 Vibrio cholerae isolates from recent cholera epidemics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zambia, Guinea and Togo. We aimed to assess the relationship between outbreaks. Applying this method, we identified 89 unique MLVA haplotypes across our isolate collection. MLVA typing revealed the short-term divergence and microevolution of these Vibrio cholerae populations to provide insight into the dynamics of cholera outbreaks in each country. Our analyses also revealed strong geographical clustering. Isolates from the African Great Lakes Region (DRC and Zambia) formed a closely related group, while West African isolates (Togo and Guinea) constituted a separate cluster. At a country-level scale our analyses revealed several distinct MLVA groups, most notably DRC 2011/2012, DRC 2009, Zambia 2012 and Guinea 2012. We also found that certain MLVA types collected in the DRC persisted in the country for several years, occasionally giving rise to expansive epidemics. Finally, we found that the six environmental isolates in our panel were unrelated to the epidemic isolates. To effectively combat the disease, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of cholera emergence and diffusion in a region-specific manner. Overall, these findings demonstrate the relationship between distinct epidemics in West Africa and the African Great Lakes Region. This study also highlights the importance of monitoring and analyzing Vibrio cholerae isolates.

  11. Epidemic cholera in Latin America: spread and routes of transmission.

    PubMed

    Guthmann, J P

    1995-12-01

    In the most recent epidemic of cholera in Latin America, nearly a million cases were reported and almost 9000 people died between January 1991 and December 1993. The epidemic spread rapidly from country to country, affecting in three years all the countries of Latin America except Uruguay and the Caribbean. Case-control studies carried out in Peru showed a significant association between drinking water and risk of disease. Cholera was associated with the consumption of unwashed fruit and vegetables, with eating food from street vendors and with contaminated crabmeat transported in travellers' luggage. This article documents the spread of the epidemic and its routes of transmission and discusses whether the introduction of the epidemic to Peru and its subsequent spread throughout the continent could have been prevented.

  12. Nepalese origin of cholera epidemic in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, R R; Keim, P S; Barrais, R; Piarroux, R

    2012-06-01

    Cholera appeared in Haiti in October 2010 for the first time in recorded history. The causative agent was quickly identified by the Haitian National Public Health Laboratory and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor. Since then, >500 000 government-acknowledged cholera cases and >7000 deaths have occurred, the largest cholera epidemic in the world, with the real death toll probably much higher. Questions of origin have been widely debated with some attributing the onset of the epidemic to climatic factors and others to human transmission. None of the evidence on origin supports climatic factors. Instead, recent epidemiological and molecular-genetic evidence point to the United Nations peacekeeping troops from Nepal as the source of cholera to Haiti, following their troop rotation in early October 2010. Such findings have important policy implications for shaping future international relief efforts. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  13. Cholera in United States associated with epidemic in Hispaniola.

    PubMed

    Newton, Anna E; Heiman, Katherine E; Schmitz, Ann; Török, Tom; Apostolou, Andria; Hanson, Heather; Gounder, Prabhu; Bohm, Susan; Kurkjian, Katie; Parsons, Michele; Talkington, Deborah; Stroika, Steven; Madoff, Lawrence C; Elson, Franny; Sweat, David; Cantu, Venessa; Akwari, Okey; Mahon, Barbara E; Mintz, Eric D

    2011-11-01

    Cholera is rare in the United States (annual average 6 cases). Since epidemic cholera began in Hispaniola in 2010, a total of 23 cholera cases caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 have been confirmed in the United States. Twenty-two case-patients reported travel to Hispaniola and 1 reported consumption of seafood from Haiti.

  14. [Cholera epidemics in the Ottoman Empire during 1910-1913 and relevant events].

    PubMed

    Unat, E K

    1995-01-01

    From 1910 to 1913 was one of the disastrous periods of the history of the Ottoman Empire. Cholera epidemic was one of the causes of this calamity. The early cases of cholera were diagnosed on July 15 in Erzurum in 1910. The disease was imported from Russia and started to spread in the country. Cholera appeared in Istanbul on September 1st and spread rapidly. This danger necessitated the mobilization of all civilian and military resources. In spite of these efforts, Istanbul became an important focus of cholera for Turkey, because of intensive human traffic in the capital. Some cholera cases came from Iran to Iraq and from Italy to Libya and disease spread out to the vicinities during this year. This epidemic disappeared in January 1911. According to the official records, between July 15, 1910 and January 12, 1911 cholera killed 4023 people. In May 1911 cholera reappeared in Samsun and spread within the Ottoman Empire and 18876 persons were infected with cholera and 12143 of them died. In 1912 and 1913, the foundations of the Ottoman Empire were shaken by Balkan War, military defeats, lost territory, unlucky refugees and immigrants, and dreadful calamity of cholera epidemic. There is no reliable official record on the exact numbers of cholera patients and deaths. This great epidemic subsided during the Autumn of 1913. In the Ottoman Empire, preparation of Kolle's vaccine against cholera was started in 1912 and its was applied during 1913.

  15. On the probability of extinction of the Haiti cholera epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Finger, Flavio; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Nearly 3 years after its appearance in Haiti, cholera has already exacted more than 8,200 deaths and 670,000 reported cases and it is feared to become endemic. However, no clear evidence of a stable environmental reservoir of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae, the infective agent of the disease, has emerged so far, suggesting that the transmission cycle of the disease is being maintained by bacteria freshly shed by infected individuals. Thus in principle cholera could possibly be eradicated from Haiti. Here, we develop a framework for the estimation of the probability of extinction of the epidemic based on current epidemiological dynamics and health-care practice. Cholera spreading is modelled by an individual-based spatially-explicit stochastic model that accounts for the dynamics of susceptible, infected and recovered individuals hosted in different local communities connected through hydrologic and human mobility networks. Our results indicate that the probability that the epidemic goes extinct before the end of 2016 is of the order of 1%. This low probability of extinction highlights the need for more targeted and effective interventions to possibly stop cholera in Haiti.

  16. Widespread epidemic cholera caused by a restricted subset of Vibrio cholerae clones.

    PubMed

    Moore, S; Thomson, N; Mutreja, A; Piarroux, R

    2014-05-01

    Since 1817, seven cholera pandemics have plagued humankind. As the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous in the aquatic ecosystem and some studies have revealed links between outbreaks and fluctuations in climatic and aquatic conditions, it has been widely assumed that cholera epidemics are triggered by environmental factors that promote the growth of local bacterial reservoirs. However, mounting epidemiological findings and genome sequence analysis of clinical isolates have indicated that epidemics are largely unassociated with most of the V. cholerae strains in aquatic ecosystems. Instead, only a specific subset of V. cholerae El Tor 'types' appears to be responsible for current epidemics. A recent report examining the evolution of a variety of V. cholerae strains indicates that the current pandemic is monophyletic and originated from a single ancestral clone that has spread globally in successive waves. In this review, we examine the clonal nature of the disease, with the example of the recent history of cholera in the Americas. Epidemiological data and genome sequence-based analysis of V. cholerae isolates demonstrate that the cholera epidemics of the 1990s in South America were triggered by the importation of a pathogenic V. cholerae strain that gradually spread throughout the region until local outbreaks ceased in 2001. Latin America remained almost unaffected by the disease until a new toxigenic V. cholerae clone was imported into Haiti in 2010. Overall, cholera appears to be largely caused by a subset of specific V. cholerae clones rather than by the vast diversity of V. cholerae strains in the environment.

  17. Cholera: a continuous epidemic in Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, A; Patric, K

    2002-06-01

    Cholera continues to plague many parts of the world, but has largely been concentrated in Africa, which contributes more than 80% of the total cases worldwide. Natural disasters, like the 2000 floods in Mozambique and the volcanic eruption in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2002, generally lead to new outbreaks of the disease. The refugee problem in many countries throughout the world also causes potential threats for disease outbreaks. Case fatality rates are high, and we are not anywhere near curbing new cholera epidemics, especially in Africa. It is thus imperative to renew discussions about the nature of this deadly disease, its treatment, measures for prevention and control, modes of transmission, its physical, social and economic impact, and potential solutions.

  18. [New epidemic outbreak of cholera in Lima].

    PubMed

    Hoyos, C; Romero, J; Monteverde, L

    1992-01-01

    We report a new outbreak of cholera on the beginning of last Summer (Dec. 91 and Jan 92). Were 281 patients, 63% male and 36% female, treated in our Cholera Unit of treatment; all of them coming from marginal-urban populations. There was a rate of lethality of inpatients of 0.46% and a mortality of 0.25% over the total of patients that we saw in our hospital; on this summer the outbreak is early and greatest than the summer of 1991. We can conclude that because of epidemic behavior during the whole 1991 and in the time elapsed of 1992, Peru has become an endemic zone of this new disease, while the current epidemiologic settings stay unchanged.

  19. On the space-time evolution of a cholera epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Azaele, S.; Maritan, A.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. Specifically, we compare epidemiological data from the real world with the space-time evolution of infected individuals predicted by a theoretical scheme based on reactive transport of infective agents through a biased network portraying actual river pathways. The data pertain to a cholera outbreak in South Africa which started in 2000 and affected in particular the KwaZulu-Natal province. The epidemic lasted for 2 years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. Hydrological and demographic data have also been carefully considered. The theoretical tools relate to recent advances in hydrochory, migration fronts, and infection spreading and are novel in that nodal reactions describe the dynamics of cholera. Transport through network links provides the coupling of the nodal dynamics of infected people, who are assumed to reside at the nodes. This proves a realistic scheme. We argue that the theoretical scheme is remarkably capable of predicting actual outbreaks and, indeed, that network structures play a controlling role in the actual, rather anisotropic propagation of infections, in analogy to spreading of species or to migration processes that also use rivers as ecological corridors.

  20. Epidemic waves of cholera in the last two decades in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Langa, José Paulo; Sema, Cynthia; De Deus, Nilsa; Colombo, Mauro Maria; Taviani, Elisa

    2015-07-04

    Africa is increasingly affected by cholera. In Mozambique, cholera appeared in the early 1970s when the seventh pandemic entered Africa from the Indian subcontinent. In the following decades, several epidemics were registered in the country, the 1997-1999 epidemic being the most extended. Since then, Mozambique has been considered an endemic area for cholera, characterized by yearly outbreaks occurring with a seasonal pattern. At least three pandemic variants are thought to have originated in the Indian subcontinent and spread worldwide at different times. To understand the epidemiology of cholera in Mozambique, whether the disease re-emerges periodically or is imported by different routes of transmission, we investigated clinical V. cholerae O1 isolated during 1997-1999 and 2012-2014 epidemics. By detecting and characterizing seven genetic elements, the mobilome profile of each isolate was obtained. By comparing it to known seventh pandemic reference strains, it was possible to discern among different V. cholerae O1 variants active in the country. During 1997-1999, epidemic strains showed two different genetic profiles, both related to a pandemic clone that originated from India and was reported in other African countries in the 1990s. Isolates from 2012-2014 outbreaks showed a genetic background related to the pandemic strains currently active as the prevalent causative agent of cholera worldwide. Despite cholera being endemic in Mozambique, the epidemiology of the disease in the past 20 years has been strongly influenced by the cholera seventh pandemic waves that originated in the Indian subcontinent.

  1. Spatially explicit modelling of cholera epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, F.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Knox, A. C.; Gatto, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological models can provide crucial understanding about the dynamics of infectious diseases. Possible applications range from real-time forecasting and allocation of health care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. We apply a spatially explicit model to the cholera epidemic that struck Haiti in October 2010 and is still ongoing. The dynamics of susceptibles as well as symptomatic and asymptomatic infectives are modelled at the scale of local human communities. Dissemination of Vibrio cholerae through hydrological transport and human mobility along the road network is explicitly taken into account, as well as the effect of rainfall as a driver of increasing disease incidence. The model is calibrated using a dataset of reported cholera cases. We further model the long term impact of several types of interventions on the disease dynamics by varying parameters appropriately. Key epidemiological mechanisms and parameters which affect the efficiency of treatments such as antibiotics are identified. Our results lead to conclusions about the influence of different intervention strategies on the overall epidemiological dynamics.

  2. On spatially explicit models of cholera epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-01-01

    We generalize a recently proposed model for cholera epidemics that accounts for local communities of susceptibles and infectives in a spatially explicit arrangement of nodes linked by networks having different topologies. The vehicle of infection (Vibrio cholerae) is transported through the network links that are thought of as hydrological connections among susceptible communities. The mathematical tools used are borrowed from general schemes of reactive transport on river networks acting as the environmental matrix for the circulation and mixing of waterborne pathogens. Using the diffusion approximation, we analytically derive the speed of propagation for travelling fronts of epidemics on regular lattices (either one-dimensional or two-dimensional) endowed with uniform population density. Power laws are found that relate the propagation speed to the diffusion coefficient and the basic reproduction number. We numerically obtain the related, slower speed of epidemic spreading for more complex, yet realistic river structures such as Peano networks and optimal channel networks. The analysis of the limit case of uniformly distributed population sizes proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. To that extent, the ratio between spreading and disease outbreak time scales proves the crucial parameter. The relevance of our results lies in the major differences potentially arising between the predictions of spatially explicit models and traditional compartmental models of the susceptible–infected–recovered (SIR)-like type. Our results suggest that in many cases of real-life epidemiological interest, time scales of disease dynamics may trigger outbreaks that significantly depart from the predictions of compartmental models. PMID:19605400

  3. Epidemic cholera among refugees in Malawi, Africa: treatment and transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, D. L.; Malenga, G.; Begkoyian, G.; Nyangulu, D.; Toole, M.; Waldman, R. J.; Puhr, D. N.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Between 23 August and 15 December 1990 an epidemic of cholera affected Mozambican refugees in Malawi causing 1931 cases (attack rate = 2.4%); 86% of patients had arrived in Malawi < 3 months before illness onset. There were 68 deaths (case-fatality rate = 3.5%); most deaths (63%) occurred within 24 h of hospital admission which may have indicated delayed presentation to health facilities and inadequate early rehydration. Mortality was higher in children < 4 years old and febrile deaths may have been associated with prolonged i.v. use. Significant risk factors for illness (P < 0.05) in two case-control studies included drinking river water (odds ratio [OR] = 3.0); placing hands into stored household drinking water (OR = 6.0); and among those without adequate firewood to reheat food, eating leftover cooked peas (OR = 8.0). Toxigenic V. cholerae O1, serotype Inaba, was isolated from patients and stored household water. The rapidity with which newly arrived refugees became infected precluded effective use of a cholera vaccine to prevent cases unless vaccination had occurred immediately upon camp arrival. Improved access to treatment and care of paediatric patients, and increased use of oral rehydration therapy, could decrease mortality. Preventing future cholera outbreaks in Africa will depend on interrupting both waterborne and foodborne transmission of this pathogen. PMID:9207730

  4. Epidemic cholera among refugees in Malawi, Africa: treatment and transmission.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, D L; Malenga, G; Begkoyian, G; Nyangulu, D; Toole, M; Waldman, R J; Puhr, D N; Tauxe, R V

    1997-06-01

    Between 23 August and 15 December 1990 an epidemic of cholera affected Mozambican refugees in Malawi causing 1931 cases (attack rate = 2.4%); 86% of patients had arrived in Malawi < 3 months before illness onset. There were 68 deaths (case-fatality rate = 3.5%); most deaths (63%) occurred within 24 h of hospital admission which may have indicated delayed presentation to health facilities and inadequate early rehydration. Mortality was higher in children < 4 years old and febrile deaths may have been associated with prolonged i.v. use. Significant risk factors for illness (P < 0.05) in two case-control studies included drinking river water (odds ratio [OR] = 3.0); placing hands into stored household drinking water (OR = 6.0); and among those without adequate firewood to reheat food, eating leftover cooked peas (OR = 8.0). Toxigenic V. cholerae O1, serotype Inaba, was isolated from patients and stored household water. The rapidity with which newly arrived refugees became infected precluded effective use of a cholera vaccine to prevent cases unless vaccination had occurred immediately upon camp arrival. Improved access to treatment and care of paediatric patients, and increased use of oral rehydration therapy, could decrease mortality. Preventing future cholera outbreaks in Africa will depend on interrupting both waterborne and foodborne transmission of this pathogen.

  5. Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jason B.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera is an acute, secretory diarrhea caused by infection with Vibrio cholerae of the O1 and O139 serogroups. Cholera is endemic in over 50 countries and also causes large epidemics. Since 1817, seven cholera pandemics have spread from Asia to much of the world. The 7th pandemic began in 1961 and affects 3–5 million people each year, killing 120,000. Although mild cholera may be indistinguishable from other diarrheal illnesses, the presentation of severe cholera is distinct, with dramatic diarrheal purging. Management of patients with cholera involves aggressive fluid replacement; effective therapy can decrease mortality from over 50% to less than 0.2%. Antibiotics decrease volume and duration of diarrhea by 50% and are recommended for patients with moderate to severe dehydration. Prevention of cholera depends on access to safe water and sanitation. Two oral cholera vaccines are available and the most effective use of these in integrated prevention programs is being actively evaluated. PMID:22748592

  6. [Cholera epidemics on Reunion Island during the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Gaüzère, B-A; Aubry, P

    2012-01-01

    The first cholera outbreak on Bourbon Island (now Reunion Island) was recorded in January 1820. The disease was imported from Mauritius Island aboard the steamer Pivert. The epidemic began on Mauritius in November 1819 after the English frigate, La Topaze, called from Calcutta, India. Dr. François Vinson demonstrated the transmissibility of cholera during this epidemic. Drastic sanitary measures spared Reunion from the two epidemics on Mauritius Island, in 1854 and 1856. The second outbreak of cholera on Reunion Island was recorded on March 6, 1859. The disease was introduced from East Africa by the steamer Mascareignes, which carried indentured servants. The captain (d'Agnel) et the supercargo (Menon) of the steamer claimed to the doctor who boarded the ship before landing that no passengers or crew had had cholera, in flagrant contradiction to the autopsy report issued by Navy surgeon Alfred Vaillant, who had concluded that cholera was present when the vessel left the African coast. This report was withheld from the boarding physician. Cholera spread quickly on the island and affected the poorest people, especially freed slaves, most severely. Dr. Petit, the chief Navy Physician and Director of the Health Department, obtained a confession by Menon about the fraudulent statements. On January 24, 1860, a trial for public health endangerment began on Reunion Island; it ended on February 1 with a not-guilty verdict, based largely on the testimony of several island doctors that cholera was not contagious.

  7. Analysis of fatality due to cholera epidemics in Tuliszków parish in 1852.

    PubMed

    Cichy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the correlation between age, gender-distribution and fatality rate during cholera epidemics. To analyze the change in the fatality rate with regard to age and gender during cholera epidemics in 1852 in Tuliszków Parish. Data for the present study were retrieved from the archives. Information on fatal cases was obtained from the records of Tuliszków Parish - The Register of Deaths (1851-1879). Age, gender of the deceased and place of residence in Tuliszków Parish were analyzed. Data from the year in which the epidemic occurred (1852) and year preceding it (1851) were compared using Pearson's χ2 test. A total of 3200 persons lived in the Roman Catholic Parish of Tuliszków during cholera epidemic in 1852. Having compared to the control year (1851), fatality rate distribution changed statistically significantly in the epidemic year (1852); (χ2=27.5665, p=0.0011). In particular, it applied to males (χ2=28.9476, p=0.0007). Irrespective of the gender, the highest increase of the fatality rate was observed in the 10-25 age group (χ2=5.0375, p=0.0248) while infant fatality rate decreased (χ2=19.2789, p=0.0000). Cholera epidemic resulted in a significant change of fatality rate in infants, males and the youth. Death of both parents aged up to 45 years old contributed to an increase in the number of orphans.

  8. Cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, J B; Morris, J G; Levine, M M

    1995-01-01

    Despite more than a century of study, cholera still presents challenges and surprises to us. Throughout most of the 20th century, cholera was caused by Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup and the disease was largely confined to Asia and Africa. However, the last decade of the 20th century has witnessed two major developments in the history of this disease. In 1991, a massive outbreak of cholera started in South America, the one continent previously untouched by cholera in this century. In 1992, an apparently new pandemic caused by a previously unknown serogroup of V. cholerae (O139) began in India and Bangladesh. The O139 epidemic has been occurring in populations assumed to be largely immune to V. cholerae O1 and has rapidly spread to many countries including the United States. In this review, we discuss all aspects of cholera, including the clinical microbiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of the disease. Special attention will be paid to the extraordinary advances that have been made in recent years in unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of this infection and in the development of new generations of vaccines to prevent it. PMID:7704895

  9. Cholera.

    PubMed

    Kaper, J B; Morris, J G; Levine, M M

    1995-01-01

    Despite more than a century of study, cholera still presents challenges and surprises to us. Throughout most of the 20th century, cholera was caused by Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup and the disease was largely confined to Asia and Africa. However, the last decade of the 20th century has witnessed two major developments in the history of this disease. In 1991, a massive outbreak of cholera started in South America, the one continent previously untouched by cholera in this century. In 1992, an apparently new pandemic caused by a previously unknown serogroup of V. cholerae (O139) began in India and Bangladesh. The O139 epidemic has been occurring in populations assumed to be largely immune to V. cholerae O1 and has rapidly spread to many countries including the United States. In this review, we discuss all aspects of cholera, including the clinical microbiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of the disease. Special attention will be paid to the extraordinary advances that have been made in recent years in unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of this infection and in the development of new generations of vaccines to prevent it.

  10. Real-time modelling used for outbreak management during a cholera epidemic, Haiti, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Abrams, J Y; Copeland, J R; Tauxe, R V; Date, K A; Belay, E D; Mody, R K; Mintz, E D

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of epidemic cholera in post-earthquake Haiti portended a public health disaster of uncertain magnitude. In order to coordinate relief efforts in an environment with limited healthcare infrastructure and stretched resources, timely and realistic projections of the extent of the cholera outbreak were crucial. Projections were shared with Government and partner organizations beginning 5 days after the first reported case and were updated using progressively more advanced methods as more surveillance data became available. The first projection estimated that 105 000 cholera cases would occur in the first year. Subsequent projections using different methods estimated up to 652 000 cases and 163 000-247 000 hospitalizations during the first year. Current surveillance data show these projections to have provided reasonable approximations of the observed epidemic. Providing the real-time projections allowed Haitian ministries and external aid organizations to better plan and implement response measures during the evolving epidemic.

  11. A generalized cholera model and epidemic-endemic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Liao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    The transmission of cholera involves both human-to-human and environment-to-human pathways that complicate its dynamics. In this paper, we present a new and unified deterministic model that incorporates a general incidence rate and a general formulation of the pathogen concentration to analyse the dynamics of cholera. Particularly, this work unifies many existing cholera models proposed by different authors. We conduct equilibrium analysis to carefully study the complex epidemic and endemic behaviour of the disease. Our results show that despite the incorporation of the environmental component, there exists a forward transcritical bifurcation at R (0)=1 for the combined human-environment epidemiological model under biologically reasonable conditions.

  12. Epidemic cholera in the Amazon: the challenge of preventing death.

    PubMed

    Quick, R E; Vargas, R; Moreno, D; Mujica, O; Beingolea, L; Palacios, A M; Seminario, L; Tauxe, R V

    1993-05-01

    Epidemic cholera struck Peru in January 1991, and spread rapidly. The national cholera case-fatality rate (CFR) was less than 1% in the first six months of the epidemic, but in some rural areas, the CFR exceeded 10%. We investigated cholera mortality in the rural Amazon region, an area with a CFR of 6.3%. We conducted a case-control study, comparing 29 decedents with 61 survivors of recent cholera-like diarrheal illness in 12 villages with a combined CFR of 13.5%. Of 29 decedents, 28 (96%) died in the village or en route to a health facility. Death occurred within 36 hours of illness onset for 83% of the decedents. In 11 (92%) villages, the first or second recognized case was fatal. Death was associated with receiving treatment only at home (odds ratio indeterminate; 95% confidence interval 3.5, indeterminate). Treatment with oral rehydration salts (ORS) was not protective against death for patients who received treatment only at home. Treatment with homemade sugar-salt solution (SSS) was also not protective; fewer than one-third of respondents knew the correct SSS recipe. Most decedents experienced multiple barriers to health care. Cholera victims died rapidly and early in village outbreaks, and few patients had access to health care. Provision of threatened villages with ORS supplies and education in their use before cholera strikes is essential to reducing cholera mortality in this region.

  13. Human Mobility Patterns and Cholera Epidemics: a Spatially Explicit Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Righetto, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    Cholera is an acute enteric disease caused by the ingestion of water or food contaminated by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Although most infected individuals do not develop severe symptoms, their stool may contain huge quantities of V.~cholerae cells. Therefore, while traveling or commuting, asymptomatic carriers can be responsible for the long-range dissemination of the disease. As a consequence, human mobility is an alternative and efficient driver for the spread of cholera, whose primary propagation pathway is hydrological transport through river networks. We present a multi-layer network model that accounts for the interplay between epidemiological dynamics, hydrological transport and long-distance dissemination of V.~cholerae due to human movement. In particular, building on top of state-of-the-art spatially explicit models for cholera spread through surface waters, we describe human movement and its effects on the propagation of the disease by means of a gravity-model approach borrowed from transportation theory. Gravity-like contact processes have been widely used in epidemiology, because they can satisfactorily depict human movement when data on actual mobility patterns are not available. We test our model against epidemiological data recorded during the cholera outbreak occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa during years 2000--2001. We show that human mobility does actually play an important role in the formation of the spatiotemporal patterns of cholera epidemics. In particular, long-range human movement may determine inter-catchment dissemination of V.~cholerae cells, thus in turn explaining the emergence of epidemic patterns that cannot be produced by hydrological transport alone. We also show that particular attention has to be devoted to study how heterogeneously distributed drinking water supplies and sanitation conditions may affect cholera transmission.

  14. Deciphering the Origin of the 2012 Cholera Epidemic in Guinea by Integrating Epidemiological and Molecular Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Mengel, Martin A.; Koivogui, Lamine; Moore, Sandra; Mutreja, Ankur; Kande, Yacouba; Yattara, Ousmane; Sarr Keita, Véronique; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Garnotel, Eric; Keita, Sakoba; Piarroux, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is typically considered endemic in West Africa, especially in the Republic of Guinea. However, a three-year lull period was observed from 2009 to 2011, before a new epidemic struck the country in 2012, which was officially responsible for 7,350 suspected cases and 133 deaths. To determine whether cholera re-emerged from the aquatic environment or was rather imported due to human migration, a comprehensive epidemiological and molecular survey was conducted. A spatiotemporal analysis of the national case databases established Kaback Island, located off the southern coast of Guinea, as the initial focus of the epidemic in early February. According to the field investigations, the index case was found to be a fisherman who had recently arrived from a coastal district of neighboring Sierra Leone, where a cholera outbreak had recently occurred. MLVA-based genotype mapping of 38 clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates sampled throughout the epidemic demonstrated a progressive genetic diversification of the strains from a single genotype isolated on Kaback Island in February, which correlated with spatial epidemic spread. Whole-genome sequencing characterized this strain as an “atypical” El Tor variant. Furthermore, genome-wide SNP-based phylogeny analysis grouped the Guinean strain into a new clade of the third wave of the seventh pandemic, distinct from previously analyzed African strains and directly related to a Bangladeshi isolate. Overall, these results highly suggest that the Guinean 2012 epidemic was caused by a V. cholerae clone that was likely imported from Sierra Leone by an infected individual. These results indicate the importance of promoting the cross-border identification and surveillance of mobile and vulnerable populations, including fishermen, to prevent, detect and control future epidemics in the region. Comprehensive epidemiological investigations should be expanded to better understand cholera dynamics and improve disease control

  15. Deciphering the origin of the 2012 cholera epidemic in Guinea by integrating epidemiological and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Mengel, Martin A; Koivogui, Lamine; Moore, Sandra; Mutreja, Ankur; Kande, Yacouba; Yattara, Ousmane; Sarr Keita, Véronique; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Garnotel, Eric; Keita, Sakoba; Piarroux, Renaud

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is typically considered endemic in West Africa, especially in the Republic of Guinea. However, a three-year lull period was observed from 2009 to 2011, before a new epidemic struck the country in 2012, which was officially responsible for 7,350 suspected cases and 133 deaths. To determine whether cholera re-emerged from the aquatic environment or was rather imported due to human migration, a comprehensive epidemiological and molecular survey was conducted. A spatiotemporal analysis of the national case databases established Kaback Island, located off the southern coast of Guinea, as the initial focus of the epidemic in early February. According to the field investigations, the index case was found to be a fisherman who had recently arrived from a coastal district of neighboring Sierra Leone, where a cholera outbreak had recently occurred. MLVA-based genotype mapping of 38 clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates sampled throughout the epidemic demonstrated a progressive genetic diversification of the strains from a single genotype isolated on Kaback Island in February, which correlated with spatial epidemic spread. Whole-genome sequencing characterized this strain as an "atypical" El Tor variant. Furthermore, genome-wide SNP-based phylogeny analysis grouped the Guinean strain into a new clade of the third wave of the seventh pandemic, distinct from previously analyzed African strains and directly related to a Bangladeshi isolate. Overall, these results highly suggest that the Guinean 2012 epidemic was caused by a V. cholerae clone that was likely imported from Sierra Leone by an infected individual. These results indicate the importance of promoting the cross-border identification and surveillance of mobile and vulnerable populations, including fishermen, to prevent, detect and control future epidemics in the region. Comprehensive epidemiological investigations should be expanded to better understand cholera dynamics and improve disease control

  16. Rainfall mediations in the spreading of epidemic cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetto, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Schild, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-10-01

    Following the empirical evidence of a clear correlation between rainfall events and cholera resurgence that was observed in particular during the recent outbreak in Haiti, a spatially explicit model of epidemic cholera is re-examined. Specifically, we test a multivariate Poisson rainfall generator, with parameters varying in space and time, as a driver of enhanced disease transmission. The relevance of the issue relates to the key insight that predictive mathematical models may provide into the course of an ongoing cholera epidemic aiding emergency management (say, in allocating life-saving supplies or health care staff) or in evaluating alternative management strategies. Our model consists of a set of dynamical equations (SIRB-like i.e. subdivided into the compartments of Susceptible, Infected and Recovered individuals, and including a balance of Bacterial concentrations in the water reservoir) describing a connected network of human communities where the infection results from the exposure to excess concentrations of pathogens in the water. These, in turn, are driven by rainfall washout of open-air defecation sites or cesspool overflows, hydrologic transport through waterways and by mobility of susceptible and infected individuals. We perform an a posteriori analysis (from the beginning of the epidemic in October 2010 until December 2011) to test the model reliability in predicting cholera cases and in testing control measures, involving vaccination and sanitation campaigns, for the ongoing epidemic. Even though predicting reliably the timing of the epidemic resurgence proves difficult due to rainfall inter-annual variability, we find that the model can reasonably quantify the total number of reported infection cases in the selected time-span. We then run a multi-seasonal prediction of the course of the epidemic until December 2015, to investigate conditions for further resurgences and endemicity of cholera in the region with a view to policies which may bring to

  17. Cholera epidemics in 2010: respective roles of environment, strain changes, and human-driven dissemination.

    PubMed

    Piarroux, R; Faucher, B

    2012-03-01

    The cholera burden has grown strikingly during the past 4 years, and has spread to countries previously spared by this disease. The current spread has proved especially violent, as illustrated by the recent deadly epidemics around the Lake Chad Basin, in East Africa, and in Haiti. This onset of severe cholera epidemics is part of the overall dynamic of the current seventh cholera pandemic, composed of successive epidemic waves. The current wave is attributable to new atypical El Tor strains, which spread from the Bay of Bengal to Papua in the east, Africa, and the Caribbean Sea in the west, and caused hundreds of thousands of cases and thousands of deaths during each of the last 4 years. The particular severity of the resulting epidemics is partially attributable to the specific characteristics of the atypical El Tor strain involved. Besides the abilty of El Tor to spread easily, this strain is associated with more severe clinical findings, because of elevated levels of toxin secretion resulting from a genetic content originating from classical strains. Conversely, recent studies of these deadly outbreaks raised hope by illustrating their relationship with human-borne dissemination rather than with the resurgence of environmental strains. As human-borne dissemination can be more easily targeted than ubiquitous environmental contamination, accurate and comprehensive epidemiological studies are essential to better understand the dynamics of the disease and to optimize future cholera responses.

  18. [Cholera epidemic in Brescia in 1836].

    PubMed

    Vaglia, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Cholera first made its appearance in Italy in 1836. According to reports of the time the consequences were catastrophic: both the number of the people falling ill and the incidence of mortality were high. On the basis of extensive documentation from various archives, the disease appears to have been known in its clinical aspect but its aetiology remained obscure. Hence physicians were powerless to combat such a scourge. The sense of unease and confusion that accompanied the evolution of these sad events drove the population to the use of religious practices of various kinds. It is still possible to find signs of such devotion in churches, votive chapels and ex voto offerings.

  19. CE: Responding to the cholera epidemic in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mary Lou Schulz; Wood, Tom; Plyler, Lance

    2014-05-01

    While Haiti was still recovering from the January 12, 2010, magnitude-7 earthquake, an outbreak of cholera spread throughout the nation, soon reaching epidemic proportions. Working through the faith-based nongovernmental organization Samaritan's Purse, an NP, an epidemiologist, and a physician joined the effort to prevent the spread of disease and treat those affected. Here they describe the prevention and intervention campaigns their organization initiated, how they prepared for each, and the essential elements of their operations.

  20. Seroepidemiologic survey of epidemic cholera in Haiti to assess spectrum of illness and risk factors for severe disease.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brendan R; Talkington, Deborah F; Pruckler, James M; Fouché, M D Bernadette; Lafosse, Elsie; Nygren, Benjamin; Gómez, Gerardo A; Dahourou, Georges A; Archer, W Roodly; Payne, Amanda B; Hooper, W Craig; Tappero, Jordan W; Derado, Gordana; Magloire, Roc; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Mintz, Eric D

    2013-10-01

    To assess the spectrum of illness from toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and risk factors for severe cholera in Haiti, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in a rural commune with more than 21,000 residents. During March 22-April 6, 2011, we interviewed 2,622 residents ≥ 2 years of age and tested serum specimens from 2,527 (96%) participants for vibriocidal and antibodies against cholera toxin; 18% of participants reported a cholera diagnosis, 39% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 320, and 64% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 80, suggesting widespread infection. Among seropositive participants (vibriocidal titers ≥ 320), 74.5% reported no diarrhea and 9.0% had severe cholera (reported receiving intravenous fluids and overnight hospitalization). This high burden of severe cholera is likely explained by the lack of pre-existing immunity in this population, although the virulence of the atypical El Tor strain causing the epidemic and other factors might also play a role.

  1. Regional-scale climate-variability synchrony of cholera epidemics in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Guégan, Jean-François; Petit, Michel; Cazelles, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The relationship between cholera and climate was explored in Africa, the continent with the most reported cases, by analyzing monthly 20-year cholera time series for five coastal adjoining West African countries: Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Methods We used wavelet analyses and derived methods because these are useful mathematical tools to provide information on the evolution of the periodic component over time and allow quantification of non-stationary associations between time series. Results The temporal variability of cholera incidence exhibits an interannual component, and a significant synchrony in cholera epidemics is highlighted at the end of the 1980's. This observed synchrony across countries, even if transient through time, is also coherent with both the local variability of rainfall and the global climate variability quantified by the Indian Oscillation Index. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that large and regional scale climate variability influence both the temporal dynamics and the spatial synchrony of cholera epidemics in human populations in the Gulf of Guinea, as has been described for two other tropical regions of the world, western South America and Bangladesh. PMID:17371602

  2. Assessing the risk factors of cholera epidemic in the Buea Health District of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Atashili, Julius; Fon, Peter Nde; Tanue, Elvis Asangbeng; Ayima, Charlotte Wenze; Kibu, Odette Dzemo

    2015-11-14

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium, Vibrio cholerae. A cholera epidemic occurred in Cameroon in 2010. After a cholera-free period at the end of 2010, new cases started appearing in early 2011. The disease affected 23,152 people and killed 843, with the South West Region registering 336 cases and 13 deaths. Hence, we assessed the risk factors of cholera epidemic in the Buea Health District to provide evidence-based cholera guidelines. We conducted an unmatched case-control study. Cases were identified from health facility records and controls were neighbours of the cases in the same community. We interviewed 135 participants on socio-economic, household hygiene, food and water exposures practices using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using STATA. Fisher exact test and logistic regression were computed. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The 135 participants included 34 (25.2 %) cholera cases and 101 (74.8 %) controls. More females [78 (57.8 %)] participated in the study. Ages ranged from 1 year 3 months to 72 years; with a mean of 29.86 (±14.51) years. The cholera attack rate was 0.03 % with no fatality. Most participants [129 (99.2 %)] had heard of cholera. Poor hygienic practices [77 (59.2 %)] and contaminated water sources [54 (41.5 %)] were the main reported transmission routes of cholera. Good hygienic practices [108 (83.1 %)] were the main preventive methods of cholera in both cases [23 (76.6 %)] and controls [85 (85.0 %)]. Logistic regression analysis showed age below 21 years (OR = 1.72, 95 % CI: 0.73-4.06, p = 0.251), eating outside the home (OR = 1.06, CI: 0.46-2.43, p = 1.00) and poor food preservation method (OR = 9.20, CI: 3.67-23.08, p < 0.0001) were independent risk factors of cholera. Also, irregular water supply (OR = 0.66, 95 % CI: 0.30-1.43, p = 0.320), poor kitchen facility (OR = 0.60, CI: 0.16-2.23, p = 0.560), lack of

  3. An epidemic model for the future progression of the current Haiti cholera epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-04-01

    As a major cholera epidemic progresses in Haiti, and the figures of the infection, up to December 2011, climb to 522,000 cases and 7,000 deaths, the development of general models to track and predict the evolution of the outbreak, so as to guide the allocation of medical supplies and staff, is gaining notable urgency. We propose here a spatially explicit epidemic model that accounts for the dynamics of susceptible and infected individuals as well as the redistribution of Vibrio cholera, the causative agent of the disease, among different human communities. In particular, we model two spreading pathways: the advection of pathogens through hydrologic connections and the dissemination due to human mobility described by means of a gravity-like model. To this end the country has been divided into hydrologic units based on drainage directions derived from a digital terrain model. Moreover the population of each unit has been estimated from census data downscaled to 1 km x 1 km resolution via remotely sensed geomorphological information (LandScan project). The model directly accounts for the role of rainfall patterns in driving the seasonality of cholera outbreaks. The two main outbreaks in fact occurred during the rainy seasons (October and May) when extensive floodings severely worsened the sanitation conditions and, in turn, raised the risk of infection. The model capability to reproduce the spatiotemporal features of the epidemic up to date grants robustness to the foreseen future development. To this end, we generate realistic scenario of future precipitation in order to forecast possible epidemic paths up to the end of the 2013. In this context, the duration of acquired immunity, a hotly debated topic in the scientific community, emerges as a controlling factor for progression of the epidemic in the near future. The framework presented here can straightforwardly be used to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative intervention strategies like mass vaccinations

  4. Epidemic cholera in Guatemala, 1993: transmission of a newly introduced epidemic strain by street vendors.

    PubMed Central

    Koo, D.; Aragon, A.; Moscoso, V.; Gudiel, M.; Bietti, L.; Carrillo, N.; Chojoj, J.; Gordillo, B.; Cano, F.; Cameron, D. N.; Wells, J. G.; Bean, N. H.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1996-01-01

    Epidemic cholera reached Guatemala in July 1991. By mid-1993, Guatemala ranked third in the hemisphere in reported cases of cholera. We conducted a case-control study with two age-, sex-, and neighbourhood-matched controls per patient in periurban Guatemala City. Twenty-six patients hospitalized for cholera and 52 controls were enrolled. Seven (47%) of 15 stool cultures obtained after admission yielded toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1. All seven were resistant to furazolidone, sulfisoxazole, and streptomycin, and differed substantially by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from the Latin American epidemic strain dominant in the hemisphere since 1991. In univariate analysis, illness was associated with consumption of left-over rice (odds ratio [OR] = 7.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-36), flavored ices (-helados') (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.1 - 12), and street-vended non-carbonated beverages (OR = 3.8, CI = 1.2-12) and food items (OR = 11.0, CI = 2.3-54). Street-vended food items remained significantly associated with illness in multivariate analysis (OR = 6.5, CI = 1.4-31). Illness was not associated with drinking municipal tap water. Maintaining water safety is important, but slowing the epidemic in Guatemala City and elsewhere may also require improvement in street vendor food handling and hygiene. PMID:8620902

  5. Sociomedical indicators in the cholera epidemic in Ferrara of 1855.

    PubMed

    Scapoli, Chiara; Guidi, Enrica; Angelini, Lauretta; Stefanati, Armando; Gregorio, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    The historical report on the cholera epidemic of 1855, conserved in Ferrara City's archives allowed us to verify the probable relation between the environment and epidemic in a broad sense, using log-linear analysis and multiple logistic regression. Two thousand and thirty-three cases were analyzed and the quantitative/qualitative variables available from the report were analyzed in relationship with mortality and morbidity rates, considered as response variables. From the analysis of the quantitative variables, it emerges that the variables having a significant influence on the morbidity/mortality rates are the number of individuals and the average number of inhabitants per house. From the analysis of the qualitative variables, it emerges that all the descriptive variables of the state of the streets and houses express a strong association with mortality and morbidity. With the present analysis, data available--a detailed 'street by street' morbidity and mortality recording from cholera in 1855 in Ferrara--were analyzed with modern means and the overall picture that emerge is that in the better kept houses in the better parts of the town had less cholera morbidity and especially mortality.

  6. Epidemic cholera in a crowded urban environment, Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, Stacie E; Mba-Jonas, Adamma; Loharikar, Anagha; Fouché, Bernadette; Peck, Mireille; Ayers, Tracy; Archer, W Roodly; De Rochars, Valery M Beau; Bender, Thomas; Moffett, Daphne B; Tappero, Jordan W; Dahourou, George; Roels, Thierry; Quick, Robert

    2011-11-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate factors associated with epidemic cholera. Water treatment and handwashing may have been protective, highlighting the need for personal hygiene for cholera prevention in contaminated urban environments. We also found a diverse diet, a possible proxy for improved nutrition, was protective against cholera.

  7. Epidemic Cholera in a Crowded Urban Environment, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Mba-Jonas, Adamma; Loharikar, Anagha; Fouché, Bernadette; Peck, Mireille; Ayers, Tracy; Archer, W. Roodly; De Rochars, Valery M. Beau; Bender, Thomas; Moffett, Daphne B.; Tappero, Jordan W.; Dahourou, George; Roels, Thierry H.; Quick, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a case–control study to investigate factors associated with epidemic cholera. Water treatment and handwashing may have been protective, highlighting the need for personal hygiene for cholera prevention in contaminated urban environments. We also found a diverse diet, a possible proxy for improved nutrition, was protective against cholera. PMID:22099120

  8. [The 1853-1856 cholera epidemic in the Portuguese press].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Antónia Pires de

    2011-12-01

    The article examines science and technology communication aimed at a non-specialized audience, using the general press as the main source in this endeavor to capture an image of the popularization of science in Portugal. Based on the fact that the nineteenth-century press was overtly concerned with garnering an audience and spreading knowledge, the study uses news, articles, and advertisements about the 1853-1856 cholera epidemic to assess the era's scientific knowledge (especially about prevention and treatment) and how this information was conveyed to society and used by it.

  9. On Spatially Explicit Models of Epidemic and Endemic Cholera: The Haiti and Lake Kivu Case Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Finger, F.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2014-12-01

    The first part of the Lecture deals with the predictive ability of mechanistic models for the Haitian cholera epidemic. Predictive models of epidemic cholera need to resolve at suitable aggregation levels spatial data pertaining to local communities, epidemiological records, hydrologic drivers, waterways, patterns of human mobility and proxies of exposure rates. A formal model comparison framework provides a quantitative assessment of the explanatory and predictive abilities of various model settings with different spatial aggregation levels. Intensive computations and objective model comparisons show that parsimonious spatially explicit models accounting for spatial connections have superior explanatory power than spatially disconnected ones for short-to intermediate calibration windows. In general, spatially connected models show better predictive ability than disconnected ones. We suggest limits and validity of the various approaches and discuss the pathway towards the development of case-specific predictive tools in the context of emergency management. The second part deals with approaches suitable to describe patterns of endemic cholera. Cholera outbreaks have been reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since the 1970s. Here we employ a spatially explicit, inhomogeneous Markov chain model to describe cholera incidence in eight health zones on the shore of lake Kivu. Remotely sensed datasets of chlorophyll a concentration in the lake, precipitation and indices of global climate anomalies are used as environmental drivers in addition to baseline seasonality. The effect of human mobility is also modelled mechanistically. We test several models on a multi-year dataset of reported cholera cases. Fourteen models, accounting for different environmental drivers, are selected in calibration. Among these, the one accounting for seasonality, El Nino Southern Oscillation, precipitation and human mobility outperforms the others in cross-validation.

  10. [On the epidemic of cholera and its prevention and control by the railway authorities in 1932].

    PubMed

    Huang, H P; Song, M H

    2016-01-28

    In 1932, the epidemic of cholera in China was serious, spreading to all provinces nationwide, causing heavy casualties. In order to prevent cholera epidemics spread along the railway line, the National Government Ministry of Railways and the local railway administration had taken all countermeasures, including the promulgation of epidemic prevention laws and regulations, quarantine, isolated check-up, disinfection, vaccination and even interruption of traffic. The measures of railway authorities had achieved a certain success. In August 1932, cholera epidemic began to subside gradually.

  11. Pre-earthquake non-epidemic Vibrio cholerae in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Winstead-Derlega, Christopher; Houpt, Eric; Heidkamp, Rebecca; Pape, Jean; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2014-01-15

    To our knowledge, there was no record of Vibrio cholerae in Haiti until the 2010 post earthquake outbreak. This study describes the analysis of 301 stool samples from 117 infants in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, who participated in a pediatric nutrition study between July 2008 and October 2009. Nine samples were identified positive with both SYBR Green and Taqman-MGB probe based molecular assays targeting V. cholerae hlyA and toxR, respectively (Ct = 33-40), but none were O1 or O139. Our results from multiple molecular assays demonstrate the presence of non-O1/O139 V. cholerae DNA in stools collected from nine asymptomatic Haitian infants two years prior to the 2010 earthquake.

  12. Pre-earthquake non-epidemic Vibrio cholerae in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Winstead-Derlega, Christopher; Houpt, Eric; Heidkamp, Rebecca; Pape, Jean; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To our knowledge, there was no record of Vibrio cholerae in Haiti until the 2010 post earthquake outbreak. Methodology This study describes the analysis of 301 stool samples from 117 infants in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, who participated in a pediatric nutrition study between July 2008 and October 2009. Results Nine samples were identified positive with both SYBR Green and Taqman-MGB probe based molecular assays targeting V. cholerae hlyA and toxR, respectively (Ct = 33 – 40), but none were O1 or O139. Conclusions Our results from multiple molecular assays demonstrate the presence of non-O1/O139 V. cholerae DNA in stools collected from nine asymptomatic Haitian infants two years prior to the 2010 earthquake. PMID:24423722

  13. Lessons learned during public health response to cholera epidemic in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Tappero, Jordan W; Tauxe, Robert V

    2011-11-01

    After epidemic cholera emerged in Haiti in October 2010, the disease spread rapidly in a country devastated by an earthquake earlier that year, in a population with a high proportion of infant deaths, poor nutrition, and frequent infectious diseases such as HIV infection, tuberculosis, and malaria. Many nations, multinational agencies, and nongovernmental organizations rapidly mobilized to assist Haiti. The US government provided emergency response through the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the US Agency for International Development and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This report summarizes the participation by the Centers and its partners. The efforts needed to reduce the spread of the epidemic and prevent deaths highlight the need for safe drinking water and basic medical care in such difficult circumstances and the need for rebuilding water, sanitation, and public health systems to prevent future epidemics.

  14. Lessons Learned during Public Health Response to Cholera Epidemic in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Tappero, Jordan W.

    2011-01-01

    After epidemic cholera emerged in Haiti in October 2010, the disease spread rapidly in a country devastated by an earthquake earlier that year, in a population with a high proportion of infant deaths, poor nutrition, and frequent infectious diseases such as HIV infection, tuberculosis, and malaria. Many nations, multinational agencies, and nongovernmental organizations rapidly mobilized to assist Haiti. The US government provided emergency response through the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the US Agency for International Development and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This report summarizes the participation by the Centers and its partners. The efforts needed to reduce the spread of the epidemic and prevent deaths highlight the need for safe drinking water and basic medical care in such difficult circumstances and the need for rebuilding water, sanitation, and public health systems to prevent future epidemics. PMID:22099111

  15. Cost-effectiveness of oral cholera vaccine in a stable refugee population at risk for epidemic cholera and in a population with endemic cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J.; McFarland, D. A.; Waldman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent large epidemics of cholera with high incidence and associated mortality among refugees have raised the question of whether oral cholera vaccines should be considered as an additional preventive measure in high-risk populations. The potential impact of oral cholera vaccines on populations prone to seasonal endemic cholera has also been questioned. This article reviews the potential cost-effectiveness of B-subunit, killed whole-cell (BS-WC) oral cholera vaccine in a stable refugee population and in a population with endemic cholera. In the population at risk for endemic cholera, mass vaccination with BS-WC vaccine is the least cost-effective intervention compared with the provision of safe drinking-water and sanitation or with treatment of the disease. In a refugee population at risk for epidemic disease, the cost-effectiveness of vaccination is similar to that of providing safe drinking-water and sanitation alone, though less cost-effective than treatment alone or treatment combined with the provision of water and sanitation. The implications of these data for public health decision-makers and programme managers are discussed. There is a need for better information on the feasibility and costs of administering oral cholera vaccine in refugee populations and populations with endemic cholera. PMID:9803585

  16. Survivability and molecular variation in Vibrio cholerae from epidemic sites in China.

    PubMed

    Li, X Q; Wang, M; Deng, Z A; Shen, J C; Zhang, X Q; Liu, Y F; Cai, Y S; Wu, X W; DI, B

    2015-01-01

    The survival behaviour of Vibrio cholerae in cholera epidemics, together with its attributes of virulence-associated genes and molecular fingerprints, are significant for managing cholera epidemics. Here, we selected five strains representative of V. cholerae O1 and O139 involved in cholera events, examined their survival capacity in large volumes of water sampled from epidemic sites of a 2005 cholera outbreak, and determined virulence-associated genes and molecular subtype changes of the surviving isolates recovered. The five strains exhibited different survival capacities varying from 17 to 38 days. The virulence-associated genes of the surviving isolates remained unchanged, while their pulsotypes underwent slight variation. In particular, one waterway-isolated strain maintained virulence-associated genes and evolved to share the same pulsotype as patient strains, highlighting its role in the cholera outbreak. The strong survival capacity and molecular attributes of V. cholerae might account for its persistence in environmental waters and the long duration of the cholera outbreak, allowing effective control measures.

  17. Genome-wide study of the defective sucrose fermenter strain of Vibrio cholerae from the Latin American cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Garza, Daniel Rios; Thompson, Cristiane C; Loureiro, Edvaldo Carlos Brito; Dutilh, Bas E; Inada, Davi Toshio; Junior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Nunes, Márcio Roberto T; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; Nunes, Keley Nascimento Barbosa; Santos, Elisabeth C O; Edwards, Robert A; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; de Sá Morais, Lena Lillian Canto

    2012-01-01

    The 7th cholera pandemic reached Latin America in 1991, spreading from Peru to virtually all Latin American countries. During the late epidemic period, a strain that failed to ferment sucrose dominated cholera outbreaks in the Northern Brazilian Amazon region. In order to understand the genomic characteristics and the determinants of this altered sucrose fermenting phenotype, the genome of the strain IEC224 was sequenced. This paper reports a broad genomic study of this strain, showing its correlation with the major epidemic lineage. The potentially mobile genomic regions are shown to possess GC content deviation, and harbor the main V. cholera virulence genes. A novel bioinformatic approach was applied in order to identify the putative functions of hypothetical proteins, and was compared with the automatic annotation by RAST. The genome of a large bacteriophage was found to be integrated to the IEC224's alanine aminopeptidase gene. The presence of this phage is shown to be a common characteristic of the El Tor strains from the Latin American epidemic, as well as its putative ancestor from Angola. The defective sucrose fermenting phenotype is shown to be due to a single nucleotide insertion in the V. cholerae sucrose-specific transportation gene. This frame-shift mutation truncated a membrane protein, altering its structural pore-like conformation. Further, the identification of a common bacteriophage reinforces both the monophyletic and African-Origin hypotheses for the main causative agent of the 1991 Latin America cholera epidemics.

  18. Genome-Wide Study of the Defective Sucrose Fermenter Strain of Vibrio cholerae from the Latin American Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Daniel Rios; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Loureiro, Edvaldo Carlos Brito; Dutilh, Bas E.; Inada, Davi Toshio; Junior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Nunes, Márcio Roberto T.; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; Nunes, Keley Nascimento Barbosa; Santos, Elisabeth C. O.; Edwards, Robert A.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; de Sá Morais, Lena Lillian Canto

    2012-01-01

    The 7th cholera pandemic reached Latin America in 1991, spreading from Peru to virtually all Latin American countries. During the late epidemic period, a strain that failed to ferment sucrose dominated cholera outbreaks in the Northern Brazilian Amazon region. In order to understand the genomic characteristics and the determinants of this altered sucrose fermenting phenotype, the genome of the strain IEC224 was sequenced. This paper reports a broad genomic study of this strain, showing its correlation with the major epidemic lineage. The potentially mobile genomic regions are shown to possess GC content deviation, and harbor the main V. cholera virulence genes. A novel bioinformatic approach was applied in order to identify the putative functions of hypothetical proteins, and was compared with the automatic annotation by RAST. The genome of a large bacteriophage was found to be integrated to the IEC224's alanine aminopeptidase gene. The presence of this phage is shown to be a common characteristic of the El Tor strains from the Latin American epidemic, as well as its putative ancestor from Angola. The defective sucrose fermenting phenotype is shown to be due to a single nucleotide insertion in the V. cholerae sucrose-specific transportation gene. This frame-shift mutation truncated a membrane protein, altering its structural pore-like conformation. Further, the identification of a common bacteriophage reinforces both the monophyletic and African-Origin hypotheses for the main causative agent of the 1991 Latin America cholera epidemics. PMID:22662140

  19. Optimal allocation of the limited oral cholera vaccine supply between endemic and epidemic settings

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean M.; Lessler, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently established a global stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) to be preferentially used in epidemic response (reactive campaigns) with any vaccine remaining after 1 year allocated to endemic settings. Hence, the number of cholera cases or deaths prevented in an endemic setting represents the minimum utility of these doses, and the optimal risk-averse response to any reactive vaccination request (i.e. the minimax strategy) is one that allocates the remaining doses between the requested epidemic response and endemic use in order to ensure that at least this minimum utility is achieved. Using mathematical models, we find that the best minimax strategy is to allocate the majority of doses to reactive campaigns, unless the request came late in the targeted epidemic. As vaccine supplies dwindle, the case for reactive use of the remaining doses grows stronger. Our analysis provides a lower bound for the amount of OCV to keep in reserve when responding to any request. These results provide a strategic context for the fulfilment of requests to the stockpile, and define allocation strategies that minimize the number of OCV doses that are allocated to suboptimal situations. PMID:26423441

  20. Optimal allocation of the limited oral cholera vaccine supply between endemic and epidemic settings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean M; Lessler, Justin

    2015-10-06

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently established a global stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) to be preferentially used in epidemic response (reactive campaigns) with any vaccine remaining after 1 year allocated to endemic settings. Hence, the number of cholera cases or deaths prevented in an endemic setting represents the minimum utility of these doses, and the optimal risk-averse response to any reactive vaccination request (i.e. the minimax strategy) is one that allocates the remaining doses between the requested epidemic response and endemic use in order to ensure that at least this minimum utility is achieved. Using mathematical models, we find that the best minimax strategy is to allocate the majority of doses to reactive campaigns, unless the request came late in the targeted epidemic. As vaccine supplies dwindle, the case for reactive use of the remaining doses grows stronger. Our analysis provides a lower bound for the amount of OCV to keep in reserve when responding to any request. These results provide a strategic context for the fulfilment of requests to the stockpile, and define allocation strategies that minimize the number of OCV doses that are allocated to suboptimal situations.

  1. Hurricanes, climate change and the cholera epidemic in Puerto Rico of 1855-1856.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Hurricanes and global climate changes may affect the environmental factors of cholera dynamics in warm coastal areas, vulnerable to seasonal or sporadic outbreaks. The cholera epidemic of Puerto Rico in 1855-1856 had a profound effect on the Puerto Rican society; but it was not influenced by any climatic events, such as preceding hurricanes or storms based on past documentary sources. Particularly, the environmental non-toxigenic strains of Vibrio Cholerae in Puerto Rican water sources can maintain their pathogenic potential for sporadic or erratic toxigenic cholera outbreaks--if a "perfect storm" ever occurs.

  2. Bayesian structured additive regression modeling of epidemic data: application to cholera.

    PubMed

    Osei, Frank B; Duker, Alfred A; Stein, Alfred

    2012-08-06

    A significant interest in spatial epidemiology lies in identifying associated risk factors which enhances the risk of infection. Most studies, however, make no, or limited use of the spatial structure of the data, as well as possible nonlinear effects of the risk factors. We develop a Bayesian Structured Additive Regression model for cholera epidemic data. Model estimation and inference is based on fully Bayesian approach via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The model is applied to cholera epidemic data in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana. Proximity to refuse dumps, density of refuse dumps, and proximity to potential cholera reservoirs were modeled as continuous functions; presence of slum settlers and population density were modeled as fixed effects, whereas spatial references to the communities were modeled as structured and unstructured spatial effects. We observe that the risk of cholera is associated with slum settlements and high population density. The risk of cholera is equal and lower for communities with fewer refuse dumps, but variable and higher for communities with more refuse dumps. The risk is also lower for communities distant from refuse dumps and potential cholera reservoirs. The results also indicate distinct spatial variation in the risk of cholera infection. The study highlights the usefulness of Bayesian semi-parametric regression model analyzing public health data. These findings could serve as novel information to help health planners and policy makers in making effective decisions to control or prevent cholera epidemics.

  3. Worldwide Occurrence of Integrative Conjugative Element Encoding Multidrug Resistance Determinants in Epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Michel A.; Fonseca, Erica L.; Andrade, Bruno N.; Cabral, Adriana C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, there has been an increase of cholera epidemics caused by multidrug resistant strains. Particularly, the integrative and conjugative element (ICE) seems to play a major role in the emergence of multidrug resistant Vibrio cholerae. This study fully characterized, by whole genome sequencing, new ICEs carried by multidrug resistant V. cholerae O1 strains from Nigeria (2010) (ICEVchNig1) and Nepal (1994) (ICEVchNep1). The gene content and gene order of these two ICEs are the same, and identical to ICEVchInd5, ICEVchBan5 and ICEVchHai1 previously identified in multidrug resistant V. cholerae O1. This ICE is characterized by dfrA1, sul2, strAB and floR antimicrobial resistance genes, and by unique gene content in HS4 and HS5 ICE regions. Screening for ICEs, in publicly available V. cholerae genomes, revealed the occurrence and widespread distribution of this ICE among V. cholerae O1. Metagenomic analysis found segments of this ICE in marine environments far from the direct influence of the cholera epidemic. Therefore, this study revealed the epidemiology of a spatio-temporal prevalent ICE in V. cholerae O1. Its occurrence and dispersion in V. cholerae O1 strains from different continents throughout more than two decades can be indicative of its role in the fitness of the current pandemic lineage. PMID:25265418

  4. [DETERMINATION OF TYPES OF EPIDEMIC MANIFESTATIONS OF CHOLERA IN REGIONS OF THE CRIMEA FEDERAL DISTRICT (REPUBLIC OF CRIMEA)].

    PubMed

    Onischenko, G G; Popova, A Yu; Moskvitina, E A; Penkovskaya, N A; Listopad, S A; Titova, S V; Kruglikov, V D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was determination of the type of epidemic manifestations of cholera in the Republic of Crimea based on evaluation of epidemic manifestations of cholera risk of introduction and spread of the infection. It was concluded, that, based on the cholera outbreaks, that had taken place, contamination of surface water bodies (fresh and sea) and sewage by Vibrio cholerae O1 ctxA+ and Vibrio cholerae O1 ctXA- potential epidemic danger of introduction of the infection by various types of international transport, population migration, the presence of epidemiologic risk in realization of water pathway of transmission of cholera causative agent and several other social conditions, the Republic of Crimea remains in the group of territories of type I by epidemic manifestations of cholera.

  5. Analysis of cholera epidemics with bacterial growth and spatial movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose novel epidemic models (named, susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible-bacteria) for cholera dynamics by incorporating a general formulation of bacteria growth and spatial variation. In the first part, a generalized ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is presented and it is found that bacterial growth contributes to the increase in the basic reproduction number, [Formula: see text]. With the derived basic reproduction number, we analyse the local and global dynamics of the model. Particularly, we give a rigorous proof on the endemic global stability by employing the geometric approach. In the second part, we extend the ODE model to a partial differential equation (PDE) model with the inclusion of diffusion to capture the movement of human hosts and bacteria in a heterogeneous environment. The disease threshold of this PDE model is studied again by using the basic reproduction number. The results on the threshold dynamics of the ODE and PDE models are compared, and verified through numerical simulation. Additionally, our analysis shows that incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability when [Formula: see text] associated with the ODE model is less than the unity.

  6. Cholera epidemic associated with raw vegetables--Lusaka, Zambia, 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    2004-09-03

    Zambia experienced widespread cholera epidemics in 1991 (13,154 cases), 1992 (11,659), and 1999 (11,327). In response to the large outbreak in 1999, the Zambian Ministry of Health (ZMOH) urged use of in-home chlorination with the locally produced solution, Clorin, and the practice increased substantially Clorin had been introduced in Zambia in 1998 as part of the Safe Water System (SWS), a point-of-use water disinfection and safe-water storage strategy launched by the Society for Family Health, in partnership with ZMOH, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and CDC. Although no outbreaks were reported during 2000-2002, cholera remained endemic. Epidemic cholera returned to Zambia in November 2003, when cases of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor were confirmed in the capital city, Lusaka. During November 28, 2003-January 4, 2004, an estimated 2,529 cholera cases and 128 cholera deaths (case-fatality rate [CFR] = 5.1%) occurred in Lusaka. In February 2004, the Lusaka District Health Management Team (LDHMT) invited CDC to assist in an investigation of the epidemic. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which implicated foodborne transmission via raw vegetables and demonstrated a protective role for hand washing with soap. The results underscore the importance of hygiene, clean water, and sanitary food handling for cholera prevention.

  7. Epidemic cholera in Guinea-Bissau: the challenge of preventing deaths in rural West Africa.

    PubMed

    Gunnlaugsson, G; Angulo, F J; Einarsdóttir, J; Passa, A; Tauxe, R V

    2000-01-01

    An epidemiologic investigation was conducted to identify factors associated with cholera mortality in a rural African setting and interventions likely to prevent deaths in future epidemics. The authors reviewed surveillance data from rural Biombo, Guinea-Bissau, interviewed family members of persons who died of cholera, and conducted a case-control study in the catchment area of a health center with a high case:fatality ratio (CFR). Forty-three deaths occurred among the 1169 persons who reported to health centers with cholera during the epidemic (CFR = 3.7%). Delayed rehydration and over-hydration probably contributed to 10 of these deaths. An additional 19 cholera deaths occurred outside health centers. In the case-control study, persons with cholera who died were 5.4 times (95% CI = 1.0-53.4) more likely to be in poor health or intoxicated at illness onset than persons with cholera who survived. Fatal cases were 6.0 times (95% CI = 1.1-60.8) more likely to not attend the health center than survivors. The low overall CFR in Biombo, compared to CFRs reported during other epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa, suggests that medical care provided at rudimentary rural health centers prevented numerous deaths. Additional deaths may be prevented by strengthening the infrastructure of health services in the rural areas and by enhanced public education regarding the need for persons with cholera to promptly seek medical care.

  8. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Epidemic Cholera in Haiti to Assess Spectrum of Illness and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Brendan R.; Talkington, Deborah F.; Pruckler, James M.; Fouché, M. D. Bernadette; Lafosse, Elsie; Nygren, Benjamin; Gómez, Gerardo A.; Dahourou, Georges A.; Archer, W. Roodly; Payne, Amanda B.; Hooper, W. Craig; Tappero, Jordan W.; Derado, Gordana; Magloire, Roc; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Mintz, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the spectrum of illness from toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and risk factors for severe cholera in Haiti, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in a rural commune with more than 21,000 residents. During March 22–April 6, 2011, we interviewed 2,622 residents ≥ 2 years of age and tested serum specimens from 2,527 (96%) participants for vibriocidal and antibodies against cholera toxin; 18% of participants reported a cholera diagnosis, 39% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 320, and 64% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 80, suggesting widespread infection. Among seropositive participants (vibriocidal titers ≥ 320), 74.5% reported no diarrhea and 9.0% had severe cholera (reported receiving intravenous fluids and overnight hospitalization). This high burden of severe cholera is likely explained by the lack of pre-existing immunity in this population, although the virulence of the atypical El Tor strain causing the epidemic and other factors might also play a role. PMID:24106192

  9. [A predicted epidemic. The appearance of cholera in 1832 in southwest France].

    PubMed

    Stéphane, Barry; Even, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    In 1832 the epidemic cholera provoked the fear of a new plague on the banks of the Garonne and the administrative measures to struggle against the illness as the sprawling epidemic could be delimited in three departments. The author describes the clinical pictures of the illness and underlines the prophylactic measures which followed from epidemics of previous centuries and lasted until pasteurism, the increasing hygiene and the apparition of chemical treatments.

  10. [Antibiotic resistance and molecular characterization of Vibrio cholera strains isolated from an outbreak of cholera epidemic in Jiangsu province].

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zhang, Xuefeng; Bao, Changjun; Zhu, Yefei; Zhuang, Ling; Tan, Zhongming; Qian, Huimin; Tang, Fenyang

    2015-02-01

    To assess the antibiotic resistance and molecular characterization of cholera strains and to provide basis for clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. 4 stains isolated from an outbreak of cholera epidemic in Huai'an City in Jiangsu province in September 2010 were characterized using antibiotic susceptibility, biotype analysis, virluence genes detection, ctxB gene sequencing, and PFGE analysis. The 4 strains were all resistant to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, erythromycin, streptomycin. High drug susceptibility of the samples was found to 6 kinds of antibiotics such as amikacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin. The isolates expressed phenotypic traits of both serogroup O1 ogawa and El Tor and carried 9 kinds of virulence genes, ctxA, ace, zot, toxR, tcpI, ompU, rtxC, tcpA, and hlyA gene. They were also identified as harboring the classical ctxB genotype based on amino acid residue substitutions. The PFGE profiles of NotI showed a single banding pattern, while SfiI's was 2 banding patterns. The bacterium type of Vibrio cholerae causing the epidemic outbreak of cholera belonged to the atypical EL Tor variant which was also identified as toxicogenic strain. The mapping of the strains prompted that there should be the common contamination source. Drug sensitivity test can guide the clinical drug use, in order to reduce the emergence of resistant strains.

  11. Use of a cholera rapid diagnostic test during a mass vaccination campaign in response to an epidemic in Guinea, 2012.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pino, Isabel; Luquero, Francisco J; Sakoba, Kéïta; Sylla, Souleymane; Haile, Melatwork; Grais, Rebecca F; Ciglenecki, Iza; Quilici, Marie-Laure; Page, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    During the 2012 cholera outbreak in the Republic of Guinea, the Ministry of Health, supported by Médecins Sans Frontières - Operational Center Geneva, used the oral cholera vaccine Shanchol as a part of the emergency response. The rapid diagnostic test (RDT) Crystal VC, widely used during outbreaks, detects lipopolysaccharide antigens of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, both included in Shanchol. In the context of reactive use of a whole-cell cholera vaccine in a region where cholera cases have been reported, it is essential to know what proportion of vaccinated individuals would be reactive to the RDT and for how long after vaccination. A total of 108 vaccinated individuals, selected systematically among all persons older than one year, were included at vaccination sites and 106 were included in the analysis. Stools samples of this cohort of vaccinated participants were collected and tested with the RDT every day until the test was negative for two consecutive visits or for a maximum of 7 days. A total of 94.3% of cholera vaccine recipients had a positive test after vaccination; all except one of these positive results were reactive only with the O139 antigen. The mean time to become negative in those with an initial positive result after vaccination was 3.8 days, standard deviation 1.1 days. The RDT Crystal VC becomes positive in persons recently vaccinated against cholera, although almost exclusively to the O139 antigen. This reactivity largely disappeared within five days after vaccination. These results suggest that the test can be used normally as soon as 24 hours after vaccination in a context of O1 epidemics, which represent the vast majority of cases, and after a period of five days in areas where V. cholerae O139 is present. The reason why only O139 test line became positive remains to be investigated.

  12. Use of a Cholera Rapid Diagnostic Test during a Mass Vaccination Campaign in Response to an Epidemic in Guinea, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pino, Isabel; Luquero, Francisco J.; Sakoba, Kéïta; Sylla, Souleymane; Haile, Melatwork; Grais, Rebecca F.; Ciglenecki, Iza; Quilici, Marie-Laure; Page, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Background During the 2012 cholera outbreak in the Republic of Guinea, the Ministry of Health, supported by Médecins Sans Frontières - Operational Center Geneva, used the oral cholera vaccine Shanchol as a part of the emergency response. The rapid diagnostic test (RDT) Crystal VC, widely used during outbreaks, detects lipopolysaccharide antigens of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, both included in Shanchol. In the context of reactive use of a whole-cell cholera vaccine in a region where cholera cases have been reported, it is essential to know what proportion of vaccinated individuals would be reactive to the RDT and for how long after vaccination. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 108 vaccinated individuals, selected systematically among all persons older than one year, were included at vaccination sites and 106 were included in the analysis. Stools samples of this cohort of vaccinated participants were collected and tested with the RDT every day until the test was negative for two consecutive visits or for a maximum of 7 days. A total of 94.3% of cholera vaccine recipients had a positive test after vaccination; all except one of these positive results were reactive only with the O139 antigen. The mean time to become negative in those with an initial positive result after vaccination was 3.8 days, standard deviation 1.1 days. Conclusions/Significance The RDT Crystal VC becomes positive in persons recently vaccinated against cholera, although almost exclusively to the O139 antigen. This reactivity largely disappeared within five days after vaccination. These results suggest that the test can be used normally as soon as 24 hours after vaccination in a context of O1 epidemics, which represent the vast majority of cases, and after a period of five days in areas where V. cholerae O139 is present. The reason why only O139 test line became positive remains to be investigated. PMID:23967359

  13. Research Spotlight: Model suggests path to ending the ongoing Haitian cholera epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-05-01

    Since early November 2010 a deadly cholera epidemic has been spreading across the Caribbean nation of Haiti, killing thousands of people and infecting hundreds of thousands. While infection rates are being actively monitored, health organizations have been left without a clear understanding of exactly how the disease has spread across Haiti. Cholera can spread through exposure to contaminated water, and the disease travels over long distances if an infected individual moves around the country. Using representations of these two predominant dispersion mechanisms, along with information on the size of the susceptible population, the number of infected individuals, and the aquatic concentration of the cholera-causing bacteria for more than 500 communities, Bertuzzo et al. designed a model that was able to accurately reproduce the progression of the Haitian cholera epidemic. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL046823, 2011)

  14. Slave mortality during the cholera epidemic in Rio de Janeiro (1855-1856): a preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Kaori; Pimenta, Tânia Salgado; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Bellido, Jaime Gregorio

    2012-12-01

    The article offers a preliminary analysis of the sociodemographic profile of deaths recorded during the first cholera epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, based on data gathered from death records at Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital. After cholera appeared in the country in 1855, Brazilian medical reports indicated a social bias, with slaves and the free poor suffering high mortality. From a historical perspective, however, little research has been done on the epidemic and its dynamics. The recovery of original data on cholera and the analysis of cholera mortality rates help us to better understand aspects of the slave universe in the urban zone of Rio de Janeiro in the period following the end of the slave trade.

  15. "Cholera forcing". The myth of the good epidemic and the coming of good water.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    It has been frequently claimed that cholera epidemics, both in the 19th century and today, were and can be the key stimulus for procurement of safe water and sanitation, an idea that I call "cholera forcing." "Technology forcing" refers to imposition of exogenous factors that suddenly make possible achievements that had not seemed so; cholera has been seen in this light. I argue that this view oversimplifies and underrepresents the importance of industrialization in securing water supplies. Careful study of the financial, political, and administrative foundations of such changes will be more fruitful.

  16. CHOLERA FORCING” The Myth of the Good Epidemic and the Coming of Good Water

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It has been frequently claimed that cholera epidemics, both in the 19th century and today, were and can be the key stimulus for procurement of safe water and sanitation, an idea that I call “cholera forcing.” “Technology forcing” refers to imposition of exogenous factors that suddenly make possible achievements that had not seemed so; cholera has been seen in this light. I argue that this view oversimplifies and underrepresents the importance of industrialization in securing water supplies. Careful study of the financial, political, and administrative foundations of such changes will be more fruitful. PMID:19820212

  17. Risk Factors Early in the 2010 Cholera Epidemic, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Emily; Loharikar, Anagha; Routh, Janell; Gaines, Joanna; Fouché, Marie-Délivrance Bernadette; Jean-Louis, Reginald; Ayers, Tracy; Johnson, Dawn; Tappero, Jordan W.; Roels, Thierry H.; Archer, W. Roodly; Dahourou, Georges A.; Mintz, Eric; Quick, Robert; Mahon, Barbara E.

    2011-01-01

    During the early weeks of the cholera outbreak that began in Haiti in October 2010, we conducted a case–control study to identify risk factors. Drinking treated water was strongly protective against illness. Our results highlight the effectiveness of safe water in cholera control. PMID:22099118

  18. OmpU as a biomarker for rapid discrimination between toxigenic and epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1/O139 and non-epidemic Vibrio cholerae in a modified MALDI-TOF MS assay

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae. Outbreaks are caused by a genetically homogenous group of strains from serogroup O1 or O139 that are able to produce the cholera toxin. Rapid detection and identification of these epidemic strains is essential for an effective response to cholera outbreaks. Results The use of ferulic acid as a matrix in a new MALDI-TOF MS assay increased the measurable mass range of existing MALDI-TOF MS protocols for bacterial identification. The assay enabled rapid discrimination between epidemic V. cholerae O1/O139 strains and other less pathogenic V. cholerae strains. OmpU, an outer membrane protein whose amino acid sequence is highly conserved among epidemic strains of V. cholerae, appeared as a discriminatory marker in the novel MALDI-TOF MS assay. Conclusions The extended mass range of MALDI-TOF MS measurements obtained by using ferulic acid improved the screening for biomarkers in complex protein mixtures. Differences in the mass of abundant homologous proteins due to variation in amino acid sequences can rapidly be examined in multiple samples. Here, a rapid MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed that could discriminate between epidemic O1/O139 strains and other less pathogenic V. cholerae strains based on differences in mass of the OmpU protein. It appeared that the amino acid sequence of OmpU from epidemic V. cholerae O1/O139 strains is unique and highly conserved. PMID:24943244

  19. OmpU as a biomarker for rapid discrimination between toxigenic and epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1/O139 and non-epidemic Vibrio cholerae in a modified MALDI-TOF MS assay.

    PubMed

    Paauw, Armand; Trip, Hein; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Sellek, Ricela; Heng, Jonathan Me; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H; de Jong, Ad L; Majchrzykiewicz-Koehorst, Joanna A; Olsen, Jaran S; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni

    2014-06-18

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae. Outbreaks are caused by a genetically homogenous group of strains from serogroup O1 or O139 that are able to produce the cholera toxin. Rapid detection and identification of these epidemic strains is essential for an effective response to cholera outbreaks. The use of ferulic acid as a matrix in a new MALDI-TOF MS assay increased the measurable mass range of existing MALDI-TOF MS protocols for bacterial identification. The assay enabled rapid discrimination between epidemic V. cholerae O1/O139 strains and other less pathogenic V. cholerae strains. OmpU, an outer membrane protein whose amino acid sequence is highly conserved among epidemic strains of V. cholerae, appeared as a discriminatory marker in the novel MALDI-TOF MS assay. The extended mass range of MALDI-TOF MS measurements obtained by using ferulic acid improved the screening for biomarkers in complex protein mixtures. Differences in the mass of abundant homologous proteins due to variation in amino acid sequences can rapidly be examined in multiple samples. Here, a rapid MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed that could discriminate between epidemic O1/O139 strains and other less pathogenic V. cholerae strains based on differences in mass of the OmpU protein. It appeared that the amino acid sequence of OmpU from epidemic V. cholerae O1/O139 strains is unique and highly conserved.

  20. [Historical report: first isolation of Vibrio cholera serogroup O1 biovar El Tor serovar Inaba during the cholerae epidemic in Peru ‑ 1991].

    PubMed

    Bravo Cruz, Nora; Guillén, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    20 years ago, a new diarrheal disease was introduced in Peru and the Enteropathogens Reference Laboratory of the Instituto Nacional de Salud had an outstanding role in the isolation and rapid and timely identification of Vibrio cholerae. Cholera had not been seen before, but during the last week of January 1991 an outbreak of acute diarrhea was detected, presenting intense dehydration and some deaths. The epidemic affected, in the beginning, many locations of the peruvian coast. Some working teams of the General Office of Epidemiology and of the Instituto Nacional de Salud obtained fecal samples from patients with acute diarrhea coming from the cities of Chancay, Chimbote, Piura and some hospitals in Lima. The collected samples were transported on Cary and Blair media and processed in the National Reference Laboratory of Enteropathogens (LANARE) of the Instituto Nacional de Salud. Vibrio cholerae serogroup 01 biovar El Tor serovar Inaba was isolated from all the samples, it was sensible to tetracyclines and other antibiotics. This research confirmed the first outbreak of cholera in Peru.

  1. Association between earthquake events and cholera outbreaks: a cross-country 15-year longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Steven A; Turner, Elizabeth L; Thielman, Nathan M

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes can cause population displacement, critical sanitation infrastructure damage, and increased threats to water resources, potentially predisposing populations to waterborne disease epidemics such as cholera. Problem The risk of cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters remains uncertain. A cross-country analysis of World Health Organization (WHO) cholera data that would contribute to this discussion has yet to be published. A cross-country longitudinal analysis was conducted among 63 low- and middle-income countries from 1995-2009. The association between earthquake disasters of various effect sizes and a relative spike in cholera rates for a given country was assessed utilizing fixed-effects logistic regression and adjusting for gross domestic product per capita, water and sanitation level, flooding events, percent urbanization, and under-five child mortality. Also, the association between large earthquakes and cholera rate increases of various degrees was assessed. Forty-eight of the 63 countries had at least one year with reported cholera infections during the 15-year study period. Thirty-six of these 48 countries had at least one earthquake disaster. In adjusted analyses, country-years with ≥10,000 persons affected by an earthquake had 2.26 times increased odds (95 CI, 0.89-5.72, P = .08) of having a greater than average cholera rate that year compared to country-years having <10,000 individuals affected by an earthquake. The association between large earthquake disasters and cholera infections appeared to weaken as higher levels of cholera rate increases were tested. A trend of increased risk of greater than average cholera rates when more people were affected by an earthquake in a country-year was noted. However these findings did not reach statistical significance at traditional levels and may be due to chance. Frequent large-scale cholera outbreaks after earthquake disasters appeared to be relatively uncommon.

  2. Cholera.

    PubMed

    Sack, David A; Sack, R Bradley; Nair, G Balakrish; Siddique, A K

    2004-01-17

    Intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae results in the loss of large volumes of watery stool, leading to severe and rapidly progressing dehydration and shock. Without adequate and appropriate rehydration therapy, severe cholera kills about half of affected individuals. Cholera toxin, a potent stimulator of adenylate cyclase, causes the intestine to secrete watery fluid rich in sodium, bicarbonate, and potassium, in volumes far exceeding the intestinal absorptive capacity. Cholera has spread from the Indian subcontinent where it is endemic to involve nearly the whole world seven times during the past 185 years. V cholerae serogroup O1, biotype El Tor, has moved from Asia to cause pandemic disease in Africa and South America during the past 35 years. A new serogroup, O139, appeared in south Asia in 1992, has become endemic there, and threatens to start the next pandemic. Research on case management of cholera led to the development of rehydration therapy for dehydrating diarrhoea in general, including the proper use of intravenous and oral rehydration solutions. Appropriate case management has reduced deaths from diarrhoeal disease by an estimated 3 million per year compared with 20 years ago. Vaccination was thought to have no role for cholera, but new oral vaccines are showing great promise.

  3. A rivalry of foulness: official and unofficial investigations of the London cholera epidemic of 1854.

    PubMed Central

    Paneth, N; Vinten-Johansen, P; Brody, H; Rip, M

    1998-01-01

    Contemporaneous with John Snow's famous study of the 1854 London cholera epidemic were 2 other investigations: a local study of the Broad Street outbreak and an investigation of the entire epidemic, undertaken by England's General Board of Health. More than a quarter-century prior to Koch's description of Vibrio comma, a Board of Health investigator saw microscopic "vibriones" in the rice-water stools of cholera patients that, in his later life, he concluded had been cholera bacilli. Although this finding was potential evidence for Snow's view that cholera was due to a contagious and probably live agent transmitted in the water supply, the Board of Health rejected Snow's conclusions. The Board of Health amassed a huge amount of information which it interpreted as supportive of its conclusion that the epidemic was attributable not so much to water as to air. Snow, by contrast, systematically tested his hypothesis that cholera was water-borne by exploring evidence that at first glance ran contrary to his expectations. Snow's success provides support for using a hypothetico-deductive approach in epidemiology, based on tightly focused hypotheses strongly grounded in pathophysiology. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9772861

  4. Modelling cholera epidemics: the role of waterways, human mobility and sanitation.

    PubMed

    Mari, L; Bertuzzo, E; Righetto, L; Casagrandi, R; Gatto, M; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I; Rinaldo, A

    2012-02-07

    We investigate the role of human mobility as a driver for long-range spreading of cholera infections, which primarily propagate through hydrologically controlled ecological corridors. Our aim is to build a spatially explicit model of a disease epidemic, which is relevant to both social and scientific issues. We present a two-layer network model that accounts for the interplay between epidemiological dynamics, hydrological transport and long-distance dissemination of the pathogen Vibrio cholerae owing to host movement, described here by means of a gravity-model approach. We test our model against epidemiological data recorded during the extensive cholera outbreak occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa during 2000-2001. We show that long-range human movement is fundamental in quantifying otherwise unexplained inter-catchment transport of V. cholerae, thus playing a key role in the formation of regional patterns of cholera epidemics. We also show quantitatively how heterogeneously distributed drinking water supplies and sanitation conditions may affect large-scale cholera transmission, and analyse the effects of different sanitation policies.

  5. Vaccination strategies for epidemic cholera in Haiti with implications for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dennis L; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2011-04-26

    In October 2010, a virulent South Asian strain of El Tor cholera began to spread in Haiti. Interventions have included treatment of cases and improved sanitation. Use of cholera vaccines would likely have further reduced morbidity and mortality, but such vaccines are in short supply and little is known about effective vaccination strategies for epidemic cholera. We use a mathematical cholera transmission model to assess different vaccination strategies. With limited vaccine quantities, concentrating vaccine in high-risk areas is always most efficient. We show that targeting one million doses of vaccine to areas with high exposure to Vibrio cholerae, enough for two doses for 5% of the population, would reduce the number of cases by 11%. The same strategy with enough vaccine for 30% of the population with modest hygienic improvement could reduce cases by 55% and save 3,320 lives. For epidemic cholera, we recommend a large mobile stockpile of enough vaccine to cover 30% of a country's population to be reactively targeted to populations at high risk of exposure.

  6. Climate, Water, and Human Health: Large Scale Hydroclimatic Controls in Forecasting Cholera Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2009-12-01

    Despite ravaging the continents through seven global pandemics in past centuries, the seasonal and interannual variability of cholera outbreaks remain a mystery. Previous studies have focused on the role of various environmental and climatic factors, but provided little or no predictive capability. Recent findings suggest a more prominent role of large scale hydroclimatic extremes - droughts and floods - and attempt to explain the seasonality and the unique dual cholera peaks in the Bengal Delta region of South Asia. We investigate the seasonal and interannual nature of cholera epidemiology in three geographically distinct locations within the region to identify the larger scale hydroclimatic controls that can set the ecological and environmental ‘stage’ for outbreaks and have significant memory on a seasonal scale. Here we show that two distinctly different, pre and post monsoon, cholera transmission mechanisms related to large scale climatic controls prevail in the region. An implication of our findings is that extreme climatic events such as prolonged droughts, record floods, and major cyclones may cause major disruption in the ecosystem and trigger large epidemics. We postulate that a quantitative understanding of the large-scale hydroclimatic controls and dominant processes with significant system memory will form the basis for forecasting such epidemic outbreaks. A multivariate regression method using these predictor variables to develop probabilistic forecasts of cholera outbreaks will be explored. Forecasts from such a system with a seasonal lead-time are likely to have measurable impact on early cholera detection and prevention efforts in endemic regions.

  7. Cholera epidemic among Rwandan refugees: experience of ICDDR,B in Goma, Zaire.

    PubMed

    Siddique, A K

    1994-01-01

    In July 1994, one of the worst cholera epidemics broke out among the nearly a million Rwandan refugees in Goma, eastern Zaire. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees estimated that nearly 12,000 people died during the epidemic. The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) sent an eight-member medical team to Goma headed by Dr AK Siddique, a senior scientist of the Center and head of the Epidemic Control Preparedness Program, Dacca, Bangladesh. During their two-week stay, the team, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Ministry of Health, Zaire, conducted epidemiological assessment, operated a temporary treatment center and provided technical advice on case management of cholera and shigellosis to other health workers. The team also set up a microbiology laboratory in Goma to identify the pathogens responsible for the epidemic and their drug sensitivity patterns. The team visited a number of temporary treatment facilities in two of the five camp sites and provided technical advice to the health-care providers. They also visited treatment facilities in Goma city, where an estimated 200,000 refugees were affected by the epidemic. Deaths from cholera even in the treatment centers were much higher than expected. The overall case-fatality rate in the treatment centers was nearly 15%. Laboratory investigations showed that the initial epidemic was indeed caused by Vibrio cholerae strains resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. By the first week of August, the number of cholera cases was declining, but the number of dysentery cases was increasing rapidly. Predominantly Shigella dysenteriae type 1 was responsible, which was resistant to most drugs used for treating shigellosis, except mecillinam. Inappropriate rehydration therapy and inadequate experience of health workers failed to prevent deaths. The team took over the operation of temporary treatment center at Katindo in Goma city with one of the highest case-fatality rates (14

  8. Epidemic cholera in Ecuador: multidrug-resistance and transmission by water and seafood

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. T.; Mintz, E. D.; Cañizares, R.; Semiglia, A.; Gomez, I.; Sempértegui, R.; Dávila, A.; Greene, K. D.; Puhr, N. D.; Cameron, D. N.; Tenover, F. C.; Barrett, T. J.; Bean, N. H.; Ivey, C.; Tauxe, R. V.; Blake, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine risk factors for cholera in an epidemic-disease area in South America, a case—control investigation was performed in Guayaquil, Ecuador, in July 1991. Residents > 5 years old who were hospitalized for treatment of acute, watery diarrhoea and two matched controls for each were interviewed regarding sources of water and food, and eating, drinking, and hygienic habits. Interviewers inspected homes of case-patients and controls to document water treatment, food-handling, and hygienic practices. Faecal specimens and shellfish were cultured for Vibrio cholerae O 1. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to a variety of antimicrobial agents. Drinking unboiled water (odds ratio [OR] = 4·0, confidence interval [CI] = 1·8—7·5), drinking a beverage from a street vendor (OR = 2·8, CI = 1·3—5·9), eating raw seafood (OR = 3·4, CI = 1·4—11·5), and eating cooked crab (OR = 5·1, CI = 1·4—19·2) were associated with illness. Always boiling drinking water at home (OR = 0·5, CI = 0·2—0·9) was protective against illness. The presence of soap in either the kitchen (OR = 0·3, CI = 0·2—0·8) or bathroom (OR = 0·4, CI = 0·2—0·9) at home was also protective. V. cholerae O 1 was recovered from a pooled sample of a bivalve mollusc and from 68% of stool samples from case-patients. Thirty-six percent of the isolates from stool specimens were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. Specific prevention measures may prevent transmission through these vehicles in the future. The appearance of antimicrobial resistance suggests the need for changes in current methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:8119348

  9. Vibrio cholerae O1 epidemic variants in Angola: a retrospective study between 1992 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Valia, Romy; Taviani, Elisa; Spagnoletti, Matteo; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Cappuccinelli, Piero; Colombo, Mauro M

    2013-01-01

    Cholera is still a major public health concern in many African countries. In Angola, after a decade of absence, cholera reemerged in 1987, spreading throughout the country until 1996, with outbreaks recurring in a seasonal pattern. In 2006 Angola was hit by one of the most severe outbreaks of the last decade, with ca. 240,000 cases reported. We analyzed 21 clinical strains isolated between 1992 and 2006 from several provinces throughout the country: Benguela, Bengo, Luanda, Cuando Cubango, and Cabinda. We used two multiplex PCR assays to investigate discriminatory mobile genetic elements (MGE) [Integrative Conjugative Elements (ICEs), VSP-II, GI12, GI14, GI15, K, and TLC phages] and we compared the profiles obtained with those of different reference V. cholerae O1 variants (prototypical, altered, and hybrid), responsible for the ongoing 7th pandemic. We also tested the strains for the presence of specific VSP-II variants and for the presence of a genomic island (GI) (WASA-1), correlated with the transmission of seventh pandemic cholera from Africa to South America. Based on the presence/absence of the analyzed genetic elements, five novel profiles were detected in the epidemic strains circulating in the 1990s. The most frequent profiles, F and G, were characterized by the absence of ICEs and the three GIs tested, and the presence of GI WASA-1 and the WASA variant of the VSP-II island. Our results identified unexpected variability within the 1990s epidemic, showing different rearrangements in a dynamic part of the genome not present in the prototypical V. cholerae O1 N16961. Moreover the 2006 strains differed from the current pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain. Taken together, our results highlight the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in diversifying the genetic background of V. cholerae within a single epidemic.

  10. [Epidemic Cholera and American Reform Movements in the 19th Century].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seohyung

    2015-12-01

    The 19th century was the age of great reform in American history. After constructing of the canal and railroads, the industrialization began and American society changed so rapidly. In this period, there were so many social crisis and American people tried to solve these problems within the several reform movements. These reform movements were the driving forces to control cholera during the 19th century. Cholera was the endemic disease in Bengal, India, but after the 19th century it had spread globally by the development of trade networks. The 1832 cholera in the United States was the first epidemic cholera in American history. The mortality of cholera was so high, but it was very hard to find out the cause of this fatal infectious disease. So, different social discourses happened to control epidemic cholera in the 19th century, these can be understood within the similar context of American reform movements during this period. Board of Health in New York States made a new public health act to control cholera in 1832, it was ineffective. Some people insisted that the cause of this infectious disease was the corruption of the United States. They emphasized unjust and immoral system in American society. Moral reform expanded to Nativism, because lots of Irish immigrants were the victims of cholera. So, epidemic cholera was the opportunity to spread the desire for moral reform. To control cholera in 1849, the sanitary reform in Britain had affected. The fact that it was so important to improve and maintain the water quality for the control and prevention of disease spread, the sanitary reform happened. There were two different sphere of the sanitary reform. The former was the private reform to improve sewer or privy, the latter was the public reform to build sewage facilities. The 1849 cholera had an important meaning, because the social discourse, which had emphasized the sanitation of people or home expanded to the public sphere. When cholera broke out in 1866 again

  11. Epidemic cholera in rural El Salvador: risk factors in a region covered by a cholera prevention campaign

    PubMed Central

    Quick, R. E.; Thompson, B. L.; Zuniga, A.; Dominguez, G.; De Brizuela, E. L.; De Palma, O.; Almeida, S.; Valencia, A.; Ries, A. A.; Bean, N. H.; Blake, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the Latin American cholera epidemic, El Salvador began a prevention programme in April 1991. The first case was confirmed in August, and 700 cases were reported within 3 months. A matched case-control study was conducted in rural La Libertad Department in November 1991. Illness was associated with eating cold cooked or raw seafood (odds ratio [OR] = 7·0; 95% confidence limits [CL] = 1·4, 35·0) and with drinking water outside the home (OR = 8·8; 95% CL = 1·7, 44·6). Assertion of knowledge about how to prevent cholera (OR = 0·2; 95% CL = 0·1, 0·8) and eating rice (OR = 0·2; 95% CL = 0·1, 0·8) were protective. More controls than patients regularly used soap (OR = 0·3; 95% CL = 0·1, 1·0). This study demonstrated three important points for cholera prevention: (1) seafood should be eaten cooked and hot; (2) populations at risk should be taught to treat household drinking water and to avoid drinking water outside the home unless it is known to be treated; and (3) education about hygiene can be an important tool in preventing cholera. PMID:7705488

  12. Epidemic cholera in rural El Salvador: risk factors in a region covered by a cholera prevention campaign.

    PubMed

    Quick, R E; Thompson, B L; Zuniga, A; Dominguez, G; De Brizuela, E L; De Palma, O; Almeida, S; Valencia, A; Ries, A A; Bean, N H

    1995-04-01

    In response to the Latin American cholera epidemic, El Salvador began a prevention programme in April 1991. The first case was confirmed in August, and 700 cases were reported within 3 months. A matched case-control study was conducted in rural La Libertad Department in November 1991. Illness was associated with eating cold cooked or raw seafood (odds ratio [OR] = 7.0; 95% confidence limits [CL] = 1.4, 35.0) and with drinking water outside the home (OR = 8.8; 95% CL = 1.7, 44.6). Assertion of knowledge about how to prevent cholera (OR = 0.2; 95% CL = 0.1, 0.8) and eating rice (OR = 0.2; 95% CL = 0.1, 0.8) were protective. More controls than patients regularly used soap (OR = 0.3; 95% CL = 0.1, 1.0). This study demonstrated three important points for cholera prevention: (1) seafood should be eaten cooked and hot; (2) populations at risk should be taught to treat household drinking water and to avoid drinking water outside the home unless it is known to be treated; and (3) education about hygiene can be an important tool in preventing cholera.

  13. Funerals during the 1994 cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa: the need for disinfection of bodies of persons dying of cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnlaugsson, G.; Einarsdóttir, J.; Angulo, F. J.; Mentambanar, S. A.; Passa, A.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1998-01-01

    The 1994 cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau resulted in 15,878 reported cases and 306 deaths. Early in the epidemic, although the health ministry mandated that the bodies of persons dying of cholera be disinfected, outbreaks occurred in several villages following funerals in the region of Biombo. To determine the influence of disinfection and funeral activities on cholera transmission, we analysed surveillance data and conducted a case-control study following a funeral. The attack rate during the week following funerals was higher in villages where bodies were not disinfected (risk ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.8). Cholera was strongly associated with eating at a funeral with a non-disinfected corpse (odds ratio [OR] = 14.5, 95% CI 0.9-786) and with touching (i.e., transporting, washing) the body (OR = 36.2, 95% CI 2.6-1769). During cholera epidemics, in addition to other cholera prevention activities, health officials should inform community leaders about the risk of cholera transmission during funerals, meals should not be served at funerals, and bodies of persons dying of cholera should be disinfected. PMID:9528812

  14. The mortality rates and the space-time patterns of John Snow's cholera epidemic map.

    PubMed

    Shiode, Narushige; Shiode, Shino; Rod-Thatcher, Elodie; Rana, Sanjay; Vinten-Johansen, Peter

    2015-06-17

    Snow's work on the Broad Street map is widely known as a pioneering example of spatial epidemiology. It lacks, however, two significant attributes required in contemporary analyses of disease incidence: population at risk and the progression of the epidemic over time. Despite this has been repeatedly suggested in the literature, no systematic investigation of these two aspects was previously carried out. Using a series of historical documents, this study constructs own data to revisit Snow's study to examine the mortality rate at each street location and the space-time pattern of the cholera outbreak. This study brings together records from a series of historical documents, and prepares own data on the estimated number of residents at each house location as well as the space-time data of the victims, and these are processed in GIS to facilitate the spatial-temporal analysis. Mortality rates and the space-time pattern in the victims' records are explored using Kernel Density Estimation and network-based Scan Statistic, a recently developed method that detects significant concentrations of records such as the date and place of victims with respect to their distance from others along the street network. The results are visualised in a map form using a GIS platform. Data on mortality rates and space-time distribution of the victims were collected from various sources and were successfully merged and digitised, thus allowing the production of new map outputs and new interpretation of the 1854 cholera outbreak in London, covering more cases than Snow's original report and also adding new insights into their space-time distribution. They confirmed that areas in the immediate vicinity of the Broad Street pump indeed suffered from excessively high mortality rates, which has been suspected for the past 160 years but remained unconfirmed. No distinctive pattern was found in the space-time distribution of victims' locations. The high mortality rates identified around the

  15. Geographical structures and the cholera epidemic in modern Japan: Fukushima prefecture in 1882 and 1895

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Lin; Fukui, Hiromichi

    2007-01-01

    Background Disease diffusion patterns can provide clues for understanding geographical change. Fukushima, a rural prefecture in northeast Japan, was chosen for a case study of the late nineteenth century cholera epidemic that occurred in that country. Two volumes of Cholera Ryu-ko Kiji (Cholera Epidemic Report), published by the prefectural government in 1882 and 1895, provide valuable records for analyzing and modelling diffusion. Text descriptions and numerical evidence culled from the reports were incorporated into a temporal-spatial study framework using geographic information system (GIS) and geo-statistical techniques. Results Changes in diffusion patterns between 1882 and 1895 reflect improvements in the Fukushima transportation system and growth in social-economic networks. The data reveal different diffusion systems in separate regions in which residents of Fukushima and neighboring prefectures interacted. Our model also shows that an area in the prefecture's northern interior was dominated by a mix of diffusion processes (contagious and hierarchical), that the southern coastal region was affected by a contagious process, and that other infected areas experienced relocation diffusion. Conclusion In addition to enhancing our understanding of epidemics, the spatial-temporal patterns of cholera diffusion offer opportunities for studying regional change in modern Japan. By highlighting the dynamics of regional reorganization, our findings can be used to better understand the formation of an urban hierarchy in late nineteenth century Japan. PMID:17603906

  16. Molecular epidemiologic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated during the 1997-8 cholera epidemic in southern Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, S.; Kongmuang, U.; Kalnauwakul, S.; Matsumoto, C.; Chen, C. H.; Nishibuchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of Vibrio cholerae O1 infection was observed in southern Thailand between late December 1997 and March 1998. Fifty-seven V. cholerae O1 strains were isolated in five provinces during this epidemic and were examined. They were El Tor Ogawa strains exhibiting similar antibiograms. All strains were resistant to tetracycline, which had not been reported in Thailand since 1993. The ribotypes. hybridization patterns with ctx and zot gene probes, arbitrarily primed PCR profiles, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of the representative strains were compared with the clinical strains isolated from patients in India and Bangladesh in 1997 and 1998 and from international travellers originating from various Asian countries during the 1992-8 period. All southern Thailand strains and the 1998 international traveller strain of Thai origin showed indistinguishable genetic fingerprinting patterns that were distinct from those of other test strains. The results suggest that a tetracycline-resistant clone newly emerged in late December 1997 caused the large epidemic in southern Thailand and that the variants with a slightly different antibiogram appeared during the course of the spreading epidemic. PMID:11561977

  17. The 2008 cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe: experience of the icddr,b team in the field.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Iqbal, Anwarul; Mazumder, Ramendra Nath; Khan, Azharul Islam; Islam, M Sirajul; Siddique, Abul Kasem; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    During August 2008-June 2009, an estimated 95,531 suspected cases of cholera and 4,282 deaths due to cholera were reported during the 2008 cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe. Despite the efforts by local and international organizations supported by the Zimbabwean Ministry of Health and Child Welfare in the establishment of cholera treatment centres throughout the country, the case-fatality rate (CFR) was much higher than expected. Over two-thirds of the deaths occurred in areas without access to treatment facilities, with the highest CFRs (>5%) reported from Masvingo, Manicaland, Mashonaland West, Mashonaland East, Midland, and Matabeleland North provinces. Some factors attributing to this high CFR included inappropriate cholera case management with inadequate use of oral rehydration therapy, inappropriate use of antibiotics, and a shortage of experienced healthcare professionals. The breakdown of both potable water and sanitation systems and the widespread contamination of available drinking-water sources were also considered responsible for the rapid and widespread distribution of the epidemic throughout the country. Training of healthcare professionals on appropriate cholera case management and implementation of recommended strategies to reduce the environmental contamination of drinking-water sources could have contributed to the progressive reduction in number of cases and deaths as observed at the end of February 2009.

  18. The 2008 Cholera Epidemic in Zimbabwe: Experience of the icddr,b Team in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Iqbal, Anwarul; Mazumder, Ramendra Nath; Khan, Azharul Islam; Islam, Md. Sirajul; Siddique, Abul Kasem; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    During August 2008–June 2009, an estimated 95,531 suspected cases of cholera and 4,282 deaths due to cholera were reported during the 2008 cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe. Despite the efforts by local and international organizations supported by the Zimbabwean Ministry of Health and Child Welfare in the establishment of cholera treatment centres throughout the country, the case-fatality rate (CFR) was much higher than expected. Over two-thirds of the deaths occurred in areas without access to treatment facilities, with the highest CFRs (>5%) reported from Masvingo, Manicaland, Mashonaland West, Mashonaland East, Midland, and Matabeleland North provinces. Some factors attributing to this high CFR included inappropriate cholera case management with inadequate use of oral rehydration therapy, inappropriate use of antibiotics, and a shortage of experienced healthcare professionals. The breakdown of both potable water and sanitation systems and the widespread contamination of available drinking-water sources were also considered responsible for the rapid and widespread distribution of the epidemic throughout the country. Training of healthcare professionals on appropriate cholera case management and implementation of recommended strategies to reduce the environmental contamination of drinking-water sources could have contributed to the progressive reduction in number of cases and deaths as observed at the end of February 2009. PMID:22106761

  19. Are there national risk factors for epidemic cholera? The correlation between socioeconomic and demographic indices and cholera incidence in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Ackers, M L; Quick, R E; Drasbek, C J; Hutwagner, L; Tauxe, R V

    1998-04-01

    From 1991 through 1995, all Latin American countries maintained cholera surveillance systems to track the epidemic that entered the region through Peru in January 1991. These data were used to assess correlations between socioeconomic and demographic indices that might serve as national risk predictors for epidemic cholera in Latin America. Correlations between country-specific cumulative cholera incidence rates from 1991 through 1995 and infant mortality, the Human Development Index [HDI] a numerical value based on life expectancy, education, and income), gross national product (GNP) per capita, and female literacy were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A total of 1,339,834 cholera cases with a cumulative incidence rate of 183 per 100,000 population were reported from affected Western Hemisphere countries from 1991 through 1995. Infant mortality rates were the most strongly correlated with cumulative cholera incidence based on the Pearson correlation coefficient. The HDI had a less strong negative correlation with cumulative cholera incidence. The GNP per capita and female literacy rates were weakly and negatively correlated with cholera cumulative incidence rates. Infant mortality and possibly the HDI may be useful indirect indices of the risk of sustained transmission of cholera within a Latin American country. Cumulative cholera incidence is decreased particularly in countries with infant mortality below 40 per 1000 live births. The lack of reported cholera cases in Uruguay and the Caribbean may reflect a low risk for ongoing transmission, consistent with socioeconomic and demographic indices. Cholera surveillance remains an important instrument for determining cholera trends within individual countries and regions.

  20. [Characteristics of the cholera epidemic of 1998 in Ecuador during El Niño].

    PubMed

    Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Pesantes, Carmen; Escalante, Santiago; Narváez, Yolanda; Vela, Enrique; García, Lidia; Zabala, Diana; Yadon, Zaida E

    2002-09-01

    To describe the outbreak of cholera that occurred in Ecuador in 1998 during the El Nino weather phenomenon, to present data on the resistance of the circulating strains of Vibrio cholerae to antimicrobial drugs, and to describe the preventive measures taken by health authorities in order to reduce the impact of the disease. The epidemiological data came from three sources: 1) the registry of the National Bureau of Epidemiology of the Ministry of Public Health of Ecuador, 2) the registry of the National Institute of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and 3) the final report of the Training Program for the Fight against Cholera and Diarrheal Diseases. Isolation, identification, and serotyping was done of V. cholerae in the feces samples from 10% of the suspected cholera cases that were identified between 1 January and 31 December 1998. The suspected cases were defined by the sudden appearance of watery diarrhea, with or without dehydration, in epidemic areas. The strains that were isolated were submitted to a standard antibiogram by the diffusion method, in which the following antibiotics were tested: amoxicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole, vibriostatic compound O/129, nalidixic acid, erythromycin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamycin, chloramphenicol, and colistin. In 1998 there were 3 755 cases reported in 17 of the 21 provinces of the country. This corresponds to an incidence rate of 53.96 per 100 000 population. Thirty seven patients died, for a case fatality rate of 0.97%. A total of 301 strains of V. cholerae were isolated in the 637 suspected-cholera samples that were processed; all corresponded to V. cholerae O1, El Tor, subtype Ogawa. All of the strains were sensitive to tetracycline and to quinolones; 5.6% of the strains were resistant to erythromycin. The only strain resistant to amoxicillin was multiresistant. Officials in Ecuador implemented a series of preventive measures, and the surveillance system was strengthened in order to reduce

  1. A spatially explicit model for the future progression of the current Haiti cholera epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Gatto, M.; Casagrandi, R.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-12-01

    As a major cholera epidemic progresses in Haiti, and the figures of the infection, up to July 2011, climb to 385,000 cases and 5,800 deaths, the development of general models to track and predict the evolution of the outbreak, so as to guide the allocation of medical supplies and staff, is gaining notable urgency. We propose here a spatially explicit epidemic model that accounts for the dynamics of susceptible and infected individuals as well as the redistribution of textit{Vibrio cholera}, the causative agent of the disease, among different human communities. In particular, we model two spreading pathways: the advection of pathogens through hydrologic connections and the dissemination due to human mobility described by means of a gravity-like model. To this end the country has been divided into hydrologic units based on drainage directions derived from a digital terrain model. Moreover the population of each unit has been estimated from census data downscaled to 1 km x 1 km resolution via remotely sensed geomorphological information (LandScan texttrademark project). The model directly account for the role of rainfall patterns in driving the seasonality of cholera outbreaks. The two main outbreaks in fact occurred during the rainy seasons (October and May) when extensive floodings severely worsened the sanitation conditions and, in turn, raised the risk of infection. The model capability to reproduce the spatiotemporal features of the epidemic up to date grants robustness to the foreseen future development. In this context, the duration of acquired immunity, a hotly debated topic in the scientific community, emerges as a controlling factor for progression of the epidemic in the near future. The framework presented here can straightforwardly be used to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative intervention strategies like mass vaccinations, clean water supply and educational campaigns, thus emerging as an essential component of the control of future cholera

  2. [Five years of cholera surveillance in Ivory Coast during social and political crisis, 2001 to 2005].

    PubMed

    Ekra, K D; Attoh-Touré, H; Bénié, B V J; Coulibaly, D; Koutouan, M G; Aka, L N; Dagnan, S N; Coulibaly, A; Douba, A; Tiembré, I; Odéhouri-Koudou, P; Tagliante-Saracino, J

    2009-05-01

    For an efficient struggle against infectious diseases with epidemic potential, the Cdte d'Ivoire set up a precocious alert system in 2001 with a main objective: to detect epidemics of cholera, measles, yellow fever and meningitis and to provide necessary information for their control and their prevention. During the 2001 to 2005 period, the country was marked by military and political crisis which occurred in 2002; the country had to face up to a reappearance of cholera. How did it evolve in such a context? The question was to describe the performances of the system and the evolution of cholera from weekly data collected by the centers of epidemiological monitoring in health districts. The cases and declared deaths were compiled and the indicators of morbidity and mortality were then studied according to time site and individual features on the period of 2001 to 2005. From 2001 to 2005, 11,874 cases were notified with 564 deaths and a lethal rate of 4.7%. In 2001, from the initial source of infection, the civil jail, the epidemic of cholera disseminated itself through visitors in the whole city of Abidjan where 3250 cases were notified. Out of city, 20 outbreaks have been declared with a total of 3010 cases. The yearly highest impact, 37 living cases/100,000 inhabitants recorded in 2001, decreased regularly until 2005 with 0.2 living cases/100,000. After 2002, outbreaks were located mainly in the half south of the country which welcomed displaced populations from the north, preferably in transition or settling zones near the front line. The lethal rate in Abidjan (2.3%) was less important than that of other health districts (8.6%). The lethal rate globally increased as the impact decreased. Vibrio cholerae was responsible for the epidemics. The group of 15 years old and over was the most affected (12.69 living cases/100,000) whereas the highest lethal rate appeared in the group under 5 years old (6.6%). The reappearance and constant cholera epidemics in Côte d

  3. International dissemination of epidemic Vibrio cholerae by cargo ship ballast and other nonpotable waters.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, S A; Khambaty, F M

    1994-07-01

    In 1991 and 1992, toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Inaba, biotype El Tor, was recovered from nonpotable (ballast, bilge, and sewage) water from five cargo ships docked in ports of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Four of these ships had taken on ballast water in cholera-infected countries; the fifth took on ballast in a noninfected country. Isolates examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were indistinguishable from the Latin American epidemic strain, C6707; however, they differed significantly from the endemic Gulf Coast strain (VRL 1984), the sixth-pandemic strain (569-B), and a V. cholerae non-O1 strain isolated from a ship arriving from a foreign port. On the basis of our findings, the Food and Drug Administration recommended that the U.S. Coast Guard issue an advisory to shipping agents and captains requesting that ballast waters be exchanged on the high seas before entry of ships into U.S. ports.

  4. Deciphering the origins and tracking the evolution of cholera epidemics with whole-genome-based molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Grad, Yonatan H; Waldor, Matthew K

    2013-09-10

    The devastating Haitian cholera outbreak that began in October 2010 is the first known cholera epidemic in this island nation. Epidemiological and genomic data have provided strong evidence that United Nations security forces from Nepal introduced toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, the cause of epidemic cholera, to Haiti shortly before the outbreak arose. However, some have contended that indigenous V. cholerae contributed to the outbreak. In a recent paper (mBio 4:e00398-13, 2013), L. S. Katz et al. explored the nature and rate of changes in this ancient pathogen's genome during an outbreak, based on whole-genome sequencing of 23 Haitian V. cholerae clinical isolates obtained over a 20-month period. Notably, they detected point mutations, deletions, and inversions but found no insertion of horizontally transmitted DNA, arguing strongly against the idea that autochthonous V. cholerae donated DNA to the outbreak strain. Furthermore, they found that Haitian epidemic V. cholerae isolates were virtually untransformable. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that the Haitian isolates were nearly identical to isolates from Nepal and that the Nepalese-Haitian isolates were distinguishable from isolates circulating elsewhere in the world. Reconstruction of the phylogeny of the Haitian isolates was consistent with a single introduction of V. cholerae to Haiti sometime between late July and late October 2010, dates remarkably concordant with epidemiological observations. In aggregate, this paper provides additional compelling evidence that the V. cholerae strain responsible for the Haitian cholera epidemic came from Nepal and illustrates the power of whole-genome-based analyses for epidemiology, pathogen evolution, and forensics.

  5. On the predictive ability of mechanistic models for the Haitian cholera epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Finger, Flavio; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Predictive models of epidemic cholera need to resolve at suitable aggregation levels spatial data pertaining to local communities, epidemiological records, hydrologic drivers, waterways, patterns of human mobility and proxies of exposure rates. We address the above issue in a formal model comparison framework and provide a quantitative assessment of the explanatory and predictive abilities of various model settings with different spatial aggregation levels and coupling mechanisms. Reference is made to records of the recent Haiti cholera epidemics. Our intensive computations and objective model comparisons show that spatially explicit models accounting for spatial connections have better explanatory power than spatially disconnected ones for short-to-intermediate calibration windows, while parsimonious, spatially disconnected models perform better with long training sets. On average, spatially connected models show better predictive ability than disconnected ones. We suggest limits and validity of the various approaches and discuss the pathway towards the development of case-specific predictive tools in the context of emergency management. PMID:25631563

  6. On the predictive ability of mechanistic models for the Haitian cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Finger, Flavio; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-03-06

    Predictive models of epidemic cholera need to resolve at suitable aggregation levels spatial data pertaining to local communities, epidemiological records, hydrologic drivers, waterways, patterns of human mobility and proxies of exposure rates. We address the above issue in a formal model comparison framework and provide a quantitative assessment of the explanatory and predictive abilities of various model settings with different spatial aggregation levels and coupling mechanisms. Reference is made to records of the recent Haiti cholera epidemics. Our intensive computations and objective model comparisons show that spatially explicit models accounting for spatial connections have better explanatory power than spatially disconnected ones for short-to-intermediate calibration windows, while parsimonious, spatially disconnected models perform better with long training sets. On average, spatially connected models show better predictive ability than disconnected ones. We suggest limits and validity of the various approaches and discuss the pathway towards the development of case-specific predictive tools in the context of emergency management.

  7. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. PMID:27297393

  8. First do no harm: making oral rehydration solution safer in a cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N A; Simons, S L; Rodrigues, A; Gunnlaugsson, G; Forster, T S; Wells, J G; Hutwagner, L; Tauxe, R V; Mintz, E D

    1999-06-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is lifesaving therapy for cholera and pediatric diarrhea. During a cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau, we evaluated the microbiologic quality of ORS prepared at a hospital and tested a simple intervention using special vessels for disinfecting tap water with bleach and for preparing, storing, and dispensing ORS. Few coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli were recovered from tap water; however, pre-intervention ORS contained numerous bacteria including E. coli and toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1. In contrast, ORS samples from intervention vessels had few or no coliform bacteria, no E. coli, and no V. cholerae. Mean pre-intervention counts of coliform bacteria (3.4 x 10(7) colony-forming units [cfu]/100 ml) and E. coli (6.2 x 10(3) cfu) decreased significantly during the intervention period to 3.6 x 10(2) cfu and 0 cfu, respectively (P < 0.001). This simple system using bleach disinfectant and special storage vessels prevents bacterial contamination of ORS and reduces the risk of nosocomial transmission of cholera and other enteric pathogens.

  9. Unique Clones of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor with Haitian Type ctxB Allele Implicated in the Recent Cholera Epidemics from Nigeria, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pazhani, Gururaja Perumal; Abiodun, Iwalokun Bamidele; Afolabi, Oluwadun; Kolawole, Olukoya Daniel; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Ramamurthy, Thanadarayan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and genetic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1, which is responsible for several cholera epidemics in Nigeria, are not reported in detail since 2007. In this study, we screened V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype isolates from cholera cases and water samples from different states to investigate their phenotypic and genetic attributes with special reference to their clonality. Results All the V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor isolates isolated during 2007–2013 were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, the drugs currently used in the treatment of cholera cases in Nigeria. Emergence of CT genotype 7 (Haitian type of ctxB allele) was predominantly seen among Ogawa serotype and the CT genotype 1 (classical ctxB allele) was mostly found in Inaba serotype. Overall, V. cholerae O1 from clinical and water samples were found to be closely related as determined by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. V. cholerae isolates from Abia, Kano and Bauchi were found to be genetically distinct from the other states of Nigeria. Conclusion Fecal contamination of the water sources may be the possible source of the cholera infection. Combined prevalence of Haitian and classical ctxB alleles were detected in Ogawa and Inaba serotypes, respectively. This study further demonstrated that V. cholerae O1 with the ctxB has been emerged similar to the isolates reported in Haiti. Our findings suggest that the use of fluoroquinolones or tetracycline/doxycycline may help in the effective management of acute cholera in the affected Nigerian states. In addition, strengthening the existing surveillance in the hospitals of all the states and supply of clean drinking water may control cholera outbreaks in the future. PMID:27479360

  10. Unique Clones of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor with Haitian Type ctxB Allele Implicated in the Recent Cholera Epidemics from Nigeria, Africa.

    PubMed

    Adewale, Akinsinde Kehinde; Pazhani, Gururaja Perumal; Abiodun, Iwalokun Bamidele; Afolabi, Oluwadun; Kolawole, Olukoya Daniel; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Ramamurthy, Thanadarayan

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and genetic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1, which is responsible for several cholera epidemics in Nigeria, are not reported in detail since 2007. In this study, we screened V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype isolates from cholera cases and water samples from different states to investigate their phenotypic and genetic attributes with special reference to their clonality. All the V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor isolates isolated during 2007-2013 were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, the drugs currently used in the treatment of cholera cases in Nigeria. Emergence of CT genotype 7 (Haitian type of ctxB allele) was predominantly seen among Ogawa serotype and the CT genotype 1 (classical ctxB allele) was mostly found in Inaba serotype. Overall, V. cholerae O1 from clinical and water samples were found to be closely related as determined by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. V. cholerae isolates from Abia, Kano and Bauchi were found to be genetically distinct from the other states of Nigeria. Fecal contamination of the water sources may be the possible source of the cholera infection. Combined prevalence of Haitian and classical ctxB alleles were detected in Ogawa and Inaba serotypes, respectively. This study further demonstrated that V. cholerae O1 with the ctxB has been emerged similar to the isolates reported in Haiti. Our findings suggest that the use of fluoroquinolones or tetracycline/doxycycline may help in the effective management of acute cholera in the affected Nigerian states. In addition, strengthening the existing surveillance in the hospitals of all the states and supply of clean drinking water may control cholera outbreaks in the future.

  11. [Preventive measures taken in Adrianople during the 1893-1894 cholera epidemic, as reflected in a local newspaper].

    PubMed

    Gökçe, N

    2001-01-01

    Cholera is derived from the Latin words colos (large intestine) and reo (to flow) and means flowing of the liquids through the stomach and the intestines. The first cholera epidemic was experienced in India and spread out to other countries. Although it had been known for ages, it was not recognized until the 16th century. Seven serious cholera epidemics have broken out in the world since the 19th century. In spite of all precautions taken by the Ottoman government, the sixth world cholera epidemic that started in Asia in 1891 and caused the loss of 40 thousand people, reached Istanbul in 1893. Later, it spread to Iznik, Salonika and Anatolia. Just as it appeared in Europe, precautions started to be taken in Adrianople. At first, special care was taken for city hygiene and a commission was formed to inspect the cleanliness of the city. Many brochures and articles were published on the protection against the illness, in order to inform the citizens of the cholera epidemic. Preachers spoke of cholera in their sermons. To protect Adrianople against the epidemic, entrance into and exit out of the city were patrolled and passengers coming from Europe or Istanbul to Adrianople were kept waiting for three days at the quarantines built in Cisri Mustafa Pasha and Catalca.

  12. Did point-of-use drinking water strategies for children change in the Dominican Republic during a cholera epidemic?

    PubMed

    McLennan, J D

    2016-09-01

    Point-of-use (POU) strategies to improve drinking water, particularly chlorination, are promoted within cholera epidemics when centrally delivered safe drinking water is lacking. Most studies examining POU practices during cholera epidemics have relied on single cross-sectional studies which are limited for assessing behavioural changes. This study examined POU practices in a community over time during a cholera outbreak. Secondary data analysis of existing dataset. During attendance at well-baby clinics serving a low-income peri-urban community in the Dominican Republic, mothers had been routinely asked, using a structured questionnaire, about POU strategies used for drinking water for their children. Frequency distribution of reported practices was determined over a 21 month period during the cholera outbreak on the island of Hispaniola. An estimated 27.8% of children were reported to have had some exposure to untreated tap water. Unsustained reductions in exposure to untreated tap water were noted early in the epidemic. POU chlorination was infrequent and showed no significant or sustained increases over the study time period. High reliance on bottled water, consistent with national household patterns prior to the cholera outbreak, may have reduced the perceived need for POU chlorination. Examination of the safety of relying on bottled water during cholera outbreaks is needed. Additionally, further inquiries are needed to understand variation in POU practices both during and beyond cholera outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemic cholera in urban Zambia: hand soap and dried fish as protective factors.

    PubMed

    DuBois, A E; Sinkala, M; Kalluri, P; Makasa-Chikoya, M; Quick, R E

    2006-12-01

    Between 28 November 2003 and 23 February 2004, 4343 cases and 154 deaths from cholera (case-fatality rate 3.5%) were reported in Lusaka, Zambia. A case-control study was conducted in February 2004 to assess potential transmission routes and prevention strategies. Consumption of raw vegetables was significantly associated with cholera [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-13, P=0.003). Consumption of a local sardine-like fish was protective (aOR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7, P=0.008). Hand soap was present in 90% of control homes and 58% of case homes. Observed hand soap was a strongly protective factor (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.04-0.4, P=0.001). No water source or treatment practice was significantly associated with cholera. This study documents the importance of foodborne transmission of cholera, illustrates the protective role of hand washing in an epidemic setting, and identifies a novel possible protective factor, a local fish, which warrants further research.

  14. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects against cholera in children under 6 years of age.

    PubMed

    Conroy, R M; Meegan, M E; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K; Barnes, J

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in risk of diarrhoeal disease in children who used solar disinfected drinking water. A cholera epidemic, occurring in an area of Kenya in which a controlled trial of solar disinfection and diarrhoeal disease in children aged under 6 had recently finished, offered an opportunity to examine the protection offered by solar disinfection against cholera. In the original trial, all children aged under 6 in a Maasai community were randomised by household: in the solar disinfection arm, children drank water disinfected by leaving it on the roof in a clear plastic bottle, while controls drank water kept indoors. We revisited all households which had participated in the original trial. There were 131 households in the trial area, of which 67 had been randomised to solar disinfection (a further 19 households had migrated as a result of severe drought). There was no significant difference in the risk of cholera in adults or in older children in households randomised to solar disinfection; however, there were only three cases of cholera in the 155 children aged under 6 years drinking solar disinfected water compared with 20 of 144 controls. Results confirm the usefulness of solar disinfection in reducing risk of water borne disease in children. Point of consumption solar disinfection can be done with minimal resources, which are readily available, and may be an important first line response to cholera outbreaks. Its potential in chorine resistant cholera merits further investigation.

  15. [The cholera epidemics and the development of public health in Meiji Japan. 1. Modernity, cholera, and health thought].

    PubMed

    Chemouilli, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We present here the beginnings of public health politics in Meiji Japan (1868-1912). Due to a two century isolation of Japan, public health concepts developed in the West from the end of the 18th century were foreign in premodern Japan. Due to its isolation, Japan was also relatively preserved from some acute infectious diseases such as cholera. In this paper, we investigate the role of cholera epidemics in the emergence of public health concepts in the peculiar context of Meiji Japan. We show that chronic diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy were neglected for a long time and that the Meiji government set priority on acute infectious diseases that were considered as long as they disturbed public order. Nevertheless, some physicians and government officials considered issues of welfare and poverty. We also review some emerging concepts of social medicine. We try to show, that in Japan as well as in Western nations, public health politics were not exempt of contradictions and paradoxes and a permanent tension existed between coercitive policies and conceptions of welfare and rights to health.

  16. Traveling wave solutions for epidemic cholera model with disease-related death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianran; Gou, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Based on Codeço's cholera model (2001), an epidemic cholera model that incorporates the pathogen diffusion and disease-related death is proposed. The formula for minimal wave speed c (∗) is given. To prove the existence of traveling wave solutions, an invariant cone is constructed by upper and lower solutions and Schauder's fixed point theorem is applied. The nonexistence of traveling wave solutions is proved by two-sided Laplace transform. However, to apply two-sided Laplace transform, the prior estimate of exponential decrease of traveling wave solutions is needed. For this aim, a new method is proposed, which can be applied to reaction-diffusion systems consisting of more than three equations.

  17. Traveling Wave Solutions for Epidemic Cholera Model with Disease-Related Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianran; Gou, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Based on Codeço's cholera model (2001), an epidemic cholera model that incorporates the pathogen diffusion and disease-related death is proposed. The formula for minimal wave speed c ∗ is given. To prove the existence of traveling wave solutions, an invariant cone is constructed by upper and lower solutions and Schauder's fixed point theorem is applied. The nonexistence of traveling wave solutions is proved by two-sided Laplace transform. However, to apply two-sided Laplace transform, the prior estimate of exponential decrease of traveling wave solutions is needed. For this aim, a new method is proposed, which can be applied to reaction-diffusion systems consisting of more than three equations. PMID:24883396

  18. Bessel and the cholera epidemic in Königsberg in 1831 (German Title: Bessel und die Cholera-Epidemie 1831 in Königsberg )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Dietmar

    When, in 1831, cholera broke out in large parts of Germany, it also claimed numerous victims in Königsberg. Bessel, although not infected, was drawn together with his observatory into the events by actions that served to control the epidemic. The report of events allows a glimpse into Bessel's life in Königsberg and into his personality.

  19. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Emergence and spread of tetracycline resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor variant during 2010 cholera epidemic in the tribal areas of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santanu Kumar; Pal, Bibhuti Bhusan; Khuntia, Hemanta Kumar; Achary, K Gopinath; Khuntia, Chinmaye Priyadarshini

    2015-04-01

    The epidemics of cholera were reported in the Kashipur, K.singhpur, B cuttack blocks of Rayagada district and Mohana block of Gajapati district of Odisha during 2010. The present study was carried out to isolate the bacterial pathogen, its drug sensitivity pattern and to describe the spread of the disease in those areas. A total of 68 rectal swabs collected from patients with severe diarrhea, admitted to different health centers and diarrhea affected villages were bacteriologically analyzed. Similarly 22 water samples collected from different villages from nala, chua, etc were tested for the presence of V cholerae. Out of 68 rectal swabs tested 35 (51.5%) were V cholerae O1 Ogawa and 14(20.6%) were E coli; which might be commensals. All water samples were negative for V cholerae. The V cholerae strains were sensitive to gentamicin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin and ofloxacin; but were resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, furazolidone, streptomycin, erythromycin, co-trimoxazole, neomycin and chloramphenicol. All V cholerae strains were 100% resistant to tetracycline and they were El Tor variants harboring ctxB gene of classical strain. The present study indicated the emergence and spread of tetracycline resistant V cholerae O1 El Tor variant in the tribal areas which needs close monitoring. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. [The cholera epidemics in Córdoba as seen through the press: the supply of preservatives and cures during the 1867-1868 epidemic].

    PubMed

    Carbonetti, Adrián; Rodríguez, María Laura; Noelia, Rimonda; Martina, Yamila

    2007-01-01

    Disease is always represented a moment of crisis for individuals and societies. When death brought by disease hangs heavy over societies, they are lead to develop strategies to prevent and cure it. Epidemics, especially cholera epidemics, have had a strong impact on Argentine society, especially on Cordoba residents, because the first cholera outbreak was highly devastating in both demographic and social terms. In this article we analyze the supply of products that were advertised in the press during the first epidemic, which broke out in 1867-68. Our basic hypothesis is that the products available developed a widespread trade that was not the object of commercial transactions common to those social grouping during periods in which there were no epidemics. When they took place, those products were directed towards more affluent groups.

  2. Diarrheal illness among US residents providing medical services in Haiti during the cholera epidemic, 2010 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Katharine A; Cartwright, Emily J; Stamper, John; Locke, Michael; Esposito, Douglas H; Balaban, Victor; Mintz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although nosocomial transmission of cholera is rare, two US healthcare workers (HCW) became ill with cholera after providing medical services during the Haiti cholera epidemic. To assess the incidence of diarrheal illness and explore preventive health behaviors practiced by US residents who provided medical services in Haiti, we conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey. We e-mailed 896 participants from 50 US-based, health-focused non-governmental organizations (NGOs), of whom 381 (43%) completed the survey. Fifty-six percent of respondents (n = 215) reported providing some care for patients with cholera. Diarrhea was reported by 31 (8%) respondents. One person was diagnosed with cholera by serologic testing. NGOs responding to international emergencies should ensure ample access to basic hygiene supplies and should promote their use to reduce the incidence of diarrheal illness among HCW working overseas.

  3. [Consumption of medications during the cholera epidemic in Douala, Cameroon (2004)].

    PubMed

    Guévart, E; Sollé, J; Bikoti, J M; Noeske, J; Mouangue, A

    2007-10-01

    To prepare for cholera outbreaks, stockpiles of supplies, rehydration salts/ solutions and appropriate antibiotics must be placed in strategic locations to ensure a prompt and effective response. However specific needs have not been evaluated up to now. The purpose of this report is to give an accurate account of medical supplies that were consumed during the cholera epidemic in Douala in 2004. Consumption of medication for the entire epidemic was measured by crosschecking data from the provincial pharmaceutical supply centre with the order forms, stock sheets and records of hospitals. Cost was calculated based on pricing data from the National Supply Center. For the 5 020 confirmed cases of cholera that were treated in the 14 hospitals in Douala from January to September 2004, consumption consisted of 499,746 doxycycline tablets, 235,881 amoxicilline tablets, 122,781 rehydration salt packets, and 60,217 units of Ringer Lactate (500 ml). The total cost of medications and consumables was 52,229,311 CFAF (approximately 80,000 Euro). Although updated recommendations are not available, comparison with the existing ones shows that the consumption levels observed were 5 times higher for both rehydration and antibiotherapy. The mean cost of treatment in Douala was 13 Euro per reported patient. This cost rose to 15 Euro if antibiotic prophylaxis was prescribed for all contacts. These findings can be useful in planning for future epidemics by allowing recommendations to be updated. We propose the follow supply levels for 50,000 inhabitants with an attack rate of 0.2%: 10,000 doxycycline tablets, 5000 amoxicilline tablets (500 mg), 2500 SRO packs (for 2500 liters) and 600 liters of Ringer Lactate.

  4. Molecular identification of pathogenicity genes and ERIC types in Vibrio cholerae O1 epidemic strains from Mozambique.

    PubMed Central

    Folgosa, E.; Mastrandrea, S.; Cappuccinelli, P.; Uzzau, S.; Rappelli, P.; Brian, M. J.; Colombo, M. M.

    2001-01-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic profiles of the V. cholerae strains causing the Mozambican 1997-8 epidemic were characterized to provide a reference for comparison with other epidemic strains. A total of 75 strains of V. cholerae O1 isolated in different provinces, were analysed. Strains were characterized by PCR for detecting toxin genes (ctxA, zot and ace), virulence associated genes (tcpA. nanH, hlyA and torR) and ERIC sequences. All V. cholerae strains were serotype O1, Ogawa, biotype El Tor. MIC testing showed a high proportion of strains multi-resistant to drugs (100% to cotrimoxazole and 52% to tetracycline) and susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. The isolates contained two intact copies of the CTX genetic element and all other genes tested. PCR of restricted DNA revealed two ERIC types: the first in provincial isolates, also predominant in other African epidemic strains, and the second in Maputo isolates (the national capital). PMID:11561970

  5. Modern cholera in the Americas: an opportunistic societal infection.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Lee, Patrick T

    2013-11-01

    In the Americas, the only two cholera epidemics of the past century have occurred in the past 25 years. Lessons from the 1991 Peruvian cholera epidemic can help to focus and refine the response to the current Haitian epidemic. After three years of acute epidemic response, we have an opportunity to refocus on the chronic conditions that make societies vulnerable to cholera. More importantly, even as international attention wanes in the aftermath of the earthquake and acute epidemic, we are faced with a need for continued and coordinated investment in improving Haiti's structural defenses against cholera, in particular access to improved water and sanitation.

  6. Modern Cholera in the Americas: An Opportunistic Societal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    In the Americas, the only two cholera epidemics of the past century have occurred in the past 25 years. Lessons from the 1991 Peruvian cholera epidemic can help to focus and refine the response to the current Haitian epidemic. After three years of acute epidemic response, we have an opportunity to refocus on the chronic conditions that make societies vulnerable to cholera. More importantly, even as international attention wanes in the aftermath of the earthquake and acute epidemic, we are faced with a need for continued and coordinated investment in improving Haiti’s structural defenses against cholera, in particular access to improved water and sanitation. PMID:24028256

  7. Evidence of a dominant lineage of Vibrio cholerae-specific lytic bacteriophages shed by cholera patients over a 10-year period in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Seed, Kimberley D; Bodi, Kip L; Kropinski, Andrew M; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Camilli, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are hypothesized to contribute to the seasonality and duration of cholera epidemics in Bangladesh. However, the bacteriophages contributing to this phenomenon have yet to be characterized at a molecular genetic level. In this study, we isolated and sequenced the genomes of 15 bacteriophages from stool samples from cholera patients spanning a 10-year surveillance period in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Our results indicate that a single novel bacteriophage type, designated ICP1 (for the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh cholera phage 1) is present in all stool samples from cholera patients, while two other bacteriophage types, one novel (ICP2) and one T7-like (ICP3), are transient. ICP1 is a member of the Myoviridae family and has a 126-kilobase genome comprising 230 open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of ICP1 and related isolates from this time period indicates a high level of genetic conservation. The ubiquitous presence of ICP1 in cholera patients and the finding that the O1 antigen of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serves as the ICP1 receptor suggest that ICP1 is extremely well adapted to predation of human-pathogenic V. cholerae O1.

  8. The Portuguese Cholera morbus epidemic of 1853-56 as seen by the press.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maria Antónia Pires

    2012-03-20

    This is a study of how scientific knowledge reached common citizens in nineteenth-century Portugal, using newspapers as the main source. Despite the population's limited access to written material, each leading newspaper might be read by 30 000 people a day in Lisbon. This made newspapers the most widely available vehicle for the diffusion of the latest scientific information to the general public. With a cholera morbus epidemic affecting the second largest Portuguese town and all the northern regions, as well as the Algarve, reports on the course of the epidemic were considered essential. The author bases her study on a database of news about the disease in 1855 and 1856, especially with regard to prevention and treatment.

  9. Effectiveness of oral rehydration salt solution (ORS) in reduction of death during cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Sircar, B K; Saha, M R; Deb, B C; Singh, P K; Pal, S C

    1990-01-01

    An extensive outbreak of acute gastroenteritis involving all age group of patients occurred during July-September, 1978 in the Central district of Manipur state. A total of 4469 cases occurred during the period. 45.7% of diarrhoea cases sampled and 47.6% of water samples collected from rivers were found to be positive for V.cholerae biotype EITor. Case fatality rate in this epidemic was exceptionally low (0.8%) which was attributed to the early domiciliary use of oral rehydration salt solution (ORS) in the affected villages. Utility of ORS in drastic reduction of case fatality rate during any epidemic situation was first of its kind in the Indian scene.

  10. On Spatially Explicit Models of Cholera Epidemics: Hydrologic controls, environmental drivers, human-mediated transmissions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Righetto, L.; Gatto, M.; Casagrandi, R.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2010-12-01

    A recently proposed model for cholera epidemics is examined. The model accounts for local communities of susceptibles and infectives in a spatially explicit arrangement of nodes linked by networks having different topologies. The vehicle of infection (Vibrio cholerae) is transported through the network links which are thought of as hydrological connections among susceptible communities. The mathematical tools used are borrowed from general schemes of reactive transport on river networks acting as the environmental matrix for the circulation and mixing of water-borne pathogens. The results of a large-scale application to the Kwa Zulu (Natal) epidemics of 2001-2002 will be discussed. Useful theoretical results derived in the spatially-explicit context will also be reviewed (like e.g. the exact derivation of the speed of propagation for traveling fronts of epidemics on regular lattices endowed with uniform population density). Network effects will be discussed. The analysis of the limit case of uniformly distributed population density proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. To that extent, it is shown that the ratio between spreading and disease outbreak timescales proves the crucial parameter. The relevance of our results lies in the major differences potentially arising between the predictions of spatially explicit models and traditional compartmental models of the SIR-like type. Our results suggest that in many cases of real-life epidemiological interest timescales of disease dynamics may trigger outbreaks that significantly depart from the predictions of compartmental models. Finally, a view on further developments includes: hydrologically improved aquatic reservoir models for pathogens; human mobility patterns affecting disease propagation; double-peak emergence and seasonality in the spatially explicit epidemic context.

  11. International dissemination of epidemic Vibrio cholerae by cargo ship ballast and other nonpotable waters.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, S A; Khambaty, F M

    1994-01-01

    In 1991 and 1992, toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Inaba, biotype El Tor, was recovered from nonpotable (ballast, bilge, and sewage) water from five cargo ships docked in ports of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Four of these ships had taken on ballast water in cholera-infected countries; the fifth took on ballast in a noninfected country. Isolates examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were indistinguishable from the Latin American epidemic strain, C6707; however, they differed significantly from the endemic Gulf Coast strain (VRL 1984), the sixth-pandemic strain (569-B), and a V. cholerae non-O1 strain isolated from a ship arriving from a foreign port. On the basis of our findings, the Food and Drug Administration recommended that the U.S. Coast Guard issue an advisory to shipping agents and captains requesting that ballast waters be exchanged on the high seas before entry of ships into U.S. ports. Images PMID:8074532

  12. An investigation of a cholera epidemic in Butiama village of the Mara Region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Killewo, J Z; Amsi, D M; Mhalu, F S

    1989-01-01

    An outbreak of cholera between 19 March and 10 April 1986 in Butiama village of the Mara Region, Tanzania, was investigated in a case-control study, to try to find out the source of infection and its mode of transmission. Sixty-seven patients, including 11 deaths occurring before 29 March, were used to describe the epidemic, but 26 of the first patients were interviewed using a questionnaire, and each was compared with age and sex-matched healthy next-door neighbours. They were questioned about likely risk factors. Though the first two patients were recorded from 2 of the 4 zones of the village, from the second day onwards they came concurrently from all the 4 zones. Also, the number of patients from each zone did not vary significantly. The number of patients reached its peak on 22 March. Females were five times more infected than males, but the case fatality rate was similar. Vibrio cholerae was not isolated from water and fish-scale samples, but a history of handling and eating fish, and attendance at social gatherings were significantly associated with the transmission of cholera. The origin of the outbreak appeared to be either multifocal or a common source with concurrent multiple exists.

  13. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholera occurs in places with a lack of water treatment or sewage treatment, or crowding, war, and famine. Common locations for cholera include: Africa Some parts of Asia India Bangladesh Mexico South and Central America

  14. Cholera.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a comma-shaped, gram-negative rod that produces an enterotoxin, which causes an acute-onset diarrheal disease ranging in severity from mild to life threatening. Worldwide, there are an estimated 3?5 million cases per year, with more than 100,000 deaths. The disease remains a significant cause of death and illness in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia (especially Bangladesh and India), and Haiti, and the infection should be recognized by the Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical provider. 2014.

  15. Clonal Relationship among Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Strains Causing the Largest Cholera Epidemic in Kenya in the Late 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Scrascia, M.; Maimone, F.; Mohamud, K. A.; Materu, S. F.; Grimont, F.; Grimont, P. A. D.; Pazzani, C.

    2006-01-01

    Eighty Vibrio cholerae O1 strains selected to represent the 1998-to-1999 history of the largest cholera epidemic in Kenya were characterized by ribotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility, and random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. Except for 19 strains from 4 local outbreaks in North Eastern Province along the Somalia border, the other 61 strains from 25 outbreaks occurring in districts scattered around the country were all ribotype B27 and resistant to chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. The 61 strains showed similar and specific amplified DNA patterns. These findings indicate that the predominant strains that caused the Kenyan epidemic had a clonal origin and suggest that ribotype B27 strains, which first appeared in West Africa in 1994, have had a rapid spread to eastern Africa. PMID:16954285

  16. Evidence for a clonally different origin of the two cholera epidemics of 2001-2002 and 1980-1987 in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Keddy, Karen H; Nadan, Sandrama; Govind, Chetna; Sturm, A Willem

    2007-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa and serotype Inaba isolates from the cholera epidemic that occurred in 2001 and 2002 in South Africa were compared with isolates of V. cholerae O1 serotype Inaba from the epidemic that occurred between 1980 and 1987. PFGE using NotI digestion was used to compare stored isolates received during the 1980s epidemic with those received during the epidemic in 2001/2002. A selected number of these isolates were then sequenced to compare the sequence of the wbeT gene in the V. cholerae O1 Ogawa strains of 2001/2002 with that in the V. cholerae O1 Inaba strains of the 1980s and 2001/2002. Isolates from the recent epidemic were shown to be related, irrespective of serotype, and had comparable banding patterns on PFGE, using NotI. They were distinctly different from those from the previous epidemic. Sequencing of the wbeT gene showed that the gene was highly conserved between the two epidemics. A single deletional mutation of an adenine residue was observed in the V. cholerae serotype Inaba isolates from the 2001/2002 epidemic, resulting in the serotype switch between the V. cholerae O1 strains from the recent epidemic. The distinct differences in PFGE patterns among isolates from the first and second epidemics exclude the possibility that the Inaba strain from the 1980s became dormant in the environment and mutated to serotype Ogawa, causing the 2001/2002 epidemic, despite the apparent consistency in the site of mutation in the Inaba serotypes between the two epidemics.

  17. Haiti's progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured.

    PubMed

    Koski-Karell, Victoria; Farmer, Paul E; Isaac, Benito; Campa, Elizabeth M; Viaud, Loune; Namphy, Paul C; Ternier, Ralph; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge), policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation's 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government's capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of the three government-sponsored water treatment stations in the research area is still functional and utilized by those who can afford it. Latrines are scarce and often shared by up to 30 people; open defecation remains common. Structural vulnerabilities cut across all sectors - not just water, sanitation, health care, and education, but agriculture, environment, (global and local) commerce, transportation, and governance as well. These are among the hidden sicknesses that impede Haiti and its partners' capacity to eliminate cholera.

  18. [Epidemics in the news in Portugal: cholera, plague, typhus, influenza and smallpox, 1854-1918].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maria Antónia Pires

    2014-01-01

    In severe health crisis like those of 1854-1856, 1899 and 1918, especially in Porto, where cholera morbus, the bubonic plague, typhus fever, pneumonic influenza and smallpox killed high percentages of the population, the images of the epidemics in the press enable us to identify the scientific knowledge in a country considered peripheral, but which had studies and personnel specialized at the most advanced levels for the time. A database of 6,700 news items and announcements reveals the medical and pharmaceutical knowledge of the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the way it was transmitted and disclosed to the public and the solutions offered by the health authorities. Hygiene was consistently highlighted in the news and announcements.

  19. [A giant field of death: medical and scientific controversies about the cholera morbus epidemic of 1855].

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciana Dos

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the cholera morbus epidemic that afflicted the province of Pernambuco, Brazil, in 1855, focusing on the medical and scientific controversies about how the disease spread, which split medical opinion into two camps: contagion and infection. Documents and reports produced by the Society of Medicine of Pernambuco and the General Public Health Board were analyzed, based on which it was possible to describe the official medical and sanitation program, involving engineers, scientists, and physicians, designed to plan a salubrious city - a model of civilization that combined redeveloping the urban space and disseminating new habits amongst the local people. It is essentially an exercise in observing a science and a society as they take shape.

  20. Historical Parallels, Ebola Virus Disease and Cholera: Understanding Community Distrust and Social Violence with Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Samuel; Kutalek, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    In the three West African countries most affected by the recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, resistance to public health measures contributed to the startling speed and persistence of this epidemic in the region. But how do we explain this resistance, and how have people in these communities understood their actions? By comparing these recent events to historical precedents during Cholera outbreaks in Europe in the 19th century we show that these events have not been new to history or unique to Africa. Community resistance must be analysed in context and go beyond simple single-variable determinants. Knowledge and respect of the cultures and beliefs of the afflicted is essential for dealing with threatening disease outbreaks and their potential social violence. PMID:26865987

  1. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects against cholera in children under 6 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R; Meegan, M; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K; Barnes, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—We have previously reported a reduction in risk of diarrhoeal disease in children who used solar disinfected drinking water. A cholera epidemic, occurring in an area of Kenya in which a controlled trial of solar disinfection and diarrhoeal disease in children aged under 6 had recently finished, offered an opportunity to examine the protection offered by solar disinfection against cholera.
METHODS—In the original trial, all children aged under 6 in a Maasai community were randomised by household: in the solar disinfection arm, children drank water disinfected by leaving it on the roof in a clear plastic bottle, while controls drank water kept indoors. We revisited all households which had participated in the original trial.
RESULTS—There were 131 households in the trial area, of which 67 had been randomised to solar disinfection (a further 19 households had migrated as a result of severe drought). There was no significant difference in the risk of cholera in adults or in older children in households randomised to solar disinfection; however, there were only three cases of cholera in the 155 children aged under 6 years drinking solar disinfected water compared with 20 of 144controls.
CONCLUSIONS—Results confirm the usefulness of solar disinfection in reducing risk of water borne disease in children. Point of consumption solar disinfection can be done with minimal resources, which are readily available, and may be an important first line response to cholera outbreaks. Its potential in chorine resistant cholera merits further investigation.

 PMID:11567937

  2. [Mass antibiotic prophylaxis against cholera in the New Bell central prison in Douala during the 2004 epidemic].

    PubMed

    Guévart, Edouard; Solle, J; Noeske, J; Amougou, G; Mouangue, A; Fouda, A Bita

    2005-01-01

    In early January 2004, cases of severe watery diarrhea were reported in Douala, the economic capital of Cameroon (estimated population: 2.4 million inhabitants). Three stool samples examined at the Cameroon National Reference Laboratory grew Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, later identified by the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France, as serotype Inaba. On 19 January, the provincial health authorities declared an outbreak of cholera. The epidemic lasted until that September. In all, 5,020 cholera cases were reported, and 69 deaths from cholera among hospital patients. The overall attack rate for Douala was 209 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, with a case-fatality ratio of 1.37%. New Bell Central Prison, the sole penitentiary facility for Douala, is situated in the center of the town, near the biggest market. It was originally built in 1930 for 700 prisoners but now houses an average of roughly 3,100 inmates. Living and sanitary conditions in the prison are deplorable. Half of the cells house more than 150 inmates with a surface area of less than 0.20 m2 per inmate. Approximately 400 people--visitors, new admissions, and discharged prisoners--enter and leave the prison. In February 2004, five suspected cases of cholera were reported in the prison's hospital ward. Immediate measures were taken to prevent an explosive spread of cholera within the prison: a) suspected cases were treated with rehydration therapy, antibiotics, and isolation; and b) preventive antibiotic treatment, consisting of a single 300-mg dose of doxycycline, was administered to all 3,036 prisoners and 164 prison staff members. No significant side effects were observed. Despite a reinforced surveillance system, no new cholera cases were reported except two suspected cases in June 2004 (four months later), and their diagnoses could not be confirmed. A cholera epidemic in an urban area mandates rigorous epidemiological surveillance system and provisions for safety stocks of therapeutic and prophylactic drugs

  3. [Treatment of cholera in the adult. Studies during recent epidemics in Apulia].

    PubMed

    Pastore, G

    1975-01-01

    A rapid and adequate intravenous infusions of saline and alkali in correcting hypovolemic shock, alectrolyte abnormalities, acidosis and renal failure, is the choice treatment in the majority of acute cholera patients. On the basis of the knowledge of chemical composition of the gastrointestinal fluids loss and the definition of exact mechanism of metabolic features observed in acute cholera patients, it has been possible, in the last ten years, to develop and utilize in a large numbers of patients, a more exact and adequate treatment consisting of replacement of water and electrolytes depletion with saline and alkali of the same ionic composition of fluids lost through the gastrointestinal tract. The isotonic saline and isotonic sodium lactare regimen in a 2:1 ratio has been employed in the treatment of our adult acute cholera patients. Hypotensive patients received a rapid fluids infusion of 2-4 liters within the first 4-6 hours immediately after admission. Later on the quantity of intravenous fluids replacement was regulated on the basis of blood electrolytes pattern, blood pressure, diuresis and patient's hydratation. With this regimen of treatment we observed electrolytes and acid-basic abnormalities in only 25% of our patients. The peritoneal dialysis was applied in three of these patients with irreversible renal failure. Antibiotic therapy, that assume a secondary role in the treatment of cholera patients, was carried out in each case: in 19 cases were given 1 gram every 12 hours i.m. of chloramphenicol succinate; 14 cases received mg 500 of tetracycline orally every six hours; 34 cases received two tablets of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole every 12 hours (mg 240 of TM and g 1,6 of SMZ total dose). Except one case of TM-SMZ group who had stool culture positive for Vibrio on 4th day of therapy, in each other patients the stool cultures were sterilized in a period of 24-72 hours of antibiotic treatment.

  4. [Defense, attack, and street fighting. The role of medicine and military illustrated the example of the cholera epidemics in Prussia].

    PubMed

    Briese, O

    1997-01-01

    This article intends to illustrate the introduction of military rhetoric into medical discourse during the cholera epidemic of 1831/32 in Europe. Even before the era of bacteriology, illness and epidemics were considered to be the military enemies of mankind. Beginning with the rise of the military in early modern times, the language of medical discourses oriented itself on the influential military institutions. Sickness appeared as a warring aggressor. Since the time of the plague at the very latest, military connotations were commonplace in Europe, and this tendency became stronger during the conflicts of the 19th century. In this vein, during the inner crises of Germany at the end of this century, cholera was, at least in the descriptive rhetoric, understood as an inner, destructive, and anarchic enemy.

  5. Update on progress in selected public health programs after the 2010 earthquake and cholera epidemic--Haiti, 2014.

    PubMed

    Domercant, J Wysler; Guillaume, Florence D; Marston, Barbara J; Lowrance, David W

    2015-02-20

    On January 12, 2010, an earthquake devastated Haiti's infrastructure, killing an estimated 230,000 persons and displacing more than 1.5 million. Ten months later, Haiti experienced the beginning of the largest cholera epidemic ever reported in a single country. Immediately after the earthquake and at the start of the cholera epidemic, health priorities in Haiti included improvement of surveillance and laboratory capacity for addressing public health threats in the general population and targeted surveillance and provision of improved water and sanitation in camps for internally displaced persons. As part of a multi-sector, post-earthquake response in collaboration with the Government of Haiti and others, CDC focused on supporting the recovery, expansion, or establishment of several key health programs. This update reports progress in selected health programs, services, and systems in Haiti as of the end of 2014.

  6. Cholera.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Donatella; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Caini, Saverio

    2016-08-01

    Cholera is an acute disease of the gastrointestinal tract caused by Vibrio cholerae. Cholera was localized in Asia until 1817, when a first pandemic spread from India to several other regions of the world. After this appearance, six additional major pandemics occurred during the 19th and 20th centuries, the latest of which originated in Indonesia in the 1960s and is still ongoing. In 1854, a cholera outbreak in Soho, London, was investigated by the English physician John Snow (1813 to 1858). He described the time course of the outbreak, managed to understand its routes of transmission, and suggested effective measures to stop its spread, giving rise to modern infectious disease epidemiology. The germ responsible for cholera was discovered twice: first by the Italian physician Filippo Pacini during an outbreak in Florence, Italy, in 1854, and then independently by Robert Koch in India in 1883, thus favoring the germ theory over the miasma theory of disease. Unlike many other infectious diseases, such as plague, smallpox, and poliomyelitis, cholera persists as a huge public health problem worldwide, even though there are effective methods for its prevention and treatment. The main reasons for its persistence are socioeconomic rather than purely biological; cholera flourishes where there are unsatisfactory hygienic conditions and where a breakdown of already fragile sanitation and health infrastructure occurs because of natural disasters or humanitarian crises.

  7. Climate and cholera in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: the role of environmental factors and implications for epidemic preparedness.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Joshua; Dawson, Terry

    2008-03-01

    A cholera epidemic that took place in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (2000-2001) was employed to investigate the impact of climatic and environmental drivers on cholera dynamics. Precipitation (PRE), sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (CHL-a) data acquired from publicly available satellite and ground measurements were analysed together with disease incidence in an effort to assess the environmental contribution to the outbreak. SST (r(2)=0.749, lag=0 months) and PRE (r(2)=0.744, lag=2 months) showed strong associations with incidence. CHL-a showed a moderately strong (r(2)=0.656, lag=6 months) association with incidence while sea surface height (SSH) demonstrated a weak relationship with incidence (r(2)=0.326, lag=5 months). Our analysis tentatively supports a coastal transmission hypothesis, heavily influenced by localized PRE extremes. The role of SSH is likely attenuated by local coastal topography. Future work should clarify the mechanism linking coastal cholera reservoirs and the regional climate system to outbreaks in this region. Finally, we discuss benefits of further research in this area using extended remotely sensed and epidemiological datasets towards the development of early-warning systems and enhanced epidemic preparedness.

  8. Cholera ante portas – The re-emergence of cholera in Kinshasa after a ten-year hiatus

    PubMed Central

    Bompangue, Didier; Vesenbeckh, Silvan Manuel; Giraudoux, Patrick; Castro, Marcia; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Kebela Ilunga, Benoît; Murray, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cholera is an endemic disease in certain well-defined areas in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The west of the country, including the mega-city Kinshasa, has been free of cases since mid 2001 when the last outbreak ended. Methods and Findings: We used routinely collected passive surveillance data to construct epidemic curves of the cholera cases and map the spatio-temporal progress of the disease during the first 47 weeks of 2011. We compared the spatial distribution of disease spread to that which occurred in the last cholera epidemic in Kinshasa between 1996 and 2001. To better understand previous determinants of cholera spread in this region, we conducted a correlation analysis to assess the impact of rainfall on weekly health zone cholera case counts between December 1998 and March 2001 and a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) regression analysis to identify factors that have been associated with the most vulnerable health zones within Kinshasa between October 1998 and June 1999. In February 2011, cholera reemerged in a region surrounding Kisangani and gradually spread westwards following the course of the Congo River to Kinshasa, home to 10 million people. Ten sampled isolates were confirmed to be Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba, resistant to trimethoprim-sulfa, furazolidone, nalidixic acid, sulfisoxaole, and streptomycin, and intermediate resistant to Chloramphenicol. An analysis of a previous outbreak in Kinshasa shows that rainfall was correlated with case counts and that health zone population densities as well as fishing and trade activities were predictors of case counts. Conclusion: Cholera is particularly difficult to tackle in the DRC. Given the duration of the rainy season and increased riverine traffic from the eastern provinces in late 2011, we expect further increases in cholera in the coming months and especially within the mega-city Kinshasa. We urge all partners involved in the response to remain

  9. Cholera Epidemic Associated with Consumption of Unsafe Drinking Water and Street-Vended Water—Eastern Freetown, Sierra Leone, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Von D.; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Lam, Eugene; Ayers, Tracy; Kargbo, David; Dafae, Foday; Jambai, Amara; Alemu, Wondimagegnehu; Kamara, Abdul; Islam, M. Sirajul; Stroika, Steven; Bopp, Cheryl; Quick, Robert; Mintz, Eric D.; Brunkard, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    During 2012, Sierra Leone experienced a cholera epidemic with 22,815 reported cases and 296 deaths. We conducted a matched case-control study to assess risk factors, enrolling 49 cases and 98 controls. Stool specimens were analyzed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Conditional logistic regression found that consuming unsafe water (matched odds ratio [mOR]: 3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 11.0), street-vended water (mOR: 9.4; 95% CI: 2.0, 43.7), and crab (mOR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.03, 10.6) were significant risk factors for cholera infection. Of 30 stool specimens, 13 (43%) showed PCR evidence of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1. Six specimens yielded isolates of V. cholerae O1, El Tor; PFGE identified a pattern previously observed in seven countries. We recommended ensuring the quality of improved water sources, promoting household chlorination, and educating street vendors on water handling practices. PMID:24470563

  10. Cholera epidemic associated with consumption of unsafe drinking water and street-vended water--Eastern Freetown, Sierra Leone, 2012.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Von D; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Lam, Eugene; Ayers, Tracy; Kargbo, David; Dafae, Foday; Jambai, Amara; Alemu, Wondimagegnehu; Kamara, Abdul; Islam, M Sirajul; Stroika, Steven; Bopp, Cheryl; Quick, Robert; Mintz, Eric D; Brunkard, Joan M

    2014-03-01

    During 2012, Sierra Leone experienced a cholera epidemic with 22,815 reported cases and 296 deaths. We conducted a matched case-control study to assess risk factors, enrolling 49 cases and 98 controls. Stool specimens were analyzed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Conditional logistic regression found that consuming unsafe water (matched odds ratio [mOR]: 3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 11.0), street-vended water (mOR: 9.4; 95% CI: 2.0, 43.7), and crab (mOR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.03, 10.6) were significant risk factors for cholera infection. Of 30 stool specimens, 13 (43%) showed PCR evidence of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1. Six specimens yielded isolates of V. cholerae O1, El Tor; PFGE identified a pattern previously observed in seven countries. We recommended ensuring the quality of improved water sources, promoting household chlorination, and educating street vendors on water handling practices.

  11. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... in water or food contaminated by feces (poop). Cholera is rare in the US. You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation, and lack of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters. The disease is ...

  12. Implementation of an alert and response system in Haiti during the early stage of the response to the cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Gayer, Michelle; Magloire, Roc; Barrais, Robert; Valenciano, Marta; Aramburu, Carmen; Poncelet, Jean Luc; Gustavo Alonso, Juan Carlos; Van Alphen, Dana; Heuschen, Florence; Andraghetti, Roberta; Lee, Robert; Drury, Patrick; Aldighieri, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    The start of the cholera epidemic in Haiti quickly highlighted the necessity of the implementation of an Alert and Response (A&R) System to complement the existing national surveillance system. The national system had been able to detect and confirm the outbreak etiology but required external support to monitor the spread of cholera and coordinate response, because much of the information produced was insufficiently timely for real-time monitoring and directing of a rapid, targeted response. The A&R System was designed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization in collaboration with the Haiti Ministry of Health, and it was based on a network of partners, including any institution, structure, or individual that could identify, verify, and respond to alerts. The defined objectives were to (1) save lives through early detection and treatment of cases and (2) control the spread through early intervention at the community level. The operational structure could be broken down into three principle categories: (1) alert (early warning), (2) verification and assessment of the information, and (3) efficient and timely response in coordination with partners to avoid duplication. Information generated by the A&R System was analyzed and interpreted, and the qualitative information was critical in qualifying the epidemic and defining vulnerable areas, particularly because the national surveillance system reported incomplete data for more than one department. The A&R System detected a number of alerts unrelated to cholera and facilitated rapid access to that information. The sensitivity of the system and its ability to react quickly was shown in May of 2011, when an abnormal increase in alerts coming from several communes in the Sud-Est Department in epidemiological weeks (EWs) 17 and 18 were noted and disseminated network-wide and response activities were implemented. The national cholera surveillance system did not register the increase until EWs 21 and

  13. Implementation of an Alert and Response System in Haiti during the Early Stage of the Response to the Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Gayer, Michelle; Magloire, Roc; Barrais, Robert; Valenciano, Marta; Aramburu, Carmen; Poncelet, Jean Luc; Gustavo Alonso, Juan Carlos; Van Alphen, Dana; Heuschen, Florence; Andraghetti, Roberta; Lee, Robert; Drury, Patrick; Aldighieri, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The start of the cholera epidemic in Haiti quickly highlighted the necessity of the implementation of an Alert and Response (A&R) System to complement the existing national surveillance system. The national system had been able to detect and confirm the outbreak etiology but required external support to monitor the spread of cholera and coordinate response, because much of the information produced was insufficiently timely for real-time monitoring and directing of a rapid, targeted response. The A&R System was designed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization in collaboration with the Haiti Ministry of Health, and it was based on a network of partners, including any institution, structure, or individual that could identify, verify, and respond to alerts. The defined objectives were to (1) save lives through early detection and treatment of cases and (2) control the spread through early intervention at the community level. The operational structure could be broken down into three principle categories: (1) alert (early warning), (2) verification and assessment of the information, and (3) efficient and timely response in coordination with partners to avoid duplication. Information generated by the A&R System was analyzed and interpreted, and the qualitative information was critical in qualifying the epidemic and defining vulnerable areas, particularly because the national surveillance system reported incomplete data for more than one department. The A&R System detected a number of alerts unrelated to cholera and facilitated rapid access to that information. The sensitivity of the system and its ability to react quickly was shown in May of 2011, when an abnormal increase in alerts coming from several communes in the Sud-Est Department in epidemiological weeks (EWs) 17 and 18 were noted and disseminated network-wide and response activities were implemented. The national cholera surveillance system did not register the increase until EWs 21 and

  14. The cholera epidemic as condenser of meanings: urban cultures, clinical narratives, and hygiene policies in Rosario, Argentina, 1886-1887.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Cecilia M

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how the 1886-1887 cholera epidemic in Rosario, Argentina led to discrimination among city spaces associated with foci, the production of certain socio-moral images about the sectors most affected, and the development of emergency clinical practices. Based on analysis of the signifiers used to define areas of segregation, I seek to show how working-class living conditions were one of the most pressing problems of urban expansion, to identify tensions between the application of hygiene measures and the evacuation or eviction of working-class sectors and to examine the role of displacement in the definition of suburban spaces.

  15. Rainfall-driven epidemic cholera: hydrologic controls on water-borne disease and multi-season projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetto, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Following the acknowledgement of a clear correlation between rainfall events and cholera resurgence, that was observed in Haiti starting from May 2011, we use a multi-variate Poisson generator to produce rainfall inputs, with which we force spatially explicit models of cholera spreading. Our models consist of ODE systems of equations, describing a network of human communities (divided in Susceptible, Infected and Recovered individuals) connected by river transport of pathogens and human mobility. We perform an a posteriori analysis -- from the beginning of the epidemic until December 2011 -- to assess the model reliability in predicting cholera cases and in testing control measures -- involving vaccination and sanitation campaigns. We then run a multi-seasonal prediction of the course of the epidemic until December 2015, to investigate further resurgences of cholera in the region and to evaluate, again, the effect of policies which may bring to the eradication of the disease in Haiti. We conclude that mathematical models may represent a key information tool for policy makers, as a way to preliminarly assess the possible future course of an epidemic and to test intervention policies to be deployed. Effect of intervention policies on the predicted course of the epidemic between 28/05-31/12/2011 (blue lines: simulations with the observed rainfall pattern; red lines/shaded range: median/25th-75th percentile range of simulations with generated rainfall). A) Effect of a reduction of the 20% of the contact rate , applied in one month starting from the 1st of June (dashed blue/red lines) or the 1st of July (dotted blue/red lines). B) A) Effect of a vaccination of 4 million individuals, implemented in one month starting from the 1st of June (dashed blue/red lines) or the 1st of July (dotted blue/red lines). C) Number of new cases in the period 28/05-31/12/2011 as a function of the reduction of the contact rate . D) Number of new cases in the period 28/05-31/12/2011 as a

  16. Cholera Transmission in Ouest Department of Haiti: Dynamic Modeling and the Future of the Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kirpich, Alexander; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Yang, Yang; Ali, Afsar; Morris, J Glenn; Longini, Ira M

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, a comprehensive, data driven, mathematical model for cholera transmission in Haiti is presented. Along with the inclusion of short cycle human-to-human transmission and long cycle human-to-environment and environment-to-human transmission, this novel dynamic model incorporates both the reported cholera incidence and remote sensing data from the Ouest Department of Haiti between 2010 to 2014. The model has separate compartments for infectious individuals that include different levels of infectivity to reflect the distribution of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases in the population. The environmental compartment, which serves as a source of exposure to toxigenic V. cholerae, is also modeled separately based on the biology of causative bacterium, the shedding of V. cholerae O1 by humans into the environment, as well as the effects of precipitation and water temperature on the concentration and survival of V. cholerae in aquatic reservoirs. Although the number of reported cholera cases has declined compared to the initial outbreak in 2010, the increase in the number of susceptible population members and the presence of toxigenic V. cholerae in the environment estimated by the model indicate that without further improvements to drinking water and sanitation infrastructures, intermittent cholera outbreaks are likely to continue in Haiti.

  17. Cholera Transmission in Ouest Department of Haiti: Dynamic Modeling and the Future of the Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Kirpich, Alexander; Weppelmann, Thomas A.; Yang, Yang; Ali, Afsar; Morris, J. Glenn; Longini, Ira M.

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, a comprehensive, data driven, mathematical model for cholera transmission in Haiti is presented. Along with the inclusion of short cycle human-to-human transmission and long cycle human-to-environment and environment-to-human transmission, this novel dynamic model incorporates both the reported cholera incidence and remote sensing data from the Ouest Department of Haiti between 2010 to 2014. The model has separate compartments for infectious individuals that include different levels of infectivity to reflect the distribution of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases in the population. The environmental compartment, which serves as a source of exposure to toxigenic V. cholerae, is also modeled separately based on the biology of causative bacterium, the shedding of V. cholerae O1 by humans into the environment, as well as the effects of precipitation and water temperature on the concentration and survival of V. cholerae in aquatic reservoirs. Although the number of reported cholera cases has declined compared to the initial outbreak in 2010, the increase in the number of susceptible population members and the presence of toxigenic V. cholerae in the environment estimated by the model indicate that without further improvements to drinking water and sanitation infrastructures, intermittent cholera outbreaks are likely to continue in Haiti. PMID:26488620

  18. [Antibiotic sensitivity to epidemic strains of Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated in Rwandan refugee camps in Zaire].

    PubMed

    Cavallo, J D; Niel, L; Talarmin, A; Dubrous, P

    1995-01-01

    Multiresistance or epidemic enteric bacteria to antibiotics greatly complicates treatment, and in some cases prophylaxis, of severe invasive gastroenteritis. During the summer of 1994, two epidemics of diarrhea, one due to Vibrio cholerae and the other to Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated from the Goma and Bukavu camps was determined by measurement of the Agar Minimal Inhibitory Concentration. Multiresistance to tetracyclins, aminopenicillins, trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole, and nifuroxazide was observed. After intensive treatment mutant forms of both bacteria resistant to nalidixic acid rapidly appeared. Only fluoroquinolones remained active on these mutant strains, but the availability of this agent in Africa is restricted due to cost. The most effective way of preventing resistance is to limit the spread of enteric infections by health education and improvement of hygiene. This can be difficult during wartime.

  19. The controversial experiments on the intravenous administration of drugs (and air!) during the cholera epidemic of 1867 in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Cholera ravaged many American and European cities in the nineteenth century. Likewise, Italy was struck by six epidemics since the morbus first appeared in 1835-1837. After the International Sanitary Conferences held in Paris in 1851, there was a decrease of the cases due to consolidation of the city in terms of public and private health. Nevertheless, due to the lack of alternative and innovative remedies, the mortality remained unchanged, affecting more than 60 percent of patients. The city of Brescia in Northern Italy was severely hit by the epidemic of 1867. Not being able to implement effective therapeutic strategies, the administration of drugs like quinine and strychnine was proposed to be done intravenously. The results of intravenous injections were ominous, and all the patients died of "‘sudden death"’. Although the academic authorities forbade further experiments, some physicians carried on a long trial using test animals and mental patients as ‘"guinea pigs"’.

  20. Haiti’s progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured

    PubMed Central

    Koski-Karell, Victoria; Farmer, Paul E; Isaac, Benito; Campa, Elizabeth M; Viaud, Loune; Namphy, Paul C; Ternier, Ralph; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge), policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation’s 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government’s capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of the three government-sponsored water treatment stations in the research area is still functional and utilized by those who can afford it. Latrines are scarce and often shared by up to 30 people; open defecation remains common. Structural vulnerabilities cut across all sectors – not just water, sanitation, health care, and education, but agriculture, environment, (global and local) commerce, transportation, and governance as well. These are among the hidden sicknesses that impede Haiti and its partners’ capacity to eliminate cholera. PMID:27307774

  1. Epidemic cholera in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya, 2009: the importance of sanitation and soap.

    PubMed

    Mahamud, Abdirahman Sheikh; Ahmed, Jamal A; Nyoka, Raymond; Auko, Erick; Kahi, Vincet; Ndirangu, James; Nguhi, Margaret; Burton, John Wagacha; Muhindo, Bosco Z; Breiman, Robert F; Eidex, Rachel B

    2012-03-12

    Cholera remains a major public health problem that causes substantial morbidity and mortality in displaced populations due to inadequate or unprotected water supplies, poor sanitation and hygiene, overcrowding, and limited resources. A cholera outbreak with 224 cases and four deaths occurred in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya from September to December 2009. We conducted a case-control study to characterize the epidemiology of the outbreak. Cases were identified by reviewing the hospital registry for patients meeting the World Health Organization (WHO) case definition for cholera. For each case a matched control was selected. A questionnaire focusing on potential risk factors was administered to cases and controls. From 18 September to 15 December 2009, a total of 224 cases were identified and were hospitalised at Kakuma IRC hospital.  Three refugees and one Kenyan national died of cholera. V. cholerae O1, serotype Inaba was isolated in 44 (42%) out of 104 stool specimens collected. A total of 93 cases and 93 matched controls were enrolled in the study. In a multivariate model, washing hands with soap was protective against cholera (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.25[0.09-0.71]; p < 0.01), while presence of dirty water storage containers was a risk factor (AOR=4.39[1.12-17.14]; p=0.03). Provision of soap, along with education on hand hygiene and cleaning water storage containers, may be an affordable intervention to prevent cholera.

  2. Cholera outbreaks in India.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Sharma, Naresh C

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is a global health problem as several thousands of cases and deaths occur each year. The unique epidemiologic attribute of the disease is its propensity to occur as outbreaks that may flare-up into epidemics, if not controlled. The causative bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae prevails in the environment and infects humans whenever there is a breakdown in the public health component. The Indian subcontinent is vulnerable to this disease due its vast coastlines with areas of poor sanitation, unsafe drinking water, and overcrowding. Recently, it was shown that climatic conditions also play a major role in the persistence and spread of cholera. Constant change in the biotypes and serotypes of V. cholerae are also important aspects that changes virulence and survival of the pathogen. Such continuous changes increase the infection ability of the pathogen affecting the susceptible population including the children. The short-term carrier status of V. cholerae has been studied well at community level and this facet significantly contributes to the recurrence of cholera. Several molecular tools recognized altering clonality of V. cholerae in relation with the advent of a serogroup or serotype. Rapid identification systems were formulated for the timely detection of the pathogen so as to identify and control the outbreak and institute proper treatment of the patients. The antimicrobials used in the past are no longer useful in the treatment of cholera as V. cholerae has acquired several mechanisms for multiple antimicrobial resistance. This upsurge in antimicrobial resistance directly influences the management of the disease. This chapter provides an overview of cholera prevalence in India, possible sources of infection, and molecular epidemiology along with antimicrobial resistance of V. cholerae.

  3. God's punishment or bad strategy: anti-epidemic measures in the lower Neretva basin at the time of cholera in 1886.

    PubMed

    Wokaunn, Mario; Fatović-Ferencić, Stella; Jurić, Ivan; Bekić, Marijo

    2012-09-01

    The epidemic of cholera that took place in the Neretva basin in 1886 was part of the fifth pandemic wave that was spreading throughout Europe. Based on the death records, vital statistics and the newspaper articles from that period, in this paper we present the emergence and the course this epidemic. In the context of analysis and experience of the epidemic of cholera in the lower Neretva basin, the newspaper articles have been recognized as a sensitive register of the changes of behavioural patterns, the way of speaking, the mechanisms of reacting and adjusting to the spreading epidemic, but also the resistance to it. It is based on this material that we can make conclusions about the relationship between the individual and the collective in the time of danger, as well as about the particularities of historical events that have been left out in other sources. Two potential paths for cholera to enter the area of the lower Neretva basin have been identified: one from the sea and the other from land, via the neighbouring country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Quarantine measures had been taken in order to prevent the onslaught of the epidemic, a sanitary cordon was organized, disinfection of the land was carried out and a cholera hospital organized in Metković. However, despite the undertaken measures, an inefficiency of the government organs was obvious, because their actions mainly applied to formal fulfilment of anti-epidemic measures and they quite easily handed over individual initiatives to physicians. The analysis of strategies concerning the application of anti-epidemic measures in the past can be useful for learning more about the multilayered nature of social mechanisms in the time of epidemics, which makes it convincing and valuable even in the present day.

  4. Using a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey to supplement findings of an outbreak investigation: cholera prevention measures during the 1991 epidemic in Peru.

    PubMed

    Quick, R E; Gerber, M L; Palacios, A M; Beingolea, L; Vargas, R; Mujica, O; Moreno, D; Seminario, L; Smithwick, E B; Tauxe, R V

    1996-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the cholera prevention activities of the Peruvian Ministry of Health, we conducted a knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) survey in urban and rural Amazon communities during the cholera epidemic in 1991. We surveyed heads of 67 urban and 61 rural households to determine diarrhoea rates, sources of cholera prevention information, and knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding ten cholera prevention measures. Twenty-five per cent of 482 urban and 11% of 454 rural household members had diarrhoea during the first 3-4 months of the epidemic. Exposure to mass media education was greater in urban areas, and education through interpersonal communication was more prevalent in rural villages. Ninety-three per cent of rural and 67% of urban respondents believed they could prevent cholera. The mean numbers of correct responses to ten knowledge questions were 7.8 for urban and 8.2 for rural respondents. Practices lagged behind knowledge and attitudes (mean correct response to ten possible: urban 4.9, rural 4.6). Seventy-five per cent of respondents drank untreated water and 91% ate unwashed produce, both of which were identified as cholera risk factors in a concurrently conducted case-control study. The cholera prevention campaign successfully educated respondents, but did not cause many to adopt preventive behaviours. Direct interpersonal education by community-based personnel may enhance the likelihood of translating education into changes in health behaviours. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices surveys conducted with case-control studies during an epidemic can be an effective method of refining education/control programmes.

  5. Notes from the Field: Chlorination Strategies for Drinking Water During a Cholera Epidemic - Tanzania, 2016.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alice; Hardy, Colleen; Rajasingham, Anangu; Martinsen, Andrea; Templin, Lindsay; Kamwaga, Stanislaus; Sebunya, Kiwe; Jhuthi, Brenda; Habtu, Michael; Kiberiti, Stephen; Massa, Khalid; Quick, Rob; Mulungu, Jane; Eidex, Rachel; Handzel, Thomas

    2016-10-21

    Since August 2015, the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MoHCDGEC) of Tanzania has been leading the response to a widespread cholera outbreak. As of June 9, 2016, cholera had affected 23 of 25 regions in Tanzania, with 21,750 cumulative cases and 341 deaths reported (Ally Nyanga, MoHCDGEC Emergency Operations Center, personal communication, June 2016). Approximately one fourth of all cases occurred in the Dar es Salaam region on the east coast. Regions surrounding Lake Victoria, in the north, also reported high case counts, including Mwanza with 9% (Ally Nyanga, MoHCDGEC Emergency Operations Center, personal communication, June 2016). Since the start of the outbreak, MoHCDGEC and the Ministry of Water (MOW) have collaborated with the Tanzania Red Cross Society, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organization (WHO), and CDC to enhance the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) response to prevent the further spread of cholera.

  6. Role of oral rehydration therapy in controlling epidemic of cholera and watery diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kamalesh

    2003-06-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is basically oral administration of liquid containing various electrolytes in specific proportions to prevent and treat dehydration. This treatment facilitates safe and optimal absorption of water and essential electrolytes such as sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride in dehydrated patients. Successful ORT was experienced in cholera patients in Kolkata and Dhaka which was followed by the development of oral rehydration salt (ORS). This procedure can be safely implemented at home. ORT reduced mortality rate both in cholera and non-cholera watery diarrhoea. The various health authorities must support preparedness before pre-positioning of adequate stocks of ORS packets for emergency situations. Health workers should have been the knowledge to prepare ORS solutions.

  7. "A wild and wondrous ride": CDC field epidemiologists in the east Pakistan smallpox and cholera epidemics of 1958.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Paul

    2011-02-01

    In mid-April of 1958 the Government of Pakistan summoned the press to announce a grave need for international aid to cope with smallpox and cholera epidemics in East Pakistan. In response, and with the backing of the US State Department, Dr. Alexander D. Langmuir, chief epidemiologist of the CDC, led a team of epidemiologists to assist authorities in Dacca strengthen their immunization programs. Langmuir's superiors hoped for a Cold War advantage, but he saw an opportunity for trainees in the Epidemic Intelligence Service to learn about public health in a developing country. Langmuir later described the episode as a "wild and wondrous ride," but it had been more like a nightmare: the East Pakistan health department had collapsed; a popular movement had taken over vaccination and squandered vaccine supplies; hostile journalists had questioned the Americans' deeper motives; and a professional rivalry opened between the Americans and a British epidemiologist named Aidan Cockburn. By the time the epidemic subsided in July 1958, 30 million Bengalis had been vaccinated for smallpox but another 20,000 had succumbed to the disease. This episode was CDC's first sustained foreign intervention, a precursor to its extensive role in the 1970s helping WHO eradicate smallpox from Bangladesh.

  8. Class 1 Integron-Borne, Multiple-Antibiotic Resistance Encoded by a 150-Kilobase Conjugative Plasmid in Epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains Isolated in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, Anders; Forslund, Anita; Petersen, Andreas; Brown, Derek J.; Dias, Francisco; Monteiro, Serifo; Mølbak, Kåre; Aaby, Peter; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Sandström, Anita

    2000-01-01

    In the 1996–1997 cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau, surveillance for antimicrobial resistance showed the emergence of a multidrug-resistant strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the course of the epidemic. The strain was resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, furazolidone, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole. Concomitant with the emergence of this strain, we observed a resurgence in the number of registered cholera cases as well as an increase in the case fatality rate from 1.0% before the emergence of the multiple-drug-resistant strain to 5.3% after the emergence of the strain. Our study shows that the strain contained a 150-kb conjugative multiple-antibiotic resistance plasmid with class 1 integron-borne gene cassettes encoding resistance to trimethoprim (dhfrXII) and aminoglycosides [ant(3")-1a]). The finding of transferable resistance to almost all of the antibiotics commonly used to treat cholera is of great public health concern. Studies should be carried out to determine to what extent the strain or its resistance genes have been spread to other areas where cholera is endemic. PMID:11015401

  9. [Contribution to fight against cholera in an instance of epidemic in Osieciny, Eastern Kujawy in 1852].

    PubMed

    Rejmanowski, T

    2001-01-01

    Description of activities of Lieutenant-Colonel Tomasz Zieliński who was not a physician, but being an officer of the Russian army during the Turkish campaign in 1831, had acquainted himself with methods of fighting against cholera and he used them with quite a good result in Osieciny in 1852.

  10. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Cholera Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karen K; Burdette, Erin; Mahon, Barbara E; Mintz, Eric D; Ryan, Edward T; Reingold, Arthur L

    2017-05-12

    Cholera, caused by infection with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae bacteria of serogroup O1 (>99% of global cases) or O139, is characterized by watery diarrhea that can be severe and rapidly fatal without prompt rehydration. Cholera is endemic in approximately 60 countries and causes epidemics as well. Globally, cholera results in an estimated 2.9 million cases of disease and 95,000 deaths annually (1). Cholera is rare in the United States, and most U.S. cases occur among travelers to countries where cholera is endemic or epidemic. Forty-two U.S. cases were reported in 2011 after a cholera epidemic began in Haiti (2); however, <25 cases per year have been reported in the United States since 2012.

  11. [The cholera epidemics and the development of public health in Meiji Japan. 2. Strength and weakness of public health politics].

    PubMed

    Chemouilli, Philippe

    2004-02-01

    We present here the beginnings of public health politics in Meiji Japan (1868-1912). Due to a two century isolation of Japan, public health concepts developed in the West from the end of the 18th century were foreign in premodern Japan. Due to its isolation, Japan was also relatively preserved from some acute infectious diseases such as cholera. In this paper, we investigate the role of cholera epidemics in the emergence of public health concepts in the peculiar context of Meiji Japan. We show that chronic diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy were neglected for a long time and that the Meiji government set priority on acute infectious diseases that were considered as long as they disturbed public order. Nevertheless, some physicians and government officials considered issues of welfare and poverty. We also review some emerging concepts of social medicine. We try to show that in Japan as well as in western nations public health politics were not exempt of contradictions and paradoxes and a permanent tension existed between coercitive policies and conceptions of welfare and rights to health.

  12. Lessons from cholera & Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Asoke C

    2011-02-01

    Cholera is an acute form of diarrhoeal disease that plagued human civilization over the centuries. The sudden and explosive onset of the disease in the form of an outbreak or epidemic, coupled with high mortality and morbidity rates, had a tragic impact on the personal as well as social life of people living in the affected areas. The enormity of human sufferings led clinicians and scientists to carry out extensive research on cholera and Vibrio cholerae (the causative bacterium of the disease) leading to major discoveries that opened up novel areas of research or new disciplines in biomedical sciences. An attempt is made here to summarize some of these breakthroughs and outline their significance in broader perspectives. Finally, the possible impact of the global socio-political scenario on the spread of cholera epidemics (pandemicity of cholera) is briefly discussed.

  13. Lessons from cholera & Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Asoke C.

    2011-01-01

    Cholera is an acute form of diarrhoeal disease that plagued human civilization over the centuries. The sudden and explosive onset of the disease in the form of an outbreak or epidemic, coupled with high mortality and morbidity rates, had a tragic impact on the personal as well as social life of people living in the affected areas. The enormity of human sufferings led clinicians and scientists to carry out extensive research on cholera and Vibrio cholerae (the causative bacterium of the disease) leading to major discoveries that opened up novel areas of research or new disciplines in biomedical sciences. An attempt is made here to summarize some of these breakthroughs and outline their significance in broader perspectives. Finally, the possible impact of the global socio-political scenario on the spread of cholera epidemics (pandemicity of cholera) is briefly discussed. PMID:21415490

  14. In a time of cholera.

    PubMed

    Grace, P A

    2014-03-01

    Dr. Nathaniel Alcock in his book A treatise on cholera described 22 cases of cholera that he treated in 1832. Blood-letting, either by leeches or venesection, was an essential part of the treatment. The belief was that reducing the blood volume would relieve stress on the heart and lungs allowing for better function. The receipts of the Townsend Street Cholera Hospital where Dr. Alcock worked show how extensive the practice was. Outside Dublin, local Boards of Health dealt with the cholera epidemic. Various public measures such as street cleaning and removal of patients to temporary hospitals were undertaken and various cures were tried. The overall mortality rate from cholera in Ireland during the epidemic was 38 %, but in some areas much higher. Even as cholera was spreading in the 1830s, a number of doctors were showing that intravenous fluids could dramatically alter the course of the disease. Unfortunately, their work was ignored and blood-letting continued to be a major component of the treatment of cholera for another 55 years.

  15. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Strains Isolated from the Cholera Epidemic in Zimbabwe▿

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Mahmud, Zahid H.; Ansaruzzaman, Mohammad; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Shafiqul; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Mazumder, Ramendra N.; Khan, Azharul I.; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Iqbal, Anwarul; Chitsatso, Owen; Mudzori, James; Patel, Sheetal; Midzi, Stanley M.; Charimari, Lincoln; Endtz, Hubert P.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This paper details the phenotypic, genotypic, and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of 88 Vibrio cholerae strains from Zimbabwe. Of the 88 strains, 83 were classified as “altered El Tor” and 5 as “hybrid El Tor” strains. All of the strains were susceptible to tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin by disc diffusion, but susceptibility to tetracycline and azithromycin diminished when observed using the MIC method. PMID:21471347

  16. A cholera epidemic in Sekong Province, Lao People's Democratic Republic, December 2007-January 2008.

    PubMed

    Lenglet, Annick; Khamphaphongphane, Bouaphanh; Thebvongsa, Phetsamay; Vongprachanh, Phengta; Sithivong, Noikaseumsy; Chantavisouk, Chitsavang; Tsuyuoka, Reiko

    2010-05-01

    Recent large-scale outbreaks in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) were reported in 1993 and 1994 and from 2000 to 2002. On December 23, 2007, a drastic increase in acute watery diarrhea patients at a health center in Sekong Province was reported to the provincial health office. An outbreak investigation was initiated to understand the magnitude of the outbreak, identify new cases, identify the suspected causal agent, implement control measures, and prevent new cases. Through active village based surveillance, 370 cases and 3 deaths were reported from 31 villages between December 15, 2007 and January 29, 2008. Of these reported cases, 29% were under the age of 5. From 28 fresh stool samples taken, 17 (58.6%) were positive for Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa strain. Two water sources close to affected villages were found to be contaminated with the same strain of V. cholerae. Control measures implemented included health education for safe household water consumption and early identification and treatment of suspected cholera patients at village level. The cause of the outbreak was suspected to be a combination of contaminated drinking water and person-to-person transmission.

  17. Population and genetic study of Vibrio cholerae from the amazon environment confirms that the WASA-1 prophage is the main marker of the epidemic strain that circulated in the region.

    PubMed

    Morais, Lena Líllian Canto de Sá; Garza, Daniel Rios; Loureiro, Edvaldo Carlos Brito; Vale, Elivam Rodrigues; Santos, Denise Suéllem Amorim de Sousa; Corrêa, Vanessa Cavaleiro; Sousa, Nayara Rufino; Gurjão, Tereza Cristina Monteiro; Santos, Elisabeth Conceição de Oliveira; Vieira, Verônica Viana; da Fonseca, Erica Lourenço; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a natural inhabitant of many aquatic environments in the world. Biotypes harboring similar virulence-related gene clusters are the causative agents of epidemic cholera, but the majority of strains are harmless to humans. Since 1971, environmental surveillance for potentially pathogenic V. cholerae has resulted in the isolation of many strains from the Brazilian Amazon aquatic ecosystem. Most of these strains are from the non-O1/non-O139 serogroups (NAGs), but toxigenic O1 strains were isolated during the Latin America cholera epidemic in the region (1991-1996). A collection of environmental V. cholerae strains from the Brazilian Amazon belonging to pre-epidemic (1977-1990), epidemic (1991-1996), and post-epidemic (1996-2007) periods in the region, was analyzed. The presence of genes related to virulence within the species and the genetic relationship among the strains were studied. These variables and the information available concerning the strains were used to build a Bayesian multivariate dependency model to distinguish the importance of each variable in determining the others. Some genes related to the epidemic strains were found in environmental NAGs during and after the epidemic. Significant diversity among the virulence-related gene content was observed among O1 strains isolated from the environment during the epidemic period, but not from clinical isolates, which were analyzed as controls. Despite this diversity, these strains exhibited similar PFGE profiles. PFGE profiles were significant while separating potentially epidemic clones from indigenous strains. No significant correlation with isolation source, place or period was observed. The presence of the WASA-1 prophage significantly correlated with serogroups, PFGE profiles, and the presence of virulence-related genes. This study provides a broad characterization of the environmental V. cholerae population from the Amazon, and also highlights the importance of identifying precisely

  18. Population and Genetic Study of Vibrio cholerae from the Amazon Environment Confirms that the WASA-1 Prophage Is the Main Marker of the Epidemic Strain that Circulated in the Region

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Lena Líllian Canto de Sá; Garza, Daniel Rios; Loureiro, Edvaldo Carlos Brito; Vale, Elivam Rodrigues; Santos, Denise Suéllem Amorim de Sousa; Corrêa, Vanessa Cavaleiro; Sousa, Nayara Rufino; Gurjão, Tereza Cristina Monteiro; Santos, Elisabeth Conceição de Oliveira; Vieira, Verônica Viana; da Fonseca, Erica Lourenço; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a natural inhabitant of many aquatic environments in the world. Biotypes harboring similar virulence-related gene clusters are the causative agents of epidemic cholera, but the majority of strains are harmless to humans. Since 1971, environmental surveillance for potentially pathogenic V. cholerae has resulted in the isolation of many strains from the Brazilian Amazon aquatic ecosystem. Most of these strains are from the non-O1/non-O139 serogroups (NAGs), but toxigenic O1 strains were isolated during the Latin America cholera epidemic in the region (1991-1996). A collection of environmental V. cholerae strains from the Brazilian Amazon belonging to pre-epidemic (1977-1990), epidemic (1991-1996), and post-epidemic (1996-2007) periods in the region, was analyzed. The presence of genes related to virulence within the species and the genetic relationship among the strains were studied. These variables and the information available concerning the strains were used to build a Bayesian multivariate dependency model to distinguish the importance of each variable in determining the others. Some genes related to the epidemic strains were found in environmental NAGs during and after the epidemic. Significant diversity among the virulence-related gene content was observed among O1 strains isolated from the environment during the epidemic period, but not from clinical isolates, which were analyzed as controls. Despite this diversity, these strains exhibited similar PFGE profiles. PFGE profiles were significant while separating potentially epidemic clones from indigenous strains. No significant correlation with isolation source, place or period was observed. The presence of the WASA-1 prophage significantly correlated with serogroups, PFGE profiles, and the presence of virulence-related genes. This study provides a broad characterization of the environmental V. cholerae population from the Amazon, and also highlights the importance of identifying precisely

  19. Evolutionary perspective on the origin of Haitian cholera outbreak strain.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Anirban; Banerjee, Rachana; Das, Santasabuj; Basak, Surajit

    2012-01-01

    Cholera epidemic has not been reported in Haiti for at least 100 years, although cholera has been present in Latin America since 1991. Surprisingly, the recent cholera epidemic in Haiti (October 2010) recorded more than 250,000 cases and 4000 deaths in the first 6 months and became one of the most explosive and deadly cholera outbreak in recent history. In the present study, we conducted genomic analyses of pathogenicity islands of three Haitian Vibrio cholerae strains and compared them with nine different V. cholerae O1 El Tor genomes. Although CIRS101 is evolutionarily most similar to the Haitian strains, our study also provides some important differences in the genetic organization of pathogenicity islands of Haitian strains with CIRS101. Evolutionary analysis suggests that unusual functional constraints have been imposed on the Haitian strains and we hypothesize that amino acid substitution is more deleterious in Haitian strains than in nonHaitian strains.

  20. [The analysis of possibility to apply new preparations in serologic diagnostic of agent of cholera in working activity of specialized anti-epidemic brigades].

    PubMed

    Mazrukho, A B; Tatarenko, O A; Alekseyeva, L P; Agafonova, V V; Shaly, O A; Pisanov, R V; Aiydinov, G V; Stupina, N A

    2013-05-01

    The approbation of diagnostic preparations on the substrate of monoclonal antibodies developed in the institute was carried out during tactical specialized exercise with building up of units on the basis of mobile complex of specialized anti-epidemic brigades. It is established that diagnostic agglutinating and fluorescent monoclonal immunoglobulins by their sensitivity are equal to polyclonal commercial preparations and can be used at the stages of laboratory diagnostic of cholera both in conditions of stationary laboratory and mobile complex of specialized anti-epidemic brigades. The method of dot immunoanalysis on the substrate of monoclonal antibodies can, on a par with such common methods as immunofluorescence, slide-agglutination and polymerase chain reaction, be applied in complex of methods of express-diagnostic of cholera.

  1. Cholera outbreaks in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Martin A; Delrieu, Isabelle; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-01-01

    During the current seventh cholera pandemic, Africa bore the major brunt of global disease burden. More than 40 years after its resurgence in Africa in 1970, cholera remains a grave public health problem, characterized by large disease burden, frequent outbreaks, persistent endemicity, and high CFRs, particularly in the region of the central African Great Lakes which might act as reservoirs for cholera. There, cases occur year round with a rise in incidence during the rainy season. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, cholera occurs mostly in outbreaks of varying size with a constant threat of widespread epidemics. Between 1970 and 2011, African countries reported 3,221,050 suspected cholera cases to the World Health Organization, representing 46 % of all cases reported globally. Excluding the Haitian epidemic, sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 86 % of reported cases and 99 % of deaths worldwide in 2011. The number of cholera cases is possibly much higher than what is reported to the WHO due to the variation in modalities, completeness, and case definition of national cholera data. One source on country specific incidence rates for Africa, adjusting for underreporting, estimates 1,341,080 cases and 160,930 deaths (52.6 % of 2,548,227 estimated cases and 79.6 % of 209,216 estimated deaths worldwide). Another estimates 1,411,453 cases and 53,632 deaths per year, respectively (50 % of 2,836,669 estimated cases and 58.6 % of 91,490 estimated deaths worldwide). Within Africa, half of all cases between 1970 and 2011 were notified from only seven countries: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, Tanzania, and South Africa. In contrast to a global trend of decreasing case fatality ratios (CFRs), CFRs have remained stable in Africa at approximately 2 %. Early propagation of cholera outbreaks depends largely on the extent of individual bacterial shedding, host and organism characteristics, the likelihood of people coming into contact with

  2. Genetic relatedness of selected clinical Vibrio cholerae O139 isolates from the southern coastal area of China over a 20-year period.

    PubMed

    Li, B S; Xiao, Y; Wang, D C; Tan, H L; Ke, B X; He, D M; Ke, C W; Zhang, Y H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139 emerged as a causative agent of epidemic cholera in 1992 in India and Bangladesh, and was subsequently reported in China in 1993. The genetic relatedness and molecular characteristics of V. cholerae O139 in Guangdong Province, located in the southern coastal area of China, remains undetermined. In this study, we investigated 136 clinical V. cholerae O139 isolates from 1993 to 2013 in Guangdong. By conventional PCR, 123 (90·4%) isolates were positive for ctxB, ace and zot. Sequencing of the positive amplicons indicated 113 (91·7%) isolates possessed the El Tor allele of ctxB (genotype 3); seven carried the classical ctxB type (genotype 1) and three harboured a novel ctxB type (genotype 5). With respect to tcpA, 123 (90·4%) isolates were positive for the El Tor allele. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (with NotI digestion) differentiated the isolates into clusters A and B. Cluster A contained seven of the non-toxigenic isolates from 1998 to 2000; another six non-toxigenic isolates (from 1998 and 2007) and all of the toxigenic isolates formed cluster B. Our results suggest that over a 20-year period, the predominant O139 clinical isolates have maintained a relatively tight clonal structure, although some genetic variance and shift has occurred. Our data highlight the persistence of toxigenic V. cholerae O139 in clinical settings in the southern coastal area of China.

  3. Genomic epidemiology of the Haitian cholera outbreak: a single introduction followed by rapid, extensive, and continued spread characterized the onset of the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Eppinger, Mark; Pearson, Talima; Koenig, Sara S K; Pearson, Ofori; Hicks, Nathan; Agrawal, Sonia; Sanjar, Fatemeh; Galens, Kevin; Daugherty, Sean; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Rene S; Price, Lance B; Upadhyay, Bishnu P; Shakya, Geeta; Fraser, Claire M; Ravel, Jacques; Keim, Paul S

    2014-11-04

    For centuries, cholera has been one of the most feared diseases. The causative agent Vibrio cholerae is a waterborne Gram-negative enteric pathogen eliciting a severe watery diarrheal disease. In October 2010, the seventh pandemic reached Haiti, a country that had not experienced cholera for more than a century. By using whole-genome sequence typing and mapping strategies of 116 serotype O1 strains from global sources, including 44 Haitian genomes, we present a detailed reconstructed evolutionary history of the seventh pandemic with a focus on the Haitian outbreak. We catalogued subtle genomic alterations at the nucleotide level in the genome core and architectural rearrangements from whole-genome map comparisons. Isolates closely related to the Haitian isolates caused several recent outbreaks in southern Asia. This study provides evidence for a single-source introduction of cholera from Nepal into Haiti followed by rapid, extensive, and continued clonal expansion. The phylogeographic patterns in both southern Asia and Haiti argue for the rapid dissemination of V. cholerae across the landscape necessitating real-time surveillance efforts to complement the whole-genome epidemiological analysis. As eradication efforts move forward, phylogeographic knowledge will be important for identifying persistent sources and monitoring success at regional levels. The results of molecular and epidemiological analyses of this outbreak suggest that an indigenous Haitian source of V. cholerae is unlikely and that an indigenous source has not contributed to the genomic evolution of this clade. In this genomic epidemiology study, we have applied high-resolution whole-genome-based sequence typing methodologies on a comprehensive set of genome sequences that have become available in the aftermath of the Haitian cholera epidemic. These sequence resources enabled us to reassess the degree of genomic heterogeneity within the Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype and to refine boundaries and

  4. Environmental Surveillance for Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Surface Waters of Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Kahler, Amy M.; Haley, Bradd J.; Chen, Arlene; Mull, Bonnie J.; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Turnsek, Maryann; Katz, Lee S.; Humphrys, Michael S.; Derado, Gordana; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Colwell, Rita R.; Huq, Anwar; Hill, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic cholera was reported in Haiti in 2010, with no information available on the occurrence or geographic distribution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Haitian waters. In a series of field visits conducted in Haiti between 2011 and 2013, water and plankton samples were collected at 19 sites. Vibrio cholerae was detected using culture, polymerase chain reaction, and direct viable count methods (DFA-DVC). Cholera toxin genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction in broth enrichments of samples collected in all visits except March 2012. Toxigenic V. cholerae was isolated from river water in 2011 and 2013. Whole genome sequencing revealed that these isolates were a match to the outbreak strain. The DFA-DVC tests were positive for V. cholerae O1 in plankton samples collected from multiple sites. Results of this survey show that toxigenic V. cholerae could be recovered from surface waters in Haiti more than 2 years after the onset of the epidemic. PMID:25385860

  5. Access to safe water in rural Artibonite, Haiti 16 months after the onset of the cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Molly; Berendes, David; Murphy, Jennifer; Bertrand, Fabienne; Husain, Farah; Handzel, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Haiti has the lowest improved water and sanitation coverage in the Western Hemisphere and is suffering from the largest cholera epidemic on record. In May of 2012, an assessment was conducted in rural areas of the Artibonite Department to describe the type and quality of water sources and determine knowledge, access, and use of household water treatment products to inform future programs. It was conducted after emergency response was scaled back but before longer-term water, sanitation, and hygiene activities were initiated. The household survey and source water quality analysis documented low access to safe water, with only 42.3% of households using an improved drinking water source. One-half (50.9%) of the improved water sources tested positive for Escherichia coli. Of households with water to test, 12.7% had positive chlorine residual. The assessment reinforces the identified need for major investments in safe water and sanitation infrastructure and the importance of household water treatment to improve access to safe water in the near term.

  6. Access to Safe Water in Rural Artibonite, Haiti 16 Months after the Onset of the Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Molly; Berendes, David; Murphy, Jennifer; Bertrand, Fabienne; Husain, Farah; Handzel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has the lowest improved water and sanitation coverage in the Western Hemisphere and is suffering from the largest cholera epidemic on record. In May of 2012, an assessment was conducted in rural areas of the Artibonite Department to describe the type and quality of water sources and determine knowledge, access, and use of household water treatment products to inform future programs. It was conducted after emergency response was scaled back but before longer-term water, sanitation, and hygiene activities were initiated. The household survey and source water quality analysis documented low access to safe water, with only 42.3% of households using an improved drinking water source. One-half (50.9%) of the improved water sources tested positive for Escherichia coli. Of households with water to test, 12.7% had positive chlorine residual. The assessment reinforces the identified need for major investments in safe water and sanitation infrastructure and the importance of household water treatment to improve access to safe water in the near term. PMID:24106191

  7. Cholera outbreak--southern Sudan, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-04-10

    Vibrio cholerae causes cholera, an acute infectious diarrheal disease that can result in death without appropriate therapy, depending on the severity of the disease. War, poverty, inadequate sanitation, and large numbers of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) are major precursors to cholera outbreaks. In 2005, Southern Sudan ended its 22-year civil war with North Sudan; as a result, IDPs and refugees are returning to the south. During April--June 2007, investigators from the Southern Sudan Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (SS-FELTP) and CDC investigated a cholera outbreak in the town of Juba, Southern Sudan. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which found that 3,157 persons were diagnosed with suspected cholera during January--June 2007, with 74 deaths resulting from the disease. An environmental investigation revealed suboptimal hygiene practices and a lack of water and sanitation infrastructure in Juba. A case-control study indicated that persons less likely to have cholera were more likely to have consumed hot meals containing meat during the outbreak. Contaminated food or water were not identified as possible sources of the cholera outbreak in Juba. However, this might be attributed to limitations of the study, including small sample size. Cholera can reach epidemic proportions if adequate control measures are not implemented early. Mass media campaigns are important for current and new residents in Juba to understand the importance of proper food handling, clean water, and optimal hygiene practices to prevent the spread of cholera.

  8. Pertussis vaccine performance in an epidemic year-Oregon, 2012.

    PubMed

    Liko, Juventila; Robison, Steve G; Cieslak, Paul R

    2014-07-15

    A 2012 pertussis epidemic in Oregon afforded an opportunity to measure vaccine effectiveness; it ranged from 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-97%) among children 15-47 months of age to 47% (95% CI, 19%-65%) among adolescents 13-16 years of age. In all age groups, pertussis incidence was higher among unimmunized persons.

  9. Monitoring water sources for environmental reservoirs of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Weber, Chad D; Johnson, Judith A; Rashid, Mohammad H; Birch, Catherine S; Brumback, Babette A; Beau de Rochars, Valery E Madsen; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2014-03-01

    An epidemic of cholera infections was documented in Haiti for the first time in more than 100 years during October 2010. Cases have continued to occur, raising the question of whether the microorganism has established environmental reservoirs in Haiti. We monitored 14 environmental sites near the towns of Gressier and Leogane during April 2012-March 2013. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains were isolated from 3 (1.7%) of 179 water samples; nontoxigenic O1 V. cholerae was isolated from an additional 3 samples. All samples containing V. cholerae O1 also contained non-O1 V. cholerae. V. cholerae O1 was isolated only when water temperatures were ≥31°C. Our data substantiate the presence of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 in the aquatic environment in Haiti. These isolations may reflect establishment of long-term environmental reservoirs in Haiti, which may complicate eradication of cholera from this coastal country.

  10. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    The first section of this study deals with areas where cholera is endemic and with the conditions normally favouring endemicity. Turning next to epidemics, the author discusses their origin and types, climatic influences on them, their periodicity and the possibility of forecasting them, the role played in them by different serological races of V. cholerae, and the causes of their decline. In a section on the factors governing the local spread of cholera, he considers contact and water-borne infection; the role of contaminated food and drink, of fomites, of flies, and of carriers; and the incidence according to sex, age, race, and occupation. The last part deals with factors governing the spread of cholera over longer distances, and includes discussion of the effect of movements of individuals and groups and of assemblies of the population on pilgrimages or at religious festivals. PMID:13472431

  11. Herald waves of cholera in nineteenth century London.

    PubMed

    Tien, Joseph H; Poinar, Hendrik N; Fisman, David N; Earn, David J D

    2011-05-06

    Deaths from cholera in London, UK, were recorded weekly from 1824 to 1901. Three features of the time series stand out: (i) cholera deaths were strongly seasonal, with peak mortality almost always in the summer, (ii) the only non-summer outbreaks occurred in the spring of 1832, the autumn of 1848 and the winter of 1853, and (iii) extraordinarily severe summer outbreaks occurred in 1832, 1849, 1854 and 1866 (the four 'great' cholera years). The non-summer outbreaks of 1832, 1848 and 1853 appear to have been herald waves of newly invading cholera strains. In addition, a simple mathematical model confirms that a non-summer introduction of a new cholera strain can result in an initial herald wave, followed by a severe outbreak the following summer. Through the analysis of the genomes of nineteenth-century specimens, it may be possible to identify the strains that caused these herald waves and the well-known cholera epidemics that followed.

  12. One Hundred Years in the Making: The Global Tobacco Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Wipfli, Heather; Samet, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Today's global tobacco epidemic may represent one of the first instances of the globalization of a noninfectious cause of disease. This article focuses on the first century of the global tobacco epidemic and its current status, reviewing the current and projected future of the global tobacco epidemic and the steps that are in progress to end it. In the United States and many countries of Western Europe, tobacco consumption peaked during the 1960s and 1970s and declined as tobacco control programs were initiated, motivated by the evidence indicting smoking as a leading cause of disease. Despite this policy advancement and the subsequent reductions in tobacco consumption, the global tobacco epidemic continued to grow exponentially in the later years of the twentieth century, as the multinational companies sought new markets to replace those shrinking in high-income countries. In response, between 2000 and 2004, the World Health Organization developed its first public health treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which entered into force in 2005. An accompanying package of interventions has been implemented. New approaches to tobacco control, including plain packaging and single representation of brands, have been implemented by Australia and Uruguay, respectively, but have been challenged by the tobacco industry.

  13. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  14. Epidemiology, determinants and dynamics of cholera in Pakistan: gaps and prospects for future research.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Maliha; Jamali, Tanzil

    2014-11-01

    Cholera is one of the notifiable endemic diseases in Pakistan, but the reporting of cholera cases is still unsatisfactory. Most of the diagnosed cases are never reported to the relevant authorities. In the year 1993 - 2005, the country did not report any single case of cholera to the WHO. The objectives of this review were to understand the epidemiology and to identify the possible determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan. Medscape, Medline, PakMedinet and PubMed, was searched, using key words, epidemiology and determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan during 1995 - 2010. Morbidity and mortality due to cholera infection during 1995 - 2010, without any language restriction. Out of 27 articles published between 1995 - 2010, 17 articles were included in the review. Vibrio cholerae O139 identified as a major cause of infection in older age group, while O1 biotype of cholera as a predominant cause of cholera among young individuals. Mainly reported determinants of cholera in Pakistan include poor sanitation and hygiene practices, increased population density in urban areas, leading to rapid and unplanned urbanization of the major cities and climate change due to increased environmental pollution in Pakistan are plausible factors for endemicity of cholera in Pakistan. Cholera reporting as a notifiable disease to the relevant departments and timely action can prevent the risk of outbreaks. There is a need to identify specific behavioral and environmental determinants responsible for outbreaks and epidemics of cholera in Pakistan which can help to design appropriate preventive and control interventions.

  15. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  16. Re-emergence of Cholera Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Berger; Shapiro

    1997-06-01

    Although epidemic cholera was first described in 1817, the disease probably has been common in the Indian subcontinent since ancient times.1 Until recently, a single bacterial type (Vibrio cholerae 01) has been responsible for each of the seven recorded cholera pandemics. The current epidemic began in Celebes (Sulawesi), Indonesia, in 1961, and is currently raging through all continents.2 During the 1990s, over 1 million cholera cases have been reported from Latin America, 2000 from Ukraine and the Russian Republic during 1994 alone (GIDEON computer software, C.Y. Informatics, Ramat Hasharon, Israel). Of the 208,755 cases of cholera (5034 fatal) officially reported to the World Health Organization in 1995,3 41.1% were from Latin America, 34.0% from Africa, 24.4% from Asia, and 0.5% from Europe and Oceania. Interest in our own country of Israel stems from the popularity of tourism (over 1 million travelers exit Israel yearly) and the presence of disease in neighboring areas. Following an epidemic of 397 cases in Jerusalem during 1970, periodic outbreaks have occurred in Gaza, Judea and Samaria.4 Three tourists returned with the infection to Israel during the 1980s, all from Egypt (which officially claims to have no cholera).5 Despite universal interest in this ancient disease, medical science has long been frustrated in its search for an effective vaccine. The most important 'vaccine' against cholera is common sense, and consists of intelligent eating and drinking while in endemic areas. For example, local raw fish (ceviche) is a common source of the disease in Latin America, while shellfish (particularly oysters) are often implicated along the American Gulf Coast. Virtually all forms of water purification are effective against Vibrio cholerae. Although antibiotic prophylaxis might be considered in some circumstances (doxycycline; or a quinolone in areas of tetracycline resistance), it is not routinely advocated.

  17. Cholera: Environmental Reservoirs and Impact on Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    ALMAGRO-MORENO, SALVADOR; TAYLOR, RONALD K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is widely known to be the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. Cholera remains a major scourge in many developing countries, infecting hundreds of thousands every year. Remarkably, V. cholerae is a natural inhabitant of brackish riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, and only a subset of strains are known to be pathogenic to humans. Recent studies have begun to uncover a very complex network of relationships between V. cholerae and other sea dwellers, and the mechanisms associated with the occurrence of seasonal epidemics in regions where cholera is endemic are beginning to be elucidated. Many of the factors required for the organism’s survival and persistence in its natural environment have been revealed, as well as the ubiquitous presence of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of pathogenic strains of V. cholerae. In this article, we will focus on the environmental stage of pathogenic V. cholerae and the interactions of the microorganism with other inhabitants of aquatic environments. We will discuss the impact that its environmental reservoirs have on disease transmission and the distinction between reservoirs of V. cholerae and the vectors that establish cholera as a zoonosis. PMID:25674360

  18. Cholera Outbreak in Grande Comore: 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Troeger, Christopher; Gaudart, Jean; Truillet, Romain; Sallah, Kankoe; Chao, Dennis L; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    In 1998, a cholera epidemic in east Africa reached the Comoros Islands, an archipelago in the Mozambique Channel that had not reported a cholera case for more than 20 years. In just a little over 1 year (between January 1998 and March 1999), Grande Comore, the largest island in the Union of the Comoros, reported 7,851 cases of cholera, about 3% of the population. Using case reports and field observations during the medical response, we describe the epidemiology of the 1998-1999 cholera epidemic in Grande Comore. Outbreaks of infectious diseases on islands provide a unique opportunity to study transmission dynamics in a nearly closed population, and they may serve as stepping-stones for human pathogens to cross unpopulated expanses of ocean. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Cholera Outbreak in Grande Comore: 1998–1999

    PubMed Central

    Troeger, Christopher; Gaudart, Jean; Truillet, Romain; Sallah, Kankoe; Chao, Dennis L.; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    In 1998, a cholera epidemic in east Africa reached the Comoros Islands, an archipelago in the Mozambique Channel that had not reported a cholera case for more than 20 years. In just a little over 1 year (between January 1998 and March 1999), Grande Comore, the largest island in the Union of the Comoros, reported 7,851 cases of cholera, about 3% of the population. Using case reports and field observations during the medical response, we describe the epidemiology of the 1998–1999 cholera epidemic in Grande Comore. Outbreaks of infectious diseases on islands provide a unique opportunity to study transmission dynamics in a nearly closed population, and they may serve as stepping-stones for human pathogens to cross unpopulated expanses of ocean. PMID:26572869

  20. The origin of the Haitian cholera outbreak strain.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chen-Shan; Sorenson, Jon; Harris, Jason B; Robins, William P; Charles, Richelle C; Jean-Charles, Roger R; Bullard, James; Webster, Dale R; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peluso, Paul; Paxinos, Ellen E; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Calderwood, Stephen B; Mekalanos, John J; Schadt, Eric E; Waldor, Matthew K

    2011-01-06

    Although cholera has been present in Latin America since 1991, it had not been epidemic in Haiti for at least 100 years. Recently, however, there has been a severe outbreak of cholera in Haiti. We used third-generation single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing to determine the genome sequences of 2 clinical Vibrio cholerae isolates from the current outbreak in Haiti, 1 strain that caused cholera in Latin America in 1991, and 2 strains isolated in South Asia in 2002 and 2008. Using primary sequence data, we compared the genomes of these 5 strains and a set of previously obtained partial genomic sequences of 23 diverse strains of V. cholerae to assess the likely origin of the cholera outbreak in Haiti. Both single-nucleotide variations and the presence and structure of hypervariable chromosomal elements indicate that there is a close relationship between the Haitian isolates and variant V. cholerae El Tor O1 strains isolated in Bangladesh in 2002 and 2008. In contrast, analysis of genomic variation of the Haitian isolates reveals a more distant relationship with circulating South American isolates. The Haitian epidemic is probably the result of the introduction, through human activity, of a V. cholerae strain from a distant geographic source. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.).

  1. The Origin of the Haitian Cholera Outbreak Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Chen-Shan; Sorenson, Jon; Harris, Jason B.; Robins, William P.; Charles, Richelle C.; Jean-Charles, Roger R.; Bullard, James; Webster, Dale R.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peluso, Paul; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Mekalanos, John J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although cholera has been present in Latin America since 1991, it had not been epidemic in Haiti for at least 100 years. Recently, however, there has been a severe outbreak of cholera in Haiti. METHODS We used third-generation single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing to determine the genome sequences of 2 clinical Vibrio cholerae isolates from the current outbreak in Haiti, 1 strain that caused cholera in Latin America in 1991, and 2 strains isolated in South Asia in 2002 and 2008. Using primary sequence data, we compared the genomes of these 5 strains and a set of previously obtained partial genomic sequences of 23 diverse strains of V. cholerae to assess the likely origin of the cholera outbreak in Haiti. RESULTS Both single-nucleotide variations and the presence and structure of hypervariable chromosomal elements indicate that there is a close relationship between the Haitian isolates and variant V. cholerae El Tor O1 strains isolated in Bangladesh in 2002 and 2008. In contrast, analysis of genomic variation of the Haitian isolates reveals a more distant relationship with circulating South American isolates. CONCLUSIONS The Haitian epidemic is probably the result of the introduction, through human activity, of a V. cholerae strain from a distant geographic source. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.) PMID:21142692

  2. An Optimal Cost Effectiveness Study on Zimbabwe Cholera Seasonal Data from 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Tridip; Mukhopadhyay, Soumalya; Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of cholera outbreak is a serious issue in underdeveloped and developing countries. In Zimbabwe, after the massive outbreak in 2008–09, cholera cases and deaths are reported every year from some provinces. Substantial number of reported cholera cases in some provinces during and after the epidemic in 2008–09 indicates a plausible presence of seasonality in cholera incidence in those regions. We formulate a compartmental mathematical model with periodic slow-fast transmission rate to study such recurrent occurrences and fitted the model to cumulative cholera cases and deaths for different provinces of Zimbabwe from the beginning of cholera outbreak in 2008–09 to June 2011. Daily and weekly reported cholera incidence data were collected from Zimbabwe epidemiological bulletin, Zimbabwe Daily cholera updates and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Zimbabwe (OCHA, Zimbabwe). For each province, the basic reproduction number () in periodic environment is estimated. To the best of our knowledge, this is probably a pioneering attempt to estimate in periodic environment using real-life data set of cholera epidemic for Zimbabwe. Our estimates of agree with the previous estimate for some provinces but differ significantly for Bulawayo, Mashonaland West, Manicaland, Matabeleland South and Matabeleland North. Seasonal trend in cholera incidence is observed in Harare, Mashonaland West, Mashonaland East, Manicaland and Matabeleland South. Our result suggests that, slow transmission is a dominating factor for cholera transmission in most of these provinces. Our model projects cholera cases and cholera deaths during the end of the epidemic in 2008–09 to January 1, 2012. We also determine an optimal cost-effective control strategy among the four government undertaken interventions namely promoting hand-hygiene & clean water distribution, vaccination, treatment and sanitation for each province. PMID:24312540

  3. Cholera outbreaks in the classical biotype era.

    PubMed

    Siddique, A K; Cash, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In the Indian subcontinent description of a disease resembling cholera has been mentioned in Sushruta Samita, estimated to have been written between ~400 and 500 BC. It is however not clear whether the disease known today as cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae Vibrio cholerae O1 is the evolutionary progression of the ancient disease. The modern history of cholera began in 1817 when an explosive epidemic broke out in the Ganges River Delta region of Bengal. This was the first of the seven recorded cholera pandemics cholera pandemics that affected nearly the entire world and caused hundreds of thousands of deaths. The bacterium responsible for this human disease was first recognised during the fifth pandemic and was named V. cholerae which was grouped as O1, and was further differentiated into Classical and El Tor biotypes. It is now known that the fifth and the sixth pandemics were caused by the V. cholerae O1 of the Classical biotype Classical biotype and the seventh by the El Tor biotype El Tor biotype . The El Tor biotype of V. cholerae, which originated in Indonesia Indonesia and shortly thereafter began to spread in the early 1960s. Within the span of 50 years the El Tor biotype had invaded nearly the entire world, completely displacing the Classical biotype from all the countries except Bangladesh. What prompted the earlier pandemics to begin is not clearly understood, nor do we know how and why they ended. The success of the seventh pandemic clone over the pre-existing sixth pandemic strain remains largely an unsolved mystery. Why classical biotype eventually disappeared from the world remains to be explained. For nearly three decades (1963-1991) during the Seventh cholera pandemic seventh pandemic, cholera in Bangladesh has recorded a unique history of co-existence of Classical and El Tor biotypes of V. cholerae O1 as epidemic and endemic strain. This long co-existence has provided us with great opportunity to improve our understanding of the disease itself

  4. Cholera in coastal Africa: a systematic review of its heterogeneous environmental determinants.

    PubMed

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Sudre, Bertrand; Faucher, Benoît; Piarroux, Renaud

    2013-11-01

    According to the "cholera paradigm," epidemiology of this prototypical waterborne disease is considered to be driven directly by climate-induced variations in coastal aquatic reservoirs of Vibrio cholerae. This systematic review on environmental determinants of cholera in coastal Africa shows that instead coastal epidemics constitute a minor part of the continental cholera burden. Most of coastal cholera foci are located near estuaries, lagoons, mangrove forests, and on islands. Yet outbreaks often originate in coastal cities, where cholera is more likely to be imported from distant areas. Cholera outbreaks also may intensify in densely populated slum quarters before spreading to adjacent regions. Frequent seasonality of cholera incidence appears driven by the rainfall-induced contamination of unprotected water sources through latrine overflow and sewage, as well as by the periodicity of human activities like fishing or traveling. Lulls in transmission periods of several years are repeatedly recorded even in high-risk coastal areas. To date, environmental studies have failed to demonstrate a perennial aquatic reservoir of toxigenic V. cholerae around the continent. Finally, applicability of the cholera paradigm therefore appears questionable in Africa, although available data remain limited. Thorough surveys with microbiological analyses of water samples and prospective genotyping of environmental and clinical strains of V. cholerae are needed to understand determinants of cholera in coastal Africa and better target prevention and control measures.

  5. Predictability of Vibrio cholerae in Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Valérie R.; Russek-Cohen, Estelle; Choopun, Nipa; Rivera, Irma N. G.; Gangle, Brian; Jiang, Sunny C.; Rubin, Andrea; Patz, Jonathan A.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to natural waters and can pose a health risk when it is consumed via untreated water or contaminated shellfish. The correlation between the occurrence of V. cholerae in Chesapeake Bay and environmental factors was investigated over a 3-year period. Water and plankton samples were collected monthly from five shore sampling sites in northern Chesapeake Bay (January 1998 to February 2000) and from research cruise stations on a north-south transect (summers of 1999 and 2000). Enrichment was used to detect culturable V. cholerae, and 21.1% (n = 427) of the samples were positive. As determined by serology tests, the isolates, did not belong to serogroup O1 or O139 associated with cholera epidemics. A direct fluorescent-antibody assay was used to detect V. cholerae O1, and 23.8% (n = 412) of the samples were positive. V. cholerae was more frequently detected during the warmer months and in northern Chesapeake Bay, where the salinity is lower. Statistical models successfully predicted the presence of V. cholerae as a function of water temperature and salinity. Temperatures above 19°C and salinities between 2 and 14 ppt yielded at least a fourfold increase in the number of detectable V. cholerae. The results suggest that salinity variation in Chesapeake Bay or other parameters associated with Susquehanna River inflow contribute to the variability in the occurrence of V. cholerae and that salinity is a useful indicator. Under scenarios of global climate change, increased climate variability, accompanied by higher stream flow rates and warmer temperatures, could favor conditions that increase the occurrence of V. cholerae in Chesapeake Bay. PMID:12732548

  6. [The determinants of the low case fatality rate of the cholera epidemic in the Littoral department of Benin in 2008].

    PubMed

    Gbary, Akpa Raphaël; Sossou, Roch Aristide; Dossou, Jean-Paul; Mongbo, Virginie; Massougbodji, Achille

    2011-01-01

    The 2008 cholera outbreak in Benin was characterized by a low case fatality rate (0.39 p.100) in the Littoral department, where 502 cases were recorded between July and December. The aim of this study was to identify the key factors associated with the low case fatality rate within the department. The cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study conducted as part of this research used 404 patient records, focus group discussions with ten former patients, in-depth interviews with 8 health authorities involved in the response and structured face-to-face interviews with 12 health personnel involved in the treatment of patients. The data were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative content analysis based on EPIINFO 3.3.2 and EXCEL 2007 software. The results from several sources were cross-checked through triangulation. The mean age of patients was 23.72 ± 14.8 years. 39.35% patients were admitted with severe dehydration. Oral rehydration, intravenous rehydration and antibiotic therapy were given to 99.5%, 85% and 97.77% of patients, respectively. Only one hospital death was noted. The low case fatality rate was mainly due to the following factors: the high quality of care provided in a center with qualified personnel and available and free of charge treatment kits, protocols based on massive rehydration and appropriate hygiene measures, and patient compliance with the treatment plan. The response was also characterized by good coordination, wide mass and local health promotion, and selective antibiotic prophylaxis, which contributed significantly to reducing the spread of the infection.

  7. [Cholera and war].

    PubMed

    Ganin, V S

    2009-09-01

    During last centures wars were the main account of spread of cholera. It is caused by movement of great mass of troops and peaceful populace, acute fall of living circumstances, decline of sanitarium conditions of population aggregates, difficultness or impossibility of effectuating of contra-epidemic measures. Cholera casualty was multifold bigger, the weapon casualty in fighting armies. The article presents data of cholera epidemics, were in fighting armies of different states. During the XXth century fight casualty began to overpass the disease casualty. It is caused by grand increasing of damage effects of measures of war, organized using of prophylaxis measures and success in treatment of infectious diseases. The article presents data about cholera falling ill during the Great Patriotic War and about system of contro-epidemic barrier on fronts and rear of state.

  8. Cholera: something old, something new.

    PubMed

    Sigman, Michael; Luchette, Fred A

    2012-08-01

    In the aftermath of a devastating earthquake in early 2011, Haiti fell victim to an outbreak of cholera that claimed thousands of lives and affected populations in nearby Dominican Republic, Venezuela, and even the United States. This was the first time cholera had been reported in Haiti in more than 100 years. The sudden appearance of cholera, a pathogen with no known non-human host, raised the question of how it was introduced to an island that has long been spared this disease. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the history of cholera, its pathophysiology and virulence factors, and current recommendations for treatment. Articles published in the past 10 years were identified by a search of the medical literature using PUBMED and reviewed. Bibliographies of each article also were reviewed for additional pertinent articles. The recent epidemic was caused by a strain that has been responsible for disease in South Asia since 1961, the seventh and most recent strain identified since 1900. It is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Once infected, the patient develops a rapidly dehydrating diarrheal illness caused by the cholera toxin, which activates cytoplasmic adenylate cyclase of the intestinal epithelial cells by adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation of the stimulatory G protein. The high cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations activate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, causing a dramatic efflux of ions and water from infected enterocytes and leading to watery diarrhea. The first line of therapy is oral hydration with intravenous fluids; antibiotics are reserved for patients with severe dehydration. Spread of cholera is preventable with simple modifications of hygiene and water preparation. Cholera has re-emerged as a major infectious disease in the recent past, with a global increase in its incidence. Vaccination should be considered as an adjunct for controlling the epidemics and also for volunteer

  9. Predictive modeling of cholera using GRACE and TRMM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cholera outbreaks can be classified in three forms- epidemic (sudden or seasonal outbreaks), endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years) and mixed-mode endemic (combination of certain epidemic and endemic conditions) with significant spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Endemic cholera is related to floods and droughts in regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate or insufficient. With more than a decade of terrestrial water storage (TWS) data obtained from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), understanding dynamics of river discharge is now feasible. We explored lead-lag relationships between TWS in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) basin and endemic cholera in Bangladesh. Since bimodal seasonal peaks in cholera in Bangladesh occur during the spring and autumn season, two separate models, between TWS and disease time series (2002 to 2010) were developed. TWS, hence water availability, showed an asymmetrical, strong association with spring (τ=-0.53; p<0.001) and autumn (τ=0.45; p<0.001) cholera prevalence up to five to six months in advance. One unit (cm of water) decrease in water availability in the basin increased odds of above normal cholera by 24% [confidence interval (CI) 20-31%; p<0.05] in the spring season, while an increase in regional water by one unit, through floods, increased odds of above average cholera in the autumn by 29% [CI:22-33%; p<0.05]. Epidemic cholera is related with warm temperatures and heavy rainfall. Using TRMM data for several locations in Asia and Africa, probability of cholera increases 18% [CI:15-23%; p<0.05] after heavy precipitation resulted in a societal conditions where access to safe water and sanitation was disrupted. Results from mechanistic modeling framework using systems approach that include satellite based hydroclimatic information with tradition disease transmission models will also be presented.

  10. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  11. Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in less than five years old children hospitalised for watery diarrhoea in Delhi, 1993.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Bora, D; Sachdeva, V; Sharma, R S; Verghese, T

    1997-03-01

    In Delhi, patients with cholera-like illness are admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital. In 1993, rectal swabs from 836 such patients aged less than five years were examined for the presence of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. Of them, 232 (28%), 180 (22%), and 424 (51%) were found suffering from O1 cholera, O139 cholera, and non-cholera watery diarrhoea respectively. Twelve children (1.4%) excreted both V. cholerae O1 and O139. Both types of cholera were similarly distributed by age, with 19% of the cases occurring in infants. The findings indicate that cholera should be suspected in children aged less than two years and in infants with acute watery diarrhoea. For both serotypes, males were more represented than females; the differences were, however, not significant. Clinical features of patients with V. cholerae O139 and O1 were indistinguishable, except that a significantly higher percentage of the former had fever. Potential risk factors for cholera were almost equally prevalent in the families of children aged less than 5 years having either O1 or O139 cholera. The results suggest a similar mode of transmission of the two serotypes in children. By inference, the preventive and control measures are also likely to be similar.

  12. Strategy, demand, management, and costs of an international cholera vaccine stockpile.

    PubMed

    Maskery, Brian; DeRoeck, Denise; Levin, Ann; Kim, Young Eun; Wierzba, Thomas F; Clemens, John D

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we review the feasibility of mass vaccination against cholera and estimate the global population at risk for epidemic cholera. We then examine the cost of establishing and managing a cholera vaccine stockpile and summarize published mathematical models of the estimated impact of reactive vaccination campaigns developed for the current Haitian outbreak and a recent outbreak in Zimbabwe. On the basis of these evaluations, we recommend a stockpile that starts at 2 million doses, with an estimated annual cost of $5.5-$13.9 million in 2013, and grows to 10 million doses per year by 2017, with an annual cost of $27-$51 million. We believe that the stockpile can enhance efforts to mitigate future cholera outbreaks by guaranteeing the availability of cholera vaccines and, through use of the stockpile, by revealing knowledge about the efficient use of cholera vaccines during and after crises.

  13. Cholera in Ethiopia in the 1990 s: epidemiologic patterns, clonal analysis, and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Scrascia, Maria; Pugliese, Nicola; Maimone, Francesco; Mohamud, Kadigia A; Ali, Imran A; Grimont, Patrick A D; Pazzani, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    In 1993, after 6 years of absence, cholera re-emerged in the Horn of Africa. Following its introduction to Djibouti, the disease spread to the central and southern areas of Ethiopia reaching Somalia in 1994. Cholera outbreaks persisted in Ethiopia with a recrudescence of cases in 1998. Twenty-two Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, selected to represent the 1998 history of cholera in Ethiopia, were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, BglI ribotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility. All isolates showed a unique amplified DNA pattern and a prevalent ribotype B8a. All strains were multidrug-resistant and harboured an IncC plasmid which conferred resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. These findings indicate that a group of closely related V. cholerae O1 strains was responsible for the cholera epidemic in Ethiopia in 1998.

  14. Dynamics of Cholera Outbreaks in Great Lakes Region of Africa, 1978–2008

    PubMed Central

    Nkoko, Didier Bompangue; Giraudoux, Patrick; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Tinda, Annie Mutombo; Piarroux, Martine; Sudre, Bertrand; Horion, Stephanie; Tamfum, Jean-Jacques Muyembe; Ilunga, Benoît Kebela

    2011-01-01

    Cholera outbreaks have occurred in Burundi, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya almost every year since 1977–1978, when the disease emerged in these countries. We used a multiscale, geographic information system–based approach to assess the link between cholera outbreaks, climate, and environmental variables. We performed time-series analyses and field investigations in the main affected areas. Results showed that cholera greatly increased during El Niño warm events (abnormally warm El Niños) but decreased or remained stable between these events. Most epidemics occurred in a few hotspots in lakeside areas, where the weekly incidence of cholera varied by season, rainfall, fluctuations of plankton, and fishing activities. During lull periods, persistence of cholera was explained by outbreak dynamics, which suggested a metapopulation pattern, and by endemic foci around the lakes. These links between cholera outbreaks, climate, and lake environments need additional, multidisciplinary study. PMID:22099090

  15. Controlling cholera in the Ouest Department of Haiti using oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kirpich, Alexander; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Yang, Yang; Morris, John Glenn; Longini, Ira M

    2017-04-01

    Following the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti, a plan was initiated to provide massive improvements to the sanitation and drinking water infrastructure in order to eliminate cholera from the island of Hispaniola by 2023. Six years and a half billion dollars later, there is little evidence that any substantial improvements have been implemented; with increasing evidence that cholera has become endemic. Thus, it is time to explore strategies to control cholera in Haiti using oral cholera vaccines (OCVs). The potential effects of mass administration of OCVs on cholera transmission were assessed using dynamic compartment models fit to cholera incidence data from the Ouest Department of Haiti. The results indicated that interventions using an OCV that was 60% effective could have eliminated cholera transmission by August 2012 if started five weeks after the initial outbreak. A range of analyses on the ability of OCV interventions started January 1, 2017 to eliminate cholera transmission by 2023 were performed by considering different combinations of vaccine efficacies, vaccine administration rates, and durations of protective immunity. With an average of 50 weeks for the waiting time to vaccination and an average duration of three years for the vaccine-induced immunity, all campaigns that used an OCV with a vaccine efficacy of at least 60% successfully eliminated cholera transmission by 2023. The results of this study suggest that even with a relatively wide range of vaccine efficacies, administration rates, and durations of protective immunity, future epidemics could be controlled at a relatively low cost using mass administration of OCVs in Haiti.

  16. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Strains Isolated from the Nigerian Cholera Outbreak in 2010.

    PubMed

    Dupke, Susann; Akinsinde, Kehinde A; Grunow, Roland; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Olukoya, Daniel K; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    We examined clinical samples from Nigerian patients with acute watery diarrhea for Vibrio cholerae during the 2010 cholera outbreak. A total of 109 suspected isolates were characterized, but only 57 V. cholerae strains could be confirmed using multiplex real-time PCR as well as rpoB sequencing and typed as V. cholerae O:1 Ogawa biotype El Tor. This finding highlighted the need for accurate diagnosis of cholera in epidemic countries to implement life-saving interventions.

  17. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Strains Isolated from the Nigerian Cholera Outbreak in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dupke, Susann; Akinsinde, Kehinde A.; Grunow, Roland; Iwalokun, Bamidele A.; Olukoya, Daniel K.; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2016-01-01

    We examined clinical samples from Nigerian patients with acute watery diarrhea for Vibrio cholerae during the 2010 cholera outbreak. A total of 109 suspected isolates were characterized, but only 57 V. cholerae strains could be confirmed using multiplex real-time PCR as well as rpoB sequencing and typed as V. cholerae O:1 Ogawa biotype El Tor. This finding highlighted the need for accurate diagnosis of cholera in epidemic countries to implement life-saving interventions. PMID:27487957

  18. 2,500-year Evolution of the Term Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Granel, Estelle

    2006-01-01

    The term epidemic (from the Greek epi [on] plus demos [people]), first used by Homer, took its medical meaning when Hippocrates used it as the title of one of his famous treatises. At that time, epidemic was the name given to a collection of clinical syndromes, such as coughs or diarrheas, occurring and propagating in a given period at a given location. Over centuries, the form and meaning of the term have changed. Successive epidemics of plague in the Middle Ages contributed to the definition of an epidemic as the propagation of a single, well-defined disease. The meaning of the term continued to evolve in the 19th-century era of microbiology. Its most recent semantic evolution dates from the last quarter of the 20th century, and this evolution is likely to continue in the future. PMID:16707055

  19. Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae Associated with a Large Cholera Outbreak in Ghana in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Eibach, Daniel; Herrera-León, Silvia; Gil, Horacio; Hogan, Benedikt; Ehlkes, Lutz; Adjabeng, Michael; Kreuels, Benno; Nagel, Michael; Opare, David; Fobil, Julius N; May, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Ghana is affected by regular cholera epidemics and an annual average of 3,066 cases since 2000. In 2014, Ghana experienced one of its largest cholera outbreaks within a decade with more than 20,000 notified infections. In order to attribute this rise in cases to a newly emerging strain or to multiple simultaneous outbreaks involving multi-clonal strains, outbreak isolates were characterized, subtyped and compared to previous epidemics in 2011 and 2012. Methodology/Principal Findings Serotypes, biotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 92 Vibrio cholerae isolates collected in 2011, 2012 and 2014 from Southern Ghana. For a subgroup of 45 isolates pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus-variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were performed. Eighty-nine isolates (97%) were identified as ctxB (classical type) positive V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and three (3%) isolates were cholera toxin negative non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae. Among the selected isolates only sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance was detectable in 2011, while 95% of all 2014 isolates showed resistance towards sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, ampicillin and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. MLVA achieved the highest subtype discrimination, revealing 22 genotypes with one major outbreak cluster in each of the three outbreak years. Apart from those clusters genetically distant genotypes circulate during each annual epidemic. Conclusions/Significance This analysis suggests different endemic reservoirs of V. cholerae in Ghana with distinct annual outbreak clusters accompanied by the occurrence of genetically distant genotypes. Preventive measures for cholera transmission should focus on aquatic reservoirs. Rapidly emerging multidrug resistance must be monitored closely. PMID:27232338

  20. Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae Associated with a Large Cholera Outbreak in Ghana in 2014.

    PubMed

    Eibach, Daniel; Herrera-León, Silvia; Gil, Horacio; Hogan, Benedikt; Ehlkes, Lutz; Adjabeng, Michael; Kreuels, Benno; Nagel, Michael; Opare, David; Fobil, Julius N; May, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Ghana is affected by regular cholera epidemics and an annual average of 3,066 cases since 2000. In 2014, Ghana experienced one of its largest cholera outbreaks within a decade with more than 20,000 notified infections. In order to attribute this rise in cases to a newly emerging strain or to multiple simultaneous outbreaks involving multi-clonal strains, outbreak isolates were characterized, subtyped and compared to previous epidemics in 2011 and 2012. Serotypes, biotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 92 Vibrio cholerae isolates collected in 2011, 2012 and 2014 from Southern Ghana. For a subgroup of 45 isolates pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus-variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were performed. Eighty-nine isolates (97%) were identified as ctxB (classical type) positive V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and three (3%) isolates were cholera toxin negative non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae. Among the selected isolates only sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance was detectable in 2011, while 95% of all 2014 isolates showed resistance towards sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, ampicillin and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. MLVA achieved the highest subtype discrimination, revealing 22 genotypes with one major outbreak cluster in each of the three outbreak years. Apart from those clusters genetically distant genotypes circulate during each annual epidemic. This analysis suggests different endemic reservoirs of V. cholerae in Ghana with distinct annual outbreak clusters accompanied by the occurrence of genetically distant genotypes. Preventive measures for cholera transmission should focus on aquatic reservoirs. Rapidly emerging multidrug resistance must be monitored closely.

  1. Oral vaccines for preventing cholera.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, David; Abba, Katharine; Zaman, K; Qadri, Firdausi; Graves, Patricia M

    2011-03-16

    Cholera is a cause of acute watery diarrhoea which can cause dehydration and death if not adequately treated. It usually occurs in epidemics, and is associated with poverty and poor sanitation. Effective, cheap, and easy to administer vaccines could help prevent epidemics. To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral cholera vaccines in preventing cases of cholera and deaths from cholera. In October 2010, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for relevant published and ongoing trials. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials of oral cholera vaccines in healthy adults and children. Each trial was assessed for eligibility and risk of bias by two authors working independently. Data was extracted by two independent reviewers and analysed using the Review Manager 5 software. Outcomes are reported as vaccine protective efficacy (VE) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven large efficacy trials, four small artificial challenge studies, and twenty-nine safety trials contributed data to this review.Five variations of a killed whole cell vaccine have been evaluated in large scale efficacy trials (four trials, 249935 participants). The overall vaccine efficacy during the first year was 52% (95% CI 35% to 65%), and during the second year was 62% (95% CI 51% to 62%). Protective efficacy was lower in children aged less than 5 years; 38% (95% CI 20% to 53%) compared to older children and adults; 66% (95% CI 57% to 73%).One trial of a killed whole cell vaccine amongst military recruits demonstrated 86% protective efficacy (95% CI 37% to 97%) in a small epidemic occurring within 4 weeks of the 2-dose schedule (one trial, 1426 participants). Efficacy data is not available beyond two years for the currently available vaccine formulations, but

  2. The politics of underdevelopment: metered to death-how a water experiment caused riots and a cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Pauw, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Water privatization programs in South Africa, part of a government policy aimed at making people pay for the full cost of running water ("total cost recovery"), was developed by private water companies and the World Bank to finance improved water supplies and build the country's economy. Instead the programs are causing more misery than development. Millions of poor people have had their water supply cut off because of inability to pay, forcing them to get their water from polluted rivers and lakes and leading to South Africa's worst cholera outbreak--which the government paid millions of dollars to control. Residents in some townships are rebelling, and many of the private multinational water companies are reassessing their involvement in South Africa.

  3. Journals of the plague years: documenting the history of the AIDS epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Markel, H

    2001-01-01

    This commentary discusses several journalistic, literary, and historical accounts of the AIDS epidemic as it has unfolded in the United States over the past 2 decades. By examining the different ways that different types of storytellers chronicle the political, social, public health, medical, and economic aspects of epidemic disease, this essay will demonstrate why the AIDS epidemic has been of such intense interest not only to physicians and public health experts but also to journalists, novelists, playwrights, memoirists, and historians. AIDS is a particularly fascinating example of society's broad concern with epidemics because it both is a global pandemic and, in recent years, has become a chronic disease. PMID:11441724

  4. [Thirty years after the Cuban dengue hemorrhagic epidemic occurred in 1981].

    PubMed

    Guzmán Tirado, C María G

    2012-01-01

    Cuba reported the first dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemic in the American region in 1981. More than 344 203 cases with 10 312 severe and very severe cases and 158 fatalities were reported. Thirty years after this epidemic, the established surveillance, the control actions and the performed research studies have allowed the country to keep free of dengue, although some epidemics and waves of transmission have occurred, which have finally been eliminated. This paper summarized some interesting aspects related with this epidemic as well as with the laboratory surveillance and results of some of the main research works.

  5. Climatic, socio-economic, and health factors affecting human vulnerability to cholera in the Lake Victoria basin, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Olago, Daniel; Marshall, Michael; Wandiga, Shem O; Opondo, Maggie; Yanda, Pius Z; Kanalawe, Richard; Githeko, Andrew K; Downs, Tim; Opere, Alfred; Kavumvuli, Robert; Kirumira, Edward; Ogallo, Laban; Mugambi, Paul; Apindi, Eugene; Githui, Faith; Kathuri, James; Olaka, Lydia; Sigalla, Rehema; Nanyunja, Robinah; Baguma, Timothy; Achola, Pius

    2007-06-01

    Cholera epidemics have a recorded history in the eastern Africa region dating to 1836. Cholera is now endemic in the Lake Victoria basin, a region with one of the poorest and fastest growing populations in the world. Analyses of precipitation, temperatures, and hydrological characteristics of selected stations in the Lake Victoria basin show that cholera epidemics are closely associated with El Niño years. Similarly, sustained temperatures high above normal (T(max)) in two consecutive seasons, followed by a slight cooling in the second season, trigger an outbreak of a cholera epidemic. The health and socioeconomic systems that the lake basin communities rely upon are not robust enough to cope with cholera outbreaks, thus rendering them vulnerable to the impact of climate variability and change. Collectively, this report argues that communities living around the Lake Victoria basin are vulnerable to climate-induced cholera that is aggravated by the low socioeconomic status and lack of an adequate health care system. In assessing the communities' adaptive capacity, the report concludes that persistent levels of poverty have made these communities vulnerable to cholera epidemics.

  6. Cholera in children in Karachi from 1990 through 1995: a study of cases admitted to a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nizami, S Q; Farooqui, B J

    1998-06-01

    Although cholera is an endemic disease in Bangladesh, India and other countries, it was never a significant cause of gastroenteritis in Pakistan before 1988. Since then, cases of cholera are identified each year, both in adults and children in Pakistan. In order to see the contribution of Vibrio cholerae as a cause of gastroenteritis in children, we reviewed the cases of cholera admitted in the pediatric ward of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Of 4346 children hospitalized with gastroenteritis during 1990 through 1995, 348 children (8%) were confirmed to have cholera. The youngest child with cholera was seven days old. The mean age was 31 +/- 34 months. The cases of cholera were received from all over the city. Most cases were due to Vibrio cholerae Ogawa biotype ELTOR but the new strain, i.e., Vibrio cholerae 0139 was isolated in 14% cases in 1994. The sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae has also changed. In 1994, the organisms were resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics, i.e., tetracycline, ampicillin and erythrocin but sensitive to ceftrioxone, cefixime, ofloxacin and nalidixic acid. Adequate measures to improve hygiene and sanitation and supply of safe potable water is needed to prevent any future epidemic of cholera in the city.

  7. Resurgence of cholera in Hong Kong.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. H.; Lai, S. T.; Lai, J. Y.; Leung, N. K.

    1996-01-01

    Cholera is one of the three diseases subject to the International Health Regulations. After a period of over 30 years, the seventh pandemic of cholera, which started in South East Asia in 1961, still shows no sign of a decline. On the contrary, it has increased its severity and invaded many other countries in Africa and Latin America. In the last two years, there has been a recrudescence of the disease in South East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. The discovery of a new strain of Vibrio cholerae 0139 in these regions is causing concern in view of its potential to cause major epidemics and higher mortality. Hong Kong had two intensive outbreaks of cholera in the last two years. The cause of these outbreaks was not clear, but adverse environmental conditions and increasing pollution of coastal waters have been implicated. The spread of cholera knows no geographical boundaries. There is a need for intensified efforts among health authorities in the affected areas to prevent the international spread of the disease. PMID:8760949

  8. Resurgence of cholera in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Lai, S T; Lai, J Y; Leung, N K

    1996-08-01

    Cholera is one of the three diseases subject to the International Health Regulations. After a period of over 30 years, the seventh pandemic of cholera, which started in South East Asia in 1961, still shows no sign of a decline. On the contrary, it has increased its severity and invaded many other countries in Africa and Latin America. In the last two years, there has been a recrudescence of the disease in South East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. The discovery of a new strain of Vibrio cholerae 0139 in these regions is causing concern in view of its potential to cause major epidemics and higher mortality. Hong Kong had two intensive outbreaks of cholera in the last two years. The cause of these outbreaks was not clear, but adverse environmental conditions and increasing pollution of coastal waters have been implicated. The spread of cholera knows no geographical boundaries. There is a need for intensified efforts among health authorities in the affected areas to prevent the international spread of the disease.

  9. The role of socioeconomic status in longitudinal trends of cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh, 1993-2007.

    PubMed

    Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Rodd, Joshua; Yunus, Mohammad; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There has been little evidence of a decline in the global burden of cholera in recent years as the number of cholera cases reported to WHO continues to rise. Cholera remains a global threat to public health and a key indicator of lack of socioeconomic development. Overall socioeconomic development is the ultimate solution for control of cholera as evidenced in developed countries. However, most research has focused on cross-county comparisons so that the role of individual- or small area-level socioeconomic status (SES) in cholera dynamics has not been carefully studied. Reported cases of cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh have fluctuated greatly over time and epidemic outbreaks of cholera continue, most recently with the introduction of a new serotype into the region. The wealth of longitudinal data on the population of Matlab provides a unique opportunity to explore the impact of socioeconomic status and other demographic characteristics on the long-term temporal dynamics of cholera in the region. In this population-based study we examine which factors impact the initial number of cholera cases in a bari at the beginning of the 0139 epidemic and the factors impacting the number of cases over time. Cholera data were derived from the ICDDR,B health records and linked to socioeconomic and geographic data collected as part of the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Longitudinal zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) multilevel regression models are used to examine the impact of environmental and socio-demographic factors on cholera counts across baris. Results indicate that baris with a high socioeconomic status had lower initial rates of cholera at the beginning of the 0139 epidemic (γ(01) = -0.147, p = 0.041) and a higher probability of reporting no cholera cases (α(01) = 0.156, p = 0.061). Populations in baris characterized by low SES are more likely to experience higher cholera morbidity at the beginning of an epidemic than populations in high

  10. The Role of Socioeconomic Status in Longitudinal Trends of Cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh, 1993–2007

    PubMed Central

    Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Rodd, Joshua; Yunus, Mohammad; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There has been little evidence of a decline in the global burden of cholera in recent years as the number of cholera cases reported to WHO continues to rise. Cholera remains a global threat to public health and a key indicator of lack of socioeconomic development. Overall socioeconomic development is the ultimate solution for control of cholera as evidenced in developed countries. However, most research has focused on cross-county comparisons so that the role of individual- or small area-level socioeconomic status (SES) in cholera dynamics has not been carefully studied. Reported cases of cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh have fluctuated greatly over time and epidemic outbreaks of cholera continue, most recently with the introduction of a new serotype into the region. The wealth of longitudinal data on the population of Matlab provides a unique opportunity to explore the impact of socioeconomic status and other demographic characteristics on the long-term temporal dynamics of cholera in the region. In this population-based study we examine which factors impact the initial number of cholera cases in a bari at the beginning of the 0139 epidemic and the factors impacting the number of cases over time. Cholera data were derived from the ICDDR,B health records and linked to socioeconomic and geographic data collected as part of the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Longitudinal zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) multilevel regression models are used to examine the impact of environmental and socio-demographic factors on cholera counts across baris. Results indicate that baris with a high socioeconomic status had lower initial rates of cholera at the beginning of the 0139 epidemic (γ01 = −0.147, p = 0.041) and a higher probability of reporting no cholera cases (α01 = 0.156, p = 0.061). Populations in baris characterized by low SES are more likely to experience higher cholera morbidity at the beginning of an epidemic than populations in high SES

  11. Genetic Studies of Vibrio cholerae in South West Cameroon—A Phylogenetic Analysis of Isolates from the 2010-2011 Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Moise C.; Masalla, Thomas; Esemu, Seraphine; Fumoloh, Foche Francis; Kracalik, Ian; Cella, Eleonora; Alam, Meer Taifur; Akoachere, Jane-Francis; Liang, Song; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Ndip, Lucy M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During the cholera outbreak from 2010 to 2011 in Cameroon, 33,192 cases with 1,440 deaths (case fatality ratio 4.34%) were reported to the World Health Organization. Of these, the South West Region reported 3,120 clinical cases. This region is in the Equatorial Monsoon climatic subzone of Cameroon, close to the coast, raising questions as to whether cases were linked with development of environmental reservoirs. Methods: In an investigation conducted by the Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Buea, toxigenic V. cholerae O1 were isolated from diarrheal stool samples from 18 patients, with ages ranging from <3 to 70 years. Coordinates for clinical centers at which cases were identified were obtained using a handheld GPS, and were mapped using ArcGIS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby ‘Bauer agar disc diffusion method. The full genomes of these strains were sequenced with the Illumina MiSeq platform. De novo assembly of cholera genomes and multiple sequence alignment were carried out using the bioinformatics pipeline developed in the Emerging Pathogens Institute laboratory at the University of Florida. Results/Discussion: Genetic comparisons showed that isolates were closely related, with pairwise p-distances ranging from 2.25 to 14.52 10-5 nt substitutions per site, and no statistically significant correlation between the pairwise genetic distances and the geographic distances among sampling locations. Indeed, the phylogeny of the Cameroonian strains displays the typical star-like topology and intermixing of strains from different locations that are characteristic of an exponential outbreak localized around a relatively restricted area with occasional spillover to other parts of the country, likely mediated by direct human contact and human movement. Findings highlight the utility of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis in understanding transmission patterns at the local level. PMID

  12. Factors Associated with Fatal Outcomes Following Cholera-Like Syndrome in Far North Region of Cameroon: A Community-Based Survey.

    PubMed

    Djouma, Fabrice N; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Ram, Malathi; Debes, Amanda K; Sack, David A

    2016-12-07

    This study demonstrates that most cholera deaths in this region of Cameroon occur out of hospital. This is a region which is prone to cholera, and interventions are needed to improve access to emergency medical care, especially during cholera outbreaks. Cameroon has experienced 14 cholera epidemics during the last 20 years, and these have had high case fatality rates. This study attempted to assess the effect of delays in seeking care and the locations of care as possible risk factors for cholera mortality. The study used data from a community-based survey regarding the circumstances of 97 fatal cases and 197 control (nonfatal) cases following a cholera-like syndrome in villages with cholera-like diseases during cholera outbreaks in Cameroon during 2009-2011. Deaths occurred in one of four environments: the community, in a temporary community treatment center (TCTC), in transit to a treatment center, or in a hospital (39%, 32%, 5%, and 24%, respectively). Using a case-control analysis, factors associated with deaths included the nonuse of a cholera treatment center, receiving health care in a TCTC instead of a hospital, and greater than 4 hours delay between the onset of symptoms and the decision to go to a treatment center (odds ratios of 17.1 [confidence interval (CI): 7.0-41.8], 2.5 [CI: 1.2-5.0], and 2.2 [CI: 1.0-4.6], respectively). During cholera epidemics, a higher proportion of deaths are still occurring in communities. The nonuse and delays in deciding to go a treatment center, and treatment at TCTC rather than a hospital were risk factors for death among patients with cholera-like syndrome in Cameroon. Informing people on community management of cholera-like syndrome and improving care in all health facilities are needed to reduce deaths during cholera epidemics.

  13. Cholera: a great global concern.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shyamapada; Mandal, Manisha Deb; Pal, Nishith Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Cholera, caused by the infection of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) to humans, is a life threatening diarrheal disease with epidemic and pandemic potential. The V. cholerae, both O1 and O139 serogroups, produce a potent enterotoxin (cholera toxin) responsible for the lethal symptoms of the disease. The O1 serogroup has two biotypes (phenotypes), classical and El Tor; each of which has two major serotypes (based on antigenic responses), Ogawa and Inaba and the extremely rare Hikojima. V. cholerae O1 strains interconvert and switch between the Ogawa and Inaba serotypes. Fluid and electrolyte replacement is the mainstay of treatment of cholera patients; the severe cases require antibiotic treatment to reduce the duration of illness and replacement of fluid intake. The antibiotic therapy currently has faced difficulties due to the rapid emergence and spread of multidrug resistant V. cholerae causing several outbreaks in the globe. Currently, cholera has been becoming endemic in an increasing number of geographical areas, reflecting a failure in implementation of control measures. However, the current safe oral vaccines lower the number of resistant infections and could thus represent an effective intervention measure to control antibiotic resistance in cholera. Overall, the priorities for cholera control remain public health interventions through improved drinking water, sanitation, surveillance and access to health care facilities, and further development of safe, effective and appropriate vaccines. Thus, this review describes the facts and phenomena related to the disease cholera, which is still a great threat mainly to the developing countries, and hence a grave global concern too.

  14. Cholera in Zimbabwe: Developing an Educational Response to a Health Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandikonza, Caleb; Musindo, Beatrice; Taylor, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In February 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe had claimed 3,300 lives and infected 66,000 people--greater than the toll of that disease in the whole of Africa in most years. How is it possible that a disease such as cholera can have such a devastating effect in modern times? How should one…

  15. Cholera in Zimbabwe: Developing an Educational Response to a Health Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandikonza, Caleb; Musindo, Beatrice; Taylor, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In February 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe had claimed 3,300 lives and infected 66,000 people--greater than the toll of that disease in the whole of Africa in most years. How is it possible that a disease such as cholera can have such a devastating effect in modern times? How should one…

  16. A Differential Effect of Indian Ocean Dipole and El Niño on Cholera Dynamics in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Faruque, A. S. G.; Yunus, Md; Streatfield, Kim; Moji, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Background A stationary (i.e., constant through time) association between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and epidemics of cholera in Bangladesh has been widely assumed. However, whether or not elements of the local climate that are relevant for cholera transmission have stationary signatures of the IOD on their dynamics over different time scales is still not clear. Here we report results on the time-varying relationships between the various remote and local environmental drivers and cholera incidence in Bangladesh. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross wavelet coherency analysis to examine patterns of association between monthly cholera cases in the hospitals in Dhaka and Matlab (1983–2008) and indices for both IOD and ENSO. Our results showed that the strength of both the IOD and ENSO associations with cholera hospitalizations changed across time scales during the study period. In Dhaka, 4-year long coherent cycles were observed between cholera and the index of IOD in 1988–1997. In Matlab, the effect of ENSO was more dominant while there was no evidence for an IOD effect on cholera hospitalizations. Conclusions/Significance Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary, possibly non-linear, patterns of association between cholera hospitalizations and climatic factors in cholera epidemic early warning systems. PMID:23555861

  17. Cholera in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The cholera epidemic 1st hit South America in January 1991 in the coastal town of Chancay, Peru. In 2 weeks, it spread over 2000 km of the Pacific coast. By the end of the 1st month, it had already reached the mountains and tropical forests. By August 1991, cholera cases were reported in order of appearances in Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Brazil, the US, Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia, and El Salvador. Health authorities still do not know how it was introduced into South America. The case fatality rate has remained at a low of 1%, probably due to the prompt actions of health authorities in informing the public of the epidemic and what preventive cautions should be taken. This epidemic is part of the 7th pandemic which originated in Celebes, Indonesia in 1961. Cholera can spread relatively unchecked in Latin America because sewage in urban areas is not treated even though they do have sewage collection systems. The untreated wastewater enters rivers and the ocean. Consumption of raw seafood is not unusual and has been responsible for cholera infection in some cases. In fact, many countries placed import restrictions on marine products from Peru following the outbreak at a loss of $US10-$US40 million. Municipal sewage treatment facilities, especially stabilization ponds, would prevent the spread of cholera and other pathogens. In rural areas, pit latrines located away from wells can effectively dispose of human wastes. Most water supplies in Latin America are not disinfected. Disinfection drinking water with adequate levels of chlorine would effectively destroy V. cholera. If this is not possible, boiling the water for 2-3 minutes would destroy the pathogen. Any cases of cholera must be reported to PAHO. PAHO has responded to the outbreak by forming a Cholera Task Force and arranged transport of oral rehydration salts, intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and other essential medical supplies.

  18. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Pollitzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    In this study, figures relating to cholera deaths occurring in individual countries, from 1900 to 1952, are recorded as well as the incidence of the disease from 1923 up to the present time. The mode of spread of cholera from its endemic home in India to outside countries is described in relation to favourable seasons, main routes followed by the infection, and the role played by large religious gatherings. The incidence of the disease in the various seaports infected within recent years is discussed. PMID:14364186

  19. The erratic evolution of cholera therapy: from folklore to science.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C C

    1990-01-01

    Cholera is an exceptionally frightening epidemic disease because it kills its victims so very rapidly. The development of cholera therapy is traced from the early 19th century purges and bloodletting to the current use of oral rehydration solutions.

  20. Efficacy of a Single-Dose, Inactivated Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Wierzba, Thomas F; Ali, Mohammad; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Saha, Amit; Khan, Iqbal A; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Akter, Afroza; Khan, Arifuzzaman; Begum, Yasmin A; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R; Khanam, Farhana; Chowdhury, Mohiul I; Islam, Taufiqul; Chowdhury, Atique I; Rahman, Anisur; Siddique, Shah A; You, Young A; Kim, Deok R; Siddik, Ashraf U; Saha, Nirod C; Kabir, Alamgir; Cravioto, Alejandro; Desai, Sachin N; Singh, Ajit P; Clemens, John D

    2016-05-05

    A single-dose regimen of the current killed oral cholera vaccines that have been prequalified by the World Health Organization would make them more attractive for use against endemic and epidemic cholera. We conducted an efficacy trial of a single dose of the killed oral cholera vaccine Shanchol, which is currently given in a two-dose schedule, in an urban area in which cholera is highly endemic. Nonpregnant residents of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who were 1 year of age or older were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of oral cholera vaccine or oral placebo. The primary outcome was vaccine protective efficacy against culture-confirmed cholera occurring 7 to 180 days after dosing. Prespecified secondary outcomes included protective efficacy against severely dehydrating culture-confirmed cholera during the same interval, against cholera and severe cholera occurring 7 to 90 versus 91 to 180 days after dosing, and against cholera and severe cholera according to age at baseline. A total of 101 episodes of cholera, 37 associated with severe dehydration, were detected among the 204,700 persons who received one dose of vaccine or placebo. The vaccine protective efficacy was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 60%; 0.37 cases per 1000 vaccine recipients vs. 0.62 cases per 1000 placebo recipients) against all cholera episodes, 63% (95% CI, 24 to 82%; 0.10 vs. 0.26 cases per 1000 recipients) against severely dehydrating cholera episodes, and 63% (95% CI, -39 to 90%), 56% (95% CI, 16 to 77%), and 16% (95% CI, -49% to 53%) against all cholera episodes among persons vaccinated at the age of 5 to 14 years, 15 or more years, and 1 to 4 years, respectively, although the differences according to age were not significant (P=0.25). Adverse events occurred at similar frequencies in the two groups. A single dose of the oral cholera vaccine was efficacious in older children (≥5 years of age) and in adults in a setting with a high level of cholera endemicity. (Funded by the Bill

  1. Characterization of environmental Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujun; Wang, Duochun; Li, Baisheng; Zhou, Haijian; Liang, Song; Ke, Changwen; Deng, Xiaoling; Kan, Biao; Morris, J Glenn; Cao, Wuchun

    2016-02-01

    Toxigenic isolates of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 from aquatic reservoirs are a key source for recurrent epidemics of cholera in human populations. However, we do not have an optimal understanding of the microbiology of the strains within these reservoirs, particularly outside of the time periods when there are active cholera cases in the surrounding community. The main objective of the present study was to identify and characterize V. cholerae O1 and O139 in the Pearl River Estuary at a time when active disease was not being identified, despite prior occurrence of epidemic cholera in the region. Water samples were collected at 24 sites in the research area at monthly intervals between 2007 and 2010, and screened for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139. All isolates were screened for the presence of ctxAB, ompW, toxR, and tcpA genes. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was used to assess possible relationships among strains. The results show that Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139 was isolated, on average, from 6.7% of the sites screened at each time point. All V. cholerae O1 and O139 isolates were ctxAB negative, and 37% were positive for tcpA. Isolation was most common in the oldest, most urbanized district compared with other districts, and was associated with lower pH. Despite year-to-year variability in isolation rates, there was no evidence of seasonality. MLVA of 27 selected isolates showed evidence of high genetic diversity, with no evidence of clustering by year or geographic location. In this region where cholera has been epidemic in the past, there is evidence of environmental persistence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. However, environmental strains were consistently nontoxigenic, with a high level of genetic diversity; their role as current or future agents of human disease remains uncertain.

  2. Cholera in a developing megacity; Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, A.; Khan, A.; Malik, T.; Fisher-Hoch, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Despite rapid urbanization and increasing affluence in Karachi, cases of cholera are frequent. We analysed computerized isolation data from the AKUH Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Karachi, from 1990-6 to examine microbiological, temporal and demographic trends in Vibrio cholerae infections. During this period 888 strains of V. cholerae (566 V. cholerae serogroup O1, and 204 V. cholerae serogroup O139) were isolated from specimens from 886 patients; 214/464 were adult inpatients, and 250/464 paediatric inpatients, the remaining 422 outpatients. Isolations peaked between June and August. Overlapping epidemics occurred in 1993 and 1994 of serogroup O1 (May to August), and serogroup O139 (August to October). All ages and social and economic strata were affected. Forty-four percent of all isolates were from children under the age of 5 years. The mean age of all patients with serogroup O1 infections was 19.6 years (+/-0.9) compared with 367 (+/-1.7) for serogroup O139 infections (P < 0.0001, t test). More than a quarter (27%) of all serogroup O1 isolates were from babies under 2 years of age. One patient had a serogroup O1 infection followed by a serogroup O139 infection 1 year later. Another patient was infected with serogroup O1 strains 5 years apart. Emergence of resistant strains was observed, but by 1996 serogroup O139 had disappeared. An aquatic organism, cholera nevertheless continues to take its toll in this city of 11 million situated in a desert. PMID:9440430

  3. Endemic cholera in rural Bangladesh, 1966-1980.

    PubMed

    Glass, R I; Becker, S; Huq, M I; Stoll, B J; Khan, M U; Merson, M H; Lee, J V; Black, R E

    1982-12-01

    Since 1963, the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), formerly the Cholera Research Laboratory, has maintained a field station in Matlab to treat patients from a surveillance population of 240,000 who have cholera and other diarrheal diseases. Since 1966, the authors have analyzed hospital records of 7141 surveillance-area patients culture-positive for v. cholerae 01 to relate the seasonality, age and sex distribution, and geographic trends with hypotheses concerning transmission, immunity, and risk groups. From this review, they have found that: 1) children 2-9 years old and adult women are most commonly hospitalized for cholera; 2) V. cholerae 01 emerges simultaneously throughout the area of surveillance, with the early cases being of different phage types; 3) three patients were hospitalized twice for cholera compared with 29 expected on the basis of life-table analysis (p less than 0.01), suggesting that immunity to severe disease conferred by previous illness may be stable and long-lasting; 4) no constant relationship was found between the times of onset or peaks of the yearly cholera epidemic and the times of onset or peaks of the monsoon rains or river water levels; and 5) an outbreak of multiply antibiotic-resistant V. cholerae 01 infection documented in 1979 raises questions about the dissemination of resistance plasmids, antibiotic-use patterns, and the need for other drugs in addition to tetracycline. While little progress has been made in understanding the mode of transmission of v. cholerae 01, and in identifying practices for prevention, fluid therapy in this area has decreased the case fatality rate significantly and provides guidance for similar programs elsewhere.

  4. Space weather and influenza epidemic in Azerbaijan during last 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayev, E. S.; Salman-Zadeh, R. Kh.; Sadykhova, F. E.; Shykhaliyeva, Sh. T.

    2002-03-01

    For purposes of studying of possible influence of the solar and geomagnetic activity on influenza diseases and epidemic, the data covering the time period of 1976 - 2000 is analyzed. Period, duration, intensity and seasonal behavior of the influenza epidemic, tendency of its beginning within a solar cycle are determined for the Absheron Peninsula area including the capital city Baku with millions of inhabitants. Investigations reveal that influenza epidemic usually begins 2 - 3 years before and/or 2 - 3 years after the sunspot cycle maximum. We suppose that solar activity affects the influenza epidemic mainly through geomagnetic activity (magnetic storms). Forecast method for prophylactic measures is developed for considered region. Obtained results are interpreted and compared with similar ones.

  5. Environmental surveillance for toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in surface waters of Haiti.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Amy M; Haley, Bradd J; Chen, Arlene; Mull, Bonnie J; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Katz, Lee S; Humphrys, Michael S; Derado, Gordana; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Colwell, Rita R; Huq, Anwar; Hill, Vincent R

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic cholera was reported in Haiti in 2010, with no information available on the occurrence or geographic distribution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Haitian waters. In a series of field visits conducted in Haiti between 2011 and 2013, water and plankton samples were collected at 19 sites. Vibrio cholerae was detected using culture, polymerase chain reaction, and direct viable count methods (DFA-DVC). Cholera toxin genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction in broth enrichments of samples collected in all visits except March 2012. Toxigenic V. cholerae was isolated from river water in 2011 and 2013. Whole genome sequencing revealed that these isolates were a match to the outbreak strain. The DFA-DVC tests were positive for V. cholerae O1 in plankton samples collected from multiple sites. Results of this survey show that toxigenic V. cholerae could be recovered from surface waters in Haiti more than 2 years after the onset of the epidemic. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Improving immunization approaches to cholera.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amit; Rosewell, Alexander; Hayen, Andrew; MacIntyre, C Raina; Qadri, Firdausi

    2017-03-01

    Cholera's impact is greatest in resource-limited countries. In the last decade several large epidemics have led to a global push to improve and implement the tools for cholera prevention and control. Areas covered: PubMed, Google Scholar and the WHO website were searched to review the literature and summarize the current status of cholera vaccines to make recommendations on improving immunization approaches to cholera. Oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) have demonstrated their effectiveness in endemic, outbreak response and emergency settings, highlighting their potential for wider adoption. While two doses of the currently available OCVs are recommended by manufacturers, a single dose would be easier to implement. Encouragingly, recent studies have shown that cold chain requirements may no longer be essential. The establishment of the global OCV stockpile in 2013 has been a major advance in cholera preparedness. New killed and live-attenuated vaccines are being actively explored as candidate vaccines for endemic settings and/or as a traveller's vaccine. The recent advances in cholera vaccination approaches should be considered in the global cholera control strategy. Expert commentary: The development of affordable cholera vaccines is a major success to improve cholera control. New vaccines and country specific interventions will further reduce the burden of this disease globally.

  7. Analyzing transmission dynamics of cholera with public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Posny, Drew; Wang, Jin; Mukandavire, Zindoga; Modnak, Chairat

    2015-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a serious public health concern in developing countries and the global increase in the number of reported outbreaks suggests that activities to control the diseases and surveillance programs to identify or predict the occurrence of the next outbreaks are not adequate. These outbreaks have increased in frequency, severity, duration and endemicity in recent years. Mathematical models for infectious diseases play a critical role in predicting and understanding disease mechanisms, and have long provided basic insights in the possible ways to control infectious diseases. In this paper, we present a new deterministic cholera epidemiological model with three types of control measures incorporated into a cholera epidemic setting: treatment, vaccination and sanitation. Essential dynamical properties of the model with constant intervention controls which include local and global stabilities for the equilibria are carefully analyzed. Further, using optimal control techniques, we perform a study to investigate cost-effective solutions for time-dependent public health interventions in order to curb disease transmission in epidemic settings. Our results show that the basic reproductive number (R0) remains the model's epidemic threshold despite the inclusion of a package of cholera interventions. For time-dependent controls, the results suggest that these interventions closely interplay with each other, and the costs of controls directly affect the length and strength of each control in an optimal strategy.

  8. A five-year study on the epidemiological approaches to cholera in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mafi, Moharam; Goya, Mohammad Mahdi; Hajia, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholera is considered a key indicator of social development but still is reported in various cities of Iran. The present study aimed to analyze the available information regarding cholera outbreaks since 2010 in Iran. Methods: All cases reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Ministry of Health and Education who had been confirmed as cholera cases by the Health Reference Laboratory, were entered into this study since 2010. A specific spreadsheet was designed to ensure the safe keeping of the patient records. Results: A total of 1522 patients were clinically diagnosed as cholera with laboratory confirmation over the study period. Cholera was detected in 26 Provinces and 115 cities during this period. Mean age of the patients was 35.1±17, both the Inaba and Ogawa strains were isolated. The highest mortality and the morbidity rate was 1.98% in 2013. The most cholera prevalent provinces in order of frequency were Baluchistan, Alborz, Gilan, Golestan and Qom, as well as Tehran. Inaba serotype was the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in 2013. Conclusion: These findings indicate significant outbreaks of cholera in some of the provinces of Iran and warrant appropriate treatment and preventive measures. PMID:27757199

  9. Understanding impacts of climatic extremes on diarrheal disease epidemics: Insights from mechanistic disease propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    An epidemic outbreak of diarrheal diseases (primarily cholera) in Haiti in 2010 is a reminder that our understanding on disease triggers, transmission and spreading mechanisms is incomplete. Cholera can occur in two forms - epidemic (defined as sudden outbreak in a historically disease free region) and endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years). Examples of countries with epidemic cholera include Pakistan (2008), Congo (2008), and most recently Haiti (2010). A significant difference between endemic and epidemic regions is the mortality rate, i.e., 1% or lower in an endemic regions versus 3-7% during recent epidemic outbreaks. A fundamentally transformational approach - a warning system with several months prediction lead time - is needed to prevent disease outbreak and minimize its impact on population. Lack of information on spatial and temporal variability of disease incidence as well as transmission in human population continues to be significant challenge in the development of early-warning systems for cholera. Using satellite data on regional hydroclimatic processes, water and sanitation infrastructure indices, and biological pathogen growth information, here we present a Simple, Mechanistic, Adaptive, Remote sensing based Regional Transmission or SMART model to (i) identify regions of potential cholera outbreaks and (ii) quantify mechanism of spread of the disease in previously disease free region. Our results indicate that epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for the growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. We discuss the above findings in light of

  10. [Cholera in 1831. Challenges for science and the federal government].

    PubMed

    Stamm-Kuhlmann, T

    1989-01-01

    The peak of the first great cholera pandemic in 1831 fomented the controversy among contagionists and non-contagionists. In the following year the public debate centered around the correct interpretation of the recent experiences with cholera. The central government of the bureaucratic-absolutist monarchy in Prussia adhered to a firmly contagionist interpretation of the disease and reacted accordingly. Local authorities in Königsberg and Berlin and the bourgeoisie in the merchant city of Danzig, however, stressed the destructive consequences of the cordon system. They considered the results of an interruption in trade and industry to be worse than the damage inflicted by the epidemic. The summer of 1831 demonstrated that cholera could not be stopped by the cordons, but the King's medical advisors nevertheless remained contagionists. Non-contagionists put forward several hypotheses to explain the origin and the spreading of cholera, mainly "miasma" theory and the Hippocratic paradigm of "epidemic constitution". The correlation between poverty and disease, however, was widely noticed. Physicians in the city of Bremen pointed to the necessity of sanitary precautions to be taken in cholera-free periods. On the other hand, many "honest" citizens believed that individuals with a "dissolute" conduct of life were more at risk to contract cholera than others. Instead of costly sanitary policies, the well-to-do classes preferred to identify the defense against cholera with the segregation of unwelcome elements of society. The article is based on hitherto unpublished sources from the former Prussian State Archives at Merseburg, GDR, and the State Archive of the Hanseatic City of Bremen.

  11. Herald waves of cholera in nineteenth century London

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Joseph H.; Poinar, Hendrik N.; Fisman, David N.; Earn, David J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Deaths from cholera in London, UK, were recorded weekly from 1824 to 1901. Three features of the time series stand out: (i) cholera deaths were strongly seasonal, with peak mortality almost always in the summer, (ii) the only non-summer outbreaks occurred in the spring of 1832, the autumn of 1848 and the winter of 1853, and (iii) extraordinarily severe summer outbreaks occurred in 1832, 1849, 1854 and 1866 (the four ‘great’ cholera years). The non-summer outbreaks of 1832, 1848 and 1853 appear to have been herald waves of newly invading cholera strains. In addition, a simple mathematical model confirms that a non-summer introduction of a new cholera strain can result in an initial herald wave, followed by a severe outbreak the following summer. Through the analysis of the genomes of nineteenth-century specimens, it may be possible to identify the strains that caused these herald waves and the well-known cholera epidemics that followed. PMID:21123253

  12. Identification of Atypical El Tor V. cholerae O1 Ogawa Hosting SXT Element in Senegal, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Diallo, Mamadou H.; Seck, Abdoulaye; Wane, Abdoul A.; Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Boye, Cheikh S.-B.; Sow, Ahmad I.; Gassama-Sow, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is the causative agent of cholera with classical and El Tor, two well-established biotypes. In last 20 years, hybrid strains of classical and El Tor and variant El Tor which carry classical ctxB have emerged worldwide. In 2004–2005, Senegal experienced major cholera epidemic with a number of cases totalling more than 31719 with approximately 458 fatal outcomes (CFR, 1.44%). In this retrospective study, fifty isolates out of a total of 403 V. cholerae biotype El Tor serovar Ogawa isolates from all areas in Senegal during the 2004–2005 cholera outbreak were randomly selected. Isolates were characterized using phenotypic and genotypic methods. The analysis of antibiotic resistance patterns revealed the predominance of the S-Su-TCY-Tsu phenotype (90% of isolates). The molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance revealed the presence of the SXT element, a self-transmissible chromosomally integrating element in all isolates. Most of V. cholerae isolates had an intact virulence cassette (86%) (ctx, zot, ace genes). All isolates tested gave amplification with primers for classical CT, and 10/50 (20%) of isolates carried classical and El Tor ctxB. The study reveals the presence of atypical V. cholerae O1 El Tor during cholera outbreak in Senegal in 2004–2005. PMID:28555129

  13. Genomic Epidemiology of the Haitian Cholera Outbreak: a Single Introduction Followed by Rapid, Extensive, and Continued Spread Characterized the Onset of the Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Talima; Koenig, Sara S. K.; Pearson, Ofori; Hicks, Nathan; Agrawal, Sonia; Sanjar, Fatemeh; Galens, Kevin; Daugherty, Sean; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Price, Lance B.; Upadhyay, Bishnu P.; Shakya, Geeta; Fraser, Claire M.; Ravel, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT For centuries, cholera has been one of the most feared diseases. The causative agent Vibrio cholerae is a waterborne Gram-negative enteric pathogen eliciting a severe watery diarrheal disease. In October 2010, the seventh pandemic reached Haiti, a country that had not experienced cholera for more than a century. By using whole-genome sequence typing and mapping strategies of 116 serotype O1 strains from global sources, including 44 Haitian genomes, we present a detailed reconstructed evolutionary history of the seventh pandemic with a focus on the Haitian outbreak. We catalogued subtle genomic alterations at the nucleotide level in the genome core and architectural rearrangements from whole-genome map comparisons. Isolates closely related to the Haitian isolates caused several recent outbreaks in southern Asia. This study provides evidence for a single-source introduction of cholera from Nepal into Haiti followed by rapid, extensive, and continued clonal expansion. The phylogeographic patterns in both southern Asia and Haiti argue for the rapid dissemination of V. cholerae across the landscape necessitating real-time surveillance efforts to complement the whole-genome epidemiological analysis. As eradication efforts move forward, phylogeographic knowledge will be important for identifying persistent sources and monitoring success at regional levels. The results of molecular and epidemiological analyses of this outbreak suggest that an indigenous Haitian source of V. cholerae is unlikely and that an indigenous source has not contributed to the genomic evolution of this clade. PMID:25370488

  14. Sustained Local Diversity of Vibrio cholerae O1 Biotypes in a Previously Cholera-Free Country

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the current cholera pandemic can trace its origin to a specific time and place, many variants of Vibrio cholerae have caused this disease over the last 50 years. The relative clinical importance and geographical distribution of these variants have changed with time, but most remain in circulation. Some countries, such as Mexico and Haiti, had escaped the current pandemic, until large epidemics struck them in 1991 and 2010, respectively. Cholera has been endemic in these countries ever since. A recent retrospective study in mBio presents the results of more than 3 decades of V. cholerae monitoring from environmental and clinical sources in Mexico (S. Y. Choi et al., mBio 7:e02160-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02160-15). It reveals that multiple V. cholerae variants, including classical strains from the previous pandemic, as well as completely novel biotypes, have been circulating in Mexico. This discovery has important implications for the epidemiology and evolution of V. cholerae. PMID:27143391

  15. The seventh pandemic of cholera in the USSR, 1961-89.

    PubMed Central

    Narkevich, M. I.; Onischenko, G. G.; Lomov, J. M.; Moskvitina, E. A.; Podosinnikova, L. S.; Medinsky, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Over the period 1961-89 a total of 1,713,057 cases of cholera were reported to WHO from 117 countries in all continents. The course of the epidemic fell into three periods: in period I (1961 to 1969), 24 countries (predominantly in Asia) reported about 419,968 cholera cases; in period II (1970 to 1977), 73 countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas reported 706,261 cases; and in period III (1978 to 1989), 83 countries reported 586,828 cases. The global epidemic was at its most severe in 1967-74. Subsequently morbidity declined and up to 1989 had remained high and stable, with 44,000-52,000 cases per annum. In the USSR 10,723 cholera cases and carriers were reported between 1965 and 1989 from 11 republics (but not Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, or Armenia). In 1965 and 1970-74 large-scale outbreaks of imported cholera were characteristic of the epidemic in the USSR. Thereafter morbidity declined, and sporadic cases were reported along with environmental, predominantly nontoxigenic strains of cholera vibrio. Most of the outbreaks in the 1970s were waterborne, and virulent strains containing the vct-gene were isolated from samples of water. Large-scale outbreaks continued that were associated with seafood and dairy produce that were contaminated with cholera vibrio. Clinical cases of cholera as well as a considerable number of carriers of avirulent nontoxigenic strains were reported. The epidemiological situation in the USSR is unstable, with cases of cholera and virulent strains from surface water being reported every year.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8490982

  16. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance of Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139 in China from 1993 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruibai; Lou, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Jie; Bi, Zhenqiang; Kan, Biao

    2012-01-01

    Regarded as an emerging diarrheal micropathogen, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 was first identified in 1992 and has become an important cause of cholera epidemics over the last two decades. O139 strains have been continually isolated since O139 cholera appeared in China in 1993, from sporadic cases and dispersed foodborne outbreaks, which are the common epidemic types of O139 cholera in China. Antibiotic resistance profiles of these epidemic strains are required for development of clinical treatments, epidemiological studies and disease control. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the antibiotic resistance of V. cholerae O139 strains isolated in China from 1993 to 2009 was conducted. The initial O139 isolates were resistant to streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and polymyxin B only, while multidrug resistance increased suddenly and became common in strains isolated after 1998. Different resistance profiles were observed in the isolates from different years. In contrast, most V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in the same period were much less resistant to these antibiotics and no obvious multidrug resistance patterns were detected. Most of the non-toxigenic strains isolated from the environment and seafood were resistant to four antibiotics or fewer, although a few multidrug resistant strains were also identified. These toxigenic O139 strains exhibited a high prevalence of the class I integron and the SXT element, which were rare in the non-toxigenic strains. Molecular subtyping of O139 strains showed highly diverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, which may correspond to the epidemic state of sporadic cases and small-scale outbreaks and complex resistance patterns. Severe multidrug resistance, even resistance transfers based on mobile antibiotic resistance elements, increases the probability of O139 cholera as a threat to public health. Therefore, continual epidemiological and antibiotic sensitivity surveillance should focus on the

  17. Multiple antibiotic resistance of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 in China from 1993 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Zhou, Yanyan; Wang, Ruibai; Lou, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Jie; Bi, Zhenqiang; Kan, Biao

    2012-01-01

    Regarded as an emerging diarrheal micropathogen, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 was first identified in 1992 and has become an important cause of cholera epidemics over the last two decades. O139 strains have been continually isolated since O139 cholera appeared in China in 1993, from sporadic cases and dispersed foodborne outbreaks, which are the common epidemic types of O139 cholera in China. Antibiotic resistance profiles of these epidemic strains are required for development of clinical treatments, epidemiological studies and disease control. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the antibiotic resistance of V. cholerae O139 strains isolated in China from 1993 to 2009 was conducted. The initial O139 isolates were resistant to streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and polymyxin B only, while multidrug resistance increased suddenly and became common in strains isolated after 1998. Different resistance profiles were observed in the isolates from different years. In contrast, most V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in the same period were much less resistant to these antibiotics and no obvious multidrug resistance patterns were detected. Most of the non-toxigenic strains isolated from the environment and seafood were resistant to four antibiotics or fewer, although a few multidrug resistant strains were also identified. These toxigenic O139 strains exhibited a high prevalence of the class I integron and the SXT element, which were rare in the non-toxigenic strains. Molecular subtyping of O139 strains showed highly diverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, which may correspond to the epidemic state of sporadic cases and small-scale outbreaks and complex resistance patterns. Severe multidrug resistance, even resistance transfers based on mobile antibiotic resistance elements, increases the probability of O139 cholera as a threat to public health. Therefore, continual epidemiological and antibiotic sensitivity surveillance should focus on the

  18. Vibrio cholerae in the environment.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Abdul Lateef; Junejo, Nasreen

    2004-08-01

    The emergence of cholera has been a significant public health problem around the world and battle to completely control this deadly disease continues. Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) microorganisms in the environment was considered as the most important factor in this regard. Soil, fresh water, sea water, aquatic plants, animals and some birds have been made target for search if they were providing reserve shelter to the causative agent during inter epidemic periods. Multiple environmental factors have been considered to have the aetiological relationship as no single source is found to host the microorganisms in an inter-epidemic period. We have attempted to review the literature from different parts of the world; encompassing experimental and isolation studies of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae in the environment. The non-pathogenic strains were also included due to converting behavior of the agents in the changing environmental scenario to pathogenic forms.

  19. National surveillance data on the epidemiology of cholera in Kenya, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Mutonga, David; Langat, Daniel; Mwangi, David; Tonui, Julia; Njeru, Mercy; Abade, Ahmed; Irura, Zephania; Njeru, Ian; Dahlke, Melissa

    2013-11-01

    Kenya has experienced multiple cholera outbreaks since 1971. Cholera remains an issue of major public health importance and one of the 35 priority diseases under Kenya's updated Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response strategy. We reviewed the cholera surveillance data reported to the World Health Organization and the Kenya Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation from 1997 through 2010 to determine trends in cholera disease for the 14-year period. A total of 68 522 clinically suspected cases of cholera and 2641 deaths were reported (overall case-fatality rate [CFR], 3.9%), affecting all regions of the country. Kenya's largest outbreak occurred during 1997-1999, resulting in 26 901 cases and 1362 deaths (CFR, 5.1%). Following a decline in disease occurrence, the country experienced a resurgence of epidemic cholera during 2007-2009 (16 616 cases and 454 deaths; CFR, 2.7%), which declined rapidly to 0 cases. Cases were reported through July 2010, with no cases reported during the second half of the year. About 42% of cases occurred in children aged <15 years. Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Inaba, was the predominant strain recorded from 2007 through 2010, although serotype Ogawa was also isolated. Recurrent outbreaks have most frequently affected Nairobi, Nyanza, and Coast provinces, as well as remote arid and semiarid regions and refugee camps. Kenya has experienced substantial amounts of reported cases of cholera during the past 14 years. Recent decreases in cholera case counts may reflect cholera control measures put in place by the National Ministry of Health; confirmation of this theory will require ongoing surveillance.

  20. 1885 Cholera Controversy: Klein versus Koch.

    PubMed

    Atalic, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    This paper will try to give new insight into the Cholera Controversy, which occurred 125 years ago. The majority of papers already written on the topic have emphasised the role of Robert Koch who described the comma bacillus as the cause of cholera epidemics. At the same time they have marginalised the role of Emanuel Edward Klein by stating that he was wrong when he objected to Robert Koch's statement, because as an employee of the British government he was politically motivated. Moreover, they have paid barely any attention to Klein's writings on the subject. In this paper I will try to approach his attitudes from the scientific, not political, perspective and try to explain the reasons why he challenged Koch.

  1. Rubella antibodies in women of childbearing age during an epidemic and the two years thereafter.

    PubMed

    Hornstein, L; Ben-Porath, E

    1976-10-01

    An epidemic of rubella started in the south of Israel late in 1971, and reached the north of the country in the spring of 1972. Between April 1972 and April 1975, 14,149 women of childbearing age from Haifa and the north of Israel were examined for rubella antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and complement fixation (CF) tests. During the year of the epidemic, CF antibody titers of greater than or equal 16 were found in 9.3% of cases with HI antibody titers of 64, in 37.7% of cases with HI titers of 128, and in 71.7% of cases with HI titers of greater than or equal 256. Two years later there were no women with CF antibody titers of greater than or equal 16 among those with HI titers of 64, and the percentage with CF antibody titers of greater than or equal 16 had decreased to 4.3% among women with HI titers of 128 and to 38.7% among those with HI antibody titers of greater than or equal 256. These results show that the determination of CF antibody titers may be useful in the serodiagnosis of recent rubella infection, especially diring an epidemic occurring several years after a previous one. The epidemic hardly altered the percentage of women susceptible to rubella. Although vaccination of 12-year-old girs was introduced in Israel in 1972, careful surveillance of women of childbearing age still remains necessary for detection and vaccination of susceptible nonpregnant women.

  2. The global burden of cholera

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Anna Lena; You, Young Ae; Kim, Young Eun; Sah, Binod; Maskery, Brian; Clemens, John

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the global burden of cholera using population-based incidence data and reports. Methods Countries with a recent history of cholera were classified as endemic or non-endemic, depending on whether they had reported cholera cases in at least three of the five most recent years. The percentages of the population in each country that lacked access to improved sanitation were used to compute the populations at risk for cholera, and incidence rates from published studies were applied to groups of countries to estimate the annual number of cholera cases in endemic countries. The estimates of cholera cases in non-endemic countries were based on the average numbers of cases reported from 2000 to 2008. Literature-based estimates of cholera case-fatality rates (CFRs) were used to compute the variance-weighted average cholera CFRs for estimating the number of cholera deaths. Findings About 1.4 billion people are at risk for cholera in endemic countries. An estimated 2.8 million cholera cases occur annually in such countries (uncertainty range: 1.4–4.3) and an estimated 87 000 cholera cases occur in non-endemic countries. The incidence is estimated to be greatest in children less than 5 years of age. Every year about 91 000 people (uncertainty range: 28 000 to 142 000) die of cholera in endemic countries and 2500 people die of the disease in non-endemic countries. Conclusion The global burden of cholera, as determined through a systematic review with clearly stated assumptions, is high. The findings of this study provide a contemporary basis for planning public health interventions to control cholera. PMID:22461716

  3. The global burden of cholera.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; Lopez, Anna Lena; You, Young Ae; Kim, Young Eun; Sah, Binod; Maskery, Brian; Clemens, John

    2012-03-01

    To estimate the global burden of cholera using population-based incidence data and reports. Countries with a recent history of cholera were classified as endemic or non-endemic, depending on whether they had reported cholera cases in at least three of the five most recent years. The percentages of the population in each country that lacked access to improved sanitation were used to compute the populations at risk for cholera, and incidence rates from published studies were applied to groups of countries to estimate the annual number of cholera cases in endemic countries. The estimates of cholera cases in non-endemic countries were based on the average numbers of cases reported from 2000 to 2008. Literature-based estimates of cholera case-fatality rates (CFRs) were used to compute the variance-weighted average cholera CFRs for estimating the number of cholera deaths. About 1.4 billion people are at risk for cholera in endemic countries. An estimated 2.8 million cholera cases occur annually in such countries (uncertainty range: 1.4-4.3) and an estimated 87,000 cholera cases occur in non-endemic countries. The incidence is estimated to be greatest in children less than 5 years of age. Every year about 91,000 people (uncertainty range: 28,000 to 142,000) die of cholera in endemic countries and 2500 people die of the disease in non-endemic countries. The global burden of cholera, as determined through a systematic review with clearly stated assumptions, is high. The findings of this study provide a contemporary basis for planning public health interventions to control cholera.

  4. Isolation of Vibrio cholera El Tor Inaba From Lemna minor and Eichhornia crassipens Roots in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cordoba Aguilar, Edgar; Herrera Rivero, Marisol; Rubi, Alberto; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; Coutino Rodriguez, Rocio

    2014-03-01

    During epidemic periods, the strain Vibrio cholera El Tor has been isolated from the aquatic macrophyte roots of Eichhornia crassipens and Lemna minor, suggesting that aquatic plants could be environmental reservoirs through either a non-specific association or a commensalism relationship. Therefore, it is important to understand V. cholera reservoirs in order to establish prevention strategies against this pathogen. Our interest was to determine whether V. cholera could be isolated and typified from L. minor and E. crassipens roots. From 2004 to 2005, plants were collected from various ecological niches and the roots were used to isolate V. cholera. Standard bacteriological, biochemical and serological tests were used for its typification. In five out of the nine ecological niches explored, we collected either L. minor or E. crassipens, as these specimens cohabited only in two niches. V. cholera was isolated from both L. minor and E. crassipens roots. The isolated V. cholera showed the same biochemical characteristics as the pure V. cholera strain which was used as a control. The isolated V. cholera corresponded to V. cholera O1 El Tor Inaba, which is the same serotype related to the last outbreak in Mexico. For first time V. cholera El Tor Inaba has been isolated several years after the last emergence of cholera in Mexico. A viable and cultivable V. cholera strain, sourced from freshwater niches in E. crassipens and L. minor roots, suggests the importance of these plants as a permanent aquatic reservoir for these organisms. The monitoring of E. crassipens and L. minor is the responsibility of health institutions in order to evaluate the ongoing risks.

  5. Isolation of Vibrio cholera El Tor Inaba From Lemna minor and Eichhornia crassipens Roots in Veracruz, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba Aguilar, Edgar; Herrera Rivero, Marisol; Rubi, Alberto; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; Coutino Rodriguez, Rocio

    2014-01-01

    Background: During epidemic periods, the strain Vibrio cholera El Tor has been isolated from the aquatic macrophyte roots of Eichhornia crassipens and Lemna minor, suggesting that aquatic plants could be environmental reservoirs through either a non-specific association or a commensalism relationship. Therefore, it is important to understand V. cholera reservoirs in order to establish prevention strategies against this pathogen. Objectives: Our interest was to determine whether V. cholera could be isolated and typified from L. minor and E. crassipens roots. Materials and Methods: From 2004 to 2005, plants were collected from various ecological niches and the roots were used to isolate V. cholera. Standard bacteriological, biochemical and serological tests were used for its typification. Results: In five out of the nine ecological niches explored, we collected either L. minor or E. crassipens, as these specimens cohabited only in two niches. V. cholera was isolated from both L. minor and E. crassipens roots. The isolated V. cholera showed the same biochemical characteristics as the pure V. cholera strain which was used as a control. The isolated V. cholera corresponded to V. cholera O1 El Tor Inaba, which is the same serotype related to the last outbreak in Mexico. Conclusions: For first time V. cholera El Tor Inaba has been isolated several years after the last emergence of cholera in Mexico. A viable and cultivable V. cholera strain, sourced from freshwater niches in E. crassipens and L. minor roots, suggests the importance of these plants as a permanent aquatic reservoir for these organisms. The monitoring of E. crassipens and L. minor is the responsibility of health institutions in order to evaluate the ongoing risks. PMID:25147681

  6. Critical Analysis of Compositions and Protective Efficacies of Oral Killed Cholera Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Two cholera vaccines, sold as Shanchol and Dukoral, are currently available. This review presents a critical analysis of the protective efficacies of these vaccines. Children under 5 years of age are very vulnerable to cholera and account for the highest incidence of cholera cases and more than half of the resulting deaths. Both Shanchol and Dukoral are two-spaced-dose oral vaccines comprising large numbers of killed cholera bacteria. The former contains Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 cells, and the latter contains V. cholerae O1 cells with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin. In a field trial in Kolkata (India), Shanchol, the preferred vaccine, protected 45% of the test subjects in all of the age groups and only 17% of the children under 5 years of age during the first year of surveillance. In a field trial in Peru, two spaced doses of Dukoral offered negative protection in children under 5 years of age and little protection (15%) in vaccinees over 6 years of age during the first year of surveillance. Little is known about Dukoral's long-term protective efficacy. Both of these vaccines have questionable compositions, using V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in 1947 that have been inactivated by heat and formalin treatments that may denature protein. Immunological studies revealed Dukoral's reduced and short-lived efficacy, as measured by several immunological endpoints. Various factors, such as the necessity for multiple doses, poor protection of children under 5 years of age, the requirement of a cold supply chain, production costs, and complex logistics of vaccine delivery, greatly reduce the suitability of either of these vaccines for endemic or epidemic cholera control in resource-poor settings. PMID:25056361

  7. Critical analysis of compositions and protective efficacies of oral killed cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Shahjahan

    2014-09-01

    Two cholera vaccines, sold as Shanchol and Dukoral, are currently available. This review presents a critical analysis of the protective efficacies of these vaccines. Children under 5 years of age are very vulnerable to cholera and account for the highest incidence of cholera cases and more than half of the resulting deaths. Both Shanchol and Dukoral are two-spaced-dose oral vaccines comprising large numbers of killed cholera bacteria. The former contains Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 cells, and the latter contains V. cholerae O1 cells with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin. In a field trial in Kolkata (India), Shanchol, the preferred vaccine, protected 45% of the test subjects in all of the age groups and only 17% of the children under 5 years of age during the first year of surveillance. In a field trial in Peru, two spaced doses of Dukoral offered negative protection in children under 5 years of age and little protection (15%) in vaccinees over 6 years of age during the first year of surveillance. Little is known about Dukoral's long-term protective efficacy. Both of these vaccines have questionable compositions, using V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in 1947 that have been inactivated by heat and formalin treatments that may denature protein. Immunological studies revealed Dukoral's reduced and short-lived efficacy, as measured by several immunological endpoints. Various factors, such as the necessity for multiple doses, poor protection of children under 5 years of age, the requirement of a cold supply chain, production costs, and complex logistics of vaccine delivery, greatly reduce the suitability of either of these vaccines for endemic or epidemic cholera control in resource-poor settings.

  8. Avian Cholera, a Threat to the Viability of an Arctic Seabird Colony?

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, Sébastien; Jenouvrier, Stéphanie; Gilchrist, H. Grant; Forbes, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that infectious diseases cause wildlife population extirpation or extinction remains anecdotal and it is unclear whether the impacts of a pathogen at the individual level can scale up to population level so drastically. Here, we quantify the response of a Common eider colony to emerging epidemics of avian cholera, one of the most important infectious diseases affecting wild waterfowl. We show that avian cholera has the potential to drive colony extinction, even over a very short period. Extinction depends on disease severity (the impact of the disease on adult female survival) and disease frequency (the number of annual epidemics per decade). In case of epidemics of high severity (i.e., causing >30% mortality of breeding females), more than one outbreak per decade will be unsustainable for the colony and will likely lead to extinction within the next century; more than four outbreaks per decade will drive extinction to within 20 years. Such severity and frequency of avian cholera are already observed, and avian cholera might thus represent a significant threat to viability of breeding populations. However, this will depend on the mechanisms underlying avian cholera transmission, maintenance, and spread, which are currently only poorly known. PMID:22355304

  9. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae diarrhea, Bangladesh, 2004.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu Syed G; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Chowdhury, Fahima; Nair, Gopinath B; Salam, Mohammed A; Sack, David A; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2005-07-01

    Flooding in Dhaka in July 2004 caused epidemics of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was almost as prevalent as Vibrio cholerae O1 in diarrheal stools. ETEC that produced heat-stable enterotoxin alone was most prevalent, and 78% of strains had colonization factors. Like V. cholerae O1, ETEC can cause epidemic diarrhea.

  10. Invasive Vibrio cholerae Infection Following Burn Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    as asymptomatic col- onization, otitis , gastroenteritis, soft-tissue infection, sepsis, or even cerebritis. In contrast, epidemic V. cholerae (O-1 or...cholerae grows well on common blood agar, with decreased bacterial over- growth on selective media , such as TCBS agar. As noted in our case (Figure 1), it...is possible for both epidemic and nonepidemic strains to have a “rugose” phenotype on nonselective media , and usually a smooth phenotype on TCBS.11

  11. Fish as Hosts of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Malka; Izhaki, Ido

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of pandemic cholera, is abundant in marine and freshwater environments. Copepods and chironomids are natural reservoirs of this species. However, the ways V. cholerae is globally disseminated are as yet unknown. Here we review the scientific literature that provides evidence for the possibility that some fish species may be reservoirs and vectors of V. cholerae. So far, V. cholerae has been isolated from 30 fish species (22 freshwater; 9 marine). V. cholerae O1 was reported in a few cases. In most cases V. cholerae was isolated from fish intestines, but it has also been detected in gills, skin, kidney, liver and brain tissue. In most cases the fish were healthy but in some, they were diseased. Nevertheless, Koch postulates were not applied to prove that V. cholerae and not another agent was the cause of the disease in the fish. Evidence from the literature correlates raw fish consumption or fish handling to a few cholera cases or cholera epidemics. Thus, we can conclude that V. cholerae inhabits some marine and freshwater fish species. It is possible that fish may protect the bacteria in unfavorable habitats while the bacteria may assist the fish to digest its food. Also, fish may disseminate the bacteria in the aquatic environment and may transfer it to waterbirds that consume them. Thus, fish are reservoirs of V. cholerae and may play a role in its global dissemination. PMID:28293221

  12. Fish as Hosts of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Malka; Izhaki, Ido

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of pandemic cholera, is abundant in marine and freshwater environments. Copepods and chironomids are natural reservoirs of this species. However, the ways V. cholerae is globally disseminated are as yet unknown. Here we review the scientific literature that provides evidence for the possibility that some fish species may be reservoirs and vectors of V. cholerae. So far, V. cholerae has been isolated from 30 fish species (22 freshwater; 9 marine). V. cholerae O1 was reported in a few cases. In most cases V. cholerae was isolated from fish intestines, but it has also been detected in gills, skin, kidney, liver and brain tissue. In most cases the fish were healthy but in some, they were diseased. Nevertheless, Koch postulates were not applied to prove that V. cholerae and not another agent was the cause of the disease in the fish. Evidence from the literature correlates raw fish consumption or fish handling to a few cholera cases or cholera epidemics. Thus, we can conclude that V. cholerae inhabits some marine and freshwater fish species. It is possible that fish may protect the bacteria in unfavorable habitats while the bacteria may assist the fish to digest its food. Also, fish may disseminate the bacteria in the aquatic environment and may transfer it to waterbirds that consume them. Thus, fish are reservoirs of V. cholerae and may play a role in its global dissemination.

  13. The "first" case of cholera in Haiti: lessons for global health.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Walton, David A

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute watery diarrheal disease caused by infection with Vibrio cholerae. The disease has a high fatality rate when untreated and outbreaks of cholera have been increasing globally in the past decade, most recently in Haiti. We present the case of a 28-year-old Haitian male with a history of severe untreated mental health disorder that developed acute fatal watery diarrhea in mid-October 2010 in central Haiti after drinking from the local river. We believe he is the first or among the first cases of cholera in Haiti during the current epidemic. By reviewing his case, we extracted lessons for global health on the importance of mental health for overall health, the globalization of diseases in small communities, and the importance of a comprehensive approach to the health of communities when planning services in resource-poor settings.

  14. The “First” Case of Cholera in Haiti: Lessons for Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C.; Walton, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute watery diarrheal disease caused by infection with Vibrio cholerae. The disease has a high fatality rate when untreated and outbreaks of cholera have been increasing globally in the past decade, most recently in Haiti. We present the case of a 28-year-old Haitian male with a history of severe untreated mental health disorder that developed acute fatal watery diarrhea in mid-October 2010 in central Haiti after drinking from the local river. We believe he is the first or among the first cases of cholera in Haiti during the current epidemic. By reviewing his case, we extracted lessons for global health on the importance of mental health for overall health, the globalization of diseases in small communities, and the importance of a comprehensive approach to the health of communities when planning services in resource-poor settings. PMID:22232448

  15. Active surveillance of the aquatic environment for potential prediction, prevention and spread of water borne disease: the cholera paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, A.; Colwell, R.

    2011-12-01

    Based on results of ecological and epidemiological studies, occurrence and spread of certain diseases are more fully understood. Cholera is a major waterborne disease, that is relatively easily treatable and clearly preventable, yet tens of thousands die each year worldwide. A dose dependent disease, the infectious dose can vary from 103-106, depending on health status of the victim. Historically, cholera has been shown to spread from person to person. Furthermore, the disease is caused predominantly via ingestion of contaminated water and most of the outbreaks that have been recorded worldwide originated in a coastal region. Using appropriate detection methods, Vibrio cholerae can be isolated from samples collected from ponds, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters globally. The populations of V. cholerae may vary in numbers during different seasons of the year. It is important to have a clear understanding of the distribution of the causative agent in the environment as such information can assist public health officials in taking action to prevent outbreaks of cholera. Thus an effective monitoring program is critical, particularly in light of climate change with temperature extremes more likely to be occurring. Based on a predictive model and results of ground truth data, temperature has been found to be a factor in the increase of V. cholerae in the environment. Correlation was observed with occurrence of cholera and both temperature and salinity. More recent research indicates additional factors need to be considered in predicting cholera epidemics, including the hydrology and disease dynamics.

  16. Initial epidemic area is strongly associated with the yearly extent of soybean rust spread in North America

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Christopher C.; Wallace, LaRae D.; Allen, Tom W.; Hollier, Clayton A.; Kemerait, Robert C.; Sikora, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Hosts of soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) are sensitive to low temperatures, limiting this obligate parasite in the United States to overwintering sites in a restricted area along the Gulf Coast. This temperature sensitivity of soybean rust hosts allowed us to study spatial spread of epidemic invasions over similar territory for seven sequential years, 2005–2011. The epidemic front expanded slowly from early April through July, with the majority of expansion occurring from August through November. There was a 7.4-fold range of final epidemic extent (0.4 to 3.0 million km2) from the year of smallest final disease extent (2011) to that of the largest (2007). The final epidemic area of each year was regressed against epidemic areas recorded at one-week intervals to determine the association of final epidemic extent with current epidemic extent. Coefficients of determination for these regressions varied between 0.44 to 0.62 during April and May. The correlation coefficients varied between 0.70 and 0.96 from early June through October, and then increased monotonically to 1.0 by year's end. Thus, the spatial extent of disease when the epidemics began rapid expansion may have been a crucial contributor to subsequent spread of soybean rust. Our analyses used presence/absence data at the county level to evaluate the spread of the epidemic front only; the subsequent local intensification of disease could be strongly influenced by other factors, including weather. PMID:23853520

  17. Initial epidemic area is strongly associated with the yearly extent of soybean rust spread in North America.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Christopher C; Wallace, Larae D; Allen, Tom W; Hollier, Clayton A; Kemerait, Robert C; Sikora, Edward J

    2013-07-01

    Hosts of soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) are sensitive to low temperatures, limiting this obligate parasite in the United States to overwintering sites in a restricted area along the Gulf Coast. This temperature sensitivity of soybean rust hosts allowed us to study spatial spread of epidemic invasions over similar territory for seven sequential years, 2005-2011. The epidemic front expanded slowly from early April through July, with the majority of expansion occurring from August through November. There was a 7.4-fold range of final epidemic extent (0.4 to 3.0 million km(2)) from the year of smallest final disease extent (2011) to that of the largest (2007). The final epidemic area of each year was regressed against epidemic areas recorded at one-week intervals to determine the association of final epidemic extent with current epidemic extent. Coefficients of determination for these regressions varied between 0.44 to 0.62 during April and May. The correlation coefficients varied between 0.70 and 0.96 from early June through October, and then increased monotonically to 1.0 by year's end. Thus, the spatial extent of disease when the epidemics began rapid expansion may have been a crucial contributor to subsequent spread of soybean rust. Our analyses used presence/absence data at the county level to evaluate the spread of the epidemic front only; the subsequent local intensification of disease could be strongly influenced by other factors, including weather.

  18. Fowl cholera.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J P; Bisgaard, M

    2000-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida subspecies multocida is the most common cause of fowl cholera, although P. multocida subspecies septica and gallicida may also cause fowl cholera-like disease to some extent. However, the virulence properties of the different subspecies for various hosts have not been elucidated. The severity and incidence of P. multocida infections may vary considerably depending on several factors associated with the host (including species and age of infected birds), the environment and the bacterial strain. No single virulence factor has been associated with the observed variation in virulence among strains. Possible virulence factors include the following: the capsule, endotoxin, outer membrane proteins, iron binding systems, heat shock proteins, neuraminidase production and antibody cleaving enzymes. No RTX toxins (repeats in toxin) appear to be produced by P. multocida, but P. multocida exotoxin (PMT) could contribute to virulence in some avian infections. The epidemiology of fowl cholera appears complex. Traditional serotyping systems are only of limited use in epidemiological studies. In recent years, molecular typing methods have been applied to avian strains of P. multocida of different origin. The results obtained using these newer methods indicate that wild birds may be a source of infection to commercial poultry. Documentation suggesting that mammals play a similar role is not as comprehensive, but the possibility cannot be excluded. Carrier birds seem to play a major role in the transmission of cholera. Surviving birds from diseased flocks appear to represent a risk, but more recent investigations indicate that carriers of P. multocida may exist within poultry flocks with no history of previous outbreaks of fowl cholera. The significance of this awaits further investigation. The site of infection for P. multocida is generally believed to be the respiratory tract. The outcome of infections may range from peracute/acute infections to chronic

  19. Sanitation in the time of cholera.

    PubMed

    Misch, A

    1991-01-01

    Cholera, identified by violent diarrhea, cramps, vomiting, and dehydration, is spreading through Peru into Colombia, Ecuador, Child, and Brazil. Water contaminated with Vibrio cholerae is used for washing food and/or drinking thereby transmitting the disease. PAHO estimates 6 million people in South America may get cholera within the next 3 years. This cholera epidemic is the result of unsanitary conditions in which the urban poor in South America live. In fact, in Lima, Peru, 40% of the people do not have potable, piped water available. These individuals fetch their water from far away taps and private vendors both of which are not necessarily safe. In addition, 40% do not have access to a sewage system. Further, 80% of sick people in developing countries have a water related illness, be it transmitted by contaminated water or by insects and snails that reproduce in the water. Diarrhea is the most deadly of these conditions. Indeed every year 10-20 million children die from the effects of diarrhea which include malnutrition, dehydration, and shock. Yet 940 million people in developing countries have no access to safe water and 1.7 billion do not have a sanitary means of disposing of human wastes, despite the fact that the UN decreed the 1980s the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade. Nevertheless UNICEF efforts did bring communal taps, odorless latrines, and/or pour flush toilets to 1.2 billion people. These types of sanitation costs $20-25/person whereas conventional sewers cost $350/person. Low technology supplied water averages $30/person compared to $200/person for piped water. Peru has spent $43 million on emergency medical care for cholera victims which could have provided low cost clean water and sanitation for almost 800,000 poor.

  20. Hydroclimatological Controls of Endemic and Non-endemic Cholera of the 20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A. S.; Whitcombe, E.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat for the developing countries. Since the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous to aquatic environment, it is not possible to eradicate the agent of the disease. Hydroclimatology based prediction and prevention strategies can be implemented in disease susceptible regions for reducing incidence rates. However, the precise role of hydrological and climatological processes, which will further aid in development of suitable prediction models, in creating spatial and temporal environmental conditions favorable for disease outbreak has not been adequately quantified. Here, we show distinction between seasonality and occurrence of cholera in epidemic and non-endemic regions. Using historical cholera mortality data, from the late 1800s for 27 locations in the Indian subcontinent, we show that non-endemic regions are generally located close to regional river systems but away from the coasts and are characterized by single sporadic outbreak in a given year. Increase in air temperature during the low river flow season increases evaporation, leading to an optimal salinity and pH required for bacterial growth. Thereafter, monsoonal rainfall, leads to interactions of contaminated river waters via human activity resulting in cholera epidemics. Endemic regions are located close to coasts where cholera outbreak occurs twice (spring and fall) in a year. Spring outbreak is generally associated with intrusion of bacterial seawater to inland whereas the fall peak is correlated with widespread flooding and cross-contamination of water resources via increased precipitation. This may be one of the first studies to hydroclimatologically quantitatively the seasonality of cholera in both endemic and non-endemic regions. Our results prompt the need of region and cause-specific prediction models for cholera, employing appropriate environmental determinants.

  1. The scenario approach for countries considering the addition of oral cholera vaccination in cholera preparedness and control plans.

    PubMed

    Deen, Jacqueline; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Luquero, Francisco J; Troeger, Christopher; Reyburn, Rita; Lopez, Anna Lena; Debes, Amanda; Sack, David A

    2016-01-01

    Oral cholera vaccination could be deployed in a diverse range of situations from cholera-endemic areas and locations of humanitarian crises, but no clear consensus exists. The supply of licensed, WHO-prequalified cholera vaccines is not sufficient to meet endemic and epidemic needs worldwide and so prioritisation is needed. We have developed a scenario approach to systematically classify situations in which oral cholera vaccination might be useful. Our scenario approach distinguishes between five types of cholera epidemiology based on experiences from around the world and provides evidence that we hope will spur the development of detailed guidelines on how and where oral cholera vaccines could, and should, be most rationally deployed.

  2. Environmental Monitoring of Endemic Cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElNemr, W.; Jutla, A. S.; Constantin de Magny, G.; Hasan, N. A.; Islam, M.; Sack, R.; Huq, A.; Hashem, F.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat. Since Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease, is autochthonous to riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, it is unlikely the bacteria can be eradicated from its natural habitat. Prediction of disease, in conjunction with preventive vaccination can reduce the prevalence rate of a disease. Understanding the influence of environmental parameters on growth and proliferation of bacteria is an essential first step in developing prediction methods for outbreaks. Large scale geophysical variables, such as SST and coastal chlorophyll, are often associated with conditions favoring growth of V. cholerae. However, local environmental factors, meaning biological activity in ponds from where the bulk of populations in endemic regions derive water for daily usage, are either neglected or oversimplified. Using data collected from several sites in two geographically distinct locations in South Asia, we have identified critical local environmental factors associated with cholera outbreak. Of 18 environmental variables monitored for water sources in Mathbaria (a coastal site near the Bay of Bengal) and Bakergonj (an inland site) of Bangladesh, water depth and chlorophyll were found to be important factors associated with initiation of cholera outbreaks. Cholera in coastal regions appears to be related to intrusion. However, monsoonal flooding creates conditions for cholera epidemics in inland regions. This may be one of the first attempts to relate in-situ environmental observations with cholera. We anticipate that it will be useful for further development of prediction models in the resource constrained regions.

  3. Climate and infectious disease: Use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lobitz, Brad; Beck, Louisa; Huq, Anwar; Wood, Byron; Fuchs, George; Faruque, A. S. G.; Colwell, Rita

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992–1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked. PMID:10677480

  4. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement.

    PubMed

    Lobitz, B; Beck, L; Huq, A; Wood, B; Fuchs, G; Faruque, A S; Colwell, R

    2000-02-15

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  5. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  6. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  7. Epidemic typhoid in Chile: analysis by molecular and conventional methods of Salmonella typhi strain diversity in epidemic (1977 and 1981) and nonepidemic (1990) years.

    PubMed Central

    Fica, A E; Prat-Miranda, S; Fernandez-Ricci, A; D'Ottone, K; Cabello, F C

    1996-01-01

    From 1977 to 1986, Chile experienced an important typhoid fever epidemic, despite statistics that indicated apparently improving levels of sanitation of drinking water and sewage disposal. The lack of antibiotic resistance among the Salmonella typhi strains isolated during this period, the mild clinical presentation of the disease, and the initially low level of efficacy of the S. typhi Ty21a vaccine in the population exposed to the epidemic suggested that this epidemic might have resulted from the dissemination of S. typhi strains with unique characteristics. To investigate this hypothesis, we used conventional methods (bacteriophage typing and biotyping) and molecular methods (restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, ribotyping, IS200 typing, and PCR amplification of the fliC-d gene) to study a population of 149 S. typhi isolates during 1977, 1981, and 1990, the years that included periods with low (when the disease was endemic) and high (when the disease was epidemic) morbidities. Our results indicate that these S. typhi isolates in Chile represent a number of highly diverse variants of the clone of S. typhi with a worldwide distribution described by Selander et al. (R. K. Selander, P. Beltran, N.H. Smith, R. Helmuth, F.A. Rubin, D.J. Kopecko, K. Ferris, B.D. Tall, A. Cravioto, and J.M. Musser, Infect. Immun. 58:2262-2275, 1990). For example, we detected 26 PstI and 10 ClaI ribotypes among 47 and 16 S. typhi strains belonging to this clone, respectively. These results suggest that the Chilean epidemic was probably produced by multiple sources of infection because of deficient sanitary conditions. These findings illustrate the usefulness of molecular methods for characterizing the potential causes of the typhoid epidemics and the possible routes of transmission of S. typhi strains in typhoid epidemics. PMID:8784573

  8. Survival of classic cholera in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Siddique, A K; Baqui, A H; Eusof, A; Haider, K; Hossain, M A; Bashir, I; Zaman, K

    1991-05-11

    During the present cholera pandemic the El Tor biotype of Vibrio cholerae has completely displaced the classic biotype, except in Bangladesh. We studied the distribution of these two biotypes in twenty-four rural districts during epidemics in 1988-89; there was clustering of the classic biotype in the southern region and of the El Tor biotype in all other regions. These findings suggest that the southern coastal region is now (and may always have been) the habitat of classic cholera. The selective distribution of V cholerae O1 biotypes in Bangladesh may have been affected by ecological changes occurring in the country.

  9. The Potential Financial Costs of Climate Change on Health of Urban and Rural Citizens: A Case Study of Vibrio cholerae Infections at Bukavu Town, South Kivu Province, Eastern of Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    MUNYULI, MB Théodore; KAVUVU, J-M Mbaka; MULINGANYA, Guy; BWINJA, G Mulinganya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cholera epidemics have a recorded history in eastern Congo dating to 1971. A study was conducted to find out the linkage between climate variability/change and cholera outbreak and to assess the related economic cost in the management of cholera in Congo. Methods: This study integrates historical data (20 years) on temperature and rainfall with the burden of disease from cholera in South-Kivu province, eastern Congo. Results: Analyses of precipitation and temperatures characteristics in South-Kivu provinces showed that cholera epidemics are closely associated with climatic factors variability. Peaks in Cholera new cases were in synchrony with peaks in rainfalls. Cholera infection cases declined significantly (P<0.05) with the rise in the average temperature. The monthly number of new Cholera cases oscillated between 5 and 450. For every rise of the average temperature by 0.35 °C to 0.75 °C degree Celsius, and for every change in the rainfall variability by 10–19%, it is likely cholera infection risks will increase by 17 to 25%. The medical cost of treatment of Cholera case infection was found to be of US$50 to 250 per capita. The total costs of Cholera attributable to climate change were found to fall in the range of 4 to 8% of the per capita in annual income in Bukavu town. Conclusion: It is likely that high rainfall favor multiplication of the bacteria and contamination of water sources by the bacteria (Vibrio cholerae). The consumption of polluted water, promiscuity, population density and lack of hygiene are determinants favoring spread and infection of the bacteria among human beings living in over-crowded environments. PMID:24427750

  10. Clinical and functional characteristics of patients two years after being affected by the soybean asthma epidemic in Barcelona.

    PubMed Central

    Sabrià, J.; Antó, J. M.; Sunyer, J.; Roca, J.; Morell, F.; Rodríguez-Roisín, R.; Rodrigo, M. J.; Codina, R.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Patients affected during the asthma outbreaks caused by soybean dust inhalation in Barcelona presented with sudden onset of severe asthma followed by the rapid relief of symptoms after treatment. Two years after the epidemics ended, a case-control study was conducted in which the clinical, functional, and immunological characteristics of these asthma patients (a randomised sample of asthmatic patients admitted as emergency cases on epidemic days, n = 213) were compared with those of a control group (a random sample of asthmatic patients admitted as emergency cases for attacks of asthma on non-epidemic days, n = 170). METHODS--The study included the administration of the ATS-DLD78 standardised respiratory questionnaire, the measurement of atopy, and performance of spirometric tests and a methacholine inhalation test. RESULTS--Patients with epidemic asthma reported fewer symptoms of asthma, had attended emergency departments less frequently during the previous year for acute attacks of asthma, were taking fewer inhaled corticosteroids at the time of the study, and attended medical follow up less frequently than did the patients with non-epidemic asthma. However, the cases and controls showed no differences in ventilatory capacity or reactivity to the methacholine bronchoprovocation test. CONCLUSIONS--Two years after the end of the soybean epidemics, people affected by epidemic asthma had a favourable prognosis. This finding contrasts with a higher risk of life threatening asthma and death during the epidemics. This paradox could be the result of a complex interaction between host and conditions of exposure. Images PMID:7940432

  11. Cholera Information for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae is found in water or food contaminated by feces. Cholera causes profuse watery diarrhea ... You can contract cholera by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with feces containing V. cholerae. This same ...

  12. Influence of diffusion on the stability of equilibria in a reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera dynamic.

    PubMed

    Capone, Florinda; De Cataldis, Valentina; De Luca, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    A reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera epidemic in a non-homogeneously mixed population is introduced. The interaction between population and toxigenic Vibrio cholerae concentration in contaminated water has been taken into account. The existence of biologically meaningful equilibria is investigated together with their linear and nonlinear stability. Using the data collected during the Haiti cholera epidemic, a numerical simulation is performed.

  13. Local environmental predictors of cholera in Bangladesh and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Emch, Michael; Feldacker, Caryl; Yunus, Mohammad; Streatfield, Peter Kim; DinhThiem, Vu; Canh, Do Gia; Ali, Mohammad

    2008-05-01

    Environmental factors have been shown to be related to cholera and thus might prove useful for prediction. In Bangladesh and Vietnam, temporal cholera distributions are related to satellite-derived and in-situ environmental time series data in order to examine the relationships between cholera and the local environment. Ordered probit models examine associations in Bangladesh; probit models examine associations at 2 sites in Vietnam. Increases in ocean chlorophyll concentration are related to an increased magnitude of cholera in Bangladesh. Increases in sea surface temperature are most influential in Hue, Vietnam, whereas increases in river height have a significant role in Nha Trang, Vietnam. Cholera appearance and epidemic magnitude are related to the local environment. Local environmental parameters have consistent effects when cholera is regular and more prevalent in endemic settings, but in situations where cholera epidemics are rare there are differential environmental effects.

  14. Seasonal Cholera Caused by Vibrio cholerae Serogroups O1 and O139 in the Coastal Aquatic Environment of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munirul; Hasan, Nur A.; Sadique, Abdus; Bhuiyan, N. A.; Ahmed, Kabir U.; Nusrin, Suraia; Nair, G. Balakrish; Siddique, A. K.; Sack, R. Bradley; Sack, David A.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2006-01-01

    Since Vibrio cholerae O139 first appeared in 1992, both O1 El Tor and O139 have been recognized as the epidemic serogroups, although their geographic distribution, endemicity, and reservoir are not fully understood. To address this lack of information, a study of the epidemiology and ecology of V. cholerae O1 and O139 was carried out in two coastal areas, Bakerganj and Mathbaria, Bangladesh, where cholera occurs seasonally. The results of a biweekly clinical study (January 2004 to May 2005), employing culture methods, and of an ecological study (monthly in Bakerganj and biweekly in Mathbaria from March 2004 to May 2005), employing direct and enrichment culture, colony blot hybridization, and direct fluorescent-antibody methods, showed that cholera is endemic in both Bakerganj and Mathbaria and that V. cholerae O1, O139, and non-O1/non-O139 are autochthonous to the aquatic environment. Although V. cholerae O1 and O139 were isolated from both areas, most noteworthy was the isolation of V. cholerae O139 in March, July, and September 2004 in Mathbaria, where seasonal cholera was clinically linked only to V. cholerae O1. In Mathbaria, V. cholerae O139 emerged as the sole cause of a significant outbreak of cholera in March 2005. V. cholerae O1 reemerged clinically in April 2005 and established dominance over V. cholerae O139, continuing to cause cholera in Mathbaria. In conclusion, the epidemic potential and coastal aquatic reservoir for V. cholerae O139 have been demonstrated. Based on the results of this study, the coastal ecosystem of the Bay of Bengal is concluded to be a significant reservoir for the epidemic serogroups of V. cholerae. PMID:16751520

  15. IncA/C plasmids harboured in serious multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Lianhui; Li, Jie; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 emerged in 1992 and is one of two major serogroups to have caused cholera epidemics. After 1998, serious multidrug-resistant (MDR) O139 strains quickly became common in China, showing a multidrug resistance profile to eight antibiotics. It is a great threat to public health, and elucidation of its mechanisms of resistance will provide a helpful guide for the clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. In this study, mega-plasmids from MDR V. cholerae O139 strains were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) without enzyme digestion. One plasmid was isolated and sequenced, belonging to the IncA/C family. Ten antibiotic resistance genes were found in the MDR regions, including a blaTEM-20 gene, and these genes endowed the host with resistance to seven antibiotics. This kind of plasmid was positive in 71.2% (198/278) of toxigenic O139 strains, and the rate of plasmid positivity was consistent with the yearly change in MDR rates of these strains. This study reveals an important role of the IncA/C family plasmid in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance of epidemic V. cholerae serogroup O139 strains, which has recombined with plasmids from different bacterial species and transferred among V. cholerae strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-toxigenic environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 strain from Haiti provides evidence of pre-pandemic cholera in Hispaniola.

    PubMed

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Jubair, Mohammad; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Nolan, David J; Farmerie, William; Rashid, Mohammad H; Sinha-Ray, Shrestha; Alam, Meer T; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2016-10-27

    Vibrio cholerae is ubiquitous in aquatic environments, with environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains serving as a source for recurrent cholera epidemics and pandemic disease. However, a number of questions remain about long-term survival and evolution of V. cholerae strains within these aquatic environmental reservoirs. Through monitoring of the Haitian aquatic environment following the 2010 cholera epidemic, we isolated two novel non-toxigenic (ctxA/B-negative) Vibrio cholerae O1. These two isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing and were investigated through comparative genomics and Bayesian coalescent analysis. These isolates cluster in the evolutionary tree with strains responsible for clinical cholera, possessing genomic components of 6(th) and 7(th) pandemic lineages, and diverge from "modern" cholera strains around 1548 C.E. [95% HPD: 1532-1555]. Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI)-1 was present; however, SXT/R391-family ICE and VPI-2 were absent. Rugose phenotype conversion and vibriophage resistance evidenced adaption for persistence in aquatic environments. The identification of V. cholerae O1 strains in the Haitian environment, which predate the first reported cholera pandemic in 1817, broadens our understanding of the history of pandemics. It also raises the possibility that these and similar environmental strains could acquire virulence genes from the 2010 Haitian epidemic clone, including the cholera toxin producing CTXϕ.

  17. Non-toxigenic environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 strain from Haiti provides evidence of pre-pandemic cholera in Hispaniola

    PubMed Central

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A.; Jubair, Mohammad; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Nolan, David J.; Farmerie, William; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Sinha-Ray, Shrestha; Alam, Meer T.; Morris, J. Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is ubiquitous in aquatic environments, with environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains serving as a source for recurrent cholera epidemics and pandemic disease. However, a number of questions remain about long-term survival and evolution of V. cholerae strains within these aquatic environmental reservoirs. Through monitoring of the Haitian aquatic environment following the 2010 cholera epidemic, we isolated two novel non-toxigenic (ctxA/B-negative) Vibrio cholerae O1. These two isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing and were investigated through comparative genomics and Bayesian coalescent analysis. These isolates cluster in the evolutionary tree with strains responsible for clinical cholera, possessing genomic components of 6th and 7th pandemic lineages, and diverge from “modern” cholera strains around 1548 C.E. [95% HPD: 1532–1555]. Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI)-1 was present; however, SXT/R391-family ICE and VPI-2 were absent. Rugose phenotype conversion and vibriophage resistance evidenced adaption for persistence in aquatic environments. The identification of V. cholerae O1 strains in the Haitian environment, which predate the first reported cholera pandemic in 1817, broadens our understanding of the history of pandemics. It also raises the possibility that these and similar environmental strains could acquire virulence genes from the 2010 Haitian epidemic clone, including the cholera toxin producing CTXϕ. PMID:27786291

  18. Model of cholera dissemination using geographic information systems and fuzzy clustering means: case study, Chabahar, Iran.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Z; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, M; Mansourian, A; Eshrati, B; Omidi, E; Nejadqoli, I

    2012-10-01

    Cholera is spread by drinking water or eating food that is contaminated by bacteria, and is related to climate changes. Several epidemics have occurred in Iran, the most recent of which was in 2005 with 1133 cases and 12 deaths. This study investigated the incidence of cholera over a 10-year period in Chabahar district, a region with one of the highest incidence rates of cholera in Iran. Descriptive retrospective study on data of patients with Eltor and NAG cholera reported to the Iranian Centre of Disease Control between 1997 and 2006. Data on the prevalence of cholera were gathered through a surveillance system, and a spatial database was developed using geographic information systems (GIS) to describe the relation of spatial and climate variables to cholera incidences. Fuzzy clustering (fuzzy C) method and statistical analysis based on logistic regression were used to develop a model of cholera dissemination. The variables were demographic characteristics, specifications of cholera infection, climate conditions and some geographical parameters. The incidence of cholera was found to be significantly related to higher temperature and humidity, lower precipitation, shorter distance to the eastern border of Iran and local health centres, and longer distance to the district health centre. The fuzzy C means algorithm showed that clusters were geographically distributed in distinct regions. In order to plan, manage and monitor any public health programme, GIS provide ideal platforms for the convergence of disease-specific information, analysis and computation of new data for statistical analysis. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced Susceptibility to Extended-Spectrum β-Lactams in Vibrio cholerae Isolated in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2016-01-01

    β-lactams are antibiotic molecules able to inhibit cell wall biosynthesis. Among other mechanisms, resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is mostly associated with production of β-lactamase enzymes able to bind and hydrolyze the β-lactam ring. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases extend this ability also to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, as well as to carbapenems and monobactams. Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of epidemic cholera and a public health burden for developing countries like Bangladesh. Although appropriate oral or intravenous rehydration is the therapy of choice for cholera, severe infections and V. cholerae-associated septicemia are treated with antimicrobial drugs, including doxycycline, erythromycin, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and/or third-generation cephalosporins. In the years after the introduction of antibiotics in clinical practice, V. cholerae developed resistance to commonly used drugs worldwide mostly through gene acquisition via horizontal gene transfer. Reduced susceptibility of V. cholerae to third-generation cephalosporins has been occasionally documented. However, carbapenemase-producing V. cholerae has been reported at higher rates than resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams, mainly associated with blaNDM-1 emergence and successful plasmid dissemination. Recent findings suggest limited β-lactam resistance is present in V. cholerae O1 isolates collected during ecological and epidemiological surveillance in Bangladesh. However, a trend to intermediate-susceptibility insurgence was observed. Horizontal gene transfer of β-lactam resistance from enteric pathogens to environmental microorganisms should not be underrated, given the ability of V. cholerae to acquire new genetic information. PMID:27803895

  20. Reduced Susceptibility to Extended-Spectrum β-Lactams in Vibrio cholerae Isolated in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2016-01-01

    β-lactams are antibiotic molecules able to inhibit cell wall biosynthesis. Among other mechanisms, resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is mostly associated with production of β-lactamase enzymes able to bind and hydrolyze the β-lactam ring. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases extend this ability also to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, as well as to carbapenems and monobactams. Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of epidemic cholera and a public health burden for developing countries like Bangladesh. Although appropriate oral or intravenous rehydration is the therapy of choice for cholera, severe infections and V. cholerae-associated septicemia are treated with antimicrobial drugs, including doxycycline, erythromycin, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and/or third-generation cephalosporins. In the years after the introduction of antibiotics in clinical practice, V. cholerae developed resistance to commonly used drugs worldwide mostly through gene acquisition via horizontal gene transfer. Reduced susceptibility of V. cholerae to third-generation cephalosporins has been occasionally documented. However, carbapenemase-producing V. cholerae has been reported at higher rates than resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams, mainly associated with blaNDM-1 emergence and successful plasmid dissemination. Recent findings suggest limited β-lactam resistance is present in V. cholerae O1 isolates collected during ecological and epidemiological surveillance in Bangladesh. However, a trend to intermediate-susceptibility insurgence was observed. Horizontal gene transfer of β-lactam resistance from enteric pathogens to environmental microorganisms should not be underrated, given the ability of V. cholerae to acquire new genetic information.

  1. [Cholera update and vaccination problems].

    PubMed

    Fournier, J M; Villeneuve, S

    1998-01-01

    Cholera remains an important public health problem. The long-term control of cholera depends on good personal hygiene, uncontaminated water supply and appropriate sewage disposal. However, the improvement of hygiene is distant goal for many countries. Thus the availability of an effective cholera vaccine is important for the prevention of cholera in these countries. Research on new cholera vaccines has mainly focused on oral formulations that stimulate the mucosal secretory immune system. Two oral cholera vaccines were experimented on large scale in human. The first vaccine, containing inactivated bacterial cells and B-subunit of cholera toxin, has been tested in Bangladesh from 1985 to 1989. This vaccine, according to WHO, may prove useful in the stable phase of refugee/displaced person crises, especially when given preventively. The second vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine containing the genetically manipulated Vibrio cholerae O1 strain CVD 103-HgR. Despite its efficacy in adult volunteers, results of a large-scale field trial carried-out in Indonesia for 4 years have shown a surprisingly low protection. Moreover, one of the safety concerns associated with live cholera vaccine is a possible horizontal gene transfer and recombination event leading to reversion to virulence. A new vaccine development program for cholera is based upon the hypothesis that immunoglobulins G directed to the O-specific polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 could confer protective immunity to cholera by inactivating the inoculum on intestinal mucosal surface. This program may lead to the development of cholera conjugate vaccines to elicit protection in infants.

  2. Increased isolation frequency of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from environmental monitoring sites in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Longini, Ira; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Morris, John Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2015-01-01

    Since the identification of the first cholera case in 2010, the disease has spread in epidemic form throughout the island nation of Haiti; as of 2014, about 700,000 cholera cases have been reported, with over 8,000 deaths. While case numbers have declined, the more fundamental question of whether the causative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae has established an environmental reservoir in the surface waters of Haiti remains to be elucidated. In a previous study conducted between April 2012 and March 2013, we reported the isolation of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 from surface waters in the Ouest Department. After a second year of surveillance (April 2013 to March 2014) using identical methodology, we observed a more than five-fold increase in the number of water samples containing culturable V. cholerae O1 compared to the previous year (1.7% vs 8.6%), with double the number of sites having at least one positive sample (58% vs 20%). Both seasonal water temperatures and precipitation were significantly related to the frequency of isolation. Our data suggest that toxigenic V. cholerae O1 are becoming more common in surface waters in Haiti; while the basis for this increase is uncertain, our findings raise concerns that environmental reservoirs are being established.

  3. Increased Isolation Frequency of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from Environmental Monitoring Sites in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Meer T.; Weppelmann, Thomas A.; Longini, Ira; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Morris, John Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2015-01-01

    Since the identification of the first cholera case in 2010, the disease has spread in epidemic form throughout the island nation of Haiti; as of 2014, about 700,000 cholera cases have been reported, with over 8,000 deaths. While case numbers have declined, the more fundamental question of whether the causative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae has established an environmental reservoir in the surface waters of Haiti remains to be elucidated. In a previous study conducted between April 2012 and March 2013, we reported the isolation of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 from surface waters in the Ouest Department. After a second year of surveillance (April 2013 to March 2014) using identical methodology, we observed a more than five-fold increase in the number of water samples containing culturable V. cholerae O1 compared to the previous year (1.7% vs 8.6%), with double the number of sites having at least one positive sample (58% vs 20%). Both seasonal water temperatures and precipitation were significantly related to the frequency of isolation. Our data suggest that toxigenic V. cholerae O1 are becoming more common in surface waters in Haiti; while the basis for this increase is uncertain, our findings raise concerns that environmental reservoirs are being established. PMID:25853552

  4. Pandemics, pathogenicity and changing molecular epidemiology of cholera in the era of global warming.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fazle Rabbi; Nur, Zannatun; Hassan, Nazia; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dunachie, Susanna

    2017-03-07

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative, non-spore forming curved rod is found in diverse aquatic ecosystems around the planet. It is classified according to its major surface antigen into around 206 serogroups, of which O1 and O139 cause epidemic cholera. A recent spatial modelling technique estimated that around 2.86 million cholera cases occur globally every year, and of them approximately 95,000 die. About 1.3 billion people are currently at risk of infection from cholera. Meta-analysis and mathematical modelling have demonstrated that due to global warming the burden of vector-borne diseases like malaria, leishmaniasis, meningococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, dengue and chikungunya will increase in the coming years in the tropics and beyond. This review offers an overview of the interplay between global warming and the pathogenicity and epidemiology of V. cholerae. Several distinctive features of cholera survival (optimal thriving at 15% salinity, 30 °C water temperature, and pH 8.5) indicate a possible role of climate change in triggering the epidemic process. Genetic exchange (ctxAB, zot, ace, cep, and orfU) between strains and transduction process allows potential emergence of new toxigenic clones. These processes are probably controlled by precise environmental signals such as optimum temperature, sunlight and osmotic conditions. Environmental influences on phytoplankton growth and chitin remineralization will be discussed alongside the interplay of poor sanitary conditions, overcrowding, improper sewage disposal and global warming in promoting the growth and transmission of this deadly disease. The development of an effective early warning system based on climate data could help to prevent and control future outbreaks. It may become possible to integrate real-time monitoring of oceanic regions, climate variability and epidemiological and demographic population dynamics to predict cholera outbreaks and support the design of cost-effective public health

  5. How Will Climate Change Impact Cholera Outbreaks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, F.; Jutla, A.; Rahimikolu, J.; Akanda, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental parameters associated with cholera are well documented. However, cholera continues to be a global public health threat. Uncertainty in defining environmental processes affecting growth and multiplication of the cholera bacteria can be affected significantly by changing climate at different temporal and spatial scales, either through amplification of the hydroclimatic cycle or by enhanced variability of large scale geophysical processes. Endemic cholera in the Bengal Delta region of South Asia has a unique pattern of two seasonal peaks and there are associated with asymmetric and episodic variability in river discharge. The first cholera outbreak in spring is related with intrusion of bacteria laden coastal seawater during low river discharge. Cholera occurring during the fall season is hypothesized to be associated with high river discharge related to a cross-contamination of water resources and, therefore, a second wave of disease, a phenomenon characteristic primarily in the inland regions. Because of difficulties in establishing linkage between coarse resolutions of the Global Climate Model (GCM) output and localized disease outbreaks, the impact of climate change on diarrheal disease has not been explored. Here using the downscaling method of Support Vector Machines from HADCM3 and ECHAM models, we show how cholera outbreak patterns are changing in the Bengal Delta. Our preliminary results indicate statistically significant changes in both seasonality and magnitude in the occurrence of cholera over the next century. Endemic cholera is likely to transform into epidemic forms and new geographical areas will be at risk for cholera outbreaks.

  6. Cholera Epidemiology in Nigeria: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Adagbada, Ajoke Olutola; Adesida, Solayide Abosede; Nwaokorie, Francisca Obiageri; Niemogha, Mary-Theresa; Coker, Akitoye Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium, Vibrio cholera. Choleragenic V. cholera O1 and O139 are the only causative agents of the disease. The two most distinguishing epidemiologic features of the disease are its tendency to appear in explosive outbreaks and its predisposition to causing pandemics that may progressively affect many countries and spread into continents. Despite efforts to control cholera, the disease continues to occur as a major public health problem in many developing countries. Numerous studies over more than a century have made advances in the understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients, but the mechanism of emergence of new epidemic strains, and the ecosystem supporting regular epidemics, remain challenging to epidemiologists. In Nigeria, since the first appearance of epidemic cholera in 1972, intermittent outbreaks have been occurring. The later part of 2010 was marked with severe outbreak which started from the northern part of Nigeria, spreading to the other parts and involving approximately 3,000 cases and 781 deaths. Sporadic cases have also been reported. Although epidemiologic surveillance constitutes an important component of the public health response, publicly available surveillance data from Nigeria have been relatively limited to date. Based on existing relevant scientific literature on features of cholera, this paper presents a synopsis of cholera epidemiology emphasising the situation in Nigeria. PMID:22937199

  7. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    Discussing the symptomatology of cholera, the author deals first with the incubation period, the clinical types, choleraic diarrhoea, and cholerine; he then considers in detail the various stages of cholera gravis and the relapses and complications that may be met. This is followed by sections on diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and on prognosis and the various factors influencing it. The author's highly detailed review of the treatment of cholera which concludes this study is divided into three parts, dealing with attempts at specific therapy, with infusion treatment, and with adjuvant treatment. PMID:13426761

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae O1 following a Single-Source Introduction to Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Lee S.; Petkau, Aaron; Beaulaurier, John; Tyler, Shaun; Antonova, Elena S.; Turnsek, Maryann A.; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Orata, Fabini; Gladney, Lori M.; Stroika, Steven; Folster, Jason P.; Rowe, Lori; Freeman, Molly M.; Knox, Natalie; Frace, Mike; Boncy, Jacques; Graham, Morag; Hammer, Brian K.; Boucher, Yan; Bashir, Ali; Hanage, William P.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Tarr, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prior to the epidemic that emerged in Haiti in October of 2010, cholera had not been documented in this country. After its introduction, a strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 spread rapidly throughout Haiti, where it caused over 600,000 cases of disease and >7,500 deaths in the first two years of the epidemic. We applied whole-genome sequencing to a temporal series of V. cholerae isolates from Haiti to gain insight into the mode and tempo of evolution in this isolated population of V. cholerae O1. Phylogenetic and Bayesian analyses supported the hypothesis that all isolates in the sample set diverged from a common ancestor within a time frame that is consistent with epidemiological observations. A pangenome analysis showed nearly homogeneous genomic content, with no evidence of gene acquisition among Haiti isolates. Nine nearly closed genomes assembled from continuous-long-read data showed evidence of genome rearrangements and supported the observation of no gene acquisition among isolates. Thus, intrinsic mutational processes can account for virtually all of the observed genetic polymorphism, with no demonstrable contribution from horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Consistent with this, the 12 Haiti isolates tested by laboratory HGT assays were severely impaired for transformation, although unlike previously characterized noncompetent V. cholerae isolates, each expressed hapR and possessed a functional quorum-sensing system. Continued monitoring of V. cholerae in Haiti will illuminate the processes influencing the origin and fate of genome variants, which will facilitate interpretation of genetic variation in future epidemics. PMID:23820394

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of Vibrio cholerae O1 following a single-source introduction to Haiti.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lee S; Petkau, Aaron; Beaulaurier, John; Tyler, Shaun; Antonova, Elena S; Turnsek, Maryann A; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; Paxinos, Ellen E; Orata, Fabini; Gladney, Lori M; Stroika, Steven; Folster, Jason P; Rowe, Lori; Freeman, Molly M; Knox, Natalie; Frace, Mike; Boncy, Jacques; Graham, Morag; Hammer, Brian K; Boucher, Yan; Bashir, Ali; Hanage, William P; Van Domselaar, Gary; Tarr, Cheryl L

    2013-07-02

    Prior to the epidemic that emerged in Haiti in October of 2010, cholera had not been documented in this country. After its introduction, a strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 spread rapidly throughout Haiti, where it caused over 600,000 cases of disease and >7,500 deaths in the first two years of the epidemic. We applied whole-genome sequencing to a temporal series of V. cholerae isolates from Haiti to gain insight into the mode and tempo of evolution in this isolated population of V. cholerae O1. Phylogenetic and Bayesian analyses supported the hypothesis that all isolates in the sample set diverged from a common ancestor within a time frame that is consistent with epidemiological observations. A pangenome analysis showed nearly homogeneous genomic content, with no evidence of gene acquisition among Haiti isolates. Nine nearly closed genomes assembled from continuous-long-read data showed evidence of genome rearrangements and supported the observation of no gene acquisition among isolates. Thus, intrinsic mutational processes can account for virtually all of the observed genetic polymorphism, with no demonstrable contribution from horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Consistent with this, the 12 Haiti isolates tested by laboratory HGT assays were severely impaired for transformation, although unlike previously characterized noncompetent V. cholerae isolates, each expressed hapR and possessed a functional quorum-sensing system. Continued monitoring of V. cholerae in Haiti will illuminate the processes influencing the origin and fate of genome variants, which will facilitate interpretation of genetic variation in future epidemics. Vibrio cholerae is the cause of substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, with over three million cases of disease each year. An understanding of the mode and rate of evolutionary change is critical for proper interpretation of genome sequence data and attribution of outbreak sources. The Haiti epidemic provides an unprecedented opportunity to

  10. Cholera outbreak in Baghdad in 2007: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Khwaif, J M; Hayyawi, A H; Yousif, T I

    2010-06-01

    In 2007 there was an epidemic of cholera in Iraq with 4667 cases. The first case in Baghdad was diagnosed on 19 September 2007 and the last case on 13 December 2007. In all, 136 cases were reported (2.9% of the country total) in 6 of the 13 districts of Baghdad. The median age of the cases was 11 years (range = 0.3-71 years). There were 3 deaths giving a case fatality rate of 2.2%. Bacteriological testing confirmed that the outbreak was caused by Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba. The strain was resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Efforts are needed in Baghdad to establish safe drinking-water and proper sanitation as limited availabilty of tap-water and sewage contamination probably contributed to the spread of the disease.

  11. Culex Flavivirus During West Nile Virus Epidemic and Interepidemic Years in Chicago, United States.

    PubMed

    Newman, Christina M; Krebs, Bethany L; Anderson, Tavis K; Hamer, Gabriel L; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Brown, William M; Kitron, Uriel D; Goldberg, Tony L

    2017-08-01

    Culex flavivirus (CxFV) is an insect-specific flavivirus infecting Culex mosquitoes, which are important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV). CxFV and WNV cocirculate in nature and coinfect Culex mosquitoes, including in a WNV "hotspot" in suburban Chicago. We previously identified a positive association between CxFV and WNV in mosquito pools collected from suburban Chicago in 2006. To further investigate this phenomenon, we compared the spatial and temporal distribution of CxFV during an interepidemic year (2011) and an epidemic year (2012) for WNV. Both viruses were more prevalent in mosquito pools in 2012 compared to 2011. During both years, the CxFV infection status of mosquito pools was associated with environmental factors such as habitat type and precipitation frequency rather than coinfection with WNV. These results support the idea that WNV and CxFV are ecologically associated, perhaps because both viruses respond to similar environmental drivers of mosquito populations.

  12. The measles epidemic trend over the past 30 years in a central district in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Shen, Bing; Xiong, JianJing; Lu, Yihan; Jiang, Qingwu

    2017-01-01

    Measles vaccination over the past 50 years has greatly reduced the incidence of measles. However, measles among migrants and the resulting changes in epidemiological characteristics have brought new challenges to the elimination of measles. We aim to describe the measles epidemic trend over the past 30 years in a central district in Shanghai, China. The present study was conducted in the Jing'an District, which is located in the center of Shanghai. Based on historical surveillance data of measles, we calculated the incidence of measles among local residents and migrants separately. Next, we classified all of the cases of the measles among local residents between 1984 and 2015 into 8 age groups and 5 birth cohorts. Finally, we calculated the measles incidence in each time period by the different age groups and birth cohorts, to understand the measles epidemic trend over past 30 years in the Jing'an District. A total of 103 cases of measles were reported from the Jing'an District, Shanghai, from 1984 to 2015. For infants less than 1 year of age and adults over 30 years of age, the incidence of measles continued to rise over the past 30 years. For a specific birth cohort, the incidence of measles after measles vaccination declined initially, and was then followed by a rebound. The incidence of measles in older adults and infants increased in some developed regions, which slows the process of measles elimination. This suggested that the population immunity against measles after measles vaccination would gradually reduce with time. We recommend supplemental immunization against measles in adults in order to reduce the immunity decline, especially for migrants.

  13. Role of phages in the epidemiology of cholera.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Shah M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic and ecological factors which support the periodic emergence of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae causing outbreaks of cholera in regions where the disease is endemic, is vital to develop preventive measures. Besides environmental factors which are not precisely defined, bacteriophages, and horizontally transmissible genetic elements are known to have a significant role in the epidemiology and evolution of the pathogen. Cholera epidemics are also known to be self-limiting, and hence identifying natural factors which contribute to the collapse of epidemics may have important implications in controlling the disease. Phages have been shown to play a crucial role in modulating cholera epidemics, and enhance V. cholerae evolution through a bactericidal selection process which favors the emergence of new clones.

  14. Distribution and molecular characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates recovered in Guangdong Province, China, 1961-2013.

    PubMed

    Li, Baisheng; Chen, Rongfeng; Wang, Duochun; Tan, Hailing; Ke, Bixia; He, Dongmei; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    China's Guangdong Province is located along the same latitude as Kolkata, India and Dhaka, Bangladesh, and is also considered a source of epidemic cholera. However, molecular description and the genetic relationships between Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates in Guangdong remain unclear. In this study, 381 clinical V. cholerae O1 isolates recovered from cholera cases presenting in Guangdong between 1961 and 2013 were investigated by PCR, amplicon sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During this time frame, four distinct epidemic periods (1-4) were observed based on the different dominant serotype leading its epidemic, correspond to years; or time periods from/to 1961-1969, 1978-1989, 1990-2000, 2001-2013, respectively. Molecular analysis of representative isolates indicated that a single dominating clone was associated with each epidemic stage. All isolates from periods 1 and 2 carried the typical El Tor ctxB; this allele was displaced by classical ctxB beginning in 1993. However all isolates carried the El Tor-specific toxin-coregulated pili subunit A (tcpA). Isolates were grouped into five clusters on the basis of Not I enzyme digested PFGE, and the first four clusters were associated with specific periods, cluster I (period 1), II (period 3), III (period 2) and IV (period 4), respectively. While cluster V consisted of isolates from all four epidemic periods, but was most heterogeneous in appearance. Our data indicate genetic variations that shape the relationship among emerging isolates of V. cholerae O1 in Guangdong Province contribute to the 7th global pandemic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Cholera - Vibrio cholerae infection Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Infection & Risk Factors Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Infections Diagnosis and Detection Laboratory Testing for Cholera ...

  16. Clinical Presentation of Dengue by Serotype and Year of Epidemic in Martinique

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Laurent; Najioullah, Fatiha; Besnier, François; Valentino, Ruddy; Césaire, Jacques Rosine Raymond; Cabié, André

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade Martinique experienced four dengue epidemics, each characterized by the predominance of 1 or 2 serotypes. In this retrospective database analysis, we investigated the relationship between dengue serotype and disease severity. Data on dengue were collected from 715 patients (male/female ratio 0.87), 14 to 91 years of age (median 35 years) examined in the adult emergency department between 2005 and 2010. In this series, DENV-4 infections more frequently had a milder clinical presentation. The DENV-2 infections were most often secondary infections admitted at the critical phase of dengue illness with signs of plasma leakage. The DENV-1 infections were disabling, particularly in females, and most often led to disease of intermediate severity, without overt plasma leakage. These data were consistent with there being differences in virulence between serotypes, regardless of the host's immune status. However, secondary DENV-2 infections showed an increased risk of plasma leakage. PMID:24865681

  17. Fifty-five years of international epidemic-assistance investigations conducted by CDC's disease detectives.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Italia V; Pearson, Michele L; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-12-01

    For more than 60 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has used its scientific expertise to help people throughout the world live healthier, safer, longer lives through science-based health action. In 1951, CDC officially established the Epidemic Intelligence Service to help build public health capacity. During 1950-2005, CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service officers conducted 462 international epidemiologic field investigations in 131 foreign countries and 7 territories. Investigations have included responding to emerging infectious and noninfectious disease outbreaks, assisting in disaster response, and evaluating core components of public health programs worldwide. Approximately 81% of investigations were responses to infectious disease outbreaks, but the proportion of investigations related to chronic and other noninfectious conditions increased 7-fold (6%-45%). These investigations have contributed to detecting and characterizing new pathogens (e.g., severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus) and conditions, provided insights regarding factors that cause or contribute to disease acquisition (e.g., Ebola hemorrhagic fever), led to development of new diagnostics and surveillance technologies, and provided information upon which global health policies and regulations can be based. CDC's disease detectives will undoubtedly continue to play a critical role in global health and in responding to emerging global disease threats.

  18. Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa El Tor strains with the ctxB7 allele driving cholera outbreaks in south-western India in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Mishra, D K; Deshmukh, D G; Jain, M; Zade, A M; Ingole, K V; Goel, A K; Yadava, P K

    2014-07-01

    Cholera has been a recurrent epidemic disease in human populations for the past 200years. We present herein a comparative characterization of clinical Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from two consecutive cholera outbreaks in 2012 and associated environmental strains from western India. The clinical and toxigenic environmental isolates were identified as hybrid V. cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor carrying the variant ctxB7 allele. Partial sequences of SXT integrase from the isolates revealed 100% identity to ICEVchInd5 (Sevagram, India, 1994) and VC1786ICE (Haiti, 2013). The full clonal relationship of the strains established by RAPD, Box PCR, ERIC PCR and MLST (pyrH, recA and rpoA) analyses, and the short time between the two outbreaks, strongly supported that both outbreaks were due to a single strain. The study corroborated that faecal contamination of the potable water supply was the main reason for the first outbreak, which further spread to other areas and resulted in the second outbreak. The study concluded that the circulating El Tor variant strains of epidemic potential in the region can be a serious concern in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Ismail Pasha and the treatise on cholera (Kolera Risâlesi)].

    PubMed

    Ozaltay, Bülent

    Since the beginning of 19th century, cholera, which was an endemic disease in India and Bengal, started epidemics in Europe and Middle East and affected the Ottoman Empire first in 1831. Ismail Pasha, who was one of the last Ottoman hekimbashis, wrote a treatise named "Kolera Risalesi" (The Treatise on Cholera), after the cholera epidemic that had broken out in Istanbul in October 1847. In this treatise, which aimed to inform people about cholera, description and causes of cholera is briefly described, and precautions which are necessary to prevent the disease and treatment methods be performed after the disease spread.

  20. Antibiotics resistance in El Tor Vibrio cholerae 01 isolated during cholera outbreaks in Mozambique from 2012 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Dengo-Baloi, Liliana Candida; Semá-Baltazar, Cynthia Amino; Manhique, Lena Vania; Chitio, Jucunu Elias; Inguane, Dorteia Luísa; Langa, José Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Mozambique has recorded cyclically epidemic outbreaks of cholera. Antibiotic therapy is recommended in specific situations for management and control of cholera outbreaks. However, an increase in resistance rates to antibiotics by Vibrio cholerae has been reported in several epidemic outbreaks worldwide. On the other hand, there are few recent records of continuous surveillance of antibiotics susceptibility pattern of V. cholerae in Mozambique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibiotics resistance pattern of Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa isolated during Cholera outbreaks in Mozambique to commonly used antibiotics. We analyzed data from samples received in the context of surveillance and response to Cholera outbreaks in the National Reference Laboratory of Microbiology from the National Institute of Health of Mozambique, 159 samples suspected of cholera from cholera treatment centers of, Metangula (09), Memba (01), Tete City (08), Moatize (01), Morrumbala (01) districts, City of Quelimane (01), Lichinga (06) and Nampula (86) districts, from 2012 to 2015. Laboratory culture and standard biochemical tests were employed to isolate and identify Vibrio cholerae; serotypes were determined by antisera agglutination reaction in blade. Biotype and presence of important virulence factors analysis was done by PCR. Antibiotics susceptibility pattern was detected by disk diffusion method Kirby Bauer. Antibiotic susceptibility and results were interpreted by following as per recommendations of CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) 2014. All samples were collected and tested in the context of Africhol Project, approved by the National Bioethics Committee for Health. Among isolates from of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Ogawa resistance to Sulphamethoxazole-trimethropim was 100% (53/53) to Trimethoprim-, being 100% (54/54) for Ampicillin, 99% (72/74) for Nalidixic Acid, 97% (64/66) to Chloramphenicol, 95% (42/44) for Nitrofurantoin and (19/20) Cotrimoxazole, 83% (80

  1. Cholera Vaccination in Urban Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Rouzier, Vanessa; Severe, Karine; Juste, Marc Antoine Jean; Peck, Mireille; Perodin, Christian; Severe, Patrice; Deschamps, Marie Marcelle; Verdier, Rose Irene; Prince, Sabine; Francois, Jeannot; Cadet, Jean Ronald; Guillaume, Florence D.; Wright, Peter F.; Pape, Jean W.

    2013-01-01

    Successful and sustained efforts have been made to curtail the major cholera epidemic that occurred in Haiti in 2010 with the promotion of hygiene and sanitation measures, training of health personnel and establishment of treatment centers nationwide. Oral cholera vaccine (OCV) was introduced by the Haitian Ministry of Health as a pilot project in urban and rural areas. This paper reports the successful OCV pilot project led by GHESKIO Centers in the urban slums of Port-au-Prince where 52,357 persons received dose 1 and 90.8% received dose 2; estimated coverage of the at-risk community was 75%. This pilot study demonstrated the effort, community mobilization, and organizational capacity necessary to achieve these results in a challenging setting. The OCV intervention paved the way for the recent launching of a national cholera vaccination program integrated in a long-term ambitious and comprehensive plan to address Haiti's critical need in water security and sanitation. PMID:24106194

  2. Natural Cholera Infection–Derived Immunity in an Endemic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Emch, Michael; Park, Jin Kyung; Yunus, Mohammad; Clemens, John

    2011-01-01

    Background. Live oral cholera vaccines may protect against cholera in a manner similar to natural cholera infections. However, information on which to base these vaccines is limited. Methods. The study was conducted in a cholera-endemic population in Bangladesh. Patients with cholera (index patients) detected between 1991 and 2000 were age-matched to 4 cholera-free controls and then followed up during the subsequent 3 years. Results. El Tor cholera was associated with a 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%–81%; P < .001) lower risk of a subsequent El Tor episode. Reduction of the risk of subsequent El Tor cholera was similar for children <5 years and for older persons and was sustained during all 3 years of follow-up. Having El Tor Inaba cholera was associated with lower risks of both El Tor Inaba and El Tor Ogawa cholera, but having El Tor Ogawa cholera was associated only with a reduced risk of El Tor Ogawa cholera. O139 cholera was associated with a 63% (95% CI, −61% to 92%; P = .18) lower risk of subsequent O139 cholera, but there was no evidence of cross-protection between the O1 and O139 serogroups. Conclusions. Live oral cholera vaccines designed to protect against the O1 and O139 serogroups should contain at least the Inaba serotype and strains of both serogroups. PMID:21849288

  3. Natural cholera infection-derived immunity in an endemic setting.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; Emch, Michael; Park, Jin Kyung; Yunus, Mohammad; Clemens, John

    2011-09-15

    Live oral cholera vaccines may protect against cholera in a manner similar to natural cholera infections. However, information on which to base these vaccines is limited. The study was conducted in a cholera-endemic population in Bangladesh. Patients with cholera (index patients) detected between 1991 and 2000 were age-matched to 4 cholera-free controls and then followed up during the subsequent 3 years. El Tor cholera was associated with a 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%-81%; P < .001) lower risk of a subsequent El Tor episode. Reduction of the risk of subsequent El Tor cholera was similar for children < 5 years and for older persons and was sustained during all 3 years of follow-up. Having El Tor Inaba cholera was associated with lower risks of both El Tor Inaba and El Tor Ogawa cholera, but having El Tor Ogawa cholera was associated only with a reduced risk of El Tor Ogawa cholera. O139 cholera was associated with a 63% (95% CI, -61% to 92%; P = .18) lower risk of subsequent O139 cholera, but there was no evidence of cross-protection between the O1 and O139 serogroups. Live oral cholera vaccines designed to protect against the O1 and O139 serogroups should contain at least the Inaba serotype and strains of both serogroups.

  4. Descriptive epidemiology of a cholera outbreak in Kaduna State, Northwest Nigeria, 2014.

    PubMed

    Sule, Ibrahim Baffa; Yahaya, Mohammed; Aisha, Abubakar Ahmed; Zainab, Ahmed Datti; Ummulkhulthum, Bajoga; Nguku, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is an acute gastrointestinal infection caused by Vibrio cholerae, which may lead to severe dehydration and death if not treated. This analysis is aimed at highlighting the magnitude, pattern and trend of cholera outbreak that occurred in Kaduna State in 2014. We obtained the 2014 cholera line-list from the Kaduna State Disease Surveillance and Notification officer (DSNO). We described the outbreaks in time, place and person using Epi-info 7 and Health Mapper. A total of 1468 case-patients and 54 deaths were recorded, giving a case fatality rate (CFR) of 3.68%. Female case-patients were 809(55.08%). The median age for case-patients was 15 years, with an age range of 0.04-90 years. Age specific case fatality rate (ASCFR) is highest among the > 60 years. Seven (30%) out of the 23 local government areas (LGAs) in Kaduna State were affected by the cholera outbreak in 2014. Igabi LGA has the highest attack rate (150.46 per 100,000 population) while Chikun LGA has the lowest attack rate (12.22 per 100,000 population). Chikun LGA records the highest CFR (17.54%). Cholera infection spread across LGAs sharing the same borders. The outbreak started from the first epidemic week of 2014 and lasted over 33 weeks. Our analysis revealed a protracted cholera outbreak that gradually increases in magnitude throughout the first half of 2014 and spread within contiguous LGAs. We recommended the strengthening of the state's diseases surveillance system towards timely detection and early response to disease outbreaks in the future.

  5. Comparative genome analysis of VSP-II and SNPs reveals heterogenic variation in contemporary strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Daisuke; Morita, Masatomo; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Tamaki; Takemura, Taichiro; Yamashiro, Tetsu; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shinoda, Sumio; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-02-13

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease and a major public health problem in many developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Since the Bay of Bengal is considered the epicenter for the seventh cholera pandemic, it is important to understand the genetic dynamism of Vibrio cholerae from Kolkata, as a representative of the Bengal region. We analyzed whole genome sequence data of V. cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India, from 2007 to 2014 and identified the heterogeneous genomic region in these strains. In addition, we carried out a phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome single nucleotide polymorphisms to determine the genetic lineage of strains in Kolkata. This analysis revealed the heterogeneity of the Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-II in Kolkata strains. The ctxB genotype was also heterogeneous and was highly related to VSP-II types. In addition, phylogenetic analysis revealed the shifts in predominant strains in Kolkata. Two distinct lineages, 1 and 2, were found between 2007 and 2010. However, the proportion changed markedly in 2010 and lineage 2 strains were predominant thereafter. Lineage 2 can be divided into four sublineages, I, II, III and IV. The results of this study indicate that lineages 1 and 2-I were concurrently prevalent between 2007 and 2009, and lineage 2-III observed in 2010, followed by the predominance of lineage 2-IV in 2011 and continued until 2014. Our findings demonstrate that the epidemic of cholera in Kolkata was caused by several distinct strains that have been constantly changing within the genetic lineages of V. cholerae O1 in recent years.

  6. Comparative genome analysis of VSP-II and SNPs reveals heterogenic variation in contemporary strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Tamaki; Takemura, Taichiro; Yamashiro, Tetsu; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Miyoshi, Shin-ichi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shinoda, Sumio; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease and a major public health problem in many developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Since the Bay of Bengal is considered the epicenter for the seventh cholera pandemic, it is important to understand the genetic dynamism of Vibrio cholerae from Kolkata, as a representative of the Bengal region. We analyzed whole genome sequence data of V. cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India, from 2007 to 2014 and identified the heterogeneous genomic region in these strains. In addition, we carried out a phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome single nucleotide polymorphisms to determine the genetic lineage of strains in Kolkata. This analysis revealed the heterogeneity of the Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-II in Kolkata strains. The ctxB genotype was also heterogeneous and was highly related to VSP-II types. In addition, phylogenetic analysis revealed the shifts in predominant strains in Kolkata. Two distinct lineages, 1 and 2, were found between 2007 and 2010. However, the proportion changed markedly in 2010 and lineage 2 strains were predominant thereafter. Lineage 2 can be divided into four sublineages, I, II, III and IV. The results of this study indicate that lineages 1 and 2-I were concurrently prevalent between 2007 and 2009, and lineage 2-III observed in 2010, followed by the predominance of lineage 2-IV in 2011 and continued until 2014. Our findings demonstrate that the epidemic of cholera in Kolkata was caused by several distinct strains that have been constantly changing within the genetic lineages of V. cholerae O1 in recent years. PMID:28192431

  7. Impetigo in epidemic and nonepidemic phases: an incidence study over 4(1/2) years in a general population.

    PubMed

    Rørtveit, S; Rortveit, G

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about incidence and natural variation of impetigo in general populations. To investigate the natural course of impetigo in a well-defined population, and to study the resistance pattern of the causal bacteria over time. This is a population-based incidence study in Austevoll, an island community of 4457 inhabitants in Norway, in the years 2001-2005. Incidence rates are given as events per person-year. Epidemic periods were identified by statistical process-control analyses. The incidence rate of impetigo for the whole study period was 0.017 events per person-year, corresponding to a total of 334 cases. The incidence rates were 0.009, 0.026, 0.019, 0.016 and 0.009 in the years 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Three epidemics were identified, starting in August of 2002, 2003 and 2004, lasting for 11, 11 and 5 weeks, respectively. Incidence rates in these epidemic periods were 0.099, 0.045 and 0.074, respectively. In epidemic periods, Staphylococcus aureus was the causal bacterium in 89% (117/132) of cases, while this proportion was 68% (84/123) in nonepidemic periods (P < 0.01). Staphylococcus aureus was resistant to fusidic acid in 84% (98/117) and 64% (54/84) of impetigo cases in epidemic and nonepidemic periods, respectively (P < 0.01). When investigating all types of infections caused by S. aureus in the study period, the proportion of fusidic acid resistance in impetigo cases (152/201, 76%) differed significantly from fusidic acid resistance in other infections (18/116, 16%) (P < 0.01). Distinctive epidemic outbreaks occurred during the summer of three of the five follow-up years. In outbreaks, S. aureus was more frequently the causal agent and the sensitivity to fusidic acid decreased significantly.

  8. [Reemergence of measles. Epidemic situation in the Valencian Community during the years 2011 and 2012].

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Silvia Guiral; Calatrava, Rosana Guaita; Vicenta Rigo Medrano, M; Vidal, Miquel Amat; Martín-Sierra Balibrea, Miguel; Zarco, Isabel Huertas; Ramón, Jorge Roda; Cifre, Antonio Salazar; Morán, Francisco González

    2014-02-01

    Measles incidence declined until becomes a sporadic reporting and infrequent notification in the last decade. The reemergence of the disease reached 744 cases in 2012, a rate of 14.50×10(5) inhabitants. A classic design in Public Health Surveillance was performed: retrospective analysis of cumulative incidence and characteristics of the affected subjects. Those dates were in record linkage with Valencia Microbiology Network (RedMIVA). Finally, 976 cases of measles were confirmed in 2011-2012 epidemic period. Time-line distribution shows three waves with amplitude length on 12-15 weeks. Proportion of unvaccinated or unknown subjects came up to 85% of cases. 25 outbreaks were reported, 499 cases associated. In 7 of the 10 community outbreaks early cases were from Roma population unvaccinated. In the city of Valencia was applied post-exposure prophylaxis in 32 schools and was observed low coverage: between 63% and 77% in 8 schools and less than 50% in 4. Serum negative rate was 12.4% and we highlight the rate under 16 months: 44.8%. Cohorts of 20-59 years had negative rates between 13.5 to 5.9%. The origin of the epidemic was the importation of cases to a territory with inadequate immune protection against measles. Its impact and development was conditioned by previous immunization coverage, the social and ethnic pattern of different areas or quarters and the extensive application of post-exposure prophylaxis at school and family contacts of cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role Of The Aquatic Reservoir In Long-Term Cholera Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetto, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    A novel class of models for Cholera epidemics is described, where the dynamics of the water volume defining the aquatic reservoir of pathogens accessible to a given local community is explicitly considered. In particular, we study how the hydrologic dynamics affects the fluctuations of Vibrio cholerae concentrations in the local reservoir thus driving the evolution of the epidemics at local scales. The novelty of the approach lies in the coupling of an input-output hydrologic dynamics with an epidemiological model which tracks susceptibles, infected and recovered individuals, jointly with bacterial concentrations. Reservoir volumes fluctuating over time indeed control the concentrations of Vibrio cholerae: one of the most common mechanisms of cholera insurgence in endemic regions is, in fact, spring water drought. Here we consider a spatially implicit framework, in order to distinguish the contribution of local dynamics to cholera insurgence at community scales. Our main goal is to investigate the relation between yearly water volume oscillations and long-term trajectories of cholera infection. To this end we take into account a monsoonal fluctuation, with one summer peak in the water input. This simple addition allows us to derive relationships between hydrologic regimes and the epidemiological behavior of the system. Since most of the numerical values of model parameters can be reliably drawn from the literature on the subject, this method allows us to concentrate on significant but still uncertain quantities and associate different ranges of parameter values to different model behaviors which need to be clearly differentiated . Our analysis provides information on the characteristic value of the model parameters for real case studies, comparing simulations and real time series. The model can be very useful in particular for the inference of the intensity of the disease, expressed in terms of the basic reproductive number.

  10. Adhesion of Vibrio cholerae to granular starches.

    PubMed

    Gancz, Hanan; Niderman-Meyer, Orly; Broza, Meir; Kashi, Yechezkel; Shimoni, Eyal

    2005-08-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by specific serogroups of Vibrio cholerae that are pathogenic to humans. Cholera can become epidemic and deadly without adequate medical care. Appropriate rehydration therapy can reduce the mortality rate from as much as 50% of the affected individuals to <1%. Thus, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is an important measure in the treatment of this disease. To further reduce the symptoms associated with cholera, improvements in oral rehydration solution (ORS) by starch incorporation were suggested. Here, we report that V. cholerae adheres to starch granules incorporated in ORS. Adhesion of 98% of the cells was observed within 2 min when cornstarch granules were used. Other starches showed varied adhesion rates, indicating that starch source and composition play an important role in the interaction of V. cholerae and starch granules. Sugars metabolized by V. cholerae showed a repressive effect on the adhesion process. The possible mechanisms involved are discussed. Comparing V. cholerae adhesion with the adhesion of other pathogens suggests the involvement of starch degradation capabilities. This adhesion to granular starch can be used to improve ORT.

  11. Urban Cholera and Water Sustainability Challenges under Climatic and Anthropogenic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Huq, A.; Faruque, A. G.; Colwell, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    The last three decades of surveillance data shows a drastic increase of cholera prevalence in the largest cholera-endemic city of the world - Dhaka, Bangladesh. Emerging megacities in the developing world, especially those located in coastal regions of the tropics remain vulnerable to similar. However, there has not been any systematic study on linking the long-term disease trends with changes in related climatic, environmental, or societal variables. Here, we analyze the 30-year dynamics of urban cholera prevalence in Dhaka with changes in climatic or societal factors: regional hydrology, flooding, water usage, changes in distribution systems, population growth and density in urban settlements, as well as shifting climate patterns. An interesting change is observed in the seasonal trends of cholera incidence; while an endemic upward trend is seen in the dry season, the post-monsoon trend seem to be more epidemic in nature. Evidence points to growing urbanization and rising population in unplanned settlements that have negligible to poor water and sanitation systems compounded by increasing frequency of record flood events. Growing water scarcity in the dry season and lack of sustainable water and sanitation infrastructure for urban settlements have increased endemicity of spring outbreaks, while record flood events and prolonged post-monsoon inundation have contributed to increased epidemic outbreaks in fall. We analyze our findings with the World Health Organization recommended guidelines and investigate water sustainability challenges in the context of climatic and anthropogenic changes in the region.

  12. [Feedback from primary care practitioners two years after the chikungunya epidemic on Reunion Island, 2005-2006].

    PubMed

    Fenétrier, E; Sissoko, D; Vernazza-Licht, N; Bley, D; Gaüzère, B-A; Malvy, D

    2013-08-01

    Primary care practitioners constitute key stakeholders in the surveillance and control of epidemic-prone infectious diseases. We carried out a survey in Reunion Island two years after the 2006 chikungunya epidemic using a purposive random sample of 100 general practitioners (GP). The objective was to describe and identity factors associated to GP involvement in case notification during the 2006 chikungunya epidemic. The methods were: administered face-to-face questionnaire and identification of notification determinants by univariate and multivariate analyses. Nearly 60% of participants declared having failed to join the case notification procedure. The main impeding factor was the acknowledgment of limited capacities consecutive to massive influx of patients. Inversely, practicing in group organization tended to show a favorable effect on case notification. In addition, most responders reported the relevance of the information provided by health authorities, despite a perceived limited efficacy of the procedure in the field. Primary care practitioners' involvement in the surveillance of epidemic infectious diseases requires to be reinforced by a preestablished partnership within a proactive network. This goal comprehends relevant training and preparation for epidemic surveillance.

  13. Methods to Assess the Impact of Mass Oral Cholera Vaccination Campaigns under Real Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Jacqueline; Ali, Mohammad; Sack, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest to use oral cholera vaccination as an additional strategy to water and sanitation interventions against endemic and epidemic cholera. There are two internationally-available and WHO-prequalified oral cholera vaccines: an inactivated vaccine containing killed whole-cells of V. cholerae O1 with recombinant cholera toxin B-subunit (WC/rBS) and a bivalent inactivated vaccine containing killed whole cells of V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 (BivWC). The efficacy, effectiveness, direct and indirect (herd) protection conferred by WC/rBS and BivWC are well established. Yet governments may need local evidence of vaccine impact to justify and scale-up mass oral cholera vaccination campaigns. We discuss various approaches to assess oral cholera vaccine protection, which may be useful to policymakers and public health workers considering deployment and evaluation of the vaccine. PMID:24516595

  14. Cholera in Portugal, 1974. II. Transmission by bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Blake, P A; Rosenberg, M L; Florencia, J; Costa, J B; do Prado Quintino, L; Gangarosa, E J

    1977-04-01

    During a cholera epidemic, Vibrio cholerae was isolated from two springs which supplied mineral water to a spa and to a commercial water bottling plant. Epidemiologic investigation found that cholera attack rates were 10-fold greater among visitors to the spa than among non-visitors. A subsequent matched-pair case-control study which excluded persons who had visted the spa showed that a history of consumption of the bottled non-carbonated water was significantly more common among bacteriologically confirmed cholera cases than among paired controls.

  15. An assessment of the emergency response among health workers involved in the 2010 cholera outbreak in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oladele, David A; Oyedeji, Kolawole S; Niemogha, Mary-Theresa; Nwaokorie, Francisca; Bamidele, Moses; Musa, Adesola Z; Adeneye, Adeniyi K; Bamidele, Tajudeen A; Ochoga, Michael; Akinsinde, Kehinde A; Brai, Bartholomew I; Omonigbehin, Emmanuel A; Fesobi, Toun W; Smith, Stella I; Ujah, Innocent A

    2012-10-01

    The 2010 cholera outbreak in northern Nigeria affected over 40,000 people, with a case fatality rate (CFR) of ≥3.75%. We assessed the emergency response of health care workers (HCWs) involved in case management. This was a cross-sectional study with data collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Data entry and analysis were performed using Epi info software. A total of 56 HCWs were interviewed. The mean age was 31 years (SD±8.16 years). The majority of the HCWs (80%; n=45) were aged 18-39 years. Most were community health extension workers (60%), and 3.6% (n=2) were medical doctors. Many of the HCWs had less than 2 years of work experience (42%). Additionally, 82% of the respondents had <1 week of cholera emergency response training, and 50% of the HCWs managed >20 suspected cases of cholera per day. Although 78% of HCWs reported the practice of universal safety precautions, 32% (n=18) knew HCWs who developed symptoms of cholera during the epidemic, most of which was believed to be hospital acquired (78%). We also found that 77% (n=43) of HCWs had no access to the required emergency response supplies. Inadequate training, a lack of qualified HCWs and a limited supply of emergency response kits were reported. Therefore, the government and stakeholders should address the gaps noted to adequately control and prevent future epidemics. Copyright © 2012 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phylodynamic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti reveals diversification driven by positive selection.

    PubMed

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L; Rashid, Mohammad H; Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Katz, Lee S; Tarr, Cheryl L; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2014-12-23

    Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. Cholera, a dehydrating diarrheal disease caused by toxigenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, emerged in 2010 in Haiti, a country where there were no available records on cholera over the past 100 years. While devastating in terms of morbidity and mortality, the outbreak provided a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary dynamics of V. cholerae and its environmental presence. The present study expands on previous work and provides an in-depth phylodynamic analysis inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms of clinical and environmental strains from dispersed geographic settings in

  17. Quorum Regulated Resistance of Vibrio cholerae against Environmental Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, M. Mozammel; Naser, Iftekhar Bin; Bari, S. M. Nayeemul; Zhu, Jun; Mekalanos, John J.; Faruque, Shah M.

    2016-01-01

    Predation by bacteriophages can significantly influence the population structure of bacterial communities. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics interacts with numerous phages in the aquatic ecosystem, and in the intestine of cholera patients. Seasonal epidemics of cholera reportedly collapse due to predation of the pathogen by phages. However, it is not clear how sufficient number of the bacteria survive to seed the environment in the subsequent epidemic season. We found that bacterial cell density-dependent gene expression termed “quorum sensing” which is regulated by signal molecules called autoinducers (AIs) can protect V. cholerae against predatory phages. V. cholerae mutant strains carrying inactivated AI synthase genes were significantly more susceptible to multiple phages compared to the parent bacteria. Likewise when mixed cultures of phage and bacteria were supplemented with exogenous autoinducers CAI-1 or AI-2 produced by recombinant strains carrying cloned AI synthase genes, increased survival of V. cholerae and a decrease in phage titer was observed. Mutational analyses suggested that the observed effects of autoinducers are mediated in part through the quorum sensing-dependent production of haemaglutinin protease, and partly through downregulation of phage receptors. These results have implication in developing strategies for phage mediated control of cholera. PMID:27892495

  18. The incubation period of cholera: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Azman, Andrew S; Rudolph, Kara E; Cummings, Derek A T; Lessler, Justin

    2013-05-01

    Recent large cholera outbreaks highlight the need for improved understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of cholera. The incubation period of cholera has important implications for clinical and public health decision-making, yet statements of the incubation period of cholera are often imprecise. Here we characterize the distribution of cholera's incubation period. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for statements of the incubation period of cholera and data that might aid in its estimation. We extracted individual-level data, parametrically estimated the distribution of toxigenic cholera's incubation period, and evaluated evidence for differences between strains. The incubation period did not differ by a clinically significant margin between strains (except O1 El Tor Ogawa). We estimate the median incubation period of toxigenic cholera to be 1.4 days (95% CI, 1.3-1.6). Five percent of cholera cases will develop symptoms by 0.5 days (95% CI 0.4-0.5), and 95% by 4.4 days (95% CI 3.9-5.0) after infection. We recommend that cholera investigations use a recall period of at least five days to capture relevant exposures; significantly longer than recent risk factor studies from the Haitian epidemic. This characterization of cholera's incubation period can help improve clinical and public health practice and advance epidemiologic research. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF CHOLERA OUTBREAKS IN BANGLADESH

    PubMed Central

    Koepke, Amanda A.; Longini, Ira M.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Wakefield, Jon; Minin, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite seasonal cholera outbreaks in Bangladesh, little is known about the relationship between environmental conditions and cholera cases. We seek to develop a predictive model for cholera outbreaks in Bangladesh based on environmental predictors. To do this, we estimate the contribution of environmental variables, such as water depth and water temperature, to cholera outbreaks in the context of a disease transmission model. We implement a method which simultaneously accounts for disease dynamics and environmental variables in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SIRS) model. The entire system is treated as a continuous-time hidden Markov model, where the hidden Markov states are the numbers of people who are susceptible, infected, or recovered at each time point, and the observed states are the numbers of cholera cases reported. We use a Bayesian framework to fit this hidden SIRS model, implementing particle Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to sample from the posterior distribution of the environmental and transmission parameters given the observed data. We test this method using both simulation and data from Mathbaria, Bangladesh. Parameter estimates are used to make short-term predictions that capture the formation and decline of epidemic peaks. We demonstrate that our model can successfully predict an increase in the number of infected individuals in the population weeks before the observed number of cholera cases increases, which could allow for early notification of an epidemic and timely allocation of resources. PMID:27746850

  20. Neurologic outcomes of toxic oil syndrome patients 18 years after the epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    de la Paz, Manuel Posada; Philen, Rossanne M; Gerr, Fredric; Letz, Richard; Ferrari Arroyo, Maria José; Vela, Lydia; Izquierdo, Maravillas; Arribas, Concepción Martín; Borda, Ignacio Abaitua; Ramos, Alejandro; Mora, Cristina; Matesanz, Gloria; Roldán, Maria Teresa; Pareja, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Toxic oil syndrome (TOS) resulted from consumption of rapeseed oil denatured with 2% aniline and affected more than 20,000 persons. Eighteen years after the epidemic, many patients continue to report neurologic symptoms that are difficult to evaluate using conventional techniques. We conducted an epidemiologic study to determine whether an exposure to toxic oil 18 years ago was associated with current adverse neurobehavioral effects. We studied a case group of 80 adults exposed to toxic oil 18 years ago and a referent group of 79 adult age- and sex-frequency-matched unexposed subjects. We interviewed subjects for demographics, health status, exposures to neurotoxicants, and responses to the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT), Programa Integrado de Exploracion Neuropsicologica (PIEN), and Goldberg depression questionnaires and administered quantitative neurobehavioral and neurophysiologic tests by computer or trained nurses. The groups did not differ with respect to educational background or other critical variables. We examined associations between case and referent groups and the neurobehavioral and neurophysiologic outcomes of interest. Decreased distal strength of the dominant and nondominant hands and increased vibrotactile thresholds of the fingers and toes were significantly associated with exposure to toxic oil. Finger tapping, simple reaction time latency, sequence B latency, symbol digit latency, and auditory digit span were also significantly associated with exposure. Case subjects also had statistically significantly more neuropsychologic symptoms compared with referents. Using quantitative neurologic tests, we found significant adverse central and peripheral neurologic effects in a group of TOS patients 18 years after exposure to toxic oil when compared with a nonexposed referent group. These effects were not documented by standard clinical examination and were found more frequently in women. PMID:12896854

  1. Neurologic outcomes of toxic oil syndrome patients 18 years after the epidemic.

    PubMed

    de la Paz, Manuel Posada; Philen, Rossanne M; Gerr, Fredric; Letz, Richard; Ferrari Arroyo, Maria José; Vela, Lydia; Izquierdo, Maravillas; Arribas, Concepción Martín; Borda, Ignacio Abaitua; Ramos, Alejandro; Mora, Cristina; Matesanz, Gloria; Roldán, Maria Teresa; Pareja, Juan

    2003-08-01

    Toxic oil syndrome (TOS) resulted from consumption of rapeseed oil denatured with 2% aniline and affected more than 20,000 persons. Eighteen years after the epidemic, many patients continue to report neurologic symptoms that are difficult to evaluate using conventional techniques. We conducted an epidemiologic study to determine whether an exposure to toxic oil 18 years ago was associated with current adverse neurobehavioral effects. We studied a case group of 80 adults exposed to toxic oil 18 years ago and a referent group of 79 adult age- and sex-frequency-matched unexposed subjects. We interviewed subjects for demographics, health status, exposures to neurotoxicants, and responses to the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT), Programa Integrado de Exploracion Neuropsicologica (PIEN), and Goldberg depression questionnaires and administered quantitative neurobehavioral and neurophysiologic tests by computer or trained nurses. The groups did not differ with respect to educational background or other critical variables. We examined associations between case and referent groups and the neurobehavioral and neurophysiologic outcomes of interest. Decreased distal strength of the dominant and nondominant hands and increased vibrotactile thresholds of the fingers and toes were significantly associated with exposure to toxic oil. Finger tapping, simple reaction time latency, sequence B latency, symbol digit latency, and auditory digit span were also significantly associated with exposure. Case subjects also had statistically significantly more neuropsychologic symptoms compared with referents. Using quantitative neurologic tests, we found significant adverse central and peripheral neurologic effects in a group of TOS patients 18 years after exposure to toxic oil when compared with a nonexposed referent group. These effects were not documented by standard clinical examination and were found more frequently in women.

  2. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E.; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Ikhtear Uddin, Muhammad; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Clemens, John D.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Methods Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Findings Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. Conclusion These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs. PMID:26562418

  3. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; LaRocque, Regina C; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Ryan, Edward T; Clemens, John D; Thomson, Nicholas R; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-11-01

    Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs.

  4. No Evidence of Significant Levels of Toxigenic V. cholerae O1 in the Haitian Aquatic Environment During the 2012 Rainy Season

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Sandrine; Lesne, Jean; Moore, Sandra; Rossignol, Emmanuel; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Gazin, Pierre; Barrais, Robert; Magloire, Roc; Boncy, Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Background: On October 21, 2010, Haiti was struck by a cholera epidemic for the first time in over a century. Epidemiological and molecular genetic data have clearly demonstrated that the bacterium was imported. Nevertheless, the persistence of the epidemic for more than two years, the high incidence rates in some coastal areas and the seasonal exacerbations of the epidemic during the rainy seasons have prompted us to examine the levels of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in the Haitian aquatic environment. Methods: In July 2012, during the warm and rainy season, 36 aquatic stations were sampled to search for toxigenic V. cholerae. These stations included fresh, brackish and saline surface waters as well as waste water; the sampling sites were located in both rural and urban areas (around Port-au-Prince and Gonaïves) located in the West and Artibonite Departments. V. cholerae bacteria were detected in enrichment cultures of water samples (sample volumes included 1 L, 100 mL, 10 mL, 1 mL, 0.1 mL, 0.01 mL and 0.001 mL depending on the context). Detection methods included both culture on selective agar (for strain isolation) and PCR assays targeting the genes ompW (V. cholerae species), O1-rfb and O139-rfb (O1 and O139 V. cholerae serogroups, respectively), and the cholera toxin gene ctxA, which is present exclusively in toxigenic cholera strains. Results: A total of 411 culturable V. cholerae isolates from 29 stations were obtained via selective culture; however, only one of these isolates displayed a late positive reaction with polyvalent anti-O1 serum. Positive V. cholerae PCR results were obtained from each of the 32 tested stations (a total of 77 enrichments out of 107 yielded a positive result); only one sample yielded a positive V. cholerae O1 PCR result. The cholera toxin gene ctxA was never detected via PCR with either primer pair, which includes samples derived from the two stations yielding positive O1 culture or positive O1 PCR results. Therefore, we could not

  5. Haitian variant ctxB producing Vibrio cholerae O1 with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin is persistent in Yavatmal, Maharashtra, India, after causing a cholera outbreak.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Mishra, D K; Deshmukh, D G; Jain, M; Zade, A M; Ingole, K V; Yadava, P K

    2014-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor producing Haitian variant Cholera Toxin (HCT) and showing reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin caused a cholera outbreak associated with a high case fatality rate (4.5) in India. HCT-secreting strains responsible for severe cholera epidemics in Orissa (India), Western Africa and Haiti were associated with increased mortality. There is a pressing need for an integrated multidisciplinary approach to combat further spread of newly emerging variant strains. The therapeutic effect of ciprofloxacin was diminished whereas use of doxycycline in moderate to severe cholera patients was found to be effective in outbreak management.

  6. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number).

  7. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number). PMID:26119824

  8. Vibrio cholerae: lessons for mucosal vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Vibrio cholerae to persist in bodies of water will continue to confound our ability to eradicate cholera through improvements to infrastructure, and thus cholera vaccines are needed. We aim for an inexpensive vaccine that can provide long-lasting protection from all epidemic cholera infections, currently caused by O1 or O139 serogroups. Recent insights into correlates of protection, epidemiology and pathogenesis may help us design improved vaccines. This notwithstanding, we have come to appreciate that even marginally protective vaccines, such as oral whole-cell killed vaccines, if widely distributed, can provide significant protection, owing to herd immunity. Further efforts are still required to provide more effective protection of young children. PMID:21162623

  9. Urban cholera transmission hotspots and their implications for reactive vaccination: evidence from Bissau city, Guinea bissau.

    PubMed

    Azman, Andrew S; Luquero, Francisco J; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Grais, Rebecca F; Banga, Cunhate Na; Grenfell, Bryan T; Lessler, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Use of cholera vaccines in response to epidemics (reactive vaccination) may provide an effective supplement to traditional control measures. In Haiti, reactive vaccination was considered but, until recently, rejected in part due to limited global supply of vaccine. Using Bissau City, Guinea-Bissau as a case study, we explore neighborhood-level transmission dynamics to understand if, with limited vaccine and likely delays, reactive vaccination can significantly change the course of a cholera epidemic. We fit a spatially explicit meta-population model of cholera transmission within Bissau City to data from 7,551 suspected cholera cases from a 2008 epidemic. We estimated the effect reactive vaccination campaigns would have had on the epidemic under different levels of vaccine coverage and campaign start dates. We compared highly focused and diffuse strategies for distributing vaccine throughout the city. We found wide variation in the efficiency of cholera transmission both within and between areas of the city. "Hotspots", where transmission was most efficient, appear to drive the epidemic. In particular one area, Bandim, was a necessary driver of the 2008 epidemic in Bissau City. If vaccine supply were limited but could have been distributed within the first 80 days of the epidemic, targeting vaccination at Bandim would have averted the most cases both within this area and throughout the city. Regardless of the distribution strategy used, timely distribution of vaccine in response to an ongoing cholera epidemic can prevent cases and save lives. Reactive vaccination can be a useful tool for controlling cholera epidemics, especially in urban areas like Bissau City. Particular neighborhoods may be responsible for driving a city's cholera epidemic; timely and targeted reactive vaccination at such neighborhoods may be the most effective way to prevent cholera cases both within that neighborhood and throughout the city.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae associated with flood in Brahamputra River valley, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soubhagya K; Vairale, Mohan G; Arya, Neha; Yadav, Priti; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Yadava, Pramod K; Kumar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    Cholera is often caused when drinking water is contaminated through environmental sources. In recent years, the drastic cholera epidemics in Odisha (2007) and Haiti (2010) were associated with natural disasters (flood and Earthquake). Almost every year the state of Assam India witnesses flood in Brahamputra River valley during reversal of wind system (monsoon). This is often followed by outbreak of diarrheal diseases including cholera. Beside the incidence of cholera outbreaks, there is lack of experimental evidence for prevalence of the bacterium in aquatic environment and its association with cholera during/after flood in the state. A molecular surveillance during 2012-14 was carried out to study prevalence, strain differentiation, and clonality of Vibrio cholerae in inland aquatic reservoirs flooded by Brahamputra River in Assam. Water samples were collected, filtered, enriched in alkaline peptone water followed by selective culturing on thiosulfate bile salt sucrose agar. Environmental isolates were identified as V. cholerae, based on biochemical assays followed by sero-grouping and detailed molecular characterization. The incidence of the presence of the bacterium in potable water sources was higher after flood. Except one O1 isolate, all of the strains were broadly grouped under non-O1/non-O139 whereas some of them did have cholera toxin (CT). Surprisingly, we have noticed Haitian ctxB in two non-O1/non-O139 strains. MLST analyses based on pyrH, recA and rpoA genes revealed clonality in the environmental strains. The isolates showed varying degree of antimicrobial resistance including tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. The strains harbored the genetic elements SXT constins and integrons responsible for multidrug resistance. Genetic characterization is useful as phenotypic characters alone have proven to be unsatisfactory for strain discrimination. An assurance to safe drinking water, sanitation and monitoring of the aquatic reservoirs is of utmost importance for

  11. The role of Vibrio cholerae genotyping in Africa.

    PubMed

    De, Rituparna; Ghosh, Jayeeta Banerjee; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Nair, G Balakrish

    2013-11-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is prevalent in the African continent from the 1970s when the seventh pandemic spread from Asia to Africa. In the past decade, cholera has caused devastating outbreaks in much of Africa, illustrated by the recent cholera epidemics in Zimbabwe and regions of central Africa. Given the extent of cholera in Africa, a robust and efficient surveillance system should be in place to prevent and control the disease in this continent. Such a surveillance system would be greatly bolstered by use of molecular typing techniques to identify genetic subtypes. In this review, we highlight the role that modern molecular typing techniques can play in tracking and aborting the spread of cholera.

  12. Genetic characterization of ØVC8 lytic phage for Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Solís-Sánchez, Alejandro; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; De la Mora, Javier; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2016-03-22

    Epidemics and pandemics of cholera, a diarrheal disease, are attributed to Vibrio cholera serogroups O1 and O139. In recent years, specific lytic phages of V. cholera have been proposed to be important factors in the cyclic occurrence of cholera in endemic areas. However, the role and potential participation of lytic phages during long interepidemic periods of cholera in non-endemic regions have not yet been described. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize specific lytic phages of V. cholera O1 strains. Sixteen phages were isolated from wastewater samples collected at the Endhó Dam in Hidalgo State, Mexico, concentrated with PEG/NaCl, and purified by density gradient. The lytic activity of the purified phages was tested using different V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. Phage morphology was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and phage genome sequencing was performed using the Genome Analyzer IIx System. Genome assembly and bioinformatics analysis were performed using a set of high-throughput programs. Phage structural proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixteen phages with lytic and lysogenic activity were isolated; only phage ØVC8 showed specific lytic activity against V. cholerae O1 strains. TEM images of ØVC8 revealed a phage with a short tail and an isometric head. The ØVC8 genome comprises linear double-stranded DNA of 39,422 bp with 50.8 % G + C. Of the 48 annotated ORFs, 16 exhibit homology with sequences of known function and several conserved domains. Bioinformatics analysis showed multiple conserved domains, including an Ig domain, suggesting that ØVC8 might adhere to different mucus substrates such as the human intestinal epithelium. The results suggest that ØVC8 genome utilize the "single-stranded cohesive ends" packaging strategy of the lambda-like group. The two structural proteins sequenced and analyzed are proteins of known function. ØVC8 is a lytic phage with specific activity against V. cholerae

  13. Ecological study of Vibrio cholerae in Vellore.

    PubMed

    Jesudason, M V; Balaji, V; Mukundan, U; Thomson, C J

    2000-04-01

    Vellore is endemic for cholera due to Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. In a previous study the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae in drinking water, lakes and sewage outfalls in a single 2-months period in Vellore, India was determined. In addition water samples from three sites were also tested for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 by fluorescent antibody staining. This follow on study has examined how the environmental distribution of V. cholerae at the same sites alters over a 12-month period and the relationship to the clinical pattern of cholera in Vellore. Samples of water were collected from fixed sites at three water bodies each month between April 1997 and March 1998. Bacteria isolated from samples were identified by standard biochemical tests and isolated strains of V. cholerae tested for their ability to agglutinate O1 and O139 antisera. Samples were also tested for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 by fluorescent antibody staining. The clinical isolation rate of V. cholerae in Vellore, maximum temperature and rainfall were also studied. The results demonstrate the presence in the environment of viable but non-cultivable (VNC) V. cholerae in 10 of 12 months of the study year as well as their viability. Their prevalence in the environment also correlated with the isolation of these pathogens from clinical samples over the same study period.

  14. Ecological study of Vibrio cholerae in Vellore.

    PubMed Central

    Jesudason, M. V.; Balaji, V.; Mukundan, U.; Thomson, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Vellore is endemic for cholera due to Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. In a previous study the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae in drinking water, lakes and sewage outfalls in a single 2-months period in Vellore, India was determined. In addition water samples from three sites were also tested for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 by fluorescent antibody staining. This follow on study has examined how the environmental distribution of V. cholerae at the same sites alters over a 12-month period and the relationship to the clinical pattern of cholera in Vellore. Samples of water were collected from fixed sites at three water bodies each month between April 1997 and March 1998. Bacteria isolated from samples were identified by standard biochemical tests and isolated strains of V. cholerae tested for their ability to agglutinate O1 and O139 antisera. Samples were also tested for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 by fluorescent antibody staining. The clinical isolation rate of V. cholerae in Vellore, maximum temperature and rainfall were also studied. The results demonstrate the presence in the environment of viable but non-cultivable (VNC) V. cholerae in 10 of 12 months of the study year as well as their viability. Their prevalence in the environment also correlated with the isolation of these pathogens from clinical samples over the same study period. PMID:10813143

  15. Cholera Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... label> bacterium have mild diarrhea or no symptoms at all. Only a small proportion, about ...

  16. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    After a general consideration of the loss of fluids and salts in evacuations from the gastro-intestinal tract, the author discusses in detail both the physical and the chemical changes in the blood of cholera patients. The author then deals exhaustively with the problems of circulatory and renal failure. PMID:13413649

  17. The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system displays antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Dana L; Miyata, Sarah T; Kitaoka, Maya; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2010-11-09

    The acute diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the marine bacterium Vibrio cholerae. A type VI secretion system (T6SS), which is structurally similar to the bacteriophage cell-puncturing device, has been recently identified in V. cholerae and is used by this organism to confer virulence toward phagocytic eukaryotes, such as J774 murine macrophages and Dictyostelium discoideum. We tested the interbacterial virulence of V. cholerae strain V52, an O37 serogroup with a constitutively active T6SS. V52 was found to be highly virulent toward multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium, and caused up to a 100,000-fold reduction in E. coli survival. Because the T6SS-deficient mutants V52ΔvasK and V52ΔvasH showed toxicity defects that could be complemented, virulence displayed by V. cholerae depends on a functional T6SS. V. cholerae V52 and strains of the O1 serogroup were resistant to V52, suggesting that V. cholerae has acquired immunity independently of its serogroup. We hypothesize that the T6SS, in addition to targeting eukaryotic host cells, confers toxicity toward other bacteria, providing a means of interspecies competition to enhance environmental survival. Thus, the V. cholerae T6SS may enhance the survival of V. cholerae in its aquatic ecosystem during the transmission of cholera and between epidemics.

  18. Cholera in Mexico: the paradoxical benefits of the last pandemic.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Jaime; Valdespino, José Luis; García-García, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    To describe the impact of preventive and control measures in Mexico prior to, and during, the cholera epidemic of 1991-2001. When cholera appeared in Latin America in January 1991, the Mexican government considered that it represented a national security problem. Therefore, actions were implemented within the health sector (e.g. epidemiological surveillance, laboratory network and patient care) and other sectors (public education and basic sanitation). The first case occurred in Mexico in June 1991. The incidence rate remained below 17.9 per 100,000 inhabitants and affected mainly rural areas. The last cholera report occurred in 2001. The disease never became endemic. The population benefited not only from acquisition of knowledge about preventive measures, but also from modification of risky practices and from reinforcement of city and municipal drinking water supplies. Control strategies had an overall impact in decreasing diarrheal mortality among children under five years of age. Additionally the country did not suffer from a decrease in tourism or economic consequences. This experience can be considered as the operationalization of a new public health system spanning multisectorial activities, involving community participation, political will and with impact on public health and economic issues.

  19. Cholera outbreak in Senegal in 2005: was climate a factor?

    PubMed

    de Magny, Guillaume Constantin; Thiaw, Wassila; Kumar, Vadlamani; Manga, Noël M; Diop, Bernard M; Gueye, Lamine; Kamara, Mamina; Roche, Benjamin; Murtugudde, Raghu; Colwell, Rita R

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal illness caused by Vibrio cholerae and occurs as widespread epidemics in Africa. In 2005, there were 31,719 cholera cases, with 458 deaths in the Republic of Senegal. We retrospectively investigated the climate origin of the devastating floods in mid-August 2005, in the Dakar Region of Senegal and the subsequent outbreak of cholera along with the pattern of cholera outbreaks in three other regions of that country. We compared rainfall patterns between 2002 and 2005 and the relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and precipitation over Senegal for 2005. Results showed a specific pattern of rainfall throughout the Dakar region during August, 2005, and the associated rainfall anomaly coincided with an exacerbation of the cholera epidemic. Comparison of rainfall and epidemiological patterns revealed that the temporal dynamics of precipitation, which was abrupt and heavy, was presumably the determining factor. Analysis of the SST gradient showed that the Atlantic Ocean SST variability in 2005 differed from that of 2002 to 2004, a result of a prominent Atlantic meridional mode. The influence of this intense precipitation on cholera transmission over a densely populated and crowded region was detectable for both Dakar and Thiès, Senegal. Thus, high resolution rainfall forecasts at subseasonal time scales should provide a way forward for an early warning system in Africa for cholera and, thereby, trigger epidemic preparedness. Clearly, attention must be paid to both natural and human induced environmental factors to devise appropriate action to prevent cholera and other waterborne disease epidemics in the region.

  20. Cholera Outbreak in Senegal in 2005: Was Climate a Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Thiaw, Wassila; Kumar, Vadlamani; Manga, Noël M.; Diop, Bernard M.; Gueye, Lamine; Kamara, Mamina; Roche, Benjamin; Murtugudde, Raghu; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal illness caused by Vibrio cholerae and occurs as widespread epidemics in Africa. In 2005, there were 31,719 cholera cases, with 458 deaths in the Republic of Senegal. We retrospectively investigated the climate origin of the devastating floods in mid-August 2005, in the Dakar Region of Senegal and the subsequent outbreak of cholera along with the pattern of cholera outbreaks in three other regions of that country. We compared rainfall patterns between 2002 and 2005 and the relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and precipitation over Senegal for 2005. Results showed a specific pattern of rainfall throughout the Dakar region during August, 2005, and the associated rainfall anomaly coincided with an exacerbation of the cholera epidemic. Comparison of rainfall and epidemiological patterns revealed that the temporal dynamics of precipitation, which was abrupt and heavy, was presumably the determining factor. Analysis of the SST gradient showed that the Atlantic Ocean SST variability in 2005 differed from that of 2002 to 2004, a result of a prominent Atlantic meridional mode. The influence of this intense precipitation on cholera transmission over a densely populated and crowded region was detectable for both Dakar and Thiès, Senegal. Thus, high resolution rainfall forecasts at subseasonal time scales should provide a way forward for an early warning system in Africa for cholera and, thereby, trigger epidemic preparedness. Clearly, attention must be paid to both natural and human induced environmental factors to devise appropriate action to prevent cholera and other waterborne disease epidemics in the region. PMID:22952995

  1. Changing patterns of HIV epidemic in 30 years in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Suguimoto, S Pilar; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Musumari, Patou Masika; El-saaidi, Christina; Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    The HIV epidemic in East Asia started relatively late compared to the rest of the world. All countries or areas, except for North Korea, had reported HIV and AIDS cases, with China being the major contributor to the epidemic. Though initially driven by injecting drug use in China, East Asia did not experience an explosive spread. Strong commitment in China and early harm reduction programs in Taiwan managed to reduce transmission substantially among injecting drug users. In contrast to China and Taiwan, injection drug use has accounted just a little, if not at all, for the spread of HIV in other East Asian counties. However, following a global trend, sexual contact has become a major route of infection across the region. While much progress has been achieved in this region, with the epidemic among other key populations relatively stable, the emerging epidemic through sex between men is a growing concern. Recent estimates suggest that HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) has reached 6.3 % in China, 7.5 % in Mongolia, and ranges between 8.1 %-10.7 % in Taiwan and between 2.7 %- 6.5 % in South Korea. In Japan, 74 % of male HIV cases were among MSM in 2012, while Hong Kong has witnessed a sharp increase of HIV cases among MSM since 2004. There is urgent need to address issues of discrimination and stigma toward homosexuality, and to strengthen the strategies to reach and care for this population.

  2. Cholera outbreaks in South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Kaushik; Bhattacharya, S K

    2014-01-01

    This chapter highlights the cholera situation in South Asia and the Bay of Bengal region, the original 'homeland' of cholera. A detailed discussion of cholera outbreaks in individual countries in South-East Asia follows. The countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) SEARO (South-East Asia Region) region are discussed first, followed by discussions about the other countries in South-East Asia that do not fall within the purview of the WHO SEARO classification of the member countries of the region. Therefore, the chapter attempts to provide a comprehensive yet precise outline of the major cholera outbreaks that have occurred in the region over the years.

  3. Vibriosis, not cholera: toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 infections in the United States, 1984-2014.

    PubMed

    Crowe, S J; Newton, A E; Gould, L H; Parsons, M B; Stroika, S; Bopp, C A; Freeman, M; Greene, K; Mahon, B E

    2016-11-01

    Toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 have caused cholera epidemics, but other serogroups - such as O75 or O141 - can also produce cholera toxin and cause severe watery diarrhoea similar to cholera. We describe 31 years of surveillance for toxigenic non-O1, non-O139 infections in the United States and map these infections to the state where the exposure probably originated. While serogroups O75 and O141 are closely related pathogens, they differ in how and where they infect people. Oysters were the main vehicle for O75 infection. The vehicles for O141 infection include oysters, clams, and freshwater in lakes and rivers. The patients infected with serogroup O75 who had food traceback information available ate raw oysters from Florida. Patients infected with O141 ate oysters from Florida and clams from New Jersey, and those who only reported being exposed to freshwater were exposed in Arizona, Michigan, Missouri, and Texas. Improving the safety of oysters, specifically, should help prevent future illnesses from these toxigenic strains and similar pathogenic Vibrio species. Post-harvest processing of raw oysters, such as individual quick freezing, heat-cool pasteurization, and high hydrostatic pressurization, should be considered.

  4. [Strategic framework for cholera prevention and control in Chengdu: construction and effectiveness evaluation].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian; Du, Chang-hui; Yang, Lan; Ma, Lin; Huang, Zhong-hang; Tuo, Xiao-Li; Yin, Zhong-liang

    2011-02-01

    To construct an operable strategic framework for cholera prevention and control which mobilized the advantages of local resources and adapted to social developments in Chengdu, and to evaluate its application effects. (1) After analyzing the local epidemic data of cholera in Chengdu from 1994 to 2004, we determined the main problems of cholera prevention and control works as well as the efficiency and deficiency of employed measures, and then formed a basic strategic framework. (2) After 55 invited experts preliminarily scored the strategic framework, we selected 72 specific measures to establish a measure entry database, and then the importance and operability of each measure were scored by 17 core experts. (3) Finally, the effectiveness of this strategic framework was evaluated according to the analyzing results of infection control, health education and etiological monitoring. (1) The framework took government leadership as main scenario and the informatization as subordination scenario. Meanwhile, it focused on three points: the improvement of social environment, the completion of system and mechanisms for monitoring and early warning, and the enhancement of CDC response to public health emergencies. Total importance score and operability score of 35 specific measures included in this framework was 4.20 ± 0.86 and 4.09 ± 0.87, respectively. (2) Chengdu had maintained zero cholera incidence for five consecutive years from 2005 to 2009 since it gradually began to implement the strategic framework in 2002. There were 19 positive cholera cases detected by etiological monitoring and all of them were seafood or fishery products including soft-shelled turtles, silver carps and bullfrogs. The coverage rate and qualification rate of the training for grassroots cadres, grassroots medical workers, mobile cooks and their assistants was 98.14% (198 452/202 220) and 98.17% (194 820/198 452) in average, respectively. The qualification rate of the training for employees in

  5. Vibrio cholerae O139 in Calcutta, 1992-1998: incidence, antibiograms, and genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Basu, A.; Garg, P.; Datta, S.; Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharya, T.; Khan, A.; Ramamurthy, S.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Yamasaki, S.; Takeda, Y.; Nair, G. B.

    2000-01-01

    We report results of surveillance for cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O139 from September 1992, when it was first identified, to December 1998. V. cholerae O139 dominated as the causative agent of cholera in Calcutta during 1992-93 and 1996- 97, while the O1 strains dominated during the rest of the period. Dramatic shifts in patterns of resistance to cotrimoxazole, neomycin, and streptomycin were observed. Molecular epidemiologic studies showed clonal diversity among the O139 strains and continuous emergence of new epidemic clones, reflected by changes in the structure, organization, and location of the CTX prophages in the V. cholerae O139 PMID:10756147

  6. Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–ϕ prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

  7. Genomic science in understanding cholera outbreaks and evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Robins, William P; Mekalanos, John J

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTXϕ prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent.

  8. Epidemic typhus.

    PubMed

    Bechah, Yassina; Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2008-07-01

    Epidemic typhus is transmitted to human beings by the body louse Pediculus humanus corporis. The disease is still considered a major threat by public-health authorities, despite the efficacy of antibiotics, because poor sanitary conditions are conducive to louse proliferation. Until recently, Rickettsia prowazekii, the causal agent, was thought to be confined to human beings and their body lice. Since 1975, R prowazekii infection in human beings has been related to contact with the flying squirrel Glaucomys volans in the USA. Moreover, Brill-Zinsser disease, a relapsed form of epidemic typhus that appears as sporadic cases many years after the initial infection, is unrelated to louse infestation. Stress or a waning immune system are likely to reactivate this earlier persistent infection, which could be the source of new epidemics when conditions facilitate louse infestation. Finally, R prowazekii is a potential category B bioterrorism agent, because it is stable in dried louse faeces and can be transmitted through aerosols. An increased understanding of the pathogenesis of epidemic typhus may be useful for protection against this bacterial threat.

  9. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1956-01-01

    The first portion of this study describes in detail the different aspects of stool examinations, including the collection, preservation, and pooling of specimens, macroscopic and bacterioscopic examination, enrichment methods, and cultivation on a variety of solid media. The author also deals with the examination of vomits and of water. The performance and value of different identification tests (agglutination, haemolysis, and bacteriophage) and confirmatory tests are then considered. An annex is included on bacteriological procedures in the laboratory diagnosis of cholera. PMID:13356145

  10. Effectiveness of reactive oral cholera vaccination in rural Haiti: a case-control study and bias-indicator analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Teng, Jessica E; Almazor, Charles P; Jerome, J Gregory; Ternier, Ralph; Boncy, Jacques; Buteau, Josiane; Murray, Megan B; Harris, Jason B; Franke, Molly F

    2015-03-01

    Between April and June, 2012, a reactive cholera vaccination campaign was done in Haiti with an oral inactivated bivalent whole-cell vaccine. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of the vaccine in a case-control study and to assess the likelihood of bias in that study in a bias-indicator study. Residents of Bocozel or Grand Saline who were eligible for the vaccination campaign (ie, age ≥12 months, not pregnant, and living in the region at the time of the vaccine campaign) were included. In the primary case-control study, cases had acute watery diarrhoea, sought treatment at one of three participating cholera treatment units, and had a stool sample positive for cholera by culture. For each case, four control individuals who did not seek treatment for acute watery diarrhoea were matched by location of residence, enrolment time (within 2 weeks of the case), and age (1-4 years, 5-15 years, and >15 years). Cases in the bias-indicator study were individuals with acute watery diarrhoea with a negative stool sample for cholera. Controls were selected in the same manner as in the primary case-control study. Trained staff used standard laboratory procedures to do rapid tests and stool cultures from study cases. Participants were interviewed to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, risk factors for cholera, and self-reported vaccination. Data were analysed by conditional logistic regression, adjusting for matching factors. From Oct 24, 2012, to March 9, 2014, 114 eligible individuals presented with acute watery diarrhoea and were enrolled, 25 of whom were subsequently excluded. 47 participants were analysed as cases in the vaccine effectiveness case-control study and 42 as cases in the bias-indicator study. 33 (70%) of 47 cholera cases self-reported vaccination versus 167 (89%) of 188 controls (vaccine effectiveness 63%, 95% CI 8-85). 27 (57%) of 47 cases had certified vaccination versus 147 (78%) of 188 controls (vaccine effectiveness 58%, 13-80). Neither self

  11. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed.

  12. Low detection of Vibrio cholerae carriage in healthcare workers returning to 12 Latin American countries from Haiti.

    PubMed

    Llanes, R; Somarriba, L; Hernández, G; Bardaji, Y; Aguila, A; Mazumder, R N

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY This investigation was undertaken to characterize the prevalence of intestinal Vibrio cholerae in healthcare workers (HCWs) returning from Haiti due to the ongoing cholera epidemic. Eight hundred and fifty asymptomatic HCWs of the Cuban Medical Brigade, who planned to leave Haiti, were studied by laboratory screening of stool culture for V. cholerae. A very low percentage (0.23%) of toxigenic V. cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Ogawa was found. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the largest reported screening study for V. cholerae infection in asymptomatic HCWs returning from a cholera-affected country. Cholera transmission to health personnel highlights a possible risk of transmitting cholera during mobilization of the population for emergency response. Aid workers are encouraged to take precautions to reduce their risk for acquiring cholera and special care should be taken by consuming safe water and food and practising regular hand washing.

  13. An outbreak of nosocomial cholera in a rural Bangladesh hospital.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R W; Rahman, A S; Alim, A R; Yunis, M D; Houda, B S

    1986-11-01

    At a time of year when Vibrio cholerae infection accounted for over 50% of admissions to a rural Bangladeshi diarrhoea treatment centre, 29% of 48 patients hospitalized with non-cholera diarrhoea developed nosocomial V. cholerae infection. During an investigation of the 8-week outbreak, only the severity of the non-cholera diarrhoea which prompted hospital admission emerged as an important risk factor for nosocomial infection; food, intravenous solutions, oral rehydration fluid, patient attendants and hospital personnel could not be implicated as transmission sources. Patients receiving antibiotics while hospitalized did not develop nosocomial infection. Antecedent non-cholera diarrhoea may represent an important risk factor in some cases of V. cholerae infection occurring in persons who reside in cholera-endemic areas where rates of non-cholera diarrhoea are also high.

  14. Great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) as potential vectors for the dispersal of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Laviad-Shitrit, Sivan; Lev-Ari, Tidhar; Katzir, Gadi; Sharaby, Yehonatan; Izhaki, Ido; Halpern, Malka

    2017-08-11

    Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a devastating epidemic and pandemic disease. Despite its importance, the way of its global dissemination is unknown. V. cholerae is abundant in aquatic habitats and is known to be borne by copepods, chironomids and fishes. Our aim was to determine if fish-eating birds act as vectors in the spread of V. cholerae by consuming infected fish. We determined the existence of V. cholerae in the microbiome of 5/7 wild cormorants' intestine. In three of these V. cholerae-positive wild cormorants, the presence of a gene for cholera toxin (ctxA) was detected. We subsequently tested eight captive, hand-reared cormorants, divided into two equal groups. Prior to the experiment, the feces of the cormorants were V. cholerae-negative. One group was fed exclusively on tilapias, which are naturally infected with V. cholerae, and the other was fed exclusively on goldfish or on koi that were V. cholerae-negative. We detected V. cholerae in the feces of the tilapia-fed, but not in the goldfish/koi-fed, cormorants. Hence, we demonstrate that fish-eating birds can be infected with V. cholerae from their fish prey. The large-scale movements of many fish-eating birds provide a potential mechanism for the global distribution of V. cholerae.

  15. Considerations for Oral Cholera Vaccine Use during Outbreak after Earthquake in Haiti, 2010−2011

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Andrea; Hyde, Terri B.; Mintz, Eric; Danovaro-Holliday, M. Carolina; Henry, Ariel; Tappero, Jordan W.; Roels, Thierry H.; Abrams, Joseph; Burkholder, Brenton T.; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc; Andrus, Jon; Dietz, Vance

    2011-01-01

    Oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) have been recommended in cholera-endemic settings and preemptively during outbreaks and complex emergencies. However, experience and guidelines for reactive use after an outbreak has started are limited. In 2010, after over a century without epidemic cholera, an outbreak was reported in Haiti after an earthquake. As intensive nonvaccine cholera control measures were initiated, the feasibility of OCV use was considered. We reviewed OCV characteristics and recommendations for their use and assessed global vaccine availability and capacity to implement a vaccination campaign. Real-time modeling was conducted to estimate vaccine impact. Ultimately, cholera vaccination was not implemented because of limited vaccine availability, complex logistical and operational challenges of a multidose regimen, and obstacles to conducting a campaign in a setting with population displacement and civil unrest. Use of OCVs is an option for cholera control; guidelines for their appropriate use in epidemic and emergency settings are urgently needed. PMID:22099114

  16. Cholera gravis associated with acute renal failure in a traveler from Haiti to the United States.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Corcho, Andrés; Pinsker, Richard W; Sarkar, Samir; Bagheri, Farshad; Patel, Mahendra C; Lam, Pablo; González, Argentina

    2012-09-01

    Cholera is a gastroenteric disease caused by epidemic or pandemic Vibrio cholerae which still is responsible for over 100,000 annual deaths worldwide. Since October 2010, Haiti experienced a cholera outbreak affecting more than 300,000 persons. Few imported cases related to the Haitian epidemic have been reported so far in the United States and Canada. We presented a patient who developed cholera gravis soon after arrival at New York City from Haiti. The patient needed admission to an Intensive Care Unit, for vigorous intravenous hydration, antibiotic therapy, and hemodialysis due to refractory oliguric renal failure. The patient was discharged the day 6 after admission and V. cholerae O1 was isolated from the stool culture. Cholera can be a life-threatening disease; early recognition based on travel history and clinical features is the corner stone for successful management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 associated with floods, Pakistan, 2010.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Ali; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Baker, Stephen; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Bokhari, Habib; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    In August 2010, Pakistan experienced major floods and a subsequent cholera epidemic. To clarify the population dynamics and transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Pakistan, we sequenced the genomes of all V. cholerae O1 El Tor isolates and compared the sequences to a global collection of 146 V. cholerae strains. Within the global phylogeny, all isolates from Pakistan formed 2 new subclades (PSC-1 and PSC-2), lying in the third transmission wave of the seventh-pandemic lineage that could be distinguished by signature deletions and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Geographically, PSC-1 isolates originated from the coast, whereas PSC-2 isolates originated from inland areas flooded by the Indus River. Single-nucleotide polymorphism accumulation analysis correlated river flow direction with the spread of PSC-2. We found at least 2 sources of cholera in Pakistan during the 2010 epidemic and illustrate the value of a global genomic data bank in contextualizing cholera outbreaks.

  18. Genomic Epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 Associated with Floods, Pakistan, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Muhammad Ali; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Baker, Stephen; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Bokhari, Habib

    2014-01-01

    In August 2010, Pakistan experienced major floods and a subsequent cholera epidemic. To clarify the population dynamics and transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Pakistan, we sequenced the genomes of all V. cholerae O1 El Tor isolates and compared the sequences to a global collection of 146 V. cholerae strains. Within the global phylogeny, all isolates from Pakistan formed 2 new subclades (PSC-1 and PSC-2), lying in the third transmission wave of the seventh-pandemic lineage that could be distinguished by signature deletions and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Geographically, PSC-1 isolates originated from the coast, whereas PSC-2 isolates originated from inland areas flooded by the Indus River. Single-nucleotide polymorphism accumulation analysis correlated river flow direction with the spread of PSC-2. We found at least 2 sources of cholera in Pakistan during the 2010 epidemic and illustrate the value of a global genomic data bank in contextualizing cholera outbreaks. PMID:24378019

  19. Considerations for oral cholera vaccine use during outbreak after earthquake in Haiti, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Vicari, Andrea; Hyde, Terri B; Mintz, Eric; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Henry, Ariel; Tappero, Jordan W; Roels, Thierry H; Abrams, Joseph; Burkholder, Brenton T; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc; Andrus, Jon; Dietz, Vance

    2011-11-01

    Oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) have been recommended in cholera-endemic settings and preemptively during outbreaks and complex emergencies. However, experience and guidelines for reactive use after an outbreak has started are limited. In 2010, after over a century without epidemic cholera, an outbreak was reported in Haiti after an earthquake. As intensive nonvaccine cholera control measures were initiated, the feasibility of OCV use was considered. We reviewed OCV characteristics and recommendations for their use and assessed global vaccine availability and capacity to implement a vaccination campaign. Real-time modeling was conducted to estimate vaccine impact. Ultimately, cholera vaccination was not implemented because of limited vaccine availability, complex logistical and operational challenges of a multidose regimen, and obstacles to conducting a campaign in a setting with population displacement and civil unrest. Use of OCVs is an option for cholera control; guidelines for their appropriate use in epidemic and emergency settings are urgently needed.

  20. Molecular evolution and functional divergence of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhabatosh; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Sarkar, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to synopsize and highlight the recent subtle genetic changes in cholera causing toxigenic Vibrio cholerae with special reference to their virulence, integrating and conjugative elements and toxin-antitoxin systems. It is not intended to cover issues on the whole genome sequence and epidemiology of cholera. Analyses have been made using major published works on genetic changes associated with potential virulence, integrating and conjugative elements and toxin-antitoxin systems of toxigenic V. cholerae. During the course of evolution, V. cholerae strains show evidence of genetic selection for the expression of additional virulence, better survival in the environment, colonization ability and antimicrobial resistance. Some of the critical modifications that occurred at the molecular level include CTXϕ genome, cholera toxin B-subunit, integrating and conjugative elements and toxin-antitoxin systems. Frequent changes in the genome of V. cholerae appear to be an ongoing dynamic process that is assisting the pathogen to subtly change during or after epidemics of cholera. Cholera is a reemerging public health problem. Continued basic research is important to understand the changing dynamics of bacterial virulence, survival strategies and disease pathogenesis for efficient therapeutic intervention and to abort transmission of the disease.

  1. Seasonal and Interannual Trends in Largest Cholera Endemic Megacity: Water Sustainability - Climate - Health Challenges in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, Ali S.; Jutla, Antarpreet; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2014-05-01

    The last three decades of surveillance data shows a drastic increase of cholera prevalence in the largest cholera-endemic city in the world - Dhaka, Bangladesh. Emerging megacities in the region, especially those located in coastal areas also remain vulnerable to large scale drivers of cholera outbreaks. However, there has not been any systematic study on linking long-term disease trends with related changes in natural or societal variables. Here, we analyze the 30-year dynamics of urban cholera prevalence in Dhaka with changes in climatic or anthropogenic forcings: regional hydrology, flooding, water usage, changes in distribution systems, population growth and density in urban settlements, as well as shifting climate patterns and frequency of natural disasters. An interesting change is observed in the seasonal trends of cholera prevalence; while an endemic upward trend is seen in the dry season, the post-monsoon trend is epidemic in nature. In addition, the trend in the pre-monsoon dry season is significantly stronger than the post-monsoon wet season; and thus spring is becoming the dominant cholera season of the year. Evidence points to growing urbanization and rising population in unplanned settlements along the city peripheries. The rapid pressure of growth has led to an unsustainable and potentially disastrous situation with negligible-to-poor water and sanitation systems compounded by changing climatic patterns and increasing number of extreme weather events. Growing water scarcity in the dry season and lack of sustainable water and sanitation infrastructure for urban settlements have increased endemicity of cholera outbreaks in spring, while record flood events and prolonged post-monsoon inundation have contributed to increased epidemic outbreaks in fall. We analyze our findings with the World Health Organization recommended guidelines and investigate large scale water sustainability challenges in the context of climatic and anthropogenic changes in the

  2. Linkage of Global Water Resources, Climate, and Human Health: A Conundrum for Which Cholera Offers a Paradigm (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, R.

    2010-12-01

    An environmental source of cholera was hypothesized as early as the late nineteenth century by Robert Koch. Standard bacteriological procedures for isolation of vibrios from environmental samples, including water, between epidemics generally were unsuccessful because Vibrio cholerae, a marine vibrio, enters into a dormant, "viable but nonculturable stage," when conditions are unfavorable for growth and reproduction. An association of Vibrio cholerae with zooplankton, notably copepods, has been established. Furthermore, the sporadicity and erraticity of cholera epidemics have been correlated with El Niño. Since zooplankton harbor the bacterium and zooplankton blooms follow phytoplankton blooms, remote sensing can be employed to predict cholera epidemics from sea surface temperature (SST), ocean height (OH), chlorophyll, and turbidity data. Cholera occurs seasonally in Bangladesh, with two annual peaks in the number of cases. From clinical remote sensing data, it has been found that SST, OH, and blooms of phytoplankton and zooplankton are correlated with cholera epidemics. Thus, selected climatological factors and incidence of V. cholerae can be recorded, bringing the potential of predicting conditions conducive to cholera outbreaks to reality. A simple filtration intervention takes into account the association of V. cholerae with plankton, and has proven to be a simple solution to the age-old problem of controlling this waterborne disease for villagers in remote regions of Bangladesh.

  3. Estimating the reproductive numbers for the 2008-2009 cholera outbreaks in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mukandavire, Zindoga; Liao, Shu; Wang, Jin; Gaff, Holly; Smith, David L; Morris, J Glenn

    2011-05-24

    Cholera remains an important global cause of morbidity and mortality, capable of causing periodic epidemic disease. Beginning in August 2008, a major cholera epidemic occurred in Zimbabwe, with 98,585 reported cases and 4,287 deaths. The dynamics of such outbreaks, particularly in nonestuarine regions, are not well understood. We explored the utility of mathematical models in understanding transmission dynamics of cholera and in assessing the magnitude of interventions necessary to control epidemic disease. Weekly data on reported cholera cases were obtained from the Zimbabwe Ministry of Health and Child Welfare (MoHCW) for the period from November 13, 2008 to July 31, 2009. A mathematical model was formulated and fitted to cumulative cholera cases to estimate the basic reproductive numbers R(0) and the partial reproductive numbers from all 10 provinces for the 2008-2009 Zimbabwe cholera epidemic. Estimated basic reproductive numbers were highly heterogeneous, ranging from a low value of just above unity to 2.72. Partial reproductive numbers were also highly heterogeneous, suggesting that the transmission routes varied by province; human-to-human transmission accounted for 41-95% of all transmission. Our models suggest that the underlying patterns of cholera transmission varied widely from province to province, with a corresponding variation in the amenability of outbreaks in different provinces to control measures such as immunization. These data underscore the heterogeneity of cholera transmission dynamics, potentially linked to differences in environment, socio-economic conditions, and cultural practices. The lack of traditional estuarine reservoirs combined with these estimates of R(0) suggest that mass vaccination against cholera deployed strategically in Zimbabwe and surrounding regions could prevent future cholera epidemics and eventually eliminate cholera from the region.

  4. Cholera in the Gilbert Island. I. Epidemiological features.

    PubMed

    Kuberski, T; Flood, T; Tera, T

    1979-07-01

    An explosive epidemic of cholera due to Vibrio cholerae, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba, was centered on the coral atoll of Tarawa, Gilbert Islands. This outbreak was a unique experience in the South and Central Pacific region. The principal mode of spread during the peak of the outbreak was probably through contamination of the main water supply. Tarawa lagoon water and shellfish were found to be contaminated with V. cholerae and ingestion of raw fish and shellfish from the lagoon also served as a source of transmission. This outbreak raises the concern of Rother outbreaks of cholera occuring on remote and poorly equipped Pacific islands where the environmental circumstances are conducive to cholera spread.

  5. Impact of oral cholera vaccines in cholera-endemic countries: A mathematical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Mogasale, Vittal; Burgess, Colleen; Wierzba, Thomas F

    2016-04-19

    Impact evaluation of vaccination programs is necessary for making decisions to introduce oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) in cholera-endemic countries. We analyzed data to forecast the future global burden of cholera. We developed a mathematical model of cholera transmission in three countries as examples: Nigeria, Uganda, and Indonesia. After fitting the model, we evaluated the impact of OCVs delivered in four vaccination strategies varying by target age group and frequency of vaccination over the period of 2015-2030. Data suggest that the global annual incidence of cholera will increase from 3046238 in 2015 to 3787385 in 2030 with the highest burden in Asia and Africa where overall population size is large and the proportion of population with access to improved sanitation facilities is low. We estimate that OCV will reduce the cumulative incidence of cholera by half in Indonesia and >80% in Nigeria and Uganda when delivered to 1+ year olds every three years at a coverage rate of 50%, although cholera may persist through higher coverage rates (i.e., >90%). The proportion of person-to-person transmission compared to water-to-person transmission is positively correlated with higher vaccination impact in all three countries. Periodic OCV vaccination every three or five years can significantly reduce the global burden of cholera although cholera may persist even with high OCV coverage. Vaccination impact will likely vary depending on local epidemiological conditions including age distribution of cases and relative contribution of different transmission routes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The diffusion of cholera outside Ibadan City, Nigeria, 1971.

    PubMed

    Adesina, H O

    1984-01-01

    This paper examined the spread of cholera epidemic to the towns of the former Western State of Nigeria and to the neighbouring villages of Ibadan after the initial introduction of the disease to Ibadan city by early January, 1971). In the diffusion process, an hierarchical diffusion was discovered at the town-village dichotomy while a distance decay function was justified at the purely urban level analyses. In the spread of cholera to all the surrounding villages of Ibadan, the epidemic speed was discovered to be too rapid that neither population size nor distance from Ibadan was relevant to the pattern of spread. The rate of cholera infection was observed to decline with distance from the city of Ibadan, while the duration of the epidemic obeyed the rank-size principles.

  7. John Snow and cholera--the bicentenary of birth.

    PubMed

    Gańczak, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The bicentenary of John Snow's birth, a legend in his field, for his research on epidemiology and the prevention ofcholera, constitutes a unique opportunity to commemorate this iconic figure. In the article, his spectacular achievements in this discipline are presented, including his epidemiological investigation during cholera epidemic and the well-known Broad Street intervention in Soho, in 1854, as well as his methodologically elegant experiment "on the grandest scale" in which he compared the cholera fatality rates in households served by two different water supply companies. Having referred to Snow's research, the cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010 is also discussed.

  8. The Second World Cholera Pandemic (1826-1849) in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies with Special Reference to the Towns of San Prisco and Forio d'Ischia.

    PubMed

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H; Imperato, Austin C

    2015-12-01

    The second world cholera pandemic in Europe (1829-1849) was significant because of its geographic extent and the enormous numbers of people who fell ill or died. It was also singularly important because it demonstrated the profound levels of ignorance in both Europe and North America concerning the cause, modes of transmission, and treatment of cholera. This paper discusses the pandemic in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies in great detail. Even though medical and public health authorities in this kingdom had several years to prepare for cholera's eventual arrival in 1836-1837, their elaborate preventive and therapeutic measures proved no more successful than elsewhere. Despite their efforts, it was estimated that there were 32,145 cases of cholera in the city of Naples by July 1837. Some 19,470 people were estimated to have died among the city's then 357,283 population. This amounted to a cholera-specific mortality rate of 54.5/1000 population. Sicily was also severely affected by the epidemic. It was estimated that 69,000 people died of cholera in Sicily, 24,000 of them in the city of Palermo. Two rural towns in the kingdom, San Prisco and Forio d'Ischia, were selected for in-depth epidemiologic study. The former had a population of 3700 in 1836-1837, while the latter had a population of 5500. The economic basis of both towns was agriculture. However, because Forio is located on an island, fishing and sea transport were then also important industries. Cholera appeared in San Prisco in July 1837 and quickly swept through the population. By August, the epidemic was essentially over. It is estimated that some 109 people died from cholera in San Prisco for a disease-specific mortality rate of 29.5/1000 population. The age range of those who died from cholera was 1 to 90 years. The majority of deaths (60.6 %) were among women. The first cases of cholera appeared in Forio d'Ischia in June 1837. The epidemic then peaked in July. It is estimated that approximately 316

  9. A case for critical ethnography: rethinking the early years of the AIDS epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fassin, Didier

    2013-12-01

    The epidemic of AIDS in South Africa has been characterized not only by its rapid progression but also its impassioned controversies. Retrospectively examining a long-term anthropological project and discussing some reactions it elicited, the paper proposes a defense and illustration of a critical ethnography at three moments of the research. Ethnography is first discussed as fieldworks, proposing an alternative to the horizontal multi-sited approach via a vertical multi-layered method using various scales and locations, and thus connecting the disease endured by patients in townships and former homelands with the heated debates in scientific and political forums: this procedure substitutes a political economy of the disease for its cultural and behavioral interpretations. Ethnography is then discussed as writing, suggesting acknowledgment of the social intelligence of the agents as well as the need for a scientific distance: this principle allows the articulation of the objective historical condition of the individuals and their subjective experience of history, both revealed in the development of the epidemic. Ultimately ethnography is considered from the perspective of its afterlife, that is, the continuous process of its translation by readers and commentators, on the one hand, by the author trying to reach beyond the boundaries of the academic realm, on the other, the work of anthropology appearing as a living object open to public conversation and consequently a resource for knowledge and action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clonal origins of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains, Papua New Guinea, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Paul F; Collins, Deirdre; Jonduo, Marinjho H; Rosewell, Alexander; Dutta, Samir R; Dagina, Rosheila; Ropa, Berry; Siba, Peter M; Greenhill, Andrew R

    2011-11-01

    We used multilocus sequence typing and variable number tandem repeat analysis to determine the clonal origins of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains from an outbreak of cholera that began in 2009 in Papua New Guinea. The epidemic is ongoing, and transmission risk is elevated within the Pacific region.

  11. Use of filter paper as a transport medium for laboratory diagnosis of cholera under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Page, Anne-Laure; Alberti, Kathryn P; Guénolé, Alain; Mondongue, Vital; Lonlas Mayele, Sylvaine; Guerin, Philippe J; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2011-08-01

    Confirmation of a cholera epidemic is based on bacteriological identification of the agent and requires the sending of samples to a culture laboratory, often in countries with limited resources. Comparison of the use of filter paper with the use of Cary-Blair reference medium for stool transport showed that this simple transport medium is appropriate for the recovery of Vibrio cholerae.

  12. Vibrio cholerae O1 from superficial water of the Tucunduba Stream, Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Sá, L.L.C.; Vale, E.R.V.; Garza, D.R.; Vicente, A.C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Isolation and genetic characterization of an environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 from the Amazon is reported. This strain lacks two major virulence factors - CTX and TCP - but carries other genes related to virulence. Genetic similarity with epidemic strains is evaluated and the importance of V. cholerae surveillance in the Amazon is emphasized. PMID:24031874

  13. Cholera - the new strike of an old foe.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Anna; Gajewski, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is an acute bacterial gastrointestinal infection caused by ingestion of water or food containing the pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The incubation period can be very short and it takes between several hours and 5 days. During the 19th century, cholera was spreading from India across the world. Its original reservoir was located in the Ganges delta. So far, there have been six epidemics of cholera; the current outbreak is the seventh. It started in Asia, attacked Africa and then the Americas. Cholera causes thousands of illnesses and deaths annually, mostly in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The current outbreak began in Yemen in October 2016, it peaked in December with subsequent decline, then the epidemic has re-erupted in April 2017 and it still continues. It is currently the largest outbreak in the world, with 5000 new infections a day (as of August 19th, 2017 the number of cholera cases stands at 527,000 with 1997 deaths). The most common symptoms of the illness are diarrhoea, dehydration, vomiting, and abdominal cramps. Case-fatality rate is lower than 1%, if rehydration treatment is prescribed rapidly, but it can exceed 70% in patients not treated properly. Aggressive and rapid fluid repletion is the basis of treatment for cholera. In many cases, rehydration therapy, given orally or parenterally, is enough to rescue infected patients. Antibiotics, mainly fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and macrolides are an adjunctive therapy for patients with moderate to severe fluid loss.

  14. Impact of rapid urbanization on the rates of infection by Vibrio cholerae O1 and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Begum, Yasmin A; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu S G; Saha, Nirod Chandra; Baby, Nabilah Ibnat; Malek, M A; Kumar, Anisha Rajeev; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Pietroni, Mark; Cravioto, Alejandro; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-04-05

    In Bangladesh, increases in cholera epidemics are being documented with a greater incidence and severity. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the prevalence and importance of V. cholerae O1 and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as causal agents of severe diarrhea in a high diarrhea prone urban area in Dhaka city. Systematic surveillance was carried out on all diarrheal patients admitted from Mirpur between March 2008 to February 2010 at the ICDDR, B hospital. Stool or rectal swabs were collected from every third diarrheal patient for microbiological evaluation. Of diarrheal patients attending the hospital from Mirpur, 41% suffered from severe dehydration with 39% requiring intravenous rehydration therapy. More diarrheal patients were above five years of age (64%) than those below five years of age (36%). About 60% of the patients above five years of age had severe dehydration compared with only 9% of patients under five years of age. The most prevalent pathogen isolated was Vibrio cholerae O1 (23%) followed by ETEC (11%). About 8% of cholera infection was seen in infants with the youngest children being one month of age while in the case of ETEC the rate was 11%. Of the isolated ETEC strains, the enterotoxin type were almost equally distributed; ST accounted for 31% of strains; LT/ST for 38% and LT for 31%. V. cholerae O1 is the major bacterial pathogen and a cause of severe cholera disease in 23% of patients from Mirpur. This represents a socioeconomic group that best reflects the major areas of high cholera burden in the country. Vaccines that can target such high risk groups in the country and the region will hopefully be able to reduce the disease morbidity and the transmission of pathogens that impact the life and health of people.

  15. Cholera in Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.

    PubMed

    Rütten, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The article sets the cholera motif in Thomas Mann's famous novella Death in Venice against the historical context from which it partially originates. It is shown that this motif, while undoubtedly appropriated to serve Mann's own poetic ends, has a solid grounding in historical and autobiographical fact, thus blurring the boundaries between fact and fiction. The article illustrates the verifiable events of the outbreak of the Venetian cholera epidemic in May 1911, which Mann partly witnessed himself, during a holiday trip to Brioni and Venice, and partly heard and read about. It is established that Thomas Mann's account of the cholera in Venice in his novella is characterised by a rare and almost preternatural insightfulness into an otherwise murky affair that was marked by rumours, speculations and denials.

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices regarding Diarrhea and Cholera following an Oral Cholera Vaccination Campaign in the Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Eleanor; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Ogaoga, Divi; Gaiofa, Jenny; Jilini, Gregory; Halpin, Alison; Dietz, Vance; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Hyde, Terri; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Yen, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background In response to a 2011 cholera outbreak in Papua New Guinea, the Government of the Solomon Islands initiated a cholera prevention program which included cholera disease prevention and treatment messaging, community meetings, and a pre-emptive cholera vaccination campaign targeting 11,000 children aged 1–15 years in selected communities in Choiseul and Western Provinces. Methodology and Principal Findings We conducted a post-vaccination campaign, household-level survey about knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea and cholera in areas targeted and not targeted for cholera vaccination. Respondents in vaccinated areas were more likely to have received cholera education in the previous 6 months (33% v. 9%; p = 0.04), to know signs and symptoms (64% vs. 22%; p = 0.02) and treatment (96% vs. 50%; p = 0.02) of cholera, and to be aware of cholera vaccine (48% vs. 14%; p = 0.02). There were no differences in water, sanitation, and hygiene practices. Conclusions This pre-emptive OCV campaign in a cholera-naïve community provided a unique opportunity to assess household-level knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea, cholera, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). Our findings suggest that education provided during the vaccination campaign may have reinforced earlier mass messaging about cholera and diarrheal disease in vaccinated communities. PMID:27548678

  17. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices regarding Diarrhea and Cholera following an Oral Cholera Vaccination Campaign in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Eleanor; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Ogaoga, Divi; Gaiofa, Jenny; Jilini, Gregory; Halpin, Alison; Dietz, Vance; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Hyde, Terri; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Yen, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    In response to a 2011 cholera outbreak in Papua New Guinea, the Government of the Solomon Islands initiated a cholera prevention program which included cholera disease prevention and treatment messaging, community meetings, and a pre-emptive cholera vaccination campaign targeting 11,000 children aged 1-15 years in selected communities in Choiseul and Western Provinces. We conducted a post-vaccination campaign, household-level survey about knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea and cholera in areas targeted and not targeted for cholera vaccination. Respondents in vaccinated areas were more likely to have received cholera education in the previous 6 months (33% v. 9%; p = 0.04), to know signs and symptoms (64% vs. 22%; p = 0.02) and treatment (96% vs. 50%; p = 0.02) of cholera, and to be aware of cholera vaccine (48% vs. 14%; p = 0.02). There were no differences in water, sanitation, and hygiene practices. This pre-emptive OCV campaign in a cholera-naïve community provided a unique opportunity to assess household-level knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea, cholera, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). Our findings suggest that education provided during the vaccination campaign may have reinforced earlier mass messaging about cholera and diarrheal disease in vaccinated communities.

  18. An outbreak of El Tor cholera associated with a tribal funeral in Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Korthuis, P T; Jones, T R; Lesmana, M; Clark, S M; Okoseray, M; Ingkokusumo, G; Wignall, F S

    1998-09-01

    An outbreak of El Tor biotype cholera occurring in a rural village in Irian Jaya, Indonesia was evaluated for risk factors associated with death from cholera. Among those dying in the village during the epidemic, a significant association between membership in one of the five tribal groups in the village complex was associated with an elevated risk of suffering a cholera death (odds ratio = 5.9). Interviews with members of the decedents' families revealed a very strong association (odds ratio = 11.6) between risk of cholera death and having attended the two day funeral of a woman who died of a cholera-like illness a few days prior to an outbreak of cholera-like diarrheal disease in the village complex. Recent flooding may have contributed to the creation of an environment conducive to cholera transmission.

  19. [Study on the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant B-subunit/whole cell cholera vaccine infused with antacids in healthy population at ages of 2-6 years].

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Li, R C; Liu, D P

    2017-09-06

    Objective: To assess the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant B-subunit/whole cell cholera vaccine (rBS/WC) oral cholera vaccine (Ora Vacs) infused with antacids in healthy population at ages of 2-6 years. Methods: Between December 2009 and January 2010, we recruited 900 volunteers aged 2-6 years od through giving out recruitment notice for the eligible children's parents from different vaccination clinics of Chongzuo city in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, and subjects were randomly (2∶1) assigned to receive Cholera vaccine infused with antacids or placebo, and observed for safety. Serum samples of 300 subjects in immunogenicity subgroups (200 for vaccine groups, 100 for control groups) before the 1st dose and 49 d (±3 d) after immunization were collected, and determined for antibody levels against the cholera toxin (anti-CT) and cholera vibriocidal (anti-Vab) with Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), based on which the GMT was calculated. There were 266 cases paired with the serum samples before and after immunization (177 for vaccine groups, 89 for control groups). The comparison of subjects' age at enrollment and the level of GMT before and after immunization between groups were analyzed by t test. The superiority test for the difference between seroconversion rates of vaccine groups and control groups were analyzed by χ(2) test. Results: Of 900 subjects enrolled, the number of males and females were 503 and 397 respectively (vaccine groups 335 vs. 265, control groups 168 vs. 132), the average ages of vaccine groups and control groups at enrollment were (4.8±1.2) years and (4.9±1.2) years respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of gender and age (χ(2)=0.00, P=1.000; t=0.55, P=0.585). The 2 times increase rates of anti-CT and anti-Vab in vaccine groups after inoculation were 90.96% and 57.63% respectively, which were superiority to those

  20. [A novel treatment of cholera by a Mexican physician in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-de-Romo, A C

    1995-01-01

    Doctor Felipe Castillo, head of the Hospital de San Pablo during the cholera epidemic of 1850, used "Salty water" as treatment for the patients who attended the hospital. The etiology and pathogenesis of this sickness were unknown in those days, so Castillo's conduct was surprising. This study is based on an unpublished report, classified as anonymous, that Castillo gave to the Governor of Mexico City during the cholera epidemic.

  1. [Epidemic diseases in the Polish Kingdom in the thirties of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Marek

    2004-01-01

    We can observe that after downfall of the November Insurrection the authorities of the Polish Kingdom were effectively engaged in the fight against numerous epidemic diseases plaguing the local society. Among "contagions" of the time there were varicella, "gastric-nervous fever", "gastric-rhinitis fever" and typhus (especially in 1836). As usual, cholera was the most dangerous one. All medical and epidemiological services in the Polish Kingdom were making effective remedial measures in order to neutralize results of the epidemics. The implemented methods were effective enough to limit considerably the incidence and number of deceased during the epidemic, which started in October 1836 and lasted till the next year. An obligation of effective cooperation between the Polish authorities and the Russian army was introduced then. The sanitary action against cholera in 1836-1837 should be very highly assessed from the logistic point of view. The wide action of protective vaccination against varicella and numerous sanitary rules completed the favorable image of the Polish Kingdom sanitary services. All the factors mentioned above lead to a conclusion that in the thirtieth of the 19th century both civil and military authorities of the Polish Kingdom did practically utmost in order to limit negative results of cyclical recurrences of epidemic diseases. It should be also stressed that the protective actions undertaken in that time were both direct and long lasting enterprises.

  2. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    In discussing prevention, the author deals first with the provision of permanently safe water, supplied from waterworks or wells, and with other improvements in environmental sanitation. Control of food and drinks, public health propaganda and education, and vaccination are also considered under this heading. The greater part of this study is devoted to suppressive measures, affecting the individual, the environment, and persons in the mass. Discussion of the isolation, detection and management of cholera patients, the management of contacts, and the management and treatment of carriers is followed by sections on, inter alia, disinfection, temporary improvements in water supplies, fly control, and personal prophylaxis. In dealing with mass prophylaxis, the author pays particular attention to vaccination. In the concluding sections he goes into the control of pilgrimages and local and international quarantine measures. PMID:13479774

  3. Hog Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Appel, M.; Bannister, G. L.; Ruckerbauer, Gerda M.; Mori, K.; Gray, D. P.

    1965-01-01

    The complement-fixation test was investigated as a means of detecting hog cholera virus in spleen from experimentally infected swine. Various methods of extracting the tissue for production of antigen are described and emphasis is placed on the necessity of using the modified direct complement-fixation test to obtain reactions. The tissue should be obtained from animals showing advanced clinical manifestations of the disease. Preferably, the tissue should be maintained frozen or at least well refrigerated. The results indicate that tissue from dead animals or from breeding sows should be avoided. The 77 per cent positive reactions obtained suggest the test could be of diagnostic value provided two or three samples are obtained from the same herd. PMID:14318539

  4. Hog Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A.; Greig, A. S.; Appel, M.; Girard, A.; Bannister, G. L.; Boulanger, P.

    1965-01-01

    The fluorescent-antibody technique was employed for detection of hog cholera virus in tissue cultures inoculated with spleens of infected animals. As controls, cultures were also inoculated with material from normal swine and from those infected with other agents. In the first series 71 of 73 infected spleens, or 97 per cent, were detected. There were no false positive reactions among the controls. Results obtained with the second series of pigs showed that spleens collected during advanced stages of the disease were more satisfactory specimens than those collected earlier during the high temperature phase of infection. Findings with the third series of older swine indicated that their spleens were less satisfactory as a source of virus than those from young pigs. Tissues from freshly killed animals provided better specimen material than those from animals which had died. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4221990

  5. Understanding the Hydrology of Cholera in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2007-12-01

    Cholera is an acute waterborne illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The disease remains a major public health issue in several regions of the developing world, mainly in coastal areas around the tropics. Cholera incidences have been historically linked to climate variables and more recently with El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The occurrence of cholera shows bi-annual seasonal peaks and strong inter-annual variability in the Ganges basin region of South Asia. However, the role of hydrologic variables in the seasonal patterns of cholera epidemics is less understood. Preliminary results suggest that a unique combination of increasing water temperature and higher salinity in the coastal zone during the low flow season provide the situation amenable to the first outbreak of cholera in the spring season. Other major factors contributing to the subsequent spread of the disease are sea surface height, monsoon precipitation, and coastal phytoplankton concentration. We will further examine the lag periods between the dominant environmental variables and cholera incidences to understand the seasonal dynamics of cholera in South Asia.

  6. Occurrence of Vibrio cholerae in water reservoirs of Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Kaboré, Saidou; Cecchi, Philippe; Mosser, Thomas; Toubiana, Mylène; Traoré, Oumar; Ouattara, Aboubakar S; Traoré, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2017-09-06

    Africa is currently an important region in which cholera epidemics occur. Little is known about the presence of Vibriocholerae in freshwater bodies in Africa. There are ca. 1700 lakes and reservoirs in Burkina Faso, most of which have been built within recent decades to secure water resources. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of V. cholerae in the water of reservoirs, using the most-probable-number polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that V. cholerae could be detected in water samples collected from 14 of 39 sampled reservoirs. The concentrations varied from 0 MPN/l to more than 1100 MPN/l. Fifty strains of V. cholerae isolated on CHROMagar™ vibrio were identified as V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139, none of which carried the ctxA gene. A significant positive correlation was found between the presence of V. cholerae in the reservoirs and both alkaline pH and phytoplankton biomass. V. cholerae was present in significantly higher numbers in reservoirs of urban areas than in rural areas. Since V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 has been shown to be a causative agent of endemic diarrheal outbreaks, their presence in Burkina Faso reservoirs suggests they may play a role in gastroenteritis in that country. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cholera Prevention and Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... submit" name="commit" type="submit" value="Submit" /> Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevention ... basics of cholera and other diarrheal disease prevention. Prevention Control Topics Six Basic Cholera Prevention Messages I ...

  8. Deadly AIDS policy failure by the highest levels of the US government: a personal look back 30 years later for lessons to respond better to future epidemics.

    PubMed

    Francis, Donald P

    2012-08-01

    Successful control of any dangerous epidemic requires: (i) early understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and (ii) rapid applications of preventive interventions. Through the lack of both policy and financial support, the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC) was severely handicapped during the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Senior staff of the Reagan Administration did not understand the essential role of Government in disease prevention. Although CDC clearly documented the dangers of HIV and AIDS early in the epidemic, refusal by the White House to deliver prevention programs then certainly allowed HIV to become more widely seeded. As much of the international health community relies on CDC for up-to-date prevention advice, these actions by the White House surely increased the spread of HIV around the world. To respond better to future epidemics, we need to understand the deadly forces that inhibited CDC at that time.

  9. Does water hyacinth on East African lakes promote cholera outbreaks?

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Tabu, Collins W; Gichuki, John

    2010-08-01

    Cholera outbreaks continue to occur regularly in Africa. Cholera has been associated with proximity to lakes in East Africa, and Vibrio cholerae has been found experimentally to concentrate on the floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth, which is periodically widespread in East African lakes since the late 1980s. From 1994 to 2008, Nyanza Province, which is the Kenyan province bordering Lake Victoria, accounted for a larger proportion of cholera cases than expected by its population size (38.7% of cholera cases versus 15.3% of national population). Yearly water-hyacinth coverage on the Kenyan section of Lake Victoria was positively associated with the number of cholera cases reported in Nyanza Province (r = 0.83; P = 0.0010). Water hyacinth on freshwater lakes might play a role in initiating cholera outbreaks and causing sporadic disease in East Africa.

  10. Does Water Hyacinth on East African Lakes Promote Cholera Outbreaks?

    PubMed Central

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Tabu, Collins W.; Gichuki, John

    2010-01-01

    Cholera outbreaks continue to occur regularly in Africa. Cholera has been associated with proximity to lakes in East Africa, and Vibrio cholerae has been found experimentally to concentrate on the floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth, which is periodically widespread in East African lakes since the late 1980s. From 1994 to 2008, Nyanza Province, which is the Kenyan province bordering Lake Victoria, accounted for a larger proportion of cholera cases than expected by its population size (38.7% of cholera cases versus 15.3% of national population). Yearly water-hyacinth coverage on the Kenyan section of Lake Victoria was positively associated with the number of cholera cases reported in Nyanza Province (r = 0.83; P = 0.0010). Water hyacinth on freshwater lakes might play a role in initiating cholera outbreaks and causing sporadic disease in East Africa. PMID:20682884

  11. Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in environmental waters of rural Bangladesh: a flow-cytometry-based field trial.

    PubMed

    Righetto, L; Zaman, R U; Mahmud, Z H; Bertuzzo, E; Mari, L; Casagrandi, R; Gatto, M; Islam, S; Rinaldo, A

    2015-08-01

    Presence of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in the waters of the rural area of Matlab, Bangladesh, was investigated with quantitative measurements performed with a portable flow cytometer. The relevance of this work relates to the testing of a field-adapted measurement protocol that might prove useful for cholera epidemic surveillance and for validation of mathematical models. Water samples were collected from different water bodies that constitute the hydrological system of the region, a well-known endemic area for cholera. Water was retrieved from ponds, river waters, and irrigation canals during an inter-epidemic time period. Each sample was filtered and analysed with a flow cytometer for a fast determination of V. cholerae cells contained in those environments. More specifically, samples were treated with O1- and O139-specific antibodies, which allowed precise flow-cytometry-based concentration measurements. Both serogroups were present in the environmental waters with a consistent dominance of V. cholerae O1. These results extend earlier studies where V. cholerae O1 and O139 were mostly detected during times of cholera epidemics using standard culturing techniques. Furthermore, our results confirm that an important fraction of the ponds' host populations of V. cholerae are able to self-sustain even when cholera cases are scarce. Those contaminated ponds may constitute a natural reservoir for cholera endemicity in the Matlab region. Correlations of V. cholerae concentrations with environmental factors and the spatial distribution of V. cholerae populations are also discussed.

  12. Antibacterial activity of Psidium guajava leaf and bark against multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae: implication for cholera control.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Niaz; Gomes, Donald James; Watanabe, Haruo; Rahman, Sabita Rizwana; Chomvarin, Chariya; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Alam, Munirul

    2010-07-01

    In clinical cholera, a 3-day course of antibiotic complements extensive rehydration therapy by reducing stool volume, shortening the illness, and averting death. However, antibiotic therapy, which has lifesaving implications for cholera, is often hindered due to multidrug resistance in Vibrio cholerae, the cause of cholera. Crude aqueous mixture and water soluble methanol extract from leaf and bark of Psidium guajava, a tropical fruit guava of the family Myrtaceae, showed strong antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant V. cholerae O1. The in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration of the crude aqueous mixture and water soluble methanol extract, which was bactericidal against 10(7) CFU/mL of V. cholerae was determined to be 1,250 microg/mL and 850 microg/mL, respectively. The antibacterial activity of P. guajava was stable at 100 degrees C for 15-20 min, suggesting nonprotein nature of the active component. The growth of V. cholerae in rice oral rehydration saline (ORS) was completely inhibited when 10 mg/mL (wt/vol) of crude aqueous mixture was premixed with the ORS in a ratio of 1:7 (vol. extract/vol. ORS). P. guajava, which is widely distributed in Bangladesh, thus offers great potential for use in indigenous, herbal medicine for controlling epidemics of cholera.

  13. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera.

  14. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C.; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K.; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004–2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004–2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera. PMID:27555841

  15. Cholera studies*†

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.; Burrows, W.

    1955-01-01

    Relevant information regarding the numerous problems encountered in cholera immunity is dealt with in great detail in this study. Toxin production, bacterial virulence, serological reactions, and the antigenic structure of V. cholerae are discussed. Natural, passive, and active cholera immunity receives special attention, the authors describing the various means of vaccination as well as the evaluation of the immunity induced. PMID:13240451

  16. Wind Direction and Its Linkage with Vibrio cholerae Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Shlomit; Broza, Meir

    2007-01-01

    Background The relevance of climatic events as causative factors for cholera epidemics is well known. However, examinations of the involvement of climatic factors in intracontinental disease distribution are still absent. Objectives The spreading of cholera epidemics may be related to the dominant wind direction over land. Methods We examined the geographic diffusion of three cholera outbreaks through their linkage with the wind direction: a) the progress of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in Africa during 1970–1971 and b) again in 2005–2006; and c) the rapid spread of Vibrio cholerae O139 over India during 1992–1993. We also discuss the possible influence of the wind direction on windborn dissemination by flying insects, which may serve as vectors. Results Analysis of air pressure data at sea level and at several altitudes over Africa, India, and Bangladesh show a correspondence between the dominant wind direction and the intracontinental spread of cholera. Conclusions We explored the hypothesis that winds have assisted the progress of cholera Vibrios throughout continents. The current analysis supports the hypothesis that aeroplankton (the tiny life forms that float in the air and that may be caught and carried upward by the wind, landing far from their origin) carry the cholera bacteria from one body of water to an adjacent one. This finding may improve our understanding of how climatic factors are involved in the rapid distribution of new strains throughout a vast continental area. Awareness of the aerial transfer of Vibrio cholerae may assist health authorities by improving the prediction of the disease’s geographic dissemination. PMID:17384764

  17. Isolation frequency and susceptibility pattern of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae in a tertiary health care laboratory, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Irfan, S; Fasih, N; Ghanchi, N K; Khan, E

    2016-04-28

    In the past decade the importance of non-O1 and non-O139 strains of Vibrio cholerae has been highlighted globally. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae in Pakistan. Data of stool specimens yielding growth of non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae isolated at a national referral laboratory from 1999 to 2012 were retrospectively analysed and evaluated for resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole and ofloxacin. A total of 95 800 stool samples submitted over 1999-2012 yielded 3668 strains of V. cholerae, of which 6% were non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae. A high isolation rate was found in the summer season, with a peak in the year 2003. Antimicrobial susceptibility data revealed increasing resistance to co-trimoxazole and ampicillin, but strains remained highly susceptible to ofloxacin. Active surveillance of serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility is essential to predict future epidemics and define measures to curtail the disease.

  18. The lung cancer epidemic in Spanish women: an analysis of mortality rates over a 37-year period.

    PubMed

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Ruiz-Ramos, Miguel; Calero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the European Union (EU) and deaths from lung cancer have been projected to escalate to epidemic proportions amongst females over the next years. We examined lung cancer mortality rates in men and women from Andalusia (Spain) over a 37-year period [1975-2012]. Longitudinal epidemiological study analyzing lung cancer mortality trends in males and females. Data on lung cancer mortality in Andalusia for the period 1975-2012 were obtained from the official cause-of-death publications of the Institute of Statistics of Andalusia. For each sex, age-standardized (European standard population) mortality rates (ASR) from lung cancer were calculated for all ages and truncated at 30-64, 65-74, and >75 years using the direct method. Standardized rate trends by age and sex were estimated by joinpoint regression analysis. In men, the ASR steadily increased through the period 1993-1995, reaching a peak of 145.72 deaths/100,000 people. Subsequently, lung cancer deaths decreased to a rate of 125.47 in the 2011-2012 period. A moderate increase was seen in women until the late 1990s and early 2000s. Thereafter, a very notable rise was observed in females for all age groups, the only exception being older subjects. The sex differences decreased from 8.6:1 in the 1975-1977 period to 6.8:1 in the 2011-2012 period. Lung cancer mortality rates decreased significantly in Andalusian men from 1975 to 2012. More importantly, we demonstrate for the first time the beginning of the lung cancer epidemics in Andalusian women as previously predicted for this area.

  19. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    effects observed in severely and non-severely ill patients. Azithromycin and tetracycline may have some advantages over other antibiotics. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Antibiotics for treating cholera Cochrane Collaboration researchers conducted a review of the effects of antibiotics for treating people with cholera. After searching for relevant trials, they included 39 randomized controlled trials enrolling 4623 people with cholera. What is cholera and how might antibiotics work Cholera is a form of severe watery diarrhoea, which spreads from person to person through food and water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Cholera is common in places with poor water and sanitation, and sometimes causes large epidemics with thousands of people falling ill. Cholera can cause severe dehydration and death, so the main treatment is to give fluids and salt either orally as oral rehydration salts, or by injection. By clearing the bacteria earlier than the patients own immune system, antibiotics could reduce the duration and severity of the illness, and reduce onward transmission to other people. What the research says Antibiotic treatment shortened the duration of diarrhoea by about one and a half days (the normal duration is between three and four days), and reduced the total amount of diarrhoea fluid by half. Consequently, the need for rehydration fluids was also reduced by almost half. Antibiotic treatment also shortened the period of time where the patient remains contagious by reducing the duration of excretion of Vibrio cholerae in the diarrhoea. The benefits of antibiotics were seen in trials recruiting only people with severe dehydration, and in those recruiting people with mixed levels of dehydration. Tetracycline or azithromycin appear more effective than some of the other antibiotics tested, but the choice of which antibiotic to use will depend on local drug resistance. PMID:24944120

  20. Phage-bacterial interactions in the evolution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Shah M.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the genetic and ecological factors which support the emergence of new clones of pathogenic bacteria is vital to develop preventive measures. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics represents a paradigm for this process in that this organism evolved from environmental non-pathogenic strains by acquisition of virulence genes. The major virulence factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) are encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage (CTXφ) and a pathogenicity island, respectively. Additional phages which cooperate with the CTXφ in horizontal transfer of genes in V. cholerae have been characterized, and the potential exists for discovering yet new phages or genetic elements which support the transfer of genes for environmental fitness and virulence leading to the emergence of new epidemic strains. Phages have also been shown to play a crucial role in modulating seasonal cholera epidemics. Thus, the complex array of natural phenomena driving the evolution of pathogenic V. cholerae includes, among other factors, phages that either participate in horizontal gene transfer or in a bactericidal selection process favoring the emergence of new clones of V. cholerae. PMID:23076327

  1. Satellite Based Assessment of Hydroclimatic Conditions Related to Cholera in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Jutla, Antarpreet; Aldaach, Haidar; Billian, Hannah; Akanda, Ali; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cholera, an infectious diarrheal disease, has been shown to be associated with large scale hydroclimatic processes. The sudden and sporadic occurrence of epidemic cholera is linked with high mortality rates, in part, due to uncertainty in timing and location of outbreaks. Improved understanding of the relationship between pathogenic abundance and climatic processes allows prediction of disease outbreak to be an achievable goal. In this study, we show association of large scale hydroclimatic processes with the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe reported to have begun in Chitungwiza, a city in Mashonaland East province, in August, 2008. Principal Findings Climatic factors in the region were found to be associated with triggering cholera outbreak and are shown to be related to anomalies of temperature and precipitation, validating the hypothesis that poor conditions of sanitation, coupled with elevated temperatures, and followed by heavy rainfall can initiate outbreaks of cholera. Spatial estimation by satellite of precipitation and global gridded air temperature captured sensitivities in hydroclimatic conditions that permitted identification of the location in the region where the disease outbreak began. Discussion Satellite derived hydroclimatic processes can be used to capture environmental conditions related to epidemic cholera, as occurred in Zimbabwe, thereby providing an early warning system. Since cholera cannot be eradicated because the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous to the aquatic environment, prediction of conditions favorable for its growth and estimation of risks of triggering the disease in a given population can be used to alert responders, potentially decreasing infection and saving lives. PMID:26417994

  2. Phage-bacterial interactions in the evolution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Shah M; Mekalanos, John J

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the genetic and ecological factors which support the emergence of new clones of pathogenic bacteria is vital to develop preventive measures. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics represents a paradigm for this process in that this organism evolved from environmental non-pathogenic strains by acquisition of virulence genes. The major virulence factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) are encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage (CTXφ) and a pathogenicity island, respectively. Additional phages which cooperate with the CTXφ in horizontal transfer of genes in V. cholerae have been characterized, and the potential exists for discovering yet new phages or genetic elements which support the transfer of genes for environmental fitness and virulence leading to the emergence of new epidemic strains. Phages have also been shown to play a crucial role in modulating seasonal cholera epidemics. Thus, the complex array of natural phenomena driving the evolution of pathogenic V. cholerae includes, among other factors, phages that either participate in horizontal gene transfer or in a bactericidal selection process favoring the emergence of new clones of V. cholerae.

  3. Satellite Based Assessment of Hydroclimatic Conditions Related to Cholera in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Jutla, Antarpreet; Aldaach, Haidar; Billian, Hannah; Akanda, Ali; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Cholera, an infectious diarrheal disease, has been shown to be associated with large scale hydroclimatic processes. The sudden and sporadic occurrence of epidemic cholera is linked with high mortality rates, in part, due to uncertainty in timing and location of outbreaks. Improved understanding of the relationship between pathogenic abundance and climatic processes allows prediction of disease outbreak to be an achievable goal. In this study, we show association of large scale hydroclimatic processes with the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe reported to have begun in Chitungwiza, a city in Mashonaland East province, in August, 2008. Climatic factors in the region were found to be associated with triggering cholera outbreak and are shown to be related to anomalies of temperature and precipitation, validating the hypothesis that poor conditions of sanitation, coupled with elevated temperatures, and followed by heavy rainfall can initiate outbreaks of cholera. Spatial estimation by satellite of precipitation and global gridded air temperature captured sensitivities in hydroclimatic conditions that permitted identification of the location in the region where the disease outbreak began. Satellite derived hydroclimatic processes can be used to capture environmental conditions related to epidemic cholera, as occurred in Zimbabwe, thereby providing an early warning system. Since cholera cannot be eradicated because the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous to the aquatic environment, prediction of conditions favorable for its growth and estimation of risks of triggering the disease in a given population can be used to alert responders, potentially decreasing infection and saving lives.

  4. [Epidemiological Surveillance of Cholera in Russia During the Period of the Seventh Pandemic].

    PubMed

    Onishhenko, G G; Moskvitina, E A; Kruglikov, V D; Titova, S V; Adamenko, O L; Vodop'ianov, A S; Vodop'ianov, S O

    2015-01-01

    In this work basic stages of formation of the epidemiological surveillance of cholera in Russia are described. In 1990-s for the first time zoning by epidemic manifestations of cholera was carried out at the level of subjects forming parts of Russia and other Republics of the Soviet Union with the introduction of differential tactics of epidemiological surveillance. Improvement of epidemiological surveillance of cholera was aimed at harmonization with the IHR (2005), integration of epidemiological surveillance of cholera and social-hygienic monitoring of water objects of I and II categories. Characterization of isolated Vibrio cholerae strains (1990-2014) on the genomic basis determined the emergence of new VNTR-genotypes of V. cholerae O1 ctxAB+ tcpA+, responsible for outbreaks, simultaneously with isolation of V. cholerae 01 ctxAB-tcpA-strains during monitoring of environmental objectsfor cholera. A viewpoint is considered of the beginning of the eighth cholera pandemic in the context of emergence of V. cholerae El Tor strains with CTXφ prophage carrying ctxB gene of cholera toxin of classical biovar. Main directions offurther enhancement ofepidemiological surveillance include the study of basic data structures used in the epidemiological surveillance system, the use of zoning of municipal units offederal subjects with corresponding surveillance tactics and expected economic effect.

  5. Effects of local climate variability on transmission dynamics of cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, M S; Sharker, M A Y; Rheman, S; Hossain, S; Mahmud, Z H; Islam, M S; Uddin, A M K; Yunus, M; Osman, M S; Ernst, R; Rector, I; Larson, C P; Luby, S P; Endtz, H P; Cravioto, A

    2009-11-01

    Cholera is considered as a model for climate-related infectious diseases. In Bangladesh, cholera epidemics occur during summer and winter seasons, but it is not known how climate variability influences the seasonality of cholera. Therefore, the variability pattern of cholera events was studied in relation to the variation in local climate variables in Matlab, Bangladesh. Classification and regression tree (CART) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to study the dependency and variability pattern of monthly total cholera cases. An average temperature <23.25 degrees C corresponded to the lowest average cholera occurrence (23 cases/month). At a temperature of >or=23.25 degrees C and sunshine <4.13h/day, the cholera occurrence was 39 cases/month. With increased sunshine (>or=4.13h/day) and temperature (23.25-28.66 degrees C), the second highest cholera occurrence (44 cases/month) was observed. When the sunshine was >or=4.13h/day and the temperature was >28.66 degrees C, the highest cholera occurrence (54 cases/month) was observed. These results demonstrate that in summer and winter seasons in Bangladesh, temperature and sunshine hours compensate each other for higher cholera incidence. The synergistic effect of temperature and sunshine hours provided the highest number of cholera cases.

  6. Genetic diversity of environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 strains isolated in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Taichiro; Murase, Kazunori; Maruyama, Fumito; Tran, Thi Luong; Ota, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nguyen, Dong Tu; Ngo, Tu Cuong; Nguyen, Thi Hang; Tokizawa, Asako; Morita, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Nguyen, Binh Minh; Yamashiro, Tetsu

    2017-10-01

    Cholera epidemics have been recorded periodically in Vietnam during the seventh cholera pandemic. Since cholera is a water-borne disease, systematic monitoring of environmental waters for Vibrio cholerae presence is important for predicting and preventing cholera epidemics. We conducted monitoring, isolation, and genetic characterization of V. cholerae strains in Nam Dinh province of Northern Vietnam from Jul 2013 to Feb 2015. In this study, four V. cholerae O1 strains were detected and isolated from 110 analyzed water samples (3.6%); however, none of them carried the cholera toxin gene, ctxA, in their genomes. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four O1 isolates were separated into two independent clusters, and one of them diverged from a common ancestor with pandemic strains. The analysis of pathogenicity islands (CTX prophage, VPI-I, VPI-II, VSP-I, and VSP-II) indicated that one strain (VNND_2014Jun_6SS) harbored an unknown prophage-like sequence with high homology to vibriophage KSF-1 phi and VCY phi, identified from Bangladesh and the USA, respectively, while the other three strains carried tcpA gene with a distinct sequence demonstrating a separate clonal lineage. These results suggest that the aquatic environment can harbor highly divergent V. cholera strains and serve as a reservoir for multiple V. cholerae virulence-associated genes which may be exchanged via mobile genetic elements. Therefore, continuous monitoring and genetic characterization of V. cholerae strains in the environment should contribute to the early detection of the sources of infection and prevention of cholera outbreaks as well as to understanding the natura