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Sample records for cholinergic enhancement reduces

  1. Acupuncture reduces memory impairment and oxidative stress and enhances cholinergic function in an animal model of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Phunchago, Nattaporn; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-Mee, Wipawee

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the therapeutic strategy against memory deficit induced by alcoholism is not satisfactory and is expensive. Therefore, an effective, low-cost strategy is required. On the basis of the memory-enhancing effect of stimulation of the HT7 acupoint, we aimed to determine whether acupuncture at the HT7 acupoint can reduce alcoholism-induced memory impairment. The possible underlying mechanism was also explored. Alcoholism was induced in male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g. The alcoholic rats received either acupuncture at HT7 or sham acupuncture for 1 minute bilaterally once daily for 14 days. Their spatial memory was assessed after 1 day, 7 days, and 14 days of treatment. At the end of the study, the malondialdehyde level and the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and acetylcholinesterase enzymes in the hippocampus were determined using colorimetric assays. The results showed that acupuncture at HT7 significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity and the malondialdehyde level, but increased the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in the hippocampus. These results suggest that acupuncture at HT7 can effectively reduce the alcoholism-induced memory deficit. However, further studies concerning the detailed relationships between the location of the HT7 acupoint and the changes in the observed parameters are required.

  2. Enhanced Cholinergic Activity Improves Cerebral Blood Flow during Orthostatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Freeman, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and consequently orthostatic tolerance when upright depends on dilation of the cerebral vasculature in the face of reduced perfusion pressure associated with the hydrostatic gradient. However, it is still unclear if cholinergic activation plays a role in this dilation. To determine if enhancing central cholinergic activity with the centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine would increase CBF when upright compared to the peripherally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, neostigmine, or saline. We performed a randomized double-blind dose-ranging study that took place over 3 days in a hospital-based research lab. Eight healthy controls (six women and two men, mean age, 26 years; range 21–33) were given infusions of physostigmine, neostigmine, or saline on three different days. Five-minute tilts were repeated at baseline (no infusion), Dose 1 (0.2 μg/kg/min physostigmine; 0.1 μg/kg/min neostigmine) and Dose 2 (0.6 μg/kg/min physostigmine or 0.3 μg/kg/min neostigmine), and placebo (0.9% NaCl). Cerebral blood velocity, beat-to-beat blood pressure, and end-tidal CO2 were continuously measured during tilts. Physostigmine (0.6 μg/kg/min) resulted in higher cerebral blood velocity during tilt (90.5 ± 1.5%) than the equivalent neostigmine (85.5 ± 2.6%) or saline (84.8 ± 1.7%) trials (P < 0.05). This increase occurred despite a greater postural hypocapnia, suggesting physostigmine had a direct vasodilatory effect on the cerebral vasculature. Cerebral hypoperfusion induced by repeated tilts was eliminated by infusion of physostigmine not neostigmine. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that enhancement of central, not peripheral, cholinergic activity attenuates the physiological decrease in CBF seen during upright tilt. These data support the need for further research to determine if enhancing central cholinergic activity may improve symptoms in patients with symptomatic

  3. Extracts and constituents of Leontopodium alpinum enhance cholinergic transmission: Brain ACh increasing and memory improving properties

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Ariane; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Vo, Nguyen Phung; Prast, Helmut; Stuppner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Leontopodium alpinum (‘Edelweiss’) was phytochemically investigated for constituents that might enhance cholinergic neurotransmission. The potency to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine (ACh) in rat brain served as key property for the bioguided isolation of cholinergically active compounds using different chromatographic techniques. The dichlormethane (DCM) extract of the root, fractions and isolated constituents were injected i.c.v. and the effect on brain ACh was detected via the push–pull technique. The DCM extract enhanced extracellular ACh concentration in rat brain and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The extracellular level of brain ACh was significantly increased by the isolated sesquiterpenes, isocomene and 14-acetoxyisocomene, while silphiperfolene acetate and silphinene caused a small increasing tendency. Only silphiperfolene acetate showed in vitro AChE inhibitory activity, thus suggesting the other sesquiterpenes to stimulate cholinergic transmission by an alternative mechanism of action. Isocomene was further investigated with behavioural tasks in mice. It restored object recognition in scopolamine-impaired mice and showed nootropic effects in the T-maze alternation task in normal and scopolamine-treated mice. Additionally, this sesquiterpene reduced locomotor activity of untreated mice in the open field task, while the activity induced by scopolamine was abolished. The enhancement of synaptic availability of ACh, the promotion of alternation, and the amelioration of scopolamine-induced deficit are in accordance with a substance that amplifies cholinergic transmission. Whether the mechanism of action is inhibition of AChE or another pro-cholinergic property remains to be elucidated. Taken together, isocomene and related constituents of L. alpinum deserve further interest as potential antidementia agents in brain diseases associated with cholinergic deficits. PMID:18541221

  4. Cholinergic enhancement of visual attention and neural oscillations in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Markus; Kluge, Christian; Bach, Dominik; Bradbury, David; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon

    2012-03-06

    Cognitive processes such as visual perception and selective attention induce specific patterns of brain oscillations. The neurochemical bases of these spectral changes in neural activity are largely unknown, but neuromodulators are thought to regulate processing. The cholinergic system is linked to attentional function in vivo, whereas separate in vitro studies show that cholinergic agonists induce high-frequency oscillations in slice preparations. This has led to theoretical proposals that cholinergic enhancement of visual attention might operate via gamma oscillations in visual cortex, although low-frequency alpha/beta modulation may also play a key role. Here we used MEG to record cortical oscillations in the context of administration of a cholinergic agonist (physostigmine) during a spatial visual attention task in humans. This cholinergic agonist enhanced spatial attention effects on low-frequency alpha/beta oscillations in visual cortex, an effect correlating with a drug-induced speeding of performance. By contrast, the cholinergic agonist did not alter high-frequency gamma oscillations in visual cortex. Thus, our findings show that cholinergic neuromodulation enhances attentional selection via an impact on oscillatory synchrony in visual cortex, for low rather than high frequencies. We discuss this dissociation between high- and low-frequency oscillations in relation to proposals that lower-frequency oscillations are generated by feedback pathways within visual cortex.

  5. Disruption of cardiac cholinergic neurons enhances susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Jungen, Christiane; Scherschel, Katharina; Eickholt, Christian; Kuklik, Pawel; Klatt, Niklas; Bork, Nadja; Salzbrunn, Tim; Alken, Fares; Angendohr, Stephan; Klene, Christiane; Mester, Janos; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Schumacher, Udo; Willems, Stephan; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Meyer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure deactivating abnormal firing cardiac tissue, is increasingly becoming the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. This is inevitably associated with the obliteration of cardiac cholinergic neurons. However, the impact on ventricular electrophysiology is unclear. Here we show that cardiac cholinergic neurons modulate ventricular electrophysiology. Mechanical disruption or pharmacological blockade of parasympathetic innervation shortens ventricular refractory periods, increases the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and decreases ventricular cAMP levels in murine hearts. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ventricular cholinergic innervation, revealing parasympathetic fibres running from the atria to the ventricles parallel to sympathetic fibres. In humans, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, which is accompanied by accidental parasympathetic and concomitant sympathetic denervation, raises the burden of premature ventricular complexes. In summary, our results demonstrate an influence of cardiac cholinergic neurons on the regulation of ventricular function and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28128201

  6. Cholinergic, but not dopaminergic or noradrenergic, enhancement sharpens visual spatial perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Caterina; Yousef, Sahar; Aarts, Esther; Wallace, Deanna L; D'Esposito, Mark; Silver, Michael A

    2017-03-23

    The neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) modulates spatial integration in visual cortex by altering the balance of inputs that generate neuronal receptive fields. These cholinergic effects may provide a neurobiological mechanism underlying the modulation of visual representations by visual spatial attention. However, the consequences of cholinergic enhancement on visuospatial perception in humans are unknown. We conducted two experiments to test whether enhancing cholinergic signaling selectively alters perceptual measures of visuospatial interactions in human subjects. In Experiment 1, a double-blind placebo-controlled pharmacology study, we measured how flanking distractors influenced detection of a small contrast decrement of a peripheral target, as a function of target/flanker distance. We found that cholinergic enhancement with the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil improved target detection, and modeling suggested that this was mainly due to a narrowing of the extent of facilitatory perceptual spatial interactions. In Experiment 2, we tested whether these effects were selective to the cholinergic system or would also be observed following enhancements of related neuromodulators dopamine (DA) or norepinephrine (NE). Unlike cholinergic enhancement, DA (bromocriptine) and NE (guanfacine) manipulations did not improve performance or systematically alter the spatial profile of perceptual interactions between targets and distractors. These findings reveal mechanisms by which cholinergic signaling influences visual spatial interactions in perception and improves processing of a visual target among distractors - effects that are notably similar to those of spatial selective attention.Significance StatementAcetylcholine influences how visual cortical neurons integrate signals across space - perhaps providing a neurobiological mechanism for the effects of visual selective attention. However, the influence of cholinergic enhancement on visuospatial perception remains

  7. Donepezil plus estradiol treatment enhances learning and delay-dependent memory performance by young ovariectomized rats with partial loss of septal cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R B; Chipman, A M; Nelson, D

    2011-04-01

    Effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance appear to diminish with age and time following the loss of ovarian function. We hypothesize that this is due to a reduction in basal forebrain cholinergic function and that treatment with a cholinergic enhancer can reverse the effect. This study tested whether combining the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil with estradiol treatment can enhance/restore estradiol effects on cognitive performance in young ovariectomized rats with selective lesions of septal cholinergic neurons. 192IgG-saporin was injected directly into the medial septum to produce selective cholinergic lesions. Rats were then treated with donepezil (Don, daily injections of 3mg/kg/day, i.p.) or vehicle, and then with 17β-estradiol (E2, administered by silastic capsule implanted s.c.) or an empty capsule. Rats were trained on a delayed matching-to-position (DMP) T-maze task which previous studies have shown is sensitive to ovariectomy and estrogen replacement. Results show that neither estradiol nor donepezil alone significantly enhanced acquisition of the DMP task in rats with cholinergic lesions. Combination therapy was effective, however, depending on the severity of the lesion. Don+E2 significantly enhanced acquisition of the task in rats with partial lesions (<50% loss of cholinergic neurons), but not in rats with severe lesions. This effect was due largely to a reduction in perseverative behavior. Don+E2 also improved working memory in rats with partial lesions, as evidenced by significantly better performance than controls during increased intertrial delays. These findings suggest that even partial loss of septal cholinergic neurons can reduce effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance, and demonstrate that combining a cholinesterase inhibitor with estrogen therapy can help to restore beneficial effects on performance. We propose that combination therapy may have similar beneficial effects in women, particularly in older women who

  8. Stimulation of the cholinergic neurotransmissions enhances the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Monzani, D; Genovese, E; Marrara, A; Presutti, L; Gherpelli, C; Panzetti, P; Forghieri, M

    2010-01-01

    Summary The primary aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation in a cohort of elderly labyrinthine-defective patients also affected by a moderate cognitive impairment of vascular origin. A secondary aim was to establish whether additional treatment with a cholinergic precursor (choline alphascerate) might enhance the results of the physical therapy in these patients. A retrospective clinical design was employed and data were collected from the vestibular rehabilitation treatment charts of 42 selected elderly patients who attended the tertiary referral centre of the Audiology and Vestibology of the University Hospital of Modena, Italy, in the period 1998-2008. Two groups of patients, well-matched for sex, age, and as close as possible for the vestibular examination upon admittance, were selected; Group A included 20 patients who had undergone vestibular rehabilitation training for one month and Group B included 22 patients who had attended the same physical therapy sessions as the former and had also received daily medication with 1200 mg of choline alphascerate per os. The outcome measures of the two forms of treatments were obtained from comparisons between posturographic and electronystagmographic examinations at baseline and 3 weeks after the end of treatment. Instrumental findings were completed by recording scores of the Dynamic Gait Index, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale before and after treatment. A statistically significant improvement in postural control (p < 0.05) and gait and balance performances (p < 0.005) was recorded in both groups; a relevant and statistically significant reduction of the asymmetry of the vestibular-ocular reflexes was also observed (p < 0.005). The self-rated dizziness handicap and psychological distress were significantly reduced (p < 0.005). Comparisons between the two groups revealed that patients who had also received medication, had achieved

  9. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Cholinergic enhancement differentially modulates neural response to encoding during face identity and face location working memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Handjaras, Giacomo; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Szczepanik, Joanna; Pietrini, Pietro; Furey, Maura L

    2013-09-01

    Potentiation of cholinergic transmission influences stimulus processing by enhancing signal detection through suppression and/or filtering out of irrelevant information (bottom-up modulation) and with top-down task-oriented executive mechanisms based on the recruitment of prefrontal and parietal attentional systems. The cholinergic system also plays a critical role in working memory (WM) processes and preferentially modulates WM encoding, likely through stimulus-processing mechanisms. Previous research reported increased brain responses in visual extrastriate cortical regions during cholinergic enhancement in the encoding phase of WM, independently addressing object and spatial encoding. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the effects of cholinergic enhancement on encoding of key visual processing features. Subjects participated in two scanning sessions, one during an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of saline and the other during an infusion of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. In each scan session, subjects alternated between a face identity recognition and a spatial location WM. Enhanced cholinergic function increased neural activity in the ventral stream during encoding of face identity and in the dorsal stream during encoding of face location. Conversely, a reduction in brain response was found for scrambled sensorimotor control images. The cholinergic effects on neural activity in the ventral stream during encoding of face identity were stronger than those observed in the dorsal stream during encoding of face location, likely as a consequence of the role of acetylcholine in establishing the inherently relevant nature of face identity. Despite the limited sample-size, the results suggest the stimulus-dependent role of cholinergic system in signal detection, as they show that cholinergic potentiation enhances neural activity in regions associated with early perceptual processing in a selective manner depending on

  11. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  12. Alterations in brain activation during cholinergic enhancement with rivastigmine in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, S; Barkhof, F; van Meel, C S; Scheltens, P

    2002-01-01

    Background: Rivastigmine enhances cholinergic activity and has been shown in clinical trials to decrease the rate of deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. It remains unclear where in the brain it exerts its effect. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to measure changes in brain function and relate these to cognition. Objectives: To use fMRI to study brain activation with rivastigmine treatment. Methods: The effect on brain activation of a single dose of rivastigmine was tested in seven patients with mild Alzheimer's disease using fMRI during face encoding, and in five patients during a parametric working memory task. Results: During face encoding, rivastigmine increased bilateral activation in the fusiform gyrus. Brain activation was also enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in a simple working memory task. When working memory load was further increased, not only was increased activation seen, but in certain areas there was also decreased activation. Conclusions: These findings link the previously observed increase in cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease after treatment with a cholinesterase inhibitor to altered brain activation. Although the results cannot be generalised to the Alzheimer's disease population at large, they provide evidence that in mild Alzheimer's disease, rivastigmine enhances brain activation in the fusiform and frontal cortices. This is compatible with the concept of cholinergic circuitry. PMID:12438467

  13. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  14. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-10-27

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices.

  15. Enhanced cholinergic suppression of previously strengthened synapses enables the formation of self-organized representations in olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Linster, Christiane; Maloney, Michaella; Patil, Madhvi; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2003-11-01

    Computational modeling assists in analyzing the specific functional role of the cellular effects of acetylcholine within cortical structures. In particular, acetylcholine may regulate the dynamics of encoding and retrieval of information by regulating the magnitude of synaptic transmission at excitatory recurrent connections. Many abstract models of associative memory function ignore the influence of changes in synaptic strength during the storage process and apply the effect of these changes only during a so-called recall-phase. Efforts to ensure stable activity with more realistic, continuous updating of the synaptic strength during the storage process have shown that the memory capacity of a realistic cortical network can be greatly enhanced if cholinergic modulation blocks transmission at synaptic connections of the association fibers during the learning process. We here present experimental data from an olfactory cortex brain slice preparation showing that previously potentiated fibers show significantly greater suppression (presynaptic inhibition) by the cholinergic agonist carbachol than unpotentiated fibers. We conclude that low suppression of non-potentiated fibers during the learning process ensures the formation of self-organized representations in the neural network while the higher suppression of previously potentiated fibers minimizes interference between overlapping patterns. We show in a computational model of olfactory cortex, that, together, these two phenomena reduce the overlap between patterns that are stored within the same neural network structure. These results further demonstrate the contribution of acetylcholine to mechanisms of cortical plasticity. The results are consistent with the extensive evidence supporting a role for acetylcholine in encoding of new memories and enhancement of response to salient sensory stimuli.

  16. Total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh reversed scopolamine-induced amnesia, improved cholinergic activities and reduced neuroinflammation in brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aliya; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Jaafar, Siti Murnirah; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Mani, Vasudevan

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the neuroprotective effects between total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh against scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. Total isoflavones (10, 20 and 40mg/kg) from soybean (SI) and tempeh (TI) were administered orally to different groups of rats (n=6) for 15days. Piracetam (400mg/kg, p.o.) was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in the animals. Radial arm and elevated plus mazes served as exteroceptive behavioural models to measure memory. Brain cholinergic activities (acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase) and neuroinflammatory activities (COX-1, COX-2, IL-1β and IL10) were also assessed. Treatment with SI and TI significantly reversed the scopolamine effect and improved memory with TI group at 40mg/kg, p.o. exhibiting the best improvement (p<0.001) in rats. The TI (10, 20 and 40mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased (p<0.001) acetylcholine and reduced acetylcholinesterase levels. Meanwhile, only a high dose (40mg/kg, p.o.) of SI showed significant improvement (p<0.05) in the cholinergic activities. Neuroinflammation study also showed that TI (40mg/kg, p.o.) was able to reduce inflammation better than SI. The TI ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory in rats through the cholinergic neuronal pathway and by prevention of neuroinflammation.

  17. Cholinergic agonists reduce blood pressure in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Amber S; Mathis, Keisa W

    2017-04-01

    Increased inflammation arising from an abnormal immune response can damage healthy tissue and lead to disease progression. An important example of this is the accumulation of inflammatory mediators in the kidney, which can subsequently lead to hypertension and renal injury. The origin of this inflammation may involve neuro-immune interactions. For example, the novel vagus nerve-to-spleen mechanism known as the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" controls inflammation upon stimulation. However, if this pathway is dysfunctional, inflammation becomes less regulated and chronic inflammatory diseases such as hypertension may develop. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with aberrant immune function, increased renal inflammation, and prevalent hypertension. We hypothesized that the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is impaired in SLE and that stimulation of this pathway would protect from the progression of hypertension in SLE mice. Female SLE (NZBWF1) and control (NZW) mice were administered nicotine or vehicle for 7 days (2 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) in order to stimulate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway at the level of the splenic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR). Blood pressure was assessed posttreatment. Nicotine-treated SLE mice did not develop hypertension and this lower blood pressure (compared to saline-treated SLE mice) coincided with lower splenic and renal cortical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data provide evidence that the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is impaired in SLE In addition, these data suggest that stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can protect the kidney by dampening inflammation and therefore prevent the progression of hypertension in the setting of SLE.

  18. The selective M1 muscarinic cholinergic agonist CDD-0102A enhances working memory and cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Artis, Sonja; Singh, Amritha; Twose, Trevor M; Beck, Joseph E; Messer, William S

    2012-03-01

    Various neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders are marked by alterations in brain cholinergic function and cognitive deficits. Efforts to alleviate such deficits have been limited by a lack of selective M(1) muscarinic agonists. 5-(3-Ethyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine hydrochloride (CDD-0102A) is a partial agonist at M(1) muscarinic receptors with limited activity at other muscarinic receptor subtypes. The present studies investigated the effects of CDD-0102A on working memory and strategy shifting in rats. CDD-0102A administered intraperitoneally 30 min before testing at 0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg significantly enhanced delayed spontaneous alternation performance in a four-arm cross maze, suggesting improvement in working memory. In separate experiments, CDD-0102A had potent enhancing effects on learning and switching between a place and visual cue discrimination. Treatment with CDD-0102A did not affect acquisition of either a place or visual cue discrimination. In contrast, CDD-0102A at 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg significantly enhanced a shift between a place and visual cue discrimination. Analysis of the errors in the shift to the place or shift to the visual cue strategy revealed that in both cases CDD-0102A significantly increased the ability to initially inhibit a previously relevant strategy and maintain a new, relevant strategy once selected. In anesthetized rats, the minimum dose required to induce salivation was approximately 0.3 mg/kg i.p. Salivation increased with dose, and the estimated ED(50) was 2.0 mg/kg. The data suggest that CDD-0102A has unique memory and cognitive enhancing properties that might be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders at doses that do not produce adverse effects such as salivation.

  19. Luteolin enhances cholinergic activities in PC12 cells through ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    El Omri, Abdelfatteh; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Ben Abdrabbah, Manef; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-02-09

    Luteolin, a 3', 4', 5, 7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is an active compound in Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiacea), and has been reported to exert several benefits in neuronal cells. However cholinergic-induced activities of luteolin still remain unknown. Neuronal differentiation encompasses an elaborate developmental program which plays a key role in the development of the nervous system. The advent of several cell lines, like PC12 cells, able to differentiate in culture proved to be the turning point for gaining and understanding of molecular neuroscience. In this work, we investigated the ability of luteolin to induce PC12 cell differentiation and its effect on cholinergic activities. Our findings showed that luteolin treatment significantly induced neurite outgrowth extension, enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, known as neuronal differentiation marker, and increased the level of total choline and acetylcholine in PC12 cells. In addition, luteolin persistently, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt; while the addition of pharmacological MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3k/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated luteolin-induced AChE activity and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The above findings suggest that luteolin induces neurite outgrowth and enhanced cholinergic activities, at least in part, through the activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling.

  20. Cortical cholinergic signaling controls the detection of cues

    PubMed Central

    Gritton, Howard J.; Howe, William M.; Mallory, Caitlin S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Berke, Joshua D.; Sarter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The cortical cholinergic input system has been described as a neuromodulator system that influences broadly defined behavioral and brain states. The discovery of phasic, trial-based increases in extracellular choline (transients), resulting from the hydrolysis of newly released acetylcholine (ACh), in the cortex of animals reporting the presence of cues suggests that ACh may have a more specialized role in cognitive processes. Here we expressed channelrhodopsin or halorhodopsin in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons of mice with optic fibers directed into this region and prefrontal cortex. Cholinergic transients, evoked in accordance with photostimulation parameters determined in vivo, were generated in mice performing a task necessitating the reporting of cue and noncue events. Generating cholinergic transients in conjunction with cues enhanced cue detection rates. Moreover, generating transients in noncued trials, where cholinergic transients normally are not observed, increased the number of invalid claims for cues. Enhancing hits and generating false alarms both scaled with stimulation intensity. Suppression of endogenous cholinergic activity during cued trials reduced hit rates. Cholinergic transients may be essential for synchronizing cortical neuronal output driven by salient cues and executing cue-guided responses. PMID:26787867

  1. Environmental enrichment reduces the response to stress of the cholinergic system in the prefrontal cortex during aging.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Gregorio; Del Arco, Alberto; Garrido, Pedro; de Blas, Marta; Mora, Francisco

    2008-05-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) induced by handling stress during aging and also to investigate whether this response changed as a result of the animals living in an enriched environment. Male Wistar rats of 3 months of age were housed in control and enriched conditions during the entire period of their adult life and experiments were performed at 6, 15 and 24 months of age. Spontaneous motor activity was first monitored in an open field arena. Then, rats were stereotaxically implanted with guide cannula to perform microdialysis experiments in the PFC and to evaluate the effects of stress on extracellular concentrations of acetylcholine. Handling stress increased the extracellular concentrations of acetylcholine in the PFC of control and enriched rats. These increases were not modified by aging in control rats. However, environmental enrichment (EE) reduced the effects of stress on acetylcholine concentrations in all groups of age. Spontaneous motor activity in the open field was reduced by aging. EE also decreased motor activity in all groups of age. These results suggest that EE reduces the reactivity to stress of the cholinergic system in the prefrontal cortex during aging.

  2. Endomorphins 1 and 2 reduce relaxant non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission in rat gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Storr, M; Gaffal, E; Schusdziarra, V; Allescher, H-D

    2002-06-14

    It is now well established that opioids modulate cholinergic excitatory neurotransmission in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to characterize a possible effect of endomorphins on nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxant neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus in vitro. The drugs used in the experiments were the endogenous mu-opioid receptors (MORs) endomorphin 1 and 2 and the mu-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2). CTAP left the basal tonus and the spontaneous activity of the preparation unchanged. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) under NANC conditions at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 16 Hz caused a frequency-dependent relaxant response on the 5-hydoxytryptamine (5-HT) (10(-7) M) precontracted smooth-muscle strip. Both endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2 significantly reduced this relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. Endomorphin 1 proved to be more potent in reducing the relaxant responses. The endomorphin effects were significantly reversed by the MOR antagonist CTAP. CTAP itself did not influence the EFS-induced relaxation. In summary, these data provide evidence that the endogenous MOR agonists endomorphin 1 and 2 can reduce nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus smooth muscle via a pathway involving MORs. The physiological relevance of these findings remains to be established, since the data presented suggest that the endomorphins act as neuromodulators within NANC relaxant neurotransmission.

  3. Involvement of cholinergic and GABAergic systems in the reversal of memory disruption by NS-105, a cognition enhancer.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, T; Itoh, Y; Tamura, M; Mushiroi, T; Ukai, Y; Kise, M; Kimura, K

    1999-09-01

    The effects of (+)-5-oxo-D-prolinepiperidinamide monohydrate (NS-105) on the scopolamine-, electrolytic lesion of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM)-, AF64A-, baclofen-, cerebral ischemia- and electroconvulsive shock (ECS)-induced memory disruption in the passive avoidance response or radial arm maze tasks were investigated in rats. The effects of NS-105 were compared with those of aniracetam, bifemelane, idebenone, and indeloxazine in two tasks of the passive avoidance response. Furthermore, effects of NS-105 on in vivo release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the cerebral cortex, high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) of the cerebral cortex in rats with lesion of NBM, HACU of the hippocampus in rats treated with pentobarbital and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) of the cerebral cortex in rats with lesion of NBM were examined. NS-105 showed antiamnestic actions in a variety of animal models of cholinergic dysfunction employed in this study. Aniracetam improved memory disruption caused by scopolamine, but bifemelane, idebenone, and indeloxazine did not. NS-105 (10 mg/kg) showed the increase of ACh release from the cerebral cortex and the enhancement of HACU both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, but showed no change in activity of ChAT. NS-105 also reversed memory disruption induced by baclofen, a potent GABA(B) receptor agonist, but all of reference drugs did not. These results suggest that antiamnestic action of NS-105 is due to the facilitation of cholinergic neuronal activity and the suppression of GABA(B) receptor-mediated responses.

  4. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, T.; Matsushita, H.

    1981-03-09

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (/sup 3/H-SPD) and /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity.

  5. Physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, is a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2013-05-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and chronic inflammation is a key contributor to many chronic diseases. Accordingly, interventions that reduce inflammation may be effective in treating multiple adverse chronic conditions. In this context, physical activity is documented to reduce systemic low-grade inflammation and is acknowledged as an anti-inflammatory intervention. Furthermore, physically active individuals are at a lower risk of developing chronic diseases. However the mechanisms mediating this anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits are unknown. We hypothesize that the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" (CAP) mediates the anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits associated with physical activity. The CAP is an endogenous, physiological mechanism by which acetylcholine from the vagus nerve, interacts with the innate immune system to modulate and restrain the inflammatory cascade. Importantly, higher levels of physical activity are associated with enhanced parasympathetic (vagal) tone and lower levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation. Accordingly, physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the CAP, may be a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

  6. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  7. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors.

  8. Enhancement of frequency domain indices of heart rate variability by cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine bromide.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ali Asghar; Foroutan, Seyyed Abbas; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Erfanian Omidvar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of orally administration of single dose sustained-released tablet of pyridostigmine bromide (PBSR) on the frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty-two healthy young men were participated in this study. They were divided into 2 groups; the pyridostigmine group (n = 22) and the placebo group (n = 10). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300 and 420 min after PBSR administration. At each time, simultaneously, a blood sample was prepared and PB plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Statistical analysis showed that in different indices of HRV, there is a significant increase in low frequency (LF) band at 300 min, but no difference in high frequency band (HF). It also showed significant decreases in normalized high frequency band (Hfnu), normalized low frequency band (Lfnu) and LF/HF ratio at 120, 240 and 300 min after PBSR administration. Maximum plasma concentration of PB was 150 min after the administration. In conclusion, administration of a single dose PBSR can enhance the frequency domains indices of HRV and improvesympathovagal balance.

  9. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory.

    PubMed

    Hut, R A; Van der Zee, E A

    2011-08-10

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor expression varies remarkably between species and even strains. Apparently, cholinergic features can be flexibly adjusted to the needs of a species or strain. Nevertheless, it can be generalized that circadian rhythmicity in the cholinergic system is characterized by high ACh release during the active phase of an individual. During the active phase, the activity of the ACh synthesizing enzyme Choline Acetyltransferase (ChAT) is enhanced, and the activity of the ACh degrading enzyme Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is reduced. The number of free, unbound and thus available muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) is highest when ACh release is lowest. The cholinergic innervation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the hypothalamic circadian master clock, arises from the cholinergic forebrain and brain stem nuclei. The density of cholinergic fibers and terminals is modest as compared to other hypothalamic nuclei. This is the case for rat, hamster and mouse, three chronobiological model rodent species studied by us. A new finding is that the rat SCN contains some local cholinergic neurons. Hamster SCN contains less cholinergic neurons, whereas the mouse SCN is devoid of such cells. ACh has an excitatory effect on SCN cells (at least in vivo), and functions in close interaction with other neurotransmitters. Originally it was thought that ACh transferred retinal light information to the SCN. This turned out to be wrong. Thereafter, the phase shifting effects of ACh prompted researches to view ACh as an agent for nocturnal clock resetting. It is still not clear, however, what the function consequence is of SCN cholinergic neurotransmission. Here, we postulate the hypothesis

  10. 5-HT6 receptor agonists and antagonists enhance learning and memory in a conditioned emotion response paradigm by modulation of cholinergic and glutamatergic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Woods, S; Clarke, NN; Layfield, R; Fone, KCF

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 5-HT6 receptors are abundant in the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and striatum, supporting their role in learning and memory. Selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists produce pro-cognitive effects in several learning and memory paradigms while 5-HT6 receptor agonists have been found to enhance and impair memory. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The conditioned emotion response (CER) paradigm was validated in rats. Then we examined the effect of the 5-HT6 receptor antagonist, EMD 386088 (10 mg·kg−1, i.p.), and agonists, E-6801 (2.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and EMD 386088 (5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) on CER-induced behaviour either alone or after induction of memory impairment by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine (0.3 mg·kg−1, i.p) or the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.1 mg·kg−1, i.p). KEY RESULTS Pairing unavoidable foot shocks with a light and tone cue during CER training induced a robust freezing response, providing a quantitative index of contextual memory when the rat was returned to the shock chamber 24 h later. Pretreatment (−20 min pre-training) with scopolamine or MK-801 reduced contextual freezing 24 h after CER training, showing production of memory impairment. Immediate post-training administration of 5-HT6 receptor antagonist, SB-270146, and agonists, EMD 386088 and E-6801, had little effect on CER freezing when given alone, but all significantly reversed scopolamine- and MK-801-induced reduction in freezing. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Both the 5-HT6 receptor agonists and antagonist reversed cholinergic- and glutamatergic-induced deficits in associative learning. These findings support the therapeutic potential of 5-HT6 receptor compounds in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction, such as seen in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:22568655

  11. Substance P selectively modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Wang, Yanyan; Cox, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Substance P (SP) is co-localized and co-released with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from approximately 50% of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. MSNs innervate several cellular targets including neighboring MSNs and cholinergic interneurons via collaterals. However, the functional role of SP release onto striatal interneurons is unknown. Here we examined SP-mediated actions on inhibitory synaptic transmission in cholinergic interneurons using whole-cell recordings in mouse corticostriatal slices. We found that SP selectively suppressed GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), but not excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in cholinergic interneurons. In contrast, SP did not alter IPSCs in fast-spiking interneurons and MSNs. SP suppressed IPSC amplitude in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and the NK1 receptor antagonist RP67580 attenuated the SP-mediated suppression. In addition, RP67580 alone enhanced the evoked IPSC amplitude in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting an endogenous action of SP on regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission. SP did not alter the paired-pulse ratio, but reduced the amplitudes of GABA(A) agonist muscimol-induced outward currents and miniature IPSCs in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting SP exerts its effects primarily at the post-synaptic site. Our results indicate that the physiological effects of SP are to enhance the activity of striatal cholinergic interneurons and provide a rationale for designing potential new antiparkinsonian agents.

  12. Cholinergic modulation of food and drug satiety and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Rada, Pedro V

    2012-06-06

    Although they comprise only a small portion of the neurons in the region, cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum appear to play an important role in the regulation of various appetitive behaviors, in part, through their interactions with mesolimbic dopamine (DA) systems. In this review, we describe studies that suggest that the activity of cholinergic interneurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cholinergic projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) affect feeding behavior. In vivo microdialysis studies in rats have revealed that the cessation of a meal is associated with a rise in acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the NAc. ACh activation will suppress feeding, and this is also associated with an increase in synaptic accumulation of ACh. Further, we discuss how, in addition to their role in the ending of a meal, cholinergic interneurons in the NAc play an integral role in the cessation of drug use. Another cholinergic system involved in different aspects of appetitive behavior is the projection from the pedunculpontine nuclei directly to the VTA. Activation of this system enhances behaviors through activation of the mesolimbic DA system, and antagonism of ACh receptors in the VTA can reduce drug self-administration. Finally, we discuss the role of accumbens ACh in both drug and palatable food withdrawal. Studies reveal that accumbens ACh is increased during withdrawal from several different drugs of abuse (including cocaine, nicotine and morphine). This rise in extracellular levels of ACh, coupled with a decrease in extracellular levels of DA, is believed to contribute to an aversive state, which can manifest as behaviors associated with drug withdrawal. This theory has also been applied to studies of overeating and/or "food addiction," and the findings suggest a similar imbalance in DA/ACh levels, which is associated with behavioral indications of drug-like withdrawal. In summary, cholinergic neurons play an important role in the modulation of both

  13. Modes and Models of Forebrain Cholinergic Neuromodulation of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hasselmo, Michael E; Sarter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    As indicated by the profound cognitive impairments caused by cholinergic receptor antagonists, cholinergic neurotransmission has a vital role in cognitive function, specifically attention and memory encoding. Abnormally regulated cholinergic neurotransmission has been hypothesized to contribute to the cognitive symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders. Loss of cholinergic neurons enhances the severity of the symptoms of dementia. Cholinergic receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors have been investigated for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction. Evidence from experiments using new techniques for measuring rapid changes in cholinergic neurotransmission provides a novel perspective on the cholinergic regulation of cognitive processes. This evidence indicates that changes in cholinergic modulation on a timescale of seconds is triggered by sensory input cues and serves to facilitate cue detection and attentional performance. Furthermore, the evidence indicates cholinergic induction of evoked intrinsic, persistent spiking mechanisms for active maintenance of sensory input, and planned responses. Models have been developed to describe the neuronal mechanisms underlying the transient modulation of cortical target circuits by cholinergic activity. These models postulate specific locations and roles of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and that cholinergic neurotransmission is controlled in part by (cortical) target circuits. The available evidence and these models point to new principles governing the development of the next generation of cholinergic treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:20668433

  14. Interactions between Aβ oligomers and presynaptic cholinergic signaling: age-dependent effects on attentional capacities

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vinay; Bernard, Carcha S.; Naughton, Sean X.; Yegla, Brittney

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that cerebral deposition of the neurotoxic fibrillar form of amyloid precursor protein, β-amyloid (Aβ), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, many aspects of AD pathology including the cognitive symptoms and selective vulnerability of cortically-projecting basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons are not well explained by this hypothesis. Specifically, it is not clear why cognitive decline appears early when the loss of BF cholinergic neurons and plaque deposition are manifested late in AD. Soluble oligomeric forms of Aβ are proposed to appear early in the pathology and to be better predictors of synaptic loss and cognitive deficits. The present study was designed to examine the impact of Aβ oligomers on attentional functions and presynaptic cholinergic transmission in young and aged rats. Chronic intracranial infusions of Aβ oligomers produced subtle decrements in the ability of rats to sustain attentional performance with time on task, irrespective of the age of the animals. However, Aβ oligomers produced robust detrimental effects on performance under conditions of enhanced attentional load in aged animals. In vivo electrochemical recordings show reduced depolarization-evoked cholinergic signals in Aβ-infused aged rats. Moreover, soluble Aβ disrupted the capacity of cholinergic synapses to clear exogenous choline from the extracellular space in both young and aged rats, reflecting impairments in the choline transport process that is critical for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release. Although aging per se reduced the cross-sectional area of BF cholinergic neurons and presynaptic cholinergic proteins in the cortex, attentional performance and ACh release remained unaffected in aged rats infused with the control peptide. Taken together, these data suggest that soluble Aβ may marginally influence attentional functions at young ages primarily by interfering with the choline uptake

  15. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  16. Small Molecule p75NTR Ligands Reduce Pathological Phosphorylation and Misfolding of Tau, Inflammatory Changes, Cholinergic Degeneration, and Cognitive Deficits in AβPPL/S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V.; Shen, Lin; Griend, Lilith Vander; Quach, Lisa N.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Saw, Nay; Yang, Tao; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR ) is involved in degenerative mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, p75NTR levels are increased in AD and the receptor is expressed by neurons that are particularly vulnerable in the disease. Therefore, modulating p75NTR function may be a significant disease-modifying treatment approach. Prior studies indicated that the non-peptide, small molecule p75NTR ligands LM11A-31, and chemically unrelated LM11A-24, could block amyloid-β-induced deleterious signaling and neurodegeneration in vitro, and LM11A-31 was found to mitigate neuritic degeneration and behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we determined whether these in vivo findings represent class effects of p75NTR ligands by examining LM11A-24 effects. In addition, the range of compound effects was further examined by evaluating tau pathology and neuroinflammation. Following oral administration, both ligands reached brain concentrations known to provide neuroprotection in vitro. Compound induction of p75NTR cleavage provided evidence for CNS target engagement. LM11A-31 and LM11A-24 reduced excessive phosphorylation of tau, and LM11A-31 also inhibited its aberrant folding. Both ligands decreased activation of microglia, while LM11A-31 attenuated reactive astrocytes. Along with decreased inflammatory responses, both ligands reduced cholinergic neurite degeneration. In addition to the amelioration of neuropathology in AD model mice, LM11A-31, but not LM11A-24, prevented impairments in water maze performance, while both ligands prevented deficits in fear conditioning. These findings support a role for p75NTR ligands in preventing fundamental tau-related pathologic mechanisms in AD, and further validate the development of these small molecules as a new class of therapeutic compounds. PMID:24898660

  17. How reduction of theta rhythm by medial septum inactivation may covary with disruption of entorhinal grid cell responses due to reduced cholinergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Pilly, Praveen K; Grossberg, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in the coordinated firing of brain neurons have been proposed to play important roles in perception, cognition, attention, learning, navigation, and sensory-motor control. The network theta rhythm has been associated with properties of spatial navigation, as has the firing of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells. Two recent studies reduced the theta rhythm by inactivating the medial septum (MS) and demonstrated a correlated reduction in the characteristic hexagonal spatial firing patterns of grid cells. These results, along with properties of intrinsic membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) in slice preparations of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), have been interpreted to support oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing. The current article shows that an alternative self-organizing map (SOM) model of grid cells can explain these data about intrinsic and network oscillations without invoking oscillatory interference. In particular, the adverse effects of MS inactivation on grid cells can be understood in terms of how the concomitant reduction in cholinergic inputs may increase the conductances of leak potassium (K(+)) and slow and medium after-hyperpolarization (sAHP and mAHP) channels. This alternative model can also explain data that are problematic for oscillatory interference models, including how knockout of the HCN1 gene in mice, which flattens the dorsoventral gradient in MPO frequency and resonance frequency, does not affect the development of the grid cell dorsoventral gradient of spatial scales, and how hexagonal grid firing fields in bats can occur even in the absence of theta band modulation. These results demonstrate how models of grid cell self-organization can provide new insights into the relationship between brain learning and oscillatory dynamics.

  18. Cholinergic Modulation of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cytokine levels and inflammation can be regulated by specifically augmenting cholinergic signaling via the efferent vagus nerve and the α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Cholinergic modalities, acting through vagus nerve- and/or α7nAChR-mediated mechanisms have been shown to suppress excessive inflammation in several experimental models of disease, including endotoxemic shock, sepsis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, hemorrhagic shock, colitis, postoperative ileus and pancreatitis. These studies have advanced the current understanding of the mechanisms regulating inflammation. They have also provided a rationale for exploring new possibilities to treat excessive, disease-underlying inflammation by applying selective cholinergic modalities in preclinical and clinical settings. An overview of this research is presented here. PMID:19079659

  19. Enhanced GABAergic Inputs Contribute to Functional Alterations of Cholinergic Interneurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Sandra M; Joshi, Prasad R; Parievsky, Anna; Galvan, Laurie; Chen, Jane Y; Fisher, Yvette E; Huynh, My N; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, striatal medium-sized spiny neurons undergo degenerative changes. In contrast, large cholinergic interneurons (LCIs) are relatively spared. However, their ability to release acetylcholine (ACh) is impaired. The present experiments examined morphological and electrophysiological properties of LCIs in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. R6/2 mice show a severe, rapidly progressing phenotype. Immunocytochemical analysis of choline acetyltransferase-positive striatal neurons showed that, although the total number of cells was not changed, somatic areas were significantly smaller in symptomatic R6/2 mice compared to wildtype (WT) littermates, For electrophysiology, brain slices were obtained from presymptomatic (3-4 weeks) and symptomatic (>8 weeks) R6/2 mice and their WT littermates. Striatal LCIs were identified by somatic size and spontaneous action potential firing in the cell-attached mode. Passive and active membrane properties of LCIs were similar in presymptomatic R6/2 and WT mice. In contrast, LCIs from symptomatic R6/2 animals displayed smaller membrane capacitance and higher input resistance, consistent with reduced somatic size. In addition, more LCIs from symptomatic mice displayed irregular firing patterns and bursts of action potentials. They also displayed a higher frequency of spontaneous GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and larger amplitude of electrically evoked IPSCs. Selective optogenetic stimulation of somatostatin- but not parvalbumin-containing interneurons also evoked larger amplitude IPSCs in LCIs from R6/2 mice. In contrast, glutamatergic spontaneous or evoked postsynaptic currents were not affected. Morphological and electrophysiological alterations, in conjunction with the presence of mutant huntingtin in LCIs, could explain impaired ACh release in HD mouse models.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances cholinergic contraction of longitudinal muscle of rabbit intestine via activation of phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Al-Qudah, M; Anderson, C D; Mahavadi, S; Bradley, Z L; Akbarali, H I; Murthy, K S; Grider, J R

    2014-02-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of proteins best known for its role in neuronal survival, differentiation, migration, and synaptic plasticity in central and peripheral neurons. BDNF is also widely expressed in nonneuronal tissues including the gastrointestinal tract. The role of BDNF in intestinal smooth muscle contractility is not well defined. The aim of this study was to identify the role of BDNF in carbachol (CCh)- and substance P (SP)-induced contraction of intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle. BDNF, selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor agonists, and pharmacological inhibitors of signaling pathways were examined for their effects on contraction of rabbit intestinal longitudinal muscle strips induced by CCh and SP. BDNF activation of intracellular signaling pathways was examined by Western blot in homogenates of muscle strips and isolated muscle cells. One-hour preincubation with BDNF enhanced intestinal muscle contraction induced by CCh but not by SP. The selective synthetic TrkB agonists LM 22A4 and 7,8-dihydroxyflavone produced similar effects to BDNF. The Trk antagonist K-252a, a TrkB antibody but not p75NTR antibody, blocked the effect of BDNF. The enhancement of CCh-induced contraction by BDNF was blocked by the phospholipase C (PLC) antagonist U73122, but not by ERK1/2 or Akt antagonists. Direct measurement in muscle strips and isolated muscle cells showed that BDNF caused phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and PLC-γ, but not ERK1/2 or Akt. We conclude that exogenous BDNF augments the CCh-induced contraction of longitudinal muscle from rabbit intestine by activating TrkB receptors and subsequent PLC activation.

  1. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Restores Sympathovagal Balance in the Failing Heart by Differential Remodeling of Cholinergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    DeMazumder, Deeptankar; Kass, David A.; O’Rourke, Brian; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is the only heart failure (HF) therapy documented to improve left ventricular (LV) function and reduce mortality. The underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. While β-adrenergic signaling has been studied extensively, the effect of CRT on cholinergic signaling is unexplored. Objective We hypothesized that remodeling of cholinergic signaling plays an important role in the aberrant calcium signaling and depressed contractile and β-adrenergic responsiveness in dyssynchronous HF (DHF) that are restored by CRT. Methods and Results Canine tachypaced DHF and CRT models were generated to interrogate responses specific to dyssynchronous vs. resynchronized ventricular contraction during hemodynamic decompensation. Echocardiographic, electrocardiographic and invasive hemodynamic data were collected from normal controls, DHF and CRT models. LV tissue was used for biochemical analyses and functional measurements (calcium transient, sarcomere shortening) from isolated myocytes (N=42–104 myocytes/model; 6–9 hearts/model). Human LV myocardium was obtained for biochemical analyses from explanted failing (N=18) and non-failing (N=7) hearts. The M2 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2-mAChR) was upregulated in human and canine HF compared to non-failing controls. CRT attenuated the increased M2-mAChR expression and Gαi-coupling, and enhanced M3-mAChR expression in association with enhanced calcium cycling, sarcomere shortening and β-adrenergic responsiveness. Despite model-dependent remodeling, cholinergic stimulation completely abolished isoproterenol-induced triggered activity in both DHF and CRT myocytes. Conclusions Remodeling of cholinergic signaling is a critical pathological component of human and canine HF. Differential remodeling of cholinergic signaling represents a novel mechanism for enhancing sympathovagal balance with CRT and may identify new targets for treatment of systolic HF. PMID

  2. Methods Reduce Cost, Enhance Quality of Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    For all the challenges posed by the microgravity conditions of space, weight is actually one of the more significant problems NASA faces in the development of the next generation of U.S. space vehicles. For the Agency s Constellation Program, engineers at NASA centers are designing and testing new vessels as safe, practical, and cost-effective means of space travel following the eventual retirement of the space shuttle. Program components like the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, intended to carry astronauts to the International Space Station and the Moon, must be designed to specific weight requirements to manage fuel consumption and match launch rocket capabilities; Orion s gross liftoff weight target is about 63,789 pounds. Future space vehicles will require even greater attention to lightweight construction to help conserve fuel for long-range missions to Mars and beyond. In order to reduce spacecraft weight without sacrificing structural integrity, NASA is pursuing the development of materials that promise to revolutionize not only spacecraft construction, but also a host of potential applications on Earth. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are one material of particular interest. These tubular, single-layer carbon molecules - 100,000 of them braided together would be no thicker than a human hair - display a range of remarkable characteristics. Possessing greater tensile strength than steel at a fraction of the weight, the nanotubes are efficient heat conductors with metallic or semiconductor electrical properties depending on their diameter and chirality (the pattern of each nanotube s hexagonal lattice structure). All of these properties make the nanotubes an appealing material for spacecraft construction, with the potential for nanotube composites to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more. The nanotubes may also feature in a number of other space exploration applications, including life support, energy storage, and sensor technologies. NASA s various

  3. A cholinergic basal forebrain feeding circuit modulates appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Herman, Alexander M; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Kochukov, Mikhail; Herman, Isabella; Quast, Kathleen B; Patel, Jay M; Tepe, Burak; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Ung, Kevin; Selever, Jennifer; Tong, Qingchun; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-10-13

    Atypical food intake is a primary cause of obesity and other eating and metabolic disorders. Insight into the neural control of feeding has previously focused mainly on signalling mechanisms associated with the hypothalamus, the major centre in the brain that regulates body weight homeostasis. However, roles of non-canonical central nervous system signalling mechanisms in regulating feeding behaviour have been largely uncharacterized. Acetylcholine has long been proposed to influence feeding owing in part to the functional similarity between acetylcholine and nicotine, a known appetite suppressant. Nicotine is an exogenous agonist for acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that endogenous cholinergic signalling may play a part in normal physiological regulation of feeding. However, it remains unclear how cholinergic neurons in the brain regulate food intake. Here we report that cholinergic neurons of the mouse basal forebrain potently influence food intake and body weight. Impairment of cholinergic signalling increases food intake and results in severe obesity, whereas enhanced cholinergic signalling decreases food consumption. We found that cholinergic circuits modulate appetite suppression on downstream targets in the hypothalamus. Together our data reveal the cholinergic basal forebrain as a major modulatory centre underlying feeding behaviour.

  4. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  5. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  6. The nicotinic cholinergic system function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Nees, Frauke

    2015-09-01

    Research on the nicotinic cholinergic system function in the brain was previously mainly derived from animal studies, yet, research in humans is growing. Up to date, findings allow significant advances on the understanding of nicotinic cholinergic effects on human cognition, emotion and behavior using a range of functional brain imaging approaches such as pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Studies provided insights across various mechanistic psychological domains using different tasks as well as at rest in both healthy individuals and patient populations, with so far partly mixed results reporting both enhancements and decrements of neural activity related to the nicotinic cholinergic system. Moreover, studies on the relation between brain structure and the nicotinic cholinergic system add important information in this context. The present review summarizes the current status of human brain imaging studies and presents the findings within a theoretical and clinical perspective as they may be useful not only for an advancement of the understanding of basic nicotinic cholinergic-related mechanisms, but also for the development and integration of psychological and pharmacological treatment approaches. Patterns of functional neuroanatomy and neural circuitry across various cognitive and emotional domains may be used as neuropsychological markers of mental disorders such as addiction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease or schizophrenia, where nicotinic cholinergic system changes are characteristic. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  7. Cholinergic circuits in cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Prado, Vania F; Janickova, Helena; Al-Onaizi, Mohammed A; Prado, Marco A M

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive flexibility, the ability to adjust behavior in response to new and unexpected conditions in the environment, is essential for adaptation to new challenges and survival. The cholinergic system is an important modulator of this complex behavior however, the exact cholinergic circuits involved in this modulation and the precise influence of acetylcholine (ACh) in the process is still not fully understood. Here we review the role of different cholinergic circuits in cognitive flexibility. Strong evidence indicates that cholinergic interneurons (CINs) from the dorsomedial striatum are essential for facilitating the establishment of a new selected strategy; an effect that seems to depend mainly on activation of muscarinic receptors. Cholinergic neurons from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nBM), which project to the prefrontal cortex, seem to modulate the initial inhibition of a previously learned strategy, however, this concept is still controversial. Additionally, some studies suggest that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons projecting to the hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, and posterior parietal cortex may also participate on the modulation of cognitive flexibility. We highlight the fact that when investigating effects of ACh on behavioral flexibility, or any other behavior, one has to keep in mind two important particularities of the cholinergic system: (1) Many cholinergic neurons in the brain co-release glutamate or GABA with ACh. Methodologies that rely on neuronal silencing or ablation lead to simultaneous elimination of both neurotransmitters, making interpretation of results complex. (2) The cholinergic gene locus has a unique organization, with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) gene present within the intron between the first and second exons of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene. Thus, behavioral studies using transgenic animals generated with ChAT bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones should be considered

  8. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion—potential target for rehabilitation approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Larry M.; McVagh, J. R.; Noga, B. R.; Cabaj, A. M.; Majczyński, H.; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J.; Leblond, H.; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a “hyper-cholinergic” state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our

  9. Cholinergic submandibular effects and muscarinic receptor expression in blood vessels of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Anders T; Selberg, Hanna; Soukup, Ondrej; Gradin, Kathryn; Tobin, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    In order to functionally characterise the muscarinic vasodilator responses, effects of cholinergic agonists were studied on isolated preparations of the rat submandibular artery and vein and carotid and jugular vessels. Tentatively, a cholinergic regulatory mechanism having different effects on the arterial and venous vessels would enhance vascular fluid recruitment for the secretory response. In vitro functional findings were correlated to the expression and cellular location of the different receptors that were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In order to find in vivo correlates to the in vitro findings, the influence of muscarinic receptors on permeability was studied on the vasculature of the submandibular gland in anaesthetised rats. Staining for muscarinic M1 receptors occurred in the endothelium, and muscarinic M5 receptors, and possibly M3 also, were detected in the arterial smooth muscle. In venous endothelium, muscarinic M1 and M4 receptors occurred. In the jugular smooth muscle layer, staining for M1, and possibly also for M3, appeared. Muscarinic agonists caused arteries to relax and veins to contract. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 10(-4)M) markedly reduced the cholinergic-evoked relaxation of pre-contracted carotid arterial preparations. In the presence of 4-DAMP (10(-7)M), the relaxation to cholinergic agonists was inhibited. Pirenzepine (10(-5)M) did not only inhibit the relaxatory effects, but even reversed the effects, while it in the jugular vein abolished the cholinergic effects. The arterial nitric oxide-dependent response to muscarinic receptor stimulation consisted of two parts -- one sensitive to pirenzepine and 4-DAMP and the other to 4-DAMP only. Inhibition of the former part only, resulted in cholinergic arterial contraction. Also, the submandibular artery and vein responses to muscarinic receptor stimulation show a resemblance with those of the carotid and jugular vessels, i.e. a pronounced arterial

  10. Vagotomy diminishes obesity in cafeteria rats by decreasing cholinergic potentiation of insulin release.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Mendes, Mariana Carla; Lubaczeuski, Camila; Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva Alegre; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we investigated whether subdiaphragmatic vagotomy has benefits on obesity, body glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in cafeteria (CAF)-obese rats. Wistar rats were fed a standard or CAF diet for 12 weeks. Subsequently, CAF rats were randomly submitted to truncal vagotomy (CAF Vag) or sham operation (CAF Sham). CAF Sham rats were hyperphagic, obese, and presented metabolic disturbances, including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Twelve weeks after vagotomy, CAF Vag rats presented reductions in body weight and perigonadal fat stores. Vagotomy did not modify glucose tolerance but normalized fed glycemia, insulinemia, and insulin sensitivity. Isolated islets from CAF Sham rats secreted more insulin in response to the cholinergic agent, carbachol, and when intracellular cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP) is enhanced by forskolin or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Vagotomy decreased glucose-induced insulin release due to a reduction in the cholinergic action on β-cells. This effect also normalized islet secretion in response to cAMP. Therefore, vagotomy in rats fed on a CAF-style diet effectively decreases adiposity and restores insulin sensitivity. These effects were mainly associated with the lack of cholinergic action on the endocrine pancreas, which decreases insulinemia and may gradually reduce fat storage and improve insulin sensitivity.

  11. Maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septum neurons require glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Christian; Rutz, Susanne; Rothmaier, Katharina; Turiault, Marc; Zhi, Qixia; Naumann, Thomas; Frotscher, Michael; Tronche, Francois; Jackisch, Rolf; Kretz, Oliver

    2006-05-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to influence trophic processes in the nervous system. In particular, they seem to be important for the development of cholinergic neurons in various brain regions. Here, we applied a genetic approach to investigate the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on the maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septal neurons between P15 and one year of age by using a mouse model carrying a CNS-specific conditional inactivation of the GR gene (GRNesCre). The number of choline acetyltransferase and p75NTR immuno-positive neurons in the medial septum (MS) was analyzed by stereology in controls versus mutants. In addition, cholinergic fiber density, acetylcholine release and cholinergic key enzyme activity of these neurons were determined in the hippocampus. We found that in GRNesCre animals the number of medial septal cholinergic neurons was significantly reduced during development. In addition, cholinergic cell number further decreased with aging in these mutants. The functional GR gene is therefore required for the proper maturation and maintenance of medial septal cholinergic neurons. However, the loss of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum is not accompanied by a loss of functional cholinergic parameters of these neurons in their target region, the hippocampus. This pinpoints to plasticity of the septo-hippocampal system, that seems to compensate for the septal cell loss by sprouting of the remaining neurons.

  12. Cholinergic Neurons in the Basal Forebrain Promote Wakefulness by Actions on Neighboring Non-Cholinergic Neurons: An Opto-Dialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Zant, Janneke C.; Kim, Tae; Prokai, Laszlo; Szarka, Szabolcs; McNally, James; McKenna, James T.; Shukla, Charu; Yang, Chun; Kalinchuk, Anna V.; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of sleep–wake states by the basal forebrain (BF) poses a challenge due to the intermingled presence of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. All three BF neuronal subtypes project to the cortex and are implicated in cortical arousal and sleep–wake control. Thus, nonspecific stimulation or inhibition studies do not reveal the roles of these different neuronal types. Recent studies using optogenetics have shown that “selective” stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons increases transitions between NREM sleep and wakefulness, implicating cholinergic projections to cortex in wake promotion. However, the interpretation of these optogenetic experiments is complicated by interactions that may occur within the BF. For instance, a recent in vitro study from our group found that cholinergic neurons strongly excite neighboring GABAergic neurons, including the subset of cortically projecting neurons, which contain the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV) (Yang et al., 2014). Thus, the wake-promoting effect of “selective” optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons could be mediated by local excitation of GABA/PV or other non-cholinergic BF neurons. In this study, using a newly designed opto-dialysis probe to couple selective optical stimulation with simultaneous in vivo microdialysis, we demonstrated that optical stimulation of cholinergic neurons locally increased acetylcholine levels and increased wakefulness in mice. Surprisingly, the enhanced wakefulness caused by cholinergic stimulation was abolished by simultaneous reverse microdialysis of cholinergic receptor antagonists into BF. Thus, our data suggest that the wake-promoting effect of cholinergic stimulation requires local release of acetylcholine in the basal forebrain and activation of cortically projecting, non-cholinergic neurons, including the GABAergic/PV neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Optogenetics is a revolutionary tool to assess the roles of

  13. Cholinergic pesticides cause mushroom body neuronal inactivation in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mary J.; Moffat, Christopher; Saranzewa, Nastja; Harvey, Jenni; Wright, Geraldine A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides that target cholinergic neurotransmission are highly effective, but their use has been implicated in insect pollinator population decline. Honeybees are exposed to two widely used classes of cholinergic pesticide: neonicotinoids (nicotinic receptor agonists) and organophosphate miticides (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors). Although sublethal levels of neonicotinoids are known to disrupt honeybee learning and behaviour, the neurophysiological basis of these effects has not been shown. Here, using recordings from mushroom body Kenyon cells in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and clothianidin, and the organophosphate miticide coumaphos oxon, cause a depolarization-block of neuronal firing and inhibit nicotinic responses. These effects are observed at concentrations that are encountered by foraging honeybees and within the hive, and are additive with combined application. Our findings demonstrate a neuronal mechanism that may account for the cognitive impairments caused by neonicotinoids, and predict that exposure to multiple pesticides that target cholinergic signalling will cause enhanced toxicity to pollinators. PMID:23535655

  14. Glutamatergic contributions to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist-evoked cholinergic transients in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Vinay; Man, Kingson; Decker, Michael W; Sarter, Martin

    2008-04-02

    Because modulation of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission has been hypothesized to represent a necessary mechanism mediating the beneficial cognitive effects of nicotine and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype-selective agonists, we used choline-sensitive microelectrodes for the real-time measurement of ACh release in vivo, to characterize cholinergic transients evoked by nicotine and the alpha4beta2*-selective nAChR partial agonist 2-methyl-3-(2-(S)-pyrrolindinylmethoxy)pyridine dihydrochloride (ABT-089), a clinically effective cognition enhancer. In terms of cholinergic signal amplitudes, ABT-089 was significantly more potent than nicotine in evoking ACh cholinergic transients. Moreover, cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were characterized by faster signal rise time and decay rate. The nAChR antagonist mecamylamine attenuated the cholinergic signals evoked by either compound. Cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were more efficaciously attenuated by the relatively beta2*-selective nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine. The alpha7 antagonist methyllycaconitine did not affect choline signal amplitudes but partly attenuated the relatively slow decay rate of nicotine-evoked cholinergic signals. Furthermore, the AMPA receptor antagonist DNQX as well as the NMDA receptor antagonist APV more potently attenuated cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089. Using glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes to measure glutamatergic transients, ABT-089 was more potent than nicotine in evoking glutamate release. Glutamatergic signals were highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of voltage-regulated sodium channels. Together, the present evidence indicates that compared with nicotine, ABT-089 evokes more potent and sharper cholinergic transients in prefrontal cortex. Glutamatergic mechanisms necessarily mediate the cholinergic effects of nAChR agonists in the prefrontal cortex.

  15. Persisting cholinergic erythema: a variant of cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G M; Black, A K; Greaves, M W

    1983-09-01

    A new variant of cholinergic urticaria is described. Four patients each had a similar persistent macular skin rash distributed maximally over the upper limbs and upper trunk. Though the rash was persistent, individual macules were of short duration but new macules continually appeared at adjacent sites. Exercise and hot baths exacerbated pruritus and provoked lesions in previously unaffected areas. Topically applied benzoyl scopolamine blocked the appearance of the lesions after challenge. Tests of cholinergic function were normal, apart from an exaggerated pupillary response to arecoline in one patient.

  16. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-03-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency.

  17. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C.; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency. PMID:28287155

  18. Effect of ageing on post-lesion oestradiol treatment on mouse cholinergic neurones in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kőszegi, Z; Abrahám, I M

    2012-09-01

    A single 17β-oestradiol (E(2)) treatment reduces the loss in cholinergic fibre density in the cortex after NMDA lesion into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) of the basal forebrain (BF) in young female mice. In the present study, we examined whether age influences this protective effect of E(2) on cholinergic neurones in male and female mice. Gonad-intact young and aged animals of both sexes were treated with E(2) after unilateral NMDA lesion into the NBM. NMDA lesion elicited ipsilateral cholinergic cell loss in the NBM and ipsilateral fibre loss in the somatosensory cortex to the same extent, irrespective of age or sex. A single E(2) injection performed 1 h post-lesion did not affect the cholinergic cell loss but reduced the loss of fibres in the ipsilateral cortex in young male and female mice. By contrast, E(2) did not have an effect on the NMDA-induced cholinergic cell and fibre loss in aged male or female mice. The oestrous stage of young female mice did not alter the number of cholinergic cells/fibres or the protective effect of E(2) on cholinergic fibres after NMDA injection. Our results show that E(2) has a protective action on BF cholinergic fibres in young males and females, although the treatment potential of E(2) declines with age.

  19. Extracellular calcium and cholinergic stimulation of isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1981-01-01

    The role of calcium gating in cholinergic stimulation of the function of parietal cells was studied using cells isolated from canine fundic mucosa by treatment with collagenase and EDTA and enriched by velocity separation in an elutriator rotor. Monitoring the accumulation of [14C[ aminopyrine as an index of parietal cell response, stimulation by carbachol, but not by histamine, was highly dependent upon the concentration of extracellular calcium. Incubation of parietal cells in 0-.1 mM calcium, rather than the usual 1.8 mM concentration, reduced the response to 100 microM carbachol by 92 +/- 2%, whereas histamine stimulation was impaired by 28 +/- 5%. A similar reduction in extracellular calcium suppressed the response to gastrin (100 nM) by 67 +/- 7%. The impairment of cholinergic stimulation found at low extracellular calcium concentrations was rapidly reversed with the readdition of calcium. Lanthanum, which blocks calcium movement across membranes, caused a similar pattern of effects on secretagogue stimulation of aminopyrine accumulation, with 100 microM lanthanum suppressing carbachol stimulation by 83 +/- 2%. This concentration of lanthanum suppressed gastrin stimulation by 40 +/- 7% and histamine stimulation by only 12 +/- 9%. Carbachol, but not histamine nor gastrin, stimulated 45Ca++ uptake. The magnitude of carbachol-stimulated calcium uptake correlated with the parietal cell content of the fractions examined (r = 0.88), and was dose responsive over carbachol concentrations from 1 microM to 1 mM. Atropine (100 nM) caused surmountable inhibition, and these effects of carbachol and atropine on calcium uptake correlated with their effects on oxygen consumption (r = 0.93) and [14C]-aminopyrine accumulation (r = 0.90). Cells preloaded with 45Ca++ lost cellular calcium in a time-dependent fashion; however, this rate of egress was not accelerated by treatment with histamine, gastrin, or carbachol, thus failing to implicate mobilization of intracellular calcium

  20. Enhanced Osteogenesis by Reduced Graphene Oxide/Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Sang-Min; Jin, Oh Seong; Kang, Seok Hee; Hong, Suck Won; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung Bo; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-12-21

    Recently, graphene-based nanomaterials, in the form of two dimensional substrates or three dimensional foams, have attracted considerable attention as bioactive scaffolds to promote the differentiation of various stem cells towards specific lineages. On the other hand, the potential advantages of using graphene-based hybrid composites directly as factors inducing cellular differentiation as well as tissue regeneration are unclear. This study examined whether nanocomposites of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) (rGO/HAp NCs) could enhance the osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts and promote new bone formation. When combined with HAp, rGO synergistically promoted the spontaneous osteodifferentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells without hindering their proliferation. This enhanced osteogenesis was corroborated from determination of alkaline phosphatase activity as early stage markers of osteodifferentiation and mineralization of calcium and phosphate as late stage markers. Immunoblot analysis showed that rGO/HAp NCs increase the expression levels of osteopontin and osteocalcin significantly. Furthermore, rGO/HAp grafts were found to significantly enhance new bone formation in full-thickness calvarial defects without inflammatory responses. These results suggest that rGO/HAp NCs can be exploited to craft a range of strategies for the development of novel dental and orthopedic bone grafts to accelerate bone regeneration because these graphene-based composite materials have potentials to stimulate osteogenesis.

  1. Optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic brainstem neurons during focal limbic seizures: Effects on cortical physiology.

    PubMed

    Furman, Moran; Zhan, Qiong; McCafferty, Cian; Lerner, Benjamin A; Motelow, Joshua E; Meng, Jin; Ma, Chanthia; Buchanan, Gordon F; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Cardin, Jessica A; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-12-01

    Focal temporal lobe seizures often cause impaired cortical function and loss of consciousness. Recent work suggests that the mechanism for depressed cortical function during focal seizures may depend on decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal, which leads to a sleep-like state of cortical slow-wave activity. To test this hypothesis, we sought to directly activate subcortical cholinergic neurons during focal limbic seizures to determine the effects on cortical function. Here we used an optogenetic approach to selectively stimulate cholinergic brainstem neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus during focal limbic seizures induced in a lightly anesthetized rat model. We found an increase in cortical gamma activity and a decrease in delta activity in response to cholinergic stimulation. These findings support the mechanistic role of reduced subcortical cholinergic arousal in causing cortical dysfunction during seizures. Through further work, electrical or optogenetic stimulation of subcortical arousal networks may ultimately lead to new treatments aimed at preventing cortical dysfunction during seizures.

  2. Characterization of a novel mechanism accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the anticancer drug irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Blandizzi, Corrado; De Paolis, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Lazzeri, Gloria; Baschiera, Fabio; Del Tacca, Mario

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the antitumour drug irinotecan. The activity of irinotecan and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), was assayed in models suitable for pharmacological studies on cholinergic system. Irinotecan moderately inhibited human or electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity, SN-38 had no effect, whereas physostigmine blocked both the enzymes with high potency and efficacy. Irinotecan and SN-38 did not affect spontaneous or electrically-induced contractile activity of human colonic muscle. Acetylcholine and dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) caused phasic contractions or relaxations, respectively. Physostigmine enhanced the motor responses elicited by electrical stimulation. Although irinotecan and SN-38 did not modify the basal contractile activity of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle strips, irinotecan 100 μM moderately enhanced cholinergic twitch contractions. Acetylcholine or DMPP caused phasic contractions, whereas physostigmine enhanced the twitch responses. Electrically-induced [3H]-acetylcholine release was reduced by irinotecan (100 μM) or physostigmine (0.1 μM). Intravenous irinotecan stimulated gastric acid secretion in rats, but no effects were obtained with SN-38, physostigmine or i.c.v. irinotecan. Hypersecretion induced by irinotecan was partly prevented by ondansetron, and unaffected by capsazepine. In the presence of atropine, vagotomy and systemic or vagal ablation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres, irinotecan did not stimulate gastric secretion. The present results indicate that irinotecan and SN-38 do not act as specific acetylcholinesterase blockers or acetylcholine receptor agonists. It is rather suggested that irinotecan promotes a parasympathetic discharge to peripheral organs, mediated by capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent fibres, and that serotonin 5-HT3 receptors are implicated in the genesis of vago-vagal reflex

  3. Catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems of mouse brain are modulated by LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, Laura; Esteban, Gerard; Giralt, Mercedes; Valente, Tony; Bolea, Irene; Solé, Montse; Sun, Ping; Benítez, Susana; Morelló, José Ramón; Reguant, Jordi; Ramírez, Bartolomé; Hidalgo, Juan; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2015-04-01

    The possible modulatory effect of the functional LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids, on the catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmission, affecting cognition decline during aging has been studied. 129S1/SvlmJ mice were fed for 10, 20, 30 and 40 days with either LMN or control diets. The enzymes involved in catecholaminergic and cholinergic metabolism were determined by both immunohistological and western blot analyses. Noradrenalin, dopamine and other metabolites were quantified by HPLC analysis. Theobromine, present in cocoa, the main LMN diet component, was analysed in parallel using SH-SY5Y and PC12 cell lines. An enhanced modulatory effect on both cholinergic and catecholaminergic transmissions was observed on 20 day fed mice. Similar effect was observed with theobromine, besides its antioxidant capacity inducing SOD-1 and GPx expression. The enhancing effect of the LMN diet and theobromine on the levels of acetylcholine-related enzymes, dopamine and specially noradrenalin confirms the beneficial role of this diet on the "cognitive reserve" and hence a possible reducing effect on cognitive decline underlying aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. The interrelationship between cholinergic pathway in the magnocellular paraventricular nucleus and natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Y; Wang, Min; Zhang, Heng A; Deng, Xi J; Wang, Peng X; Mao, Hui Z; Lin, Yuan; Jiang, Chun L

    2015-07-01

    The central nervous system is known to play important roles in the regulation of renal sodium excretion. The present study was designed to reveal the interrelationship between cholinergic pathway in the magnocellular paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the natriuresis induced by brain cholinergic stimuli. The results indicated that urinary sodium excretion was significantly increased at 40 min after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of carbachol (CBC). Immunohistochemical studies showed that CBC increased choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactivity (ChAT-IR) in the magnocellular PVN and renal proximal convoluted tubule (PCT), respectively. After pretreatment with atropine, urinary sodium excretion was significantly reduced, and carbachol-increased ChAT-IR in the magnocellular PVN and PCT was also significantly decreased. These results suggested that brain cholinergic stimuli induced the natriuresis and increased the activity of cholinergic neurons in the magnocellular PVN and cholinergic system in the PCT. The blockade of muscarinic receptor completely abolished the natriuresis and partially inhibited carbachol-exerted stimulatory effects in the magnocellular PVN and PCT. To summarize, brain cholinergic pathway and peripheral cholinergic system in kidney were found to contribute to the natriuresis following brain cholinergic stimulation. Our findings revealed novel evidence that PVN was involved in the natriuresis via humoral mechanisms.

  5. Sex differences in brain cholinergic activity in MSG-obese rats submitted to exercise.

    PubMed

    Sagae, Sara Cristina; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Raineki, Charlis; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Marques da Silva, Ana Carla

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is an epidemic disease most commonly caused by a combination of increased energy intake and lack of physical activity. The cholinergic system has been shown to be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Moreover, physical exercise promotes a reduction of fat pads and body mass by increasing energy expenditure, but also influences the cholinergic system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction between physical exercise (swimming) and central cholinergic activity in rats treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG, a model for obesity) during infancy. Our results show that MSG treatment is able to induce obesity in male and female rats. Specifically, MSG-treated rats presented a reduced body mass and nasoanal length, and increased perigonadal and retroperitoneal fat pads in relation to the body mass. Physical exercise was able to reduce body mass in both male and female rats, but did not change the fat pads in MSG-treated rats. Increased food intake was only seen in MSG-treated females submitted to exercise. Cholinergic activity was increased in the cortex of MSG-treated females and physical exercise was able to reduce this activity. Thalamic cholinergic activity was higher in sedentary MSG-treated females and exercised MSG-treated males. Hypothalamic cholinergic activity was higher in male and female MSG-treated rats, and was not reduced by exercise in the 2 sexes. Taken together, these results show that MSG treatment and physical exercise have different effects in the cholinergic activity of males and females.

  6. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients' waiting time.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Iman; AlSarheed, Ahlam

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients-which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS) and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient's satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients' distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients' waiting time will consequently affect patients' satisfaction and improve the quality of health care services.

  7. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  8. Cholinergic modulation of event-related oscillations (ERO)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Robledo, Patricia; Wills, Derek N.; Havstad, James; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system in the brain modulates patterns of activity involved in general arousal, attention processing, memory and consciousness. In the present study we determined the effects of selective cholinergic lesions of the medial septum area (MS) or nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on amplitude and phase characteristics of event related oscillations (EROs). A time–frequency based representation was used to determine ERO energy, phase synchronization across trials, recorded within a structure (phase lock index, PLI), and phase synchronization across trials, recorded between brain structures (phase difference lock index, PDLI), in the frontal cortex (Fctx), dorsal hippocampus (DHPC) and central amygdala (Amyg). Lesions in MS produced: (1) decreases in ERO energy in delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequencies in Amyg, (2) reductions in gamma ERO energy and PLI in Fctx, (3) decreases in PDLI between the Fctx–Amyg in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequencies, and (4) decreases in PDLI between the DHPC–Amyg and Fctx–DHPC in the theta frequency bands. Lesions in NBM resulted in: (1) increased ERO energy in delta and theta frequency bands in Fctx, (2) reduced gamma ERO energy in Fctx and Amyg, (3) reductions in PLI in the theta, beta and gamma frequency ranges in Fctx, (4) reductions in gamma PLI in DHPC and (5) reduced beta PLI in Amyg. These studies suggest that the MS cholinergic system can alter phase synchronization between brain areas whereas the NBM cholinergic system modifies phase synchronization/phase resetting within a brain area. PMID:24594019

  9. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B.; Perrat, Paola N.; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Summary Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses. PMID:26948892

  10. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic.

    PubMed

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B; Perrat, Paola N; Waddell, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses.

  11. Reducing and filtering point clouds with enhanced vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Stefano; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Piuri, Vincenzo; Borghese, N Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Modern scanners are able to deliver huge quantities of three-dimensional (3-D) data points sampled on an object's surface, in a short time. These data have to be filtered and their cardinality reduced to come up with a mesh manageable at interactive rates. We introduce here a novel procedure to accomplish these two tasks, which is based on an optimized version of soft vector quantization (VQ). The resulting technique has been termed enhanced vector quantization (EVQ) since it introduces several improvements with respect to the classical soft VQ approaches. These are based on computationally expensive iterative optimization; local computation is introduced here, by means of an adequate partitioning of the data space called hyperbox (HB), to reduce the computational time so as to be linear in the number of data points N, saving more than 80% of time in real applications. Moreover, the algorithm can be fully parallelized, thus leading to an implementation that is sublinear in N. The voxel side and the other parameters are automatically determined from data distribution on the basis of the Zador's criterion. This makes the algorithm completely automatic. Because the only parameter to be specified is the compression rate, the procedure is suitable even for nontrained users. Results obtained in reconstructing faces of both humans and puppets as well as artifacts from point clouds publicly available on the web are reported and discussed, in comparison with other methods available in the literature. EVQ has been conceived as a general procedure, suited for VQ applications with large data sets whose data space has relatively low dimensionality.

  12. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders.

  13. Cholinergic gating of hippocampal auditory evoked potentials in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Klinkenberg, Inge; Sambeth, Anke; Blokland, Arjan

    2013-08-01

    As perturbations in auditory filtering appear to be a candidate trait marker of schizophrenia, there has been considerable interest in the development of translational rat models to elucidate the underlying neural and neurochemical mechanisms involved in sensory gating. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the non-selective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, the muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden and the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil (also in combination with scopolamine and biperiden) on auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and sensory gating. In the saline condition, only the N50 peak displayed sensory gating. Scopolamine and biperiden both disrupted sensory gating by increasing N50 amplitude for the S2 click. Donepezil was able to fully reverse the effects of biperiden on N50 sensory gating, but had residual effects when combined with scopolamine; i.e., it enhanced sensory gating by increasing N50 amplitude of the S1 stimulus. Donepezil by itself improved sensory gating by enhancing N50 amplitude of S1, and reducing N50 amplitude of the S2 click. In conclusion, due to its relatively more selective effects biperiden is to be preferred over scopolamine as a means for pharmacologically inducing cholinergic impairments in auditory processing in healthy rats. Changes in auditory processing and sensory gating induced by cholinergic drugs may serve as a translational model for aging instead of schizophrenia.

  14. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal network function

    PubMed Central

    Teles-Grilo Ruivo, Leonor M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic septohippocampal projections from the medial septal area to the hippocampus are proposed to have important roles in cognition by modulating properties of the hippocampal network. However, the precise spatial and temporal profile of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus remains unclear making it difficult to define specific roles for cholinergic transmission in hippocampal dependent behaviors. This is partly due to a lack of tools enabling specific intervention in, and recording of, cholinergic transmission. Here, we review the organization of septohippocampal cholinergic projections and hippocampal acetylcholine receptors as well as the role of cholinergic transmission in modulating cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, and rhythmic network oscillations. We point to a number of open questions that remain unanswered and discuss the potential for recently developed techniques to provide a radical reappraisal of the function of cholinergic inputs to the hippocampus. PMID:23908628

  15. Running reduces stress and enhances cell genesis in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Kannangara, Timal S; Lucero, Melanie J; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Drapala, Robert J; Simpson, Jessica M; Christie, Brian R; van Praag, Henriette

    2011-12-01

    Cell proliferation and neurogenesis are diminished in the aging mouse dentate gyrus. However, it is not known whether isolated or social living affects cell genesis and stress levels in old animals. To address this question, aged (17-18 months old) female C57Bl/6 mice were single or group housed, under sedentary or running conditions. We demonstrate that both individual and socially housed aged C57Bl/6 mice have comparable basal cell proliferation levels and demonstrate increased running-induced cell genesis. To assess stress levels in young and aged mice, corticosterone (CORT) was measured at the onset of the active/dark cycle and 4h later. In young mice, no differences in CORT levels were observed as a result of physical activity or housing conditions. However, a significant increase in stress in socially housed, aged sedentary animals was observed at the onset of the dark cycle; CORT returned to basal levels 4h later. Together, these results indicate that voluntary exercise reduces stress in group housed aged animals and enhances hippocampal cell proliferation.

  16. Neurotrophin-3 promotes the cholinergic differentiation of sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brodski, Claude; Schnürch, Harald; Dechant, Georg

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins influence the epigenetic shaping of the vertebrate nervous system by regulating neuronal numbers during development and synaptic plasticity. Here we attempt to determine whether these growth factors can also regulate neurotransmitter plasticity. As a model system we used the selection between noradrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmission by paravertebral sympathetic neurons. Developing sympathetic neurons express the neurotrophin receptors TrkA and TrkC, two highly related receptor tyrosine kinases. Whereas the TrkA ligand nerve growth factor (NGF) has long been known to regulate both the survival and the expression of noradrenergic traits in sympathetic neurons, the role of TrkC and of its ligand neurotrophin-3 (NT3) has remained unclear. We found that TrkC expression in the avian sympathetic chain overlaps substantially with that of choline acetyltransferase. In sympathetic chain explants, transcripts of the cholinergic marker genes choline acetyltransferase and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide were strongly enriched in the presence of NT3 compared with NGF, whereas the noradrenergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine transporter were reduced. The transcription factor chicken achaete scute homolog 1 was coexpressed with cholinergic markers. The effects of NT3 are reversed and antagonized by NGF. They are independent of neuronal survival and developmentally regulated. These results suggest a role for NT3 as a differentiation factor for cholinergic neurons and establish a link between neurotrophins and neurotransmitter plasticity. PMID:10931939

  17. Deletion of neurturin impairs development of cholinergic nerves and heart rate control in postnatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony M; Jalloh, Hawa B; Prater, Kayla J; Fregoso, Santiago P; Bond, Cherie E; Hampton, Thomas G; Hoover, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The neurotrophic factor neurturin is required for normal cholinergic innervation of adult mouse heart and bradycardic responses to vagal stimulation. Our goals were to determine effects of neurturin deletion on development of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic functions, vagal baroreflex response, and cholinergic nerve density in nodal regions of postnatal mice. Experiments were performed on postnatal C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and neurturin knockout (KO) mice. Serial electrocardiograms were recorded noninvasively from conscious pups using an ECGenie apparatus. Mice were treated with atenolol to evaluate and block sympathetic effects on heart rate (HR) and phenylephrine (PE) to stimulate the baroreflex. Immunohistochemistry was used to label cholinergic nerves in paraffin sections. WT and KO mice showed similar age-dependent increases in HR and decreases in PR interval between postnatal days (P) 2.5 and 21. Treatment with atenolol reduced HR significantly in WT and KO pups at P7.5. PE caused a reflex bradycardia that was significantly smaller in KO pups. Cholinergic nerve density was significantly less in nodal regions of P7.5 KO mice. We conclude that cholinergic nerves have minimal influence on developmental changes in HR and PR, QRS, and QTc intervals in mouse pups. However, cholinergic nerves mediate reflex bradycardia by 1 week postnatally. Deletion of neurturin impairs cholinergic innervation of the heart and the vagal efferent component of the baroreflex early during postnatal development.

  18. Opposing regulation of dopaminergic activity and exploratory motor behavior by forebrain and brainstem cholinergic circuits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti C; Rossignol, Elsa; Rice, Margaret E; Machold, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine transmission is critical for exploratory motor behaviour. A key regulator is acetylcholine; forebrain acetylcholine regulates striatal dopamine release, whereas brainstem cholinergic inputs regulate the transition of dopamine neurons from tonic to burst firing modes. How these sources of cholinergic activity combine to control dopamine efflux and exploratory motor behaviour is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking total forebrain acetylcholine exhibit enhanced frequency-dependent striatal dopamine release and are hyperactive in a novel environment, whereas mice lacking rostral brainstem acetylcholine are hypoactive. Exploratory motor behaviour is normalized by the removal of both cholinergic sources. Involvement of dopamine in the exploratory motor phenotypes observed in these mutants is indicated by their altered sensitivity to the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist raclopride. These results support a model in which forebrain and brainstem cholinergic systems act in tandem to regulate striatal dopamine signalling for proper control of motor activity.

  19. Cholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurosecretion in the rabbit iris-ciliary body

    SciTech Connect

    Jumblatt, J.E.; North, G.T.

    1988-04-01

    The prejunctional effects of cholinergic agents on release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings were investigated in the isolated, superfused rabbit iris-ciliary body. Stimulation-evoked release of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was inhibited by the cholinergic agonists methacholine, oxotremorine, muscarine, carbamylcholine and acetylcholine (plus eserine), but was unmodified by pilocarpine or nicotine. Agonist-induced inhibition was antagonized selectively by atropine, indicating a muscarinic response. Atropine alone markedly enhanced norepinephrine release, revealing considerable tonic activation of prejunctional cholinergic receptors in this system. Prejunctional inhibition by carbamylcholine was found to completely override the facilitative action of forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on neurotransmitter release. Cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic effects on neurosecretion were non-additive, suggesting that the underlying receptors coexist at neurotransmitter release sites.

  20. Using Bibliotherapy to Enhance Probation and Reduce Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutt, Russell K.; Deng, Xiaogang; Stoehr, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Prior research indicates that probation programs that include efforts to change cognitive orientations and social patterns can enhance their effectiveness. This article reports an evaluation of an enhanced probation program, Changing Lives Through Literature, which uses a form of bibliotherapy to increase its rehabilitative effect. Controlling for…

  1. What do phasic cholinergic signals do?

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Lustig, Cindy; Berry, Anne S; Gritton, Howard; Howe, William M; Parikh, Vinay

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the neuromodulatory role of cholinergic systems, brief, temporally discrete cholinergic release events, or "transients", have been associated with the detection of cues in attention tasks. Here we review four main findings about cholinergic transients during cognitive processing. Cholinergic transients are: (1) associated with the detection of a cue and influenced by cognitive state; (2) not dependent on reward outcome, although the timing of the transient peak co-varies with the temporal relationship between detection and reward delivery; (3) correlated with the mobilization of the cue-evoked response; (4) causal mediators of shifts from monitoring to cue detection. We next discuss some of the key questions concerning the timing and occurrence of transients within the framework of available evidence including: (1) Why does the shift from monitoring to cue detection require a transient? (2) What determines whether a cholinergic transient will be generated? (3) How can cognitive state influence transient occurrence? (4) Why do cholinergic transients peak at around the time of reward delivery? (5) Is there evidence of cholinergic transients in humans? We conclude by outlining future research studies necessary to more fully understand the role of cholinergic transients in mediating cue detection.

  2. Cellular and molecular basis of cholinergic function

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdall, M.J.; Hawthorne, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 105 selections. Some of the titles are: Functional correlates of brain nicotine receptors; Muscarinic receptor subclasses; Cholinergic innervation and levels of nerve growth factor and its mRNA in the central nervous system; Developmentally regulated neurontrophic activities of Torpedo electric organ tissue; and Association of a regulatory peptide with cholinergic neurons.

  3. Cholinergic regulation of fear learning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marlene A; Fadel, Jim R

    2017-03-01

    Cholinergic activation regulates cognitive function, particularly long-term memory consolidation. This Review presents an overview of the anatomical, neurochemical, and pharmacological evidence supporting the cholinergic regulation of Pavlovian contextual and cue-conditioned fear learning and extinction. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons provide inputs to neocortical regions and subcortical limbic structures such as the hippocampus and amygdala. Pharmacological manipulations of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors support the role of cholinergic processes in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex in modulating the learning and extinction of contexts or cues associated with threat. Additional evidence from lesion studies and analysis of in vivo acetylcholine release with microdialysis similarly support a critical role of cholinergic neurotransmission in corticoamygdalar or corticohippocampal circuits during acquisition of fear extinction. Although a few studies have suggested a complex role of cholinergic neurotransmission in the cellular plasticity essential for extinction learning, more work is required to elucidate the exact cholinergic mechanisms and physiological role of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in these fear circuits. Such studies are important for elucidating the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder that involve deficits in extinction learning as well as for developing novel therapeutic approaches for such disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Linster, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function. PMID:26334007

  5. Cholinergic suppression of visual responses in primate V1 is mediated by GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Disney, Anita A; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has been implicated in selective attention. To understand the local circuit action of ACh, we iontophoresed cholinergic agonists into the primate primary visual cortex (V1) while presenting optimal visual stimuli. Consistent with our previous anatomical studies showing that GABAergic neurons in V1 express ACh receptors to a greater extent than do excitatory neurons, we observed suppressed visual responses in 36% of recorded neurons outside V1's primary thalamorecipient layer (4c). This suppression is blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine. Within layer 4c, ACh release produces a response gain enhancement (Disney AA, Aoki C, Hawken MJ. Neuron 56: 701-713, 2007); elsewhere, ACh suppresses response gain by strengthening inhibition. Our finding contrasts with the observation that the dominant mechanism of suppression in the neocortex of rats is reduced glutamate release. We propose that in primates, distinct cholinergic receptor subtypes are recruited on specific cell types and in specific lamina to yield opposing modulatory effects that together increase neurons' responsiveness to optimal stimuli without changing tuning width.

  6. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoshi; Linster, Christiane; Cleland, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function.

  7. The serotonin1A receptor partial agonist S15535 [4-(benzodioxan-5-yl)1-(indan-2-yl)piperazine] enhances cholinergic transmission and cognitive function in rodents: a combined neurochemical and behavioral analysis.

    PubMed

    Millan, Mark J; Gobert, Alain; Roux, Sylvain; Porsolt, Roger; Meneses, Alfredo; Carli, Mirjana; Di Cara, Benjamin; Jaffard, Robert; Rivet, Jean-Michel; Lestage, Pierre; Mocaer, Elisabeth; Peglion, Jean-Louis; Dekeyne, Anne

    2004-10-01

    These studies examined the influence of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(1A) receptor partial agonist S15535 [4-(benzodioxan-5-yl)1-(indan-2-yl)piperazine] upon cholinergic transmission and cognitive function in rodents. In the absence of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, S15535 dose-dependently (0.04-5.0 mg/kg s.c.) elevated dialysis levels of acetylcholine in the frontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of freely moving rats. In the cortex, the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY100,635 [(N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclo-hexanecarboxamide) fumarate] dose-dependently (0.0025-0.63) blocked this action of S15535. By contrast, in dorsal hippocampus, WAY100,635 mimicked the induction of acetylcholine release by S15535. In a social recognition paradigm, S15535 dose-dependently (0.16-10.0) improved retention, an action blocked by WAY100,635 (0.16), which was ineffective alone. Furthermore, S15535 dose-dependently (0.04-2.5) and WAY100,635 reversibly abolished amnesic properties of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (0.63) in this procedure. Cognitive deficits provoked by scopolamine in autoshaping and Morris water-maze procedures were likewise blocked by S15535 at doses of 0.63 to 10.0 and 0.16 to 2.5, respectively. In a two-platform spatial discrimination task, in which S15535 similarly abrogates cognitive deficits elicited by scopolamine, injection of S15535 (1.0 and 10.0 microg) into dorsal hippocampus blocked amnesic effects of the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (0.5 microg). Finally, S15535 (0.16-0.63) improved performance in a spatial, delayed nonmatching to sample model in mice, and in an operant delayed nonmatching to sample model in old rats, S15535 (1.25-5.0 mg/kg p.o.) increased response accuracy and reduced latency to respond. In conclusion, S15535 reinforces frontocortical and hippocampal release of acetylcholine and displays a broad-based pattern of procognitive properties

  8. [Influence of a central cholinergic mode of action on the regulation of the intact and disturbed cerebral blood flow (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ott, E

    1978-08-01

    Cerebral chemical vasomotor reactivity and autoregulation were tested in normal baboons before and after intravertebral, intravenous and (or) intracarotid infusion of atropine and neostigmine. Furthermore, disordered cholinergic neurotransmission and dysautoregulation after acute experimental cerebral infarction have also been investigated. Intravertebral injection of atropine suppressed the increase of CBF by inhalation of 5% CO2 and enhanced the decrease of CBF induced by hyperventilation, but did not appreciably affect autoregulatory response. On the other hand, cerebral autoregulatory vasoconstriction during increases of CPP was significantly reduced following both intravertebral and intracarotid neostigmine infusion. Cerebral vasodilatory reactivity to CO2 inhalation was significantly enhanced only following intravertebral neostigmine and cerebral vasoconstrictive response to hyperventilation was not influenced by neostigmine. Following experimental cerebral infarction regional dysautoregulation was found in infarcted gray matter and correlated significantly with increased AChE levels in the same zones of cortex and basal ganglia. Intravenous infusion of scopolamine restored autoregulation to the ischemic zones. The results thus obtained support the view that central cholinergic cerebrovascular influences exist and are vasodilatory in nature. Furthermore, in acute experimental cerebral infarction disordered cholinergic neurotransmission seems to play a role in vasoconstrictive dysautoregulation.

  9. Assessment of Cholinergic Properties of Ashwagandha Leaf-Extract in the Amnesic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Akash; Wadhwa, Renu; Thakur, Mahendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In our earlier study, we have shown the memory enhancing and scopolamine-induced amnesia recovery properties of Ashwagandha leaf extract using behavioral paradigm and expression analysis of synaptic plasticity genes. Purpose However, the exact mechanism through which Ashwagandha demonstrates these effects is still unknown. Methods In the present study, we hypothesized that the alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves (i-Extract) possesses cholinergic properties, which in turn inhibit the anti-cholinergic nature of scopolamine. Therefore, the potential of i-Extract to recover from the scopolamine-induced cholinergic deficits was assessed by measuring acetylcholine (neurotransmitter) and Arc (synaptic activity-related gene) expression level in the mouse brain. Results The enzymatic activity of acetyl cholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase was assessed through colorimetric assays, and expression level of Arc protein was examined by Western blotting. Furthermore, mRNA level of these genes was examined by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. We observed that the treatment of i-Extract in scopolamine-induced amnesic mouse attenuates scopolamine-induced detrimental alterations in the cholinergic system. Conclusion Thus, our study provided biochemical and molecular evidence of cholinergic properties of Ashwagandha leaf extract during brain disorders associated with cholinergic dysfunction. PMID:27647956

  10. Attention and the Cholinergic System: Relevance to Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Cindy; Sarter, Martin

    Traditional methods of drug discovery often rely on a unidirectional, "bottom-up" approach: A search for molecular compounds that target a particular neurobiological substrate (e.g., a receptor type), the refinement of those compounds, testing in animal models using high-throughput behavioral screening methods, and then human testing for safety and effectiveness. Many attempts have found the "effectiveness" criterion to be a major stumbling block, and we and others have suggested that success may be improved by an alternative approach that considers the neural circuits mediating the effects of genetic and molecular manipulations on behavior and cognition. We describe our efforts to understand the cholinergic system's role in attention using parallel approaches to test main hypotheses in both rodents and humans as well as generating converging evidence using methods and levels of analysis tailored to each species. The close back-and-forth between these methods has enhanced our understanding of the cholinergic system's role in attention both "bottom-up" and "top-down"-that is, the basic neuroscience identifies potential neuronal circuit-based mechanisms of clinical symptoms, and the patient and genetic populations serve as natural experiments to test and refine hypotheses about its contribution to specific processes. Together, these studies have identified (at least) two major and potentially independent contributions of the cholinergic system to attention: a neuromodulatory component that influences cognitive control in response to challenges from distractors that either make detection more difficult or draw attention away from the distractor, and a phasic or transient cholinergic signal that instigates a shift from ongoing behavior and the activation of cue-associated response. Right prefrontal cortex appears to play a particularly important role in the neuromodulatory component integrating motivational and cognitive influences for top-down control across

  11. Historical warming reduced due to enhanced land carbon uptake.

    PubMed

    Shevliakova, Elena; Stouffer, Ronald J; Malyshev, Sergey; Krasting, John P; Hurtt, George C; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-10-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of enhanced vegetation growth under future elevated atmospheric CO2 for 21st century climate warming. Surprisingly no study has completed an analogous assessment for the historical period, during which emissions of greenhouse gases increased rapidly and land-use changes (LUC) dramatically altered terrestrial carbon sources and sinks. Using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory comprehensive Earth System Model ESM2G and a reconstruction of the LUC, we estimate that enhanced vegetation growth has lowered the historical atmospheric CO2 concentration by 85 ppm, avoiding an additional 0.31 ± 0.06 °C warming. We demonstrate that without enhanced vegetation growth the total residual terrestrial carbon flux (i.e., the net land flux minus LUC flux) would be a source of 65-82 Gt of carbon (GtC) to atmosphere instead of the historical residual carbon sink of 186-192 GtC, a carbon saving of 251-274 GtC.

  12. Phenol reduces hypertonia and enhances strength: a longitudinal case study.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Patrick H; Eng, Janice J; Willms, Rhonda

    2004-06-01

    Phenyl alcohol blocks are used to relieve spasticity. Such nerve conduction blocks result from phenol-induced axonotmesis and could potentially affect muscle properties related to the ability to generate, maximize, and reduce force. This study assessed the 12-week longitudinal effect of phenol on position (stiffness) and velocity (damping) components of hypertonia, in addition to strength (peak torque and times to generate and reduce torque) in an individual with chronic elbow flexor spasticity following stroke. Phenol motor point injections of flexor muscles paradoxically increased the magnitude of flexion torque and decreased the times required to generate and reduce flexion and extension joint torques, in addition to reducing elbow extension stiffness and damping. Large reductions in the velocity-related component of hypertonia (damping changes > 90%) occurred immediately following injection, which is a finding that supports the velocity-dependent definition of spasticity. Although the changes in damping were large and transient, changes in stiffness and strength variables were small, slower to occur, and maintained. This suggests secondary changes following nerve block, possibly facilitated by regular elbow use subsequent to spasticity reduction.

  13. Cholinergic systems are essential for late-stage maturation and refinement of motor cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S.; Conner, James M.; Anilkumar, Arjun A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that early postnatal cholinergic lesions severely perturb early cortical development, impairing neuronal cortical migration and the formation of cortical dendrites and synapses. These severe effects of early postnatal cholinergic lesions preclude our ability to understand the contribution of cholinergic systems to the later-stage maturation of topographic cortical representations. To study cholinergic mechanisms contributing to the later maturation of motor cortical circuits, we first characterized the temporal course of cortical motor map development and maturation in rats. In this study, we focused our attention on the maturation of cortical motor representations after postnatal day 25 (PND 25), a time after neuronal migration has been accomplished and cortical volume has reached adult size. We found significant maturation of cortical motor representations after this time, including both an expansion of forelimb representations in motor cortex and a shift from proximal to distal forelimb representations to an extent unexplainable by simple volume enlargement of the neocortex. Specific cholinergic lesions placed at PND 24 impaired enlargement of distal forelimb representations in particular and markedly reduced the ability to learn skilled motor tasks as adults. These results identify a novel and essential role for cholinergic systems in the late refinement and maturation of cortical circuits. Dysfunctions in this system may constitute a mechanism of late-onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome and schizophrenia. PMID:25505106

  14. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  15. Enhancing imagined contact to reduce prejudice against people with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    West, Keon; Holmes, Emily; Hewstone, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Four studies investigated the effect of imagining intergroup contact on prejudice against people with schizophrenia. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that a neutral imagined contact task can have negative effects, compared to a control condition, even when paired with incidental positive information (Experiment 2). Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated, however, that an integrated positive imagined contact scenario does result in less intergroup anxiety and more positive attitudes, even toward this challenging group. Analyses of participants’ descriptions of the imagined interactions in and across the first three studies confirm that positive and high quality imagined contact is important for reducing prejudice, but failing to ensure that imagined contact is positive may have deleterious consequences. We emphasize the importance of investigating the quality of the imagined contact experience, and discuss the implications for using imagined contact as a prejudice-reducing intervention. PMID:26435686

  16. How Distinctive Processing Enhances Hits and Reduces False Alarms

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive processing is a concept designed to account for precision in memory, both correct responses and avoidance of errors. The principal question addressed in two experiments is how distinctive processing of studied material reduces false alarms to familiar distractors. Jacoby (Jacoby, Kelley, & McElree, 1999) has used the metaphors early selection and late correction to describe two different types of control processes. Early selection refers to limitations on access whereas late correction describes controlled monitoring of accessed information. The two types of processes are not mutually exclusive, and previous research has provided evidence for the operation of both. The data reported here extend previous work to a criterial recollection paradigm and to a recognition memory test. The results of both experiments show that variables that reduce false memory for highly familiar distracters continue to exert their effect under conditions of minimal post-access monitoring. Level of monitoring was reduced in the first experiment through test instructions and in the second experiment through speeded test responding. The results were consistent with the conclusion that both early selection and late correction operate to control accuracy in memory. PMID:26034343

  17. Bacopa monnieri ameliorates memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice: possible involvement of glutamatergic and cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Le, Xoan Thi; Pham, Hang Thi Nguyet; Do, Phuong Thi; Fujiwara, Hironori; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Van Nguyen, Tai; Nguyen, Khoi Minh; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (BM) on cognitive deficits using olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice and the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. OBX mice were treated daily with BM (50 mg/kg, p.o.) or a reference drug, tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 week before and continuously 3 days after OBX. Cognitive performance of the animals was analyzed by the novel object recognition test, modified Y maze test, and fear conditioning test. Brain tissues of OBX animals were used for neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies. OBX impaired non-spatial short-term memory, spatial working memory, and long-term fair memory. BM administration ameliorated these memory disturbances. The effect of BM on short-term memory deficits was abolished by a muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine. OBX downregulated phosphorylation of synaptic plasticity-related signaling proteins: NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and calmodulin-dependent kinase II but not cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the hippocampus. OBX also reduced choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus and cholinergic neurons in the medial septum, and enlarged the size of lateral ventricle. BM administration reversed these OBX-induced neurochemical and histological alterations, except the decrease of GluR1 phosphorylation, and enhanced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, BM treatment inhibited ex vivo activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain. These results indicate that BM treatment ameliorates OBX-induced cognition dysfunction via a mechanism involving enhancement of synaptic plasticity-related signaling and BDNF transcription and protection of cholinergic systems from OBX-induced neuronal damage.

  18. Nerve growth factor promotes survival of septal cholinergic neurons after fimbrial transections.

    PubMed

    Hefti, F

    1986-08-01

    Several findings obtained in recent years suggest that NGF, aside from its well-established function as a neurotrophic factor for peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons, also has trophic influence on the cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain. The present study assessed whether NGF was able to affect survival of central cholinergic neurons after axonal transections in adult rats. The septo-hippocampal pathway was transected unilaterally by cutting the fimbria, and animals were implanted with a cannula through which NGF or control solutions were injected intraventricularly over 4 weeks. The lesions reduced the number of large cell bodies, as visualized by Nissl staining in the medial septal nucleus and in the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca. Furthermore, in the same nuclei, they reduced the number of cell bodies positively stained for AChE after pretreatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (a method known to result in reliable identification of cholinergic neurons in the septal area). On lesioned sides, the number of cholinergic cells in medial septal nucleus and the vertical limb of the diagonal band was reduced by 50 +/- 4%, as compared to the number on contralateral sides. On lesioned sides of animals chronically treated with NGF, the number of AChE-positive cells in these areas was reduced only by 12 +/- 6%, as compared to control levels. These findings suggest that fimbrial transections resulted in retrograde degeneration of cholinergic septo-hippocampal neurons and that NGF treatment strongly attenuated this lesion-induced degeneration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  20. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  1. Cholinergic connectivity: it's implications for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scarr, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew S.; Neo, Jaclyn; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine has been implicated in both the pathophysiology and treatment of a number of psychiatric disorders, with most of the data related to its role and therapeutic potential focusing on schizophrenia. However, there is little thought given to the consequences of the documented changes in the cholinergic system and how they may affect the functioning of the brain. This review looks at the cholinergic system and its interactions with the intrinsic neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid as well as those with the projection neurotransmitters most implicated in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders; dopamine and serotonin. In addition, with the recent focus on the role of factors normally associated with inflammation in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, links between the cholinergic system and these factors will also be examined. These interfaces are put into context, primarily for schizophrenia, by looking at the changes in each of these systems in the disorder and exploring, theoretically, whether the changes are interconnected with those seen in the cholinergic system. Thus, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the connectivity between the cholinergic system and some of the major areas of research into the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, resulting in a critical appraisal of the potential outcomes of a dysregulated central cholinergic system. PMID:23653591

  2. Chotosan, a kampo formula, ameliorates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced deficits in object recognition behaviors and central cholinergic systems in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Murakami, Yukihisa; Tohda, Michihisa; Obi, Ryosuke; Shimada, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2007-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that the Kampo formula chotosan (CTS) ameliorated spatial cognitive impairment via central cholinergic systems in a chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (P2VO) mouse model. In this study, the object discrimination tasks were used to determine if the ameliorative effects of CTS on P2VO-induced cognitive deficits are a characteristic pharmacological profile of this formula, with the aim of clarifying the mechanisms by which CTS enhances central cholinergic function in P2VO mice. The cholinesterase inhibitor tacrine (THA) and Kampo formula saikokeishito (SKT) were used as controls. P2VO impaired object discrimination performance in the object recognition, location, and context tests. Daily administration of CTS (750 mg/kg, p.o.) and THA (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) improved the object discrimination deficits, whereas SKT (750 mg/kg, p.o.) did not. In ex vivo assays, tacrine but not CTS or SKT inhibited cortical cholinesterase activity. P2VO reduced the mRNA expression of m(3) and m(5) muscarinic receptors and choline acetyltransferase but not that of other muscarinic receptor subtypes in the cerebral cortex. Daily administration of CTS and THA but not SKT reversed these expression changes. These results suggest that CTS and THA improve P2VO-induced cognitive impairment by normalizing the deficit of central cholinergic systems and that the beneficial effect on P2VO-induced cognitive deficits is a distinctive pharmacological characteristic of CTS.

  3. Dissociation in control of physiological and behavioral responses to emotional stress by cholinergic neurotransmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Marianna K; Miguel, Tarciso T; Busnardo, Cristiane; Scopinho, América A; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo L; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-02-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a forebrain structure implicated in physiological and behavioral responses to emotional stress. However, the local neurochemical mechanisms mediating the BNST control of stress responses are not fully known. Here, we investigated the involvement of BNST cholinergic neurotransmission, acting via muscarinic receptors, in cardiovascular (increase in blood pressure and heart rate and fall in tail skin temperature) and neuroendocrine (increase in plasma corticosterone) responses and behavioral consequences (anxiogenic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze) evoked by acute restraint stress in rats. Bilateral microinjection into the BNST of either the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (3 nmol/100 nl) or the muscarinic receptor antagonist methylatropine (3 nmol/100 nl) enhanced the heart rate increase and inhibited the anxiogenic-like effect observed in the elevated plus-maze evoked by restraint. However, neither hemicholinium-3 nor methylatropine affected the increase in blood pressure and plasma corticosterone levels and the fall in tail skin temperature. Facilitation of local cholinergic signaling by microinjection of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (0.1 nmol/100 nl) into the BNST reduced restraint-evoked pressor and tachycardiac responses and the fall in tail cutaneous temperature, without affecting the increase in plasma corticosterone. All effects of neostigmine were completely abolished by local BNST pretreatment with methylatropine. These findings indicate an opposite role of BNST cholinergic neurotransmission, acting via local muscarinic receptor, in control of cardiovascular responses (inhibitory influence) and emotional consequences (facilitatory influence) evoked by restraint stress. Furthermore, present findings provide evidence that BNST control of neuroendocrine responses to stress is mediated by mechanisms others than local cholinergic signaling.

  4. Cholinergic modulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels regulates synaptic strength and spine calcium in cartwheel cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S; Brenowitz, Stephan D

    2014-04-09

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs.

  5. Cholinergic Modulation of Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Regulates Synaptic Strength and Spine Calcium in Cartwheel Cells of the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs. PMID:24719104

  6. Internal Cholinergic Regulation of Learning and Recall in a Model of Olfactory Processing

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Dean, Owen; Devore, Sasha; Smith, David M.; Linster, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory system, cholinergic modulation has been associated with contrast modulation and changes in receptive fields in the olfactory bulb, as well the learning of odor associations in olfactory cortex. Computational modeling and behavioral studies suggest that cholinergic modulation could improve sensory processing and learning while preventing pro-active interference when task demands are high. However, how sensory inputs and/or learning regulate incoming modulation has not yet been elucidated. We here use a computational model of the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex (PC) and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) to explore how olfactory learning could regulate cholinergic inputs to the system in a closed feedback loop. In our model, the novelty of an odor is reflected in firing rates and sparseness of cortical neurons in response to that odor and these firing rates can directly regulate learning in the system by modifying cholinergic inputs to the system. In the model, cholinergic neurons reduce their firing in response to familiar odors—reducing plasticity in the PC, but increase their firing in response to novel odor—increasing PC plasticity. Recordings from HDB neurons in awake behaving rats reflect predictions from the model by showing that a subset of neurons decrease their firing as an odor becomes familiar. PMID:27877112

  7. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine tegmental neurons projecting to the subthalamic nucleus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Takako; Kita, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the mesopontine tegmentum. This study investigated the numbers and distributions of neurons involved in these projections in rats using Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tracing combined with immunostaining of choline acetyltransferase and a neuron-specific nuclear protein. The results suggest that a small population of cholinergic neurons mainly in the caudoventral part of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN), approximately 360 neurons (≈10% of total) in the homolateral and 80 neurons (≈2%) in the contralateral PPN, projects to the STN. In contrast, the number of non-cholinergic neurons projecting to the STN was estimated to be 9 times as much, with approximately 3300 in the homolateral side and 1300 neurons in the contralateral side. A large gathering of the FG-labeled non-cholinergic neurons was found rostrodorsomedial to the caudolateral PPN. The biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) anterograde tracing method was used to substantiate the mesopontine-STN projections. Injection of BDA into the caudoventral PPN labeled numerous thin fibers with small en-passant varicosities in the STN. Injection of BDA into the non-cholinergic neuron-rich area labeled a moderate number of thicker fibers with patches of aggregates of larger boutons. The densities of labeled fibers and the number of retrogradely labeled cells in the mesopontine tegmentum suggested that the terminal field formed in the STN by each cholinergic neuron is more extensive than that by each non-cholinergic neuron. The findings suggest that cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine afferents may carry different information to the STN. PMID:21198985

  8. Caffeine elicits c-Fos expression in horizontal diagonal band cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Fadel, Jim R

    2009-12-09

    Caffeine is a widely self-administered psychostimulant with purported neuroprotective and procognitive effects in rodent models of aging. The cholinergic basal forebrain is important for arousal and attention and is implicated in age-related cognitive decline. Accordingly, we determined the effects of caffeine on cholinergic neuron activation in the rat basal forebrain. Young adult (age 2 months) male rats were treated with caffeine (0, 10, or 50 mg/kg) and killed 2 h later. Caffeine significantly increased c-Fos expression in cholinergic neurons of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca but not other basal forebrain regions such as the medial septum or substantia innominata. The horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca provides cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb, suggesting that deficits in this structure may contribute to diminished olfactory function observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. These results suggest that part of the cognitive-enhancing effects of caffeine may be mediated through activation of this part of the cholinergic basal forebrain.

  9. Endogenous cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generator is not required for REM sleep to occur.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Vanstone, Lindsay E; Horner, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the pontine subceruleus (SubC) by cholinergic inputs. Although the capacity of cholinergic neurotransmission to contribute to REM sleep generation has been established, the role of cholinergic inputs in the generation of REM sleep is ultimately undetermined as the critical test of this hypothesis (local blockade of SubC acetylcholine receptors) has not been rigorously performed. We used bilateral microdialysis in freely behaving rats (n = 32), instrumented for electroencephalographic and electromyographic recording, to locally manipulate neurotransmission in the SubC with select drugs. As predicted, combined microperfusion of D-AP5 (glutamate receptor antagonist) and muscimol (GABAA receptor agonist) in the SubC virtually eliminated REM sleep. However, REM sleep was not reduced by scopolamine microperfusion in this same region, at a concentration capable of blocking the effects of cholinergic receptor stimulation. This result suggests that transmission of REM sleep drive to the SubC is acetylcholine-independent. Although SubC cholinergic inputs are not majorly involved in REM sleep generation, they may perform a minor function in the reinforcement of transitions into REM sleep, as evidenced by increases in non-REM-to-REM sleep transition duration and failure rate during cholinergic receptor blockade. Cholinergic receptor antagonism also attenuated the normal increase in hippocampal θ oscillations that characterize REM sleep. Using computational modeling, we show that our in vivo results are consistent with a mutually excitatory interaction between the SubC and cholinergic neurons where, importantly, cholinergic neuron activation is gated by SubC activity.

  10. Enhanced photothermal effect of plasmonic nanoparticles coated with reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong-Kwon; Barhoumi, Aoune; Wylie, Ryan G; Reznor, Gally; Langer, Robert S; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-09-11

    We report plasmonic gold nanoshells and nanorods coated with reduced graphene oxide that produce an enhanced photothermal effect when stimulated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Electrostatic interactions between nanosized graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles followed by in situ chemical reduction generated reduced graphene oxide-coated nanoparticles; the coating was demonstrated using Raman and HR-TEM. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles showed enhanced photothermal effect compared to noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles killed cells more rapidly than did noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles.

  11. Features of cholinergic cardia regulation under conditions of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, Y. A.; Bondarenko, Y. I.; Bolyarskaya, V. A.; Fayfura, V. V.; Rosolovskiy, A. P.; Babinskaya, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    The features of cholinergic processes in the heart on the 4th, 8th, 16th and 30th days of hypokinesia were studied in experiments on 382 albino rats. It was shown that hypokinesia is attended by increased acetylcholine content in the atria, reduced choline acetyltransferase activity in the atria and ventricles and by increased activity of acetylcholinesterase in the ventricles and of pseudocholinesterase in both parts of the heart. The sensitivity of the heart to exogenic acetylcholine and to stimulation of the vagus nerve increases.

  12. TrkA Gene Ablation in Basal Forebrain Results in Dysfunction of the Cholinergic Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Yui, Daishi; Song, Dongli; Li, Yun; Rubenstein, John L.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Parada, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) is an early pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies have indicated that nerve growth factor (NGF) supports survival and phenotypic differentiation of BFCNs. Consistent with a potential link to AD pathogenesis, TrkA, a NGF receptor, is expressed in cholinergic forebrain neuronal populations including those in basal forebrain (BF) and striatum, and is markedly reduced in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) without dementia and early-stage AD. To investigate the role of TrkA in the development, connectivity, and function of the BF cholinergic system and its contribution to AD pathology, we have generated a forebrain-specific conditional TrkA knockout mouse line. Our findings show a key role for TrkA signaling in establishing the BF cholinergic circuitry through the ERK pathway, and demonstrate that the normal developmental increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression becomes critically dependent on TrkA signaling before neuronal connections are established. Moreover, the anatomical and physiological deficits caused by lack of TrkA signaling in BFCNs have selective impact on cognitive activity. These data demonstrate that TrkA loss results in cholinergic BF dysfunction and cognitive decline that is reminiscent of MCI and early AD. PMID:22442072

  13. Cholinergic Potentiation Improves Perceptual-Cognitive Training of Healthy Young Adults in Three Dimensional Multiple Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun, Mira; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Legault, Isabelle; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Dumbrava, Daniela; Faubert, Jocelyn; Vaucher, Elvire

    2017-01-01

    A large body of literature supports cognitive enhancement as an effect of cholinergic potentiation. However, it remains elusive whether pharmacological manipulations of cholinergic neurotransmission enhance complex visual processing in healthy individuals. To test this hypothesis, we randomly administered either the cholinergic transmission enhancer donepezil (DPZ; 5 mg P.O.) or placebo (lactose) to young adults (n = 17) 3 h before each session of the three-dimensional (3D) multiple object tracking (3D-MOT) task. This multi-focal attention task evaluates perceptual-cognitive learning over five sessions conducted 7 days apart. A significant amount of learning was observed in the DPZ group but not the placebo group in the fourth session. In the fifth session, this learning effect was observed in both groups. Furthermore, preliminary results for a subgroup of participants (n = 9) 4–14 months later suggested the cholinergic enhancement effect was long lasting. On the other hand, DPZ had no effect on basic visual processing as measured by a motion and orientation discrimination task performed as an independent one-time, pre-post drug study without placebo control (n = 10). The results support the construct that cholinergic enhancement facilitates the encoding of a highly demanding perceptual-cognitive task although there were no significant drug effects on the performance levels compared to placebo. PMID:28377707

  14. Cholinergic Potentiation Improves Perceptual-Cognitive Training of Healthy Young Adults in Three Dimensional Multiple Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Mira; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Legault, Isabelle; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Dumbrava, Daniela; Faubert, Jocelyn; Vaucher, Elvire

    2017-01-01

    A large body of literature supports cognitive enhancement as an effect of cholinergic potentiation. However, it remains elusive whether pharmacological manipulations of cholinergic neurotransmission enhance complex visual processing in healthy individuals. To test this hypothesis, we randomly administered either the cholinergic transmission enhancer donepezil (DPZ; 5 mg P.O.) or placebo (lactose) to young adults (n = 17) 3 h before each session of the three-dimensional (3D) multiple object tracking (3D-MOT) task. This multi-focal attention task evaluates perceptual-cognitive learning over five sessions conducted 7 days apart. A significant amount of learning was observed in the DPZ group but not the placebo group in the fourth session. In the fifth session, this learning effect was observed in both groups. Furthermore, preliminary results for a subgroup of participants (n = 9) 4-14 months later suggested the cholinergic enhancement effect was long lasting. On the other hand, DPZ had no effect on basic visual processing as measured by a motion and orientation discrimination task performed as an independent one-time, pre-post drug study without placebo control (n = 10). The results support the construct that cholinergic enhancement facilitates the encoding of a highly demanding perceptual-cognitive task although there were no significant drug effects on the performance levels compared to placebo.

  15. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  16. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Memory.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M

    2017-02-18

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons constitute a way station for many ascending and descending pathways. These cholinergic neurons have a role in eliciting cortical activation and arousal. It is well established that they are mainly involved in cognitive processes requiring increased levels of arousal, attentive states and/or cortical activation with desynchronized activity in the EEG. These cholinergic neurons are modulated by several afferents of different neurotransmitter systems. Of particular importance within the cortical targets of basal forebrain neurons is the hippocampal cortex. The septohippocampal pathway is a bidirectional pathway constituting the main septal efferent system, which is widely known to be implicated in every memory process investigated. The present work aims to review the main neurotransmitter systems involved in modulating cognitive processes related to learning and memory through modulation of basal forebrain neurons.

  17. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of THINs in vitro. We found that the dominant effect of dopamine was a dramatic enhancement of the ability of THINs to generate long-lasting depolarizing plateau potentials (PPs). Interestingly, the same effect could also be elicited by amphetamine-induced release of endogenous dopamine suggesting that THINs may exhibit similar responses to changes in extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. The enhancement of PPs in THINs is perhaps the most pronounced effect of dopamine on the intrinsic excitability of neostriatal neurons described to date. Further, we demonstrate that all subtypes of THINSs tested also express nicotinic cholinergic receptors. All THIS responded, albeit differentially, with depolarization, PPs and spiking to brief application of nicotinic agonists. Powerful modulation of the nonlinear integrative properties of THINs by dopamine and the direct depolarization of these neurons by acetylcholine may play important roles in mediating the effects of these neuromodulators in the neostriatum with potentially important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:25908399

  18. Cholinergic antagonists in a solitary wasp venom.

    PubMed

    Piek, T; Mantel, P

    1986-01-01

    The venom of the solitary wasp Philanthus triangulum contains a cholinergic antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog, Xenopus laevis. The venom of African P. triangulum contains two different cholinergic factors, a competitive and a non-competitive antagonist. The venom of the European P. triangulum may not contain a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of X. laevis, but only a very strong non-competitive antagonist. The possible non-synonymity of both groups of P. triangulum is discussed.

  19. Both pre- and post-synaptic alterations contribute to aberrant cholinergic transmission in superior cervical ganglia of APP(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhao-Lin; Zhang, Jia-Jia; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jin-Zhao; Xiao, Peng; Yang, Li; Long, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Though amyloid precursor protein (APP) can potentially be cleaved to generate the pathological amyloid β peptide (Aβ), APP itself plays an important role in regulating neuronal activity. APP deficiency causes functional impairment in cholinergic synaptic transmission and cognitive performance. However, the mechanisms underlying altered cholinergic synaptic transmission in APP knock-out mice (APP(-/-)) are poorly understood. In this study, we conducted in vivo extracellular recording to investigate cholinergic compound action potentials (CAPs) of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in APP(-/-) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice. Our results demonstrate that APP not only regulates presynaptic activity, but also affects postsynaptic function at cholinergic synapses in SCG. APP deficiency reduces the number of vesicles in presynaptic terminalsand attenuatesthe amplitude of CAPs, likely due to dysfunction of high-affinity choline transporters. Pharmacological and biochemical examination showed that postsynaptic responsesmediated by α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are reduced in the absence of APP. Our research provides evidences on how APP regulates cholinergic function and therefore may help to identify potential therapeutic targets to treat cholinergic dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  20. Alterations in Cholinergic Pathways and Therapeutic Strategies Targeting Cholinergic System after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in varying degrees of disability in a significant number of persons annually. The mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction after TBI have been explored in both animal models and human clinical studies for decades. Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic dysfunction has been described in many previous reports. In addition, cholinergic dysfunction has also been a familiar topic among TBI researchers for many years. Although pharmacological agents that modulate cholinergic neurotransmission have been used with varying degrees of success in previous studies, improving their function and maximizing cognitive recovery is an ongoing process. In this article, we review the previous findings on the biological mechanism of cholinergic dysfunction after TBI. In addition, we describe studies that use both older agents and newly developed agents as candidates for targeting cholinergic neurotransmission in future studies. PMID:25646580

  1. Cholinergic suppression of excitatory synaptic transmission in layers II/III of the parasubiculum.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, S D; Glovaci, I; Karpowicz, L S; Chapman, C A

    2012-01-10

    Layer II of the parasubiculum (PaS) receives excitatory synaptic input from the CA1 region of the hippocampus and sends a major output to layer II of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex. The PaS also receives heavy cholinergic innervation from the medial septum, which contributes to the generation of theta-frequency (4-12 Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Cholinergic receptor activation exerts a wide range of effects in other areas of the hippocampal formation, including membrane depolarization, changes in neuronal excitability, and suppression of excitatory synaptic responses. The present study was aimed at determining how cholinergic receptor activation modulates excitatory synaptic input to the layer II/III neurons of the PaS in acute brain slices. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in layer II/III of the PaS were evoked by stimulation of either layer I afferents, or ascending inputs from layer V. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (0.5-10 μM) suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs evoked by both superficial- and deep layer stimulation, and also enhanced paired-pulse facilitation. Constant bath-application of the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (10 μM) failed to eliminate the suppression, indicating that the cholinergic suppression of fEPSPs is not due to increased inhibitory tone. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (1 μM) blocked the suppression of fEPSPs, and the selective M(1)-preferring receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 μM), but not the M(2)-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1-5 μM), also significantly attenuated the suppression. Therefore, cholinergic receptor activation suppresses excitatory synaptic input to layer II/III neurons of the PaS, and this suppression is mediated in part by M(1) receptor activation.

  2. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  3. Tailoring partially reduced graphene oxide as redox mediator for enhanced biotransformation of iopromide under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Toral-Sánchez, Eduardo; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Ascacio Valdés, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristóbal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-10-22

    This work reports the first successful application of graphene oxide (GO) and partially reduced GO (rGO) as redox mediator (RM) to increase the biotransformation of the recalcitrant iodinated contrast medium, iopromide (IOP). Results showed that GO-based materials promoted up to 5.5 and 2.8-fold faster biotransformation of IOP by anaerobic sludge under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, respectively. Correlation between the extent of reduction of GO and its redox-mediating capacity was demonstrated, which was reflected in faster removal and greater extent of biotransformation of IOP. Further analysis indicated that the biotransformation pathway of IOP involved multiple reactions including deiodination, decarboxylation, demethylation, dehydration and N-dealkylation. GO-based materials could be strategically tailored and integrated in biological treatment systems to effectively enhance the redox conversion of recalcitrant pollutants commonly found in wastewater treatment systems and industrial effluents.

  4. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  5. Targeting the Cholinergic System to Develop a Novel Therapy for Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gary X; Waldvogel, Henry J

    2016-12-15

    In this review, we outline the role of the cholinergic system in Huntington's disease, and briefly describe the dysfunction of cholinergic transmission, cholinergic neurons, cholinergic receptors and cholinergic survival factors observed in post-mortem human brains and animal models of Huntington's disease. We postulate how the dysfunctional cholinergic system can be targeted to develop novel therapies for Huntington's disease, and discuss the beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  6. Targeting the Cholinergic System to Develop a Novel Therapy for Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Gary X.; Waldvogel, Henry J.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we outline the role of the cholinergic system in Huntington’s disease, and briefly describe the dysfunction of cholinergic transmission, cholinergic neurons, cholinergic receptors and cholinergic survival factors observed in post-mortem human brains and animal models of Huntington’s disease. We postulate how the dysfunctional cholinergic system can be targeted to develop novel therapies for Huntington’s disease, and discuss the beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27983560

  7. Cholinergic transmission underlies modulation of frustration by open field exposure.

    PubMed

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba; Justel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Frustration can be defined as an emotional state generated by the omission or devaluation in the quantity or quality of an expected appetitive reward. Thus, reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with the different reinforcer values of that reward. This phenomenon is known as incentive relativity, and can be studied by different paradigms. Although methodologically simple, the exploration of a novel open field (OF) is a complex situation that involves several behavioral processes, including stress induction and novelty detection. OF exposure can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. These experiments evaluated the effect of OF exploration on frustration and the role played by the cholinergic system in this phenomenon. OF exploration before first or second trial of incentive downshift modulated the expression of frustration. This effect of OF was blocked by the administration of scopolamine either before or after OF exploration. These results indicate that the cholinergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of OF information.

  8. Establishment of cholinergic neuron-like cell lines with differential vulnerability to nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Personett, David A; Williams, Katrina; Baskerville, Karen A; McKinney, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Cholinergic cell lines were established by fusion of embryonic day 17 wild-type neurons from rat basal forebrain (BF) and upper brainstem (BS) with N18tg neuroblastoma cells. Isolated clones expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activities that were increased upon differentiation with retinoic acid. Clones from the BF expressed high levels of the tyrosine kinase type A (TrkA) receptor expression and activation of the mitogen-activated kinase ERK2 upon treatment with nerve growth factor. Like wild-type cholinergic populations, the six clones studied were variably resistant to nitric oxide (NO) excess from addition of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP). Of these, the BS2 clone exhibited resistance like in vivo BS cholinergic neurons, while the MS10 clone mimicked in vivo BF vulnerability. Apoptosis in response to NO excess was preceded by increases in mitochondrial responses bax/bcl-2 ratios, but cytochrome C was not released. Mitochondrial levels of apoptosis initiating factor (AIF) were either unchanged or increased, and only in MS clones was endonuclease G (EndoG) released. Microarray data indicated the existence of endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and caspase-4 and caspase-12 were involved in the pathway to DNA fragmentation. The array data also indicated a survival role for mdm2, and its blockade rendered vulnerable the brainstem survivor clone BS2. Akt and ERK1/2 pathways were activated in response to NO and their blockade increased DNA fragmentation. Blockade of GSK-3 alpha/beta, a downstream target of Akt, reduced SNAP toxicity and this was more prominent in basal forebrain clones. We have identified two cholinergic cell lines useful for molecular studies of cholinergic vulnerability. We hypothesize that, in cholinergic neurons, control of ER stress signaling may be a major factor in differential vulnerability.

  9. Cholinergic dysfunction and amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Bergmann, Jürgen; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Kronbichler, Martin; Kraus, Jörg; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    The specific neurochemical substrate underlying the amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still poorly defined. Memory impairment has been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the cholinergic system. A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), may give direct information about the function of some cholinergic pathways in the human motor cortex. In the present study, we measured SAI in eight alcoholics with WKS and compared the data with those from a group of age-matched healthy individuals; furthermore, we correlated the individual SAI values of the WKS patients with memory and other cognitive functions. Mean SAI was significantly reduced in WKS patients when compared with the controls. SAI was increased after administration of a single dose of donezepil in a subgroup of four patients. The low score obtained in the Rey Complex Figure delayed recall test, the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Corsi's Block Span subtest of the WAIS-R documented a severe impairment in the anterograde memory and short-term memory. None of the correlations between SAI values and these neuropsychological tests reached significance. We provide physiological evidence of cholinergic involvement in WKS. However, this putative marker of central cholinergic activity did not significantly correlate with the memory deficit in our patients. These findings suggest that the cholinergic dysfunction does not account for the memory disorder and that damage to the cholinergic system is not sufficient to cause a persisting amnesic syndrome in WKS.

  10. Photoluminescence intensity enhancement in SWNT aqueous suspensions due to reducing agent doping: Influence of adsorbed biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Lytvyn, O. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of biopolymer wrapped around nanotube on the enhancement of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence (PL) in aqueous suspension which increases due to the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) doping effect was revealed. The greatest enhancement of PL was observed for SWNTs covered with double- or single stranded DNA (above 170%) and DTT weak influence was revealed for SWNTs:polyC suspension (∼45%). The magnitude of the PL enhancement depends also on nanotube chirality and sample aging. The behavior of PL from SWNTs covered with various polymers is explained by the different biopolymers ordering on the nanotube surface. The ordered polymer conformation on the nanotube weakens the reducing agent doping effect. The method of reducing agent doping of nanotube:biopolymer aqueous suspension can serve as a sensitive luminescent probe of the biopolymer ordering on the carbon nanotube and can be used to increase the sensitivity of luminescent biosensors.

  11. The LIM-homeobox gene Lhx8 is required for the development of many cholinergic neurons in the mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yangu; Marín, Oscar; Hermesz, Edit; Powell, Aaron; Flames, Nuria; Palkovits, Miklós; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Westphal, Heiner

    2003-01-01

    Forebrain cholinergic neurons play important roles as striatal local circuit neurons and basal telencephalic projection neurons. The genetic mechanisms that control development of these neurons suggest that most of them are derived from the basal telencephalon where Lhx8, a LIM-homeobox gene, is expressed. Here we report that mice with a null mutation of Lhx8 are deficient in the development of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Lhx8 mutants lack the nucleus basalis, a major source of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. In addition, the number of cholinergic neurons is reduced in several other areas of the subcortical forebrain in Lhx8 mutants, including the caudate-putamen, medial septal nucleus, nucleus of the diagonal band, and magnocellular preoptic nucleus. Although cholinergic neurons are not formed, initial steps in their specification appear to be preserved, as indicated by a presence of cells expressing a truncated Lhx8 mRNA and mRNA of the homeobox gene Gbx1. These results provide genetic evidence supporting an important role for Lhx8 in development of cholinergic neurons in the forebrain. PMID:12855770

  12. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Sensory information processing in the olfactory bulb (OB) relies on diverse populations of bulbar interneurons. In rodents, the accessory OB (AOB) is divided into two bulbar regions, the anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB), which differ substantially in their circuitry connections and associated behaviors. We previously identified and characterized a large number of morphologically diverse cholinergic interneurons in the main OB (MOB) using transgenic mice to visualize the cell bodies of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons and immunolabeling (Krosnowski et al., 2012)). However, whether there are cholinergic neurons in the AOB is controversial and there is no detailed characterization of such neurons. Using the same line of ChAT(bacterial artificial chromosome, BAC)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice, we investigated cholinergic neurons in the AOB. We found significant differences in the number and location of GFP-expressing (GFP+), putative cholinergic interneurons between the aAOB and pAOB. The highest numbers of GFP+ interneurons were found in the aAOB glomerular layer (aGL) and pAOB mitral/tufted cell layer (pMCL). We also noted a high density of GFP+ interneurons encircling the border region of the pMCL. Interestingly, a small subset of glomeruli in the middle of the GL receives strong MCL GFP+ nerve processes. These local putative cholinergic-innervated glomeruli are situated just outside the aGL, setting the boundary between the pGL and aGL. Many but not all GFP+ neurons in the AOB were weakly labeled with antibodies against ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). We further determined if these GFP+ interneurons differ from other previously characterized interneuron populations in the AOB and found that AOB GFP+ interneurons express neither GABAergic nor dopaminergic markers and most also do not express the glutamatergic marker. Similar to the cholinergic interneurons of the MOB, some AOB GFP+ interneurons

  13. Spectroscopic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Gu, Huaimin; Shen, Gaoshan; Dong, Xiao; Kang, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids system under different aqueous solution environment has been studied in this paper. The relative intensity of SERS of caffeine significantly varies with different concentrations of sodium chloride and silver particles. However, at too high or too low concentration of sodium chloride and silver particle, the enhancement of SERS spectra is not evident. The SERS spectra of caffeine suggest that the contribution of the charge transfer mechanism to SERS may be dominant. The chloride ions can significantly enhance the efficiency of SERS, while the enhancement is selective, as the efficiency in charge transfer enhancement is higher than in electromagnetic enhancement. Therefore, it can be concluded that the active site of chloride ion locates on the bond between the caffeine and the silver surface. In addition, the SERS spectra of caffeine on borohydride-reduced and citrate-reduced silver colloids are different, which may be due to different states caffeine adsorbed on silver surface under different silver colloids.

  14. Defect-induced enhanced photocatalytic activities of reduced α-Fe2O3 nanoblades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Honglei; Wang, Yiqian; Wang, Chao; Diao, Feiyu; Zhu, Wenhui; Mu, Peng; Yuan, Lu; Zhou, Guangwen; Rosei, Federico

    2016-07-01

    Bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 nanoblades (NBs) synthesized by thermal oxidation of iron foils were reduced in vacuum, to study the effect of reduction treatment on microstructural changes and photocatalytic properties. After the vacuum reduction, most bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 NBs transform into single-layered NBs, which contain more defects such as oxygen vacancies, perfect dislocations and dense pores. By comparing the photodegradation capability of non-reduced and reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs over model dye rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we find that vacuum-reduction induced microstructural defects can significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. Even after 10 cycles, the reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs still show a very high photocatalytic activity. Our results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the photocatalytic performance of nanomaterials.

  15. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Albin, Roger L; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinson's disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinson's disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 ± 7.4 years old; 6.0 ± 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 ± 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 ± 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and (11)C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 1-3 and 5, respectively. Regression

  16. The interface between cholinergic pathways and the immune system and its relevance to arthritis.

    PubMed

    McAllen, Robin M; Cook, Andrew D; Khiew, Hsu Wei; Martelli, Davide; Hamilton, John A

    2015-03-31

    The nervous and immune systems are likely to be interacting in arthritis, with the possible involvement of both neural and non-neural cholinergic transmission. Centrally acting muscarinic agonists, electrical stimulation of the vagus and treatment with nicotinic receptor agonists can all act systemically to reduce inflammation, although the responsible pathways are incompletely understood. While this 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway' is widely viewed as a significant pathophysiological mechanism controlling inflammation, the evidence supporting this view is critically reviewed and considered inconclusive; an alternative pathway via sympathetic nerves is implicated. This review also discusses how cholinergic pathways, both neural and non-neural, may impact on inflammation and specifically arthritis. Nicotinic agonists have been reported to reduce the incidence and severity of murine arthritis, albeit an observation we could not confirm, and clinical studies in rheumatoid arthritis have been proposed and/or are underway. While the therapeutic potential of nicotinic agonists and vagal stimulation is clear, we suggest that the 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway' should not be uncritically embraced as a significant factor in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Clinical Markers for Identifying Cholinergic Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martijn L.T.M.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Kotagal, Vikas; Scott, Peter J.H.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Frey, Kirk A.; Albin, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholinergic projection systems degeneration is associated with dopamine non-responsive features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Cholinergic deficits are variable in non-demented PD. Identification of cholinergic deficits in PD may help with selection of suitable patients for targeted cholinergic drug treatment in PD. The objective of this retrospective multivariate predictor analysis study was to identify clinical markers indicative of cholinergic deficits in PD patients, as assessed by acetylcholinesterase ([11C]PMP) positron emission tomography. Methods One hundred thirty-seven PD patients (34 female) participated; median modified Hoehn and Yahr score was 2.5 (range 1–4), average age of 65.6 ± 7.4 years, and average duration of motor disease symptoms of 6.0 ± 4.2 years. Subjects were dichotomized as “normocholinergic” or “hypocholinergic” based on a 5th percentile cutoff from normal for the basal forebrain-cortical and pedunculopontine nucleus-thalamic cholinergic projection systems. Previously identified clinical indices of cholinergic denervation were used for statistical prediction of cholinergic deficits. Logistic regression determined which risk factors predicted cholinergic deficits. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined for the (combinations of) significant predictor variables. Results There were 49 (35.8%) hypocholinergic PD subjects. The combination of RBD symptoms and fall history showed highest diagnostic accuracy (81.1%) for predicting combined thalamic and cortical cholinergic deficits. A combined assessment of 8.5 meter walk time and lower score on the Montreal cognitive assessment scale provided diagnostic accuracy of 80.7 % for predicting isolated cortical cholinergic denervation. Conclusion Assessment of clinical indices of cholinergic denervation may be useful for identifying suitable subjects for trials of targeted cholinergic drug treatments in PD. PMID:25393613

  18. Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil enhances the non-specific immune system and prevents oxidative damage in Rhamdia quelen experimentally infected by Aeromonas hydrophila: Effects on cholinergic and purinergic systems in liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Júnior, Guerino B; de Vargas, Agueda C; Boligon, Aline A; de Campos, Marli M A; Stefani, Lenita M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of M. alternifolia essential oil used to treat silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) experimentally infected by Aeromonas hydrophila on oxidative stress variables, and for the first time, on hepatic enzymes of the cholinergic and adenosinergic systems. For that, fish were divided into six groups (A-F), each containing seven animals. Groups A, B and C were composed of uninfected animals, while animals in groups D, E and F were intramuscularly inoculated with A. hydrophila. Groups B and E received a prophylactic bath with M. alternifolia essential oil (50 μL/L, diluted in ethanol) for seven days, while groups C and F were exposed to ethanol. After the prophylactic baths, groups D, E and F were inoculated with 100 μL of A. hydrophila solution (2.1 × 10(9) colony-forming unit). Two days after inoculation, the animals were euthanized and liver samples were collected. Infected animals (the group D) showed increased TBARS and protein carbonylation levels, while CAT, AChE and ADA activities decreased compared to uninfected animals (the group A). The prophylactic treatment with M. alternifolia essential oil (the group E) prevented the alterations caused by A. hydrophila, but it did not change AChE activity. Thus, the prophylactic treatment prevents damage caused by lipids and proteins, as well as alterations of the adenosinergic system, demonstrating that the anti-inflammatory effect of TTO is mediated by the adenosinergic pathway. In addition, TTO prophylactic treatment might be considered an important approach to prevent the hepatic damage caused by A. hydrophila.

  19. Constitutive adipocyte mTORC1 activation enhances mitochondrial activity and reduces visceral adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Magdalon, Juliana; Chimin, Patricia; Belchior, Thiago; Neves, Rodrigo X; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Andrade, Maynara L; Farias, Talita S; Bolsoni-Lopes, Andressa; Paschoal, Vivian A; Yamashita, Alex S; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Festuccia, William T

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) loss of function reduces adiposity whereas partial mTORC1 inhibition enhances fat deposition. Herein we evaluated how constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes modulates adiposity in vivo. Mice with constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes induced by tuberous sclerosis complex (Tsc)1 deletion and littermate controls were evaluated for body mass, energy expenditure, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial function, mRNA and protein contents. Adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion reduced visceral, but not subcutaneous, fat mass, as well as adipocyte number and diameter, phenotypes that were associated with increased lipolysis, UCP-1 content (browning) and mRNA levels of pro-browning transcriptional factors C/EBPβ and ERRα. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion enhanced mitochondrial oxidative activity, fatty acid oxidation and the expression of PGC-1α and PPARα in both visceral and subcutaneous fat. In brown adipocytes, however, Tsc1 deletion did not affect UCP-1 content and basal respiration. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion also reduced visceral adiposity and enhanced glucose tolerance, liver and muscle insulin signaling and adiponectin secretion in mice fed with purified low- or high-fat diet. In conclusion, adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion enhances mitochondrial activity, induces browning and reduces visceral adiposity in mice.

  20. Deficits in Attentional Control: Cholinergic Mechanisms and Circuitry-Based Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Martin; Paolone, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    The cognitive control of attention involves maintaining task rules in working memory (or “online”), monitoring reward and error rates, filtering distractors, and suppressing prepotent and competitive responses. Weak attentional control increases distractibility and causes attentional lapses, impulsivity and attentional fatigue. Levels of tonic cholinergic activity (changes over tens of seconds or minutes) modulate cortical circuitry as a function of the demands on cognitive control. Increased cholinergic modulation enhances the representation of cues, by augmenting cue-evoked activity in thalamic glutamatergic afferents, thereby increasing the rate of detection. Such cholinergic modulation is mediated primarily via α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Animal experiments and clinical trials in adult patients with ADHD indicate that attentional symptoms and disorders may benefit from drugs that stimulate this receptor. Tonic cholinergic modulation of cue-evoked glutamatergic transients in prefrontal regions is an essential component of the brain’s executive circuitry. This circuitry model guides the development of treatments of deficits in attentional control. PMID:22122146

  1. Brain atrophy in primary progressive aphasia involves the cholinergic basal forebrain and Ayala’s nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Teipel, Stefan J.; Flatz, Wilhelm; Ackl, Nibal; Grothe, Michel; Kilimann, Ingo; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; Kljajevic, Vanja; Alho, Eduardo; Knels, Christina; Ebert, Anne; Heinsen, Helmut; Danek, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by left hemispheric frontotemporal cortical atrophy. Evidence from anatomical studies suggests that the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP), a subnucleus of the cholinergic basal forebrain, may be involved in the pathological process of PPA. Therefore, we studied the pattern of cortical and basal forebrain atrophy in 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PPA and 18 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We determined the cholinergic basal forebrain nuclei according to Mesulam’s nomenclature and the NSP in MRI reference space based on histological sections and the MRI scan of a post-mortem brain in cranio. Using voxel-based analysis, we found left hemispheric cortical atrophy in PPA patients compared with controls, including prefrontal, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobe areas. We detected cholinergic basal forebrain atrophy in left predominant localizations of Ch4p, Ch4am, Ch4al, Ch3 and NSP. For the first time, we have described the pattern of basal forebrain atrophy in PPA and confirmed the involvement of NSP that had been predicted based on theoretical considerations. Our findings may enhance understanding of the role of cholinergic degeneration for the regional specificity of the cortical destruction leading to the syndrome of PPA. PMID:24434193

  2. Enhanced natural attenuation of BTEX in the nitrate-reducing environment by different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Qu, Dan; Hou, Zhimin; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in groundwater is a potential remediation technology. This study focused on selecting appropriate electron acceptors to promote BTEX degradation in a nitrate-reducing environment. Nitrate-reducing soil was obtained from simulated BTEX-contaminated column. Enhancing experiments were conducted in the microcosm with nitrate-reducing material and simulated BTEX-polluted groundwater to investigate the promoting feasibility of adding dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, chelated Fe(III), and sulphate as electron acceptors. The concentrations of BTEX, electron acceptors, and their reducing products were measured. The order of promoting BTEX degradation with four electron acceptors was nitrate>sulphate>chelated Fe(III)>DO, and the first-order decay coefficients were 0.0432, 0.0333, 0.0240, and 0.0155, respectively. Nitrate, sulphate, and chelated Fe(III) enhanced attenuation. Nitrate was the most effective electron acceptor under nitrate-reducing conditions. Selecting proper electron acceptor is significant in promoting BTEX degradation according to the biogeochemical characteristics of local underground environment.

  3. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  4. Enhanced Hot-Carrier Luminescence in Multilayer Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Chunfeng; Xue, Fei; Zhou, Yong; Li, Wei; Wang, Ye; Tu, Wenguang; Zou, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2013-07-01

    We report a method to promote photoluminescence emission in graphene materials by enhancing carrier scattering instead of directly modifying band structure in multilayer reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanospheres. We intentionally curl graphene layers to form nanospheres by reducing graphene oxide with spherical polymer templates to manipulate the carrier scattering. These nanospheres produce hot-carrier luminescence with more than ten-fold improvement of emission efficiency as compared to planar nanosheets. With increasing excitation power, hot-carrier luminescence from nanospheres exhibits abnormal spectral redshift with dynamic feature associated to the strengthened electron-phonon coupling. These experimental results can be well understood by considering the screened Coulomb interactions. With increasing carrier density, the reduced screening effect promotes carrier scattering which enhances hot-carrier emission from such multilayer rGO nanospheres. This carrier-scattering scenario is further confirmed by pump-probe measurements.

  5. Cholinergic circuit control of postnatal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Asrican, Brent; Paez-Gonzalez, Patricia; Erb, Joshua; Kuo, Chay T.

    2016-01-01

    abstract New neuron addition via continued neurogenesis in the postnatal/adult mammalian brain presents a distinct form of nervous system plasticity. During embryonic development, precise temporal and spatial patterns of neurogenesis are necessary to create the nervous system architecture. Similar between embryonic and postnatal stages, neurogenic proliferation is regulated by neural stem cell (NSC)-intrinsic mechanisms layered upon cues from their local microenvironmental niche. Following developmental assembly, it remains relatively unclear what may be the key driving forces that sustain continued production of neurons in the postnatal/adult brain. Recent experimental evidence suggests that patterned activity from specific neural circuits can also directly govern postnatal/adult neurogenesis. Here, we review experimental findings that revealed cholinergic modulation, and how patterns of neuronal activity and acetylcholine release may differentially or synergistically activate downstream signaling in NSCs. Higher-order excitatory and inhibitory inputs regulating cholinergic neuron firing, and their implications in neurogenesis control are also considered. PMID:27468423

  6. BMP9 ameliorates amyloidosis and the cholinergic defect in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Rebecca M.; Norman, Timothy A.; Haydar, Tarik F.; Slack, Barbara E.; Leeman, Susan E.; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Mellott, Tiffany J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) promotes the acquisition of the cholinergic phenotype in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) during development and protects these neurons from cholinergic dedifferentiation following axotomy when administered in vivo. A decline in BFCN function occurs in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and contributes to the AD-associated memory deficits. We infused BMP9 intracerebroventricularly for 7 d in transgenic AD model mice expressing green fluorescent protein specifically in cholinergic neurons (APP.PS1/CHGFP) and in wild-type littermate controls (WT/CHGFP). We used 5-mo-old mice, an age when the AD transgenics display early amyloid deposition and few cholinergic defects, and 10-mo-old mice, by which time these mice exhibit established disease. BMP9 infusion reduced the number of Aβ42-positive amyloid plaques in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 5- and 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice and reversed the reductions in choline acetyltransferase protein levels in the hippocampus of 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice. The treatment increased cholinergic fiber density in the hippocampus of both WT/CHGFP and APP.PS1/CHGFP mice at both ages. BMP9 infusion also increased hippocampal levels of neurotrophin 3, insulin-like growth factor 1, and nerve growth factor and of the nerve growth factor receptors, tyrosine kinase receptor A and p75/NGFR, irrespective of the genotype of the mice. These data show that BMP9 administration is effective in reducing the Aβ42 amyloid plaque burden, reversing cholinergic neuron abnormalities, and generating a neurotrophic milieu for BFCN in a mouse model of AD and provide evidence that the BMP9-signaling pathway may constitute a therapeutic target for AD. PMID:24218590

  7. Cholinergic urticaria and exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stefan L

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will present the physical manifestations of two similar conditions. The first is cholinergic urticaria. This is chronic urticaria precipitated by an elevated body temperature. The second is exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be idiopathic, a result of a specific allergenic trigger (food, medication, or insect sting), or exercise induced. We will focus on the third subtype. We describe the causes, symptoms, pathophysiology, testing, treatment, and prognosis of these two conditions.

  8. Alzheimer's Disease: Targeting the Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Guimaraes, Isabella M.; Silva, Flavia R.; Ribeiro, Fabiola M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a crucial role in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is responsible for synthesizing ACh from acetyl-CoA and choline in the cytoplasm and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) uptakes the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles. Following depolarization, ACh undergoes exocytosis reaching the synaptic cleft, where it can bind its receptors, including muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. ACh present at the synaptic cleft is promptly hydrolyzed by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), forming acetate and choline, which is recycled into the presynaptic nerve terminal by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). Cholinergic neurons located in the basal forebrain, including the neurons that form the nucleus basalis of Meynert, are severely lost in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the most ordinary cause of dementia affecting 25 million people worldwide. The hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, there is no real correlation between levels of cortical plaques and AD-related cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, synaptic loss is the principal correlate of disease progression and loss of cholinergic neurons contributes to memory and attention deficits. Thus, drugs that act on the cholinergic system represent a promising option to treat AD patients. PMID:26813123

  9. Central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit alleviates experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Rabbi, M F; Labis, B; Pavlov, V A; Tracey, K J; Ghia, J E

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism that regulates immune responses and cytokine production through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) signaling. Decreased efferent vagus nerve activity is observed in inflammatory bowel disease. We determined whether central activation of this pathway alters inflammation in mice with colitis and the mediating role of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit and α7nAChR signaling. Two experimental models of colitis were used in C57BL/6 mice. Central cholinergic activation induced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine or a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatments resulted in reduced mucosal inflammation associated with decreased major histocompatibility complex II level and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by splenic CD11c⁺ cells mediated by α7nAChR signaling. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy was abolished in mice with vagotomy, splenic neurectomy, or splenectomy. In conclusion, central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit controls intestinal inflammation and this regulation can be explored to develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Changes in brain cholinergic markers and spatial learning in old galanin-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Pirondi, S; D'Intino, G; Gusciglio, M; Massella, A; Giardino, L; Kuteeva, E; Ogren, S-O; Hökfelt, T; Calzà, L

    2007-03-23

    The cholinergic forebrain system is involved in learning and memory, and its age-dependent decline correlates with a decrease in cognitive performance. Since the neuropeptide galanin participates in cholinergic neuron regulation, we have studied 19- to 23-month-old male mice overexpressing galanin under the platelet-derived growth factor B promoter (GalOE) and wild-type (WT) littermates by monitoring behavioral, neurochemical and morphological/histochemical parameters. In the Morris water maze test, old transgenic animals showed a significant impairment in escape latency in the hidden platform test compared to age-matched WT animals. The morphological/histochemical studies revealed that cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain display a slight, age- but not genotype-related, alteration in choline acetyltransferase- (ChAT) immunoreactivity. The neurochemical studies showed an age-related decline in ChAT activity in the cerebral cortex of all mice, whereas in the hippocampal formation this effect was seen in GalOE but not WT animals. Expression of BDNF mRNA in the hippocampal formation, as evaluated by RT-PCR, was reduced in old animals; no age- or genotype-induced variations in NGF mRNA expression were observed. These data suggest that galanin overexpression further accentuates the age-related decline of the cholinergic system activity in male mice, resulting in impairment of water maze performance in old animals.

  11. Striatal cholinergic functional alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Paulose, C S

    2013-10-01

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxia. Cholinergic alterations and its further complications in respiration due to hypoxic insult in neonatal rats and the effect of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation was evaluated in the present study. Receptor binding and gene expression studies were done in the corpus striatum to analyse the changes in total muscarinic receptors, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors, and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism, choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase. Neonatal hypoxia decreased total muscarinic receptors with reduced expression of muscarinic M1, M2, and M3 receptor genes. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the downregulated choline acetyltransferase and upregulated acetyl cholinesterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances were reversed to near control in glucose-resuscitated hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration are also reported. The present findings points to the cholinergic alterations due to neonatal hypoxic shock and suggests a proper resuscitation method to ameliorate these striatal changes.

  12. Compensatory responses to age-related decline in odor quality acuity: cholinergic neuromodulation and olfactory enrichment.

    PubMed

    Mandairon, Nathalie; Peace, Shane T; Boudadi, Karim; Boxhorn, Christine E; Narla, Venkata Anupama; Suffis, Sara D; Cleland, Thomas A

    2011-12-01

    The perceptual differentiation of odors can be measured behaviorally using generalization gradients. The steepness of these gradients defines a form of olfactory acuity for odor quality that depends on neural circuitry within the olfactory bulb and is regulated by cholinergic activity therein as well as by associative learning. Using this system as a reduced model for age-related cognitive decline, we show that aged mice, while maintaining almost the same baseline behavioral performance as younger mice, are insensitive to the effects of acutely elevated acetylcholine, which sharpens generalization gradients in young adult mice. Moreover, older mice exhibit evidence of chronically elevated acetylcholine levels in the olfactory bulb, suggesting that their insensitivity to further elevated levels of acetylcholine may arise because the maximum capacity of the system to respond to acetylcholine has already been reached. We propose a model in which an underlying, age-related, progressive deficit is mitigated by a compensatory cholinergic feedback loop that acts to retard the behavioral effects of what would otherwise be a substantial age-related decline in olfactory plasticity. We also treated mice with 10-day regimens of olfactory environmental enrichment and/or repeated systemic injections of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. Each treatment alone sharpened odor quality acuity, but administering both treatments together had no greater effect than either alone. Age was not a significant main effect in this study, suggesting that some capacity for acetylcholine-dependent plasticity is still present in aged mice despite their sharply reduced ability to respond to acute increases in acetylcholine levels. These results suggest a dynamical framework for understanding age-related decline in neural circuit processing in which the direct effects of aging can be mitigated, at least temporarily, by systemic compensatory responses. In particular, a decline in

  13. Berberine relieves insulin resistance via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fen; Zhao, Yun-bin; Wang, Ding-kun; Zou, Xin; Fang, Ke; Wang, Kai-fu

    2016-02-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Rhizoma coptidis and has been used for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in China. The development of T2DM is often associated with insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. In this study, we examined whether BBR attenuated glucose uptake dysfunction through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in HepG2 cells. Cellular glucose uptake, quantified by the 2-[N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), was inhibited by 21% after HepG2 cells were incubated with insulin (10(-6) mol/L) for 36 h. Meanwhile, the expression of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) protein was reduced without the change of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the culture supernatant, the ratio of phosphorylated I-kappa-B kinase-β (IKκβ) Ser181/IKKβ and the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein were also increased. However, the treatment with BBR enhanced the glucose uptake, increased the expression of α7nAChR protein and inhibited AChE activity. These changes were also accompanied with the decrease of the ratio of pIKKβ Ser181/IKKβ, NF-κB p65 expression and IL-6 level. Taken together, these results suggest that BBR could enhance glucose uptake, and relieve insulin resistance and inflammation in HepG2 cells. The mechanism may be related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and the inhibition of AChE activity.

  14. Brain cholinergic impairment in liver failure

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Cauli, Omar; Silveyra, María-Ximena; Rodrigo, Regina; Candela, Asunción; Compañ, Antonio; Jover, Rodrigo; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Martínez, Salvador; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The cholinergic system is involved in specific behavioural responses and cognitive processes. Here, we examined potential alterations in the brain levels of key cholinergic enzymes in cirrhotic patients and animal models with liver failure. An increase (∼30%) in the activity of the acetylcholine-hydrolyzing enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is observed in the brain cortex from patients deceased from hepatic coma, while the activity of the acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, remains unaffected. In agreement with the human data, AChE activity in brain cortical extracts of bile duct ligated (BDL) rats was increased (∼20%) compared to controls. A hyperammonemic diet did not result in any further increase of AChE levels in the BDL model, and no change was observed in hyperammonemic diet rats without liver disease. Portacaval shunted rats which display increased levels of cerebral ammonia did not show any brain cholinergic abnormalities, confirming that high ammonia levels do not play a role in brain AChE changes. A selective increase of tetrameric AChE, the major AChE species involved in hydrolysis of acetylcholine in the brain, was detected in both cirrhotic humans and BDL rats. Histological examination of BDL and non-ligated rat brains shows that the subcellular localization of both AChE and choline acetyltransferase, and thus the accessibility to their substrates, appears unaltered by the pathological condition. The BDL-induced increase in AChE activity was not parallelled by an increase in mRNA levels. Increased AChE in BDL cirrhotic rats leads to a pronounced decrease (∼50–60%) in the levels of acetylcholine. Finally, we demonstrate that the AChE inhibitor rivastigmine is able to improve memory deficits in BDL rats. One week treatment with rivastigmine (0.6 mg/kg; once a day, orally, for a week) resulted in a 25% of inhibition in the enzymatic activity of AChE with no change in protein composition, as assessed by sucrose density

  15. Cholinergic interneurons control the excitatory input to the striatum.

    PubMed

    Pakhotin, Pavel; Bracci, Enrico

    2007-01-10

    How the extent and time course of presynaptic inhibition depend on the action potentials of the neuron controlling the terminals is unknown. We investigated this issue in the striatum using paired recordings from cholinergic interneurons and projection neurons. Glutamatergic EPSCs were evoked in projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons by stimulation of afferent fibers in the cortex and the striatum, respectively. A single spike in a cholinergic interneuron caused significant depression of the evoked glutamatergic EPSC in 34% of projection neurons located within 100 microm and 41% of cholinergic interneurons located within 200 microm. The time course of these effects was similar in the two cases, with EPSC inhibition peaking 20-30 ms after the spike and disappearing after 40-80 ms. Maximal depression of EPSC amplitude was up to 27% in projection neurons and to 19% in cholinergic interneurons. These effects were reversibly blocked by muscarinic receptor antagonists (atropine or methoctramine), which also significantly increased baseline EPSC (evoked without a preceding spike in the cholinergic interneuron), suggesting that some tonic cholinergic presynaptic inhibition was present. This was confirmed by the fact that lowering extracellular potassium, which silenced spontaneously active cholinergic interneurons, also increased baseline EPSC amplitude, and these effects were occluded by previous application of muscarinic receptor antagonists. Collectively, these results show that a single spike in a cholinergic interneuron exerts a fast and powerful inhibitory control over the glutamatergic input to striatal neurons.

  16. Attentional Control of Gait and Falls: Is Cholinergic Dysfunction a Common Substrate in the Elderly and Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pelosin, Elisa; Ogliastro, Carla; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bonassi, Gaia; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Avanzino, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address whether deficits in the central cholinergic activity may contribute to the increased difficulty to allocate attention during gait in the elderly with heightened risk of falls. We recruited 50 participants with a history of two or more falls (33 patients with Parkinson’s Disease and 17 older adults) and 14 non-fallers age-matched adults. Cholinergic activity was estimated by means of short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique that assesses an inhibitory circuit in the sensorimotor cortex and is regarded as a global marker of cholinergic function in the brain. Increased difficulty to allocate attention during gait was evaluated by measuring gait performance under single and dual-task conditions. Global cognition was also assessed. Results showed that SAI was reduced in patients with PD than in the older adults (fallers and non-fallers) and in older adults fallers with respect to non-fallers. Reduction in SAI indicates less inhibition i.e., less cholinergic activity. Gait speed was reduced in the dual task gait compared to normal gait only in our faller population and changes in gait speed under dual task significantly correlated with the mean value of SAI. This association remained significant after adjusting for cognitive status. These findings suggest that central cholinergic activity may be a predictor of change in gait characteristics under dual tasking in older adults and PD fallers independently of cognitive status. PMID:27242515

  17. Reducing statistics anxiety and enhancing statistics learning achievement: effectiveness of a one-minute strategy.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chei-Chang; Wang, Yu-Min; Lee, Li-Tze

    2014-08-01

    Statistical knowledge is widely used in academia; however, statistics teachers struggle with the issue of how to reduce students' statistics anxiety and enhance students' statistics learning. This study assesses the effectiveness of a "one-minute paper strategy" in reducing students' statistics-related anxiety and in improving students' statistics-related achievement. Participants were 77 undergraduates from two classes enrolled in applied statistics courses. An experiment was implemented according to a pretest/posttest comparison group design. The quasi-experimental design showed that the one-minute paper strategy significantly reduced students' statistics anxiety and improved students' statistics learning achievement. The strategy was a better instructional tool than the textbook exercise for reducing students' statistics anxiety and improving students' statistics achievement.

  18. Enhancing Slow Wave Sleep with Sodium Oxybate Reduces the Behavioral and Physiological Impact of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K.; Hall-Porter, Janine M.; Griffin, Kara S.; Dodson, Ehren R.; Forst, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Denise T.; Eisenstein, Rhody D.; Schweitzer, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether enhancement of slow wave sleep (SWS) with sodium oxybate reduces the impact of sleep deprivation. Design: Double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled design Setting: Sleep research laboratory Participants: Fifty-eight healthy adults (28 placebo, 30 sodium oxybate), ages 18-50 years. Interventions: A 5-day protocol included 2 screening/baseline nights and days, 2 sleep deprivation nights, each followed by a 3-h daytime (08:00-11:00) sleep opportunity and a recovery night. Sodium oxybate or placebo was administered prior to each daytime sleep period. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), psychomotor vigilance test (PVT), Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and Profile of Mood States were administered during waking hours. Measurements and Results: During daytime sleep, the sodium oxybate group had more SWS, more EEG spectral power in the 1-9 Hz range, and less REM. Mean MSLT latency was longer for the sodium oxybate group on the night following the first daytime sleep period and on the day following the second day sleep period. Median PVT reaction time was faster in the sodium oxybate group following the second day sleep period. The change from baseline in SWS was positively correlated with the change in MSLT and KSS. During recovery sleep the sodium oxybate group had less TST, SWS, REM, and slow wave activity (SWA) than the placebo group. Conclusions: Pharmacological enhancement of SWS with sodium oxybate resulted in a reduced response to sleep loss on measures of alertness and attention. In addition, SWS enhancement during sleep restriction appears to result in a reduced homeostatic response to sleep loss. Citation: Walsh JK; Hall-Porter JM; Griffin KS; Dodson ER; Forst EH; Curry DT; Eisenstein RD; Schweitzer PK. Enhancing slow wave sleep with sodium oxybate reduces the behavioral and physiological impact of sleep loss. SLEEP 2010;33(9):1217-1225. PMID:20857869

  19. Caloric restriction preserves memory and reduces anxiety of aging mice with early enhancement of neurovascular functions

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Ishita; Guo, Janet; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Zhong, Yu; Rempe, Ralf G.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Armstrong, Rachel; Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Neurovascular integrity plays an important role in protecting cognitive and mental health in aging. Lifestyle interventions that sustain neurovascular integrity may thus be critical on preserving brain functions in aging and reducing the risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that caloric restriction (CR) had an early effect on neurovascular enhancements, and played a critical role in preserving vascular, cognitive and mental health in aging. In particular, we found that CR significantly enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-brain barrier function in young mice at 5-6 months of age. The neurovascular enhancements were associated with reduced mammalian target of rapamycin expression, elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, and increased ketone bodies utilization. With age, CR decelerated the rate of decline in CBF. The preserved CBF in hippocampus and frontal cortex were highly correlated with preserved memory and learning, and reduced anxiety, of the aging mice treated with CR (18-20 months of age). Our results suggest that dietary intervention started in the early stage (e.g., young adults) may benefit cognitive and mental reserve in aging. Understanding nutritional effects on neurovascular functions may have profound implications in human brain aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27829242

  20. Intrahippocampal Administration of Ibotenic Acid Induced Cholinergic Dysfunction via NR2A/NR2B Expression: Implications of Resveratrol against Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Karthick, Chennakesavan; Periyasamy, Sabapathy; Jayachandran, Kesavan S.; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO) in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5 μg/μl) lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility, and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the hippocampal

  1. Green synthesis and nanotopography of heparin-reduced gold nanoparticles with enhanced anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jun, Sang Hui; Koo, Yean Kyoung; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the green synthesis of heparin-reduced gold nanoparticles and their nanotopography as studied with atomic force microscopy. The study also evaluated the anticoagulant activity of the newly prepared gold nanoparticles. The heparin-reduced gold nanoparticles were homogeneous, showing characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands of approximately 523-527 nm, and their shapes were mostly spherical and amorphous. The average diameter of the nanoparticles measured from atomic force microscopic images was either 20.26 +/- 3.35 nm or 40.85 +/- 8.95 nm depending on the different precursor salts and heparin concentrations. Atomic force microscopic images revealed that the topography of the heparin polymer aggregated when deposited onto mica, resembling a chain of mountains. This characteristic nanotopography of the heparin disappeared after the synthesis of the gold nanoparticles was performed. Interestingly, prolonged prothrombin time, thrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time were observed in the heparin-reduced gold nanoparticles when compared to a control heparin, suggesting the enhancement of anticoagulant activity in heparin-reduced gold nanoparticles. Hence, the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles with heparin using a simple reaction step could be a viable procedure for enhancing heparin's anticoagulant activity.

  2. Nipecotic acid ethyl ester: a cholinergic agonist that may differentiate muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, S.H.; Duman, R.S.; Enna, S.J.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P.; Micheletti, R.; Giraldo, E.; Giachetti, A.

    1986-03-05

    Reports indicate that nipecotic acid ethyl ester (NAEE) displays cholinomimetic properties in vivo. In the present study a series of physiological and biochemical tests were conducted to characterize this action. NAEE had a negative inotropic effect on the guinea pig atrium, and stimulated contraction of the guinea pig ileum and isolated mouse stomach strip at concentrations similar to bethanechol (BCH). The atrial and ilial effects were reversed by atropine. Unlike BCH, NAEE had no effect on basal acid secretion in the isolated mouse stomach at concentrations < 100 ..mu..M. NAEE was more potent than carbachol (CCH) in displacing /sup 3/H-ONB binding from rat brain membranes. The potency of NAEE to inhibit antagonist binding in rat heart membranes was enhanced by Mg/sup + +/ (Hill coefficient < 1.0) and reduced by Gpp(NH)p. Like CCH, NAEE inhibited GTP-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat brain striatal membranes. As compared to CCH, NAEE had little effect (< 5%) as a stimulator of inositol phosphate (IP) production in rat brain slices. The results indicate that NAEE is a direct-acting muscarinic receptor agonist. Moreover, its differential effects on acid secretion, IP accumulation, and adenylate cyclase suggest that it may be useful for defining cholinergic receptor subclasses.

  3. Aging elevates metabolic gene expression in brain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Karen A; Kent, Caroline; Personett, David; Lai, Weil R; Park, Peter J; Coleman, Paul; McKinney, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system is selectively vulnerable in human brain diseases, while the cholinergic groups in the upper pons of the brainstem (BS) resist neurodegeneration. Cholinergic neurons (200 per region per animal) were laser-microdissected from five young (8 months) and five aged (24 months) F344 rats from the BF and the BS pontine lateral dorsal tegmental/pedunculopontine nuclei (LDTN/PPN) and their expression profiles were obtained. The bioinformatics program SigPathway was used to identify gene groups and pathways that were selectively affected by aging. In the BF cholinergic system, aging most significantly altered genes involved with a variety of metabolic functions. In contrast, BS cholinergic neuronal age effects included gene groupings related to neuronal plasticity and a broad range of normal cellular functions. Transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPalpha), which controls expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, was more strongly upregulated in the BF cholinergic neurons (+107%) than in the BS cholinergic population (+40%). The results suggest that aging elicits elevates metabolic activity in cholinergic populations and that this occurs to a much greater degree in the BF group than in the BS group.

  4. Optogenetic cholinergic modulation of the mouse superior colliculus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) plays a critical role in orienting movements, in part by integrating modulatory influences on the sensorimotor transformations it performs. Many species exhibit a robust brain stem cholinergic projection to the intermediate and deep layers of the SC arising mainly from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), which may serve to modulate SC function. However, the physiological effects of this input have not been examined in vivo, preventing an understanding of its functional role. Given the data from slice experiments, cholinergic input may have a net excitatory effect on the SC. Alternatively, the input could have mixed effects, via activation of inhibitory neurons within or upstream of the SC. Distinguishing between these possibilities requires in vivo experiments in which endogenous cholinergic input is directly manipulated. Here we used anatomical and optogenetic techniques to identify and selectively activate brain stem cholinergic terminals entering the intermediate and deep layers of the awake mouse SC and recorded SC neuronal responses. We first quantified the pattern of the cholinergic input to the mouse SC, finding that it was predominantly localized to the intermediate and deep layers. We then found that optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic terminals in the SC significantly increased the activity of a subpopulation of SC neurons. Interestingly, cholinergic input had a broad range of effects on the magnitude and timing of SC responses, perhaps reflecting both monosynaptic and polysynaptic innervation. These findings begin to elucidate the functional role of this cholinergic projection in modulating the processing underlying sensorimotor transformations in the SC. PMID:26019317

  5. Stress, Chemical Defense Agents and Cholinergic Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-30

    permitted to avoid a comparable 1 -mA scrambled footshock in the chamber by reaching the safe platform within 10 sec of being placed in the apparatus. For...rate constant h was compared for the incorporation into and decline in specl.ic 3ctlvities of choline and ACh (see Smith et al., 1984a; tac’gni et al...to detect cholinergic function was assessed (Table 2). When compared with controls (no CS presentation), rats which had been exposed to the CS

  6. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal cells and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2005-01-01

    Septo-hippocampal cholinergic fibres ramify extensively throughout the hippocampal formation to release acetylcholine upon a diverse range of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are differentially expressed by distinct populations of neurones. The resultant modulation of cellular excitability and synaptic transmission within hippocampal circuits underlies the ability of acetylcholine to influence the dynamic properties of the hippocampal network and results in the emergence of a range of stable oscillatory network states. Recent findings suggest a multitude of actions contribute to the oscillogenic properties of acetylcholine which are principally induced by activation of muscarinic receptors but also regulated through activation of nicotinic receptor subtypes. PMID:15528238

  7. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles simultaneously enhance antitumor activity and reduce the toxicity of cantharidin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Wang, Shengpeng; Liang, Rixin; Wang, Lan; Chen, Meiwan; Li, Hui; Wang, Yitao

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to prepare cantharidin-entrapped non-ionic surfactant vesicles (CTD-NSVs) and evaluate their potential in enhancing the antitumor activities and reducing CTD’s toxicity. Methods and results CTD-NSVs were prepared by injection method. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that CTD-NSVs could significantly enhance in vitro toxicity against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and induce more significant cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Moreover, Hoechst 33342 staining implicated that CTD-NSVs induced higher apoptotic rates in MCF-7 cells than free CTD solution. In vivo therapeutic efficacy was investigated in imprinting control region mice bearing mouse sarcoma S180. Mice treated with 1.0 mg/kg CTD-NSVs showed the most powerful antitumor activity, with an inhibition rate of 52.76%, which was significantly higher than that of cyclophosphamide (35 mg/kg, 40.23%) and the same concentration of free CTD (1.0 mg/kg, 31.05%). In addition, the acute toxicity and liver toxicity of CTD were also distinctly decreased via encapsulating into NSVs. Conclusion Our results revealed that NSVs could be a promising delivery system for enhancing the antitumor activity and simultaneously reducing the toxicity of CTD. PMID:23807847

  8. Reduced dopamine function within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens enhances latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A J D; Thur, K E; Horsley, R R; Spicer, C; Marsden, C A; Cassaday, H J

    2011-03-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a CS that has previously been presented without consequence. There is some evidence that LI can be potentiated by reduced mesoaccumbal dopamine (DA) function but the locus within the nucleus accumbens of this effect is as yet not firmly established. Experiment 1 tested whether 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of DA terminals within the core and medial shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) would enhance LI under conditions that normally disrupt LI in controls (weak pre-exposure). LI was measured in a thirst motivated conditioned emotional response procedure with 10 pre-exposures (to a noise CS) and 2 conditioning trials. The vehicle-injected and core-lesioned animals did not show LI and conditioned to the pre-exposed CS at comparable levels to the non-pre-exposed controls. 6-OHDA lesions to the medial shell, however, produced potentiation of LI, demonstrated across two extinction tests. In a subsequent experiment, haloperidol microinjected into the medial shell prior to conditioning similarly enhanced LI. These results underscore the dissociable roles of core and shell subregions of the NAc in mediating the expression of LI and indicate that reduced DA function within the medial shell leads to enhanced LI.

  9. Synaptic mechanisms underlying cholinergic control of thalamic reticular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks of the thalamus are the target of extensive cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and the brainstem. Activation of these afferents can regulate neuronal excitability, transmitter release, and firing patterns in thalamic networks, thereby altering the flow of sensory information during distinct behavioural states. However, cholinergic regulation in the thalamus has been primarily examined by using receptor agonist and antagonist, which has precluded a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics that govern cholinergic signalling under physiological conditions. This review summarizes recent studies on cholinergic synaptic transmission in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a brain structure intimately involved in the control of sensory processing and the generation of rhythmic activity in the thalamocortical system. This work has shown that acetylcholine (ACh) released from individual axons can rapidly and reliably activate both pre- and postsynaptic cholinergic receptors, thereby controlling TRN neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal precision. PMID:24973413

  10. Enhanced hot-carrier luminescence in multilayer reduced graphene oxide nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Chunfeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-03-01

    We report a method to promote photoluminescence emission in graphene materials by enhancing carrier scattering instead of directly modifying band structure in multilayer reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanospheres. We intentionally curl graphene layers to form nanospheres by reducing graphene oxide with spherical polymer templates to manipulate the carrier scattering. These nanospheres produce hot-carrier luminescence with more than ten-fold improvement of emission efficiency as compared to planar nanosheets. With increasing excitation power, hot-carrier luminescence from nanospheres exhibits abnormal spectral redshift with dynamic feature associated to the strengthened electron-phonon coupling. These experimental results can be well understood by considering the screened Coulomb interactions. With increasing carrier density, the reduced screening effect promotes carrier scattering which enhances hot-carrier emission from such multilayer rGO nanospheres. This carrier-scattering scenario is further confirmed by pump-probe measurements. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB921801 and 2013CB932903), the National Science Foundation of China (91233103, 61108001, 11227406 and 11021403), and the Program of International S&T Cooperation (2011DFA01400).

  11. Reduced silanized graphene oxide/epoxy-polyurethane composites with enhanced thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Zhang, Peipei; Zheng, Cheng; Wu, Xu; Mao, Taoyan; Zhu, Mingning; Wang, Huaquan; Feng, Danyan; Qian, Shuxuan; Cai, Xianfang

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of reduced silanized graphene oxide/epoxy-polyurethane (EPUAs/R-Si-GEO) composites with enhanced thermal and mechanical properties. Graphene oxide (GEO), prepared from natural graphite flakes, was modified with methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane to prepare silanized GEO (Si-GEO), and was then reduced by NaHSO3 to prepare R-Si-GEO (partially reduced Si-GEO). EPAc/R-Si-GEO (R-Si-GEO/epoxy acrylate copolymers) was synthesized via an in situ polymerization of R-Si-GEO and epoxy acrylic monomers. EPUAs/R-Si-GEO was obtained by curing reaction between EPAc/R-Si-GEO and an isocyanate curing agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface and crystal structure of the modified graphene and EPUAs/R-Si-GEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize their morphology. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile strength, elongation at break, and cross-linking density measurements showed that the thermal stability and mechanical properties of EPUAs/R-Si-GEO were greatly enhanced by the addition of R-Si-GEO.

  12. Augmentation of cholinergic-mediated amylase release by forskolin in mouse parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.L.; Singh, J.C.; Jacobson, K.L.

    1985-12-30

    Cholinergic-mediated amylase release in mouse parotid acini was augmented by forskolin; the potency but not the maximal response to carbachol was altered. Amylase released by carbachol plus forskolin was dependent on extracellular calcium and was mimicked by the calcium ionophore, A23187 plus forskolin. Forskolin was also shown to enhance carbachol-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into isolated acini. Hydroxylamine, nitroprusside, and 8-bromo-c-GMP each in combination with forskolin mimicked the effects of carbachol plus forskolin on amylase release. In the presence of carbachol (10/sup -8/M) forskolin did not augment c-AMP levels. However, in the presence of carbachol (5 x 10/sup -7/ M) or hydroxylamine (50 ..mu..M) forskolin did significantly augment c-AMP accumulation. These results suggest that calcium and c-GMP may mediate the augmentation of cholinergic-mediated amylase release by effects on c-AMP metabolism. 21 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  13. High yield production of reduced TiO2 with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jian; Hu, Xiaolin; Yang, Hongru; Zhou, Yanli; Cui, Hongzhi; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The reduced TiO2 nanobelts are prepared through reduction of pure nanobelts by utilizing NaBH4. Compared with pure TiO2 nanobelts, the reduced TiO2 nanobelts present enhanced UV and visible photocatalytic performance in decomposing methyl orange (MO) and water splitting for hydrogen production. Experimental results and theoretical calculations show that the improved performance is due to the generation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancy, which can increase the visible light absorption, promote charge carrier trapping, and improve photogenerated electron⿿hole separation efficiency, thus the photocatalytic property is improved. Moreover, the reduced TiO2 nanobelts with high ratio of Ti3+ (55.8%) present better photocatalytic properties than that of reduced TiO2 nanobelts with lower ratio of Ti3+ (9.8%), which indicates that a certain high ratio of Ti3+ will facilitate photocatalysis. The results show that the reduced TiO2 represent an effective strategy in improving the visible photocatalytic properties.

  14. Source reduction in Florida's salt marshes: management to reduce pesticide use and enhance the resource.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Douglas B

    2006-09-01

    Source reduction as part of an integrated pest management program is a cornerstone of the American Mosquito Control Association's Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program Strategy Document to reduce pesticide risk. Since the early 1980s, Florida has made important strides in implementing environmentally sound source reduction strategies in salt marshes while managing them for both mosquito control and natural resource enhancement. The political mechanism for this progress has been interagency cooperation through the Florida Coordinating Council on Mosquito Control and its Subcommittee on Managed Marshes. Challenges in accomplishing source reduction continue because both public and private lands are involved. Public lands include those owned by federal (e.g., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service), state (Florida Department of Environmental Protection), and local governments, and they have a diversity of management objectives. This diversity adds to the challenge facing mosquito control agencies in providing mosquito control services while protecting and enhancing the environment.

  15. Latrepirdine (Dimebon™) enhances autophagy and reduces intracellular GFP-Aβ42 levels in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Prashant R.; Verdile, Giuseppe; Barr, Renae K.; Gupta, Veer; Steele, John W.; Lachenmayer, M. Lenard; Yue, Zhenyu; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Petsko, Gregory; Ju, Shulin; Ringe, Dagmar; Sankovich, Sonia E.; Caine, Joanne M.; Macreadie, Ian G.; Gandy, Sam; Martins, Ralph N.

    2012-01-01

    Latrepirdine (Dimebon™), an anti-histamine, has shown some benefits in trials of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of aggregated or misfolded protein such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and has been shown to promote the removal of α-synuclein protein aggregates in vivo. An important pathway for removal of aggregated or misfolded proteins is the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, which has been implicated in AD pathogenesis, and enhancing this pathway has been shown to have therapeutic potential in AD and other proteinopathies. Here we use a yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to investigate whether latrepirdine can enhance autophagy and reduce levels of Aβ42 aggregates. Latrepirdine was shown to up-regulate yeast vacuolar (lysosomal) activity and promote transport of the autophagic marker (Atg8) to the vacuole. Using an in vitro GFP tagged Aβ yeast expression system, we investigated whether latrepirdine-enhanced autophagy was associated with a reduction in levels of intracellular GFP-Aβ42. GFP-Aβ42 was localized into punctate patterns compared to the diffuse cytosolic pattern of GFP and the GFP-Aβ42 (19:34), which does not aggregate. In the autophagy deficient mutant (Atg8Δ), GFP-Aβ42 showed a more diffuse cytosolic localization, reflecting the inability of this mutant to sequester GFP-Aβ42. Similar to rapamycin, we observed that latrepirdine significantly reduced GFP-Aβ42 in wild-type compared to the Atg8Δ mutant. Further, latrepirdine treatment attenuated Aβ42-induced toxicity in wild-type cells but not in the Atg8Δ mutant. Together, our findings provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action for latrepirdine in inducing autophagy and reducing intracellular levels of GFP-Aβ42. PMID:22903131

  16. Decreased interactions in protein kinase A-glucocorticoid receptor signaling in the hippocampus after selective removal of the basal forebrain cholinergic input.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chol Seung; Kim, Youn Jung; Hwang, Yoo Kyeong; Bañuelos, Christina; Bizon, Jennifer L; Han, Jung-Soo

    2012-03-01

    Removal of the cholinergic innervation to the hippocampus via selective immunolesions of septohippocampal cholinergic neurons induces dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and decreases glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA. This study examined whether removal of the cholinergic innervation decreased GR protein levels and induced changes in the interaction between GR and the cytoplasmic catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKAc) in the hippocampus. In lesioned animals, GR protein levels were markedly decreased in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of hippocampal neurons, whereas mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) levels remained unchanged in both the nucleus and cytosol. PKAc levels did not differ between lesioned and control groups, but PKAc activity was reduced in lesion tissue compared with the controls. The interaction between GR and PKAc was also decreased in the hippocampus without cholinergic input. These results indicate that degeneration of septohippocampal cholinergic neurons leads to reduced PKAc activity in the hippocampus which, in turn, alters GR signaling. The altered GR signaling induced by the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons may contribute to dysfunction of the HPA axis in aged animals and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and lead to neuropsychiatric symptoms that occur throughout the course of AD.

  17. Enhanced performance in coherent BOTDA sensor with reduced effect of chromatic dispersion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zonglei; Yan, Lianshan; Shao, Liyang; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2015-11-16

    An approach for reducing chromatic dispersion (CD) induced Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) distortion and measurement instabilities in coherent Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing systems is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By utilizing intensity modulated probe (IMP) instead of phase modulated probe (PMP), sensing performance is obviously improved. Reduction of ~6-MHz decoding error caused by the CD induced BGS distortion is achieved in the measurement of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) along the whole 40-km sensing distance. Enhanced system stabilities are demonstrated by testing the BGS under different conditions.

  18. Interleukin-1 Inhibits Putative Cholinergic Neurons in Vitro and REM Sleep when Microinjected into the Rat Laterodorsal Tegmental Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Dario; Barajon, Isabella; Bianchi, Susanna; Opp, Mark R.; Imeri, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: REM sleep is suppressed during infection, an effect mimicked by the administration of cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). In spite of this observation, brain sites and neurochemical systems mediating IL-1-induced suppression of REM sleep have not been identified. Cholinergic neurons in the brainstem laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are part of the neuronal circuitry responsible for REM sleep generation. Since IL-1 inhibits acetylcholine synthesis and release, the aim of this study was to test the two different, but related hypotheses. We hypothesized that IL-1 inhibits LDT cholinergic neurons, and that, as a result of this inhibition, IL-1 suppresses REM sleep. Design, Measurement, and Results: To test these hypotheses, the electrophysiological activity of putative cholinergic LDT neurons was recorded in a rat brainstem slice preparation. Interleukin-1 significantly inhibited the firing rate of 76% of recorded putative cholinergic LDT neurons and reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic evoked potentials in 60% of recorded neurons. When IL-1 (1 ng) was microinjected into the LDT of freely behaving rats, REM sleep was reduced by about 50% (from 12.7% ± 1.5% of recording time [after vehicle] to 6.1% ± 1.4% following IL-1 administration) during post-injection hours 3-4. Conclusions: Results of this study support the hypothesis that IL-1 can suppress REM sleep by acting at the level of the LDT nucleus. Furthermore this effect may result from the inhibition of evoked glutamatergic responses and of spontaneous firing of putative cholinergic LDT neurons. Citation: Brambilla D; Barajon I; Bianchi S; Opp MR; Imeri L. Interleukin-1 inhibits putative cholinergic neurons in vitro and REM sleep when microinjected into the rat laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. SLEEP 2010;33(7):919-929. PMID:20614852

  19. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh S.; Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S.; Dwivedi, Hari N.; Pant, Aditiya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  20. Combining enhanced biomass density with reduced lignin level for improved forage quality.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Shadle, Gail; Shen, Hui; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Fresquet Corrales, Sandra; Wang, Huanzhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    To generate a forage crop with increased biomass density that retains forage quality, we have genetically transformed lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) expressing antisense constructs targeting two different lignin pathway biosynthetic genes with a construct for down-regulation of a WRKY family transcription factor that acts as a repressor of secondary cell wall formation in pith tissues. Plants with low-level expression of the WRKY dominant repressor construct produced lignified cell walls in pith tissues and exhibited enhanced biomass and biomass density, with an increase in total sugars in the cell wall fraction; however, lines with high expression of the WRKY dominant repressor construct exhibited a very different phenotype, with loss of interfascicular fibres associated with repression of the NST1 transcription factor. This latter phenotype was not observed in transgenic lines in which the WRKY transcription factor was down-regulated by RNA interference. Enhanced and/or ectopic deposition of secondary cell walls was also seen in corn and switchgrass expressing WRKY dominant repressor constructs, with enhanced biomass in corn but reduced biomass in switchgrass. Neutral detergent fibre digestibility was not impacted by WRKY expression in corn. Cell walls from WRKY-DR-expressing alfalfa plants with enhanced secondary cell wall formation exhibited increased sugar release efficiency, and WRKY dominant repressor expression further increased sugar release in alfalfa down-regulated in the COMT, but not the HCT, genes of lignin biosynthesis. These results suggest that significant enhancements in forage biomass and quality can be achieved through engineering WRKY transcription factors in both monocots and dicots.

  1. Activation of Phosphoinositide Metabolism by Cholinergic Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-15

    production in slices that had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol and baclofen , a specific GABAB agonist, was as effective as GABA in enhancing the response...to NE (Figure 15). Neither GABA nor baclofen significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of quisqualate, but baclofen reduced the inhibitory effect of...hydrolysis (Figure 60). Propranolol , a 0- adrenergic-receptor antagonist, did not alter phosphcinositide hydrolysis induced by NE, ACPD, 37 or both agonists

  2. Activation of Phosphoinositide Metabolism by Cholinergic Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-16

    acid significantly inhibited NE-induced [3H]IP1 production in slices that had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol and baclofen , a specific GABAB...agonist, was as effective as GABA in enhancing the response to NE (Figure 15). Neither GABA nor baclofen significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of...quisqualate, but baclofen reduced the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid. Effects of NMDA receptor antagonists on phosphoinositide hydrolysis MK-801 is

  3. Evolution of increased phenotypic diversity enhances population performance by reducing sexual harassment in damselflies.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuma; Kagawa, Kotaro; Svensson, Erik I; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-07-18

    The effect of evolutionary changes in traits and phenotypic/genetic diversity on ecological dynamics has received much theoretical attention; however, the mechanisms and ecological consequences are usually unknown. Female-limited colour polymorphism in damselflies is a counter-adaptation to male mating harassment, and thus, is expected to alter population dynamics through relaxing sexual conflict. Here we show the side effect of the evolution of female morph diversity on population performance (for example, population productivity and sustainability) in damselflies. Our theoretical model incorporating key features of the sexual interaction predicts that the evolution of increased phenotypic diversity will reduce overall fitness costs to females from sexual conflict, which in turn will increase productivity, density and stability of a population. Field data and mesocosm experiments support these model predictions. Our study suggests that increased phenotypic diversity can enhance population performance that can potentially reduce extinction rates and thereby influence macroevolutionary processes.

  4. Microshell Arrays Enhanced Sensitivity in Detection of Specific Antibody for Reduced Graphene Oxide Optical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Shuai; Xin, Wei; Chen, Shao-Nan; Li, Cun-Bo; Gao, Xiao-Guang; Pan, Lei-Ting; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in the investigation of biomolecules. In this paper, we reported on the use of a reduced graphene oxide microshell (RGOM)-based optical biosensor for the determination of goat anti-rabbit IgG. The biosensor was prepared through a self-assembly of monolayers of monodisperse polystyrene microspheres, combined with a high-temperature reduction, in order to decorate the RGOM with rabbit IgG. The periodic microshells allowed a simpler functionalization and modification of RGOM with bioreceptor units, than reduced graphene oxide (RGO). With additional antibody-antigen binding, the RGOM-based biosensor achieved better real-time and label-free detection. The RGOM-based biosensor presented a more satisfactory response to goat anti-rabbit IgG than the RGO-based biosensor. This method is promising for immobilizing biomolecules on graphene surfaces and for the fabrication of biosensors with enhanced sensitivity. PMID:28125011

  5. Enhanced treatment performance of coking wastewater and reduced membrane fouling using a novel EMBR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Du, Cong; Shi, Shengnan; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan; Ji, Xiangyu

    2017-04-01

    A novel EMBR (electric field applied in MBR) by placing stainless steel mesh cathode inside a flat membrane module and stainless steel mesh anode outside the module was built and operated to enhance the treatment performance of coking wastewater containing phenol, pyridine and quinoline and reduce the membrane fouling. The degradation rates of COD, phenol, pyridine and quinoline in EMBR with electric field (reactor A) were significantly higher than the sum of EMBR without electric field (reactor B) and only electro-catalytic degradation during the long-term treatment, confirming that a coupling effect was existed between biodegradation and electro-catalytic degradation process. Illumina sequencing data revealed that bacterial community was richer and more diverse in reactor A. Comamonas strain JB as the inoculums was the most dominant genus in each reactor and electric field applied in reactor A further improved the abundance of strain JB. The membrane fouling in reactor A was reduced.

  6. Cuprous Sulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Solvothermal Synthesis and Enhanced Electrochemical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhanjun; Zhu, Yabo; Xing, Zheng; Wang, Zhengyuan

    2016-01-01

    The cuprous sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared via a facile and efficient solvothermal synthesis method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that CuS micronspheres composed of nanosheets and distributed on the rGO layer in well-monodispersed form. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that graphene oxide (GO) had been reduced to rGO. The electrochemical performances of CuS/rGO nanocomposites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge techniques, which showed that the specific capacitance of CuS/rGO nanocomposites was enhanced because of the introduction of rGO.

  7. Herbal Extracts That Reduce Ocular Oxidative Stress May Enhance Attentive Performance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hohyun; Kwon, Moonyoung; Jang, Hyojung; Lee, Jee-Bum; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2016-01-01

    We used herbal extracts in this study to investigate the effects of blue-light-induced oxidative stress on subjects' attentive performance, which is also associated with work performance. We employed an attention network test (ANT) to measure the subjects' work performance indirectly and used herbal extracts to reduce ocular oxidative stress. Thirty-two subjects participated in either an experimental group (wearing glasses containing herbal extracts) or a control group (wearing glasses without herbal extracts). During the ANT experiment, we collected electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) data and measured button responses. In addition, electrocardiogram (ECG) data were collected before and after the experiments. The EOG results showed that the experimental group exhibited a reduced number of eye blinks per second during the experiment and faster button responses with a smaller variation than did the control group; this group also showed relatively more sustained tension in their ECG results. In the EEG analysis, the experimental group had significantly greater cognitive processing, with larger P300 and parietal 2–6 Hz activity, an orienting effect with neural processing of frontal area, high beta activity in the occipital area, and an alpha and beta recovery process after the button response. We concluded that reducing blue-light-induced oxidative stress with herbal extracts may be associated with reducing the number of eye blinks and enhancing attentive performance. PMID:28090203

  8. Herbal Extracts That Reduce Ocular Oxidative Stress May Enhance Attentive Performance in Humans.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hohyun; Kwon, Moonyoung; Jang, Hyojung; Lee, Jee-Bum; Yoon, Kyung Chul; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    We used herbal extracts in this study to investigate the effects of blue-light-induced oxidative stress on subjects' attentive performance, which is also associated with work performance. We employed an attention network test (ANT) to measure the subjects' work performance indirectly and used herbal extracts to reduce ocular oxidative stress. Thirty-two subjects participated in either an experimental group (wearing glasses containing herbal extracts) or a control group (wearing glasses without herbal extracts). During the ANT experiment, we collected electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) data and measured button responses. In addition, electrocardiogram (ECG) data were collected before and after the experiments. The EOG results showed that the experimental group exhibited a reduced number of eye blinks per second during the experiment and faster button responses with a smaller variation than did the control group; this group also showed relatively more sustained tension in their ECG results. In the EEG analysis, the experimental group had significantly greater cognitive processing, with larger P300 and parietal 2-6 Hz activity, an orienting effect with neural processing of frontal area, high beta activity in the occipital area, and an alpha and beta recovery process after the button response. We concluded that reducing blue-light-induced oxidative stress with herbal extracts may be associated with reducing the number of eye blinks and enhancing attentive performance.

  9. Brief, pre-learning stress reduces false memory production and enhances true memory selectively in females.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Peters, David M; Kalchik, Andrea E; Hoffman, Mackenzie M; Aufdenkampe, Rachael L; Woelke, Sarah A; Wolters, Nicholas E; Talbot, Jeffery N

    2014-04-10

    Some of the previous research on stress-memory interactions has suggested that stress increases the production of false memories. However, as accumulating work has shown that the effects of stress on learning and memory depend critically on the timing of the stressor, we hypothesized that brief stress administered immediately before learning would reduce, rather than increase, false memory production. In the present study, participants submerged their dominant hand in a bath of ice cold water (stress) or sat quietly (no stress) for 3 min. Then, participants completed a short-term memory task, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm, in which they were presented with 10 different lists of semantically related words (e.g., candy, sour, sugar) and, after each list, were tested for their memory of presented words (e.g., candy), non-presented unrelated "distractor" words (e.g., hat), and non-presented semantically related "critical lure" words (e.g., sweet). Stress, overall, significantly reduced the number of critical lures recalled (i.e., false memory) by participants. In addition, stress enhanced memory for the presented words (i.e., true memory) in female, but not male, participants. These findings reveal that stress does not unequivocally enhance false memory production and that the timing of the stressor is an important variable that could mediate such effects. Such results could have important implications for understanding the dependability of eyewitness accounts of events that are observed following stress.

  10. BODIPY-doped silica nanoparticles with reduced dye leakage and enhanced singlet oxygen generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuyuan; Hong, Xuehua; Zong, Shenfei; Tang, Changquan; Cui, Yiping; Zheng, Qingdong

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising modality for cancer treatment. The essential element in PDT is the photosensitizer, which can be excited by light of a specific wavelength to generate cytotoxic oxygen species (ROS) capable of killing tumor cells. The effectiveness of PDT is limited in part by the low yield of ROS from existing photosensitizers and the unwanted side effects induced by the photosensitizers toward normal cells. Thus the design of nanoplatforms with enhanced PDT is highly desirable but remains challenging. Here, we developed a heavy atom (I) containing dipyrromethene boron difluoride (BODIPY) dye with a silylated functional group, which can be covalently incorporated into a silica matrix to form dye-doped nanoparticles. The incorporated heavy atoms can enhance the generation efficiency of ROS. Meanwhile, the covalently dye-encapsulated nanoparticles can significantly reduce dye leakage and subsequently reduce unwanted side effects. The nanoparticles were successfully taken up by various tumor cells and showed salient phototoxicity against these cells upon light irradiation, demonstrating promising applications in PDT. Moreover, the incorporated iodine atom can be replaced by a radiolabeled iodine atom (e.g., I-124, I-125). The resulting nanoparticles will be good contrast agents for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with their PDT functionality retained. PMID:26211417

  11. Recent Enhancements to the Development of CFD-Based Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent enhancements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) are presented. These enhancements include the simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input, static aeroelastic analysis using a ROM, and matched-point solutions using a ROM. The simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input enables the computation of the unsteady aerodynamic state-space matrices with a single CFD execution, independent of the number of structural modes. The responses obtained from a simultaneous excitation of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system are processed using system identification techniques in order to generate an unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM. Once the unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is generated, a method for computing the static aeroelastic response using this unsteady aerodynamic ROM and a state-space model of the structure, is presented. Finally, a method is presented that enables the computation of matchedpoint solutions using a single ROM that is applicable over a range of dynamic pressures and velocities for a given Mach number. These enhancements represent a significant advancement of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic ROM technology.

  12. Applying lessons learned to enhance human performance and reduce human error for ISS operations

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-09-01

    A major component of reliability, safety, and mission success for space missions is ensuring that the humans involved (flight crew, ground crew, mission control, etc.) perform their tasks and functions as required. This includes compliance with training and procedures during normal conditions, and successful compensation when malfunctions or unexpected conditions occur. A very significant issue that affects human performance in space flight is human error. Human errors can invalidate carefully designed equipment and procedures. If certain errors combine with equipment failures or design flaws, mission failure or loss of life can occur. The control of human error during operation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be critical to the overall success of the program. As experience from Mir operations has shown, human performance plays a vital role in the success or failure of long duration space missions. The Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is developed a systematic approach to enhance human performance and reduce human errors for ISS operations. This approach is based on the systematic identification and evaluation of lessons learned from past space missions such as Mir to enhance the design and operation of ISS. This paper describes previous INEEL research on human error sponsored by NASA and how it can be applied to enhance human reliability for ISS.

  13. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  14. The case of galantamine: repurposing and late blooming of a cholinergic drug

    PubMed Central

    Mucke, Hermann AM

    2015-01-01

    Galantamine is a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterases and an allosteric modulator of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors which restores reduced cholinergic tone in the central and peripheral nervous system. Characterized in the early 1950s in Bulgaria, it saw limited use for paralytic and neuropathic conditions until the cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease opened totally new perspectives for its utility. Although constricted supplies at extremely high prices and a fragmented patent situation made its repurposing challenging, galantamine was globally launched as an Alzheimer’s disease drug in 2000. Many other possible uses have been clinically investigated, and might yet develop into another drug career. This case study is presented as an example for classical on-target drug repurposing and the challenges that such a project can face. PMID:28031923

  15. Stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Acosta, Jazmin I; Browning, Jenny R; Hamilton, Elizabeth C; Neisewander, Janet L

    2009-09-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors (5-HT(1B)Rs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT(1B)R agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253 would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0-1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT(1B)Rs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT(1B)Rs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence.

  16. Beyond Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Novel Cholinergic Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamkwalala, Asante R; Newhouse, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The major components of the cholinergic receptor system of the human brain include projections from the basal forebrain nuclei, and utilize the two types of receptors that they synapse on, nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. With the widespread cortical and subcortical projections of the basal forebrain, activity of these two receptor systems provide modulation of neurotransmitter activity underlying normal cognitive processes, such as attention, episodic memory, and working memory. Alzheimer's disease (AD) targets and damages cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, and as these projections are lost, cognitive performance progressively declines. Currently, the most widely prescribed treatment for AD is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor medications, which work by partially blocking the degradation of acetylcholine in the synapse and enabling more of the neurotransmitter to reach and activate cholinergic receptors. However since these medications have limited effectiveness, alternate treatments that focus on augmenting the activity of the receptors themselves, independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition, are being explored. This review will discuss: 1) the role of the cholinergic system in modulating cognition, 2) novel cholinergic treatment strategies for AD-related cognitive decline, in particular treatments intended to increase cholinergic system activity by selectively targeting muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors to improve cognitive performance, 3) risks, and additional considerations for cholinergic cognitive treatments for AD.

  17. Analgesic and Antineuropathic Drugs Acting Through Central Cholinergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Alessandro; Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo Di; Ghelardini, Carla

    2011-01-01

    The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in analgesia and neuropathic pain relief is relatively unknown. This review describes how such drugs induce analgesia or alleviate neuropathic pain by acting on the central cholinergic system. Several pharmacological strategies are discussed which increase synthesis and release of acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic neurons. The effects of their acute and chronic administration are described. The pharmacological strategies which facilitate the physiological functions of the cholinergic system without altering the normal modulation of cholinergic signals are highlighted. It is proposed that full agonists of muscarinic or nicotinic receptors should be avoided. Their activation is too intense and un-physiological because neuronal signals are distorted when these receptors are constantly activated. Good results can be achieved by using agents that are able to a) increase ACh synthesis, b) partially inhibit cholinesterase activity c) selectively block the autoreceptor or heteroreceptor feedback mechanisms. Activation of M1 subtype muscarinic receptors induces analgesia. Chronic stimulation of nicotinic (N1) receptors has neuronal protective effects. Recent experimental results indicate a relationship between repeated cholinergic stimulation and neurotrophic activation of the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. At least 9 patents covering novel chemicals for cholinergic system modulation and pain control are discussed. PMID:21585331

  18. Tetrachloroethene degradation by reducing-agent enhanced Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Lu, S.; Gu, X.; Yan, N.; Qiu, Z.; Sui, Q.

    2015-12-01

    This project investigated the effect of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene(PCE) by Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC). SPC possesses similar function as liquid H2O2, such that free H2O2 is released into solution when percarbonate is mixed with water. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redoxcycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations.The results of chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO● was the predominant radical in the system and that O2●-played a minor role. This was further confirmed by the results of electron paramagnetic resonance measurements and salicylic acid hydroxylationanalysis by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a strong HO● scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO● was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It should be noted that the release of Cl- was slightly delayed in the first 20 mins, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis did not detect any chlorinated organic compound except PCE, indicating these intermediates were quickly degraded, which resulted in the complete conversion of PCE to CO2. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  19. Cholinergic, Glutamatergic, and GABAergic Neurons of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Have Distinct Effects on Sleep/Wake Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L; Petit, Gaetan; Mahoney, Carrie E; Fuller, Patrick M; Arrigoni, Elda; Scammell, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been implicated in the regulation of cortical activity and behavioral states, including rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. For example, electrical stimulation of the PPT region during sleep leads to rapid awakening, whereas lesions of the PPT in cats reduce REM sleep. Though these effects have been linked with the activity of cholinergic PPT neurons, the PPT also includes intermingled glutamatergic and GABAergic cell populations, and the precise roles of cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT cell groups in regulating cortical activity and behavioral state remain unknown. Using a chemogenetic approach in three Cre-driver mouse lines, we found that selective activation of glutamatergic PPT neurons induced prolonged cortical activation and behavioral wakefulness, whereas inhibition reduced wakefulness and increased non-REM (NREM) sleep. Activation of cholinergic PPT neurons suppressed lower-frequency electroencephalogram rhythms during NREM sleep. Last, activation of GABAergic PPT neurons slightly reduced REM sleep. These findings reveal that glutamatergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons differentially influence cortical activity and sleep/wake states.

  20. A ten fold reduction of nicotine yield in tobacco smoke does not spare the central cholinergic system in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Correa-Santos, Monique; Dutra-Tavares, Ana C; Paes-Branco, Danielle; Nunes-Freitas, Andre; Manhães, Alex C; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The tobacco industry has gradually decreased nicotine content in cigarette smoke but the impact of this reduction on health is still controversial. Since the central cholinergic system is the primary site of action of nicotine, here, we investigated the effects of exposure of adolescent mice to tobacco smoke containing either high or low levels of nicotine on the central cholinergic system and the effects associated with cessation of exposure. From postnatal day (PN) 30 to 45, male and female Swiss mice were exposed to tobacco smoke (whole body exposure, 8h/day, 7 days/week) generated from 2R1F (HighNic group: 1.74mg nicotine/cigarette) or 4A1 (LowNic group: 0.14mg nicotine/cigarette) research cigarettes, whereas control mice were exposed to ambient air. Cholinergic biomarkers were assessed in the cerebral cortex and midbrain by the end of exposure (PN45), at short- (PN50) and long-term (PN75) deprivation. In the cortex, nicotinic cholinergic receptor upregulation was observed with either type of cigarette. In the midbrain, upregulation was detected only in HighNic mice and remained significant in females at short-term deprivation. The high-affinity choline transporter was reduced in the cortex: of HighNic mice by the end of exposure; of both HighNic and LowNic females at short-term deprivation; of LowNic mice at long-term deprivation. These decrements were separable from effects on choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, suggesting cholinergic synaptic impairment. Here, we demonstrated central cholinergic alterations in an animal model of tobacco smoke exposure during adolescence. This system was sensitive even to tobacco smoke with very low nicotine content.

  1. Cortical cholinergic input is required for normal auditory perception and experience-dependent plasticity in adult ferrets.

    PubMed

    Leach, Nicholas D; Nodal, Fernando R; Cordery, Patricia M; King, Andrew J; Bajo, Victoria M

    2013-04-10

    The nucleus basalis (NB) in the basal forebrain provides most of the cholinergic input to the neocortex and has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions related to the processing of sensory stimuli. However, the role that cortical acetylcholine release plays in perception remains unclear. Here we show that selective loss of cholinergic NB neurons that project to the cortex reduces the accuracy with which ferrets localize brief sounds and prevents them from adaptively reweighting auditory localization cues in response to chronic occlusion of one ear. Cholinergic input to the cortex was disrupted by making bilateral injections of the immunotoxin ME20.4-SAP into the NB. This produced a substantial loss of both p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR))-positive and choline acetyltransferase-positive cells in this region and of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibers throughout the auditory cortex. These animals were significantly impaired in their ability to localize short broadband sounds (40-500 ms in duration) in the horizontal plane, with larger cholinergic cell lesions producing greater performance impairments. Although they localized longer sounds with normal accuracy, their response times were significantly longer than controls. Ferrets with cholinergic forebrain lesions were also less able to relearn to localize sound after plugging one ear. In contrast to controls, they exhibited little recovery of localization performance after behavioral training. Together, these results show that cortical cholinergic inputs contribute to the perception of sound source location under normal hearing conditions and play a critical role in allowing the auditory system to adapt to changes in the spatial cues available.

  2. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  3. Basic and modern concepts on cholinergic receptor: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prashant; Dwivedi, Shubhangi; Singh, Mukesh Pratap; Mishra, Rahul; Chandy, Anish

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic system is an important system and a branch of the autonomic nervous system which plays an important role in memory, digestion, control of heart beat, blood pressure, movement and many other functions. This article serves as both structural and functional sources of information regarding cholinergic receptors and provides a detailed understanding of the determinants governing specificity of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor to researchers. The study helps to give overall information about the fundamentals of the cholinergic system, its receptors and ongoing research in this field.

  4. Pure Cold-Induced Cholinergic Urticaria in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tina; Frith, John; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cold urticaria and cholinergic urticaria are two distinct entities. The presentation of exclusive cold-induced cholinergic urticaria is very rare. The patient described herein had experienced urticaria in the exclusive setting of exercising in a cold environment. Urticarial testing including laboratory and in-office testing was all negative. The patient has prevented urticaria symptoms with oral antihistamine therapy. Pure cold-induced cholinergic urticaria is rarely described in literature. This form of urticaria has yet to be described in a pediatric patient. PMID:28025628

  5. Reduced linewidth enhancement factor due to excited state transition of quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Fei; Ji, Hai-Ming; Xiao, Jin-Long; Gu, Yong-Xian; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Tao

    2012-04-15

    The carrier induced refractive index change and linewidth enhancement factor α due to ground-state (GS) and excited-state (ES) transitions have been compared by measuring the optical gain spectra from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) laser structure. It is shown that the ES transition exhibits a reduced α-factor compared to the value due to the GS transition. This result can be explained by the α-factor due to the ES transition having a smaller increase from the non-resonant carriers in the combined state of the wetting layer and InGaAs strain reducing layer than the α-factor increase due to the GS transition, since the relaxation time for carriers from the combined state of the wetting layer and InGaAs strain reducing layer to the ES is shorter than to the GS. The result reported here shows another advantage of using ES QD lasers for optical communication, in addition to their higher modulation speed.

  6. Increased sensitivity to cocaine by cholinergic cell ablation in nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hikida, Takatoshi; Kaneko, Satoshi; Isobe, Tomohiro; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Watanabe, Dai; Pastan, Ira; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2001-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cocaine causes long-lasting behavioral changes associated with cocaine reinforcement and addiction. An important neural substrate for cocaine addiction is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which receives dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area. Although the neural circuit of the NAc is controlled by several other neurotransmitters, their involvement in cocaine addiction remains elusive. In this investigation, we ablated cholinergic interneurons from the adult NAc with immunotoxin-mediated cell targeting and examined the role of acetylcholine transmitter in adaptive behavioral changes associated with cocaine reinforcement and addiction. Acute exposure to cocaine induced abnormal rotation in unilaterally cholinergic cell-eliminated mice. This abnormal turning was enhanced by repeated exposure of cocaine. In bilaterally cholinergic cell-eliminated mice, chronic cocaine administration induced a prominent and progressive increase in locomotor activity. Moreover, these mice showed robust conditioned place preference with a lower dose of cocaine, compared with wild-type littermates. This investigation demonstrates that acetylcholine in the NAc plays a key role in both acute and chronic actions of cocaine. PMID:11606786

  7. Effectiveness of nootropic drugs with cholinergic activity in treatment of cognitive deficit: a review

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Luisa; Bosco, Massimiliano; Ziello, Antonio Rosario; Rea, Raffaele; Amenta, Francesco; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria

    2012-01-01

    Nootropics represent probably the first “smart drugs” used for the treatment of cognitive deficits. The aim of this paper is to verify, by a systematic analysis of the literature, the effectiveness of nootropics in this indication. The analysis was limited to nootropics with cholinergic activity, in view of the role played by acetylcholine in learning and memory. Acetylcholine was the first neurotransmitter identified in the history of neuroscience and is the main neurotransmitter of the peripheral, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for the 5-year period 2006–2011. From the data reported in the literature, it emerges that nootropics may be an effective alternative for strengthening and enhancing cognitive performance in patients with a range of pathologies. Although nootropics, and specifically the cholinergic precursors, already have a long history behind them, according to recent renewal of interest, they still seem to have a significant therapeutic role. Drugs with regulatory indications for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, often have transient effects in dementia disorders. Nootropics with a cholinergic profile and documented clinical effectiveness in combination with cognate drugs such as cholinesterase inhibitors or alone in patients who are not suitable for these inhibitors should be taken into account and evaluated further. PMID:27186129

  8. Agonist-induced restoration of hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive improvement in a model of cholinergic denervation.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Eckman, Christopher B

    2010-05-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus and severe neuronal loss within the hippocampal CA1 region are early hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, and are strongly correlated with cognitive status. Various therapeutic approaches involve attempts to enhance neurotransmission or to provide some level of neuroprotection for remaining cells. An alternative approach may involve the generation of new cells to replace those lost in AD. Indeed, a simple shift in the balance between cell generation and cell loss may slow disease progression and possibly even reverse existing cognitive deficits. One potential neurogenic regulator might be acetylcholine, itself, which has been shown to play a critical role in hippocampal development. Here, we report the effects of various cholinergic compounds on indices of hippocampal neurogenesis, demonstrating a significant induction following pharmacological activation of muscarinic M1 receptors, located on hippocampal progenitors in the adult brain. This is the first report that a small-molecule agonist may induce neurogenesis in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, such treatment reversed deficits in markers of neurogenesis and spatial working memory triggered by cholinergic denervation in a rodent model. This study suggests the use of small molecule, receptor agonists may represent a novel means to trigger the restoration of specific neuronal populations lost to a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of periaqueductal grey neurons: does it contribute to epileptogenesis after organophosphorus nerve agent intoxication?

    PubMed

    Sanada, Mitsuru; Zheng, Fang; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian

    2007-04-20

    Previous work has shown that a single focal microinjection of the unselective cholinergic agonist, carbachol, into the periaqueductal grey (PAG) of the midbrain is sufficient to induce forebrain seizures in rats. In order to determine the cholinergic mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis at the cellular and network level of the PAG, we performed whole-cell recordings from rat PAG neurons in vitro and examined how the activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors modulates cellular excitability and synaptic responses. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors produced either a pirenzepine-sensitive depolarization (40% of PAG neurons), or a gallamine-sensitive hyperpolarization (20%), suggesting the involvement of M1 and M2 receptors, respectively. In the remaining neurons (40%), no change was observed. Voltage-clamp recordings showed that muscarinic depolarization resulted from the inhibition of a resting K(+) current, in part accompanied by simultaneous activation of a presumed non-selective cation current. Muscarinic hyperpolarization was caused by the activation of a G protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K(+) current. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors enhanced the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), but strongly suppressed evoked IPSCs. In addition, nicotine almost doubled the frequency of miniature IPSCs. Based on our findings and the network properties of the PAG, we advance a scenario in which excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors would substantially contribute to generalized seizures after organophosphorus nerve agent poisoning.

  10. Somatostatin inhibits cANP-mediated cholinergic transmission in the myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which somatostatin acts to modulate cholinergic transmission is not clear. In this study the authors investigated the role of the adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in mediating cholinergic transmission in the guinea pig myenteric plexus and examined the ability of somatostatin to alter acetylcholine (ACh) release stimulated by various cAMP agonists. Forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and cholera toxin each stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh in a dose-related manner. Addition of theophylline enhanced the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh stimulated by these cAMP agonists. The observations suggest that cAMP may serve as a physiological mediator for ACh release from myenteric neurons. Somatostatin inhibited release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by various cAMP agonists in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin antagonized the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by forskolin, VIP, or cholera toxin but had no effect on the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by 8-bromo-cAMP. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which somatostatin inhibits cAMP-mediated cholinergic transmission is via activation of the inhibitory regulatory protein (N{sub i} subunit) of adenyalte cyclase.

  11. Age-Related Decrements in the Muscarinic Enhancement of K(+)-Evoked Release of Endogenous Striatal Dopamine: An Indicator of Altered Cholinergic-Dopaminergic Reciprocal Inhibitory Control in Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED FILE N V AinAW~I~ "A’IbRT DOCUMENTATION PAGEI MUJlbV - lbAD -A20 " 2 1 . RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS 2 3.. , . DISTRIUUTION/AVAI LABILITY OF...degassed tained (in mM) NaHCO 3 21, glucose 3.4, NaH 2PO4 100 mM KH 2PO4 buffer containing 3 mM 1 -heptane- 1.3, EGTA 1 , MgCi 2 0.93, NaCI 127 and KCI 2.5...0#M, 10MuM, 100 MM, 500 MM)]. 20 In addition, the specificity of any muscarinic agonist 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 enhancement of KCI-induced

  12. Pharmacological and Behavioral Enhancement of Neuroplasticity in the MPTP-Lesioned Mouse and Nonhuman Primate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    environmental enrichment with objects to promote social interactions , reduce stress, and provide voluntary exercise with running wheels [30; 31...2000. Cholinergic basal forebrain is critical for social transmission of food preferences. Hippocampus 10, 729–738. Berger, T.W., Kaul, S., Stricker...receptor agonist, enhances neuroplasticity by modulating glutamate- dopamine interactions . This proposal has two components. Using the MPTP C57BL/6 mouse

  13. Reduced Carbohydrate Availability Enhances the Susceptibility of Arabidopsis toward Colletotrichum higginsianum1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Horst, Robin J.; Pröls, Reinhard; Pröschel, Marlene; Dietz, Franziska; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Voll, Lars M.

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus that is adapted to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). After breaching the host surface, the fungus establishes an initial biotrophic phase in the penetrated epidermis cell, before necrotrophic growth is initiated upon further host colonization. We observed that partitioning of major leaf carbohydrates was shifted in favor of sucrose and at the expense of starch during necrotrophic fungal growth. Arabidopsis mutants with impaired starch turnover were more susceptible toward C. higginsianum infection, exhibiting a strong negative correlation between diurnal carbohydrate accumulation and fungal proliferation for the tested genotypes. By altering the length of the light phase and employing additional genotypes impaired in nocturnal carbon mobilization, we revealed that reduced availability of carbon enhances susceptibility in the investigated pathosystem. Systematic starvation experiments resulted in two important findings. First, we showed that carbohydrate supply by the host is dispensable during biotrophic growth of C. higginsianum, while carbon deficiency was most harmful to the host during the necrotrophic colonization phase. Compared with the wild type, the increases in the total salicylic acid pool and camalexin accumulation were reduced in starch-free mutants at late interaction stages, while an increased ratio of free to total salicylic acid did not convey elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression in starch-free mutants. These observations suggest that reduced carbon availability dampens induced defense responses. In contrast, starch-free mutants were more resistant toward the fungal biotroph Erysiphe cruciferarum, indicating that reduced carbohydrate availability influences susceptibility differently in the interaction with the investigated hemibiotrophic and biotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:23487433

  14. Surface modifications of photoanodes in dye sensitized solar cells: enhanced light harvesting and reduced recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Vibha; Aswal, D. K.

    2015-06-01

    In a quest to harvest solar power, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have potential for low-cost eco-friendly photovoltaic devices. The major processes which govern the efficiency of a DSSC are photoelectron generation, injection of photo-generated electrons to the conduction band (CB) of the mesoporous nanocrystalline semiconductor (nc-SC); transport of CB electrons through nc-SC and subsequent collection of CB electrons at the counter electrode (CE) through the external circuit; and dye regeneration by redox couple or hole transport layer (HTL). Most of these processes occur at various interfaces of the photoanode. In addition, recombination losses of photo-generated electrons with either dye or redox molecules take place at the interfaces. Therefore, one of the key requirements for high efficiency is to improve light harvesting of the photoanode and to reduce the recombination losses at various interfaces. In this direction, surface modification of the photoanode is the simplest method among the various other approaches available in the literature. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion on surface modification of the photoanode, which has been adopted in the literature for not only enhancing light harvesting but also reducing recombination. Various approaches towards surface modification of the photoanode discussed are (i) fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)/nc-SC interface modified via a compact layer of semiconductor material which blocks exposed sites of FTO to electrolyte (or HTL), (ii) nc-SC/dye interface modification either through acid treatment resulting in enhanced dye loading due to a positively charged surface or by depositing insulating/semiconducting blocking layer on the nc-SC surface, which acts as a tunneling barrier for recombination, (iii) nc-SC/dye interface modified by employing co-adsorbents which helps in reducing the dye aggregation and thereby recombination, and (iv) dye/electrolyte (or dye/HTL) interface modification using

  15. Different additives to enhance the gelation of surimi gel with reduced sodium content.

    PubMed

    Cando, Deysi; Herranz, Beatriz; Borderías, A Javier; Moreno, Helena M

    2016-04-01

    This study tested the effect of adding tetra-sodium pyrophosphate, cystine and lysine as surimi gelation enhancers (Alaska Pollock) in order to reduce the sodium content of gels up to 0.3%. These gels were compared with others that contained 3% NaCl content (the amount typically used for surimi processing). To induce protein gelation, gels were first heated and then set at 5 °C/24 h. Once the physicochemical and rheological properties of the gels were determined, cystine and lysine were found to be the most effective additives improving the characteristics of low NaCl surimi gels. The action of these additives is mainly based on the induction of myofibrillar protein unfolding thus facilitating the formation of the types of bonds needed to establish an appropriate network. It was found that a setting period was needed for gel processing to maximize the effect of the additives.

  16. Loss of Drosophila Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation through reduced Tor activity

    PubMed Central

    Takáts, Szabolcs; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Juhász, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The HOPS tethering complex facilitates autophagosome-lysosome fusion by binding to Syx17 (Syntaxin 17), the autophagosomal SNARE. Here we show that loss of the core HOPS complex subunit Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation and slows down Drosophila development. Mechanistically, Tor kinase is less active in Vps16A mutants likely due to impaired endocytic and biosynthetic transport to the lysosome, a site of its activation. Tor reactivation by overexpression of Rheb suppresses autophagosome formation and restores growth and developmental timing in these animals. Thus, Vps16A reduces autophagosome numbers both by indirectly restricting their formation rate and by directly promoting their clearance. In contrast, the loss of Syx17 blocks autophagic flux without affecting the induction step in Drosophila. PMID:26061715

  17. Robust energy enhancement of ultrashort pulse laser accelerated protons from reduced mass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Metzkes, J.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kraft, S. D.; Sauerbrey, R.; Schmidt, B.; Zier, M.; Schramm, U.

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on a systematic investigation of the ultrashort pulse laser driven acceleration of protons from thin targets of finite size, so-called reduced mass targets (RMTs). Reproducible series of targets, manufactured with lithographic techniques, and varying in size, thickness, and mounting geometry, were irradiated with ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses of intensities of about 8 × 1020 W cm-2. A robust maximum energy enhancement of almost a factor of two was found when comparing gold RMTs to reference irradiations of plain gold foils of the same thickness. Furthermore, a change of the thickness of these targets has less influence on the measured maximum proton energy when compared to standard foils, which, based on detailed particle-in-cell simulations, can be explained by the influence of the RMT geometry on the electron sheath. The performance gain was, however, restricted to lateral target sizes of greater than 50 µm, which can be attributed to edge and mounting structure influences.

  18. Climate change reduces warming potential of nitrous oxide by an enhanced Brewer-Dobson circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, Daniela; Reick, Christian H.; Manzini, Elisa; Schultz, Martin G.; Stein, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), which is an important driver of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, is expected to accelerate with climate change. One particular consequence of this acceleration is the enhanced transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) from its sources at the Earth's surface toward its main sink region in the stratosphere, thus inducing a reduction in its lifetime. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas and the most relevant currently emitted ozone-depleting substance. Here we examine the implications of a reduced N2O lifetime in the context of climate change. We find a decrease in its global warming potential (GWP) and, due to a decline in the atmospheric N2O burden, also a reduction in its total radiative forcing. From the idealized transient global warming simulation we can identify linear regressions for N2O sink, lifetime, and GWP with temperature rise. Our findings are thus not restricted to a particular scenario.

  19. Hydrophilic prodrug approach for reduced pigment binding and enhanced transscleral retinal delivery of celecoxib.

    PubMed

    Malik, Pradip; Kadam, Rajendra S; Cheruvu, Narayan P S; Kompella, Uday B

    2012-03-05

    Transscleral retinal delivery of celecoxib, an anti-inflammatory and anti-VEGF agent, is restricted by its poor solubility and binding to the melanin pigment in choroid-RPE. The purpose of this study was to develop soluble prodrugs of celecoxib with reduced pigment binding and enhanced retinal delivery. Three hydrophilic amide prodrugs of celecoxib, celecoxib succinamidic acid (CSA), celecoxib maleamidic acid (CMA), and celecoxib acetamide (CAA) were synthesized and characterized for solubility and lipophilicity. In vitro melanin binding to natural melanin (Sepia officinalis) was estimated for all three prodrugs. In vitro transport studies across isolated bovine sclera and sclera-choroid-RPE (SCRPE) were performed. Prodrug with the highest permeability across SCRPE was characterized for metabolism and cytotoxicity and its in vivo transscleral delivery in pigmented rats. Aqueous solubilities of CSA, CMA, and CAA were 300-, 182-, and 76-fold higher, respectively, than celecoxib. Melanin binding affinity and capacity were significantly lower than for celecoxib for all three prodrugs. Rank order for the % in vitro transport across bovine sclera and SCRPE was CSA > CMA ~ CAA ~ celecoxib, with the transport being 8-fold higher for CSA than celecoxib. CSA was further assessed for its metabolic stability and in vivo delivery. CSA showed optimum metabolic stability in all eye tissues with only 10-20% conversion to parent celecoxib in 30 min. Metabolic enzymes responsible for bioconversion included amidases, esterase, and cytochrome P-450. In vivo delivery in pigmented BN rats showed that CSA had 4.7-, 1.4-, 3.3-, 6.0-, and 4.5-fold higher delivery to sclera, choroid-RPE, retina, vitreous, and lens than celecoxib. CSA has no cytotoxicity in ARPE-19 cells in the concentration range of 0.1 to 1000 μM. Celecoxib succinamidic acid, a soluble prodrug of celecoxib with reduced melanin binding, enhances transscleral retinal delivery of celecoxib.

  20. Liraglutide reduces lipid accumulation in steatotic L‑02 cells by enhancing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Man; Zhu, Min

    2014-11-01

    Simple hepatic steatosis is the early stage of non‑alcoholic fatty liver disease and is recognized as a benign process. Previous studies show that glucagon‑like peptide‑1 has great potential in improving hepatic steatosis. Recent data have revealed that inhibiting autophagy exacerbates lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effects of liraglutide (LG) on simple hepatic steatosis and the possible role of autophagy. Firstly, steatotic L‑02 cells were induced by incubating L‑02 cells with 1 mmol/l free fatty acid (FFA) mixture (oleic acid and palmitic acid at a molar ratio of 2:1) for 24 h. Intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability, oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated. Secondly, steatotic L‑02 cells were treated with 10 or 100 nmol/l LG, 100 nmol/l LG plus 3‑methyladenine (3‑MA), or rapamycin for 24 h, and then lipid accumulation was measured. Next, the degree of lipid accumulation and the intensity of autophagy were assessed. Oil red O staining and triglyceride quantification demonstrated notable steatosis in L‑02 cells following exposure to 1 mmol/l FFA mixture for 24 h. There was no significant cytotoxicity, oxidative stress or apoptosis in steatotic L‑02 cells. Treatment with 100 nmol/l LG reduced lipid accumulation in steatotic L‑02 cells and increased the mRNA levels of microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3B. Additionally, it enhanced the autophagic flux in steatotic L‑02 cells, as measured by western blot analysis and shown by electron microscopy. Additionally, 3‑MA weakened the ability of LG to improve hepatic steatosis and enhance autophagy. Our data indicate that LG reduces the lipid accumulation in steatotic L‑02 cells, and the activation of autophagy plays a significant role in this process.

  1. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M; van Minnen, L Paul; Rijkers, Ger T; Timmerman, Harro M; Franzén, Lennart E; Gooszen, Hein G; Akkermans, Louis M A; Söderholm, Johan D; Sandström, Per A

    2008-11-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress, inflammation, and acinar cell injury during the early phase of AP. Fifty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into groups: 1) control, 2) sham procedure, 3) AP with no treatment, 4) AP with probiotics, and 5) AP with placebo. AP was induced under general anesthesia by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion (15 mM) and intravenous cerulein (5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1), for 6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting 5 days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, pancreas samples were collected for analysis including lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, histological grading of pancreatic injury, and NF-kappaB activation. The severity of pancreatic injury correlated to oxidative damage (r = 0.9) and was ameliorated by probiotics (1.5 vs. placebo 5.5; P = 0.014). AP-induced NF-kappaB activation was reduced by probiotics (0.20 vs. placebo 0.53 OD(450nm)/mg nuclear protein; P < 0.001). Probiotics attenuated AP-induced lipid peroxidation (0.25 vs. placebo 0.51 pmol malondialdehyde/mg protein; P < 0.001). Not only was AP-induced glutathione depletion prevented (8.81 vs. placebo 4.1 micromol/mg protein, P < 0.001), probiotic pretreatment even increased glutathione compared with sham rats (8.81 vs. sham 6.18 miccromol/mg protein, P < 0.001). Biosynthesis of glutathione (glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity) was enhanced in probiotic-pretreated animals. Probiotics enhanced the biosynthesis of glutathione, which may have reduced activation of inflammation and acinar cell injury and ameliorated experimental AP, via a reduction in oxidative stress.

  2. BDA-410 Treatment Reduces Body Weight and Fat Content by Enhancing Lipolysis in Sedentary Senescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Andrea S; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Zhang, Tan; Wu, Hanzhi; Register, Thomas C; Forbes, Elizabeth; Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O; Files, Daniel Clark; Abba, Martin C; Furdui, Cristina; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-27

    Loss of muscle mass and force with age leads to fall risk, mobility impairment, and reduced quality of life. This article shows that BDA-410, a calpain inhibitor, induced loss of body weight and fat but not lean mass or skeletal muscle proteins in a cohort of sedentary 23-month-old mice. Food and water intake and locomotor activity were not modified, whereas BDA-410 treatment decreased intramyocellular lipid and perigonadal fat, increased serum nonesterified fatty acids, and upregulated the genes mediating lipolysis and oxidation, lean phenotype, muscle contraction, muscle transcription regulation, and oxidative stress response. This finding is consistent with our recent report that lipid accumulation in skeletal myofibers is significantly correlated with slower fiber-contraction kinetics and diminished power in obese older adult mice. A proteomic analysis and immunoblot showed downregulation of the phosphatase PPP1R12B, which increases phosphorylated myosin half-life and modulates the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. This study demonstrates that BDA-410 exerts a beneficial effect on skeletal muscle contractility through new, alternative mechanisms, including enhanced lipolysis, upregulation of "lean phenotype-related genes," downregulation of the PP1R12B phosphatase, and enhanced excitation-contraction coupling. This single compound holds promise for treating age-dependent decline in muscle composition and strength.

  3. Reduced expression of glycolate oxidase leads to enhanced disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Chern, Mawsheng; Bai, Wei; Chen, Xuewei; Canlas, Patrick E; Ronald, Pamela C

    2013-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GLO) is a key enzyme in photorespiration, catalyzing the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate. Arabidopsis GLO is required for nonhost defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae and for tobacco Pto/AvrPto-mediated defense responses. We previously described identification of rice GLO1 that interacts with a glutaredoxin protein, which in turn interacts with TGA transcription factors. TGA transcription factors are well known to participate in NPR1/NH1-mediated defense signaling, which is crucial to systemic acquired resistance in plants. Here we demonstrate that reduction of rice GLO1 expression leads to enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo). Constitutive silencing of GLO1 leads to programmed cell death, resulting in a lesion-mimic phenotype and lethality or reduced plant growth and development, consistent with previous reports. Inducible silencing of GLO1, employing a dexamethasone-GVG (Gal4 DNA binding domain-VP16 activation domain-glucocorticoid receptor fusion) inducible system, alleviates these detrimental effects. Silencing of GLO1 results in enhanced resistance to Xoo, increased expression of defense regulators NH1, NH3, and WRKY45, and activation of PR1 expression.

  4. Enhanced coagulation for improving coagulation performance and reducing residual aluminum combining polyaluminum chloride with diatomite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenchao; Wu, Chunde

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of using enhanced coagulation, which combined polyaluminum chloride (PAC) with diatomite for improving coagulation performance and reducing the residual aluminum (Al), was discussed. The effects of PAC and diatomite dosage on the coagulation performance and residual Al were mainly investigated. Results demonstrated that the removal efficiencies of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV254 were significantly improved by the enhanced coagulation, compared with PAC coagulation alone. Meaningfully, the five forms of residual Al (total Al (TAl), total dissolved Al (TDAl), dissolved organic Al (DOAl), dissolved monomeric Al (DMAl), and dissolved organic monomeric Al (DOMAl)) all had different degrees of reduction in the presence of diatomite and achieved the lowest concentrations (0.185, 0.06, 0.053, 0.014, and 0 mg L(-1), respectively) at a PAC dose of 15 mg L(-1) and diatomite dose of 40 mg L(-1). In addition, when PAC was used as coagulant, the majority of residual Al existed in dissolved form (about 31.14-70.16%), and the content of DOMAl was small in the DMAl.

  5. Vertical Finger Displacement is Reduced in Index Finger Tapping During Repeated Bout Rate Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-12-21

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip. Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping.

  6. Structural mediation on polycation nanoparticles by sulfadiazine to enhance DNA transfection efficiency and reduce toxicity.

    PubMed

    Long, Xingwen; Zhang, Zhihui; Han, Shangcong; Tang, Minjie; Zhou, Junhui; Zhang, Jianhua; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Rongxin; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2015-04-15

    Reducing the toxicity while maintaining high transfection efficiency is an important issue for cationic polymers as gene carriers in clinical application. In this paper, a new zwitterionic copolymer, polycaprolactone-g-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methyacrylate-co-sulfadiazine methacrylate) (PC-SDZ) with unique pH-sensitivity, was designed and prepared. The incorporation of sulfadiazine into poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) chains successfully mediates the surface properties including compacter shell structure, lower density of positive charges, stronger proton buffer capability, and enhanced hydrophobicity, which lead to reduction in toxicity and enhancements in stability, cellular uptake, endosome escape, and transfection efficiency for the PC-SDZ2 nanoparticles (NPs)/DNA complexes. Excellent transfection efficiency at the optimal N/P ratio of 10 was observed for PC-SDZ2 NPs/DNA complexes, which was higher than that of the commercial reagent-branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The cytotoxicity was evaluated by CCK8 measurement, and the results showed significant reduction in cytotoxicity even at high concentration of complexes after sulfadiazine modification. Therefore, this work may demonstrate a new way of structural mediation of cationic polymer carriers for gene delivery with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  7. Reduced graphene oxide/CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Jasmeet Anand, Kanika; Singh, Gurpreet; Hastir, Anita; Virpal,; Singh, Ravi Chand; Anand, Kanica

    2015-05-15

    In this work, reduced graphene oxide /cerium oxide (RGO/CeO{sub 2}) nanocomposite was synthesized by in situ reduction of cerium nitrate Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O in the presence of graphene oxide by hydrazine hydrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O). The intrinsic characteristics of as-prepared nanocomposite were studied using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) was employed as a model reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of the RGO/CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite. The as-obtained RGO/CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite displays a significantly enhanced photocatalytic degradation of MB dye in comparison with bare CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles under sunlight irradiation, which can be attributed to the improved separation of electron-hole pairs and enhanced adsorption performance due to presence of RGO.

  8. Terbium-Doped VO2 Thin Films: Reduced Phase Transition Temperature and Largely Enhanced Luminous Transmittance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Duchamp, Martial; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Liu, Shiyu; Zeng, XianTing; Cao, Xun; Long, Yi

    2016-01-26

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a well-known thermochromic material with large IR modulating ability, promising for energy-saving smart windows. The main drawbacks of VO2 are its high phase transition temperature (τ(c) = 68°C), low luminous transmission (T(lum)), and weak solar modulating ability (ΔT(sol)). In this paper, the terbium cation (Tb(3+)) doping was first reported to reduce τ(c) and increase T(lum) of VO2 thin films. Compared with pristine VO2, 2 at. % doping level gives both enhanced T(lum) and ΔT(sol) from 45.8% to 54.0% and 7.7% to 8.3%, respectively. The T(lum) increases with continuous Tb(3+) doping and reaches 79.4% at 6 at. % doping level, representing ∼73.4% relative increment compared with pure VO2. This has surpassed the best reported doped VO2 thin films. The enhanced thermochromic properties is meaningful for smart window applications of VO2 materials.

  9. Cannabinoid and cholinergic systems interact during performance of a short-term memory task in the rat.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Robinson, Lianne; Hampson, Robert E; Riedel, Gernot

    2010-10-01

    It is now well established that cannabinoid agonists such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), anandamide, and WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) produce potent and specific deficits in working memory (WM)/short-term memory (STM) tasks in rodents. Although mediated through activation of CB1 receptors located in memory-related brain regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, these may, in part, be due to a reduction in acetylcholine release (i.e., cholinergic hypofunction). To determine the interaction between cannabinoid and cholinergic systems, we exposed rats treated with WIN-2 or cholinergic drugs to a hippocampal-dependent delayed nonmatch to sample (DNMS) task to study STM, and recorded hippocampal single-unit activity in vivo. WIN-2 induced significant deficits in DNMS performance and reduced the average firing and bursting rates of hippocampal principal cells through a CB1 receptor-mediated mechanism. Rivastigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, reversed these STM deficits and normalized hippocampal discharge rates. Effects were specific to 1 mg/kg WIN-2 as rivastigmine failed to reverse the behavioral and physiological deficits that were observed in the presence of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. This supports the notion that cannabinoid-modulated cholinergic activity is a mechanism underlying the performance deficits in DNMS. Whether deficits are due to reduced nicotinic or muscarinic receptor activation, or both, awaits further analysis.

  10. Centrality of Striatal Cholinergic Transmission in Basal Ganglia Function

    PubMed Central

    Bonsi, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Martella, Giuseppina; Madeo, Graziella; Schirinzi, Tommaso; Puglisi, Francesca; Ponterio, Giulia; Pisani, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Work over the past two decades revealed a previously unexpected role for striatal cholinergic interneurons in the context of basal ganglia function. The recognition that these interneurons are essential in synaptic plasticity and motor learning represents a significant step ahead in deciphering how the striatum processes cortical inputs, and why pathological circumstances cause motor dysfunction. Loss of the reciprocal modulation between dopaminergic inputs and the intrinsic cholinergic innervation within the striatum appears to be the trigger for pathophysiological changes occurring in basal ganglia disorders. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence showing profound changes in cholinergic markers in these disorders, in particular Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Based on converging experimental and clinical evidence, we provide an overview of the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in physiological and pathological conditions, in the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders. PMID:21344017

  11. Effect of tianeptine on the central cholinergic system: involvement of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bertorelli, R; Amoroso, D; Girotti, P; Consolo, S

    1992-03-01

    The effect of tianeptine on in vivo acetylcholine (ACh) release from brain hemispheric regions of freely moving rats was investigated using the microdialysis technique coupled with a sensitive radioenzymatic method. Tianeptine, at the dose of 30 mg/kg i.p., reduced ACh release from dorsal hippocampi by 40% in 40 min, and induced a 30% decrease of ACh output from frontal cortices while at the doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg it had no effect. In striata the drug did not significantly affect ACh release although it showed a tendency to increase it. The ACh content in the three areas considered was not affected by tianeptine at above doses. The drug did not alter choline-o-acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities suggesting that it did not influence the cholinergic system through direct action on the ACh metabolism; furthermore, it did not influence the sodium-dependent high-affinity uptake of choline in striatum, cortex and hippocampus. Impairment of serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission by chemical lesion of the median raphe nucleus or by metergoline, a blocker of 5-HT receptors, antagonized the cholinergic effect of tianeptine. The involvement of the serotonergic system is specific because lesions of the noradrenergic dorsal bundle failed to prevent the inhibitory action of tianeptine. The present data suggest that 5-HT may mediate the effect of tianeptine on the cholinergic system in dorsal hippocampi.

  12. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Minggang; Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli; Zheng, Minrui; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Thong, John T. L.; Li, Baowen

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} to 1.22 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  13. Nutrient-Enhanced Diet Reduces Noise-Induced Damage to the Inner Ear and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Gagnon, P. M; Bennett, D. C.; Ohlemiller, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been broadly implicated as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared to PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of Type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (p<0.05), and there was a trend towards less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that pre-noise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. Demonstration of functional and morphological preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients, and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  14. Navigating the information technology highway: computer solutions to reduce errors and enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Ranie

    2005-10-01

    Standardized, seamless, integrated information technology in the health-care environment used with other industry tools can markedly decrease preventable errors or adverse events and increase patient safety. According to an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report released in 1999, preventable errors have caused between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths per year. Following the report, President Bill Clinton requested that the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality, a government agency, look into the issue and fund, at the local or state level, processes that can reduce errors. Funding subsequently was made available for research that utilizes best practice tools in clinical practice to increase patient safety. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization has placed a great deal of emphasis on strategies to reduce patient identification errors. Fragmented systems tout the individual as well as enhanced safety applications. These applications, however, are related to prevention in specific conditions and in specific health-care settings. Systems are not integrated with common reference data and common terminology aggregated at a regional or national level to provide access to patient safety risks for timely interventions before errors and adverse events occur. Standardized integrated patient care information systems are not available either on a regional or on a national level. This article examines tangible options to increase patient safety through improved state-of-the-art tools that can be incorporated into the health-care system to prevent errors.

  15. Enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing for assessment of DNA methylation at base pair resolution.

    PubMed

    Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Sheridan, Caroline K; Kacmarczyk, Thadeous J; Ishii, Jennifer; Betel, Doron; Alonso, Alicia; Mason, Christopher E; Figueroa, Maria E; Melnick, Ari M

    2015-02-24

    DNA methylation pattern mapping is heavily studied in normal and diseased tissues. A variety of methods have been established to interrogate the cytosine methylation patterns in cells. Reduced representation of whole genome bisulfite sequencing was developed to detect quantitative base pair resolution cytosine methylation patterns at GC-rich genomic loci. This is accomplished by combining the use of a restriction enzyme followed by bisulfite conversion. Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (ERRBS) increases the biologically relevant genomic loci covered and has been used to profile cytosine methylation in DNA from human, mouse and other organisms. ERRBS initiates with restriction enzyme digestion of DNA to generate low molecular weight fragments for use in library preparation. These fragments are subjected to standard library construction for next generation sequencing. Bisulfite conversion of unmethylated cytosines prior to the final amplification step allows for quantitative base resolution of cytosine methylation levels in covered genomic loci. The protocol can be completed within four days. Despite low complexity in the first three bases sequenced, ERRBS libraries yield high quality data when using a designated sequencing control lane. Mapping and bioinformatics analysis is then performed and yields data that can be easily integrated with a variety of genome-wide platforms. ERRBS can utilize small input material quantities making it feasible to process human clinical samples and applicable in a range of research applications. The video produced demonstrates critical steps of the ERRBS protocol.

  16. HIV-1 enhancing effect of prostatic acid phosphatase peptides is reduced in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Martellini, Julie A; Cole, Amy L; Svoboda, Pavel; Stuchlik, Olga; Chen, Li-Mei; Chai, Karl X; Gangrade, Bhushan K; Sørensen, Ole E; Pohl, Jan; Cole, Alexander M

    2011-01-20

    We recently reported that HIV-1 infection can be inhibited by innate antimicrobial components of human seminal plasma (SP). Conversely, naturally occurring peptidic fragments from the SP-derived prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) have been reported to form amyloid fibrils called "SEVI" and enhance HIV-1 infection in vitro. In order to understand the biological consequence of this proviral effect, we extended these studies in the presence of human SP. PAP-derived peptides were agitated to form SEVI and incubated in the presence or absence of SP. While PAP-derived peptides and SEVI alone were proviral, the presence of 1% SP ablated their proviral activity in several different anti-HIV-1 assays. The anti-HIV-1 activity of SP was concentration dependent and was reduced following filtration. Supraphysiological concentrations of PAP peptides and SEVI incubated with diluted SP were degraded within hours, with SP exhibiting proteolytic activity at dilutions as high as 1:200. Sub-physiological concentrations of two prominent proteases of SP, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and matriptase, could degrade physiological and supraphysiological concentrations of PAP peptides and SEVI. While human SP is a complex biological fluid, containing both antiviral and proviral factors, our results suggest that PAP peptides and SEVI may be subject to naturally occurring proteolytic components capable of reducing their proviral activity.

  17. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes identified rat mesopontine cholinergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Reiner, P B

    1993-09-01

    Inhibition of brainstem cholinergic neurons by noradrenergic neurons of the locus ceruleus has long been suggested as a key mechanism of behavioral state control. In particular, the commonly held view is that noradrenaline (NA) plays a permissive role in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation by disinhibiting brainstem cholinergic neurons. While this notion has been supported by numerous investigations, the inhibition of cholinergic neurons by NA has never been directly demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of NA upon identified cholinergic neurons in the rat mesopontine tegmentum. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in slices, 175 cells were studied during bath application of 50 microM NA. Cholinergic neurons were positively identified by intracellular labeling with biocytin and subsequent staining with NADPH-diaphorase, a reliable marker for brainstem cholinergic neurons (Vincent et al., 1983). Successful intracellular labeling was obtained in 96 cells. Ninety-two percent (36 of 39) of cholinergic neurons hyperpolarized in response to NA, while noncholinergic cells (n = 57) exhibited mixed responses. Application of NA in a low-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solution elicited the same hyperpolarizing effect as in normal solution, which indicated that the effect of NA on cholinergic neurons was direct. The noradrenergic hyperpolarization was mimicked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14,304, and was blocked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, which suggested an alpha 2-mediated response. Finally, voltage-clamp experiments revealed that NA activates the inwardly rectifying potassium current, IKG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A second wind for the cholinergic system in Alzheimer's therapy.

    PubMed

    Douchamps, Vincent; Mathis, Chantal

    2017-04-01

    Notwithstanding tremendous research efforts, the cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains elusive and there is no curative treatment. The cholinergic hypothesis presented 35 years ago was the first major evidence-based hypothesis on the etiology of AD. It proposed that the depletion of brain acetylcholine was a primary cause of cognitive decline in advanced age and AD. It relied on a series of observations obtained in aged animals, elderly, and AD patients that pointed to dysfunctions of cholinergic basal forebrain, similarities between cognitive impairments induced by anticholinergic drugs and those found in advanced age and AD, and beneficial effects of drugs stimulating cholinergic activity. This review revisits these major results to show how this hypothesis provided the drive for the development of anticholinesterase inhibitor-based therapies of AD, the almost exclusively approved treatment in use despite transient and modest efficacy. New ideas for improving cholinergic therapies are also compared and discussed in light of the current revival of the cholinergic hypothesis on the basis of two sets of evidence from new animal models and refined imagery techniques in humans. First, human and animal studies agree in detecting signs of cholinergic dysfunctions much earlier than initially believed. Second, alterations of the cholinergic system are deeply intertwined with its reactive responses, providing the brain with efficient compensatory mechanisms to delay the conversion into AD. Active research in this field should provide new insight into development of multitherapies incorporating cholinergic manipulation, as well as early biomarkers of AD enabling earlier diagnostics. This is of prime importance to counteract a disease that is now recognized to start early in adult life.

  19. Subjective memory impairment and cholinergic transmission: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Peter; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Subjective memory impairment (SMI) is being increasingly recognized as a preclinical phase of Alzheimer disease (AD). Short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) is helpful in demonstrating dysfunction of central cholinergic circuits, and was reported to be abnormal in patients with AD and amnestic multiple domain mild cognitive impairment. In this study, we found normal SAI in 20 subjects with SMI. SAI could be a useful biomarker for identifying, among individuals with memory complaints, those in whom cholinergic degeneration has occurred.

  20. Personalized genetics of the cholinergic blockade of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Simchovitz, Alon; Heneka, Michael T; Soreq, Hermona

    2017-03-21

    Acetylcholine signaling is essential for cognitive functioning and blocks inflammation. To maintain homeostasis, cholinergic signaling is subjected to multi-leveled and bidirectional regulation by both proteins and non-coding microRNAs ('CholinomiRs'). CholinomiRs coordinate the cognitive and inflammatory aspects of cholinergic signaling by targeting major cholinergic transcripts including the acetylcholine hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Notably, AChE inhibitors are the only currently approved line of treatment for Alzheimer's disease patients. Since cholinergic signaling blocks neuroinflammation which is inherent to Alzheimer's disease, genomic changes modifying AChE's properties and its susceptibility to inhibitors and/or to CholinomiRs regulation may affect the levels and properties of inflammasome components such as NLRP3. This calls for genomic-based medicine approaches based on genotyping of both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in cholinergic signaling. An example is a SNP in a recognition element for the primate-specific microRNA-608 within the 3' untranslated region of the AChE transcript. Carriers of the minor allele of that SNP present massively elevated brain AChE levels, increased trait anxiety and inflammation, accompanied by perturbed CholinomiR-608 regulatory networks and elevated prefrontal activity under exposure to stressful insults. Several additional SNPs in the AChE and other cholinergic genes await further studies, and might likewise involve different CholinomiRs and pathways including those modulating the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. CholinomiRs regulation of the cholinergic system thus merits in-depth interrogation and is likely to lead to personalized medicine approaches for achieving better homeostasis in health and disease. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms.

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical activities of reduced TiO2-x/BiOCl heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongrong; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Ma, Lu; Gao, Shanmin; Wang, Qingyao; Wang, Zeyan; Huang, Baibiao; Dai, Ying; Lu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A key issue to design highly efficient photoelectrodes for hydrogen production is how to prohibit the rapid carrier recombination. In order to use the visible light and reduce the recombination of electrons and holes, reduced TiO2-x/BiOCl heterojunctions are successfully synthesized and the photoelectrodes are assembled in this work. The effects of various Bi/Ti molar ratios on the structural, morphological, optical, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activities of the resultant samples are investigated systematically. The TiO2-x nanoparticles contain Ti3+, Ti2+, and oxygen vacancies (Ov), while the BiOCl nanosheets exposed {001} facet. Ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) results indicate that the existence of Ti3+, Ti2+ and Ov expand the light-response range. Linear scan voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicate that more efficient electron transportation is presented in the heterojunctions with the appropriate Bi/Ti molar ratio. Consequently, the reduced TiO2-x/BiOCl heterojunction with the most appropriate Bi/Ti molar ratio exhibits a high photocurrent density of 0.755 mA cm-2 with photoconversion efficiency up to 0.634%, 10.5 and 22.6 times larger than that of pure TiO2 and BiOCl. Furthermore, this heterojunction exhibit 48.38 and 12.54 times enhancement for the visible-light decomposition of rhodamine B compared with pure TiO2 and BiOCl.

  2. Enhanced winter soil frost reduces methane emission during the subsequent growing season in a boreal peatland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate change may result in reduced snow cover and could, consequently, alter the soil frost regime and biogeochemical processes underlying the exchange of methane (CH4 ) in boreal peatlands. In this study, we investigated the short-term (1-3 years) vs. long-term (11 years) effects of intensified winter soil frost (induced by experimental snow exclusion) on CH4 exchange during the following growing season in a boreal peatland. In the first 3 years (2004-2006), lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots relative to the control coincided with delayed soil temperature increase in the treatment plots at the beginning of the growing season (May). After 11 treatment years (in 2014), CH4 emissions were lower in the treatment plots relative to the control over the entire growing season, resulting in a reduction in total growing season CH4 emission by 27%. From May to July 2014, reduced sedge leaf area coincided with lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots compared to the control. From July to August, lower dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the pore water of the treatment plots explained 72% of the differences in CH4 emission between control and treatment. In addition, greater Sphagnum moss growth in the treatment plots resulted in a larger distance between the moss surface and the water table (i.e., increasing the oxic layer) which may have enhanced the CH4 oxidation potential in the treatment plots relative to the control in 2014. The differences in vegetation might also explain the lower temperature sensitivity of CH4 emission observed in the treatment plots relative to the control. Overall, this study suggests that greater soil frost, associated with future winter climate change, might substantially reduce the growing season CH4 emission in boreal peatlands through altering vegetation dynamics and subsequently causing vegetation-mediated effects on CH4 exchange.

  3. Enhancing Supportive-Educative Nursing Systems to Reduce Risk of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Jane M.; Shook, Robin P.; Schneider, Melanie K; Brooks, Constance W.; Peterson, Julie; Stewart, Bob R

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the use of data regarding self-care agency to enhance a supportive-educative nursing system for breast cancer survivors to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema post surgery. Impetus for this study came from the analysis of participant feedback from a parent study (Lance Armstrong Foundation pilot study) that sought to plan an educational program for nurses that will improve their supportive-educative nursing system when working with breast cancer survivors. The goal is to enable these women to reduce the risk of lymphedema post surgery. The parent study examined a bundled behavioral-educative intervention, which included standard lymphedema education coupled with Modified Manual Lymph Drainage (MMLD) to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema in newly-diagnosed breast cancer survivors. Based upon the feedback received from the parent study, the research team recognized that many of the participants were not fully following the recommendations of the intervention protocol. In order for nurses to help patients develop self-care agency (SCA) (Orem, 2001) to engage in actions that addressed the self-care requisites associated with post-breast cancer surgery, these nurses needed to refine their intervention skills. Prior to the development of a program for the nurses, the research team conducted a study to explore the state of power related to SCA of the study participants. The information obtained from this was then used in the development of an educational program for bundled intervention. Both motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002) and solution-focused therapy (Berg & DeJong, 1996) were incorporated into the educational program for the research nurse team to strengthen and improve supportive-educative nursing systems. Supportive-educative systems of care that integrate self-care deficit nursing theory, motivational interviewing, and solution-focused therapy can assist patients to develop and sustain self-care agency. PMID

  4. Managing tile drainage, subirrigation, and nitrogen fertilization to enhance crop yields and reduce nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Reynolds, W D; Welacky, T W; Oloya, T O; Gaynor, J D

    2009-01-01

    Improving field-crop use of fertilizer nitrogen is essential for protecting water quality and increasing crop yields. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of controlled tile drainage (CD) and controlled tile drainage with subsurface irrigation (CDS) for mitigating off-field nitrate losses and enhancing crop yields. The CD and CDS systems were compared on a clay loam soil to traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD) under a corn (Zea Mays L.)-soybean (Glycine Max. (L.) Merr.) rotation at two nitrogen (N) fertilization rates (N1: 150 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, no N applied to soybean; N2: 200 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, 50 kg N ha(-1) applied to soybean). The N concentrations in tile flow events with the UTD treatment exceeded the provisional long-term aquatic life limit (LT-ALL) for freshwater (4.7 mg N L(-1)) 72% of the time at the N1 rate and 78% at the N2 rate, whereas only 24% of tile flow events at N1 and 40% at N2 exceeded the LT-ALL for the CDS treatment. Exceedances in N concentration for surface runoff and tile drainage were greater during the growing season than the non-growing season. At the N1 rate, CD and CDS reduced average annual N losses via tile drainage by 44 and 66%, respectively, relative to UTD. At the N2 rate, the average annual decreases in N loss were 31 and 68%, respectively. Crop yields from CDS were increased by an average of 2.8% relative to UTD at the N2 rate but were reduced by an average of 6.5% at the N1 rate. Hence, CD and CDS were effective for reducing average nitrate losses in tile drainage, but CDS increased average crop yields only when additional N fertilizer was applied.

  5. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06412.001 PMID:25723967

  6. Enhanced monolithic diffraction gratings with high efficiency and reduced polarization sensitivity for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebel, Peter; Diehl, Torsten; Moeller, Tobias; Gatto, Alexandre; Pesch, Alexander; Erdmann, Lars H.; Burkhardt, Matthias; Kalies, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Spectral imaging systems lead to enhanced sensing properties when the sensing system provides sufficient spectral resolution to identify materials from its spectral reflectance signature. The performance of diffraction gratings provides an initial way to improve instrumental resolution. Thus, subsequent manufacturing techniques of high quality gratings are essential to significantly improve the spectral performance. The ZEISS unique technology of manufacturing real-blazed profiles and as well as lamellar profiles comprising transparent substrates is well suited for the production of transmission gratings. In order to reduce high order aberrations, aspherical and free-form surfaces can be alternatively processed to allow more degrees of freedom in the optical design of spectroscopic instruments with less optical elements and therefore size and weight advantages. Prism substrates were used to manufacture monolithic GRISM elements for UV to IR spectral range. Many years of expertise in the research and development of optical coatings enable high transmission anti-reflection coatings from the DUV to the NIR. ZEISS has developed specially adapted coating processes (Ion beam sputtering, ion-assisted deposition and so on) for maintaining the micro-structure of blazed gratings in particular. Besides of transmission gratings, numerous spectrometer setups (e.g. Offner, Rowland circle, Czerny-Turner system layout) working on the optical design principles of reflection gratings. This technology steps can be applied to manufacture high quality reflection gratings from the EUV to the IR applications with an outstanding level of low stray light and ghost diffraction order by employing a combination of holography and reactive ion beam etching together with the in-house coating capabilities. We report on results of transmission gratings on plane and curved substrates and GRISM elements with enhanced efficiency of the grating itself combined with low scattered light in the angular

  7. The Eng1 β-Glucanase Enhances Histoplasma Virulence by Reducing β-Glucan Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Garfoot, Andrew L.; Shen, Qian; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum parasitizes host phagocytes. To avoid antimicrobial immune responses, Histoplasma yeasts must minimize their detection by host receptors while simultaneously interacting with the phagocyte. Pathogenic Histoplasma yeast cells, but not avirulent mycelial cells, secrete the Eng1 protein, which is a member of the glycosylhydrolase 81 (GH81) family. We show that Histoplasma Eng1 is a glucanase that hydrolyzes β-(1,3)-glycosyl linkages but is not required for Histoplasma growth in vitro or for cell separation. However, Histoplasma yeasts lacking Eng1 function have attenuated virulence in vivo, particularly during the cell-mediated immunity stage. Histoplasma yeasts deficient for Eng1 show increased exposure of cell wall β-glucans, which results in enhanced binding to the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor. Consistent with this, Eng1-deficient yeasts trigger increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine production from macrophages and dendritic cells. While not responsible for large-scale cell wall structure and function, the secreted Eng1 reduces levels of exposed β-glucans at the yeast cell wall, thereby diminishing potential recognition by Dectin-1 and proinflammatory cytokine production by phagocytes. In α-glucan-producing Histoplasma strains, Eng1 acts in concert with α-glucan to minimize β-glucan exposure: α-glucan provides a masking function by covering the β-glucan-rich cell wall, while Eng1 removes any remaining exposed β-glucans. Thus, Histoplasma Eng1 has evolved a specialized pathogenesis function to remove exposed β-glucans, thereby enhancing the ability of yeasts to escape detection by host phagocytes. PMID:27094334

  8. A cost analysis of web-enhanced training to reduce alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons

    PubMed Central

    Page, Timothy F.; Nederhoff, Dawn M.; Ecklund, Alexandra M.; Horvath, Keith J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to document the development and testing costs of the Enhanced Alcohol Risk Management (eARM) intervention, a web enhanced training program to prevent alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons and to estimate its implementation costs in a “real world”, non-research setting. Methods Data for this study were obtained retrospectively from a randomized controlled trial of the eARM intervention, which was conducted across 15 communities in a Midwestern metropolitan area. Inputs and their costs were obtained from records maintained during the randomized controlled trial. Total development and testing costs were computed, and implementation costs were estimated with input from the research team. The average implementation cost per establishment was calculated by dividing the total estimated implementation cost by the number of establishments that participated in the study. This provides an estimate of the resources needed to support a broader dissemination of interventions such as eARM. Results Direct development and testing costs were $484,904. Including the University's overhead cost rate of 51 percent, total development and testing costs were $732,205. Total estimated implementation costs were $179,999 over a 12 month period. The average cost per establishment was $1,588. Conclusions Given the large damage liability awards faced by establishments that serve alcohol to drunk drivers, establishments or their insurance companies may be willing to pay the $1,588 estimated implementation cost in order to limit their exposure to these large damage awards. Therefore, making interventions such as eARM available could be an effective and sustainable policy for reducing alcohol-related incidents. PMID:27087708

  9. Enhanced Neural Responses to Imagined Primary Rewards Predict Reduced Monetary Temporal Discounting.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Shabnam; Hare, Todd A

    2015-09-23

    The pervasive tendency to discount the value of future rewards varies considerably across individuals and has important implications for health and well-being. Here, we used fMRI with human participants to examine whether an individual's neural representation of an imagined primary reward predicts the degree to which the value of delayed monetary payments is discounted. Because future rewards can never be experienced at the time of choice, imagining or simulating the benefits of a future reward may play a critical role in decisions between alternatives with either immediate or delayed benefits. We found that enhanced ventromedial prefrontal cortex response during imagined primary reward receipt was correlated with reduced discounting in a separate monetary intertemporal choice task. Furthermore, activity in enhanced ventromedial prefrontal cortex during reward imagination predicted temporal discounting behavior both between- and within-individual decision makers with 62% and 73% mean balanced accuracy, respectively. These results suggest that the quality of reward imagination may impact the degree to which future outcomes are discounted. Significance statement: We report a novel test of the hypothesis that an important factor influencing the discount rate for future rewards is the quality with which they are imagined or estimated in the present. Previous work has shown that temporal discounting is linked to individual characteristics ranging from general intelligence to the propensity for addiction. We demonstrate that individual differences in a neurobiological measure of primary reward imagination are significantly correlated with discounting rates for future monetary payments. Moreover, our neurobiological measure of imagination can be used to accurately predict choice behavior both between and within individuals. These results suggest that improving reward imagination may be a useful therapeutic target for individuals whose high discount rates promote

  10. Coexistence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles: enhancing or reducing environmental risks?

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Junpeng; Zhang, Hongwu

    2014-09-01

    Due to their bactericidal and photocatalytic characteristics, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in the fields of environment and physiology. Once these untreated nanoparticles are released into an aquatic environment and encounter one another, there is more uncertainty about their fate and ecotoxicological risks compared with the single nanoparticles. To expand our knowledge of the health and environmental impacts of nanoparticles, we investigated the possible risk of the co-existence of TiO2 NPs and Ag NPs in an aquatic environment using ciliated protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis) as an aquatic animal model. In this study, silver ion (Ag(+)) release and physicochemical properties, as well as their effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, were monitored. Continuous illumination (12,000 lx) led to the 20.0% decrease in Ag(+) release in comparison with dark conditions, while TiO2 NPs and continuous illumination resulted in decreasing the Ag(+) concentration to 64.3% in contrast with Ag NPs-only suspensions. Toxicity tests indicated that different illumination modes exerted distinct effects of TiO2 NPs on the toxicity of Ag NPs: no effects, antagonism and synergism in dark, natural light and continuous light, respectively. In the presence of 1.5mg/L (18.8 μM) TiO2 NPs, the toxicity of 1.5 mg/L (13.9 μM) Ag NPs was reduced by 28.7% and increased by 6.93% in natural light and 12,000 lx of continuous light, respectively. After culturing in 12,000 lx continuous light for 24h, SOD activity of the light control surged to 1.96 times compared to the dark control (P<0.001). TiO2 NPs induced a reduction of CAT activity by an average of (36.1±1.7) % in the light. In the natural light reductions in the toxicity of Ag, NPs decrease Ag(+) concentrations via adsorption of Ag(+) onto TiO2 NPs surfaces. The enhancement of Ag NPs toxicity can contribute to the formation of activated TiO2-Ag NPs complexes in continuous light. The

  11. Enhanced steroid dosing reduces seizures during antiparasitic treatment for cysticercosis and early after

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzales, Isidro; Lescano, Andres G.; Bustos, Javier A.; Pretell, E. Javier; Saavedra, Herbert; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of seizures and epilepsy in endemic countries. Antiparasitic treatment of brain cysts leads to seizures due to the host’s inflammatory reaction, requiring concomitant steroids. We hypothesized that increased steroid dosing will reduce treatment-associated seizures. Methods Open-label randomized trial comparing 6 mg/d dexamethasone for 10 days (conventional) with 8 mg/d for 28 days followed by a 2 week taper (enhanced) in neurocysticercosis patients receiving albendazole. Follow up included active seizure surveillance and brain imaging. Study outcomes were seizure days and patients with seizures, both measured in days 11-42. Additional analyses compared days 1-10, 11-21, 22-32, 33-42, 43-60, and 61-180. Results Thirty-two individuals were randomized into each arm, two did not complete follow up. From days 11 to 42, 59 partial and 6 generalized seizure days occurred in 20 individuals, non-significantly fewer in the enhanced arm (12 versus 49, p=0.114). The numbers of patients with seizures in this period showed similar non-significant differences. In the enhanced steroid arm there were significantly fewer days and individuals with seizures during antiparasitic treatment (days 1-10: 4 versus 17, p=0.004, and 1 versus 10, p=0.003, number needed to treat 4.6, relative risk 0.1013, 95%CI: 0.01 – 0.74) and early after dexamethasone cessation (days 11-21: 6 versus 27, p=0.014, and 4 versus 12, p=0.021, NNT 4.0, RR 0.33, 95%CI: 0.12 – 0.92) but not after day 21. There were no significant differences in antiparasitic efficacy or relevant adverse events. Significance Increased dexamethasone dosing results in fewer seizures for the first 21 days during and early after antiparasitic treatment for viable parenchymal neurocysticercosis but not during the first 11-42 days, which was the primary predetermined time of analysis. PMID:25092547

  12. Inhibition of drinking in water-deprived rats by combined central angiotensin II and cholinergic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Ganten, U; Phillips, M I; Schmid, P G; Schelling, P; Ganten, D

    1978-01-01

    The effect of blockade of central angiotensin II (AII) receptors and cholinergic receptors on thirst induced by water deprivation was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats and rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (DI). Neither central AII nor cholinergic blockade alone affected drinking. Antagonism of both receptors simultaneously, however, significantly inhibited water intake of both Sprague-Dawley and DI rats. This inhibitory effect was not observed in water-deprived, nephrectomized rats. The combined antagonism on water intake was specific, since milk intake in hungry rats was not affected by simultaneous AII and cholinergic blockade. Isorenin concentrations in brain tissue were at control levels in water-deprived, nephrectomized, and non-nephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats but were increased in water-deprived DI rats. The results suggest that angiotensin and cholinergic receptors in the brain have a physiological role in thirst. Thirst is maintained when either receptor is intact, but reduced when both receptors are inhibited by antagonists. They are independently capable of maintaining thirst.

  13. Muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists differentially mediate acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preference and quinine-conditioned flavor avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Francis M; Olsson, Kerstin; Vig, Vishal; Yenko, Ira; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Kohen, Ilanna; Aminov, Alon; Dindyal, Trisha; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Rats display both conditioned flavor preference (CFP) for fructose, and conditioned flavor avoidance (CFA) following sweet adulteration with quinine. Previous pharmacological analyses revealed that fructose-CFP expression was significantly reduced by dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 antagonists, but not NMDA or opioid antagonists. Fructose-CFP acquisition was significantly reduced by DA D1, DA D2 or NMDA antagonists, but not opioid antagonists. Quinine-CFA acquisition was significantly enhanced and prolonged by DA D1, NMDA or opioid, but not DA D2 antagonists. Cholinergic interneurons and projections interact with DA systems in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Further, both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling have been implicated in sweet intake and development of food-related preferences. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic administration of muscarinic (scopolamine: SCOP) or nicotinic (mecamylamine: MEC) cholinergic receptor antagonists mediated fructose-CFP expression, fructose-CFP acquisition and quinine-CFA acquisition. For fructose-CFP expression, rats were trained over 10 sessions with a CS+ flavor in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin and a CS- flavor in 0.2% saccharin. Two-bottle choice tests with CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 0.2% saccharin occurred following vehicle, SCOP (0.1-10mg/kg) and MEC (1-8mg/kg). For fructose-CFP acquisition, six groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg), MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) or a limited intake vehicle control 0.5h prior to 10 CS+ and CS- training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS+ and CS- choice tests in 0.2% saccharin. For quinine-CFA acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg) or MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) 0.5h prior to 8 one-bottle CS- (8% fructose+0.2% saccharin: FS) and CS+ (fructose+saccharin+quinine (0.030%: FSQ) training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS- and CS+ choice tests in fructose-saccharin solutions. Fructose-CFP expression was

  14. Cholinergic Dysfunction in Fragile X Syndrome and Potential Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R; Lightbody, Amy A; Reiss, Allan L

    2009-01-01

    Males with fragile X syndrome are at risk for significant cognitive and behavioral deficits, particularly those involving executive prefrontal systems. Disruption of the cholinergic system secondary to fragile X mental retardation protein deficiency may contribute to the cognitive-behavioral impairments associated with fragile X. We measured choline in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 9 males with fragile X syndrome and 9 age-matched typically developing controls using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Right choline/creatine was significantly reduced in the fragile X group compared to controls. In controls, both left and right choline was significantly positively correlated with intelligence and age was significantly negatively correlated with left choline. There were no correlations in the fragile X group. Subjects with fragile X syndrome participating in a pilot open-label trial of donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, demonstrated significantly improved cognitive-behavioral function. Studies utilizing biochemical neuroimaging techniques such as these have the potential to significantly impact the design of treatment strategies for fragile X syndrome and other genetic disorders by helping identify neurochemical targets for intervention as well as serving as metrics for treatment efficacy. PMID:19215057

  15. Positive modulation of the α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Boffi, JC; Wedemeyer, C; Lipovsek, M; Katz, E; Calvo, DJ; Elgoyhen, AB

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The activation of α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) present at the synapse between efferent olivocochlear fibres and cochlear hair cells can prevent acoustic trauma. Hence, pharmacological potentiators of these receptors could be useful therapeutically. In this work, we characterize ascorbic acid as a positive modulator of recombinant α9α10 nAChRs. Experimental Approach ACh-evoked responses were analysed under two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with α9 and α10 cRNAs. Key Results Ascorbic acid potentiated ACh responses in X. laevis oocytes expressing α9α10 (but not α4β2 or α7) nAChRs, in a concentration-dependent manner, with an effective concentration range of 1–30 mM. The compound did not affect the receptor's current–voltage profile nor its apparent affinity for ACh, but it significantly enhanced the maximal evoked currents (percentage of ACh maximal response, 240 ± 20%). This effect was specific for the L form of reduced ascorbic acid. Substitution of the extracellular cysteine residues present in loop C of the ACh binding site did not affect the potentiation. Ascorbic acid turned into a partial agonist of α9α10 nAChRs bearing a point mutation at the pore domain of the channel (TM2 V13′T mutant). A positive allosteric mechanism of action rather than an antioxidant effect of ascorbic acid is proposed. Conclusions and Implications The present work describes one of the few agents that activates or potentiates α9α10 nAChRs and leads to new avenues for designing drugs with potential therapeutic use in inner ear disorders. PMID:22994414

  16. Haptic feedback enhances rhythmic motor control by reducing variability, not improving convergence rate.

    PubMed

    Ankarali, M Mert; Tutkun Sen, H; De, Avik; Okamura, Allison M; Cowan, Noah J

    2014-03-01

    Stability and performance during rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion are critical for survival across taxa: falling down would bode well for neither cheetah nor gazelle. Little is known about how haptic feedback, particularly during discrete events such as the heel-strike event during walking, enhances rhythmic behavior. To determine the effect of haptic cues on rhythmic motor performance, we investigated a virtual paddle juggling behavior, analogous to bouncing a table tennis ball on a paddle. Here, we show that a force impulse to the hand at the moment of ball-paddle collision categorically improves performance over visual feedback alone, not by regulating the rate of convergence to steady state (e.g., via higher gain feedback or modifying the steady-state hand motion), but rather by reducing cycle-to-cycle variability. This suggests that the timing and state cues afforded by haptic feedback decrease the nervous system's uncertainty of the state of the ball to enable more accurate control but that the feedback gain itself is unaltered. This decrease in variability leads to a substantial increase in the mean first passage time, a measure of the long-term metastability of a stochastic dynamical system. Rhythmic tasks such as locomotion and juggling involve intermittent contact with the environment (i.e., hybrid transitions), and the timing of such transitions is generally easy to sense via haptic feedback. This timing information may improve metastability, equating to less frequent falls or other failures depending on the task.

  17. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW•cm-2 depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  18. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications. PMID:27587001

  19. Reduced Noise UV Enhancement of Etch Rates for Nuclear Tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Rebecca; Clarkson, David; Ume, Rubab; Regan, Sean; Sangster, Craig; Padalino, Stephen; McLean, James

    2016-10-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is an effective technique for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched in NaOH at 80°C for 6 hours, producing micron-scale signal pits at the nuclear track sites. Using CR-39 irradiated with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 1.0 MeV protons, we show that exposing the CR-39 to high intensity UV light before etching, with wavelengths between 240 nm and 350 nm, speeds the etch process. Elevated temperatures during UV exposure amplifies this effect, with etch rates up to 50% greater than unprocessed conditions. CR-39 pieces exposed to UV light and heat can also exhibit heightened levels of etch-induced noise (surface features not caused by nuclear particles). By illuminating the CR-39 from the side opposite to the tracks, a similar level of etch enhancement was obtained with little to no noise. The effective wavelength range is reduced, due to strong attenuation of shorter wavelengths. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity in H photofragment detection by two-color reduced-Doppler ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Epshtein, Michael; Portnov, Alexander; Kupfer, Rotem; Rosenwaks, Salman; Bar, Ilana

    2013-11-14

    Two-color reduced-Doppler (TCRD) and one-color velocity map imaging (VMI) were used for probing H atom photofragments resulting from the ∼243.1 nm photodissociation of pyrrole. The velocity components of the H photofragments were probed by employing two counterpropagating beams at close and fixed wavelengths of 243.15 and 243.12 nm in TCRD and a single beam at ∼243.1 nm, scanned across the Doppler profile in VMI. The TCRD imaging enabled probing of the entire velocity distribution in a single pulse, resulting in enhanced ionization efficiency, as well as improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. These advantages were utilized for studying the pyrrole photodissociation at ∼243.1 and 225 nm, where the latter wavelength provided only a slight increase in the H yield over the self-signal from the probe beams. The TCRD imaging enabled obtaining high quality H{sup +} images, even for the low H photofragment yields formed in the 225 nm photolysis process, and allowed determining the velocity distributions and anisotropy parameters and getting insight into pyrrole photodissociation.

  1. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E.; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D.; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, alpha-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by re-exposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are currently no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA provides a novel pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse. PMID:24121737

  2. Third-Party Cooperation: How Reducing Material Involvement Enhances Contributions to the Public Good.

    PubMed

    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B; Heerema, Roeland L; Sanfey, Alan G

    2016-03-01

    Decisions to cooperate are often delegated to a third party. We examined whether cooperation differs when decisions are made for a third party compared with ourselves and specified which motives are important for third-party cooperation. Participants played multiple rounds of a public goods game (PGG). In Study 1, we varied personal involvement from high to low; participants played for themselves (Self), for themselves and a third party (Shared), and solely for a third party (Third Party). Participants contributed most when personal involvement was lowest (i.e., Third Party) and least when personal involvement was high (i.e., Self). Study 2 explored if social motives underlie third-party cooperation by comparing cooperation with social (human) and non-social (computer) group members. Reducing personal involvement in the PGG (i.e., Third Party) increased cooperation in social contexts compared with non-social contexts, indicating enhanced collective interest. Increased cooperation for a third party may result from taking the other's perspective, thereby increasing social norm preferences.

  3. Enhanced Bioactivity of α-Tocopheryl Succinate Based Block Copolymer Nanoparticles by Reduced Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Palao-Suay, Raquel; Aguilar, María Rosa; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J; Maji, Samarendra; Hoogenboom, Richard; Rohner, Nathan A; Thomas, Susan N; Román, Julio San

    2016-12-01

    Well-structured amphiphilic copolymers are necessary to obtain self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) based on synthetic polymers. Highly homogeneous and monodispersed macromolecules obtained by controlled polymerization have successfully been used for this purpose. However, disaggregation of the organized macromolecules is desired when a bioactive element, such as α-tocopheryl succinate, is introduced in self-assembled NPs and this element must be exposed or released to exert its action. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that the bioactivity of synthetic NPs based on defined reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization copolymers can be enhanced by the introduction of hydrophilic comonomers in the hydrophobic segment. The amphiphilic terpolymers are based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophilic block, and a hydrophobic block based on a methacrylic derivative of α-tocopheryl succinate (MTOS) and small amounts of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (PEG-b-poly(MTOS-co-HEMA)). The introduction of HEMA reduces hydrophobicity and introduces "disorder" both in the homogeneous blocks and the compact core of the corresponding NPs. These NPs are able to encapsulate additional α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) with high efficiency and their biological activity is much higher than that described for the unmodified copolymers, proposedly due to more efficient degradation and release of α-TOS, demonstrating the importance of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance.

  4. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E; Redhi, Godfrey H; Panlilio, Leigh V; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana's main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by reexposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA offers a pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse.

  5. Facile synthesis and enhanced catalytic performance of reduced graphene oxide decorated with hexagonal structure Ni nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyuan; Wang, Yuqin; Shen, Xiaoping; Ma, Hanyu; Yang, Juan; Yuan, Aihua; Zhou, Hu

    2017-02-01

    In this study, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) supported Ni nanoparticles were synthesized by a facile in-situ refluxing approach using triethylene glycol as both reductive and dispersing agent. The as-synthesized RGO/Ni nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, which revealed that Ni nanoparticles with hexagonal close-packed structure were homogeneously dispersed on the surface of RGO sheets. The catalytic activity and electrochemical properties of the RGO/Ni nanocomposites were investigated. It is found that the RGO/Ni nanocomposites exhibit markedly enhanced catalytic activity toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol by NaBH4, which is comparable to noble metal catalyst. The RGO/Ni nanocomposites also exhibited excellent electrocatalytic response to glucose. The linear range, detection limit and sensitivity were estimated to be 0.01-3.0mM (R(2)=0.997), 2.8μM and 535.258μAmM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. It is expected that this facile method presented here could be extended to synthesize other RGO/metal nanocomposites with various functions.

  6. Formate simultaneously reduces oxidase activity and enhances respiration in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Issmat I.; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Esseili, Kawthar A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    The foodborne microaerophilic pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses a periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and two terminal oxidases, which serve to metabolize formate and facilitate the use of oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor, respectively. Formate, a primary energy source for C. jejuni, inhibits oxidase activity in other bacteria. Here, we hypothesized that formate might affect both energy metabolism and microaerobic survival in C. jejuni. Subsequently, we showed that C. jejuni 81–176 (wildtype) exhibited enhanced chemoattraction to and respiration of formate in comparison to other organic acids. Formate also significantly increased C. jejuni’s growth, motility, and biofilm formation under microaerobic (5% O2) conditions. However, formate reduced oxidase activity under microaerobic conditions as well as aerotolerance and biofilm formation under ambient oxygen conditions. The expression of genes encoding the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and proteins that facilitate the use of alternative electron acceptors generally increased in the presence of formate. Taken together, formate might play a role in optimizing C. jejuni’s adaptation to the oxygen-limited gastrointestinal tract of the host. By affecting oxidase activity, formate possibly facilitates shuttling electrons to alternative acceptors, while likely conserving limited oxygen concentrations for other essential functions such as DNA synthesis via RNR which is required for C. jejuni’s growth. PMID:28091524

  7. Reducing Food Loss and Waste to Enhance Food Security and Environmental Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Shafiee-Jood, Majid; Cai, Ximing

    2016-08-16

    While food shortage remains a big concern in many regions around the world, almost one-third of the total food production is discarded as food loss and waste (FLW). This is associated with about one-quarter of land, water, and fertilizer used for crop production, even though resources and environmental constraints are expected to limit food production around the world. FLW reduction represents a potential opportunity to enhance both food security and environmental sustainability and therefore has received considerable attention recently. By reviewing the recent progress and new developments in the literature, this paper highlights the importance of FLW prevention as a complementary solution to address the Grand Challenge of global food security and environmental sustainability. However, raising awareness only is not enough to realize the expected FLW reduction. We identify the knowledge gaps and opportunities for research by synthesizing the strategies of FLW reduction and the barriers, including (1) filling the data gaps, (2) quantifying the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of FLW reduction strategies, (3) understanding the scale effects, and (4) exploring the impacts of global transitions. It is urgent to take more aggressive yet scientifically based actions to reduce FLW, which require everyone's involvement along the food supply chain, including policy makers, food producers and suppliers, and food consumers.

  8. Diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 inhibition enhances intestinal fatty acid oxidation and reduces energy intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Schober, Gudrun; Arnold, Myrtha; Birtles, Susan; Buckett, Linda K; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Turnbull, Andrew V; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2013-05-01

    Acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT-1) catalyzes the final step in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and is highly expressed in the small intestine. Because DGAT-1 knockout mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, we investigated the acute effects of intragastric (IG) infusion of a small molecule diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 inhibitor (DGAT-1i) on eating, circulating fat metabolites, indirect calorimetry, and hepatic and intestinal expression of key fat catabolism enzymes in male rats adapted to an 8 h feeding-16 h deprivation schedule. Also, the DGAT-1i effect on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) was investigated in enterocyte cell culture models. IG DGAT-1i infusions reduced energy intake compared with vehicle in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed rats, but scarcely in chow-fed rats. IG DGAT-1i also blunted the postprandial increase in serum TAG and increased β-hydroxybutyrate levels only in HFD-fed rats, in which it lowered the respiratory quotient and increased intestinal, but not hepatic, protein levels of Complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and of mitochondrial hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase. Finally, the DGAT-1i enhanced FAO in CaCo2 (EC50 = 0.3494) and HuTu80 (EC50 = 0.00762) cells. Thus, pharmacological DGAT-1 inhibition leads to an increase in intestinal FAO and ketogenesis when dietary fat is available. This may contribute to the observed eating-inhibitory effect.

  9. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm−2 depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy. PMID:26424175

  10. Cotinine enhances the extinction of contextual fear memory and reduces anxiety after fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Ross; Patel, Sagar; Solomon, Rosalynn; Tran, John; Weeber, Edwin J; Echeverria, Valentina

    2012-03-17

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder triggered by traumatic events. Symptoms include anxiety, depression and deficits in fear memory extinction (FE). PTSD patients show a higher prevalence of cigarette smoking than the general population. The present study investigated the effects of cotinine, a tobacco-derived compound, over anxiety and contextual fear memory after fear conditioning (FC) in mice, a model for inducing PTSD-like symptoms. Two-month-old C57BL/6J mice were separated into three experimental groups. These groups were used to investigate the effect of pretreatment with cotinine on contextual fear memory and posttreatment on extinction and stability or retrievability of the fear memory. Also, changes induced by cotinine on the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were assessed after extinction in the hippocampus. An increase in anxiety and corticosterone levels were found after fear conditioning. Cotinine did not affect corticosterone levels but enhanced the extinction of contextual fear, decreased anxiety and the stability and/or retrievability of contextual fear memory. Cotinine-treated mice showed higher levels of the active forms of ERK1/2 than vehicle-treated mice after FC. This evidence suggests that cotinine is a potential new pharmacological treatment to reduce symptoms in individuals with PTSD.

  11. Caffeine, but not nicotine, enhances visual feature binding.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Fagioli, Sabrina; Erasmus, Vicki; Hommel, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The distributed organization of the human visual cortex calls for a mechanism that integrates and binds the features of a perceived event, and neural synchronization is a prime candidate to serve that purpose. Animal studies suggest that synchronization in the visual cortex is enhanced by the muscarinic cholinergic system. Here we show that in healthy humans the binding of shape and colour, and of shape and location, of visual objects is increased by stimulating the muscarinic cholinergic system (caffeine consumption) but not by stimulating the nicotinic cholinergic system (nicotine consumption). Binding across perception and action is unaffected by either manipulation, suggesting a specific link between the visual system and the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  12. Nasturtium officinale reduces oxidative stress and enhances antioxidant capacity in hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Yazdanparast, Razieh; Bahramikia, Seifollah; Ardestani, Amin

    2008-04-15

    Nasturtium officinale R. Br. (Brassicaceae) has been used as a home remedy by the people of south eastern (SE) region of Iran as a medicinal plant. This therapeutical application has been attributed to Nasturtium officinale (N. officinale) antioxidant capacity which is mostly tested by means of cell-free assays: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). In addition, the antioxidant effect of N. officinale extract has been investigated in hypercholesterolaemic rats in vivo. The results revealed that the extract has notable scavenging activity against DPPH radicals as well as potent reducing power in FRAP assay. Intragastric administration of N. officinale (500 mg/kg body weight per day) to groups of hypercholesterolaemic rats for 30 days lowered their blood total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels by 37, 44 and 48%, respectively. However, the blood high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in the same treated rats increased by 16%. To evaluate the mechanism(s) of action, we studied the antioxidative potential of N. officinale extract in terms of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and also the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) in the liver tissues. In addition, hepatic tissue malondialdehyde level (MDA, an index of lipid peroxidation) was also determined. Under hypercholesterolaemic condition, hepatic MDA was increased. Moreover, our data indicated GSH depletion along with significant reduction in the activities of CAT and SOD in rats fed high-fat diet rats. On the other hand, significant elevation in the activities of GPx and GR were seen in the same group of rats. Treatment of hypercholesterolaemic rats with N. officinale extract significantly increased the GSH level along with enhanced CAT and SOD activities in liver tissues. Furthermore, N. officinale extract significantly

  13. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  14. Intrinsic Cholinergic Neurons in the Hippocampus: Fact or Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Rinnofner, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice) have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic marker ChAT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes. PMID:27014052

  15. Alcohol and Sleep Restriction Combined Reduces Vigilant Attention, Whereas Sleep Restriction Alone Enhances Distractibility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Manousakis, Jessica; Fielding, Joanne; Anderson, Clare

    2015-01-01

    , Manousakis J, Fielding J, Anderson C. Alcohol and sleep restriction combined reduces vigilant attention, whereas sleep restriction alone enhances distractibility. SLEEP 2015;38(5):765–775. PMID:25515101

  16. Cyclodextrin complexes of reduced bromonoscapine in guar gum microspheres enhance colonic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Baruah, Bharat; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Yates, Clayton; Turner, Timothy; Rangari, Vijay; Hamelberg, Donald; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-12-01

    Here, we report improved solubility and enhanced colonic delivery of reduced bromonoscapine (Red-Br-Nos), a cyclic ether brominated analogue of noscapine, upon encapsulation of its cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in bioresponsive guar gum microspheres (GGM). Phase-solubility analysis suggested that Red-Br-Nos complexed with β-CD and methyl-β-CD in a 1:1 stoichiometry, with a stability constant (Kc) of 2.29 × 10(3) M(-1) and 4.27 × 10(3) M(-1). Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy indicated entrance of an O-CH₂ or OCH₃-C₆H₄-OCH₃ moiety of Red-Br-Nos in the β-CD or methyl-β-CD cavity. Furthermore, the cage complex of Red-Br-Nos with β-CD and methyl-β-CD was validated by several spectral techniques. Rotating frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy revealed that the Ha proton of the OCH₃-C₆H₄-OCH₃ moiety was closer to the H₅ proton of β-CD and the H₃ proton of the methyl-β-CD cavity. The solubility of Red-Br-Nos in phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH ∼ 7.4) was improved by ∼10.7-fold and ∼21.2-fold when mixed with β-CD and methyl-β-CD, respectively. This increase in solubility led to a favorable decline in the IC₅₀ by ∼2-fold and ∼3-fold for Red-Br-Nos-β-CD-GGM and Red-Br-Nos-methyl-β-CD-GGM formulations respectively, compared to free Red-Br-Nos-β-CD and Red-Br-Nos-methyl-β-CD in human colon HT-29 cells. GGM-bearing drug complex formulations were found to be highly cytotoxic to the HT-29 cell line and further effective with simultaneous continuous release of Red-Br-Nos from microspheres. This is the first study to showing the preparation of drug-complex loaded GGMS for colon delivery of Red-Br-Nos that warrants preclinical assessment for the effective management of colon cancer.

  17. Cyclodextrin Complexes of Reduced Bromonoscapine in Guar Gum Microspheres Enhance Colonic Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report improved solubility and enhanced colonic delivery of reduced bromonoscapine (Red-Br-Nos), a cyclic ether brominated analogue of noscapine, upon encapsulation of its cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in bioresponsive guar gum microspheres (GGM). Phase–solubility analysis suggested that Red-Br-Nos complexed with β-CD and methyl-β-CD in a 1:1 stoichiometry, with a stability constant (Kc) of 2.29 × 103 M–1 and 4.27 × 103 M–1. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy indicated entrance of an O–CH2 or OCH3–C6H4–OCH3 moiety of Red-Br-Nos in the β-CD or methyl-β-CD cavity. Furthermore, the cage complex of Red-Br-Nos with β-CD and methyl-β-CD was validated by several spectral techniques. Rotating frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy revealed that the Ha proton of the OCH3–C6H4–OCH3 moiety was closer to the H5 proton of β-CD and the H3 proton of the methyl-β-CD cavity. The solubility of Red-Br-Nos in phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH ∼ 7.4) was improved by ∼10.7-fold and ∼21.2-fold when mixed with β-CD and methyl-β-CD, respectively. This increase in solubility led to a favorable decline in the IC50 by ∼2-fold and ∼3-fold for Red-Br-Nos−β-CD-GGM and Red-Br-Nos–methyl-β-CD-GGM formulations respectively, compared to free Red-Br-Nos−β-CD and Red-Br-Nos–methyl-β-CD in human colon HT-29 cells. GGM-bearing drug complex formulations were found to be highly cytotoxic to the HT-29 cell line and further effective with simultaneous continuous release of Red-Br-Nos from microspheres. This is the first study to showing the preparation of drug-complex loaded GGMS for colon delivery of Red-Br-Nos that warrants preclinical assessment for the effective management of colon cancer. PMID:25350222

  18. Cholinergic Enhancement of Frontal Lobe Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Wishart, Heather A.; Rabin, Laura A.; Flashman, Laura A.; McHugh, Tara L.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors positively affect cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions, but no controlled functional MRI studies have examined where their effects occur in the brain. We examined the effects of donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept[Registered sign]) on cognition and brain activity in patients with amnestic mild cognitive…

  19. Nitrogen Limitation is Reducing the Enhancement of NPP by Elevated CO2 in a Deciduous Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Warren, Jeffrey; Iversen, Colleen M; Medlyn, Belinda; McMurtrie, Ross; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2008-01-01

    Accurate model representation of the long-term response of forested ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is important for predictions of future concentrations of CO2. For biogeochemical models that predict the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCO2, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments provide the only source of data for comparison. A synthesis of forest FACE experiments reported a 23% increase in NPP in eCO2, and this result has been used as a model benchmark. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous forest in Tennessee that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by eCO2, consistent with predictions from ecosystem and global models that incorporate N feedbacks. The Liquidambar styraciflua stand has been exposed to current ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998. Results from the first 6 years of the experiment indicated that NPP was significantly enhanced by eCO2 and that this was a consistent and sustained response. Now, with 10 years of data, our analysis must be revised. The response of NPP to eCO2 has declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2007. The diminishing response to eCO2 since 2004 coincides with declining NPP in ambient CO2 plots. Productivity of this forest stand is limited by N availability, and the steady decline in forest NPP is closely related to changes in the N economy, as evidenced by declining foliar N concentrations. There is a strong linear relationship between foliar [N] and NPP, and the steeper slope in eCO2 indicates that the NPP response to eCO2 should diminish as foliar N declines. Increased fine-root production and root proliferation deeper in the soil have sustained N uptake, but not to an extent sufficient to benefit aboveground production. The mechanistic basis of the N effect on NPP resides in the photosynthetic machinery. The linear relationships between Jmax and Vcmax with foliar [N] did not change from 1998

  20. Enhanced efficacy and reduced side effects of diazepam by kava combination.

    PubMed

    Tawfiq, Rasha A; Nassar, Noha N; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; El-Denshary, Ezzeldein S

    2014-09-01

    The long term use of antiepileptic drugs possesses many unwanted effects; thus, new safe combinations are urgently mandated. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the anticonvulsant effect of kava alone or in combination with a synthetic anticonvulsant drug, diazepam (DZ). To this end, female Wistar rats were divided into two subsets, each comprising 6 groups as follows: group (i) received 1% Tween 80 p.o. and served as control, while groups (ii) and (iii) received kava at two dose levels (100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.). The remaining three groups received (iv) DZ alone (10 mg/kg p.o.) or kava in combination with DZ (v) (5 mg/kg, p.o.) or (vi) (10 mg/kg, p.o.). Results of the present study revealed that kava increased the maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) and enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of diazepam following both acute and chronic treatment. Moreover, neither kava nor its combination with DZ impaired motor co-ordination either acutely or chronically. Furthermore, kava ameliorated both the reduction in locomotor activity as well as changes in liver function tests induced by chronic administration of DZ. Moreover, no elevation was shown in the creatinine concentration vs. control group following chronic administration of kava or DZ either alone or in combination with kava. In conclusion, the present study suggests the possibility of combining a low dose DZ with kava to reduce harmful effects and might be recommended for clinical use in patients chronically treated with this synthetic anticonvulsant drug.

  1. HIPS-GLAD core shell nanorod array photodetectors with enhanced photocurrent and reduced dark current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keles, Filiz; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Badraddin, Emad O.; Brozak, Matthew P.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Karabacak, Tansel

    2016-10-01

    Vertically aligned core/shell nanorod array photodetectors were fabricated by high pressure sputter (HIPS) deposition of copper indium sulfide (CIS) films on glancing angle deposited (GLAD) indium sulfide (In2S3) nanorods. For comparison, we also studied nanorod photodetectors with conventional low pressure sputtered (LPS) CIS film coatings and counterpart thin film devices incorporating HIPS or LPS-CIS on In2S3 films. HIPS-GLAD core/shell photodetectors have shown a superior photocurrent density response along with lowest dark current density. Photoresponsivity defined with the photocurrent density/dark current density ratio γ = |J ph/J dark| was about ˜1820 for HIPS-GLAD nanorod devices, which is several orders of magnitude higher compared to those of LPS-CIS thin film (γ ˜ 2) and HIPS-CIS thin film (γ ˜ 9) devices, and also about four-fold higher than LPS-CIS nanorod devices (γ ˜ 490). Enhanced photoresponsivity is attributed to the porous microstructure and improved conformality of HIPS-CIS film around the In2S3 nanorods confirmed by SEM and EDS measurements. Due to randomization of the sputtered flux at higher working gas pressures, HIPS can provide a more conformal while at the same time a voidy low-density film around nanostructured surfaces. Reduced interelectrode distance and improved p-n junction interface due to the more uniform conformality of HIPS-CIS result in a higher photocurrent in our HIPS-GLAD devices. In addition, the voids in HIPS-CIS film as a result of its porous nature can behave as highly resistive spots that lower the dark current. Therefore, we have demonstrated that by utilizing a simple and low-temperature HIPS-GLAD method, high-photocurrent and low-dark-current photodetectors can be achieved by controlling the conformality and microstructure of a shell layer around nanorod arrays. HIPS shell coating method can be extended to almost any type of nanostructured substrate.

  2. Enhancing surface functionality of reduced graphene oxide biosensors by oxygen plasma treatment for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chae, Myung-Sic; Kim, Jinsik; Jeong, Dahye; Kim, YoungSoo; Roh, Jee Hoon; Lee, Sung Min; Heo, Youhee; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Tae Geun; Chang, Suk Tai; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2017-06-15

    We performed oxygen plasma treatment on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to improve its surface reactivity with respect to biomolecular interactions. Oxygen-plasma-treated rGO surfaces were employed as reactive interfaces for the detection of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides, the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as the target analytes. By measuring the changes in electrical characteristics and confirmation through topographic analysis, the oxygen-plasma-treated rGO sensors had enhanced surface functionality for better antibody immobilization and sensing performance, with a 3.33-fold steeper slope for the electrical responses versus analyte concentration curve (logarithmic scale) compared to the untreated. The elicited biomolecular reactivity of the rGO surfaces with the oxygen plasma treatment remained at 46-51% of the initial value even after aging for 6h in ambient conditions. This phenomenon was also confirmed by pretreating the rGO surfaces with a blocking agent and subsequently subjecting them to antibody immobilization. Finally, the feasibility of the oxygen-plasma-treated rGO sensors as a diagnostic tool was evaluated with clinical samples of neural-derived exosomal Aβ peptides extracted from apparent AD patients and normal controls (NC). In contrast to the untreated sensors (p=0.0460), the oxygen-plasma-treated rGO sensors showed a significant p-value in the identification of clinical samples of AD and NC subjects (p<0.001). These results suggest that oxygen plasma treatment improves sensor performance without complicated fabrication procedures and should aid in the development of novel diagnostic tools based on carbon nanomaterials.

  3. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  4. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  5. Impact of Altered Cholinergic Tones on the Neurovascular Coupling Response to Whisker Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, Clotilde; Sandoe, Claire H; Neupane, Sujaya; Kropf, Pascal; Toussay, Xavier; Tong, Xin-Kang; Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Shmuel, Amir; Hamel, Edith

    2017-02-08

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity rely on the coupling between electrophysiology and hemodynamics, a phenomenon referred to as "neurovascular coupling" (NVC). It is unknown whether this relationship remains reliable under altered brain states associated with acetylcholine (ACh) levels, such as attention and arousal and in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. We therefore assessed the effects of varying ACh tone on whisker-evoked NVC responses in rat barrel cortex, measured by cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurophysiological recordings (local field potentials, LFPs). We found that acutely enhanced ACh tone significantly potentiated whisker-evoked CBF responses through muscarinic ACh receptors and concurrently facilitated neuronal responses, as illustrated by increases in the amplitude and power in high frequencies of the evoked LFPs. However, the cellular identity of the activated neuronal network within the responsive barrel was unchanged, as characterized by c-Fos upregulation in pyramidal cells and GABA interneurons coexpressing vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. In contrast, chronic ACh deprivation hindered whisker-evoked CBF responses and the amplitude and power in most frequency bands of the evoked LFPs and reduced the rostrocaudal extent and area of the activated barrel without altering its identity. Correlations between LFP power and CBF, used to estimate NVC, were enhanced under high ACh tone and disturbed significantly by ACh depletion. We conclude that ACh is not only a facilitator but also a prerequisite for the full expression of sensory-evoked NVC responses, indicating that ACh may alter the fidelity of hemodynamic signals in assessing changes in evoked neuronal activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurovascular coupling, defined as the tight relationship between activated neurons and hemodynamic responses, is a fundamental brain function that underlies hemodynamic-based functional brain

  6. Aluminum-Induced Cholinergic Deficits in Different Brain Parts and Its Implications on Sociability and Cognitive Functions in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Mahboob, Aamra; Iqbal, Ghazala; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-10-06

    Aluminum is associated with etiology of many neurodegenerative diseases specially Alzheimer's disease. Chronic exposure to aluminum via drinking water results in aluminum deposition in the brain that leads to cognitive deficits. The study aimed to determine the effects of aluminum on cholinergic biomarkers, i.e., acetylcholine level, free choline level, and choline acetyltransferase gene expression, and how cholinergic deficit affects novel object recognition and sociability in mice. Mice were treated with AlCl3 (250 mg/kg). Acetylcholine level, free choline level, and choline acetyltransferase gene expression were determined in cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala. The mice were subjected to behavior tests (novel object recognition and social novelty preference) to assess memory deficits. The acetylcholine level in cortex and hippocampus was significantly reduced in aluminum-treated animals, as compared to cortex and hippocampus of control animals. Acetylcholine level in amygdala of aluminum-treated animals remained unchanged. Free choline level in all the three brain parts was found unaltered in aluminum-treated mice. The novel object recognition memory was severely impaired in aluminum-treated mice, as compared to the control group. Similarly, animals treated with aluminum showed reduced sociability compared to the control mice group. Our study demonstrates that aluminum exposure via drinking water causes reduced acetylcholine synthesis in spite of normal free choline availability. This deficit is caused by reduced recycling of acetylcholine due to lower choline acetyltransferase level. This cholinergic hypofunction leads to cognitive and memory deficits. Moreover, hippocampus is the most affected brain part after aluminum intoxication.

  7. A Cost Analysis of Web-Enhanced Training to Reduce Alcohol Sales to Intoxicated Bar Patrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Timothy F.; Nederhoff, Dawn M.; Ecklund, Alexandra M.; Horvath, Keith J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to document the development and testing costs of the Enhanced Alcohol Risk Management (eARM) intervention, a web enhanced training program to prevent alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons and to estimate its implementation costs in a "real world", non-research setting. Methods: Data for this…

  8. Astrocyte Intermediaries of Septal Cholinergic Modulation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Milan; Braganza, Oliver; Dannenberg, Holger; Hu, Wen; Pothmann, Leonie; Rosen, Jurij; Mody, Istvan; van Loo, Karen; Deisseroth, Karl; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Beck, Heinz

    2016-05-18

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine, derived from the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca complex, has been accorded an important role in hippocampal learning and memory processes. However, the precise mechanisms whereby acetylcholine released from septohippocampal cholinergic neurons acts to modulate hippocampal microcircuits remain unknown. Here, we show that acetylcholine release from cholinergic septohippocampal projections causes a long-lasting GABAergic inhibition of hippocampal dentate granule cells in vivo and in vitro. This inhibition is caused by cholinergic activation of hilar astrocytes, which provide glutamatergic excitation of hilar inhibitory interneurons. These results demonstrate that acetylcholine release can cause slow inhibition of principal neuronal activity via astrocyte intermediaries.

  9. Nerve growth factor attenuates cholinergic deficits following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, C E; Flinn, P; Bao, J; Venya, R; Hayes, R L

    1997-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in chronic derangements in central cholinergic neurotransmission that may contribute to posttraumatic memory deficits. Intraventricular cannula (IVC) nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion can reduce axotomy-induced spatial memory deficits and morphologic changes observed in medial septal cholinergic neurons immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). We examined the efficacy of NGF to (1) ameliorate reduced posttraumatic spatial memory performance, (2) release of hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh), and (3) ChAT immunoreactivity in the rat medial septum. Rats (n = 36) were trained prior to TBI on the functional tasks and retested on Days 1-5 (motor) and on Day 7 (memory retention). Immediately following injury, an IVC and osmotic pump were implanted, and NGF or vehicle was infused for 7 days. While there were no differences in motor performance, the NGF-treated group had significantly better spatial memory retention (P < 0.05) than the vehicle-treated group. The IVC cannula was then removed on Day 7, and a microdialysis probe was placed into the dorsal hippocampus. After a 22-h equilibration period, samples were collected prior to and after administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg), which evoked ACh release by blocking autoreceptors. The posttraumatic reduction in scopolamine-evoked ACh release was completely reversed with NGF. Injury produced a bilateral reduction in the number and cross-sectional area of ChAT immunopositive medial septal neurons that was reversed by NGF treatment. These data suggest that cognitive but not motor deficits following TBI are, in part, mediated by chronic deficits in cholinergic systems that can be modulated by neurotrophic factors such as NGF.

  10. Cholinergic imaging in corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Aotsuka, Akiyo; Tanaka, Noriko; Ota, Tsuneyoshi; Sato, Koichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2010-07-01

    Corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy and frontotemporal dementia are all part of a disease spectrum that includes common cognitive impairment and movement disorders. The aim of this study was to characterize brain cholinergic deficits in these disorders. We measured brain acetylcholinesterase activity by [11C] N-methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate and positron emission tomography in seven patients with corticobasal syndrome (67.6+/-5.9 years), 12 with progressive supranuclear palsy (68.5+/-4.1 years), eight with frontotemporal dementia (59.8+/-6.9 years) and 16 healthy controls (61.2+/-8.5 years). Two-tissue compartment three-parameter model and non-linear least squares analysis with arterial input function were performed. k3 value, an index of acetylcholinesterase activity, was calculated voxel-by-voxel in the brain of each subject. The k3 images in each disease group were compared with the control group by using Statistical Parametric Mapping 2. Volume of interest analysis was performed on spatially normalized k3 images. The corticobasal syndrome group showed decreased acetylcholinesterase activity (k3 values) in the paracentral region, frontal, parietal and occipital cortices (P<0.05, cluster corrected). The group with progressive supranuclear palsy had reduced acetylcholinesterase activity in the paracentral region and thalamus (P<0.05, cluster corrected). The frontotemporal dementia group showed no significant differences in acetylcholinesterase activity. Volume of interest analysis showed mean cortical acetylcholinesterase activity to be reduced by 17.5% in corticobasal syndrome (P<0.001), 9.4% in progressive supranuclear palsy (P<0.05) and 4.4% in frontotemporal dementia (non-significant), when compared with the control group. Thalamic acetylcholinesterase activity was reduced by 6.4% in corticobasal syndrome (non-significant), 24.0% in progressive supranuclear palsy (P<0.03) and increased by 3.3% in frontotemporal dementia (non-significant). Both

  11. Altered prejunctional modulation of intestinal cholinergic and noradrenergic pathways by α2-adrenoceptors in the presence of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Baschiera, Fabio; Barbara, Giovanni; Giorgio, Roberto De; Ponti, Fabrizio De; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Tacca, Mario Del

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of intestinal inflammation on: (1) the control of intestinal neurotransmission and motility by prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors and (2) the expression of intestinal α2-adrenoceptors. Experimental colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (DNBS) to rats. UK-14,304 inhibited atropine-sensitive electrically evoked contractions of ileal and colonic longitudinal muscle preparations. UK-14,304 acted with similar potency, but higher efficacy, on tissues from DNBS-treated animals; its effects were antagonized with greater potency by phentolamine than rauwolscine. Electrically induced [3H]noradrenaline release from ileal preparations was reduced in the presence of colitis. Tritium outflow was decreased by UK-14,304 and stimulated by rauwolscine or phentolamine: these effects were enhanced in preparations from animals with colitis. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay demonstrated the protein expression of α2A-adrenoceptors in mucosal and muscular tissues isolated from ileum and colon. The induction of colitis increased α2A-adrenoceptor expression in both ileal and colonic muscular layers, without concomitant changes in mucosal tissues. Induction of colitis reduced gastrointestinal propulsion of a charcoal suspension in vivo. In this setting, the gastrointestinal transit was inhibited by intraperitoneal (i.p.) UK-14,304 and stimulated by i.p. rauwolscine. After pretreatment with guanethidine, the stimulant action of rauwolscine no longer occurred, and UK-14,304 exerted a more prominent inhibitory effect that was antagonized by rauwolscine. The present results indicate that, in the presence of intestinal inflammation, prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors contribute to an enhanced inhibitory control of cholinergic and noradrenergic transmission both at inflamed and noninflamed distant sites. Evidence was obtained that such modulatory actions depend on an increased

  12. Interaction of nerve agent antidotes with cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Soukup, O; Tobin, G; Kumar, U K; Binder, J; Proska, J; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K

    2010-01-01

    The poisoning with organophosphorus compounds represents a life threatening danger especially in the time of terroristic menace. No universal antidote has been developed yet and other therapeutic approaches not related to reactivation of acetylcholinesterase are being investigated. This review describes the main features of the cholinergic system, cholinergic receptors, cholinesterases and their inhibitors. It also focuses on the organophosphorus nerve agents, their properties, effects and a large part describes various possibilities in treatments, mainly traditional oxime therapies based on reactivation of AChE. Furthermore, non-cholinesterase coupled antidotal effects of the oximes are thoroughly discussed. These antidotal effects principally include oxime interactions with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  13. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    PubMed Central

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  14. Cold-induced cholinergic urticaria--case report.

    PubMed

    Geller, M

    1989-07-01

    A 9-year-old child with cold-induced cholinergic urticaria was studied. When exposed to cold water or ambient cold air, the patient developed generalized urticaria. The lesions consisted of punctate wheals and surrounding erythema similar to that seen in cholinergic urticaria. The patient did not react to cutaneous challenge with an ice cube and a cold water immersion test was negative. Urticaria was not provoked by vigorous exercise sufficient to cause profuse sweating. The methacholine skin test was reactive. The patient was well controlled by combination therapy with hydroxyzine plus cyproheptadine.

  15. Physiology and immunology of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Cytokine production by the immune system contributes importantly to both health and disease. The nervous system, via an inflammatory reflex of the vagus nerve, can inhibit cytokine release and thereby prevent tissue injury and death. The efferent neural signaling pathway is termed the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway. Cholinergic agonists inhibit cytokine synthesis and protect against cytokine-mediated diseases. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevents the damaging effects of cytokine release in experimental sepsis, endotoxemia, ischemia/reperfusion injury, hemorrhagic shock, arthritis, and other inflammatory syndromes. Herein is a review of this physiological, functional anatomical mechanism for neurological regulation of cytokine-dependent disease that begins to define an immunological homunculus. PMID:17273548

  16. Sildenafil and Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors to Reduce Cardiotoxicity and Enhance the Response of Breast Tumors to Doxorubicin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0360 TITLE: Sildenafil and phosphodiesterase-5...Feb 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sildenafil and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors to reduce cardiotoxicity and enhance the...the differential effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, such as sildenafil , in terms of protecting cardiac cells and the heart from the toxicity

  17. Sildenafil and Phosphofiesterase-5 Inhibitors to Reduce Cardiotoxicity and Enhance the Response of Breast Tumors to Doxrubicin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0360 TITLE: Sildenafil and Phosphofiesterase-5...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sildenafil and Phosphofiesterase-5 Inhibitors to Reduce Cardiotoxicity and Enhance the Response of...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In our studies of the interaction between sildenafil and adriamycin in breast tumor cells and cardiomyocytes, we have made

  18. Enhanced resolution in Fourier incoherent single channel holography (FISCH) with reduced optical path difference.

    PubMed

    Kelner, Roy; Rosen, Joseph; Brooker, Gary

    2013-08-26

    Fourier incoherent single channel holography (FISCH) is a method for recording spatially incoherent digital Fourier holograms. We present a general design of enhanced FISCH with a smaller optical path difference between interfering beams, when compared to our initial design [Opt. Lett. 37, 3723 (2012)]. This reduction enables a proper system operation with a wider bandwidth. Potential resolution enhancement of the images reconstructed from the FISCH holograms consequentially follows.

  19. Cholinergic blockade frees fear extinction from its contextual dependency

    PubMed Central

    Zelikowsky, Moriel; Hast, Timothy A.; Bennett, Rebecca Z.; Merjanian, Michael; Nocera, Nathaniel A.; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fears that are maladaptive or inappropriate can be reduced through extinction training. However, extinction is highly context-sensitive, resulting in the renewal of fear following shifts in context, and limiting the clinical efficacy of extinction training. Lesion and inactivation studies have shown that the contextualization of extinction depends on the hippocampus. Parallel studies have found that intrahippocampal scopolamine blocks contextual fear conditioning. Importantly, this effect was replicated using a non-invasive technique in which a low dose of scopolamine was administered systemically. We aimed to transfer the effects of this non-invasive approach to block the contextualization of fear extinction. Methods Rats were tone fear conditioned and extinguished under various systemic doses of scopolamine or the saline vehicle. They were subsequently tested (off drug) for tone fear in a context that was the same (controls) or shifted (renewal group) with respect to the extinction context. Results The lowest dose of scopolamine produced a significant attenuation of fear renewal when renewal was tested either in the original training context or a novel context. The drug also slowed the rate of long-term extinction memory formation, which was readily overcome by extending extinction training. Scopolamine only gave this effect when it was administered during, but not after extinction training. Higher doses of scopolamine severely disrupted extinction learning. Conclusions We discovered that disrupting contextual processing during extinction with the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine blocked subsequent fear renewal. Low doses of scopolamine may be a clinically promising adjunct to exposure therapy by making extinction more relapse-resistant. PMID:22981655

  20. Neuroprotection provided by dietary restriction in rats is further enhanced by reducing glucocortocoids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guang; Spangler, Edward L; Wan, Ruiqian; Miller, Marshall; Mattson, Mark P; So, Kwok-Fai; de Cabo, Rafael; Zou, Sige; Ingram, Donald K

    2012-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC)--corticosterone (CORT) in rodents and cortisol in primates--are stress-induced hormones secreted by adrenal glands that interact with the hypothalamic pituitary axis. High levels of cortisol in humans are observed in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as in diabetes, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and major depression. Experimental models of diabetes in rats and mice have demonstrated that reduction of CORT reduces learning and memory deficits and attenuates loss of neuronal viability and plasticity. In contrast to the negative associations of elevated GC levels, CORT is moderately elevated in dietary restriction (DR) paradigms which are associated with many healthy anti-aging effects including neuroprotection. We demonstrate here in rats that ablating CORT by adrenalectomy (ADX) with replenishment to relatively low levels (30% below that of controls) prior to the onset of a DR regimen (ADX-DR) followed by central administration of the neurotoxin, kainic acid (KA), significantly attenuates learning deficits in a 14-unit T-maze task. The performance of the ADX-DR KA group did not differ from a control group (CON) that did not receive KA and was fed ad libitum (AL). By contrast, the sham-operated DR (SHAM-DR KA) group, SHAM-AL KA group, and ADX-AL KA group demonstrated poorer learning behavior in this task compared to the CON group. Stereological analysis revealed equivalent DR-induced neuroprotection in the SH-DR KA and ADX-DR KA groups, as measured by cell loss in the CA2/CA3 region of the hippocampus, while substantial cell loss was observed in SH-AL and ADX-AL rats. A separate set of experiments was conducted with similar dietary and surgical treatment conditions but without KA administration to examine markers of neurotrophic activity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), transcriptions factors (pCREB), and chaperone proteins (HSP-70). Under these conditions, we noted

  1. Neuroprotection provided by dietary restriction in rats is further enhanced by reducing glucocortocoids

    PubMed Central

    Qui, Guang; Spangler, Edward; Wan, Ruiqian; Miller, Marshall; Mattson, Mark; So, Kwi-fok; de Cabo, Rafael; Zou, Sige; Ingram, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC)--corticosterone (CORT) in rodents and cortisol in primates--are stress-induced hormones secreted by adrenal glands that interact with the hypothalamic pituitary axis. High levels of cortisol in humans are observed in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as in diabetes, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and major depression. Experimental models of diabetes in rats and mice have demonstrated that reduction of CORT reduces learning and memory deficits and attenuates loss of neuronal viability and plasticity. In contrast to the negative associations of elevated GC levels, CORT is moderately elevated in dietary restriction (DR) paradigms which are associated with many healthy anti-aging effects including neuroprotection. We demonstrate here in rats that ablating CORT by adrenalectomy (ADX) with replenishment to relatively low levels (30% below that of controls) prior to the onset of a DR regimen (ADX-DR) followed by central administration of the neurotoxin, kainic acid (KA), significantly attenuates learning deficits in a 14-unit T-maze task. The performance of the ADX-DR KA group did not differ from a control group (CON) that did not receive KA and was fed ad libitum (AL). By contrast, the sham-operated DR (SHAM-DR KA) group, SHAM-AL KA group, and ADX-AL KA group demonstrated poorer learning behavior in this task compared to the CON group. Stereological analysis revealed equivalent DR-induced neuroprotection in the SH-DR KA and ADX-DR KA groups, as measured by cell loss in the CA2/CA3 region of the hippocampus, while substantial cell loss was observed in SH-AL and ADX-AL rats. A separate set of experiments was conducted with similar dietary and surgical treatment conditions but without KA administration to examine markers of neurotrophic activity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), transcriptions factors (pCREB), and chaperone proteins (HSP-70). Under these conditions, we noted

  2. Balancing Arc synthesis, mRNA decay, and proteasomal degradation: maximal protein expression triggered by rapid eye movement sleep-like bursts of muscarinic cholinergic receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Soulé, Jonathan; Alme, Maria; Myrum, Craig; Schubert, Manja; Kanhema, Tambudzai; Bramham, Clive R

    2012-06-22

    Cholinergic signaling induces Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate early gene crucial for synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that dictate Arc mRNA and protein dynamics during and after cholinergic epochs are little understood. Using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAchR) stimulation triggers Arc synthesis, whereas translation-dependent RNA decay and proteasomal degradation strictly limit the amount and duration of Arc expression. Chronic application of the mAchR agonist, carbachol (Cch), induces Arc transcription via ERK signaling and release of calcium from IP(3)-sensitive stores. Arc translation requires ERK activation, but not changes in intracellular calcium. Proteasomal degradation of Arc (half-life ∼37 min) was enhanced by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic calcium-ATPase pump. Similar mechanisms of Arc protein regulation were observed in cultured rat hippocampal slices. Functionally, we studied the impact of cholinergic epoch duration and temporal pattern on Arc protein expression. Acute Cch treatment (as short as 2 min) induces transient, moderate Arc expression, whereas continuous treatment of more than 30 min induces maximal expression, followed by rapid decline. Cholinergic activity associated with rapid eye movement sleep may function to facilitate long term synaptic plasticity and memory. Employing a paradigm designed to mimic intermittent rapid eye movement sleep epochs, we show that application of Cch in a series of short bursts generates persistent and maximal Arc protein expression. The results demonstrate dynamic, multifaceted control of Arc synthesis during mAchR signaling, and implicate cholinergic epoch duration and repetition as critical determinants of Arc expression and function in synaptic plasticity and behavior.

  3. Reduced Burst Release and Enhanced Oral Bioavailability in Shikimic Acid-Loaded Polylactic Acid Submicron Particles by Coaxial Electrospray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yuanwen; Omari-Siaw, Emmanuel; Wang, Shengli; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Ximing

    2016-08-01

    In this study, using the coaxial electrospray method, we prepared submicron particles of the water-soluble drug shikimic acid (SA) with polylactic acid (PLA) as a polymer, to reduce the burst release and enhance the oral bioavailability. In vitro release study performed in HCl solution (pH 1.2) showed that the coaxial electrospray submicron particles could reduce burst release effect and presented a sustained release profile, compared with free SA and the particles prepared by electrospray method. The absorption of SA in the intestinal tract, studied using an in situ perfusion method in rats, also revealed jejunum as the main absorptive segment followed by duodenum and ileum. Moreover, the SA-loaded particles greatly enhanced the absorption of SA in the tested intestinal segments. The intestinal absorption rate was not enhanced with increasing drug concentration (5-15 μg/mL) which suggested that active transport or facilitated diffusion could play vital role in SA absorption. In addition, the SA-loaded PLA coaxial electrospray particle exhibited a prolonged plasma circulation with enhanced bioavailability after oral administration. In all, the coaxial electrospray technique could provide notable advantages for the oral delivery of SA, thereby enhancing its clinical application.

  4. Alteration of cholinergic, purinergic and sensory neurotransmission in the mouse colon of food allergy model.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yuxin; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2008-11-21

    It is well known that intestinal anaphylaxis results in a disturbed intestinal motility. It is hypothesized that the chronic intestinal anaphylaxis-induced changes in the enteric neuronal circuitry cause intestinal motor malfunctions. However, detailed mechanisms largely remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathophysiological role of ATP, which acts as a non-cholinergic neurotransmitter and a neuroimmune modulator, in a disturbed intestinal motility of food allergy (FA). The FA mice developed allergic diarrhea accompanied with chronic inflammation and mast cell hyperplasia in the colon. The excised proximal colons (PCs) were suspended in the longitudinal direction in organ baths. In the PCs precontracted by KCl (50 mM), contractile responses to exogenous ATP (1 mM) were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in FA mice (34.2% of KCl-induced precontractions) as compared to control mice (17.2%). Pretreatment with P2 purinoceptor antagonists [suramin and PPADs] significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the ATP-evoked contractions to 7.7% and 1.5% in FA and control PCs, respectively. Furthermore, in the presence of inhibitors of cholinergic nerves and capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves the electrical field stimulation (EFS; 10Hz)-evoked contractions were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in FA mice (65.8% of EFS-evoked maximum contractions, n = 6) than those in control mice (47.9%, n = 6). In addition, cumulative application of suramin and PPADs further inhibited EFS-induced contractions by 21.7% in FA mice (n = 6, P < 0.01) and 8.7% in control mice (n = 6, P < 0.05). Thus, the present study suggests that the sustained alteration in cholinergic, purinergic and sensory neurotransmission contribute to the disturbed motility during the chronic intestinal anaphylaxis.

  5. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of dopaminergic/cholinergic interactions in the baboon brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Brodie, J.D.; Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Schlyer, D.J.; King, P.T.; Alexoff, D.L.; Volkow, N.D.; Shiue, C.Y.; Wolf, A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between the dopaminergic D2 receptor system and the muscarinic cholinergic system in the corpus striatum of adult female baboons (Papio anubis) were examined using positron emission tomography (PET) combined with (18F)N-methylspiroperidol (( 18F)NMSP) (to probe D2 receptor availability) and (N-11C-methyl)benztropine (to probe muscarinic cholinergic receptor availability). Pretreatment with benztropine, a long-lasting anticholinergic drug, bilaterally reduced the incorporation of radioactivity in the corpus striatum but did not alter that observed in the cerebellum or the rate of metabolism of (18F)NMSP in plasma. Pretreatment with unlabelled NMSP, a potent dopaminergic antagonist, reduced the incorporation of (N-11C-methyl)benztropine in all brain regions, with the greatest effect being in the corpus striatum greater than cortex greater than thalamus greater than cerebellum, but did not alter the rate of metabolism of the labelled benztropine in the plasma. These reductions in the incorporation of either (18F)NMSP or (N-11C-methyl)benztropine exceeded the normal variation in tracer incorporation in repeated studies in the same animal. This study demonstrates that PET can be used as a tool for investigating interactions between neurochemically different yet functionally linked neurotransmitters systems in vivo and provides insight into the consequences of multiple pharmacologic administration.

  6. Behavioral deficits and cholinergic pathway abnormalities in male Sanfilippo B mice.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shih-Hsin; Le, Steven Q; Bui, Quang D; Benedict, Braeden; Cushman, Jesse; Sands, Mark S; Dickson, Patricia I

    2016-10-01

    Sanfilippo B syndrome is a progressive neurological disorder caused by inability to catabolize heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans. We studied neurobehavior in male Sanfilippo B mice and heterozygous littermate controls from 16 to 20 weeks of age. Affected mice showed reduced anxiety, with a decrease in the number of stretch-attend postures during the elevated plus maze (p=0.001) and an increased tendency to linger in the center of an open field (p=0.032). Water maze testing showed impaired spatial learning, with reduced preference for the target quadrant (p=0.01). In radial arm maze testing, affected mice failed to achieve above-chance performance in a win-shift working memory task (t-test relative to 50% chance: p=0.289), relative to controls (p=0.037). We found a 12.4% reduction in mean acetylcholinesterase activity (p<0.001) and no difference in choline acetyltransferase activity or acetylcholine in whole brain of affected male animals compared to controls. Cholinergic pathways are affected in adult-onset dementias, including Alzheimer disease. Our results suggest that male Sanfilippo B mice display neurobehavioral deficits at a relatively early age, and that as in adult dementias, they may display deficits in cholinergic pathways.

  7. Cellular mechanisms underlying spatiotemporal features of cholinergic retinal waves

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin J.; Félix, Aude L.; Feller, Marla B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to vision, a transient network of recurrently connected cholinergic interneurons, called starburst amacrine cells (SACs), generates spontaneous retinal waves. Despite an absence of robust inhibition, cholinergic retinal waves initiate infrequently and propagate within finite boundaries. Here we combine a variety of electrophysiological and imaging techniques and computational modeling to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these spatial and temporal properties of waves in developing mouse retina. Waves initiate via rare spontaneous depolarizations of SACs. Waves propagate through recurrent cholinergic connections between SACs and volume release of ACh as demonstrated using paired recordings and a cell-based ACh optical sensor. Perforated patch recordings and two-photon calcium imaging reveal that individual SACs have slow afterhyperpolarizations that induce SACs to have variable depolarizations during sequential waves. Using a computational model in which the properties of SACs are based on these physiological measurements, we reproduce the slow frequency, speed, and finite size of recorded waves. This study represents a detailed description of the circuit that mediates cholinergic retinal waves and indicates that variability of the interneurons that generate this network activity may be critical for the robustness of waves across different species and stages of development. PMID:22262883

  8. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research. PMID:25107282

  9. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  10. Selective optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, Abigail; Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine profoundly affects neocortical function, being involved in arousal, attention, learning, memory, sensory and motor function, and plasticity. The majority of cholinergic afferents to neocortex are from neurons in nucleus basalis. Nucleus basalis also contains projecting neurons that release other transmitters, including GABA and possibly glutamate. Hence, electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis evokes the release of a mixture of neurotransmitters in neocortex, and this lack of selectivity has impeded research on cholinergic signaling in neocortex. We describe a method for the selective stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex. We used the Cre-lox system and a viral vector to express the light-activated protein channelrhodopsin-2 in cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis and their axons in neocortex. Labeled neurons depolarized on illumination with blue light but were otherwise unchanged. In anesthetized mice, illumination of neocortex desynchronized the local field potential, indicating that light evoked release of ACh. This novel technique will enable many new studies of the cellular, network, and behavioral physiology of ACh in neocortex.

  11. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  12. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates lipid oxidation, reduces protein oxidation, and enhances insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M A; Schmitz, O; Mengel, A; Keller, A; Christiansen, J S; Zapf, J; Froesch, E R

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity, eight healthy subjects were treated with saline and recombinant human (IGF-I (10 micrograms/kg.h) during 5 d in a crossover, randomized fashion, while receiving an isocaloric diet (30 kcal/kg.d) throughout the study period. On the third and fourth treatment days, respectively, an L-arginine stimulation test and an intravenous glucose tolerance test were performed. A euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry and a glucose tracer infusion were performed on the fifth treatment day. IGF-I treatment led to reduced fasting and stimulated (glucose and/or L-arginine) insulin and growth hormone secretion. Basal and stimulated glucagon secretion remained unchanged. Intravenous glucose tolerance was unaltered despite reduced insulin secretion. Resting energy expenditure and lipid oxidation were both elevated, while protein oxidation was reduced, and glucose turnover rates were unaltered on the fifth treatment day with IGF-I as compared to the control period. Enhanced lipolysis was reflected by elevated circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, insulin-stimulated oxidative and nonoxidative glucose disposal (i.e., insulin sensitivity) were enhanced during IGF-I treatment. Thus, IGF-I treatment leads to marked changes in lipid and protein oxidation, whereas, at the dose used, carbohydrate metabolism remains unaltered in the face of reduced insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Images PMID:8227340

  13. Unique Contributions of Distinct Cholinergic Projections to Motor Cortical Plasticity and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kulczycki, M.; Tuszynski, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    The cholinergic basal forebrain projects throughout the neocortex, exerting a critical role in modulating plasticity associated with normal learning. Cholinergic modulation of cortical plasticity could arise from 3 distinct mechanisms by 1) “direct” modulation via cholinergic inputs to regions undergoing plasticity, 2) “indirect” modulation via cholinergic projections to anterior, prefrontal attentional systems, or 3) modulating more global aspects of processing via distributed inputs throughout the cortex. To segregate these potential mechanisms, we investigated cholinergic-dependent reorganization of cortical motor representations in rats undergoing skilled motor learning. Behavioral and electrophysiological consequences of depleting cholinergic inputs to either motor cortex, prefrontal cortex, or globally, were compared. We find that local depletion of cholinergic afferents to motor cortex significantly disrupts map plasticity and skilled motor behavior, whereas prefrontal cholinergic depletion has no effect on these measures. Global cholinergic depletion perturbs map plasticity comparable with motor cortex depletions but results in significantly greater impairments in skilled motor acquisition. These findings indicate that local cholinergic activation within motor cortex, as opposed to indirect regulation of prefrontal systems, modulate cortical map plasticity and motor learning. More globally acting cholinergic mechanisms provide additional support for the acquisition of skilled motor behaviors, beyond those associated with cortical map reorganization. PMID:20181623

  14. Contribution of the Cholinergic System to Verbal Memory Performance in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Peter, Jessica; Lahr, Jacob; Minkova, Lora; Lauer, Eliza; Grothe, Michel J; Teipel, Stefan; Köstering, Lena; Kaller, Christoph P; Heimbach, Bernhard; Hüll, Michael; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph; Reis, Janine; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-06-18

    Acetylcholine is critically involved in modulating learning and memory function, which both decline in neurodegeneration. It remains unclear to what extent structural and functional changes in the cholinergic system contribute to episodic memory dysfunction in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in addition to hippocampal degeneration. A better understanding is critical, given that the cholinergic system is the main target of current symptomatic treatment in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. We simultaneously assessed the structural and functional integrity of the cholinergic system in 20 patients with MCI and 20 matched healthy controls and examined their effect on verbal episodic memory via multivariate regression analyses. Mediating effects of either cholinergic function or hippocampal volume on the relationship between cholinergic structure and episodic memory were computed. In MCI, a less intact structure and function of the cholinergic system was found. A smaller cholinergic structure was significantly correlated with a functionally more active cholinergic system in patients, but not in controls. This association was not modulated by age or disease severity, arguing against compensational processes. Further analyses indicated that neither functional nor structural changes in the cholinergic system influence verbal episodic memory at the MCI stage. In fact, those associations were fully mediated by hippocampal volume. Although the cholinergic system is structurally and functionally altered in MCI, episodic memory dysfunction results primarily from hippocampal neurodegeneration, which may explain the inefficiency of cholinergic treatment at this disease stage.

  15. 76 FR 54408 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), Department of Health and Human Services... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Parts 50 and 56 Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects...

  16. Enhanced Brewer Dobson circulation reduces N2O warming potential under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, Daniela; Reick, Christian; Manzini, Elisa; Schultz, Martin; Stein, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    One implication of climate change is an enhancement of the Brewer Dobson circulation (BDC) triggering the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere. This change in atmospheric dynamics will have effects on atmospheric constituents, especially those with stratospheric sinks such as ozone depleting substances (ODS) including nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O is the most important currently emitted ODS, and the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Under enhanced BDC, more N2O is transported from the troposphere into the stratosphere, reaching higher altitudes, resulting in an increased N2O sink and a decrease in N2O lifetime. Some aspects of the effect of an enhanced BDC on lifetimes of ODS have already been examined with focus on its implications for ozone. In this study, we examine the effect of a decreasing N2O lifetime in light of climate change. To this end we conduct idealized transient global warming simulations with ECHAM, the atmosphere component of the MPI Earth System Model. As we prescribe surface flux boundary conditions for N2O, we are able to examine further implications of an enhanced N2O sink on atmospheric abundance, which is an important factor for e.g. generating concentration scenarios. Due the idealized simulation setup, we derive findings that are scenario-independent and can easily be extended to other global warming scenarios.

  17. Reducing Alcohol Risk in Adjudicated Male College Students: Further Validation of a Group Motivational Enhancement Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBrie, Joseph W.; Cail, Jessica; Pedersen, Eric R.; Migliuri, Savannah

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a single-session group motivational enhancement alcohol intervention on adjudicated male college students. Over two sequential academic years, 230 students sanctioned by the university for alcohol-related infractions attended a 60- to 75-minute group intervention. The intervention consisted of a timeline…

  18. Cholinergic and perfusion brain networks in Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Wyper, David J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate muscarinic M1/M4 cholinergic networks in Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and their association with changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) after 12 weeks of treatment with donepezil. Methods: Forty-nine participants (25 PDD and 24 elderly controls) underwent 123I-QNB and 99mTc-exametazime SPECT scanning. We implemented voxel principal components (PC) analysis, producing a series of PC images of patterns of interrelated voxels across individuals. Linear regression analyses derived specific M1/M4 and perfusion spatial covariance patterns (SCPs). Results: We found an M1/M4 SCP of relative decreased binding in basal forebrain, temporal, striatum, insula, and anterior cingulate (F1,47 = 31.9, p < 0.001) in cholinesterase inhibitor–naive patients with PDD, implicating limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks. The corresponding regional cerebral blood flow SCP showed relative decreased uptake in temporoparietal and prefrontal areas (F1,47 = 177.5, p < 0.001) and nodes of the frontoparietal and default mode networks (DMN). The M1/M4 pattern that correlated with an improvement in MMSE (r = 0.58, p = 0.005) revealed relatively preserved/increased pre/medial/orbitofrontal, parietal, and posterior cingulate areas coinciding with the DMN and frontoparietal networks. Conclusion: Dysfunctional limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks were associated with PDD. Established cholinergic maintenance of the DMN and frontoparietal networks may be prerequisite for cognitive remediation following cholinergic treatment in this condition. PMID:27306636

  19. Involvement of the cholinergic system in conditioning and perceptual memory.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2011-08-10

    The cholinergic systems play a pivotal role in learning and memory, and have been the centre of attention when it comes to diseases containing cognitive deficits. It is therefore not surprising, that the cholinergic transmitter system has experienced detailed examination of its role in numerous behavioural situations not least with the perspective that cognition may be rescued with appropriate cholinergic 'boosters'. Here we reviewed the literature on (i) cholinergic lesions, (ii) pharmacological intervention of muscarinic or nicotinic system, or (iii) genetic deletion of selective receptor subtypes with respect to sensory discrimination and conditioning procedures. We consider visual, auditory, olfactory and somatosensory processing first before discussing more complex tasks such as startle responses, latent inhibition, negative patterning, eye blink and fear conditioning, and passive avoidance paradigms. An overarching reoccurring theme is that lesions of the cholinergic projection neurones of the basal forebrain impact negatively on acquisition learning in these paradigms and blockade of muscarinic (and to a lesser extent nicotinic) receptors in the target structures produce similar behavioural deficits. While these pertain mainly to impairments in acquisition learning, some rare cases extend to memory consolidation. Such single case observations warranted replication and more in-depth studies. Intriguingly, receptor blockade or receptor gene knockout repeatedly produced contradictory results (for example in fear conditioning) and combined studies, in which genetically altered mice are pharmacological manipulated, are so far missing. However, they are desperately needed to clarify underlying reasons for these contradictions. Consistently, stimulation of either muscarinic (mainly M(1)) or nicotinic (predominantly α7) receptors was beneficial for learning and memory formation across all paradigms supporting the notion that research into the development and

  20. Brainstem cholinergic modulation of muscle tone in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Gall, Andrew J; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S

    2007-06-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between these two regions. First, in unanesthetized pups, we found that chemical infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (22 mm, 0.1 microL) within the DLPT produced high muscle tone. Next, chemical lesions of the PnO were used to produce a chronic state of high nuchal muscle tone, at which time the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (10 mm, 0.1 microL) was infused into the DLPT. Scopolamine effectively decreased nuchal muscle tone, thus suggesting that lesions of the PnO increase muscle tone via cholinergic activation of the DLPT. Using 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, metabolic activation throughout the DLPT was observed after PnO lesions. Finally, consistent with the hypothesis that PnO inactivation produces high muscle tone, infusion of the sodium channel blocker lidocaine (2%) into the PnO of unanesthetized pups produced rapid increases in muscle tone. We conclude that, even early in infancy, the DLPT is critically involved in the regulation of muscle tone and behavioral state, and that its activity is modulated by a cholinergic mechanism that is directly or indirectly controlled by the PnO.

  1. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse brain against D-galactose-induced impairment of cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Ye, Qin; Fan, Shao-Hua; Shan, Qun; Wang, Yong-Jian

    2010-02-01

    Previous evidence showed that administration of d-galactose (d-gal) increased ROS production and resulted in impairment of cholinergic system. Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against d-gal-induced impairment of cholinergic system, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our results displayed that troxerutin administration significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in step-through test and morris water maze task. One of the potential mechanisms of this action was decreased AGEs, ROS and protein carbonyl levels in the basal forebrain, hippocampus and front cortex of d-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, our results also showed that troxerutin significantly inhibited cholinesterase (AchE) activity, increased the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (nAchRalpha7) and enhanced interactions between nAchRalpha7 and either postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1) in the basal forebrain, hippocampus and front cortex of d-gal-treated mice, which could help restore impairment of brain function.

  2. Cholinergic modulation differs between basal and apical dendritic excitation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Péloquin, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesize that endogenous cholinergic modulation of dendritic processing of hippocampal CA1 is layer specific, and it specifically enhances spike output resulting from basal as compared with the apical dendritic excitation. Laminar profiles of evoked field potentials were recorded in the CA1 area of urethane-anesthetized rats using multichannel silicon probes and analyzed as current source density. High-frequency stimulation of the pontis oralis (PnO) attenuated the midapical more than the basal or distal apical dendritic excitatory sink. Population spike (PS) and excitatory sink-PS potentiation resulting from basal dendritic excitation were facilitated, while the PS evoked by apical dendritic stimulation was attenuated by PnO stimulation. Perfusion of cholinergic agonist carbachol onto hippocampal slices in vitro also attenuated the apical more than the basal dendritic excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Excitatory sink attenuation and PS changes after PnO stimulation were blocked by systemic or local scopolamine and by intracerebroventricular (icv) M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine but not by icv M2 receptor antagonist AFDX-116 or nicotinic antagonists. However, a hippocampal theta rhythm activated by PnO stimulation was blocked by systemic but not by local scopolamine. We conclude that endogenous acetylcholine mediates a stronger presynaptic inhibition of the midapical than basal and distal apical excitation mainly through M1 receptors.

  3. Results of ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Programming to Reduce Therapies and Improve Quality of Life (from the ENHANCED-ICD Study).

    PubMed

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Pedersen, Susanne S; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Doevendans, Pieter A; Meine, Mathias

    2016-02-15

    Novel implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) discrimination algorithms and programming strategies have significantly reduced the incidence of inappropriate shocks, but there are still gains to be made with respect to reducing appropriate but unnecessary antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and shocks. We examined whether programming a number of intervals to detect (NID) of 60/80 for ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) detection was safe and the impact of this strategy on (1) adverse events related to ICD shocks and syncopal events; (2) ATPs/shocks; and (3) patient-reported outcomes. The "ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator programming to reduce therapies and improve quality of life" study (ENHANCED-ICD study) was a prospective, safety-monitoring study enrolling 60 primary and secondary prevention patients at the University Medical Center Utrecht. Patients implanted with any type of ICD with SmartShock technology and aged 18 to 80 years were eligible to participate. In all patients, a prolonged NID 60/80 was programmed. The cycle length for VT/fast VT/VF was 360/330/240 ms, respectively. Programming a NID 60/80 proved safe for ICD patients. Because of the new programming strategy, unnecessary ICD therapy was prevented in 10% of ENHANCED-ICD patients during a median follow-up period of 1.3 years. With respect to patient-reported outcomes, levels of distress were highest and perceived health status lowest at the time of implantation, which both gradually improved during follow-up. In conclusion, the ENHANCED-ICD study demonstrates that programming a NID 60/80 for VT/VF detection is safe for ICD patients and does not negatively impact their quality of life.

  4. An In Vivo Pharmacological Screen Identifies Cholinergic Signaling as a Therapeutic Target in Glial-Based Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Messing, Albee

    2016-01-01

    The role that glia play in neurological disease is poorly understood but increasingly acknowledged to be critical in a diverse group of disorders. Here we use a simple genetic model of Alexander disease, a progressive and severe human degenerative nervous system disease caused by a primary astroglial abnormality, to perform an in vivo screen of 1987 compounds, including many FDA-approved drugs and natural products. We identify four compounds capable of dose-dependent inhibition of nervous system toxicity. Focusing on one of these hits, glycopyrrolate, we confirm the role for muscarinic cholinergic signaling in pathogenesis using additional pharmacologic reagents and genetic approaches. We further demonstrate that muscarinic cholinergic signaling works through downstream Gαq to control oxidative stress and death of neurons and glia. Importantly, we document increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression in Alexander disease model mice and in postmortem brain tissue from Alexander disease patients, and that blocking muscarinic receptors in Alexander disease model mice reduces oxidative stress, emphasizing the translational significance of our findings. We have therefore identified glial muscarinic signaling as a potential therapeutic target in Alexander disease, and possibly in other gliopathic disorders as well. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the urgent need for better treatments for neurological diseases, drug development for these devastating disorders has been challenging. The effectiveness of traditional large-scale in vitro screens may be limited by the lack of the appropriate molecular, cellular, and structural environment. Using a simple Drosophila model of Alexander disease, we performed a moderate throughput chemical screen of FDA-approved drugs and natural compounds, and found that reducing muscarinic cholinergic signaling ameliorated clinical symptoms and oxidative stress in Alexander disease model flies and mice. Our work demonstrates that small

  5. Muscarinic activation of inwardly rectifying K+ conductance reduces EPSPs in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Thomas; Alzheimer, Christian

    2001-01-01

    To determine how acetylcholine (ACh) modulates the somatodendritic processing of EPSPs, we performed whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slices and examined the effect of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol (CCh), on α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl isoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) EPSPs, miniature EPSPs, and EPSP-like waveforms evoked by brief dendritic glutamate pulses (glutamate-evoked postsynaptic potentials, GPSPs). Although CCh is known to enhance the intrinsic excitability of the neuron in several ways, activation of atropine-sensitive (muscarinic) receptors on the apical dendrite or the soma of CA1 pyramidal cells consistently reduced the amplitude of EPSPs and GPSPs. Cholinergic inhibition of evoked and simulated EPSP waveforms displayed considerable voltage dependence, with the amplitude of the postsynaptic potentials progressively declining with membrane hyperpolarization indicating the involvement of an inwardly rectifying current. Extracellular Ba2+ (200 μm) and tertiapin (30 nm), a novel and selective blocker of G protein-activated, inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels, completely blocked the effect of CCh on GPSP amplitude. Muscarinic reduction of GPSPs was not sensitive to the M1 receptor-preferring antagonist, pirenzepine, but was suppressed by the M2 receptor-preferring antagonist, methoctramine, and by the allosteric M2 receptor antagonist, gallamine. In voltage-clamp recordings, CCh induced an ion current displaying inward rectification in the hyperpolarizing direction, which was identified as a GIRK current based on its sensitivity to low Ba2+ and tertiapin. Its pharmacological profile paralleled that of the cholinergic GPSP reduction. We link the observed reduction of postsynaptic potentials to the cholinergic activation of a GIRK conductance, which serves to partially shunt excitatory synaptic input. PMID:11533131

  6. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-10-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface.

  7. Advertising to the enemy: enhanced floral fragrance increases beetle attraction and reduces plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Theis, Nina; Adler, Lynn S

    2012-02-01

    Many organisms face challenges in avoiding predation while searching for mates. For plants, emitting floral fragrances to advertise reproductive structures could increase the attraction of detrimental insects along with pollinators. Very few studies have experimentally evaluated the costs and benefits of fragrance emission with explicit consideration of how plant fitness is affected by both pollinators and florivores. To determine the reproductive consequences of increasing the apparency of reproductive parts, we manipulated fragrance, pollination, and florivores in the wild Texas gourd, Cucurbita pepo var. texana. With enhanced fragrance we found an increase in the attraction of florivores, rather than pollinators, and a decrease in seed production. This study is the first to demonstrate that enhanced floral fragrance can increase the attraction of detrimental florivores and decrease plant reproduction, suggesting that florivory as well as pollination has shaped the evolution of floral scent.

  8. Reduced lifetimes are directly correlated with excitation irradiance in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF).

    PubMed

    Karolin, Jan O; Geddes, Chris D

    2012-11-01

    We describe a fundamental observation in Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), which has become a leading technology in the life sciences today, namely, how the lifetime of fluorophores near-to metallic plasmon-supporting silver islands/nanoparticles, modulates as a function of excitation power irradiance. This finding is in stark contrast to that observed in classical far-field fluorescence spectroscopy, where excitation power does not influence fluorophore radiative decay/lifetime.

  9. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate. PMID:21164826

  10. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-11-22

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate.

  11. Enhanced and selective ammonia sensing of reduced graphene oxide based chemo resistive sensor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2016-05-01

    The reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated by using the spin coating method. The reduced graphene oxide samples were characterised by Raman studies to obtain corresponding D and G bands at 1360 and 1590 cm-1 respectively. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra consists of peak corresponds to sp2 hybridisation of carbon atoms at 1560 cm-1. The reduced graphene oxide based chemoresistive sensor exhibited a p-type semiconductor behaviour in ambient conditions and showed good sensitivity to different concentration of ammonia from 25 ppm to 500 ppm and excellent selectivity at room temperature. The sensor displays selectivity to several hazardous vapours such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and hydrazine hydrate. The sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.8 at 25 ppm concentration of ammonia with response time of 163 seconds.

  12. Hematite Reduction Buffers Acid Generation and Enhances Nutrient Uptake by a Fermentative Iron Reducing Bacterium, Orenia metallireducens Strain Z6.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A; Chang, Yun-Juan; McInerney, Michael J; Fouke, Bruce W

    2017-01-03

    Fermentative iron-reducing organisms have been identified in a variety of environments. Instead of coupling iron reduction to respiration, they have been consistently observed to use ferric iron minerals as an electron sink for fermentation. In the present study, a fermentative iron reducer, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was shown to use iron reduction to enhance fermentation not only by consuming electron equivalents, but also by generating alkalinity that effectively buffers the pH. Fermentation of glucose by this organism in the presence of a ferric oxide mineral, hematite (Fe2O3), resulted in enhanced glucose decomposition compared with fermentation in the absence of an iron source. Parallel evidence (i.e., genomic reconstruction, metabolomics, thermodynamic analyses, and calculation of electron transfer) suggested hematite reduction as a proton-consuming reaction effectively consumed acid produced by fermentation. The buffering effect of hematite was further supported by a greater extent of glucose utilization by strain Z6 in media with increasing buffer capacity. Such maintenance of a stable pH through hematite reduction for enhanced glucose fermentation complements the thermodynamic interpretation of interactions between microbial iron reduction and other biogeochemical processes. This newly discovered feature of iron reducer metabolism also has significant implications for groundwater management and contaminant remediation by providing microbially mediated buffering systems for the associated microbial and/or chemical reactions.

  13. Effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of usnic acid in ascitic tumor-bearing mice treated with bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-Qing; Liu, Yu-Hong; Guo, Hui-Zhen; Sun, Chao-Yue; Xie, Jian-Hui; Li, Yu-Cui; Chen, Jian-Nan; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Su, Zi-Ren; Chen, Hai-Ming

    2017-03-08

    Usnic acid (UA) can be found in certain lichen species. Growing evidence suggests that UA possesses antitumoral, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. Bleomycin (BLM) is widely used in the treatment of malignant ascites, however, it unexpectedly causes pulmonary fibrosis (PF). Researches show that excessive inflammatory response and oxidative stress in lung tissue is conspicuous causes of BLM-induced PF. Here we investigated mechanism underlying the effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of UA on H22-bearing mice treated with BLM. UA combined with BLM was significantly more effective than BLM alone in inhibiting the tumor growth, arresting the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, and promoting the cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-8 activities to induce cancer cellular apoptosis. The mechanism may be associated with the transcriptional regulation of p53/p21/Cyclin pathway. Furthermore, UA effectively moderated the histopathological changes, reduced the content of MDA, HYP, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1, and increased the level of SOD when combined with BLM in lung tissues of H22-bearing mice, which was believed to be related to the inhibition on the protein level of p-Smad2/3 and enhancement of Smad7 expression. These findings suggested that UA might be a potential effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing candidate for BLM in the treatment of malignant ascites.

  14. Distillers by-product cattle diets enhance reduced sulfur gas fluxes from feedlot soils and manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from animal feeding operations are a concern with increased feeding of high-sulfur distillers by-products. Three feeding trials were conducted to evaluate feeding wet distillers grain plus solubles (WDGS) on TRS fluxes. Fresh manure was collected three times duri...

  15. Opportunities to Reduce Potential Duplication in Government Programs, Save Tax Dollars, and Enhance Revenue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    allows increasing annual amounts of conventional biofuels through 2015, which ensures a market for a conventional corn starch ethanol industry that...13. Addressing duplicative federal efforts directed at increasing domestic ethanol production could reduce revenue losses by up to $5.7 billion...identifying and selecting joint information technology investments. Officials from both DOD and VA agreed with these recommendations. • Domestic ethanol

  16. Mixed-Mode Surveys: A Strategy to Reduce Costs and Enhance Response Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Daniel; Thomson, Joan; Radhakrishna, Rama; LaBorde, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-mode surveys present one opportunity for Extension to determine program outcomes at lower costs. In order to conduct a follow-up evaluation, we implemented a mixed-mode survey that relied on communication using the Web, postal mailings, and telephone calls. Using multiple modes conserved costs by reducing the number of postal mailings yet…

  17. Spaced Learning Enhances Subsequent Recognition Memory by Reducing Neural Repetition Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Poldrack, Russell; Dong, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Spaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half…

  18. Enhanced reduced sulfur emission from manures of beef cattle fed distiller's byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are normal products of manure decomposition which are emitted from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). These compounds not only contribute to nuisance odors, but with recent EPA regulations, H2S emissions in excess of 100 lbs per day must be reported by the livestock...

  19. Feeding Distiller's Byproducts May Enhance Reduced Sulfur Emissions from Cattle Feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are normal products of manure decomposition which are emitted from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). These compounds not only contribute to nuisance odors, but with recent EPA regulations, H2S emissions in excess of 100 lbs per day must be reported by the livestock...

  20. Impacts of enhanced CCN on the organization of convection and recent reduced counts of monsoon depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Martin, Andrew; Krishnamurti, Ruby; Simon, Anu; Thomas, Aype; Kumar, Vinay

    2012-11-01

    Monsoon depressions, that form during the Indian summer monsoon season (June to September) are known to be baroclinic disturbances (horizontal scale 2000 to 3000 km) and are driven by deep convection that carries a very large vertical slope towards cold air aloft in the upper troposphere. Deep convection is nearly always organized around the scale of these depressions. In the maintenance of the monsoon depression the generation of eddy kinetic energy on the scale of the monsoon depression is largely governed by the "in scale" covariance of heating and temperature and of vertical velocity and temperature over the region of the monsoon depression. There are normally about 6 to 8 monsoon depressions during a summer monsoon season. Recent years 2009, 2010 and 2011 saw very few (around 1, 0 and 1 per season respectively). The best numerical models such as those from ECMWF and US (GFS) carried many false alarms in their 3 to 5 day forecasts, more like 6 to 8 disturbances. Even in recent years with fewer observed monsoon depressions a much larger number of depressions is noted in ECMWF forecasts. These are fairly comprehensive models that carry vast data sets (surface and satellite based), detailed data assimilation, and are run at very high resolutions. The monsoon depression is well resolved by these respective horizontal resolutions in these models (at 15 and 35km). These models carry complete and detailed physical parameterizations. The false alarms in their forecasts leads us to suggest that some additional important ingredient may be missing in these current best state of the art models. This paper addresses the effects of pollution for the enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei and the resulting disruption of the organization of convection in monsoon depressions. Our specific studies make use of a high resolution mesoscale model (WRF/CHEM) to explore the impacts of the first and second aerosol indirect effects proposed by Twomey and Albrecht. We have conducted

  1. Impacts of enhanced CCN on the organization of convection and recent reduced counts of monsoon depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Martin, Andrew; Krishnamurti, Ruby; Simon, Anu; Thomas, Aype; Kumar, Vinay

    2013-07-01

    Monsoon depressions, that form during the Indian summer monsoon season (June to September) are known to be baroclinic disturbances (horizontal scale 2,000-3,000 km) and are driven by deep convection that carries a very large vertical slope towards cold air aloft in the upper troposphere. Deep convection is nearly always organized around the scale of these depressions. In the maintenance of the monsoon depression the generation of eddy kinetic energy on the scale of the monsoon depression is largely governed by the "in scale" covariance of heating and temperature and of vertical velocity and temperature over the region of the monsoon depression. There are normally about 6-8 monsoon depressions during a summer monsoon season. Recent years 2009, 2010 and 2011 saw very few (around 1, 0 and 1 per season respectively). The best numerical models such as those from ECMWF and US (GFS) carried many false alarms in their 3-5 day forecasts, more like 6-8 disturbances. Even in recent years with fewer observed monsoon depressions a much larger number of depressions is noted in ECMWF forecasts. These are fairly comprehensive models that carry vast data sets (surface and satellite based), detailed data assimilation, and are run at very high resolutions. The monsoon depression is well resolved by these respective horizontal resolutions in these models (at 15 and 35 km). These models carry complete and detailed physical parameterizations. The false alarms in their forecasts leads us to suggest that some additional important ingredient may be missing in these current best state of the art models. This paper addresses the effects of pollution for the enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei and the resulting disruption of the organization of convection in monsoon depressions. Our specific studies make use of a high resolution mesoscale model (WRF/CHEM) to explore the impacts of the first and second aerosol indirect effects proposed by Twomey and Albrecht. We have conducted preliminary

  2. Enhancement of the Musca domestica hytrosavirus infection with orally delivered reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Boucias, D; Baniszewski, J; Prompiboon, P; Lietze, V; Geden, C

    2015-01-01

    House flies (Musca domestica L.) throughout the world are infected with the salivary gland hypertrophy virus MdSGHV (Hytrosaviridae). Although the primary route of infection is thought to be via ingestion, flies that are old enough to feed normally are resistant to infection per os, suggesting that the peritrophic matrix (PM) is a barrier to virus transmission. Histological examination of the peritrophic matrix of healthy flies revealed a multilaminate structure produced by midgut cells located near the proventriculus. SEM revealed the PM to form a confluent sheet surrounding the food bolus with pores/openings less than 10nm in diameter. TEM revealed the PM to be multilayered, varying in width from 350 to 900 nm, and generally thinner in male than in female flies. When flies were fed on the reducing agents dithiothetriol (DTT) or tris (2-caboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) for 48 h before per os exposure to the virus, infection rates increased 10- to 20-fold compared with flies that did not receive the reducing agent treatments. PM's from flies treated with DTT and TCEP displayed varying degrees of disruption, particularly in the outer layer, and lacked the electron-dense inner layer facing the ectoperitrophic space. Both drugs were somewhat toxic to the flies, resulting in>40% mortality at doses greater than 10mM (DTT) or 5 mM (TCEP). DTT increased male fly susceptibility (55.1% infected) more than that of females (7.8%), whereas TCEP increased susceptibility of females (42.9%) more than that of males (26.2%). The cause for the sex differences in response to oral exposure the reducing agents is unclear. Exposing flies to food treated with virus and the reducing agents at the same time, rather than pretreating flies with the drugs, had no effect on susceptibility to the virus. Presumably, the reducing agent disrupted the enveloped virus and acted as a viricidal agent. In summary, it is proposed that the reducing agents influence integrity of the PM barrier

  3. Genetically Engineered Alginate Lyase-PEG Conjugates Exhibit Enhanced Catalytic Function and Reduced Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lamppa, John W.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Scanlon, Thomas C.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    Alginate lyase enzymes represent prospective biotherapeutic agents for treating bacterial infections, particularly in the cystic fibrosis airway. To effectively deimmunize one therapeutic candidate while maintaining high level catalytic proficiency, a combined genetic engineering-PEGylation strategy was implemented. Rationally designed, site-specific PEGylation variants were constructed by orthogonal maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. In contrast to random PEGylation of the enzyme by NHS-ester mediated chemistry, controlled mono-PEGylation of A1-III alginate lyase produced a conjugate that maintained wild type levels of activity towards a model substrate. Significantly, the PEGylated variant exhibited enhanced solution phase kinetics with bacterial alginate, the ultimate therapeutic target. The immunoreactivity of the PEGylated enzyme was compared to a wild type control using in vitro binding studies with both enzyme-specific antibodies, from immunized New Zealand white rabbits, and a single chain antibody library, derived from a human volunteer. In both cases, the PEGylated enzyme was found to be substantially less immunoreactive. Underscoring the enzyme's potential for practical utility, >90% of adherent, mucoid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were removed from abiotic surfaces following a one hour treatment with the PEGylated variant, whereas the wild type enzyme removed only 75% of biofilms in parallel studies. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that site-specific mono-PEGylation of genetically engineered A1-III alginate lyase yielded an enzyme with enhanced performance relative to therapeutically relevant metrics. PMID:21340021

  4. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  5. Evaluation of levetiracetam effects on pilocarpine-induced seizures: cholinergic muscarinic system involvement.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A A; Nogueira, C R A; Nascimento, V S; Aguiar, L M V; Freitas, R M; Sousa, F C F; Viana, G S B; Fonteles, M M F

    2005-09-16

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a new antiepileptic drug effective as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures. It displays a unique pharmacological profile against experimental models of seizures, including pilocarpine-induced seizures in rodents. Aiming to clarify if anticonvulsant activity of LEV occurs due to cholinergic alterations, adult male mice received LEV injections before cholinergic agonists' administration. Pretreatment with LEV (30-200 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the latencies of seizures, but decreased status epilepticus and death on the seizure model induced by pilocarpine, 400 mg/kg, s.c. (P400). LEV (LEV200, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment also reduced the intensity of tremors induced by oxotremorine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p). [3H]-N-methylscopolamine-binding assays in mice hippocampus showed that LEV200 pretreatment reverts the downregulation on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR), induced by P400 administration, bringing back these density values to control ones (0.9% NaCl, i.p.). However, subtype-specific-binding assays revealed that P400- and LEV-alone treatments result in M1 and M2 subtypes decrease, respectively. The agonist-like behavior of LEV on the inhibitory M2 mAChR subtype, observed in this work, could contribute to explain the reduction on oxotremorine-induced tremors and the delay on pilocarpine-induced seizures, by an increase in the attenuation of neuronal activity mediated by the M1 receptors.

  6. Short-term plasticity and modulation of synaptic transmission at mammalian inhibitory cholinergic olivocochlear synapses

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eleonora; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti, the mammalian sensory epithelium of the inner ear, has two types of mechanoreceptor cells, inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs). In this sensory epithelium, vibrations produced by sound waves are transformed into electrical signals. When depolarized by incoming sounds, IHCs release glutamate and activate auditory nerve fibers innervating them and OHCs, by virtue of their electromotile property, increase the amplification and fine tuning of sound signals. The medial olivocochlear (MOC) system, an efferent feedback system, inhibits OHC activity and thereby reduces the sensitivity and sharp tuning of cochlear afferent fibers. During neonatal development, IHCs fire Ca2+ action potentials which evoke glutamate release promoting activity in the immature auditory system in the absence of sensory stimuli. During this period, MOC fibers also innervate IHCs and are thought to modulate their firing rate. Both the MOC-OHC and the MOC-IHC synapses are cholinergic, fast and inhibitory and mediated by the α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) coupled to the activation of calcium-activated potassium channels that hyperpolarize the hair cells. In this review we discuss the biophysical, functional and molecular data which demonstrate that at the synapses between MOC efferent fibers and cochlear hair cells, modulation of transmitter release as well as short term synaptic plasticity mechanisms, operating both at the presynaptic terminal and at the postsynaptic hair-cell, determine the efficacy of these synapses and shape the hair cell response pattern. PMID:25520631

  7. Differential alterations in muscarinic receptor subtypes in Alzheimer's disease: implications for cholinergic-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Flynn, D D; Ferrari-DiLeo, G; Levey, A I; Mash, D C

    1995-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of muscarinic receptors (m1-m5) are novel targets for cholinergic replacement therapies in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, knowledge concerning the relative distribution, abundance and functional status of these receptors in human brain and AD is incomplete. Recent data from our laboratory have demonstrated a defect in the ability of the M1 receptor subtype to form a high affinity agonist-receptor-G protein complex in AD frontal cortex. This defect is manifested by decreased M1 receptor-stimulated GTPgammaS binding and GTPase activity and by a loss in receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity. Normal levels of G proteins suggest that the aberrant receptor-G protein interaction may result from an altered form of the m1 receptor in AD. The combined use of radioligand binding and receptor-domain specific antibodies has permitted the re-examination of the status of muscarinic receptor subtypes in the human brain. In AD, normal levels of m1 receptor [3H]-pirenzepine binding contrasted with diminished m1 immunoreactivity, further suggesting that there is an altered form of the m1 receptor in the disease. Reduced m2 immunoreactivity was consistent with decreased numbers of m2 binding sites. Increased levels of m4 receptors were observed in both binding and immunoreactivity measurements. These findings suggest one possible explanation for the relative ineffectiveness of cholinergic replacement therapies used to date and suggest potential new directions for development of effective therapeutic strategies for AD.

  8. Participation of cholinergic pathways in α-hederin-induced contraction of rat isolated stomach strips.

    PubMed

    Mendel, M; Chłopecka, M; Dziekan, N; Karlik, W; Wiechetek, M

    2012-05-15

    The dry extract of Hedra helix leaves and its main active compounds, predominantly α-hederin and hederacoside C, has been traditionally believed to act spasmolytic. However, it has been recently proved that both, the extract of ivy and triterpenoid saponins, exhibit strong contractile effect on rat isolated stomach smooth muscle strips. It turned out that the most potent contractile agent isolated from the extract of ivy leaves is α-hederin. Thus, it seems reasonable to estimate the mechanism of the contractile effect of this saponin. The presented study was aimed at verifying the participation of cholinergic pathways (muscarinic and nicotine receptors) in α-hederin-induced contraction. The experiments were carried out on rat isolated stomach corpus and fundus strips under isotonic conditions. The preparations were preincubated with either atropine or hexamethonium and then exposed to α-hederin. All results are expressed as the percentage of the response to acetylcholine - a reference contractile agent. The obtained results revealed that the pretreatment of isolated stomach strips (corpus and fundus) with atropine neither prevented nor remarkably reduced the reaction of the preparations to α-hederin. Similarly, if the application of saponin was preceded by the administration of hexamethonium, the strength of the contraction of stomach fundus strips induced by α-hederin was not modified. Concluding, it can be assumed that the cholinergic pathways do not participate in α-hederin-evoked contraction of rat isolated stomach preparations.

  9. Dietary energy restriction reduces high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sneha; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a reduction in energy intake ameliorated the high-fat diet-enhanced spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN93G diet, a high-fat diet or a high-fat diet with a 5% restriction of the intake. Energy restriction reduced body adiposity and body weight, but maintained growth similar to mice fed the AIN93G diet. The high-fat diet significantly increased the number and size (cross-sectional area and volume) of metastases formed in lungs. Restricted feeding reduced the number of metastases by 23%, metastatic cross-sectional area by 32% and volume by 45% compared to the high-fat diet. The high-fat diet elevated plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin), angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1) and insulin. Restricted feeding significantly reduced the high-fat diet-induced elevations in plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors and insulin. These results demonstrated that a reduction in diet intake by 5% reduced high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis, which may be associated with the mitigation of adiposity and down-regulation of cancer-promoting proinflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors. PMID:27582541

  10. Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Graphene (Reduced Graphene Oxide)/Aluminum Composites with a Bioinspired Nanolaminated Structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zan; Guo, Qiang; Li, Zhiqiang; Fan, Genlian; Xiong, Ding-Bang; Su, Yishi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Di

    2015-12-09

    Bulk graphene (reduced graphene oxide)-reinforced Al matrix composites with a bioinspired nanolaminated microstructure were fabricated via a composite powder assembly approach. Compared with the unreinforced Al matrix, these composites were shown to possess significantly improved stiffness and tensile strength, and a similar or even slightly higher total elongation. These observations were interpreted by the facilitated load transfer between graphene and the Al matrix, and the extrinsic toughening effect as a result of the nanolaminated microstructure.

  11. Characterization of the conformational alterations, reduced anticoagulant activity, and enhanced antiangiogenic activity of prelatent antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2008-05-23

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996-12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071-36081), since the (1)H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  12. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    effects suggesting that like many other interventions (e.g., exercise, diet, etc), for therapy effects to persist, continued massage treatments may be...In this study massage and relaxation therapies were examined for women with early stages of breast cancer for 1) reducing anxiety and stress hormone...16). Women in the massage and relaxation therapies received 3-30 minute sessions a week for 5 weeks. On the first and last days of the 5-week study

  13. Reducing readmissions using teach-back: enhancing patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Peter, Debra; Robinson, Paula; Jordan, Marie; Lawrence, Susan; Casey, Krista; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement initiative, implemented by a patient education workgroup within a tertiary Magnet® facility. The project focused on the association between inadequate care transitions in patients with heart failure and subsequent costly readmissions. The teach-back initiative was piloted with patients hospitalized with heart failure, because of this population's high risk of readmission. Learning outcomes included documented improvements in patients' understanding of their disease and reduced readmission rates.

  14. Enhancing soil infiltration reduces gaseous emissions and improves N uptake from applied dairy slurry.

    PubMed

    Bhandral, R; Bittman, S; Kowalenko, G; Buckley, K; Chantigny, M H; Hunt, D E; Bounaix, F; Friesen, A

    2009-01-01

    Rapid infiltration of liquid manure into the soil reduces emissions of ammonia (NH(3)) into the atmosphere. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of two low-cost methods of assisting infiltration of applied dairy slurry on emissions of NH(3), nitrous oxide (N(2)O), and on crop N uptake. The two methods were removing of solids by settling-decantation to make the manure less viscous and mechanically aerating the soil. Ammonia emissions were measured with wind tunnels as percentage of applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) while emissions of N(2)O were measured with vented chambers. Mechanically aerating the soil before manure application significantly reduced emissions of NH(3) relative to the nonaerated soil in spring (38.6 to 20.3% of applied TAN), summer (41.1 to 26.4% of applied TAN) and fall (27.7 to 13.6% of applied TAN) trials. Decantation of manure had no effect on NH(3) emissions in spring, tended to increase emissions in summer and significantly decreased emissions in fall (30.3 to 11.1% of applied TAN). Combining the two abatement techniques reduced NH(3) emission by 82% in fall, under cool weather conditions typical of manure spreading. The two abatement techniques generally did not significantly affect N(2)O emissions. Uptake of applied N by Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was generally significantly greater with decanted than from whole manure but the effect of aeration was generally small and not significant. The study shows that low cost methods that assist manure infiltration into the soil may be used to greatly reduce ammonia loss without increasing N(2)O emissions, but efficacy of abatement methods is affected by weather conditions.

  15. Alginate enhances excretion and reduces absorption of strontium and cesium in rats.

    PubMed

    Idota, Yoko; Harada, Hitomi; Tomono, Takumi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kobayashi, Shoko; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Miyajima, Chihiro; Kasahara, Fumiyoshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    Alginate (ALA), which is an intercellular polysaccharide associated with brown algae, is used as a food additive, a health food and a medicine. Here, we first examined the adsorption of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs) by ALA in vitro, and then evaluated the effects of ALA on absorption and excretion of Sr and Cs in rats, in order to evaluate its potential usefulness for minimizing radiation damage from materials released after a nuclear accident. Both Sr and Cs were concentration-dependently adsorbed by sodium alginate (ALA-Na) in vitro. In rats given diet containing either ALA-Na or calcium alginate (ALA-Ca) for two weeks, the plasma concentration of Sr gradually decreased compared with the controls (normal diet); however, in the case of Cs, the plasma concentration was decreased only in the ALA-Ca group, but not the ALA-Na group. Moreover, we examined the effect of preadministration of diet containing either ALA-Na or ALA-Ca on absorption of Sr and Cs administered orally as the chloride salts to rats. Absorption of both Sr and Cs was reduced in the ALA-Ca group, while absorption of only Sr was reduced in the ALA-Na group. Safety assessments indicated that ALA-Ca is safer than ALA-Na. These results indicate that ALA-Ca reduces absorption and promotes excretion of both Sr and Cs, while ALA-Na does so only for Sr.

  16. Enhanced carrier collection efficiency and reduced quantum state absorption by electron doping in self-assembled quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian; Lu, Haofeng; Fu, Lan; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dagenais, Mario

    2015-02-01

    Reduced quantum dot (QD) absorption due to state filling effects and enhanced electron transport in doped QDs are demonstrated to play a key role in solar energy conversion. Reduced QD state absorption with increased n-doping is observed in the self-assembled In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs QDs from high resolution below-bandgap external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurement, which is a direct consequence of the Pauli exclusion principle. We also show that besides partial filling of the quantum states, electron-doping produces negatively charged QDs that exert a repulsive Coulomb force on the mobile electrons, thus altering the electron trajectory and reducing the probability of electron capture, leading to an improved collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, as indicated by an absolute above-bandgap EQE measurement. The resulting redistribution of the mobile electron in the planar direction is further validated by the observed photoluminescence intensity dependence on doping.

  17. Pontine cholinergic neurons depend on three neuroprotection systems to resist nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Michael; Williams, Katrina; Personett, David; Kent, Caroline; Bryan, David; Gonzalez, John; Baskerville, Karen

    2004-03-26

    Brainstem cholinergic populations survive in neurodegenerative disease, while basal forebrain cholinergic neurons degenerate. We have postulated that variable resistance to oxidative stress may in part explain this. Rat primary cultures were used to study the effects of several nitrosative/oxidative stressors on brainstem (upper pons, containing pedunculopontine and lateraldorsal tegmental nuclei; BS) cholinergic neurons, comparing them with medial septal (MS), and striatal cholinergic neurons. BS cholinergic neurons were significantly more resistant to S-nitro-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and hydrogen peroxide than were MS cholinergic neurons, which in turn were more resistant than striatal cholinergic neurons. Pharmacological analyses using specific inhibitors of neuroprotective systems also revealed differences between these three cholinergic populations with respect to their vulnerability to SNAP. Toxicity of SNAP to BS neurons was exacerbated by blocking NF-kappaB activation with SN50 or ERK1/2 activation by PD98059, or by inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) activity by LY294002. In contrast, SNAP toxicity to MS neurons was augmented only by SN50, and SNAP toxicity to striatal cholinergic neurons was not increased by any of these three pharmacological agents. In neuron-enriched primary cultures, BS cholinergic neurons remained resistant to SNAP while MS cholinergic neurons remained vulnerable to this agent. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrated nitric oxide (NO)-induced increases in nuclear levels of phospho-epitopes for ERK1/2 and Akt, and of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB, within BS cholinergic neurons. These data indicate that the relative resistance of BS cholinergic neurons to toxic levels of nitric oxide involves three intrinsic neuroprotective pathways that control transcriptional and anti-apoptotic cellular functions.

  18. Decreased cholinergic function in the cerebral cortex of hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Smijin, S; Chinthu, R; Paulose, C S

    2012-01-15

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxia. Cholinergic alterations and its further complications in learning and memory due to hypoxic insult in neonatal rats and the effect of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation was evaluated in the present study. Receptor binding and gene expression studies were done in the cerebral cortex to analyze the changes in total muscarinic receptors, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism - choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine esterase. Neonatal hypoxia decreased total muscarinic receptors with reduced muscarinic M1, M2 and M3 receptor genes. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the down regulated choline acetyltransferase and up regulated acetylcholine esterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances were reversed to near control in glucose resuscitated hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration are also reported. This has immense clinical significance in establishing a proper resuscitation for the management of neonatal hypoxia.

  19. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  20. Vitamin E containing polymer micelles for reducing normal cell cytotoxicity and enhancing chemotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-Yi; Chiang, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Ning-Yu; Yang, Chieh-Yu; Lo, Chun-Liang; Ku, Chen-An

    2015-09-01

    An α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) containing diblock copolymer micellar system was used to deliver doxorubicin (Dox), an anticancer drug, for HCT116 colon cancer therapy. The α-TOS containing diblock copolymers were synthesized by conjugation of α-TOS molecules and a mPEG-b-PHEMA hydrophilic diblock copolymer by ester bonds. The Dox-loaded polymeric micelles were then obtained by solvent exchange process. In acidic surroundings such as endosomes or secondary lysosomes, the structures of the Dox-loaded polymeric micelles deformed and released the drug loads. Additionally, Dox-loaded polymeric micelles enhanced the cytotoxicity of Dox and α-TOS to cancer cells in vitro. Dox-loaded polymeric micelles also showed an exceptional tumor inhibiting effect in vivo. This study indicates that the α-TOS containing polymeric micelle system can be used as a drug carrier for cancer therapy.

  1. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  2. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors enhances a slow calcium-dependent potassium conductance and reduces the firing of stratum oriens interneurons.

    PubMed

    Griguoli, Marilena; Scuri, Rossana; Ragozzino, Davide; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-09-01

    A large variety of distinct locally connected GABAergic cells are present in the hippocampus. By releasing GABA into principal cells and interneurons, they exert a powerful control on neuronal excitability and are responsible for network oscillations crucial for information processing in the brain. Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings in current and voltage clamp mode were used to study the functional role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on the firing properties of stratum oriens interneurons in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in a subpopulation of GABAergic cells containing somatostatin (GIN mice). Unexpectedly, activation of nAChRs by nicotine or endogenously released acetylcholine strongly enhanced spike frequency adaptation. This effect was blocked by apamin, suggesting the involvement of small calcium-dependent potassium channels (SK channels). Nicotine-induced reduction in firing frequency was dependent on intracellular calcium rise through calcium-permeable nAChRs and voltage-dependent calcium channels activated by the depolarizing action of nicotine. Calcium imaging experiments directly showed that nicotine effects on firing rate were correlated with large increases in intracellular calcium. Furthermore, blocking ryanodine receptors with ryanodine or sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase with thapsygargin or cyclopiazonic acid fully prevented the effects of nicotine, suggesting that mobilization of calcium from the internal stores contributed to the observed effects. By regulating cell firing, cholinergic signalling through nAChRs would be instrumental for fine-tuning the output of stratum oriens interneurons and correlated activity at the network level.

  3. Facile synthesis of platinum-ruthenium nanodendrites supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; Li, Shan-Shan; Chen, Fang-Yi; Bao, Ning; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-11-01

    In this report, a simple and facile solvothermal method is developed for fabrication of platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanodendrites supported on reduced graphene oxide (PtRu-RGO) in the ethylene glycol (EG) system, using hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HDPC) as a shape-directing agent. The as-prepared nanocomposites show the superior catalytic activity and better stability towards EG oxidation, compared with RGO-supported Pt nanoparticles and commercial PtRu/C (Pt 30 wt. %, Ru 15 wt. %) catalysts. This strategy may open a new route to design and prepare advanced electrocatalysts in direct EG fuel cells.

  4. Reduced expression of monocyte CD200R is associated with enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Simon D.; Sadofsky, Laura R.; Kaye, Paul M.; Hart, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    In sarcoidosis, the proinflammatory cytokines interferon gamma, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 are released by monocyte-derived macrophages and lymphocytes in the lungs and other affected tissues. Regulatory receptors expressed on monocytes and macrophages act to suppress cytokine production, and reduced expression of regulatory receptors may thus promote tissue inflammation. The aim of this study was to characterise the role of regulatory receptors on blood monocytes in patients with sarcoidosis. Cytokine release in response to stimulation of whole blood was measured in healthy controls and Caucasian non-smoking patients with sarcoidosis who were not taking disease modifying therapy. Expression of the regulatory molecules IL-10R, SIRP-α/β, CD47, CD200R, and CD200L was measured by flow cytometry, and functional activity was assessed using blocking antibodies. Stimulated whole blood and monocytes from patients with sarcoidosis produced more TNF and IL-6 compared with healthy controls. 52.9% of sarcoidosis patients had monocytes characterised by low expression of CD200R, compared with 11.7% of controls (p < 0.0001). Patients with low monocyte CD200R expression produced higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In functional studies, blocking the CD200 axis increased production of TNF and IL-6. Reduced expression of CD200R on monocytes may be a mechanism contributing to monocyte and macrophage hyper-activation in sarcoidosis. PMID:27929051

  5. Does Enhancing Work-Time Control and Flexibility Reduce Turnover? A Naturally Occurring Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Hill, Rachelle

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the turnover effects of an organizational innovation (ROWE—Results Only Work Environment) aimed at moving away from standard time practices to focus on results rather than time spent at work. To model rates of turnover, we draw on survey data from a sample of employees at a corporate headquarters (N = 775) and institutional records of turnover over eight months following the ROWE implementation. We find the odds of turnover are indeed lower for employees participating in the ROWE initiative, which offers employees greater work-time control and flexibility, and that this is the case regardless of employees’ gender, age, or family life stage. ROWE also moderates the turnover effects of organizational tenure and negative home-to-work spillover, physical symptoms, and job insecurity, with those in ROWE who report these situations generally less likely to leave the organization. Additionally, ROWE reduces turnover intentions among those remaining with the corporation. This research moves the “opting-out” argument from one of private troubles to an issue of greater employee work-time control and flexibility by showing that an organizational policy initiative can reduce turnover. PMID:21532909

  6. Berberine reduces Toll-like receptor-mediated macrophage migration by suppression of Src enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Erh; Ying Chang, Miao; Wei, Jyun-Yan; Chen, Yen-Jen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Leu, Tzeng-Horng

    2015-06-15

    Berberine is an isoquinoline with anti-inflammatory activity. We previously demonstrated that there was a loop of signal amplification between nuclear factor kappa B and Src for macrophage mobility triggered by the engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The simultaneous suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and cell mobility in berberine-treated macrophages suggested Src might be a target of berberine. Indeed, th reduced migration, greatly suppressed Src induction in both protein and RNA transcript by berberine were observed in macrophages exposed to LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides. In addition to Src induction, berberine also inhibited LPS-mediated Src activation in Src overexpressing macrophages and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (a nitric oxide donor) could partly restore it. Moreover, berberine suppressed Src activity in fibronectin-stimulated macrophages and in v-Src transformed cells. These results implied that by effectively reducing Src expression and activity, berberine inhibited TLR-mediated cell motility in macrophages.

  7. Enhancing Hematite Photoanode Activity for Water Oxidation by Incorporation of Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    do Amaral Carminati, Saulo; Souza, Flavio L; Nogueira, Ana F

    2016-01-04

    Two effective methods to prepare reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/hematite nanostructured photoanodes and their photoelectrochemical characterization towards water splitting reactions are presented. First, graphene oxide (GO) is reduced to rGO using hydrazine in a basic solution containing tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), and then deposited over the nanostructured hematite photoanodes previously treated at 750 °C for 30 min. The second method follows the deposition of a paste containing a mixture of hematite nanoparticles and rGO sheets by the doctor-blade method, varying the rGO concentration. Since hematite suffers from low electron mobility, a low absorption coefficient, high recombination rates and slow reaction kinetics, the incorporation of rGO in the hematite can overcome such limitations due to graphene's exceptional properties. Using the first method, the rGO incorporation results in a photocurrent density increase from 0.56 to 0.82 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 VRHE. Our results indicate that the rGO incorporation in the hematite photoanodes shows a positive effect in the reduction of the electron-hole recombination rate.

  8. Evaluation of organic substrates to enhance the sulfate-reducing activity in phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Julio; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José M

    2012-11-15

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the activity and growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in a metal-rich culture medium (approx. 250 mg/L Fe, 75 mg/L Zn and Cu, 10mg/L Cd) with phosphogypsum as bacterial inoculum. Phosphogypsum was collected from the stack covering the salt-marshes of the Tinto river (SW Spain). Three organic amendments were used as carbon sources, two low-cost wastes (horse manure and legume compost) and one sample of natural soil (vegetal cover). In the experiments, sulfate was reduced to sulfide during the growth of SRB populations, and concentrations were decreased in the solution. Metal concentrations also decreased to values below the detection limit. Metal removal took place by precipitation of newly-formed sulfides. Pyrite-S was the main sulfide component (approx. 200 μmol/g and 80% of pyritization) and occurred mainly as framboidal grains and rarely as isolated polyhedral crystals. Horse manure was the most successful organic substrate to promote SRB activity (sulfate removal of 61%), followed by vegetal cover (49%) and legume compost (31%). These findings propose the possibility of using naturally-occurring SRB in the phosphogypsum for bioremediation strategies based on natural soil covers with organic amendments.

  9. Reducing anxiety and enhancing physical performance by using an advanced version of EMDR: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rathschlag, Marco; Memmert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background The main aim of this pilot study was to investigate an advanced version of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for reducing anxiety. Methods Fifty participants were asked at two times of measurement (T1 and T2 with a rest of 4 weeks) to generate anxiety via the recall of autobiographical memories according to their anxiety. Furthermore, the participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group, and the experimental group received an intervention of 1–2 h with the advanced version of EMDR in order to their anxiety 2 weeks after T1. At T1 as well as T2, we measured the intensity of participants' anxiety with a Likert scale (LS) and collected participants' state (temporary) and trait (chronic) anxiety with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In addition, we measured participants' physical performance in a test for the finger musculature under the induction of their anxiety. Results The results showed that participant's ratings of their perceived intensity of anxiety (measured by a 9-point LS) and the state and trait anxiety decreased significantly in the experimental group but not in the control group from T1 to T2. Moreover, the physical performance under the induction of participants' anxiety increased significantly in the experimental group from T1 to T2 and there were no significant changes in the control group. Conclusions The study could show that the advanced version of EMDR is an appropriate method to reduce anxiety. PMID:24944864

  10. Reduced biological control and enhanced chemical pest management in the evolution of fungus farming in ants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Zimmerman, Jess K.; Nash, David R.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.; Wcislo, William T.

    2009-01-01

    To combat disease, most fungus-growing ants (Attini) use antibiotics from mutualistic bacteria (Pseudonocardia) that are cultured on the ants' exoskeletons and chemical cocktails from exocrine glands, especially the metapleural glands (MG). Previous work has hypothesized that (i) Pseudonocardia antibiotics are narrow-spectrum and control a fungus (Escovopsis) that parasitizes the ants' fungal symbiont, and (ii) MG secretions have broad-spectrum activity and protect ants and brood. We assessed the relative importance of these lines of defence, and their activity spectra, by scoring abundance of visible Pseudonocardia for nine species from five genera and measuring rates of MG grooming after challenging ants with disease agents of differing virulence. Atta and Sericomyrmex have lost or greatly reduced the abundance of visible bacteria. When challenged with diverse disease agents, including Escovopsis, they significantly increased MG grooming rates and expanded the range of targets. By contrast, species of Acromyrmex and Trachymyrmex maintain abundant Pseudonocardia. When challenged, these species had lower MG grooming rates, targeted primarily to brood. More elaborate MG defences and reduced reliance on mutualistic Pseudonocardia are correlated with larger colony size among attine genera, raising questions about the efficacy of managing disease in large societies with chemical cocktails versus bacterial antimicrobial metabolites. PMID:19324734

  11. A cholinergic mechanism for reward timing within primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chubykin, Alexander A.; Roach, Emma B.; Bear, Mark F.; Shuler, Marshall G. Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurons in rodent primary visual cortex (V1) relate operantly conditioned stimulus-reward intervals with modulated patterns of spiking output, but little is known about the locus or mechanism of this plasticity. Here we show that cholinergic basal forebrain projections to V1 are necessary for the neural acquisition, but not the expression, of reward timing in the visual cortex of awake, behaving animals. We then mimic reward timing in vitro by pairing white matter stimulation with muscarinic receptor activation at a fixed interval, and show that this protocol results in the prolongation of electrically-evoked spike train durations out to the conditioned interval. Together, these data suggest that (1) V1 possesses the circuitry and plasticity to support reward time prediction learning and (2) the cholinergic system serves as an important reinforcement signal which, in vivo, conveys to the cortex the outcome of behavior. PMID:23439124

  12. Carrageenans solubilize asymmetric acetylcholinesterase from nicotinic cholinergic synapses.

    PubMed

    von Bernhardi, R; Ayal, H; Inestrosa, N C

    1990-01-01

    1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in both vertebrate and invertebrates organisms. 2. The asymmetric synaptic AChE is attached to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the neuromuscular junction through heparin sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). 3. It has been shown previously that heparin-like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) can solubilize this enzyme from the cholinergic synapses. 4. The present paper describes the solubilization of asymmetric AChE by different marine macroalgal polysaccharides, called carrageenans. 5. Important differences were found among all the carrageenans tested; they released 15-50% of the total AChE activity normally solubilized by heparin. 6. Carrageenans extracted from tetrasporic stages of Iridaea ciliata and I. membranacea were always better extracting agents than those from the cystocarpic stages of these algae, suggesting that lambda-like carrageenans are involved. 7. This hypothesis was confirmed by extracting AChE with purified carrageenans.

  13. Evaluation of a patient with cold and cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sigler, R W; Levinson, A I; Evans, R; Horakova, Z; Kaplan, A P

    1979-01-01

    A-20-year-old male Army paratrooper presented with a history of inducible urticaria associated with exercise as well as cold exposure. Upon evaluation, he not only had a positive ice cube test, but also had a positive mecholyl skin test with numberous satellite lesions and generalized punctate urticaria following exercise challenge. Thus, he appeared to have combined cold and cholinergic urticaria. When mediator release was examined during cold and exercise challenge, histamine release was observed in each instance; a rapid rise and fall of plasma histamine was seen after cold challenge, while a lag phase followed by sustained elevation of plasma histamine was associated with exercise challenge. This represents the fourth reported case of combined cold and cholinergic urticaria and is the first in whom mediator release was assessed. The time-course of histamine release was characteristic of each disorder.

  14. An Innovative Enhanced Wall to Reduce the Energy Demand in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Filipeschi, S.; Mameli, M.; Nesi, S.; Cillari, G.; Mantelli, M. B. H.; Milanez, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Energy saving in buildings is one of most important issues for European countries. Although in the last years many studies have been carried out in order to reach the zero-consumption house the energy rate due to passive solar heating could be further enhanced. This paper proposes a method for increasing the energy rate absorbed by opaque walls by using a two phase loop thermosyphon connecting the internal and the external façade of a prefabricated house wall. The evaporator zone is embedded into the outside facade and the condenser is indoor placed to heat the domestic environment. The thermosyphon has been preliminary designed and implanted into a wall for a prefabricated house in Italy. An original dynamic thermal model of the building equipped with the thermosyphon wall allowed the evolution of the indoor temperature over time and the energy saving rates. The transient behaviour of the building has been simulated during the winter period by using the EnergyPlusTM software. The annual saving on the heating energy is higher than 50% in the case of a low consumption building.

  15. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications.

  16. Motor cortex stimulation enhances motor recovery and reduces peri-infarct dysfunction following ischemic insult.

    PubMed

    Kleim, Jeffrey A; Bruneau, Rochelle; VandenBerg, Penny; MacDonald, Erin; Mulrooney, Renee; Pocock, David

    2003-12-01

    Recovery of motor function following stroke is believed to be supported, at least in part, by functional compensation involving residual neural tissue. The present study used a rodent model of focal ischemia and intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to examine the behavioral and physiological effects of cortical stimulation in combination with motor rehabilitation. Adult rats were trained to criterion on a single pellet reaching task before ICMS was used to derive maps of movement representations within forelimb motor cortex contralateral to the trained paw. All animals then received a focal ischemic infarct within the motor map. A cortical surface electrode was implanted over the motor cortex. Low levels of electrical stimulation were applied during rehabilitative training on the same reaching task for 10 days and ICMS used to derive a second motor map. Results showed that both monopolar and bipolar cortical stimulation significantly enhanced motor recovery and increased the area of cortex from which microstimulation movements could be evoked. The results demonstrate the behavioral and neurophysiological benefits of cortical stimulation in combination with rehabilitation for recovery from stroke.

  17. Nanostructured TiO2-based gas sensors with enhanced sensitivity to reducing gases.

    PubMed

    Maziarz, Wojciech; Kusior, Anna; Trenczek-Zajac, Anita

    2016-01-01

    2D TiO2 thin films and 3D flower-like TiO2-based nanostructures, also decorated with SnO2, were prepared by chemical and thermal oxidation of Ti substrates, respectively. The crystal structure, morphology and gas sensing properties of the TiO2-based sensing materials were investigated. 2D TiO2 thin films crystallized mainly in the form of rutile, while the flower-like 3D nanostructures as anatase. The sensor based on the 2D TiO2 showed the best performance for H2 detection, while the flower-like 3D nanostructures exhibited enhanced selectivity to CO(CH3)2 after sensitization by SnO2 nanoparticles. The sensor response time was of the order of several seconds. Their fast response, high sensitivity to selected gas species, improved selectivity and stability suggest that the SnO2-decorated flower-like 3D nanostructures are a promising material for application as an acetone sensor.

  18. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  19. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Terry D.; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C2C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C2C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids. PMID:26875982

  20. Nanostructured TiO2-based gas sensors with enhanced sensitivity to reducing gases

    PubMed Central

    Kusior, Anna; Trenczek-Zajac, Anita

    2016-01-01

    2D TiO2 thin films and 3D flower-like TiO2-based nanostructures, also decorated with SnO2, were prepared by chemical and thermal oxidation of Ti substrates, respectively. The crystal structure, morphology and gas sensing properties of the TiO2-based sensing materials were investigated. 2D TiO2 thin films crystallized mainly in the form of rutile, while the flower-like 3D nanostructures as anatase. The sensor based on the 2D TiO2 showed the best performance for H2 detection, while the flower-like 3D nanostructures exhibited enhanced selectivity to CO(CH3)2 after sensitization by SnO2 nanoparticles. The sensor response time was of the order of several seconds. Their fast response, high sensitivity to selected gas species, improved selectivity and stability suggest that the SnO2-decorated flower-like 3D nanostructures are a promising material for application as an acetone sensor. PMID:28144521

  1. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    PubMed

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-02-02

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns.

  2. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  3. Reducing non-collision injuries in special transportation services by enhanced safety culture.

    PubMed

    Wretstrand, Anders; Petzäll, Jan; Bylund, Per-Olof; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2010-04-01

    Previous research has pointed out that non-collision injuries occur among wheelchair users in Special Transportation Services (STS - a demand-responsive transport mode). The organization of such modes is also quite complex, involving both stakeholders and key personnel at different levels. Our objective was therefore to qualitatively explore the state of safety, as perceived and discussed within a workplace context. Focus groups were held with drivers of both taxi companies and bus companies. The results indicated that passengers run the risk of being injured without being involved in a vehicle collision. The pertinent organizational and corporate culture did not prioritize safety. The drivers identified some relatively clear-cut safety threats, primarily before and after a ride, at vehicle standstill. The driver's work place seemed to be surrounded with a reactive instead of proactive structure. We conclude that not only vehicle and wheelchair technical safety must be considered in STS, but also system safety. Instead of viewing drivers' error as a cause, it should be seen as a symptom of systems failure. Human error is connected to aspects of tools, tasks, and operating environment. Enhanced understanding and influence of these connections within STS and accessible public transport systems will promote safety for wheelchair users.

  4. Regulatory risk assessments: Is there a need to reduce uncertainty and enhance robustness?

    PubMed

    Snodin, D J

    2015-12-01

    A critical evaluation of several recent regulatory risk assessments has been undertaken. These relate to propyl paraben (as a food additive, cosmetic ingredient or pharmaceutical excipient), cobalt (in terms of a safety-based limit for pharmaceuticals) and the cancer Threshold of Toxicological Concern as applied to food contaminants and pharmaceutical impurities. In all cases, a number of concerns can be raised regarding the reliability of the current assessments, some examples being absence of data audits, use of single-dose and/or non-good laboratory practice studies to determine safety metrics, use of a biased data set and questionable methodology and lack of consistency with precedents and regulatory guidance. Drawing on these findings, a set of recommendations is provided to reduce uncertainty and improve the quality and robustness of future regulatory risk assessments.

  5. Reduced dyes enhance single-molecule localization density for live superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Lina; Benke, Alexander; Reymond, Luc; Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Manley, Suliana

    2014-03-17

    Cell-permeable rhodamine dyes are reductively quenched by NaBH4 into a non-fluorescent leuco-rhodamine form. Quenching is reversible, and their fluorescence is recovered when the dyes are oxidized. In living cells, oxidation occurs spontaneously, and can result in up to ten-fold higher densities of single molecule localizations, and more photons per localization as compared with unmodified dyes. These two parameters directly impact the achievable resolution, and we see a significant improvement in the quality of live-cell point-localization super-resolution images taken with reduced dyes. These improvements carry over to increase the density of trajectories for single-molecule tracking experiments.

  6. Enhanced thermal oxidation stability of reduced graphene oxide by nitrogen doping.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Stefania; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A; Rao, C N R; Fuertes, Amparo; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-09-15

    Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-doped RGO) samples with a high level of doping, up to 13 wt. %, have been prepared by annealing graphene oxide under a flow of pure ammonia. The presence of nitrogen within the structure of RGO induces a remarkable increase in the thermal stability against oxidation by air. The thermal stability is closely related with the temperature of synthesis and the nitrogen content. The combustion reaction of nitrogen in different coordination environments (pyridinic, pyrrolic, and graphitic) is analyzed against a graphene fragment (undoped) from a thermodynamic point of view. In agreement with the experimental observations, the combustion of undoped graphene turns out to be more spontaneous than when nitrogen atoms are present.

  7. Slow pyrolysis enhances the recovery and reuse of phosphorus and reduces metal leaching from biosolids.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Cole, Andrew J; Whelan, Anna; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2017-03-16

    In this study, biochar is produced from biosolids with and without alum at a range of temperatures and simulated oxidative aging of the biochars is conducted to quantify the long-term leaching of P and metals. While biosolids containing alum had negligible amounts of plant-available P, after pyrolysis >90% of the P became immediately available for plant growth. When biosolids with no alum were converted into biochar there was a small increase in the availability of P but a larger pool was available after oxidation. Both of the biosolids leached significant amounts of metals after oxidation. In contrast, the biochars had a very low available metal content and this did not increase with oxidation, demonstrating a stable metal content. Pyrolysis is an effective waste management strategy for biosolids that can simultaneously reduce the leaching of metals and increase the efficiency of recycling of P for beneficial re-use.

  8. Enhanced ordering reduces electric susceptibility of liquids confined to graphene slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Kiley, Patrick J.; Elliott, James A.

    2016-06-01

    The behaviours of a range of polar and non-polar organic liquids (acetone, ethanol, methanol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), carbon tetrachloride and water) confined to 2D graphene nanochannels with thicknesses in the range of 4.5 Å to 40 Å were studied using classical molecular dynamics and hybrid density functional theory. All liquids were found to organise spontaneously into ordered layers parallel to the confining surfaces, with those containing polar molecules having their electric dipoles aligned parallel to such surfaces. In particular, monolayers of NMP showed remarkable in-plane ordering and low molecular mobility, suggesting the existence of a previously unknown 2D solid-like phase. Calculations for polar liquids showed dramatically reduced static permittivities normal to the confining surfaces; these changes are expected to improve electron tunnelling across the liquid films, modifying the DC electrical properties of immersed assemblies of carbon nanomaterials.

  9. Customization of user interfaces to reduce errors and enhance user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Burkolter, Dina; Weyers, Benjamin; Kluge, Annette; Luther, Wolfram

    2014-03-01

    Customization is assumed to reduce error and increase user acceptance in the human-machine relation. Reconfiguration gives the operator the option to customize a user interface according to his or her own preferences. An experimental study with 72 computer science students using a simulated process control task was conducted. The reconfiguration group (RG) interactively reconfigured their user interfaces and used the reconfigured user interface in the subsequent test whereas the control group (CG) used a default user interface. Results showed significantly lower error rates and higher acceptance of the RG compared to the CG while there were no significant differences between the groups regarding situation awareness and mental workload. Reconfiguration seems to be promising and therefore warrants further exploration.

  10. Enhanced ordering reduces electric susceptibility of liquids confined to graphene slit pores

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Kiley, Patrick J.; Elliott, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviours of a range of polar and non-polar organic liquids (acetone, ethanol, methanol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), carbon tetrachloride and water) confined to 2D graphene nanochannels with thicknesses in the range of 4.5 Å to 40 Å were studied using classical molecular dynamics and hybrid density functional theory. All liquids were found to organise spontaneously into ordered layers parallel to the confining surfaces, with those containing polar molecules having their electric dipoles aligned parallel to such surfaces. In particular, monolayers of NMP showed remarkable in-plane ordering and low molecular mobility, suggesting the existence of a previously unknown 2D solid-like phase. Calculations for polar liquids showed dramatically reduced static permittivities normal to the confining surfaces; these changes are expected to improve electron tunnelling across the liquid films, modifying the DC electrical properties of immersed assemblies of carbon nanomaterials. PMID:27265098

  11. Eye closure helps memory by reducing cognitive load and enhancing visualisation.

    PubMed

    Vredeveldt, Annelies; Hitch, Graham J; Baddeley, Alan D

    2011-10-01

    Closing the eyes helps memory. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the eyeclosure effect by exposing 80 eyewitnesses to different types of distraction during the witness interview: blank screen (control), eyes closed, visual distraction, and auditory distraction. We examined the cognitive load hypothesis by comparing any type of distraction (visual or auditory) with minimal distraction (blank screen or eyes closed). We found recall to be significantly better when distraction was minimal, providing evidence that eyeclosure reduces cognitive load. We examined the modality-specific interference hypothesis by comparing the effects of visual and auditory distraction on recall of visual and auditory information. Visual and auditory distraction selectively impaired memory for information presented in the same modality, supporting the role of visualisation in the eyeclosure effect. Analysis of recall in terms of grain size revealed that recall of basic information about the event was robust, whereas recall of specific details was prone to both general and modality-specific disruptions.

  12. Enhancing Motivation to Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection for Economically Disadvantaged Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Forsyth, Andrew D.; Wright, Ednita M.; Johnson, Blair T.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated a motivation-based HIV-risk-reduction intervention for economically disadvantaged urban women. Participants completed a survey that assessed HIV-related knowledge, risk perceptions, behavioral intentions, sexual communication, substance use, and risk behavior. A total of 102 at-risk women (76% African-American) were randomly assigned to either the risk-reduction intervention or to a waiting list. Women were reassessed at three and twelve weeks. Results indicated that treated women increased their knowledge and risk awareness, strengthened their intentions to adopt safer sexual practices, communicated their intentions with partners, reduced substance use proximal to sexual activities, and engaged in fewer acts of unprotected vaginal intercourse. These effects were observed immediately and most were maintained at follow-up. PMID:9256553

  13. Trait absorption is related to enhanced emotional picture processing and reduced processing of secondary acoustic probes.

    PubMed

    Benning, Stephen D; Rozalski, Vincent; Klingspon, Kara L

    2015-10-01

    Trait absorption reflects a propensity to have one's attention drawn to engaging sensory or imaginal experiences. It is related to self-reported levels of positive and negative emotionality, but little work has examined whether absorption is related to greater levels of basic emotional processing. We used the late positive potential (LPP) to pictures and P3 response to subsequent startle probes during those pictures to examine how absorption was related to initial emotional processing and reactivity to a second stimulus. Across genders, absorption was positively related to LPP amplitude to emotional versus neutral pictures at PZ, and it was negatively related to overall P3 amplitude to startle probes at FZ. Thus, absorption appears to index greater processing of emotional material at the cost of reduced processing of subsequent incoming stimuli.

  14. Reduced graphene oxide-yttria nanocomposite modified electrode for enhancing the sensitivity of electrochemical genosensor.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, P Abdul; Radhakrishnan, Thulasi; Shihabudeen, P K; Sandhyarani, N

    2016-09-15

    Reduced graphene oxide-yttria nanocomposite (rGO:Y) is applied as electrochemical genosensor platform for ultrahigh sensitive detection of breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) gene for the first time. The sensor is based on the sandwich assay in which gold nanoparticle cluster labeled reporter DNA hybridize to the target DNA. Glassy carbon electrode modified with rGO-yttria serves as the immobilization platform for capture probe DNA. The sensor exhibited a fine capability of sensing BRCA1 gene with linear range of 10attomolar (aM) to 1nanomolar (nM) and a detection limit of 5.95attomolar. The minimum distinguishable response concentration is down to the attomolar level with a high sensitivity and selectivity. We demonstrated that the use of rGO:Y modified electrode along with gold nanoparticle cluster (AuNPC) label leads to the highly sensitive electrochemical detection of BRCA1 gene.

  15. Cinnamaldehyde enhances in vitro parameters of immunity and reduces in vivo infection against avian coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Jang, Seung I; Lee, Kyung Woo; Park, Myeong Seon; Bravo, David; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2011-09-01

    The effects of cinnamaldehyde (CINN) on in vitro parameters of immunity and in vivo protection against avian coccidiosis were evaluated. In vitro stimulation of chicken spleen lymphocytes with CINN (25-400 ng/ml) induced greater cell proliferation compared with the medium control (P < 0·001). CINN activated cultured macrophages to produce higher levels of NO at 1·2-5·0 μg/ml (P < 0·001), inhibited the growth of chicken tumour cells at 0·6-2·5 μg/ml (P < 0·001) and reduced the viability of Eimeria tenella parasites at 10 and 100 μg/ml (P < 0·05 and P < 0·001, respectively), compared with media controls. In chickens fed a diet supplemented with CINN at 14·4 mg/kg, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15 and interferon-γ transcripts in intestinal lymphocytes were 2- to 47-fold higher (P < 0·001) compared with chickens given a non-supplemented diet. To determine the effect of CINN diets on avian coccidiosis, chickens were fed diets supplemented with CINN at 14·4 mg/kg (E. maxima or E. tenella) or 125 mg/kg (E. acervulina) from hatch for 24 d, and orally infected with 2·0 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts at age 14 d. CINN-fed chickens showed 16·5 and 41·6 % increased body-weight gains between 0-9 d post-infection (DPI) with E. acervulina or E. maxima, reduced E. acervulina oocyst shedding between 5-9 DPI and increased E. tenella-stimulated parasite antibody responses at 9 DPI compared with controls.

  16. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity.

  17. Hydrogen gas reduced acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a focal ischemia rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Manaenko, A; Zhan, Y; Liu, W W; Ostrowki, R P; Tang, J; Zhang, J H

    2010-08-11

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the effect of hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H(2)); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H(2) (MCAO+H(2)). All rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg i.p.) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 h during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 h, 0.5 h, 4 h, and 6 h after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluated by measuring the level of 8 Hydroxyguanosine (8OHG), 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 h after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 h reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen was accompanied by a reduction of the expression of 8OHG, HNE, and nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500+/-32.51 to 366+/-68.22 mg/dl at 4 h after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occludin, collagen IV or aquaporin4 (AQP4). In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced brain infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological function in rats. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation.

  18. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Enhances Mitochondrial Function and Reduces Cisplatin-Induced Tubule Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Diane L.; Chroscicki, Piotr; Lee, Sangju; Dondeti, Krishna; Ye, Hong; Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Stevens, Brian K.; Jobin, Katarzyna; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), the natural sphingolipid ligand for a family of five G protein– coupled receptors (S1P1–S1P5Rs), regulates cell survival and lymphocyte circulation. We have shown that the pan-S1PR agonist, FTY720, attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury by directly activating S1P1 on proximal tubule (PT) cells, independent of the canonical lymphopenic effects of S1P1 activation on B and T cells. FTY720 also reduces cisplatin-induced AKI. Therefore, in this study, we used conditional PT-S1P1-null (PepckCreS1pr1fl/fl) and control (PepckCreS1pr1w/wt) mice to determine whether the protective effect of FTY720 in AKI is mediated by PT-S1P1. Cisplatin induced more renal injury in PT-S1P1-null mice than in controls. Although FTY720 produced lymphopenia in both control and PT-S1P1-null mice, it reduced injury only in control mice. Furthermore, the increase in proinflammatory cytokine (CXCL1, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6) expression and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages induced by cisplatin treatment was attenuated by FTY720 in control mice but not in PT-S1P1-null mice. Similarly, S1P1 deletion rendered cultured PT cells more susceptible to cisplatin-induced injury, whereas S1P1 overexpression protected PT cells from injury and preserved mitochondrial function. We conclude that S1P1 may have an important role in stabilizing mitochondrial function and that FTY720 administration represents a novel strategy in the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:25145931

  19. Chloroquine Treatment Enhances Regulatory T Cells and Reduces the Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Thomé, Rodolfo; Moraes, Adriel S.; Bombeiro, André Luis; Farias, Alessandro dos Santos; Francelin, Carolina; da Costa, Thiago Alves; Di Gangi, Rosária; dos Santos, Leonilda Maria Barbosa; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; Verinaud, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Background The modulation of inflammatory processes is a necessary step, mostly orchestrated by regulatory T (Treg) cells and suppressive Dendritic Cells (DCs), to prevent the development of deleterious responses and autoimmune diseases. Therapies that focused on adoptive transfer of Treg cells or their expansion in vivo achieved great success in controlling inflammation in several experimental models. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, was shown to reduce inflammation, although the mechanisms are still obscure. In this context, we aimed to access whether chloroquine treatment alters the frequency of Treg cells and DCs in normal mice. In addition, the effects of the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with CQ on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model for human Multiple Sclerosis, was investigated as well. Methodology/Principal Findings EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35–55) peptide. C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally treated with chloroquine. Results show that the CQ treatment provoked an increase in Treg cells frequency as well as a decrease in DCs. We next evaluated whether prophylactic CQ administration is capable of reducing the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE. Our results demonstrated that CQ-treated mice developed mild EAE compared to controls that was associated with lower infiltration of inflammatory cells in the central nervous system CNS) and increased frequency of Treg cells. Also, proliferation of MOG35–55-reactive T cells was significantly inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Similar results were observed when chloroquine was administrated after disease onset. Conclusion We show for the first time that CQ treatment promotes the expansion of Treg cells, corroborating previous reports indicating that chloroquine has immunomodulatory properties. Our results also show that CQ treatment suppress the inflammation in the CNS of EAE

  20. Integrative training for children and adolescents: techniques and practices for reducing sports-related injuries and enhancing athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Chu, Donald A; Falkel, Jeff; Ford, Kevin R; Best, Thomas M; Hewett, Timothy E

    2011-02-01

    As more children and adolescents participate in sports and conditioning activities (sometimes without consideration for cumulative workload), it is important to establish age-appropriate training guidelines that may reduce the risk of sports-related injury and enhance athletic performance. The purpose of this article is to review the scientific evidence on youth strength and conditioning and to provide age-appropriate recommendations for integrating different strength and conditioning activities into a well-designed program that is safe, effective, and enjoyable. Integrative training is defined as a program or plan that incorporates general and specific strength and conditioning activities that enhance both health- and skill-related components of physical fitness. The cornerstone of integrative training is age-appropriate education and instruction by qualified professionals who understand the physical and psychosocial uniqueness of children and adolescents.

  1. Sodium chloride enhances cadmium tolerance through reducing cadmium accumulation and increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Lin; Shang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guo-Ping

    2013-06-01

    The effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on cadmium (Cd) uptake, translocation, and oxidative stress was investigated using 2 tobacco cultivars differing in Cd tolerance. The growth inhibition of the tobacco plants exposed to Cd toxicity was in part alleviated by moderate addition of NaCl in the culture solution. Cadmium concentration of shoots and roots in the 2 cultivars increased with increasing Cd levels in the solution and decreased with the addition of NaCl. The addition of NaCl could alleviate the oxidative stress caused by Cd toxicity, as reflected by reduced production of malondialdehyde and recovered or enhanced activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The results also showed that the enhancement of antioxidative enzyme activity by NaCl for the tobacco plants exposed to Cd stress is related to induced Ca signaling.

  2. Modulation of the Cholinergic Mechanisms in the Bronchial Smooth Muscle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    STANDARDS 16r A CD in UMODULATION OF THE CHOLINERGICMECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN FOR THE DOCTOR...MECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN FOR THE DOCTOR SCIENTIARUM DEGREE by Pi1 An E% LECTE3 NORE/PUBL-84...DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 118 FFITOX/465/001 4) TITLE MODULATION OF THE CHOLINERGIC MECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE (A thesis submitted to

  3. Estrogen modulates cognitive and cholinergic processes in surgically menopausal monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tinkler, Gregory Paul; Voytko, Mary Lou

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women is associated with changes in physiological processes. The extent to which estrogen loss is associated with cognitive changes noted by postmenopausal women has been more difficult to determine for a variety of reasons. Primate models of menopause are now being used to determine the effects of estrogen loss and replacement on cognitive abilities and to investigate the neural mechanisms by which estrogen may influence cognitive function. The present report presents data from cognitive and neurobiological studies in surgically menopausal monkeys that have examined how estrogen loss and replacement may be affecting cognitive abilities and the cholinergic system; a neural system that is known to influence memory and attention function. These studies are indicating that visuospatial attention function is especially sensitive to estrogen states in young monkeys, but that multiple cognitive domains are sensitive to estrogen states in middle-aged monkeys. In addition, anatomical and functional imaging studies indicate that the primate cholinergic system is modulated by estrogen, and pharmacological studies demonstrate that estrogen uses cholinergic muscarinic receptors to influence visuospatial attention. These studies demonstrate that estrogen influences cognitive abilities in monkey models of menopause and the cholinergic system may be one of the mechanisms by which estrogen modulates cognitive function. Given the current unknowns and concerns regarding the use of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, continued studies in monkey models of menopause are especially needed to further elucidate the effects of estrogen on cognitive and neurobiological processes, with particular emphasis on studies in middle-aged monkeys, determining the optimal aspects of ERT regimens, and identifying the relationships between estrogen effects on cognitive and neurobiological function.

  4. BEMER Electromagnetic Field Therapy Reduces Cancer Cell Radioresistance by Enhanced ROS Formation and Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Artati, Anna; Adamski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Each year more than 450,000 Germans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer subsequently receiving standard multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On top, molecular-targeted agents are increasingly administered. Owing to intrinsic and acquired resistance to these therapeutic approaches, both the better molecular understanding of tumor biology and the consideration of alternative and complementary therapeutic support are warranted and open up broader and novel possibilities for therapy personalization. Particularly the latter is underpinned by the increasing utilization of non-invasive complementary and alternative medicine by the population. One investigated approach is the application of low-dose electromagnetic fields (EMF) to modulate cellular processes. A particular system is the BEMER therapy as a Physical Vascular Therapy for which a normalization of the microcirculation has been demonstrated by a low-frequency, pulsed EMF pattern. Open remains whether this EMF pattern impacts on cancer cell survival upon treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and the molecular-targeted agent Cetuximab inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Using more physiological, three-dimensional, matrix-based cell culture models and cancer cell lines originating from lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreas, we show significant changes in distinct intermediates of the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways and enhanced cancer cell radiosensitization associated with increased DNA double strand break numbers and higher levels of reactive oxygen species upon BEMER treatment relative to controls. Intriguingly, exposure of cells to the BEMER EMF pattern failed to result in sensitization to chemotherapy and Cetuximab. Further studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the cellular alterations induced by the BEMER EMF pattern and to clarify the application areas for human disease. PMID:27959944

  5. BEMER Electromagnetic Field Therapy Reduces Cancer Cell Radioresistance by Enhanced ROS Formation and Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Storch, Katja; Dickreuter, Ellen; Artati, Anna; Adamski, Jerzy; Cordes, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Each year more than 450,000 Germans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer subsequently receiving standard multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On top, molecular-targeted agents are increasingly administered. Owing to intrinsic and acquired resistance to these therapeutic approaches, both the better molecular understanding of tumor biology and the consideration of alternative and complementary therapeutic support are warranted and open up broader and novel possibilities for therapy personalization. Particularly the latter is underpinned by the increasing utilization of non-invasive complementary and alternative medicine by the population. One investigated approach is the application of low-dose electromagnetic fields (EMF) to modulate cellular processes. A particular system is the BEMER therapy as a Physical Vascular Therapy for which a normalization of the microcirculation has been demonstrated by a low-frequency, pulsed EMF pattern. Open remains whether this EMF pattern impacts on cancer cell survival upon treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and the molecular-targeted agent Cetuximab inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Using more physiological, three-dimensional, matrix-based cell culture models and cancer cell lines originating from lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreas, we show significant changes in distinct intermediates of the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways and enhanced cancer cell radiosensitization associated with increased DNA double strand break numbers and higher levels of reactive oxygen species upon BEMER treatment relative to controls. Intriguingly, exposure of cells to the BEMER EMF pattern failed to result in sensitization to chemotherapy and Cetuximab. Further studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the cellular alterations induced by the BEMER EMF pattern and to clarify the application areas for human disease.

  6. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Rybczynska, Anna A; Elsinga, Philip H; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M; Luiten, Paul G M; Dierckx, Rudi A

    2011-08-10

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially considered as a subtype of the opioid family, are unique ligand-regulated molecular chaperones in the endoplasmatic reticulum playing a modulatory role in intracellular calcium signaling and in the activity of several neurotransmitter systems, particularly the cholinergic and glutamatergic pathways. Several central nervous system (CNS) drugs show high to moderate affinities for sigma-1 receptors, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil), antipsychotics (haloperidol, rimcazole), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluvoxamine, sertraline) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline). These compounds can influence cognitive functions both via their primary targets and by activating sigma-1 receptors in the CNS. Sigma-1 agonists show powerful anti-amnesic and neuroprotective effects in a large variety of animal models of cognitive dysfunction involving, among others (i) pharmacologic target blockade (with muscarinic or NMDA receptor antagonists or p-chloroamphetamine); (ii) selective lesioning of cholinergic neurons; (iii) CNS administration of β-amyloid peptides; (iv) aging-induced memory loss, both in normal and senescent-accelerated rodents; (v) neurodegeneration induced by toxic compounds (CO, trimethyltin, cocaine), and (vi) prenatal restraint stress.

  7. Modulatory compartments in cortex and local regulation of cholinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Ward, Nicholas J; Jadi, Monika P; Disney, Anita A

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulatory signaling is generally considered broad in its impact across cortex. However, variations in the characteristics of cortical circuits may introduce regionally-specific responses to diffuse modulatory signals. Features such as patterns of axonal innervation, tissue tortuosity and molecular diffusion, effectiveness of degradation pathways, subcellular receptor localization, and patterns of receptor expression can lead to local modification of modulatory inputs. We propose that modulatory compartments exist in cortex and can be defined by variation in structural features of local circuits. Further, we argue that these compartments are responsible for local regulation of neuromodulatory tone. For the cholinergic system, these modulatory compartments are regions of cortical tissue within which signaling conditions for acetylcholine are relatively uniform, but between which signaling can vary profoundly. In the visual system, evidence for the existence of compartments indicates that cholinergic modulation likely differs across the visual pathway. We argue that the existence of these compartments calls for thinking about cholinergic modulation in terms of finer-grained control of local cortical circuits than is implied by the traditional view of this system as a diffuse modulator. Further, an understanding of modulatory compartments provides an opportunity to better understand and perhaps correct signal modifications that lead to pathological states.

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of ZnO-reduced graphene oxide hybrid synthesized via ultrasonic probe-assisted study

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.; Sahu, N. K.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-02-05

    A facile ultrasonic horn-assisted reaction has been used to synthesize zinc oxide-reduced graphene oxide (ZnO-RGO) hybrids in dimethylformamide. The incorporation of graphene oxide prevents the cluster formation of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance in degradation of methylene blue has been investigated with ZnO and ZnO-RGO hybrids and the results show that the RGO plays an important role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance of ZnO-RGO. A direct evidence of electron exchange between ZnO and RGO is confirmed by zeta potentials measurements, which is an established reason for photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes.

  9. Facile synthesis of porous Pt-Pd nanospheres supported on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for enhanced methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Lv, Jing-Jing; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Jie-Ning; Chen, Jian-Rong; Wang, Ai-Jun; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a simple, facile, and effective wet-chemical strategy was developed in the synthesis of uniform porous Pt-Pd nanospheres (Pt-Pd NSs) supported on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (RGOs) under ambient temperature, where octylphenoxypolye thoxyethanol (NP-40) is used as a soft template, without any seed, organic solvent or special instruments. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enhanced electrocatalytic activity and good stability toward methanol oxidation, compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C catalysts. This strategy may open a new route to design and prepare advanced electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  10. Synergistic effect of titanium dioxide nanocrystal/reduced graphene oxide hybrid on enhancement of microbial electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Ma, Cai-Xia; Li, Xin; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-02-01

    A small sized TiO2 nanocrystal (˜10 nm)/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) hybrid is synthesized through a sol-gel process for hybrid TiO2/GO followed by solvothermal reduction of GO to rGO and is further used as a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode. The strong synergistic effect from a large surface area produced by uniformly deposited TiO2 nanocrystals, good hydrophilicity of TiO2 nanocrystals and superior conductivity of rGO leads to significantly improved electrocatalysis. In particular, a direct electrochemistry is realized by generating endogenous flavins from a large amount of microbes grown on the highly biocompatible TiO2 nanocrystals to mediate fast electron transfer between microbes and conductive rGO for a high performance anode. The TiO2/rGO hybrid anode delivers a maximum power density of 3169 mW m-2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFC, which is much large than that of the conventional carbon cloth anode and reported TiO2/carbon hybrid anode, thus offering great potential for practical applications of MFC. This work is for the first time to report that the synergistic effect from tailoring the physical structure to achieve small sized TiO2 nanocrystals while rationally designing chemistry to introduce highly conductive rGO and superior biocompatible TiO2 is able to significantly boost the MFC performance.

  11. Reduced ventilation and enhanced magnitude of the deep Pacific carbon pool during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, L.; McCave, I. N.; Carter, L.; Fallon, S.; Scrivner, A. E.; Primeau, F.

    2015-02-01

    It has been proposed that the ventilation of the deep Pacific carbon pool was not significantly reduced during the last glacial period, posing a problem for canonical theories of glacial-interglacial CO2 change. However, using radiocarbon dates of marine tephra deposited off New Zealand, we show that deep- (> 2000 m) and shallow sub-surface ocean-atmosphere 14C age offsets (i.e. "reservoir-" or "ventilation" ages) in the southwest Pacific increased by ˜1089 and 337 yrs respectively, reaching ˜2689 and ˜1037 yrs during the late glacial. A comparison with other radiocarbon data from the southern high-latitudes suggests that broadly similar changes were experienced right across the Southern Ocean. If, like today, the Southern Ocean was the main source of water to the glacial ocean interior, these observations would imply a significant change in the global radiocarbon inventory during the last glacial period, possibly equivalent to an increase in the average radiocarbon age > 2 km of ˜ 700 yrs. Simple mass balance arguments and numerical model sensitivity tests suggest that such a change in the ocean's mean radiocarbon age would have had a major impact on the marine carbon inventory and atmospheric CO2, possibly accounting for nearly half of the glacial-interglacial CO2 change. If confirmed, these findings would underline the special role of high latitude shallow sub-surface mixing and air-sea gas exchange in regulating atmospheric CO2 during the late Pleistocene.

  12. Muscle Relaxation of the Foot Reduces Corticospinal Excitability of Hand Muscles and Enhances Intracortical Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kouki; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Kento; Nakata, Hiroki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The object of this study was to clarify the effects of foot muscle relaxation on activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) of the hand area. Subjects were asked to volitionally relax the right foot from sustained contraction of either the dorsiflexor (tibialis anterior; TA relaxation) or plantarflexor (soleus; SOL relaxation) in response to an auditory stimulus. Single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the hand area of the left M1 at different time intervals before and after the onset of TA or SOL relaxation. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and flexor carpi radialis (FCR). MEP amplitudes of ECR and FCR caused by single-pulse TMS temporarily decreased after TA and SOL relaxation onset, respectively, as compared with those of the resting control. Furthermore, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of ECR evaluated with paired-pulse TMS temporarily increased after TA relaxation onset. Our findings indicate that muscle relaxation of the dorsiflexor reduced corticospinal excitability of the ipsilateral hand muscles. This is most likely caused by an increase in intracortical inhibition.

  13. High-dose parenteral ascorbate enhanced chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer and reduced toxicity of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Chapman, Julia; Levine, Mark; Polireddy, Kishore; Drisko, Jeanne; Chen, Qi

    2014-02-05

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) was an early, unorthodox therapy for cancer, with an outstanding safety profile and anecdotal clinical benefit. Because oral ascorbate was ineffective in two cancer clinical trials, ascorbate was abandoned by conventional oncology but continued to be used in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent studies provide rationale for reexamining ascorbate treatment. Because of marked pharmacokinetic differences, intravenous, but not oral, ascorbate produces millimolar concentrations both in blood and in tissues, killing cancer cells without harming normal tissues. In the interstitial fluid surrounding tumor cells, millimolar concentrations of ascorbate exert local pro-oxidant effects by mediating hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) formation, which kills cancer cells. We investigated downstream mechanisms of ascorbate-induced cell death. Data show that millimolar ascorbate, acting as a pro-oxidant, induced DNA damage and depleted cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activated the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, and resulted in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition and death in ovarian cancer cells. The combination of parenteral ascorbate with the conventional chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel synergistically inhibited ovarian cancer in mouse models and reduced chemotherapy-associated toxicity in patients with ovarian cancer. On the basis of its potential benefit and minimal toxicity, examination of intravenous ascorbate in combination with standard chemotherapy is justified in larger clinical trials.

  14. Enhanced dielectric performance in polymer composite films with carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide hybrid filler.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, TaeYoung; Suk, Ji Won; Chou, Harry; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-08-27

    The electrical conductivity and the specific surface area of conductive fillers in conductor-insulator composite films can drastically improve the dielectric performance of those films through changing their polarization density by interfacial polarization. We have made a polymer composite film with a hybrid conductive filler material made of carbon nanotubes grown onto reduced graphene oxide platelets (rG-O/CNT). We report the effect of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler on the dielectric performance of the composite film. The composite film had a dielectric constant of 32 with a dielectric loss of 0.051 at 0.062 wt% rG-O/CNT filler and 100 Hz, while the neat polymer film gave a dielectric constant of 15 with a dielectric loss of 0.036. This is attributed to the increased electrical conductivity and specific surface area of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler, which results in an increase in interfacial polarization density between the hybrid filler and the polymer.

  15. Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Harris, Janna L; Carl, Steven M; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Eva Selfridge, J; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Koppel, Scott; Morris, Jill; Burns, Jeffrey M; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Brooks, William M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-12-15

    Brain bioenergetic function declines in some neurodegenerative diseases, this may influence other pathologies and administering bioenergetic intermediates could have therapeutic value. To test how one intermediate, oxaloacetate (OAA) affects brain bioenergetics, insulin signaling, inflammation and neurogenesis, we administered intraperitoneal OAA, 1-2 g/kg once per day for 1-2 weeks, to C57Bl/6 mice. OAA altered levels, distributions or post-translational modifications of mRNA and proteins (proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, PGC1 related co-activator, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor A of the mitochondria, cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, cAMP-response element binding, p38 MAPK and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) in ways that should promote mitochondrial biogenesis. OAA increased Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and P70S6K phosphorylation. OAA lowered nuclear factor κB nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios and CCL11 mRNA. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, doublecortin mRNA, doublecortin protein, doublecortin-positive neuron counts and neurite length increased in OAA-treated mice. (1)H-MRS showed OAA increased brain lactate, GABA and glutathione thereby demonstrating metabolic changes are detectable in vivo. In mice, OAA promotes brain mitochondrial biogenesis, activates the insulin signaling pathway, reduces neuroinflammation and activates hippocampal neurogenesis.

  16. Early life adversity reduces stress reactivity and enhances impulsive behavior: implications for health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, William R

    2013-10-01

    Altered reactivity to stress, either in the direction of exaggerated reactivity or diminished reactivity, may signal a dysregulation of systems intended to maintain homeostasis and a state of good health. Evidence has accumulated that diminished reactivity to psychosocial stress may signal poor health outcomes. One source of diminished cortisol and autonomic reactivity is the experience of adverse rearing during childhood and adolescence. The Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project has examined a cohort of 426 healthy young adults with and without a family history of alcoholism. Regardless of family history, persons who had experienced high degrees of adversity prior to age 16 had a constellation of changes including reduced cortisol and heart rate reactivity, diminished cognitive capacity, and unstable regulation of affect, leading to behavioral impulsivity and antisocial tendencies. We present a model whereby this constellation of physiological, cognitive, and affective tendencies is consistent with altered central dopaminergic activity leading to changes in brain function that may foster impulsive and risky behaviors. These in turn may promote greater use of alcohol other drugs along with adopting poor health behaviors. This model provides a pathway from early life adversity to low stress reactivity that forms a basis for risky behaviors and poor health outcomes.

  17. Sprinkler irrigation of rice fields reduces grain arsenic but enhances cadmium.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Meharg, Andrew A; Smolders, Erik; Manzano, Rebeca; Becerra, Daniel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier; Albarrán, Ángel; López-Piñero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that rice cultivated under flooded conditions has higher concentrations of arsenic (As) but lower cadmium (Cd) compared to rice grown in unsaturated soils. To validate such effects over long terms under Mediterranean conditions a field experiment, conducted over 7 successive years was established in SW Spain. The impact of water management on rice production and grain arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) was measured, and As speciation was determined to inform toxicity evaluation. Sprinkler irrigation was compared to traditional flooding. Both irrigation techniques resulted in similar grain yields (~3000 kg grain ha(-1)). Successive sprinkler irrigation over 7 years decreased grain total As to one-sixth its initial concentration in the flooded system (0.55 to 0.09 mg As kg(-1)), while one cycle of sprinkler irrigation also reduced grain total As by one-third (0.20 mg kg(-1)). Grain inorganic As concentration increased up to 2 folds under flooded conditions compared to sprinkler irrigated fields while organic As was also lower in sprinkler system treatments, but to a lesser extent. This suggests that methylation is favored under water logging. However, sprinkler irrigation increased Cd transfer to grain by a factor of 10, reaching 0.05 mg Cd kg(-1) in 7 years. Sprinkler systems in paddy fields seem particularly suited for Mediterranean climates and are able to mitigate against excessive As accumulation, but our evidence shows that an increased Cd load in rice grain may result.

  18. Early life adversity reduces stress reactivity and enhances impulsive behavior: Implications for health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lovallo, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Altered reactivity to stress, either in the direction of exaggerated reactivity or diminished reactivity, may signal a dysregulation of systems intended to maintain homeostasis and a state of good health. Evidence has accumulated that diminished reactivity to psychosocial stress may signal poor health outcomes. One source of diminished cortisol and autonomic reactivity is the experience of adverse rearing during childhood and adolescence. The Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project has examined a cohort of 426 healthy young adults with and without a family history of alcoholism. Regardless of family history, persons who had experienced high degrees of adversity prior to age 16 had a constellation of changes including reduced cortisol and heart rate reactivity, diminished cognitive capacity, and unstable regulation of affect, leading to behavioral impulsivity and antisocial tendencies. We present a model whereby this constellation of physiological, cognitive, and affective tendencies is consistent with altered central dopaminergic activity leading to changes in brain function that may foster impulsive and risky behaviors. These in turn may promote greater use of alcohol other drugs along with adopting poor health behaviors. This model provides a pathway from early life adversity to low stress reactivity that forms a basis for risky behaviors and poor health outcomes. PMID:23085387

  19. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced antimicrobial activity of reduced graphene oxide–zinc oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Rajaura, Rajveer; Sharma, Vinay; Shrivastava Ronin, Rishabh; Gupta, Deepak K.; Srivastava, Subodh; Agrawal, Kailash; Vijay, Y. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report a simple and facile one-pot chemical approach of the decoration of uniform zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (GO) and a study of its antimicrobial activity. The nanocomposite was fully characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). TEM and SEM images clearly indicated the presence of Graphene sheets decorated with uniformly sized zinc oxide nanoparticles. Further, as an application of rGO-ZnO nanocomposites, their superior antibacterial activity was demonstrated on the Escherichia coli MTCC40 bacterial strain, using the standard disk diffusion method. This clearly showed that rGO-ZnO nanocomposites exhibited more pronounced antibacterial activity than rGO alone. This feature was revealed to be due to increased biocompatibility of PEGylated rGO-ZnO nanocomposites. In conclusion, the as-synthesized nanocomposite showed excellent antibacterial activity and has great potential for biomedical application.

  20. Efficiency enhancement of pyramidal Si solar cells with reduced graphene oxide hybrid electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wei-Chen; Huang, Chun-Ying; Fang, Chang-Wen; Lin, Ming-Yi; Lee, Wen-Chieh; Liu, Xiang-Sheng; Uen, Wu-Yih

    2016-12-01

    Developing a transparent and cost-effective electrode for a textured and large-scale optoelectronic device is an important requirement for high-throughput products. Here, we propose a costly fabrication procedure using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid materials composed of rGO, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Ag nanowires (AgNWs) top electrodes for structured Si solar cells via a spin coating method. This work overcomes the obstacle of graphene damage during the transferred process and provides a simple way to form large-scale graphene-based films on textured surfaces. Due to the spin-coated rGO being uniform along with AgNW frameworks and plasmonic AuNPs, the pyramidal Si solar cell exhibits a significant improved efficiency of 10.75% compared with solar cells using pure rGO flakes as the top electrodes. Our study realizes the rGO hybrid materials deposited on a textured surface and has great potential for integration into transparent and structured devices for next-generation industrial production.

  1. Anticholinesterase Effects on Number and Function of Brain Muscarinic Receptors and Central Cholinergic Activity: Drug Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-11

    still unresolved problem connected with the mechanisms by which the anticholinesterases affect cholinergic nerves which should lead to a more thorough...understanding of their most adverse reactions, i.e the generalized cholinergic stimulation, convulsions and neuromuscular paralysis. This may lead to...which the anticholinesterases affect cholinergic nerves which should lead to a more thorough understanding of their most adverse reactions, i.e the

  2. Selective loss of alpha motor neurons with sparing of gamma motor neurons and spinal cord cholinergic neurons in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Powis, Rachael A; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterised primarily by loss of lower motor neurons from the ventral grey horn of the spinal cord and proximal muscle atrophy. Recent experiments utilising mouse models of SMA have demonstrated that not all motor neurons are equally susceptible to the disease, revealing that other populations of neurons can also be affected. Here, we have extended investigations of selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the spinal cord of SMA mice to include comparative assessments of alpha motor neuron (α-MN) and gamma motor neuron (γ-MN) pools, as well as other populations of cholinergic neurons. Immunohistochemical analyses of late-symptomatic SMA mouse spinal cord revealed that numbers of α-MNs were significantly reduced at all levels of the spinal cord compared with controls, whereas numbers of γ-MNs remained stable. Likewise, the average size of α-MN cell somata was decreased in SMA mice with no change occurring in γ-MNs. Evaluation of other pools of spinal cord cholinergic neurons revealed that pre-ganglionic sympathetic neurons, central canal cluster interneurons, partition interneurons and preganglionic autonomic dorsal commissural nucleus neuron numbers all remained unaffected in SMA mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that α-MNs are uniquely vulnerable among cholinergic neuron populations in the SMA mouse spinal cord, with γ-MNs and other cholinergic neuronal populations being largely spared.

  3. Enhancing Accessibility and Engagement in Evidence-Based Parenting Programs to Reduce Maltreatment: Conversations With Vulnerable Parents

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Metzler, Carol W.; Prinz, Ronald J.; Kast, Elizabeth Z.

    2013-01-01

    11 focus groups (N = 160) of high-risk parents in Los Angeles County were asked to assess the value of social media to deliver an evidence-based parenting program, Triple P—Positive Parenting Program, to reduce child maltreatment. For feasibility, (N = 238) parents were surveyed regarding their internet use. Parents responded enthusiastically to the online program, and expressed the importance of a sense of community and learning through the experiences of others. 78% of the young, high-poverty, minority parents used the internet. An online evidence-based parenting program delivered in social media could enhance accessibility and engagement of high-risk parents – a powerful tool to reduce child maltreatment. PMID:23710156

  4. Erythropoietin reduces cumulative nephrotoxicity from cisplatin and enhances renal tubular cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zafirov, Dimce; Petrusevska, G; Sikole, Aleksandar; Trojacanec, J; Labacevski, N; Kostova, E; Jakovski, K; Atanasovska, E; Petrov, S

    2008-12-01

    Cisplatin, a heavy metal complex, is one of the most active drugs used in the treatment of several human malignancies. However, high-dose therapy with cisplatin is limited by its cumulative nephrotoxicity. The main objectives of this study were to determine the role of recombinant human erythropoietin (Epoetin alfa) in the prevention of nephrotoxicity induced experimentally in Wistar rats by long-term administration of cisplatin (2 mg/kg/b.w./week) over eight weeks, and an evaluation of its effect on renal tubular cell proliferation. The animals were randomly assigned into three groups, each including 25 rats. Group 1 (CP) received only cisplatin (2 mg/kg/b.w./week), group 2 (CP+EPO) received cisplatin (2 mg/kg/b.w./week) and epoetin alfa (150 IE/kg/b.w./three times a week), and group 3 (control group) received only saline. During the study, the following tests for the assessment of the renal function and renal damages were performed: determination of concentration of serum creatinine and BUN and determination of total protein quantity in 24-hour urine samples. At the end of the study, the abdomen was opened and both kidneys of the rats were removed and sent for histological and morphometric analysis. Ki-67 was used as a tool to determine a proliferative index. The results obtained have shown that epoetin alfa significantly reduced the functional renal failures and renal damages, and increased toleration of high doses of cisplatin. At the same time, our results with regard to tubular proliferative index have confirmed that one of the possible mechanisms by which erythropoietin accomplishes its renoprotective effect is stimulation of tubular cell proliferation and regeneration.

  5. Intranasal oxytocin administration is associated with enhanced endogenous pain inhibition and reduced negative mood states

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Anderson, Austen J. B.; Freeman, Emily L.; Bulls, Hailey W.; Robbins, Meredith T.; Ness, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examined whether the administration of intranasal oxytocin was associated with pain sensitivity, endogenous pain inhibitory capacity, and negative mood states. Methods A total of 30 pain-free, young adults each completed three laboratory sessions on consecutive days. The first session (baseline) assessed ischemic pain sensitivity, endogenous pain inhibition via conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and negative mood using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). CPM was tested on the dominant forearm and ipsilateral masseter muscle using algometry (test stimulus) and the cold pressor task (conditioning stimulus; non-dominant hand). For the second and third sessions, participants initially completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and then self-administered a single (40IU/1mL) dose of intranasal oxytocin or placebo in a randomized counter-balanced order. Thirty minutes post-administration, participants again completed the STAI and repeated assessments of ischemic pain sensitivity and CPM followed by the POMS. Results Findings demonstrated that ischemic pain sensitivity did not significantly differ across the three study sessions. CPM at the masseter, but not the forearm, was significantly greater following administration of oxytocin compared to placebo. Negative mood was also significantly lower following administration of oxytocin compared to placebo. Similarly, anxiety significantly decreased following administration of oxytocin but not placebo. Discussion This study incorporated a placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subjects crossover design with randomized administration of intranasal oxytocin and placebo. The data suggest that the administration of intranasal oxytocin may augment endogenous pain inhibitory capacity and reduce negative mood states including anxiety. PMID:25370147

  6. Diet enriched with procyanidins enhances antioxidant activity and reduces myocardial post-ischaemic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Facino, R M; Carini, M; Aldini, G; Berti, F; Rossoni, G; Bombardelli, E; Morazzoni, P

    1999-01-01

    Aim of this work was to study the efficacy of procyanidins from Vitis vinifera seeds, a standardized mixture of polyphenol antioxidants, on cardiac mechanics following ischemia/reperfusion stunning in the rat, after 3 weeks supplementation. Young and aged male rats were fed a diet enriched with procyanidins complexed (1:3 w/w) with soybean lecithin (2.4%); control animals (CTR-young and CTR-aged) received an equal amount of lecithin and 2 additional groups of animals the standard diet. At the end of the treatment, the total plasma antioxidant defense (TRAP), vitamin E, ascorbic acid and uric acid were determined in plasma and the hearts from all groups of animals subjected to moderate ischemia (flow reduction to 1 ml/min for 20 min) and reperfusion (15 ml/min for 30 min). In both young and aged rats supplemented with procyanidins the recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) at the end of reperfusion was 93% (p < 0.01) and 74% (p < 0.01) of the preischemic values and the values of coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) were maintained close to those of the preischemic period. Also creatine kinase (CK) outflow was restrained to baseline levels, while a 2-fold increase in prostacyclin (6-keto-PGF1alpha) in the perfusate from hearts of young and aged rats was elicited during both ischemia and reperfusion. In parallel, procyanidins significantly increased the total antioxidant plasma capacity (by 40% in young and by 30% in aged rats) and the plasma levels of ascorbic acid, while tend to reduce vitamin E levels; no significant differences were observed in uric acid levels. The results of this study demonstrate that procyanidins supplementation in the rat (young and aged) makes the heart less susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion damage and that this is positively associated to an increase in plasma antioxidant activity.

  7. Abiotic stresses sequentially applied enhance natural resistance and reduce postharvest decay.

    PubMed

    D'Hallewin, G; Molinu, G M; Dore, A; Venditti, T; Rodov, V

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility to restrain citrus green mould (Penicillium digitatum Sacc.) during storage, by means of induced natural resistance, was investigated following combined heat and ultravioLet light C (254 nm, UV-C) treatments. Heat treatment (HT) was performed by keeping Citrus fruits in a humid saturated room at 36 degrees C for 36 h while, the UV-C light treatment (254 nm) was carried out by illuminating the fruits with 3 or 6 kJm(-2). Physical treatments were sequential and reversely applied to un-inoculated or to 24 h-old inoculated lemons or oranges. Then, fruits were stored for 30 days at 8 or 5 degrees C with 95% relative humidity (RH) followed by a 6 day simulated marketing period at 20 degrees C and 75% RH. Constitutive (cuticle and epicuticular wax) and induced resistance (scoparone biosynthesis) were monitored and the variation in natural resistance was correlated to the decay development. HT influenced positively the constitutive factors of resistance by reducing or delaying cuticular cracking and by remodelling the epicuticular wax layer. Following HT the synthesis of scoparone took place only in the albedo of wounds and was greater when fruits were inoculated. Following UV-C illumination, scoparone accumulated rapidly in the outer rind (flavedo) but, particularly with 6 kJm(-2), favoured cuticular fracturing during storage. Sequential treatments resulted significantly more effective in controlling decay on either, inoculated and non inoculated fruit. The best control of green mould during storage of lemons and oranges was obtained when HT preceded 6 kJm(-2) UV-C illumination with 52 and 45% reduction of natural decay in fruit stored at 8 degrees C compared to the control, respectively.

  8. Reducing Health Disparities and Enhancing the Responsible Conduct of Research Involving LGBT Youth.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Although there is clearly a need for evidenced-based behavioral or biomedical prevention or treatment programs for suicide, substance abuse, and sexual health targeted to members of the LGBT population under the age of eighteen, few such programs exist, due in substantial part to limited research knowledge. Ambiguities in regulations that govern human subjects protections and the related inconsistencies in institutional review board (IRB) interpretations of regulatory language are the key reason for the lack of rigorous clinical trial evidence to support treatment choices and prevention approaches to reducing health disparities for this population. Given the socially sensitive nature of suicide, substance abuse, and HIV and STI research in general and LGBT research specifically, in the absence of empirical data to guide their decisions, IRBs must often rely on subjective judgments of minimal risk, which can lead to overestimation of the magnitude and probability of psychological, social, and informational harms that might arise from LGBT youth participation in clinical trials. In addition, more than other youth, LGBT adolescents whose families are unaware of their sexual orientation or gender identity or whose families have victimized them on account of it may be reluctant to participate in studies that require guardian permission. This, in turn, intensifies problems of recruitment and unbiased sampling. However, many IRBs are reluctant to apply federal regulations permitting waiver of guardian permission under conditions in which such permission is clearly not "feasible" or "reasonable" to require. Consequently, many investigators have excluded LGBT individuals under eighteen years of age in health intervention research proposals because of anticipated or actual difficulties obtaining IRB approval. This situation is in conflict with current ethical discourse focusing on the right of youths to participate in trials that will protect them from receiving

  9. Reduced expression of AMPK-β1 during tumor progression enhances the oncogenic capacity of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy sensor that is involved in regulating cell metabolism. Our previous study revealed that the subunits of the heterotimeric AMPK enzyme are diversely expressed during ovarian cancer progression. However, the impact of the variable expression of these AMPK subunits in ovarian cancer oncogenesis remains obscure. Here, we provide evidence to show that reduced expression of the AMPK-β1 subunit during tumor progression is associated with the increased oncogenic capacity of advanced ovarian cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that AMPK-β1 levels were reduced in advanced-stage (P = 0.008), high-grade (P = 0.013) and metastatic ovarian cancers (P = 0.008). Intriguingly, down-regulation of AMPK-β1 was progressively reduced from tumor stages 1 to 3 of ovarian cancer. Functionally, enforced expression of AMPK-β1 inhibited ovarian-cancer-cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, cell migration and invasion. Conversely, depletion of AMPK-β1 by siRNA enhanced the oncogenic capacities of ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that the loss of AMPK-β1 favors the aggressiveness of ovarian cancer. Mechanistically, enforced expression of AMPK-β1 increased AMPK activity, which, in turn, induced cell-cycle arrest via inhibition of AKT/ERK signaling activity as well as impaired cell migration/invasion through the suppression of JNK signaling in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that the reduced expression of AMPK-β1 confers lower AMPK activity, which enhances the oncogenic capacity of advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:24602453

  10. Extrinsic Sources of Cholinergic Innervation of the Striatal Complex: A Whole-Brain Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dautan, Daniel; Hacioğlu Bay, Husniye; Bolam, J. Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V.; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the striatal complex plays an important role in normal behavior and is affected in a number of neurological disorders. Although early studies suggested that acetylcholine in the striatum (STR) is derived almost exclusively from cholinergic interneurons (CIN), recent axonal mapping studies using conditional anterograde tracing have revealed the existence of a prominent direct cholinergic pathway from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. The identification of the importance of this pathway is essential for creating a complete model of cholinergic modulation in the striatum, and it opens the question as to whether other populations of cholinergic neurons may also contribute to such modulation. Here, using novel viral tracing technologies based on phenotype-specific fluorescent reporter expression in combination with retrograde tracing, we aimed to define other sources of cholinergic innervation of the striatum. Systematic mapping of the projections of all cholinergic structures in the brain (Ch1 to Ch8) by means of conditional tracing of cholinergic axons, revealed that the only extrinsic source of cholinergic innervation arises in the brainstem pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Our results thus place the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal nuclei in a key and exclusive position to provide extrinsic cholinergic modulation of the activity of the striatal systems. PMID:26834571

  11. Modified expression of peripheral blood lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptors in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Emanuela; Tabbì, Luca; Scozzi, Davide; Mariotta, Salvatore; Galli, Elena; Carello, Rossella; Avitabile, Simona; Tayebati, Seyed Koshrow; Amenta, Francesco; De Vitis, Claudia; Mancini, Rita; Ricci, Alberto

    2015-07-15

    Lymphocytes possess an independent cholinergic system. We assessed the expression of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in lymphocytes from 49 asthmatic children and 10 age matched controls using Western blot. We demonstrated that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors which density were significantly increased in asthmatic children in comparison with controls. M2 and M4 receptor increase was strictly related with IgE and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurements and with impairment in objective measurements of airway obstruction. Increased lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression may concur with lung cholinergic dysfunction and with inflammatory molecular framework in asthma.

  12. Development of myenteric cholinergic neurons in ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Marlene M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2013-10-01

    Cholinergic neurons are the major excitatory neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and include intrinsic sensory neurons, interneurons, and excitatory motor neurons. Cholinergic neurons have been detected in the embryonic ENS; however, the development of these neurons has been difficult to study as they are difficult to detect prior to birth using conventional immunohistochemistry. In this study we used ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice to examine the development of cholinergic neurons in the gut of embryonic and postnatal mice. Cholinergic (YFP+) neurons were first detected at embryonic day (E)11.5, and the proportion of cholinergic neurons gradually increased during pre- and postnatal development. At birth, myenteric cholinergic neurons comprised less than half of their adult proportions in the small intestine (25% of myenteric neurons were YFP+ at P0 compared to 62% in adults). The earliest cholinergic neurons appear to mainly project anally. Projections into the presumptive circular muscle were first observed at E14.5. A subpopulation of cholinergic neurons coexpress calbindin through embryonic and postnatal development, but only a small proportion coexpressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Our study shows that cholinergic neurons in the ENS develop over a protracted period of time.

  13. Genetic deletion or TWEAK blocking antibody administration reduce atherosclerosis and enhance plaque stability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Cristina; Fernández-Laso, Valvanera; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Muñoz-García, Begoña; Moreno, Juan A; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Burkly, Linda C; Egido, Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose L; Blanco-Colio, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical complications associated with atherosclerotic plaques arise from luminal obstruction due to plaque growth or destabilization leading to rupture. Tumour necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 12 (TNFSF12) also known as TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a proinflammatory cytokine that participates in atherosclerotic plaque development, but its role in plaque stability remains unclear. Using two different approaches, genetic deletion of TNFSF12 and treatment with a TWEAK blocking mAb in atherosclerosis-prone mice, we have analysed the effect of TWEAK inhibition on atherosclerotic plaques progression and stability. Mice lacking both TNFSF12 and Apolipoprotein E (TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−) exhibited a diminished atherosclerotic burden and lesion size in their aorta. Advanced atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treated mice exhibited an increase collagen/lipid and vascular smooth muscle cell/macrophage ratios compared with TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− control mice, reflecting a more stable plaque phenotype. These changes are related with two different mechanisms, reduction of the inflammatory response (chemokines expression and secretion and nuclear factor kappa B activation) and decrease of metalloproteinase activity in atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−. A similar phenotype was observed with anti-TWEAK mAb treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Brachiocephalic arteries were also examined since they exhibit additional features akin to human atherosclerotic plaques associated with instability and rupture. Features of greater plaque stability including augmented collagen/lipid ratio, reduced macrophage content, and less presence of lateral xanthomas, buried caps, medial erosion, intraplaque haemorrhage and calcium content were present in TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Overall, our data indicate that anti-TWEAK treatment has the capacity to diminish

  14. Amplified photoacoustic performance and enhanced photothermal stability of reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods for sensitive photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyungwon; Kumar, Dinesh; Kim, Haemin; Sim, Changbeom; Chang, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-03-24

    We report a strongly amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance of the new functional hybrid material composed of reduced graphene oxide and gold nanorods. Due to the excellent NIR light absorption properties of the reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods (r-GO-AuNRs) and highly efficient heat transfer process through the reduced graphene oxide layer, r-GO-AuNRs exhibit excellent photothermal stability and significantly higher photoacoustic amplitudes than those of bare-AuNRs, nonreduced graphene oxide coated AuNRs (GO-AuNRs), or silica-coated AuNR, as demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The linear response of PA amplitude from reduced state controlled GO on AuNR indicates the critical role of GO for a strong photothermal effect of r-GO-AuNRs. Theoretical studies with finite-element-method lab-based simulation reveal that a 4 times higher magnitude of the enhanced electromagnetic field around r-GO-AuNRs can be generated compared with bare AuNRs or GO-AuNRs. Furthermore, the r-GO-AuNRs are expected to be a promising deep-tissue imaging probe because of extraordinarily high PA amplitudes in the 4-11 MHz operating frequency of an ultrasound transducer. Therefore, the r-GO-AuNRs can be a useful imaging probe for highly sensitive photoacoustic images and NIR sensitive therapeutics based on a strong photothermal effect.

  15. Perceptions of Risk of Developing Skin Cancer for Diverse Audiences: Enhancing Relevance of Sun Protection to Reduce the Risk

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, John; Gordon, Elisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-five percent of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perceptions of risk of developing skin cancer, amelioration of this risk with sun protection, and having choices among sun protection strategies may enhance sun protection use by KTRS, who are at greater risk than the general population. Thirty KTRs stratified among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanic/Latinos evaluated three versions of the interactive, web-based, electronic sun protection program and suggested refinements. The sequence of content presentation prepared the participant to accept the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of the message. Beginning with informing participants that using sun protection reduces the chance of developing skin cancer made the information credible to KTRs. Showing skin cancer on all skin types and patient testimonials enhanced participants' awareness of their susceptibility to develop skin cancer and primed patients to receive their personal risk of developing skin cancer. Coupling presentation of knowledge about the benefits of sun protection in reducing the risk of developing skin cancer with the personal risk of getting the disease was essential to KTRs believing that they could influence their health outcome. PMID:26209181

  16. Facile synthesis of hierarchical dendritic PtPd nanogarlands supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Zheng, Jie-Ning; Ma, Xiaohong; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-05-01

    A simple and facile method is developed for one-pot preparation of hierarchical dendritic PtPd nanogarlands supported on reduced graphene oxide (PtPd/RGO) at room temperature, without using any seed, organic solvent, or complex apparatus. It is found that octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (NP-40) as a soft template and its amount are critical to the formation of PtPd garlands. The as-prepared nanocomposites are further applied to methanol and ethanol oxidation with significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and better stability in alkaline media.A simple and facile method is developed for one-pot preparation of hierarchical dendritic PtPd nanogarlands supported on reduced graphene oxide (PtPd/RGO) at room temperature, without using any seed, organic solvent, or complex apparatus. It is found that octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (NP-40) as a soft template and its amount are critical to the formation of PtPd garlands. The as-prepared nanocomposites are further applied to methanol and ethanol oxidation with significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and better stability in alkaline media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, Fig. S1-S12 and Tables S1 and S2. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06808k

  17. The Helminth-Derived Immunomodulator AvCystatin Reduces Virus Enhanced Inflammation by Induction of Regulatory IL-10+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuijs, Martijn J.; Hartmann, Susanne; Selkirk, Murray E.; Roberts, Luke B.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a major pathogen causing low respiratory tract disease (bronchiolitis), primarily in infants. Helminthic infections may alter host immune responses to both helminths and to unrelated immune triggers. For example, we have previously shown that filarial cystatin (AvCystatin/Av17) ameliorates allergic airway inflammation. However, helminthic immunomodulators have so far not been tested in virus-induced disease. We now report that AvCystatin prevents Th2-based immunopathology in vaccine-enhanced RSV lung inflammation, a murine model for bronchiolitis. AvCystatin ablated eosinophil influx, reducing both weight loss and neutrophil recruitment without impairing anti-viral immune responses. AvCystatin also protected mice from excessive inflammation following primary RSV infection, significantly reducing neutrophil influx and cytokine production in the airways. Interestingly, we found that AvCystatin induced an influx of CD4+ FoxP3+ interleukin-10-producing T cells in the airway and lungs, correlating with immunoprotection, and the corresponding cells could also be induced by adoptive transfer of AvCystatin-primed F4/80+ macrophages. Thus, AvCystatin ameliorates enhanced RSV pathology without increasing susceptibility to, or persistence of, viral infection and warrants further investigation as a possible therapy for virus-induced airway disease. PMID:27560829

  18. The Helminth-Derived Immunomodulator AvCystatin Reduces Virus Enhanced Inflammation by Induction of Regulatory IL-10+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuijs, Martijn J; Hartmann, Susanne; Selkirk, Murray E; Roberts, Luke B; Openshaw, Peter J M; Schnoeller, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a major pathogen causing low respiratory tract disease (bronchiolitis), primarily in infants. Helminthic infections may alter host immune responses to both helminths and to unrelated immune triggers. For example, we have previously shown that filarial cystatin (AvCystatin/Av17) ameliorates allergic airway inflammation. However, helminthic immunomodulators have so far not been tested in virus-induced disease. We now report that AvCystatin prevents Th2-based immunopathology in vaccine-enhanced RSV lung inflammation, a murine model for bronchiolitis. AvCystatin ablated eosinophil influx, reducing both weight loss and neutrophil recruitment without impairing anti-viral immune responses. AvCystatin also protected mice from excessive inflammation following primary RSV infection, significantly reducing neutrophil influx and cytokine production in the airways. Interestingly, we found that AvCystatin induced an influx of CD4+ FoxP3+ interleukin-10-producing T cells in the airway and lungs, correlating with immunoprotection, and the corresponding cells could also be induced by adoptive transfer of AvCystatin-primed F4/80+ macrophages. Thus, AvCystatin ameliorates enhanced RSV pathology without increasing susceptibility to, or persistence of, viral infection and warrants further investigation as a possible therapy for virus-induced airway disease.

  19. Perceptions of Risk of Developing Skin Cancer for Diverse Audiences: Enhancing Relevance of Sun Protection to Reduce the Risk.

    PubMed

    Robinson, June K; Friedewald, John; Gordon, Elisa J

    2016-03-01

    Sixty-five percent of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perceptions of risk of developing skin cancer, amelioration of this risk with sun protection, and having choices among sun protection strategies may enhance sun protection use by KTRS, who are at greater risk than the general population. Thirty KTRs stratified among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanic/Latinos evaluated three versions of the interactive, web-based, electronic sun protection program and suggested refinements. The sequence of content presentation prepared the participant to accept the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of the message. Beginning with informing participants that using sun protection reduces the chance of developing skin cancer made the information credible to KTRs. Showing skin cancer on all skin types and patient testimonials enhanced participants' awareness of their susceptibility to develop skin cancer and primed patients to receive their personal risk of developing skin cancer. Coupling presentation of knowledge about the benefits of sun protection in reducing the risk of developing skin cancer with the personal risk of getting the disease was essential to KTRs believing that they could influence their health outcome.

  20. Reducing non-productive adsorption of cellulase and enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses by noncovalent modification of lignin with lignosulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hongming; Wang, Mengxia; Lai, Huanran; Lin, Xuliang; Zhou, Mingsong; Yang, Dongjie; Qiu, Xueqing

    2013-10-01

    Four fractions of one commercial sodium lignosulfonate (SXP) with different molecular weight (MW) and anionic polymers were studied to reduce non-productive adsorption of cellulase on bound lignin in a lignocellulosic substrate. SXP with higher MW had stronger blocking effect on non-productive adsorption of a commercial Trichoderma reesi cellulase cocktail (CTec2) on lignin measured by quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring. Linear anionic aromatic polymers have strong blocking effect, but they would also reduce CTec2 adsorption on cellulose to decrease the enzymatic activity. The copolymer of lignin and polyethylene glycol (AL-PEG1000) has strong enhancement in enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, because it not only improves the cellulase activity to cellulose, but also blocks the non-productive cellulase adsorption on lignin. Apart from improving the cellulase activity to cellulose, the enhancements of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose by adding AL-PEG1000 and SXPs are the result of the decreased cellulase non-productive adsorption on lignin.

  1. Enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal from effluent by sulfate-reducing bacteria with copper-iron bimetallic particles support.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Chen, Yongzhe; Yang, Ming; Li, Wenkai; Deng, Le

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of copper-iron bimetallic particles supported sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in enhancing the reduction of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) in effluent. The results showed that the copper-iron bimetallic particles can enhance Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal and the resistance of the sulfate-reducing bacteria towards metals toxicity, the inhibiting concentration of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) for SRB was significantly increased (from 100 to 200 mg/L for Cu(2+) and 300 to 400 mg/L for Zn(2+)). The removal efficiencies of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (initial concentration 100 mg/L) were 98.17% and 99.67% in SRB-Cu/Fe system after 48 h, while only 29.83% Cu(2+), 90.88% Zn(2+) and 63.81% Cu(2+), 72.63% Zn(2+) were removed in the SRB and Cu/Fe system at the same condition.

  2. Enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced anxiety in mice over-expressing human catalase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Johnson, Lance A; Zuloaga, Damian G; Limoli, Charles L; Raber, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a modulatory role in synaptic plasticity and signaling pathways. Mitochondria (MT), a major source of ROS because of their involvement in energy metabolism, are important for brain function. MT-generated ROS are proposed to be responsible for a significant proportion of OS and are associated with developmental abnormalities and aspects of cellular aging. The role of ROS and MT function in cognition of healthy individuals is relatively understudied. In this study, we characterized behavioral and cognitive performance of 5- to 6-month-old mice over-expressing mitochondrial catalase (MCAT). MCAT mice showed enhancements in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the water maze and contextual fear conditioning, and reduced measures of anxiety in the elevated zero maze. Catalase activity was elevated in MCAT mice in all brain regions examined. Measures of oxidative stress (glutathione, protein carbonyl content, lipid peroxidation, and 8-hydroxyguanine) did not significantly differ between the groups. The lack of differences in these markers of oxidative stress suggests that the differences observed in this study may be due to altered redox signaling. Catalase over-expression might be sufficient to enhance cognition and reduce measures of anxiety even in the absence of alteration in levels of OS.

  3. Enhanced summer warming reduces fungal decomposer diversity and litter mass loss more strongly in dry than in wet tundra.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Casper T; Haugwitz, Merian S; Priemé, Anders; Nielsen, Cecilie S; Elberling, Bo; Michelsen, Anders; Grogan, Paul; Blok, Daan

    2017-01-01

    Many Arctic regions are currently experiencing substantial summer and winter climate changes. Litter decomposition is a fundamental component of ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycles, with fungi being among the primary decomposers. To assess the impacts of seasonal climatic changes on litter fungal communities and their functioning, Betula glandulosa leaf litter was surface-incubated in two adjacent low Arctic sites with contrasting soil moisture regimes: dry shrub heath and wet sedge tundra at Disko Island, Greenland. At both sites, we investigated the impacts of factorial combinations of enhanced summer warming (using open-top chambers; OTCs) and deepened snow (using snow fences) on surface litter mass loss, chemistry and fungal decomposer communities after approximately 1 year. Enhanced summer warming significantly restricted litter mass loss by 32% in the dry and 17% in the wet site. Litter moisture content was significantly reduced by summer warming in the dry, but not in the wet site. Likewise, fungal total abundance and diversity were reduced by OTC warming at the dry site, while comparatively modest warming effects were observed in the wet site. These results suggest that increased evapotranspiration in the OTC plots lowered litter moisture content to the point where fungal decomposition activities became inhibited. In contrast, snow addition enhanced fungal abundance in both sites but did not significantly affect litter mass loss rates. Across sites, control plots only shared 15% of their fungal phylotypes, suggesting strong local controls on fungal decomposer community composition. Nevertheless, fungal community functioning (litter decomposition) was negatively affected by warming in both sites. We conclude that although buried soil organic matter decomposition is widely expected to increase with future summer warming, surface litter decay and nutrient turnover rates in both xeric and relatively moist tundra are likely to be significantly restricted by

  4. Implementation of Enhanced Attenuation at the DOE Mound Site OU-1 Landfill: Accelerating Progress and Reducing Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, Gwendolyn; Cato, Rebecca; Looney, Brian

    2016-03-06

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Legacy Management, Mound, Ohio, Site, chlorinated organic contaminants (cVOCs) originating from the former solid-waste landfill have impacted groundwater in Operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The baseline groundwater remedy was groundwater pump and treat (P&T). Since the source materials have been removed from the landfill, the Mound core team, which consists of DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Ohio EPA, and other stakeholders, is assessing the feasibility of switching from the active P&T remedy to a passive attenuation-based remedy. Toward this end, an enhanced attenuation (EA) strategy based on the creation of structured geochemical zones was developed. This EA strategy addresses the residual areas of elevated cVOCs in soil and groundwater while minimizing the rebound of groundwater concentrations above regulatory targets (e.g., maximum contaminant levels [MCLs]) and avoiding plume expansion while the P&T system is turned off. The EA strategy has improved confidence and reduced risk on the OU-1 groundwater transition path to monitored natural attenuation (MNA). To better evaluate the EA strategy, DOE is conducting a field demonstration to evaluate the use of edible oils to enhance the natural attenuation processes. The field demonstration is designed to determine whether structured geochemical zones can be established that expedite the attenuation of cVOCs in the OU-1 groundwater. The EA approach at OU-1 was designed based on “structured geochemical zones” and relies on groundwater flow through a succession of anaerobic and aerobic zones. The anaerobic zones stimulate relatively rapid degradation of the original solvent source compounds (e.g., cVOCs such as tetrachloroethene [PCE] and trichloroethene [TCE]). The surrounding aerobic areas encourage relatively rapid degradation of daughter products (such as dichloroethene [DCE] and vinyl chloride [VC]) as well as enhanced cometabolism of TCE resulting from

  5. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  6. Cholinergic stimulation of pancreatic amylase release and muscarinic receptors: effect of ionophore A23187

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, L.; Morisset, J.

    1985-07-22

    Dispersed rat pancreatic acini were incubated in 0.5 mM calcium medium with increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine, with or without the ionophore A23187 (10/sup -6/M). Addition of the ionophore reduced maximal amylase release, increased the maximal effective concentration of carbamylcholine and dramatically impaired the agonist's capacity to induce enzyme secretion at low concentration. The ionophore also abolished the inhibition of secretion observed at high carbamylcholine concentrations. These effects of the ionophore on the cholinergic secretory response cannot be explained by interaction at the muscarinic receptor since neither the Bmax, the affinity of the receptor for the (/sup 3/H)QNB nor the binding of carbamylcholine were affected by the ionophore. It is suggested that for the conditions studied, the ionophore can interact with the secretory process at one or several points ulterior to the initial recognition site of carbamylcholine on its receptor. 30 references, 3 figures.

  7. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25–0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35–0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise. PMID:27088484

  8. A High Soy Diet Reduces Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Bcl-xL Expression In Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Glendenning, Michele; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy and have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects in the brain. We have shown that a high soy diet significantly reduces infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we tested the hypothesis that a high soy diet would attenuate programmed cell death after stroke. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and fed either an isoflavone-reduced diet (IFP) or a high soy diet (SP) for 2 weeks before undergoing 90 minutes of transient MCAO (tMCAO) followed by 22.5 hr reperfusion. Infarct size, as assessed by TTC staining, was significantly reduced by a high soy diet (p< 0.05). Apoptosis in the ischemic cortex, measured by TUNEL staining, was significantly reduced by the high soy diet. The number of active caspase-3 positive cells and caspase-mediated α-spectrin cleavage was also significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Soy significantly increased bcl-xL mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic cortex compared to IFP rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased neuronal expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the ischemic cortex of both IFP and SP rats following tMCAO. These results suggest that a high soy diet decreases both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent programmed cell death following tMCAO. Further, a high soy diet enhances expression of the cell survival factor bcl-xL following tMCAO, contributing to the neuroprotective effects of soy in the ischemic cortex. PMID:17706879

  9. Purinergic and Cholinergic Drugs Mediate Hyperventilation in Zebrafish: Evidence from a Novel Chemical Screen

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Saman; Pan, Wen; Jonz, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid test to identify drugs that affect autonomic responses to hypoxia holds therapeutic and ecologic value. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a convenient animal model for investigating peripheral O2 chemoreceptors and respiratory reflexes in vertebrates; however, the neurotransmitters and receptors involved in this process are not adequately defined. The goals of the present study were to demonstrate purinergic and cholinergic control of the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia in zebrafish, and to develop a procedure for screening of neurochemicals that affect respiration. Zebrafish larvae were screened in multi-well plates for sensitivity to the cholinergic receptor agonist, nicotine, and antagonist, atropine; and to the purinergic receptor antagonists, suramin and A-317491. Nicotine increased ventilation frequency (fV) maximally at 100 μM (EC50 = 24.5 μM). Hypoxia elevated fV from 93.8 to 145.3 breaths min-1. Atropine reduced the hypoxic response only at 100 μM. Suramin and A-317491 maximally reduced fV at 50 μM (EC50 = 30.4 and 10.8 μM) and abolished the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Purinergic P2X3 receptors were identified in neurons and O2-chemosensory neuroepithelial cells of the gills using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. These studies suggest a role for purinergic and nicotinic receptors in O2 sensing in fish and implicate ATP and acetylcholine in excitatory neurotransmission, as in the mammalian carotid body. We demonstrate a rapid approach for screening neuroactive chemicals in zebrafish with implications for respiratory medicine and carotid body disease in humans; as well as for preservation of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27100625

  10. Cholinergic and ghrelinergic receptors and KCNQ channels in the medial PFC regulate the expression of palatability

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Marc A.; Amarante, Linda M.; Swanson, Kyra; Laubach, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is a key brain region for the control of consummatory behavior. Neuronal activity in this area is modulated when rats initiate consummatory licking and reversible inactivations eliminate reward contrast effects and reduce a measure of palatability, the duration of licking bouts. Together, these data suggest the hypothesis that rhythmic neuronal activity in the mPFC is crucial for the control of consummatory behavior. The muscarinic cholinergic system is known to regulate membrane excitability and control low-frequency rhythmic activity in the mPFC. Muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) act through KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels, which have recently been linked to the orexigenic peptide ghrelin. To understand if drugs that act on KCNQ channels within the mPFC have effects on consummatory behavior, we made infusions of several muscarinic drugs (scopolamine, oxotremorine, physostigmine), the KCNQ channel blocker XE-991, and ghrelin into the mPFC and evaluated their effects on consummatory behavior. A consistent finding across all drugs was an effect on the duration of licking bouts when animals consume solutions with a relatively high concentration of sucrose. The muscarinic antagonist scopolamine reduced bout durations, both systemically and intra-cortically. By contrast, the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine, the KCNQ channel blocker XE-991, and ghrelin all increased the durations of licking bouts when infused into the mPFC. Our findings suggest that cholinergic and ghrelinergic signaling in the mPFC, acting through KCNQ channels, regulates the expression of palatability. PMID:26578914

  11. Characterization of Channelrhodopsin and Archaerhodopsin in Cholinergic Neurons of Cre-Lox Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Tristan; Danskin, Bethanny; Larsen, Rylan S.; Ollerenshaw, Doug; Groblewski, Peter; Valley, Matthew; Olsen, Shawn; Waters, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The study of cholinergic signaling in the mammalian CNS has been greatly facilitated by the advent of mouse lines that permit the expression of reporter proteins, such as opsins, in cholinergic neurons. However, the expression of opsins could potentially perturb the physiology of opsin-expressing cholinergic neurons or mouse behavior. Indeed, the published literature includes examples of cellular and behavioral perturbations in preparations designed to drive expression of opsins in cholinergic neurons. Here we investigate expression of opsins, cellular physiology of cholinergic neurons and behavior in two mouse lines, in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and archaerhodopsin (Arch) are expressed in cholinergic neurons using the Cre-lox system. The two mouse lines were generated by crossing ChAT-Cre mice with Cre-dependent reporter lines Ai32(ChR2-YFP) and Ai35(Arch-GFP). In most mice from these crosses, we observed expression of ChR2 and Arch in only cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and in other putative cholinergic neurons in the forebrain. In small numbers of mice, off-target expression occurred, in which fluorescence did not appear limited to cholinergic neurons. Whole-cell recordings from fluorescently-labeled basal forebrain neurons revealed that both proteins were functional, driving depolarization (ChR2) or hyperpolarization (Arch) upon illumination, with little effect on passive membrane properties, spiking pattern or spike waveform. Finally, performance on a behavioral discrimination task was comparable to that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that ChAT-Cre x reporter line crosses provide a simple, effective resource for driving indicator and opsin expression in cholinergic neurons with few adverse consequences and are therefore an valuable resource for studying the cholinergic system. PMID:27243816

  12. Dysfunction of the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the airways and blood cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Ignaz; Bittinger, Fernando; Kamin, Wolfgang; Zepp, Fred; Meyer, Eckhard; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2007-05-30

    The non-neuronal cholinergic system is widely expressed in human airways, skin and immune cells. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholine and nicotine/muscarine receptors are demonstrated in epithelial surface cells, submucosal glands, airway smooth muscle fibres and immune cells. Moreover, acetylcholine is involved in the regulation of cell functions like proliferation, differentiation, migration, organization of the cytoskeleton, cell-cell contact, secretion and transport of ions and water. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most frequent genetic disorder, is known to be caused by a mutation of the CF-gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). CFTR represents a regulating transport protein for ion channels and processes involving endo- and exocytosis. Despite the identification of the genetic mutation knowledge of the underlying cellular pathways is limited. In the present experiments the cholinergic system was investigated in the peripheral blood and in the lung of CF patients undergoing lung transplantation (n=7). Acetylcholine content in bronchi and lung parenchyma of CF was reduced by 70% compared to controls (tumor-free tissue obtained from patients with lung tumor; n=13). In contrast, ChAT activity was elevated to some extent (p>0.05) in CF, and esterase activity did not differ from control. Acetylcholine content extracted from peripheral leucocytes (30 ml) was also reduced by 70% in CF (n=13) compared to healthy volunteers (n=9). Double labelling experiments with anti-CF antibodies and anti-ChAT antibodies showed a co-localization in peripheral lymphocytes, giving first evidence that CFTR may be linked with the intracellular storage/transport of non-neuronal acetylcholine. It is concluded that the non-neuronal cholinergic system is involved in the pathogenesis of CF. A reduced content of non-neuronal acetylcholine could contribute to the deleterious changes of epithelial ion and water movements in CF, because acetylcholine

  13. Dual actions of albumin packaging and tumor targeting enhance the antitumor efficacy and reduce the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Zhou, Xiaolei; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Yaxin; Huang, Yunmei; Chen, Zhuo; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapy drug used to treat different types of cancers. However, DOX has severe side effects, especially life-threatening cardiotoxicity. We herein report a new approach to reduce the toxicity of DOX by embedding DOX inside human serum albumin (HSA). HSA is further fused by a molecular biology technique with a tumor-targeting agent, amino-terminal fragment of urokinase (ATF). ATF binds with a high affinity to urokinase receptor, which is a cell-surface receptor overexpressed in many types of tumors. The as-prepared macromolecule complex (ATF–HSA:DOX) was not as cytotoxic as free DOX to cells in vitro, and was mainly localized in cell cytosol in contrast to DOX that was localized in cell nuclei. However, in tumor-bearing mice, ATF–HSA:DOX was demonstrated to have an enhanced tumor-targeting and antitumor efficacy compared with free DOX. More importantly, histopathological examinations of the hearts from the mice treated with ATF–HSA:DOX showed a significantly reduced cardiotoxicity compared with hearts from mice treated with free DOX. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach in reducing the cardiotoxicity of DOX while strengthening its antitumor efficacy. Such a tumor-targeted albumin packaging strategy can also be applied to other antitumor drugs. PMID:26346331

  14. Deficiency of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-Epsilon Reduces Atherosclerotic Lesions in LDLR−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ryoko; Gery, Sigal; Gombart, Adrian F.; Wang, Xuping; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Akagi, Tadayuki; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Ho, Quoc; L