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Sample records for cholinesterases

  1. Cholinesterases from Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Riov, J.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A cholinesterase was purified 36-fold from mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) roots by a combination of differential extraction media and gel filtration. The enzyme could be effectively extracted only by high salt concentration, indicating that it is probably membrane-bound. Methods used for assaying animal cholinesterases were tested, two of which were adapted for use with the bean cholinesterase. The bean enzyme hydrolyzed choline and noncholine esters but showed its highest affinity for acetylcholine and acetylthiocholine. The pH optimum was 8.5 for acetylthiocholine and 8.7 for acetylcholine. The Michaelis constants were 72 and 84 μm for acetylcholine and acetylthiocholine, respectively. The cholinesterase was relatively insensitive to eserine (half-maximum inhibition at 0.42 mm) but showed high sensitivity to neostigmine (half-maximum inhibition at 0.6 μm). Other animal cholinesterase inhibitors were also found to inhibit the bean enzyme but most of them at higher concentrations than are generally encountered. Choline stimulated enzymatic activity. The molecular weight of the cholinesterase was estimated to be greater than 200,000, but at least one smaller form was observed. It is suggested that the large form of cholinesterase is converted to the smaller form by proteolysis. PMID:16658363

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  4. Cholinesterase risk for Iowa farmers.

    PubMed

    Helmers, S; Dykstra, J; Kemp, B

    1990-02-01

    Exposure to organophosphate insecticides may pose a significant risk in rural populations. The study involved 71 Iowa farmers and 28 agribusiness workers who underwent serial measurements of serum cholinesterase levels prior to and following exposure to organophosphate containing pesticides.

  5. Cholinesterase activity in Japanese quail dusted with carbaryl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were dusted with 5% carbaryl to determine if this topical treatment would alter plasma and brain cholinesterase activities. Within 6 hours after dusting, plasma cholinesterase activity was depressed compared with controls, the depression averaging 20% for females and 27% for males. By 24 hours the cholinesterase activity of females had returned to normal, but the cholinesterase activity of males remained depressed. Brain cholinesterase activity was not affected by the treatment, and there were no overt toxic signs.

  6. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory


    Biomonitoring of organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides has focused primarily on the inhibition of blood cholinesterase. Blood biomonitoring, however, can be invasive, time-consuming, and costly, especially in young children and infants. Therefore, saliva biomonitoring ha...

  7. Composites of silica with immobilized cholinesterase incorporated into polymeric shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payentko, Victoriya; Matkovsky, Alexander; Matrunchik, Yulia

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic approaches for new nanocomposite materials with relatively high cholinesterase activity have been developed. The peculiarity of the formation of such systems is the introduction of cholinesterase into polymer with subsequent incorporation on the ready-made silica particles and into the polysiloxane matrixes during sol-gel synthesis. Evaluation of the cholinesterase activity has been fulfilled through the imitation of the acetylcholine chloride decomposition reaction. Values of activity for cholinesterase nanocomposites demonstrated in this work are higher than those for the native cholinesterase. The higher activity of cholinesterase contained in nanocomposites was found for those prepared using highly dispersed silica.

  8. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  9. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to measure cholinesterase (an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to choline) in... obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of cholinesterase inhibition disorders...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to measure cholinesterase (an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to choline) in... obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of cholinesterase inhibition disorders...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to measure cholinesterase (an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to choline) in... obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of cholinesterase inhibition disorders...

  12. [Methods for determination of cholinesterase activity].

    PubMed

    Dingová, D; Hrabovská, A

    2015-01-01

    Cholinesterases hydrolyze acetylcholine and thus they play a key role in a process of cholinergic neurotransmission. Changes in their activities are linked to many diseases (e.g Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, lipid disorders). Thus, it is important to determine their activity in a fast, simply and precise way. In this review, different approaches of studying cholinesterase activities (e.g pH-dependent, spectrophotometric, radiometric, histochemical methods or biosensors) are discussed. Comparisons, advantages or disadvantages of selected methods (e.g most widely used Ellman's assay, extremely sensitive Johnson Russell method or modern technique with golden nanoparticles) are presented. This review enables one to choose a suitable method for determination of cholinesterase activities with respect to laboratory equipment, type of analysis, pH, temperature scale or special conditions. PMID:26852525

  13. Brain cholinesterase activities of passerine birds in forests sprayed with cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; Shea, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in passerines collected from northwestern forests that had been sprayed with trichlorfon, acephate, and carbaryl at 0.56, 1.13 and 2.26 kg/ha. Trichlorfon and carbaryl inhibited cholinesterase activity slightly in only a few birds, primarily canopy dwellers. In contrast, acephate caused marked inhibition of cholinesterase activity in nearly all birds collected. The inhibition was present even 33 days after spraying. Some birds from the acephate-sprayed forests exhibited clinical signs compatible with acute acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

  14. Measuring cholinesterase activity in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Claus Henn, Birgit; McMaster, Suzanne; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-10-01

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 different collection methods: a disposable plastic pipette, and a cotton-wool roll. A brief questionnaire was conducted each week to document changes in exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors for the duration of the sampling. To measure cholinesterase activity, an existing radiometric method was modified to make it suitable for human saliva. Using this method, cholinesterase activity was measurable in saliva, and duplicate samples showed reliable repeatability. Activity in both collection methods ranged from 3 to 265 nmol/h/ml saliva (mean = 52 +/- 37 [SD] nmol/h/ml saliva). For some individuals, enzyme activity was consistent over the five sampling weeks; for others, activity was highly variable. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were calculated to assess variability, and mean CVs were the same for both collection methods (about 35%). Adjusting for protein concentration in the pipette-collected samples did not change results. Both collection methods worked well for collecting between 1 and 3 ml saliva, but at the majority of visits (86%), participants preferred the cotton-wool roll. Results from this study suggest that saliva may be a useful indicator of potential neurotoxic effects from exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides, but that factors affecting variability should be explored further.

  15. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  16. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  17. A new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, A; Lane, A B; Jenkins, T

    1988-01-01

    A South African Afrikaans speaking family is reported in which a new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant was found to occur in the mother and son. The variant has the same electrophoretic mobility as the "usual' enzyme, but greater heat stability. Its higher specific activity is associated with a normal number of enzyme molecules. The variant may be inherited as a dominant trait, though its locus is uncertain. Images PMID:3225823

  18. Comparative aspects of the purification and properties of cholinesterases

    PubMed Central

    Augustinsson, Klas-Bertil

    1971-01-01

    Recent years have seen great progress in the purification and characterization of cholinesterases. Investigation has indicated the existence of two principal groups: a fairly homogeneous group of acetylcholinesterases and a group of enzymes that utilize butyrylcholine, propionycholine, or benzoylcholine as substrates and that differ widely in their properties. This paper reviews the different types of cholinesterase and their sources, the importance of a proper choice of substrate in cholinesterase studies, methods for the purification of cholinesterases, and some of the properties of these enzymes. PMID:4938026

  19. Serial cholinesterase estimation in carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pinakini, K S; Kumar, T S Mohan

    2006-07-01

    Poisoning is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries like India. Anticholinesterase compounds like organophosphates (OP) and carbamates account for the majority of these poisoning cases because of their easy availability and agricultural use. Carbamates are as popular as OPs as insecticides that often go undiagnosed. A fatal case of carbofuran poisoning is presented where serial cholinesterase estimation played a major role in the diagnosis of the same. The pertinent medical literature on carbofuran poisoning is reviewed. The establishment of poison information center in each state is needed for proper diagnosis and management of poisoning cases.

  20. [Cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning: a complicated medical challenge].

    PubMed

    Lavon, Ophir; Sagi, Ram

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to insecticides, mainly cholinesterase inhibitors, is a global problem with substantial morbidity and mortality. Risk of intoxication is increased in rural areas where there is high availability and proximity of insecticides to families and children. Neglected storage and inadequate practice lead to dangerous exposure. Strict regulations and appropriate safety measures are needed for the prevention of exposure to insecticides. Broad toxicological knowledge is necessary in order to treat organophosphate and carbamate poisoned patients. Diagnosis is not trivial, since the identity of the poison is not always apparent. Multiple exposures including organic solvents are possible. The clinical presenting can be confusing. Measurement of cholinesterase activity is mandatory in establishing the diagnosis. Prompt treatment with proper antidotes and respiratory support is indicated. Early administration of anticonvulsants may mitigate central neurologic complications. Monitoring neurologic and cardiac function is advised for rapid identification of complications and prognosis evaluation. Meticulous preparedness of health care providers for insecticide poisoning is needed from the pre-hospital phase to emergency departments and the different hospital wards.

  1. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates as cholinesterases inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2015-02-01

    Based on the presence of dialkyl phosphate moiety, we evaluated twenty-seven salicylanilide diethyl phosphates (diethyl [2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl] phosphates) for the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel (Electrophorus electricus L.) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from equine serum. Ellman's spectrophotometric method was used. The inhibitory activity (expressed as IC50 values) was compared with that of the established drugs galantamine and rivastigmine. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates showed significant activity against both cholinesterases with IC50 values from 0.903 to 86.3 μM. IC50s for BChE were comparatively lower than those obtained for AChE. All of the investigated compounds showed higher inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, and six of them inhibited BChE more effectively than both rivastigmine and galantamine. In general, derivatives of 4-chlorosalicylic acid showed enhanced activity when compared to derivatives of 5-halogenated salicylic acids, especially against BChE. The most effective inhibitor of AChE was O-{5-chloro-2-[(3-bromophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate with IC50 of 35.4 μM, which is also one of the most potent inhibitors of BChE. O-{5-Chloro-2-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate exhibited in vitro the strongest inhibition of BChE (0.90 μM). Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates act as pseudo-irreversible cholinesterases inhibitors. PMID:25462625

  2. Cholinesterase Newfoundland: a new succinylcholine-sensitive variant of cholinesterase at locus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, N E; Elliott, C R

    1981-01-01

    A family from Newfoundland was found to have a new rare variant for plasma cholinesterase (E.C.3.1.1.8) recognized by a high-percentage inhibition by dibucaine (DN), particularly when succinyldithiocholine was used as substrate (DNSDTC) but also somewhat high when benzoylcholine was substrate (DNBZCH). The family data demonstrated that the variant is determined by an allele of the usual and atypical alleles at locus 1, and the new allele is designated CHE1*NFLD. The proband who was heterozygous for the Newfoundland and atypical alleles had shown sensitivity to succinylcholine. It is postulated that cholinesterase Newfoundland (NFLD) has a reduced affinity for succinylcholine. Samples selected for high DNs with a benzoylcholine from 200 Canadian Caucasians and 70 Newfoundlanders did not have the variant, and, therefore, it is assumed that the remainder of the samples did not have the variant. PMID:7246542

  3. Prognostic Factors in Cholinesterase Inhibitor Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sun, In O; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Lee, Kwang Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphates and carbamates are insecticides that are associated with high human mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) poisoning. Material/Methods This study included 92 patients with CI poisoning in the period from January 2005 to August 2013. We divided these patients into 2 groups (survivors vs. non-survivors), compared their clinical characteristics, and analyzed the predictors of survival. Results The mean age of the included patients was 56 years (range, 16–88). The patients included 57 (62%) men and 35 (38%) women. When we compared clinical characteristics between the survivor group (n=81, 88%) and non-survivor group (n=11, 12%), there were no differences in renal function, pancreatic enzymes, or serum cholinesterase level, except for serum bicarbonate level and APACHE II score. The serum bicarbonate level was lower in non-survivors than in survivors (12.45±2.84 vs. 18.36±4.73, P<0.01). The serum APACHE II score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (24.36±5.22 vs. 12.07±6.67, P<0.01). The development of pneumonia during hospitalization was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (n=9, 82% vs. n=31, 38%, P<0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum bicarbonate concentration, APACHE II score, and pneumonia during hospitalization were the important prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Conclusions Serum bicarbonate and APACHE II score are useful prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Furthermore, pneumonia during hospitalization was also important in predicting prognosis in patients with CI poisoning. Therefore, prevention and active treatment of pneumonia is important in the management of patients with CI poisoning. PMID:26411989

  4. The carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glynis; Moore, Samuel W

    2012-06-01

    Carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family members are responsible for controlling the nerve impulse, detoxification and various developmental functions, and are a major target of pesticides and chemical warfare agents. Comparative structural analysis of these enzymes is thus important. The invertebrate deuterostomes (phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata and subphyla Urochordata and Cephalochordata) lie in the transition zone between invertebrates and vertebrates, and are thus of interest to the study of evolution. Here we have investigated the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in the sequenced genomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata), Saccoglossus kowalevskii (Hemichordata), Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata) and Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordata), using sequence analysis of the catalytic apparatus and oligomerisation domains, and phylogenetic analysis. All four genomes show blurring of structural boundaries between cholinesterases and carboxylesterases, with many intermediate enzymes. Non-enzymatic proteins are well represented. The Saccoglossus and Branchiostoma genomes show evidence of extensive gene duplication and retention. There is also evidence of domain shuffling, resulting in multidomain proteins consisting either of multiple carboxylesterase domains, or of carboxylesterase/cholinesterase domains linked to other domains, including RING finger, chitin-binding, immunoglobulin, fibronectin type 3, CUB, cysteine-rich-Frizzled, caspase activation and 7tm-1, amongst others. Such gene duplication and domain shuffling in the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family appears to be unique to the invertebrate deuterostomes, and we hypothesise that these factors may have contributed to the evolution of the morphological complexity, particularly of the nervous system and neural crest, of the vertebrates. PMID:22210164

  5. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level.

  6. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level. PMID:27315378

  7. The carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glynis; Moore, Samuel W

    2012-06-01

    Carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family members are responsible for controlling the nerve impulse, detoxification and various developmental functions, and are a major target of pesticides and chemical warfare agents. Comparative structural analysis of these enzymes is thus important. The invertebrate deuterostomes (phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata and subphyla Urochordata and Cephalochordata) lie in the transition zone between invertebrates and vertebrates, and are thus of interest to the study of evolution. Here we have investigated the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in the sequenced genomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata), Saccoglossus kowalevskii (Hemichordata), Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata) and Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordata), using sequence analysis of the catalytic apparatus and oligomerisation domains, and phylogenetic analysis. All four genomes show blurring of structural boundaries between cholinesterases and carboxylesterases, with many intermediate enzymes. Non-enzymatic proteins are well represented. The Saccoglossus and Branchiostoma genomes show evidence of extensive gene duplication and retention. There is also evidence of domain shuffling, resulting in multidomain proteins consisting either of multiple carboxylesterase domains, or of carboxylesterase/cholinesterase domains linked to other domains, including RING finger, chitin-binding, immunoglobulin, fibronectin type 3, CUB, cysteine-rich-Frizzled, caspase activation and 7tm-1, amongst others. Such gene duplication and domain shuffling in the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family appears to be unique to the invertebrate deuterostomes, and we hypothesise that these factors may have contributed to the evolution of the morphological complexity, particularly of the nervous system and neural crest, of the vertebrates.

  8. Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Lewy Body Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yasue, Ichiro; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-01-01

    Background: We performed a meta-analysis of cholinesterase inhibitors for patients with Lewy body disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Methods: The meta-analysis included only randomized controlled trials of cholinesterase inhibitors for Lewy body disorders. Results: Seventeen studies (n = 1798) were assessed. Cholinesterase inhibitors significantly improved cognitive function (standardized mean difference [SMD] = −0.53], behavioral disturbances (SMD = −0.28), activities of daily living (SMD = −0.28), and global function (SMD = −0.52) compared with control treatments. Changes in motor function were not significantly different from control treatments. Furthermore, the cholinesterase inhibitor group had a higher all-cause discontinuation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.48, number needed to harm [NNH] = 14), discontinuation due to adverse events (RR = 1.59, NNH = 20), at least one adverse event (RR = 1.13, NNH = 11), nausea (RR = 2.50, NNH = 13), and tremor (RR = 2.30, NNH = 20). Conclusions: Cholinesterase inhibitors appear beneficial for the treatment of Lewy body disorders without detrimental effects on motor function. However, a careful monitoring of treatment compliance and side effects is required. PMID:26221005

  9. [THE CHOLINESTERASE OF BLOOD SERUM IN WORKERS OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISE].

    PubMed

    Radamishina, G G; Bakirov, A B; Gimranova, G G; Valeeva, O V

    2015-08-01

    The biochemical study of activity of serum cholinesterase in workers of industrial enterprise was carried out on the example of petrochemical industry. The indicators of average activity of enzyme and prevalence of indicators going beyond limits of reference values were analyzed depending on manufacturing-labor experience, profession and diseases established in workers. The main diseases, professional and labor experience groups were identified where activity of cholinesterase significantly changes. The impact of labor experience and profession on level of activity ofenzyme in blood serum is demonstrated. PMID:26596043

  10. Modifications of a cholinesterase method for determination of erythrocyte cholinesterase activity in wild mammals.

    PubMed

    Donovan, D A; Zinkl, J G

    1994-04-01

    A method to determine erythrocyte cholinesterase (ChE) activity was modified for use in wild mammals. Erythrocyte ChE of California voles (Microtus californicus) was primarily acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which was similar to the brain and unlike plasma which was primarily butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Triplicate erythrocyte AChE analyses from individual animals of several species of wild rodents revealed a mean coefficient of variation of 8.7% (SD = 4.3%). Erythrocyte ChE activity of several wild mammals of California revealed that mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) had the highest erythrocyte AChE activity (1,514.5 mU/ml) and dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes) had the lowest activity (524.3 mU/ml). No ChE activity was found in erythrocytes of several species of birds and fish. PMID:8028108

  11. Application of brain cholinesterase reactivation to differentiate between organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide exposure in wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.R.; Thomas, N.J.; Hulse, C.

    1995-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activity was measured to evaluate pesticide exposure in wild birds. Thermal reactivation of brain cholinesterase was used to differentiate between carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide exposure. Brain cholinesterase activity was compared with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of stomach contents. Pesticides were identified and confirmed in 86 of 102 incidents of mortality from 29 states within the USA from 1986 through 1991. Thermal reactivation of cholinesterase activity was used to correctly predict carbamates in 22 incidents and organophosphates in 59 incidents. Agreement (P < 0.001) between predictions based on cholinesterase activities and GC/MS results was significant.

  12. A third type of serum cholinesterase deficiency in Eskimos.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E M; Wright, R C

    1976-01-01

    A new type of serum cholinesterase deficiency with less than 10% of the normal activity was found in an Alaskan Eskimo. The new type of deficiency appeared to be allelic with two types previously described in this population. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1266852

  13. Relationship Between Brain and Plasma Carbaryl Levels and Cholinesterase Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl is a N-methylcarbamate pesticide and, like others in this class, is a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes. Although studied for many years, there is a surprising lack of information relating tissue levels of carbaryl with ChE activity in the same animals...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  15. Structural analysis of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides of cholinesterases. N-linked carbohydrates of cholinesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Doctor, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    Cholinesterases are serine esterases that hydrolyse choline esters faster than other substrates. They are highly glycosylated proteins with up to 24% of their molecular weight constituted of carbohydrates. Here we report the results of our studies on the glycosylation of fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (Eq BChE). Analysis of the monosaccharide content of the two enzymes indicated that Eq BChE contained 520 nmoles of monosaccharide/mg protein, as compared to 1290 nmoles/mg protein for Eq BChE. Both enzymes contained mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid. Fucose was present in Eq BChE only. The structures of the two major oligosaccharides from FBS AChE and one major oligosaccharide from Eq BChE were determined and found to be very similar except that one of the oligosaccharides from FBS AChE contained a galactose alphal-3 galactose betal-4-determinant which has been identified as a potentially immunogenic determinant.

  16. [Pesticide detection in Costarican vegetables based on the inhibition of serum and erythrocytic human cholinesterases].

    PubMed

    Nevermann, Karl Schosinsky; Guzmán, Eugenia Quintana

    2004-12-01

    A simple and low cost method able to detect the presence of pesticides, organophosphates and carbamates based on the inhibition of serum and erythrocytic cholinesterases, was used in lettuce (Lactuca sativa), cilantro (Coriandum santivum) and celery (Apium graveolens) obtained from the Ferias del Agricultor from Valle Central of Costa Rica. The percentage inhibition of cholinesterases is related to the presence of plaguicide in the vegetable. Thirteen percent of the analyzed samples were positive for plaguicides using serum cholinesterase and 33% for erythrocytic cholinesterase. Washing and cooking the vegetables does not eliminate the presence of plaguicides but they lower slightly the concentration. Statistical evidence (p = 0.0001) indicates that erythrocytic cholinesterase has higher analytical sensitivity than serum cholinesterase. It is very important to establish the degree of contamination with pesticides in these agricultural products because they are exposed to direct contamination by fumigation, soil contamination and irrigation water, and are products that are often consumed without adequate cooking and washing.

  17. Amino acid sequence of human cholinesterase. Annual report, 30 September 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, O.

    1985-10-01

    The active-site serine residue is located 198 amino acids from the N-terminal. The active-site peptide was isolated from three different genetic types of human serum cholinesterase: from usual, atypical, and atypical-silent genotypes. It was found that the amino acid sequence of the active-site peptide was identical in all three genotypes. Comparison of the complete sequences of cholinesterase from human serum and acetylcholinesterase from the electric organ of Torpedo californica shows an identity of 53%. Cholinesterase is of interest to the Department of Defense because cholinesterase protects against organophosphate poisons of the type used in chemical warfare. The structural results presented here will serve as the basis for cloning the gene for cholinesterase. The potential uses of large amounts of cholinesterase would be for cleaning up spills of organophosphates and possibly for detoxifying exposed personnel.

  18. [Insect cholinesterases and irreversible inhibitors. Statistical treatment of the data].

    PubMed

    Moralev, S N

    2010-01-01

    The data on sensitivity of cholinesterases (ChE) of different insects to reversible inhibitors, as well as the data on physico-chemical parameters of amino acids constituting their active centers, were treated by factor analysis and juxtaposed. It is shown that both these characteristics are related to taxonomical belonging of insects. It is revealed the "material substrate" of the factors determining inhibitor action specificity, which are specific sites in ChE active center.

  19. [Levels of plasma cholinesterase in Colombian working-class populations].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime

    2003-12-01

    Levels of plasma cholinesterase in Colombian working-class populations Reference values for plasma cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) are not available for Colombian populations. A representative sample of a working-class population was used to establish these values to provide reference data for use by the social security system. Two working-class populations were sampled from the Aburrá Valley (Aburrá) and eastern Antioquia (Oriente). Cholinesterase activity was measured in 827 workers, with ages spanning 18-49 years, 415 from Aburrá and 412 people from Oriente. Three methods were used to measure cholinesterase: Michel, EQM and Monotest The average values by Michel and EQM were not statistically different between regions (Michel: Aburrá, 1.11, and East, 1.13 deltas pH/hora; EQM: Aburrá, 2.55, and Oriente, 2.48 U/ml). By the Monotest, the enzyme average was statistically higher in Aburra than in Oriente (5,743 and 5,459 U/L respectively; p = 0 .012). By region and technique, men had significantly higher enzymatic levels than women. Within both regions and sexes, no statistically significant difference among the three aged groups was noted. Our obtained Colombian values differed significantly from foreign reference values: Michel and Monotest levels were higher and EQM levels were lower. For making clinical and epidemiologic decisions in Colombia related to these data, the values obtained for the Colombian populations are preferred over values derived from external sources. PMID:14968922

  20. [The reversible inhibition of cholinesterases from different biological sources by phosphonium betaines].

    PubMed

    Zhuzhovskiĭ, Iu G; Kuznetsova, L P; Sochilina, E E; Dmitrieva, E N; Gololobov, Iu G; Bykovskaia, E Iu

    1996-01-01

    The action of some phosphonium betains on cholinesterases from different biological sources has been studied. It has been shown, that all studied betains are reversible inhibitors of cholinesterase hydrolysis of acetyltiocholine. Inhibiting action of these compounds on acetylcholinesterases is about ten times weaker that of the majority of known phosphonium salts, while their action on butyrylcholinesterases has no peculiarities. There were found certain differences for each betain compounds in their action on cholinesterases from different biological sources. These results may be used for detail classification of cholinesterases and allow to extend knowledge in comparative enzymology. PMID:8967277

  1. Histochemical localization of cholinesterase activity in the dental epithelium of guinea pig teeth.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, C K; Takano, Y

    2004-07-01

    Cholinesterase is known for its remarkable diversity in distribution and function. An association of this enzyme with proliferative and morpho-differentiating tissues has been reported in several species. Here we report on the first evidence of the presence of cholinesterase in the enamel organ of continuously erupting incisors and molars of the guinea pig. Frozen sections of the incisors and molars of the guinea pig were incubated for histochemical demonstration of cholinesterase activity by means of the thiocholine method as described by Karnovsky and Root. The cholinesterase activity was observed in several types of cells of the dental epithelium; cells forming the basal portion of the enamel organ, outer enamel epithelium and maturation stage ameloblasts of both the incisors and molars. In the crown analogue side, the outer enamel epithelial cells gained strong reactions for cholinesterase and maintained the reaction throughout the secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis. In contrast, cholinesterase reactions were lacking in the inner enamel epithelium, pre-ameloblasts, and secretory ameloblasts. In the early stage of enamel maturation, ameloblasts began to show positive reactions for cholinesterase, which was upregulated in the incisal direction. Although both tooth types showed similar reactive patterns for cholinesterase at the growing ends, maturation ameloblasts depicted a different pattern of staining displaying the reactions only sporadically in molars. These data indicate the role of cholinesterase in the enamel organ in tooth morphogenesis and function of guinea pig teeth. PMID:15224211

  2. Blood cholinesterase in rats fed an insect resistance apple clone containing a natural cholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Stoewsand, G S; Anderson, J L; Brown, S K

    1994-01-01

    A crab apple clone (Malus brevipes 1021), highly resistant to the apple maggot, is being used in breeding programs developing commercial apple cultivars. This study has discovered that this crab apple contains a natural cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor that caused a 17.5% in vitro inhibition of rat blood ChE activity. This crab apple also showed a relatively high total (titratable) acidity of 1.28%. The commercial, nonresistant, apple cultivar McIntosh was capable of causing a 7.9% inhibition of blood ChE in vitro. The total acidity in McIntosh was 0.45%. A 4-wk feeding study compared 2 groups of 5-wk-old Fischer 344 male rats fed diets containing 45% of either M. brevipes or McIntosh freeze-dried apples to a third (control) group of rats fed a semipurified diet. In vivo blood ChE activities were similar in all groups of rats, as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell counts. The liver mixed-function oxidase activity through aminopyrine N-demethylase in the rats fed the apple diets was higher than the controls, but p-nitroanisole O-demethylase activity was induced only in the animals fed the maggot-resistant crab apple. Lowered growth with concomitant lowered food intake, in the otherwise healthy rats fed the maggot-resistant crab apple diet, was attributed to the less palatable, highly acidic fruit. This study indicates that the natural ChE inhibitor in the insect-resistant apple M. brevipes is apparently detoxified upon ingestion.

  3. Evaluation of Candidate Genes for cholinesterase Activity in Farmworkers Exposed to organophosphorous Pesticides-Association of SNPs in BCHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Organophosphate pesticides act as cholinesterase inhibitors, and as such may give rise to potential neurological effects. Cholinesterase activity is a useful, indirect measurement of pesticide exposure, especially in high-risk individuals such as farmworkers. To und...

  4. Silent cholinesterase gene: variations in the properties of serum enzyme in apparent homozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, H. M.; Dietz, A. A.; Hodges, L. K.; Lubrano, T.; Czebotar, V.

    1970-01-01

    The cholinesterase activity of the sera of 25 subjects diagnosed as homozygotes for the silent cholinesterase gene was studied by a sensitive enzymatic method employing several thiocholine esters and various inhibitors, and by disc electrophoretic, immunochemical, and chromatographic methods. (a) With one exception, the sera fell into two classes by all criteria. One class (type I, 16 cases) had no normal serum cholinesterase. The other class (type II, eight cases) had about 2% of apparently normal serum cholinesterase. The remaining serum was intermediate between the two classes in several respects. One explanation for these results is that there are several “silent” genes concerned; possibly these are allelic. (b) Normal sera and all silent sera contain small amounts of a cholinesterase activity labeled the residual cholinesterase. The enzyme(s) responsible has properties similar to those of acetylcholinesterase rather than serum cholinesterase. It is estimated that about 1% of the activity of normal serum against acetylthiocholine is due to this enzyme. The source of the residual cholinesterase is not yet known. Images PMID:4984470

  5. Automated conductimetric assay of human serum cholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Duffy, P; Wallach, J M

    1989-01-01

    Serum cholinesterase activity was determined by conductimetry using samples in the microliter range. Butyrylcholine iodide was demonstrated to be a convenient substrate for the conductimetric assay. Validation of the microassay was made by using either purified enzyme or control serum. In the range of 0-60 U/l, a linear relationship was demonstrated. Correlation with a reference spectrophotometric method was obtained with a slope of 1.18. An explanation of this value is proposed, as different hydrolysis rates were obtained with human sera, depending on the substrate used (butyrylthio- or butyryl-choline ester).

  6. Weight Loss Associated with Cholinesterase Inhibitors In Patients With Dementia in a National Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Sheffrin, Meera; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Steinman, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Inconsistent data from randomized trials suggest cholinesterase inhibitors may cause weight loss. We sought to determine if the initiation of cholinesterase inhibitors is associated with significant weight loss in a real-word clinical setting. Design Retrospective cohort study from 2007-2010, comparing weight loss in patients with dementia newly prescribed cholinesterase inhibitors and patients newly prescribed other chronic medications Setting National Veterans Affairs (VA) data Participants Patients 65 years or older with a diagnosis of dementia who received a new prescription for a cholinesterase inhibitor or other new other chronic medication. Measurements The primary outcome was time to 10 pound weight loss over 12 months. We used propensity score matching patients to control for the likelihood of receiving a cholinesterase inhibitor based on baseline characteristics. Data were analyzed in a priori defined subgroups by age, comorbid burden, and initial weight. Results Of 6,504 patients that met study criteria, 1188 patients started on cholinesterase inhibitors were matched to 2189 patients started on other medications. The propensity-matched cohorts were well balanced on baseline covariates. Patients initiated on cholinesterase inhibitors had a higher risk of weight loss compared to matched controls at 12 months, HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.07 - 1.41). At twelve months, 29.3% of patients on cholinesterase inhibitors had experienced weight loss compared to 22.8% of non-users, corresponding to a number needed to harm of 21.2 (95% CI 12.5 – 71.4) over one year. There were no significant differences across subgroups. Conclusion Patients with dementia started on cholinesterase inhibitors had a higher risk of clinically significant weight loss over a 12-month period compared to matched controls. These results are consistent with the available data from randomized controlled trials. Clinicians should consider the risk of weight loss when prescribing

  7. Cholinesterases in neural development: new findings and toxicologic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, S; Koenigsberger, C

    1999-01-01

    Developing animals are more sensitive than adults to acute cholinergic toxicity from anticholinesterases, including organophosphorus pesticides, when administered in a laboratory setting. It is also possible that these agents adversely affect the process of neural development itself, leading to permanent deficits in the architecture of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent observations indicate that organophosphorus exposure can affect DNA synthesis and cell survival in neonatal rat brain. New evidence that acetylcholinesterase may have a direct role in neuronal differentiation provides additional grounds for interest in the developmental toxicity of anticholinesterases. For example, correlative anatomic studies show that transient bursts of acetylcholinesterase expression often coincide with periods of axonal outgrowth in maturing avian, rodent, and primate brain. Some selective cholinesterase inhibitors effectively suppress neurite outgrowth in model systems like differentiating neuroblastoma cells and explanted sensory ganglia. When enzyme expression is altered by genetic engineering, acetylcholinesterase levels on the outer surface of transfected neurons correlate with ability to extend neurites. Certain of these "morphogenic" effects may depend on protein-protein interactions rather than catalytic acetylcholinesterase activity. Nonetheless, it remains possible that some pesticides interfere with important developmental functions of the cholinesterase enzyme family. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:10229707

  8. The distribution of cholinesterases in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Biscoe, T J; Silver, A

    1966-03-01

    1. The distribution of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase in the carotid body of the cat has been examined histochemically. Studies were made on normal carotid bodies and on carotid bodies from cats in which certain nerves had been cut some time previously. The nerves sectioned were the sinus nerve, the post-ganglionic sympathetic branch of the superior cervical ganglion or the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk.2. It was confirmed that more butyrylcholinesterase than acetylcholinesterase is present. Both enzymes are found in three sites: (i) as strands, (ii) as plexuses, (iii) inside a few cells.3. The distribution is unaffected by cutting the sinus nerve or preganglionic cervical sympathetic nerves. Disorganization and depletion of the cholinesterases in the strands and plexuses occurs when the post-ganglionic branch of the superior cervical ganglion is cut. The cholinesterase in cells is unaffected.4. In carotid bodies in which vessels were filled with red blood cells or in which the vascular bed was injected with carmine-gelatine, it was seen that strands and plexuses are associated with blood vessels, and with blood vessels and cells respectively.5. It is suggested that a cholinergic pathway controlling carotid body blood vessels runs in the post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic.

  9. Pharmacoeconomics of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Linus

    2003-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors constitute one of few treatment options available for Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. The modest effects and relatively high acquisition costs of these drugs make the health economics of dementia an important subject of study. Simulation models can be used to bring together existing data and make predictions of the long-term cost effectiveness of treatment. Most models have been built around cognitive function as a key parameter based on the observed relationship between cognitive function and costs of care. Patients with more severe disease attain higher total costs of care. Also, these patients have a higher share of formal care costs than do patients with mild disease, who are usually looked after by informal caregivers. The valuation of unpaid care is controversial, and the choice of method may affect results considerably. Another important issue is the measurement of health-related QOL in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The few existing studies have used proxy respondents to elicit utility weights in different disease states; however, this methodology has not been validated. It is likely that the increased drug costs incurred by the use of cholinesterase inhibitors will be offset (at least partly) by savings in other healthcare costs. However, these results should be viewed as preliminary, since we are still awaiting data from long-term follow-up studies. Also, the value of treatment for patients and caregivers in terms of QOL improvements has yet to be established. PMID:13129415

  10. A review on cholinesterase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Anand, Preet; Singh, Baldev

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the deficits in the cholinergic system and deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ) in the form of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. Since the cholinergic system plays an important role in the regulation of learning and memory processes, it has been targetted for the design of anti-Alzheimer's drugs. Cholinesterase inhibitors enhance cholinergic transmission directly by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which hydrolyses acetylcholine. Furthermore, it has been also demonstrated that both acetylcholinesterase and butrylcholinesterase (BuChE) play an important role in Aβ-aggregation during the early stages of senile plaque formation. Therefore, AChE and BuChE inhibition have been documented as critical targets for the effective management of AD by an increase in the availability of acetylcholine in the brain regions and decrease in the Aβ deposition. This review discusses the different classes of cholinesterase inhibitors including tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, xanthostigmine, para-aminobenzoic acid, coumarin, flavonoid, and pyrrolo-isoxazole analogues developed for the treatment of AD.

  11. Exposure of nonbreeding migratory shorebirds to cholinesterase-inhibiting contaminants in the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strum, K.M.; Hooper, M.J.; Johnson, K.A.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Zaccagnini, M.E.; Sandercock, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    Migratory shorebirds frequently forage and roost in agricultural habitats, where they may be exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. Exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate compounds, common anti-cholinesterases, can cause sublethal effects, even death. To evaluate exposure of migratory shorebirds to organophosphorus and carbamates, we sampled birds stopping over during migration in North America and wintering in South America. We compared plasma cholinesterase activities and body masses of individuals captured at sites with no known sources of organophosphorus or carbamates to those captured in agricultural areas where agrochemicals were recommended for control of crop pests. In South America, plasma acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in Buff-breasted Sandpipers was lower at agricultural sites than at reference sites, indicating exposure to organophosphorus and carbamates. Results of plasma cholinesterase reactivation assays and foot-wash analyses were inconclusive. A meta-analysis of six species revealed no widespread effect of agricultural chemicals on cholinesterase activity. however, four of six species were negative for acetylcholinesterase and one of six for butyrylcholinesterase, indicating negative effects of pesticides on cholinesterase activity in a subset of shorebirds. Exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors can decrease body mass, but comparisons between treatments and hemispheres suggest that agrochemicals did not affect migratory shorebirds' body mass. Our study, one of the first to estimate of shorebirds' exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, suggests that shorebirds are being exposed to cholinesterase- inhibiting pesticides at specific sites in the winter range but not at migratory stopover sites. future research should examine potential behavioral effects of exposure and identify other potential sitesand levels of exposure. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2010.

  12. Cholinesterase inhibitors from the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoon Ho; Cuong, To Dao; Hung, Tran Manh; Kim, Jeong Ah; Woo, Mi Hee; Byeon, Jeong Su; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of cholinesterase has been proposed to be a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's diseases. In our preliminary screening study on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens (Pedaliaceae) was found to inhibit AChE activity at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. Ten compounds (1-10) were isolated from the active fraction and evaluated for their inhibitory effect on AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Among the isolates, verbascosides (5, 6, and 8) containing a caffeoyl and a 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl groups in their structures, showed effective AChE inhibitory activity and also possessed BChE inhibitory activity. The findings suggest that verbascoside derivatives may be partially related to the anti-Alzheimer effect of this medicinal plant. PMID:24374905

  13. Cholinesterase inhibitors from the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoon Ho; Cuong, To Dao; Hung, Tran Manh; Kim, Jeong Ah; Woo, Mi Hee; Byeon, Jeong Su; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of cholinesterase has been proposed to be a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's diseases. In our preliminary screening study on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens (Pedaliaceae) was found to inhibit AChE activity at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. Ten compounds (1-10) were isolated from the active fraction and evaluated for their inhibitory effect on AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Among the isolates, verbascosides (5, 6, and 8) containing a caffeoyl and a 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl groups in their structures, showed effective AChE inhibitory activity and also possessed BChE inhibitory activity. The findings suggest that verbascoside derivatives may be partially related to the anti-Alzheimer effect of this medicinal plant.

  14. Carbofuran poisoning in herons: diagnosis using cholinesterase reactivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K A; Hooper, M J; Littrell, E E

    1995-04-01

    Exposure to the carbamate insecticide carbofuran was detected using brain cholinesterase (ChE) reactivation techniques in heron carcasses collected from a potential pesticide exposure incident. Great egrets (Nycticorax nycticorax), great blue herons (Ardea herodias), and black-crowned night herons (Casmerodius albus) were exposed to carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) either by dermal exposure while wading or through ingestion of contaminated food items. Carcasses may have been in the field up to 5 days prior to collection. Brain ChE, substantially inhibited in most samples, increased 7.9-208% in the reactivation assay after 4 to 96 hours at 37 C, providing evidence of exposure to a carbamate pesticide. Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) identified in the crops of some herons contained carbofuran residues of up to 0.6 parts per million wet weight, providing additional evidence of exposure. Reactivated brain ChE in several samples approached the range of control values.

  15. Inhibition of cholinesterases by stereoisomers of Huperzine-A

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Qian, N.; Kovach, I.M.; Ashani, Y.; Kozikowski, A.P.

    1993-05-13

    Huperzine-A, a potential drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and possible pretreament for nerve agent toxicity, has recently been characterized as a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterases (Ashani et al., BBRC, 184:719-726, 1992). Long-term incubation of purified cholinesterases with Huperzine-A did not show any chemical modification of Huperzine-A. The dissociation constant, K(I), for fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) was approximately 20 nM, for Torpedo AChE was 215 nM, and for horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was 40 micrometers M. Inhibition studies with the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A have shown that naturally occurring (-)-Huperzine-A inhibited FBS AChE 35-fold more potently than (+)-Huperzine-A, with K(I) values of 6.2 nM and 210 nM, respectively. These results are in agreement with those reported previously using crude preparations of rat cortical AChE (McKinney et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol., 203, 303-305, 1991). (-)-Huperzine-A, on the other hand, was 80-fold more potent than (+)-Huperzine-A in inhibiting Torpedo AChE, with K(I), values of 0.25 micrometers M and 22 micrometer M, respectively. No significant differences in K(I) were observed for the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A with horse serum BChE, indicating the lack of stereoselectivity of this compound for BChE. Molecular modeling studies involving docking of each of the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A into the active-site gorge of Torpedo AChE also revealed that (-)-Huperzine-A gave a better fit than (+)-Huperzine-A.

  16. Association of chronic pesticide exposure with serum cholinesterase levels and pulmonary functions.

    PubMed

    Sutoluk, Zeynel; Kekec, Zeynep; Daglioglu, Nebile; Hant, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The present study focused on the analysis of serum cholinesterase levels and the pulmonary function tests in seasonal farm workers who were chronically exposed to pesticides, mostly organophosphorus, in comparison with non-farm workers in the farming areas of Cukurova region, Turkey. Serum cholinesterase levels and pulmonary function tests using spyrometer in 50 male seasonal farm workers (study group) were compared to 50 male non-farm workers (control group) in this cross-sectional study. The mean serum cholinesterase enzyme level in the farm worker group (7095.5 ± 1699.4 U/L) was significantly lower than those of the control group (9716.4 ± 1484.4 U/L) (p < .001). There was no significant difference between pulmonary function tests of 2 groups (p > .05). These results show that chronic environmental organophosphorus exposure caused a decrease in the serum cholinesterase enzyme levels in farm workers, emphasizing the importance of primary prevention. PMID:24484366

  17. [Study of the interaction of main potato glycoalkaloids in inhibition of immobilized butyryl cholinesterase].

    PubMed

    Arkhypova, V M; Dziadevych, S V; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Martelet, C; Soldatkin, O P

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of main potato glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine in inhibition of horse serum butyryl cholinesterases immobilized on the pH-sensitive field-effect transistors has been investigated. The method of isobol diagram of Loewe and Muishnek has been used for interpretation of results. It has been shown the alpha-chaconine inhibits the immobilized bytyryl cholinesterases more strongly than alpha-solanine, and their mixture has the addition effect.

  18. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders.

  19. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders. PMID:27369572

  20. A cholinesterase genes server (ESTHER): a database of cholinesterase-related sequences for multiple alignments, phylogenetic relationships, mutations and structural data retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Liévin, P; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1996-01-01

    We have built a database of sequences phylogenetically related to cholinesterases (ESTHER) for esterases, alpha/beta hydrolase enzymes and relatives). These sequences define a homogeneous group of enzymes (carboxylesterases, lipases and hormone-sensitive lipases) with some related proteins devoid of enzymatic activity. The purpose of ESTHER is to help comparison and alignment of any new sequence appearing in the field, to favour mutation analysis of structure-function relationships and to allow structural data recovery. ESTHER is a World Wide Web server with the URL http://www.montpellier.inra.fr:70/cholinesterase. PMID:8594562

  1. A cholinesterase genes server (ESTHER): a database of cholinesterase-related sequences for multiple alignments, phylogenetic relationships, mutations and structural data retrieval.

    PubMed

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Liévin, P; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1996-01-01

    We have built a database of sequences phylogenetically related to cholinesterases (ESTHER) for esterases, alpha/beta hydrolase enzymes and relatives). These sequences define a homogeneous group of enzymes (carboxylesterases, lipases and hormone-sensitive lipases) with some related proteins devoid of enzymatic activity. The purpose of ESTHER is to help comparison and alignment of any new sequence appearing in the field, to favour mutation analysis of structure-function relationships and to allow structural data recovery. ESTHER is a World Wide Web server with the URL http://www.montpellier.inra.fr:70/cholinesterase.

  2. Simulating cholinesterase inhibition in birds caused by dietary insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corson, M.S.; Mora, M.A.; Grant, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a stochastic simulation model that simulates avian foraging in an agricultural landscape to evaluate factors affecting dietary insecticide exposure and to predict post-exposure cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. To evaluate the model, we simulated published field studies and found that model predictions of insecticide decay and ChE inhibition reasonably approximated most observed results. Sensitivity analysis suggested that foraging location usually influenced ChE inhibition more than diet preferences or daily intake rate. Although organophosphorus insecticides usually caused greater inhibition than carbamate insecticides, insecticide toxicity appeared only moderately important. When we simulated impact of heavy insecticide applications during breeding seasons of 15 wild bird species, mean maximum ChE inhibition in most species exceeded 20% at some point. At this level of inhibition, birds may experience nausea and/or may exhibit minor behavioral changes. Simulated risk peaked in April-May and August-September and was lowest in July. ChE inhibition increased with proportion of vegetation in the diet. This model, and ones like it, may help predict insecticide exposure of and sublethal ChE inhibition in grassland animals, thereby reducing dependence of ecological risk assessments on field studies alone.

  3. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  4. Purification and studies on characteristics of cholinesterases from Daphnia magna *

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-xia; Niu, Li-zhi; Li, Shao-nan

    2013-01-01

    Due to their significant value in both economy and ecology, Daphnia had long been employed to investigate in vivo response of cholinesterase (ChE) in anticholinesterase exposures, whereas the type constitution and property of the enzyme remained unclear. A type of ChE was purified from Daphnia magna using a three-step procedure, i.e., Triton X-100 extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose™-Fast-Flow chromatography. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular mass of the purified ChE was estimated to be 84 kDa. Based on substrate studies, the purified enzyme preferred butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTCh) [with maximum velocity (V max)/Michaelis constant (K m)=8.428 L/(min·mg protein)] to acetylthiocholine iodide (ATCh) [with V max/K m=5.346 L/(min·mg protein)] as its substrate. Activity of the purified enzyme was suppressed by high concentrations of either ATCh or BTCh. Inhibitor studies showed that the purified enzyme was more sensitive towards inhibition by tetraisopropylpyrophosphoramide (iso-OMPA) than by 1,5-bis(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl) pentan-3-one dibromide (BW284C51). Result of the study suggested that the purified ChE was more like a type of pseudocholinesterase, and it also suggested that Daphnia magna contained multiple types of ChE in their bodies. PMID:23549850

  5. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  6. Effects of two oxadiazolidinones on cholinesterases and acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bakry, N.; Lockyer, S.; Sherby, S.; Eldefrawi, A.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyryl cholinesterase (BuChE) by 3-(2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-benzofuran-'7-yl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(/sup 3/H)-one (DBOX) and 3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(/sup 3/H)-one (MPOX) was measured by the Ellmann spectrophotometric method. Inhibition was quasi first order and irreversible. DBOX was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent than MPOX. Housefly brain AChE and horse serum BuChE were more sensitive than AChEs of red blood cells or eel and Torpedo electric organs. It is suggested that the nonesteratic oxadiazolidinones are activated to carbanillates on the surface of the enzyme and produce a carbanillated enzyme which ages rapidly. Carbamate anticholinesterases protected AChE against carbanillation as they did against phosphorylation. At higher concentrations, the two oxadiazolidinones also affected binding of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha.. bungarotoxin and (/sup 3/H)perhydrohistrionicotoxin to Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but did not affect binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate to rat brain muscarinic receptors.

  7. Brain cholinesterase activity of apparently normal wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides are potent anticholinesterase substances that have killed large numbers of wild birds of various species. Cause of death is diagnosed by demonstration of depressed brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in combination with chemical detection of anticholinesterase residue in the affected specimen. ChE depression is determined by comparison of the affected specimen to normal ChE activity for a sample of control specimens of the same species, but timely procurement of controls is not always possible. Therefore, a reference file of normal whole brain ChE activity is provided for 48 species of wild birds from North America representing 11 orders and 23 families for use as emergency substitutes in diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning. The ChE values, based on 83 sets of wild control specimens from across the United States, are reproducible provided the described procedures are duplicated. Overall, whole brain ChE activity varied nearly three-fold among the 48 species represented, but it was usually similar for closely related species. However, some species were statistically separable in most families and some species of the same genus differed as much as 50%.

  8. Cholinesterase inhibitors affect brain potentials in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Irimajiri, Rie; Michalewski, Henry J; Golob, Edward J; Starr, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an isolated episodic memory disorder that has a high likelihood of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease. Auditory sensory cortical responses (P50, N100) have been shown to be increased in amplitude in MCI compared to older controls. We tested whether (1) cortical potentials to other sensory modalities (somatosensory and visual) were also affected in MCI and (2) cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), one of the therapies used in this disorder, modulated sensory cortical potentials in MCI. Somatosensory cortical potentials to median nerve stimulation and visual cortical potentials to reversing checkerboard stimulation were recorded from 15 older controls and 15 amnestic MCI subjects (single domain). Results were analyzed as a function of diagnosis (Control, MCI) and ChEIs treatment (Treated MCI, Untreated MCI). Somatosensory and visual potentials did not differ significantly in amplitude in MCI subjects compared to controls. When ChEIs use was considered, somatosensory potentials (N20, P50) but not visual potentials (N70, P100, N150) were of larger amplitude in untreated MCI subjects compared to treated MCI subjects. Three individual MCI subjects showed increased N20 amplitude while off ChEIs compared to while on ChEIs. An enhancement of N20 somatosensory cortical activity occurs in amnestic single domain MCI and is sensitive to modulation by ChEIs. PMID:17320833

  9. Toxicological Differences Between NMDA Receptor Antagonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodong; Lin, Xiaotian; Hu, Rui; Sun, Nan; Hao, Jingru; Gao, Can

    2016-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), represented by donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, used to be the only approved class of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After the approval of memantine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been recognized by authorities and broadly used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Along with complementary mechanisms of action, NMDA antagonists and ChEIs differ not only in therapeutic effects but also in adverse reactions, which is an important consideration in clinical drug use. And the number of patients using NMDA antagonists and ChEIs concomitantly has increased, making the matter more complicated. Here we used the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System for statistical analysis , in order to compare the adverse events of memantine and ChEIs. In general, the clinical evidence confirmed the safety advantages of memantine over ChEIs, reiterating the precautions of clinical drug use and the future direction of antidementia drug development. PMID:26769920

  10. Neurobehavioral effects of the pyridinium aldoxime cholinesterase reactivator HI-6.

    PubMed

    Liu, W F; Shih, J H

    1990-01-01

    A series of neurobehavioral testing procedures was used to evaluate the behavioral effects of the pyridinium aldoxime cholinesterase reactivator HI-6 in male Sprague-Dawley rats. These procedures were fixed-ratio (FR) responding, shuttle-box conditioned avoidance response (CAR), conditioned taste aversion (CTA), drinking behavior, open-field exploratory behavior, negative geotaxis, and wire suspension time. Dose-response studies of HI-6 at dose-levels of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, or saline (IP) were evaluated. HI-6 disrupted FR responding in a dose-dependent fashion, with significant effects occurring at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg. The pattern of disruption was characterized by extended periods of nonresponding having an abrupt onset and offset. HI-6 produced CTA in a dose-related manner, with significant effects at doses equal to those that disrupted FR performance. HI-6 did not alter CAR, drinking motivation, exploratory behavior, negative geotaxis, or wire suspension time. These data suggest that there may be a commonality in the underlying mechanism(s) for the disruption in FR performance and the induction of the CTA. This mechanism may relate to the presumed drug-induced adverse internal state inducing the CTA.

  11. Protease inhibitors and indoleamines selectively inhibit cholinesterases in the histopathologic structures of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C I; Guela, C; Mesulam, M M

    1993-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques express acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in Alzheimer disease. We previously reported that traditional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as BW284C51, tacrine, and physostigmine were more potent inhibitors of the acetylcholinesterase in normal axons and cell bodies than of the acetylcholinesterase in plaques and tangles. We now report that the reverse pattern is seen with indoleamines (such as serotonin and its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan), carboxypeptidase inhibitor, and the nonspecific protease inhibitor bacitracin. These substances are more potent inhibitors of the cholinesterases in plaques and tangles than of those in normal axons and cell bodies. These results show that the enzymatic properties of plaque and tangle-associated cholinesterases diverge from those of normal axons and cell bodies. The selective susceptibility to bacitracin and carboxypeptidase inhibitor indicates that the catalytic sites of plaque and tangle-bound cholinesterases are more closely associated with peptidase or protease-like properties than the catalytic sites of cholinesterases in normal axons and cell bodies. This shift in enzymatic affinity may lead to the abnormal protein processing that is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The availability of pharmacological and dietary means for altering brain indoleamines raises therapeutic possibilities for inhibiting the abnormal cholinesterase activity associated with Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:8421706

  12. Behavioral changes and cholinesterase activity of rats acutely treated with propoxur.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, F V; Barros, H M; Tannhauser, M; Tannhauser, S L

    1999-01-01

    Early assessment of neurological and behavioral effects is extremely valuable for early identification of intoxications because preventive measures can be taken against more severe or chronic toxic consequences. The time course of the effects of an oral dose of the anticholinesterase agent propoxur (8.3 mg/kg) was determined on behaviors displayed in the open-field and during an active avoidance task by rats and on blood and brain cholinesterase activity. Maximum inhibition of blood cholinesterase was observed within 30 min after administration of propoxur. The half-life of enzyme-activity recovery was estimated to be 208.6 min. Peak brain cholinesterase inhibition was also detected between 5 and 30 min of the pesticide administration, but the half-life for enzyme activity recovery was much shorter, in the range of 85 min. Within this same time interval of the enzyme effects, diminished motor and exploratory activities and decreased performance of animals in the active avoidance task were observed. Likewise, behavioral normalization after propoxur followed a time frame similar to that of brain cholinesterase. These data indicate that behavioral changes that occur during intoxication with low oral doses of propoxur may be dissociated from signs characteristic of cholinergic over-stimulation but accompany brain cholinesterase activity inhibition.

  13. Correlation between Cholinesterase and Paraoxonase 1 Activities:Case Series of Pesticide Poisoning Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Richard, S Austin; Frank, Elizabeth A; D'Souza, Cletus J M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exposure to pesticide due to suicidal poisoning is the most extensive cause of pesticide exposure, compared with all other causes including agricultural or industrial exposure. Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate group of pesticides can inhibit acetylcholinesterase; on the other hand, paraoxonase1 can detoxify organophosphate poisoning by hydrolyzing organophosphate metabolites. Methods: We have compared the serum paraoxonase1 status and cholinesterase activity of subjects who attempted to commit suicide by consuming OP pesticide. Cholinesterase and paraoxonase1 activity were measured spectrophotometrically using butyrylthiocholine and phenyl acetate as substrates, respectively. Results: A positive correlation was found between serum paraoxonase1 activity and cholinesterase activity among pesticide consumed subjects. Conclusion: Our results suggest that subjects with higher paraoxonase1 activity may have a better chance of detoxifying the lethal effect of acute organophosphate poisoning. PMID:24163803

  14. Brain cholinesterase response in the snakehead fish (Channa striata) after field exposure to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Cong; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Bayley, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The snakehead Channa striata is an economically important air-breathing fish species in the Mekong delta of Vietnam. Rice paddies, which are disturbed by the frequent application of agro-chemicals, are among the preferred habitats for this species during the rainy season. Diazinon is one of most commonly used chemicals in rice paddies. In the present study, exposure of adult snakehead fish to a single diazinon application in cages within a rice field resulted in long-term brain cholinesterase inhibition, while the water concentration of this insecticide fell below the detection limit within 3 days. In addition, incubation of brain homogenates with 2-PAM caused reactivation of the cholinesterase diazinon complex to within 80% of the control level. These experiments also showed that chemical ageing of the diazinon cholinesterase binding occurred, which may explain the long-term effects of this pesticide.

  15. Brain cholinesterase response in the snakehead fish (Channa striata) after field exposure to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Cong; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Bayley, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The snakehead Channa striata is an economically important air-breathing fish species in the Mekong delta of Vietnam. Rice paddies, which are disturbed by the frequent application of agro-chemicals, are among the preferred habitats for this species during the rainy season. Diazinon is one of most commonly used chemicals in rice paddies. In the present study, exposure of adult snakehead fish to a single diazinon application in cages within a rice field resulted in long-term brain cholinesterase inhibition, while the water concentration of this insecticide fell below the detection limit within 3 days. In addition, incubation of brain homogenates with 2-PAM caused reactivation of the cholinesterase diazinon complex to within 80% of the control level. These experiments also showed that chemical ageing of the diazinon cholinesterase binding occurred, which may explain the long-term effects of this pesticide. PMID:18514898

  16. Assessment of Serum Cholinesterase in Rural Punjabi Sprayers Exposed to a Mixture of Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Amar Santosh; Sharma, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Serum cholinesterase (SChE) activity is considered as a biomarker and is also taken as an exposure index to assess the low level, chronic residue exposures among sprayers. Thus, cholinesterase activity was studied in the professional rural Punjabi sprayers of Bathinda district in Punjab. This study was made to estimate the irregularities in the level of cholinesterase according to multiple pesticides used by sprayers, exposure periods, age, and body mass index (BMI) of the sprayers. The data generated was statistically analyzed by applying Student's ‘t’ test and one-way analysis of variance. A positive correlation was found between SChE activity and years of exposure and a significant reduction in SChE activity was observed in younger population. Again, a positive correlation was seen between BMI and SChE inhibition. PMID:24082509

  17. Evaluation of Cholinesterase Activities During in Vivo Intoxication Using an Electrochemical Sensor Strip – Correlation With Intoxication Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Novotný, Ladislav; Misík, Jan; Kuca, Kamil; Zdarova-Karasova, Jana; Hrabinova, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Cholinesterase activity in blood of laboratory rats was monitored. Rats were intoxicated with paraoxon at dosis of 0 – 65 – 125 – 170 – 250 – 500 nmol. The 250 nmol dose was found to be the LD50. An electrochemical sensor was found useful to provide information about cholinesterase activity. The decrease of cholinesterase activity was correlated to intoxication symptoms and mortality level. It was found that the symptoms of intoxication are not observed while at least 50% of cholinesterase activity in blood remains. The minimal cholinesterase activity essential to survival is around 10%, when compared with the initial state. No changes in levels of low moleculary weight antioxidants were observed. PMID:22412329

  18. Toluidine blue O is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Biberoglu, Kevser; Tek, Melike Yuksel; Ghasemi, Seyhan Turk; Tacal, Ozden

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the inhibitory effects of three phenothiazines [toluidine blue O (TBO), thionine (TH) and methylene violet (MV)] were tested on human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and their inhibitory mechanisms were studied in detail. MV acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human BChE with Ki = 0.66 ± 0.06 μM and α = 13.6 ± 3.5. TBO and TH caused nonlinear inhibition of human BChE, compatible to double occupancy. Ki values estimated by nonlinear regression analysis for TBO and TH were 0.008 ± 0.003 μM and 2.1 ± 0.42 μM, respectively. The inhibitory potential of TBO was also tested on human erythrocyte AChE. TBO acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human AChE with Ki = 0.041 ± 0.005 μM and α = 1.6 ± 0.007. Using four site-directed BChE mutants, the role of peripheral anionic site residues of human BChE was also investigated in the binding of TBO to BChE. The peripheral anionic site mutants of BChE caused 16-69-fold increase in Ki value of TBO, compared to recombinant wild-type, suggesting that peripheral anionic site residues are involved in the binding of TBO to human BChE. In conclusion, TBO which is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases, may be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27296777

  19. Serum acetyl cholinesterase as a biomarker of arsenic induced neurotoxicity in sprague-dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Anita K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2005-04-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant, and one of the major mechanisms by which it exerts its toxic effect is through an impairment of cellular respiration by inhibition of various mitochondrial enzymes, and the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Most toxicity of arsenic results from its ability to interact with sulfhydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and to substitute phosphorus in a variety of biochemical reactions. Most toxicity of arsenic results from its ability to interact with sulfhydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and to substitute phosphorus in a variety of biochemical reactions. Recent studies have pointed out that arsenic toxicity is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, which may cause severe injury/damage to the nervous system. The main objective of this study was to conduct biochemical analysis to determine the effect of arsenic trioxide on the activity of acetyl cholinesterase; a critical important nervous system enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Four groups of six male rats each weighing an average 60 +/- 2 g were used in this study. Arsenic trioxide was intraperitoneally administered to the rats at the doses of 5, 10, 15, 20mg/kg body weight (BW), one dose per 24 hour given for five days. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water without chemical. Following anaesthesia, blood specimens were immediately collected using heparinized syringes, and acetyl cholinesterase detection and quantification were performed in serum samples by spectrophotometry. Arsenic trioxide exposure significantly decreased the activity of cholinesterase in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Acetyl cholinesterase activities of 6895 +/- 822, 5697 +/- 468, 5069 +/- 624, 4054 +/- 980, and 3158 +/- 648 U/L were recorded for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg, respectively; indicating a gradual decrease in acetyl cholinesterase activity with increasing doses of arsenic. These findings indicate that acetyl

  20. [Change of cholinesterase relative activity under modulated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation in experiments in vitro].

    PubMed

    Pashovkina, M S; Pashovkin, T N

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the activity of enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) have been experimentally investigated under the influence of amplitude-modulated super-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (carrier frequency of 2.375 MHz; power flux density of 8 mW/cm2, 20 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2; modulation frequency range 10 to 210 Hz; exposure time 5 min). The appearance of peaks of the cholinesterase increased relative activity, as well as the changes in the direction and intensity of the reaction associated with the modulation frequency and power flux are observed at equal power flux densities and exposure times.

  1. Pro-2-PAM Therapy for Central and Peripheral Cholinesterases

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James C.; Clarkson, Edward D.; Ratcliffe, Ruthie H.; Campbell, Amy J.; Thangavelu, Sonia G.; Herdman, Christine A.; Leader, Haim; Schulz, Susan M.; Marek, Elizabeth; Medynets, Marie A.; Ku, Theresa C.; Evans, Sarah A.; Khan, Farhat A.; Owens, Roberta R.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gordon, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Novel therapeutics to overcome the toxic effects of organophosphorus (OP) chemical agents are needed due to the documented use of OPs in warfare (e.g. 1980–1988 Iran/Iraq war) and terrorism (e.g. 1995 Tokyo subway attacks). Standard OP exposure therapy in the United States consists of atropine sulfate (to block muscarinic receptors), the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivator (oxime) pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM), and a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant to ameliorate seizures. A major disadvantage is that quaternary nitrogen charged oximes, including 2-PAM, do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) to treat brain AChE. Therefore, we have synthesized and evaluated pro-2-PAM (a lipid permeable 2-PAM derivative) that can enter the brain and reactivate CNS AChE, preventing seizures in guinea pigs after exposure to OPs. The protective effects of the pro-2-PAM after OP exposure were shown using a) surgically-implanted radiotelemetry probes for electroencephalogram (EEG) b) neurohistopathology of brain, c) cholinesterase activities in the PNS and CNS, and d) survivability. The PNS oxime 2-PAM was ineffective at reducing seizures/status epilepticus (SE) in diisopropyl-fluorophosphate (DFP)-exposed animals. In contrast, pro-2-PAM significantly suppressed and then eliminated seizure activity. In OP-exposed guinea pigs, there was a significant reduction in neurological damage with pro-2-PAM, but not 2-PAM. Distinct regional areas of the brains showed significantly higher AChE activity 1.5 h after OP exposure in pro-2-PAM treated animals compared to the 2-PAM treated ones. However, blood and diaphragm showed similar AChE activities in animals treated with either oxime, as both 2-PAM and pro 2-PAM are PNS active oximes. In conclusion, pro-2-PAM can cross the BBB, is rapidly metabolized inside the brain to 2-PAM, and protects against OP-induced SE through restoration of brain AChE activity. Pro-2-PAM represents the first non-invasive means of administering a CNS therapeutic for

  2. DIFFERENTIAL PROFILES OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN RATS EXPOSED TO FENAMIPHOS AND PROFENOPHOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and neurobehavioral changes was examined using two ChE-inhibiting organophosphorus pesticides, fenamiphos and profenophos. Both pesticides inhibit blood ChE, yet brain ChE is relatively spared (little to no inhibition up t...

  3. Kinetic analysis of interactions of amodiaquine with human cholinesterases and organophosphorus compounds.

    PubMed

    Bierwisch, Anne; Wille, Timo; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2016-03-30

    Standard therapy of poisoning by organophosphorus compounds (OP) is a combined administration of an anti-muscarinic drug (e.g. atropine) and an oxime as reactivator of inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Limited efficacy of clinically used oximes against a variety of OPs was shown in numerous studies, calling for research on novel reactivators of OP-inhibited AChE. Recently, reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE by the antimalarial drug amodiaquine was reported. In the present study, amodiaquine and its interactions with human cholinesterases in presence or absence of OP nerve agents was investigated in vitro. Thereby, reversible inhibition of human cholinesterases by amodiaquine (AChE ≫ BChE) was observed. Additionally, a mixed competitive-non-competitive inhibition type of amodiaquine with human AChE was determined. Slow and partial reactivation of sarin-, cyclosarin- and VX-inhibited cholinesterases by amodiaquine was recorded, amodiaquine failed to reactivate tabun-inhibited human cholinesterases. Amodiaquine, being a potent, reversible AChE inhibitor, was tested for its potential benefit as a pretreatment to prevent complete irreversible AChE inhibition by the nerve agent soman. Hereby, amodiaquine failed to prevent phosphonylation and resulted only in a slight increase of AChE activity after removal of amodiaquine and soman. At present the molecular mechanism of amodiaquine-induced reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE is not known, nevertheless amodiaquine could be considered as a template for the design of more potent non-oxime reactivators. PMID:26851641

  4. Crystal Structure of the Extracellular Cholinesterase-Like Domain from Neuroligin-2

    SciTech Connect

    Koehnke,J.; Jin, X.; Budreck, E.; Posy, S.; Scheiffele, P.; Hnoig, B.; Shapiro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) are catalytically inactive members of a family of cholinesterase-like transmembrane proteins that mediate cell adhesion at neuronal synapses. Postsynaptic neuroligins engage in Ca2+-dependent transsynaptic interactions via their extracellular cholinesterase domain with presynaptic neurexins (NRXs). These interactions may be regulated by two short splice insertions (termed A and B) in the NL cholinesterase domain. Here, we present the 3.3- Angstroms crystal structure of the ectodomain from NL2 containing splice insertion A (NL2A). The overall structure of NL2A resembles that of cholinesterases, but several structural features are unique to the NL proteins. First, structural elements surrounding the esterase active-site region differ significantly between active esterases and NL2A. On the opposite surface of the NL2A molecule, the positions of the A and B splice insertions identify a candidate NRX interaction site of the NL protein. Finally, sequence comparisons of NL isoforms allow for mapping the location of residues of previously identified mutations in NL3 and NL4 found in patients with autism spectrum disorders. Overall, the NL2 structure promises to provide a valuable model for dissecting NL isoform- and synapse-specific functions.

  5. Caregiver Acceptance of Adverse Effects and Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C.; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire…

  6. Brain cholinesterase inhibition in songbirds from pecan groves sprayed with phosaline and disulfoton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Seginak, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Disulfoton at 0.83 kg/ha caused moderate to severe brain cholinesterase (ChE) depression in 11 of 15 blue jays collected in pecan groves 6-7 hr after the application. Phosalone at 0.83 kg/ha to pecan groves caused only slight ChE inhibition in a few blue jays and red-bellied woodpeckers.

  7. Regional cholinesterase activity in white-throated sparrow brain is differentially affected by acephate (Orthene?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Romo, G.A.; Komaragiri, M.V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of a 14-day dietary exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), were determined on cholinesterase activity in three regions (basal ganglia, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of the white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, brain. All three regions experienced depressed cholinesterase activity between 0.5-2 ppm acephate. The regions exhibited cholinesterase recovery at 2-16 ppm acephate; however, cholinesterase activity dropped and showed no recovery at higher dietary levels (>16 ppm acephate). Evidence indicates that the recovery is initiated by the magnitude of depression, not the duration. In general, as acephate concentration increased, differences in ChE activity among brain regions decreased. Three terms are introduced to describe ChE response to acephate exposure: (1) ChE resistance threshold, (2) ChE compensation threshold, and (3) ChE depression threshold. It is hypothesized that adverse effects to birds in the field may occur at pesticide exposure levels customarily considered negligible.

  8. Stress does not enable pyridostigmine to inhibit brain cholinesterase after parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Grauer, E; Alkalai, D; Kapon, J; Cohen, G; Raveh, L

    2000-05-01

    The peripherally acting cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine was widely used during the Gulf War as a pretreatment against possible chemical warfare attack. Following consistent reports on long-term illness among Gulf War veterans, pyridostigmine was examined for its possible long-term effects. These effects were suggested to be induced by the combination of pyridostigmine administration and stress exposure that allowed this quaternary compound to enter the brain through stress induced changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Recently, pyridostigmine administration was demonstrated to inhibit brain cholinesterase following acute stress in mice. However, the effect was not replicated under similar conditions in guinea pigs. Because of the significant implication of these findings, we tested brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition following the administration of pyridostigmine, or the tertiary carbamate physostigmine, with or without stress in mice. Different experiments were performed to examine the contribution of gender, age (young and adults), stress (type and intensity), or strain (CD-1 and FVB/n) parameters. No inhibition of brain ChE was detected in any of these experiments. At the same time, physostigmine induced the expected decrease in brain ChE in all the experiments. Thus, we could not replicate the findings that suggest pyridostigmine can affect brain cholinesterase following stress.

  9. COMPARISON OF ACUTE NEUROBEHAVIORAL AND CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF N-METHYL CARBAMATES IN RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few studies evaluating direct functional and biochemical consequences of exposure. In the present study of the acute toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamate pesticides, we evaluated the dose-response profiles of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition in brain and erythrocytes (R...

  10. Plasma and whole brain cholinesterase activities in three wild bird species in Mosul, IRAQ: In vitro inhibition by insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Alias, Ashraf S.; Al-Zubaidy, Muna H.I.; Mousa, Yaareb J.; Mohammad, Fouad K.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma and brain cholinesterase activities were determined in three wild bird species to assess their exposure to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides which are used in agriculture and public health. In the present study, we used an electrometric method for measurement of cholinesterase activities in the plasma and whole brain of three indigenous wild birds commonly found in northern Iraq. The birds used were apparently healthy adults of both sexes (8 birds/species, comprising 3–5 from each sex) of quail (Coturnix coturnix), collard dove (Streptopelia decaocto) and rock dove (Columba livia gaddi), which were captured in Mosul, Iraq. The mean respective cholinesterase activities (Δ pH/30 minutes) in the plasma and whole brain of the birds were as follows: quail (0.96 and 0.29), collard dove (0.97and 0.82) and rock dove (1.44 and 1.42). We examined the potential susceptibility of the plasma or whole brain cholinesterases to inhibition by selected insecticides. The technique of in vitro cholinesterase inhibition for 10 minutes by the organophosphate insecticides dichlorvos, malathion and monocrotophos (0.5 and 1.0 µM) and the carbamate insecticide carbaryl (5 and10 µM) in the enzyme reaction mixtures showed significant inhibition of plasma and whole brain cholinesterase activities to various extents. The data further support and add to the reported cholinesterase activities determined electrometrically in wild birds in northern Iraq. The plasma and whole brain cholinesterases of the birds are highly susceptible to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides as determined by the described electrometric method, and the results further suggest the usefulness of the method in biomonitoring wild bird cholinesterases. PMID:22058655

  11. Effect of apolipoprotein E and butyrylcholinesterase genotypes on cognitive response to cholinesterase inhibitor treatment at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C E; Todd, S A; Passmore, A P

    2011-12-01

    Factors that influence response to drug treatment are of increasing importance. We report an analysis of genetic factors affecting response to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in 165 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The presence of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) allele was associated with early and late cognitive response to cholinesterase inhibitor treatment in mild AD (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥21) (P<0.01). In moderate-to-severe AD (MMSE ≤15), presence of the BCHE-K variant was associated with late response to cholinesterase inhibitor treatment (P=0.02). Testing for APOE and BCHE genotypes may be useful in therapeutic decision making.

  12. The relationship between the level of cholinesterase in plasma and the action of suxamethonium in animals

    PubMed Central

    Hobbiger, F.; Peck, A. W.

    1970-01-01

    1. The neuromuscular blocking action of suxamethonium, given by intravenous injection, and the effect upon it of iso-OMPA (tetraisopropyl pyrophosphoramide) in doses which produced marked selective inhibition of cholinesterase in blood were studied in anaesthetized rats and cats, and in mice. 2. In cats experiments were also carried out in which suxamethonium was given by intravenous infusion until an effect which remained constant with time was achieved. From the degree of neuromuscular block (under equilibrium conditions) obtained with different infusion rates the infusion rate for 50% reduction in twitch tension of the indirectly stimulated soleus and gastrocnemius muscles (IR50) was calculated. The effect on it of raising the suxamethonium hydrolysing capacity of blood and of selectively reducing the level of cholinesterase in blood by various doses of iso-OMPA was then investigated. 3. At relevant stages of each experiment cholinesterase activity in blood was determined with butyrylcholine or benzoylcholine and where appropriate with suxamethonium as substrate. 4. The results obtained show that in rats and cats the effectiveness of suxamethonium is unrelated to the level of cholinesterase activity in blood and that raising the suxamethonium hydrolysing capacity in the blood up to 22-fold (in cats) only reduces the IR50 by a factor of 1·6. 5. The enhancement of the effectiveness of suxamethonium in the three species (2- to 3-fold in rats, 2- to 4-fold in mice and 7- to 8-fold in cats under the conditions used for comparison) which follows the administration of iso-OMPA is attributable to inhibition of cholinesterase in the tissues. 6. It is concluded that the results obtained clearly indicate that the species studied do not give information as regards suxamethonium and its metabolism which is applicable to man. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 6 PMID:4322043

  13. Evaluating the protective effects of vitamin C on serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity of male rats exposed to malathion

    PubMed Central

    Taherdehi, Faezeh Ghorbani; Nikravesh, Mohammad Reza; Jalali, Mehdi; Fazel, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malathion is one of organophosphate poisons (OPPs) that inhibit cholinesterase activity and induce oxidative stress in target organs, such as the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Malathion on serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity in male rats and also to assess the protective effects of vitamin C in this regard. Methods This experimental study was performed in the Pharmacology Laboratory of the Pharmacy Faculty and in the Advanced Histology Techniques Laboratory of the Medical Faculty of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) in January 2014. Thirty male wistar rats, weighting 200–250 g, were divided into five groups of six. The different groups were exposed as follows: group 1: Malathion 50 mg/kg; group 2: Vitamin C; group 3: Malathion plus Vitamin C with the specified doses; sham group: normal saline; and control group: no exposure. After six weeks, 3 ml blood samples were taken from the rats, and titrimetric and Ellman methods were used to assess serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16, and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results The activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase were inhibited significantly in the Malathion exposed group compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The administration of Vitamin C alone significantly increased the activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase. The serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase inhibition showed improvement in the group that received both Malathion and Vitamin C. Conclusion Malathion reduced the activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase in exposed animals. It probably has the same intoxication effects on people who are exposed. Improvement of cholinesterase activity by antioxidant effects of Vitamin C suggests that Vitamin C supplementation can be used to decrease side effects of OPP exposure. PMID:27648190

  14. Evaluating the protective effects of vitamin C on serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity of male rats exposed to malathion

    PubMed Central

    Taherdehi, Faezeh Ghorbani; Nikravesh, Mohammad Reza; Jalali, Mehdi; Fazel, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malathion is one of organophosphate poisons (OPPs) that inhibit cholinesterase activity and induce oxidative stress in target organs, such as the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Malathion on serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity in male rats and also to assess the protective effects of vitamin C in this regard. Methods This experimental study was performed in the Pharmacology Laboratory of the Pharmacy Faculty and in the Advanced Histology Techniques Laboratory of the Medical Faculty of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) in January 2014. Thirty male wistar rats, weighting 200–250 g, were divided into five groups of six. The different groups were exposed as follows: group 1: Malathion 50 mg/kg; group 2: Vitamin C; group 3: Malathion plus Vitamin C with the specified doses; sham group: normal saline; and control group: no exposure. After six weeks, 3 ml blood samples were taken from the rats, and titrimetric and Ellman methods were used to assess serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase activity, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16, and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results The activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase were inhibited significantly in the Malathion exposed group compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The administration of Vitamin C alone significantly increased the activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase. The serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase inhibition showed improvement in the group that received both Malathion and Vitamin C. Conclusion Malathion reduced the activities of serum and erythrocyte cholinesterase in exposed animals. It probably has the same intoxication effects on people who are exposed. Improvement of cholinesterase activity by antioxidant effects of Vitamin C suggests that Vitamin C supplementation can be used to decrease side effects of OPP exposure.

  15. Longitudinal Assessment of Blood Cholinesterase Activities over Two Consecutive Years among Latino Non-farmworkers and Pesticide-Exposed Farmworkers in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A; Pope, Carey N.; Chen, Haiying; Summers, Phillip; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study (1) describes patterns of whole blood total cholinesterase, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase activities across the agricultural season, comparing farmworkers and non-farmworkers; and (2) explores differences between farmworkers' and non-farmworkers' likelihood of cholinesterase depression. Methods Blood samples from 210 Latino male farmworkers and 163 Latino workers with no occupational pesticide exposure collected eight times across two agricultural seasons were analyzed. Mean cholinesterase activity levels and depressions ≥15% were compared by month. Results Farmworkers had significantly lower total cholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in July and August and lower acetylcholinesterase activity in August. Farmworkers had significantly greater likelihood of cholinesterase depression for each cholinesterase measure across the agricultural season. Significance A repeated-measures design across two years with a non-exposed control group demonstrated anticholinesterase effects in farmworkers. Current regulations designed to prevent pesticide exposure are not effective. PMID:26247638

  16. Clinical observation and comparison of the effectiveness of several oxime cholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Xue, S Z; Ding, X J; Ding, Y

    1985-01-01

    After passing toxicity and experimental therapeutic tests, four oxime cholinesterase reactivators [PAM (pyridine aldoxime methiodide), PAC (pralidoxime, pyridine aldoxime methylchloride), TMB4 (trimedoxime), and DMO4 (obidoxime, Toxogonin, LüH6)] were compared in clinical trials. All of them proved capable of restoring erythrocyte cholinesterase activity and relieving symptoms and signs of organophosphate insecticide poisoning. Mildly and moderately poisoned patients can be treated by several injections of any one of these drugs alone, but severe cases need the synergistic action of atropine, as well as treatments for two to three consecutive days. Although response to treatment is stronger with TMB4 and DMO4, they are not recommended for routine treatment because of their dangerous adverse side effects.

  17. Clinical observation and comparison of the effectiveness of several oxime cholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Xue, S Z; Ding, X J; Ding, Y

    1985-01-01

    After passing toxicity and experimental therapeutic tests, four oxime cholinesterase reactivators [PAM (pyridine aldoxime methiodide), PAC (pralidoxime, pyridine aldoxime methylchloride), TMB4 (trimedoxime), and DMO4 (obidoxime, Toxogonin, LüH6)] were compared in clinical trials. All of them proved capable of restoring erythrocyte cholinesterase activity and relieving symptoms and signs of organophosphate insecticide poisoning. Mildly and moderately poisoned patients can be treated by several injections of any one of these drugs alone, but severe cases need the synergistic action of atropine, as well as treatments for two to three consecutive days. Although response to treatment is stronger with TMB4 and DMO4, they are not recommended for routine treatment because of their dangerous adverse side effects. PMID:3914075

  18. Structural difference at the active site of dibucaine resistant variant of human plasma cholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Muensch, H; Yoshida, A; Altland, K; Jensen, W; Goedde, H W

    1978-01-01

    Human plasma cholinesterase from five different genotypes -- E1U E1U, E1U E1A, E1A E1A, E1U E1S, E1A E1S, and E1U E1U C5+ -- was purified 8,000 fold from serum by a two-step procedure involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and preparative disc electrophoresis. The esterases were labeled with diisopropyl-1, 3-C14-fluorophosphate (DFP) aminoethylated, and digested by trypsin. The trytic digests were subjected to high voltage electrophoresis, and the radioactive peptides were detected by radioautography. Comparison of the peptides revealed different electrophoretic mobilities of the usual and atypical (dibucaine resistant) plasma cholinesterase peptides. The results are consistent with a structural abnormality of the active center in the variant enzyme. No difference was observed an the esteratic site of the enzyme with C5 component. Images Fig. 1 PMID:677127

  19. Identification of 4-aminoquinoline core for the design of new cholinesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Bian, Yaoyao; Sun, Yuan; Kang, Chen; Yu, Sheng; Fu, Tingming; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using small molecules is still one of the most successful therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previously we reported compound T5369186 with a core of quinolone as a new cholinesterase inhibitor. In the present study, in order to identify new cores for the designing of AChE inhibitors, we screened different derivatives of this core with the aim to identify the best core as the starting point for further optimization. Based on the results, we confirmed that only 4-aminoquinoline (compound 04 and 07) had cholinesterase inhibitory effects. Considering the simple structure and high inhibitory potency against AChE, 4-aminoquinoline provides a good starting core for further designing novel multifunctional AChEIs. PMID:27441112

  20. Effect of methylmercury on acetylcholinestrase and serum cholinesterase activity in monkeys, Macaca fascicularis

    SciTech Connect

    Petruccioli, L.; Turillazzi, P.G. )

    1991-05-01

    The consumption of fish and fish-derived products is the main pathway of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury levels vary widely in fish, depending on age, size, the position of the species in the food chain, and most of all, on pollution levels. MeHg affects the Acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and the serum Cholinesterase activity (BChE). Histoenzymatic studies showed that 100mg Methyoxyethylmercury chloride administered for 6 days to rats caused a reduction of AChE activity in the thalamus and an increase in different parts of the nervous central system. The present study aims at verifying whether the dose permitted by F.A.O. and doses 10 and 100 fold higher affect the Cholinesterase activity in primates, and whether there is a correlation between AChE and BChE.

  1. Characterization of Cholinesterases in Plasma of Three Portuguese Native Bird Species: Application to Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cátia S. A.; Monteiro, Marta S.; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Loureiro, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades the inhibition of plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity has been widely used as a biomarker to diagnose organophosphate and carbamate exposure. Plasma ChE activity is a useful and non-invasive method to monitor bird exposure to anticholinesterase compounds; nonetheless several studies had shown that the ChE form(s) present in avian plasma may vary greatly among species. In order to support further biomonitoring studies and provide reference data for wildlife risk-assessment, plasma cholinesterase of the northern gannet (Morus bassanus), the white stork (Ciconia ciconia) and the grey heron (Ardea cinerea) were characterized using three substrates (acetylthiocholine iodide, propionylthiocholine iodide, and S-butyrylthiocholine iodide) and three ChE inhibitors (eserine sulphate, BW284C51, and iso-OMPA). Additionally, the range of ChE activity that may be considered as basal levels for non-exposed individuals was determined. The results suggest that in the plasma of the three species studied the main cholinesterase form present is butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Plasma BChE activity in non-exposed individuals was 0.48±0.11 SD U/ml, 0.39±0.12 SD U/ml, 0.15±0.04 SD U/ml in the northern gannet, white stork and grey heron, respectively. These results are crucial for the further use of plasma BChE activity in these bird species as a contamination bioindicator of anti-cholinesterase agents in both wetland and marine environments. Our findings also underscore the importance of plasma ChE characterization before its use as a biomarker in biomonitoring studies with birds. PMID:22470503

  2. Serum and Plasma Cholinesterase Activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture (Gyps coprotheres).

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri

    2016-04-28

    Vulture (Accipitridae) poisonings are a concern in South Africa, with hundreds of birds dying annually. Although some of these poisonings are accidental, there has been an increase in the number of intentional baiting of poached rhinoceros (Rhinocerotidae) and elephant (Elephantidae) carcasses to kill vultures that alert officials to poaching sites by circling overhead. The primary chemicals implicated are the organophosphorous and carbamate compounds. Although most poisoning events can be identified by dead vultures surrounding the scavenged carcass, weak birds are occasionally found and brought to rehabilitation centers for treatment. The treating veterinarian needs to make an informed decision on the cause of illness or poisoning prior to treatment. We established the reference interval for serum and plasma cholinesterase activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture ( Gyps coprotheres ) as 591.58-1,528.26 U/L, providing a clinical assay for determining potential exposure to cholinesterase-depressing pesticides. Both manual and automated samplers were used with the butyrylthiocholine method. Species reference intervals for both serum and plasma cholinesterase showed good correlation and manual and automated measurements yielded similar results.

  3. Serum and Plasma Cholinesterase Activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture (Gyps coprotheres).

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri

    2016-04-28

    Vulture (Accipitridae) poisonings are a concern in South Africa, with hundreds of birds dying annually. Although some of these poisonings are accidental, there has been an increase in the number of intentional baiting of poached rhinoceros (Rhinocerotidae) and elephant (Elephantidae) carcasses to kill vultures that alert officials to poaching sites by circling overhead. The primary chemicals implicated are the organophosphorous and carbamate compounds. Although most poisoning events can be identified by dead vultures surrounding the scavenged carcass, weak birds are occasionally found and brought to rehabilitation centers for treatment. The treating veterinarian needs to make an informed decision on the cause of illness or poisoning prior to treatment. We established the reference interval for serum and plasma cholinesterase activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture ( Gyps coprotheres ) as 591.58-1,528.26 U/L, providing a clinical assay for determining potential exposure to cholinesterase-depressing pesticides. Both manual and automated samplers were used with the butyrylthiocholine method. Species reference intervals for both serum and plasma cholinesterase showed good correlation and manual and automated measurements yielded similar results. PMID:26981685

  4. Resistance in cholinesterase activity after an acute and subchronic exposure to azinphos-methyl in the freshwater gastropod Biomphalaria straminea.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Karina; Otero, Sofía; Oliver, Agustina Balazote; Nahabedian, Daniel; Kristoff, Gisela

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorous and carbamates insecticides are ones of the most popular classes of pesticides used in agriculture. Its success relies on their high acute toxicity and rapid environmental degradation. These insecticides inhibit cholinesterase and cause severe effects on aquatic non-target species, particularly in invertebrates. Since the properties of cholinesterases may differ between species, it is necessary to characterize them before their use as biomarkers. Also organophosphorous and carbamates inhibit carboxylesterases and the use of both enzymes for biomonitoring is suggested. Azinphos-methyl is an organophosphorous insecticide used in several parts of the word. In Argentina, it is the most applied insecticide in fruit production in the north Patagonian region. It was detected with the highest frequency in superficial and groundwater of the region. This work aims to evaluate the sensitivity of B. straminea cholinesterases and carboxylesterases to the OP azinphos-methyl including estimations of 48 h NOEC and IC50 of the pesticide and subchronic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations. These will allow us to evaluate the possibility of using cholinesterase and carboxylesterase of B. straminea as sensitive biomarkers. Previously a partial characterization of these enzymes will be performed. As in most invertebrates, acetylthiocholine was the preferred hydrolyzed substrate of B. straminea ChE, followed by propionylthiocholine and being butyrylthiocholine hydrolysis very low. Cholinesterase activity of B. straminea was significantly inhibited by the selective cholinesterases inhibitor (eserine) and by the selective inhibitor of mammalian acethylcholinesterase (BW284c51). In contrast, iso-OMPA, a specific inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase, did not inhibit cholinesterase activity. These results suggest that cholinesterase activity in total soft tissue of B. straminea corresponds to acethylcholinesterase. Carboxylesterases activity was one order of

  5. Chronic Neuropsychological Sequelae of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in the Absence of Structural Brain Damage: Two Cases of Acute Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Tapia, Lola; Leyva, Antonia; Laynez, Francisco; Santed, Fernando Sánchez

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe two cases of carbamate poisoning. Patients AMF and PVM were accidentally poisoned by cholinesterase inhibitors. The medical diagnosis in both cases was overcholinergic syndrome, as demonstrated by exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors. The widespread use of cholinesterase inhibitors, especially as pesticides, produces a great number of human poisoning events annually. The main known neurotoxic effect of these substances is cholinesterase inhibition, which causes cholinergic overstimulation. Once AMF and PVM had recovered from acute intoxication, they were subjected to extensive neuropsychological evaluation 3 and 12 months after the poisoning event. These assessments point to a cognitive deficit in attention, memory, perceptual, and motor domains 3 months after intoxication. One year later these sequelae remained, even though the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans were interpreted as being within normal limits. We present these cases as examples of neuropsychological profiles of long-term sequelae related to acute poisoning by cholinesterase inhibitor pesticides and show the usefulness of neuropsychological assessment in detecting central nervous system dysfunction in the absence of biochemical or structural markers. PMID:15929901

  6. Cholinesterase-inhibiting and genotoxic effects of acute carbofuran intoxication in man: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zeljezic, Davor; Vrdoljak, Ana Lucic; Kopjar, Nevenka; Radic, Bozica; Milkovic Kraus, Sanja

    2008-10-01

    Carbofuran belongs to the group of N-methylcarbamate insecticides used for the control of soil-dwelling and foliar-feeding insects in various crops; its consumption totals approximately 20,000 tonnes per year. Although the neurological effects on human beings have been well documented, little is known on its impact on the genome. A 38-year-old, healthy male worker employed in a carbofuran production facility accidentally inhaled the dust of the active ingredient carbofuran. Thirty minutes later, he experienced weakness, fatigue, perspiration, breathing difficulties, cephalalgia, disorientation, abdominal pain and vomiting. Blood samples were taken to measure cholinesterase activity, and to perform the alkaline comet assay and micronucleus assay combined with pancentromeric probes. Analyses were repeated 72 hr after intoxication and compared with the results obtained from regular monitoring conducted 10 days prior to the accident. Cholinesterase activity showed the highest correlation with the number of apoptotic cells, comet assay tail length, and number of long-tailed nuclei, suggesting that these are the genomic end-points primarily affected by carbofuran intake. Only a weak correlation was detected for the total number of micronuclei, centromere-containing micronuclei and nuclear buds. Since those end-points increased significantly 72 hr after the accident, they could be considered as late biomarkers of the effects of carbofuran intoxication. The results of this report suggest that, in the interests of higher standards in risk assessment and health hazard protection, periodical medical examination of carbamate-exposed populations should include genotoxicity testing in addition to the assessment of cholinesterase activity.

  7. Identification of the structural mutation responsible for the dibucaine-resistant (atypical) variant form of human serum cholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, M C; Nogueira, C P; Bartels, C F; Lightstone, H; Hajra, A; Van der Spek, A F; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1989-01-01

    A point mutation in the gene for human serum cholinesterase was identified that changes Asp-70 to Gly in the atypical form of serum cholinesterase. The mutation in nucleotide 209, which changes codon 70 from GAT to GGT, was found by sequencing a genomic clone and sequencing selected regions of DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The entire coding sequences for usual and atypical cholinesterases were compared, and no other consistent base differences were found. A polymorphic site near the C terminus of the coded region was detected, but neither allele at this locus segregated consistently with the atypical trait. The nucleotide-209 mutation was detected in all five atypical cholinesterase families examined. There was complete concordance between this mutation and serum cholinesterase phenotypes for all 14 heterozygous and 6 homozygous atypical subjects tested. The mutation causes the loss of a Sau3A1 restriction site; the resulting DNA fragment length polymorphism was verified by electrophoresis of 32P-labeled DNA restriction fragments from usual and atypical subjects. Dot-blot hybridization analysis with a 19-mer allele-specific probe to the DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction distinguished between the usual and atypical genotypes. We conclude that the Asp-70----Gly mutation (acidic to neutral amino acid substitution) accounts for reduced affinity of atypical cholinesterase for choline esters and that Asp-70 must be an important component of the anionic site. Heterogeneity in atypical alleles may exist, but the Asp-70 point mutation may represent an appreciable portion of the atypical gene pool. Images PMID:2915989

  8. Cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation following intracerebral administration of paraoxon in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Liu, J.; Karanth, S.; Gao, Y.; Brimijoin, S.; Pope, C.

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the inhibition of striatal cholinesterase activity following intracerebral administration of paraoxon assaying activity either in tissue homogenates ex vivo or by substrate hydrolysis in situ. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or paraoxon in aCSF was infused unilaterally (0.5 {mu}l/min for 2 h) and ipsilateral and contralateral striata were harvested for ChE assay ex vivo. High paraoxon concentrations were needed to inhibit ipsilateral striatal cholinesterase activity (no inhibition at < 0.1 mM; 27% at 0.1 mM; 79% at 1 mM paraoxon). With 3 mM paraoxon infusion, substantial ChE inhibition was also noted in contralateral striatum. ChE histochemistry generally confirmed these concentration- and side-dependent effects. Microdialysates collected for up to 4 h after paraoxon infusion inhibited ChE activity when added to striatal homogenate, suggesting prolonged efflux of paraoxon. Since paraoxon efflux could complicate acetylcholine analysis, we evaluated the effects of paraoxon (0, 0.03, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 {mu}M, 1.5 {mu}l/min for 45 min) administered by reverse dialysis through a microdialysis probe. ChE activity was then monitored in situ by perfusing the colorimetric substrate acetylthiocholine through the same probe and measuring product (thiocholine) in dialysates. Concentration-dependent inhibition was noted but reached a plateau of about 70% at 1 {mu}M and higher concentrations. Striatal acetylcholine was below the detection limit at all times with 0.1 {mu}M paraoxon but was transiently elevated (0.5-1.5 h) with 10 {mu}M paraoxon. In vivo paraoxon (0.4 mg/kg, sc) in adult rats elicited about 90% striatal ChE inhibition measured ex vivo, but only about 10% inhibition measured in situ. Histochemical analyses revealed intense AChE and glial fibrillary acidic protein staining near the cannula track, suggesting proliferation of inflammatory cells/glia. The findings suggest that ex vivo and in situ cholinesterase assays can provide very different views

  9. Cholinesterase inhibition in meadow voles Microtus pennsylvanicus following field applications of Orthene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Brain acetylcholinesterase activity in field-caught meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) was depressed after a field-spray of Orthene (acephate: acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester) by as much as 32% in 1982 and 38% in 1983. Short-term recovery was demonstrated and occurred in a time-dependent fashion in 1982. Plasma cholinesterase levels were move variable but also were depressed. Residues were detected in vegetation samples and in the gastrointestinal tracts of exposed voles. Residues in vegetation were diluted or absent 7 to 8 d following the treatment.

  10. Cholinesterase inhibition of birds inhabiting wheat fields treated with methyl parathion and toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niethammer, K.R.; Baskett, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and dickcissels (Spiza americana) inhabiting wheat fields treated with 0.67 kg AI/ha methyl parathion and 1.35 kg AI/ha toxaphene showed brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition compared with birds inhabiting untreated fields. Maximum inhibition occurred about five days after insecticide application. ChE activities again approached normal 10 days after treatment. ChE inhibition for dickcissels and red-winged blackbirds differed significantly (p<0.05); maximum inhibition for the former species was 74%, and for the latter, 40%. These differences could not be explained by the diets of the two species, as they were similar.

  11. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  12. RAPID ESTIMATION OF SERUM CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY USING THE ASTRUP MICRO EQUIPMENT.

    PubMed

    JOHNSON, J K; WHITEHEAD, T P

    1965-07-01

    A rapid micro technique for the estimation of serum cholinesterase is described. Acetylcholine bromide is incubated with serum within the capillary of the Astrup electrode. The enzyme hydrolyses the substrate with the liberation of acetic acid. This causes a fall of pH which is seen on the galvanometer of the instrument and the rate of this fall is shown to be proportional to enzyme concentration. The method has been calibrated in international units and compared with a more conventional technique. The values found in homozygotes with normal dibucaine-resistant enzymes and in heterozygotes are reported, together with their dibucaine and fluoride numbers. PMID:14318694

  13. Amperometric biosensors based on nafion coated screen-printed electrodes for the determination of cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gogol, E V; Evtugyn, G A; Marty, J L; Budnikov, H C; Winter, V G

    2000-11-01

    Screen-printed electrodes coated with the nafion layer have been investigated for cholinesterase biosensor design. The butyrylcholinesterase (ChE) from horse serum was immobilised onto the nafion layer by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde vapours. The biosensors obtained showed better long-term stability and lower working potential in comparison to those obtained with no nafion coating. The sensitivity of a biosensor toward organophosphate pesticides is not affected by the nafion coating. The detection limits were found to be 3.5x10(-7) M for trichlorfon and 1.5x10(-7) M for coumaphos. PMID:18968123

  14. Sesquiterpene Lactones from Cynara cornigera: Acetyl Cholinesterase Inhibition and In Silico Ligand Docking.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Ibrahim, Abeer Y; Mohamed, Tarik A; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; El Halawany, Ali M; Abdel-Azim, Nahla S; Alsaid, Mansour S; Paré, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Wild artichoke (Cynara cornigera), a thistle-like perennial belonging to the Asteraceae family, is native to the Mediterranean region, northwestern Africa, and the Canary Islands. While the pleasant, albeit bitter, taste of the leaves and flowers is attributed to the sesquiterpene lactones cynaropicrin and cynarin, a comprehensive phytochemical investigation still needs to be reported. In this study seven sesquiterpene lactones were isolated from an aqueous methanol plant extract, including a new halogenated metabolite (1), the naturally isolated compound sibthorpine (2), and five metabolites isolated for the first time from C. cornigera. Structures were established by spectroscopic methods, including HREIMS, (1 )H, (13 )C, DEPT, (1 )H-(1 )H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC-NMR experiments as well as by X-ray analysis. The isolated bioactive nutrients were analyzed for their antioxidant and metal chelating activity. Compound 1 exhibited a potent metal chelating activity as well as a high antioxidant capacity. Moreover, select compounds were effective as acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors presenting the possibility for such compounds to be examined for anti-neurodegenerative activity. A computational pharmacophore elucidation and docking study was performed to estimate the pharmacophoric features and binding conformation of isolated compounds in the acetyl cholinesterase active site. PMID:26441064

  15. Multitarget-directed tricyclic pyridazinones as G protein-coupled receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pau, Amedeo; Catto, Marco; Pinna, Giovanni; Frau, Simona; Murineddu, Gabriele; Asproni, Battistina; Curzu, Maria M; Pisani, Leonardo; Leonetti, Francesco; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José; Pinna, Gérard A; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    By following a multitarget ligand design approach, a library of 47 compounds was prepared, and they were tested as binders of selected G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and inhibitors of acetyl and/or butyryl cholinesterase. The newly designed ligands feature pyridazinone-based tricyclic scaffolds connected through alkyl chains of variable length to proper amine moieties (e.g., substituted piperazines or piperidines) for GPCR and cholinesterase (ChE) molecular recognition. The compounds were tested at three different GPCRs, namely serotoninergic 5-HT1A, adrenergic α1A, and dopaminergic D2 receptors. Our main goal was the discovery of compounds that exhibit, in addition to ChE inhibition, antagonist activity at 5-HT1A because of its involvement in neuronal deficits typical of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ligands with nanomolar affinity for the tested GPCRs were discovered, but most of them behaved as dual antagonists of α1A and 5-HT1A receptors. Nevertheless, several compounds displaying this GPCR affinity profile also showed moderate to good inhibition of AChE and BChE, thus deserving further investigations to exploit the therapeutic potential of such unusual biological profiles.

  16. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel rhodanine derivatives as potential cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2016-10-01

    Based on a broad spectrum of biological activities of rhodanines, we synthesized aromatic amides and esters of 2-(4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl)acetic acid (rhodanine-3-acetic acid) via carbodiimide- or PCl3-mediated coupling. Both esters and amides were investigated for their in vitro inhibitory potency and selectivity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from equine serum using Ellman's spectrophotometric method. The derivatives exhibited mostly a moderate activity against both cholinesterases. IC50 values for AChE were in a closer concentration range of 24.05-86.85μM when compared to BChE inhibition (7.92-227.19μM). The esters caused the more efficient inhibition of AChE than amides and parent acid. The esterification and amidation of the rhodanine-3-acetic acid increased inhibition of BChE, even up to 26 times. Derivatives of 4-nitroaniline/phenol showed the activity superior to other substituents (H, Cl, CH3, OCH3, CF3). Rhodanines produced a balanced inhibition of both cholinesterases. Seven derivatives produced the more potent inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, a clinically used drug; additional three compounds were comparable. Two amides exceeded inhibitory potency of rivastigmine towards BChE. Importantly, this is the first evidence that rhodanine-based compounds are able to inhibit BChE.

  17. Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibition and molecular modelling studies of coumarin linked thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer; Zaib, Sumera; Ashraf, Saba; Iftikhar, Javeria; Muddassar, Muhammad; Zhang, Kam Y J; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is among the most widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Cholinesterases (ChEs) play an indispensable role in the control of cholinergic transmission and thus the acetylcholine level in the brain is enhanced by inhibition of ChEs. Coumarin linked thiourea derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated biologically in order to determine their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterases (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterases (BChE). The synthesized derivatives of coumarin linked thiourea compounds showed potential inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE. Among all the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(3-chlorophenyl)thiourea (2e) was the most potent inhibitor against AChE with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.01μM, while 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)thiourea (2b) showed the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.06±0.02μM against BChE. Molecular docking simulations were performed using the homology models of both cholinesterases in order to explore the probable binding modes of inhibitors. Results showed that the novel synthesized coumarin linked thiourea derivatives are potential candidates to develop for potent and efficacious acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors.

  18. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  19. The structure-function relationships in Drosophila neurotactin show that cholinesterasic domains may have adhesive properties.

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, I; Barthalay, Y; Piovant, M; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R

    1996-01-01

    Neurotactin (Nrt), a Drosophila transmembrane glycoprotein which is expressed in neuronal and epithelial tissues during embryonic and larval stages, exhibits heterophilic adhesive properties. The extracellular domain is composed of a catalytically inactive cholinesterase-like domain. A three-dimensional model deduced from the crystal structure of Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been constructed for Nrt and suggests that its extracellular domain is composed of two sub-domains organized around a gorge: an N-terminal region, whose three-dimensional structure is almost identical to that of Torpedo AChE, and a less conserved C-terminal region. By using truncated Nrt molecules and a homotypic cell aggregation assay which involves a soluble ligand activity, it has been possible to show that the adhesive function is localized in the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain comprised between His347 and His482. The C-terminal region of the protein can be removed without impairing Nrt adhesive properties, suggesting that the two sub-domains are structurally independent. Chimeric molecules in which the Nrt cholinesterase-like domain has been replaced by homologous domains from Drosophila AChE, Torpedo AChE or Drosophila glutactin (Glt), share similar adhesive properties. These properties may require the presence of Nrt cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains since authentic Drosophila AChE does not behave as an adhesive molecule when transfected in S2 cells. Images PMID:8890157

  20. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel rhodanine derivatives as potential cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2016-10-01

    Based on a broad spectrum of biological activities of rhodanines, we synthesized aromatic amides and esters of 2-(4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl)acetic acid (rhodanine-3-acetic acid) via carbodiimide- or PCl3-mediated coupling. Both esters and amides were investigated for their in vitro inhibitory potency and selectivity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from equine serum using Ellman's spectrophotometric method. The derivatives exhibited mostly a moderate activity against both cholinesterases. IC50 values for AChE were in a closer concentration range of 24.05-86.85μM when compared to BChE inhibition (7.92-227.19μM). The esters caused the more efficient inhibition of AChE than amides and parent acid. The esterification and amidation of the rhodanine-3-acetic acid increased inhibition of BChE, even up to 26 times. Derivatives of 4-nitroaniline/phenol showed the activity superior to other substituents (H, Cl, CH3, OCH3, CF3). Rhodanines produced a balanced inhibition of both cholinesterases. Seven derivatives produced the more potent inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, a clinically used drug; additional three compounds were comparable. Two amides exceeded inhibitory potency of rivastigmine towards BChE. Importantly, this is the first evidence that rhodanine-based compounds are able to inhibit BChE. PMID:27428597

  1. Hematological, protein electrophoresis and cholinesterase values of free-living nestling peregrine falcons in Spain.

    PubMed

    Lanzarot, M P; Montesinos, A; San Andrés, M I; Rodríguez, C; Barahona, M V

    2001-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis, hematological and cholinesterase values were determined in 32 nestling free-living peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) (15- to 27-days-old) in order to establish normal reference values for this population. The following values (mean +/- SD) were observed: prealbumin 0.31 +/- 0.04 g/dl, albumin 1.25 +/- 0.06 g/dl, alpha1 and alpha2-globulin 0.23 +/- 0.02 and 0.16 +/- 0.02 g/dl respectively, beta-globulin 1.02 +/- 0.05 g/dl, gamma-globulin 0.060 +/- 0.08 g/dl, total protein 3.79 +/- 0.18 g/dl, 21.26 +/- 1.30 white blood cells/microl (1 x 10(3)), 2.17 +/- 0.07 red blood cells/microl (1 x 10(6)), packed cell volume 37.58 +/- 0.82%, hemoglobin 20.96 +/- 0.29 g/dl, heterophils 61.14 +/- 2.50% and cholinesterase 1,184 +/- 75 IU/L. There were no difference in any of these parameters among males and females. The hematological values obtained could be considered as representative values in free-living nestling peregrine falcons.

  2. Arylesterase Phenotype-Specific Positive Association Between Arylesterase Activity and Cholinesterase Specific Activity in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yutaka; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cholinesterase (ChE) specific activity is the ratio of ChE activity to ChE mass and, as a biomarker of exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, has a potential advantage over simple ChE activity. Objective: To examine the association of several potential correlates (serum arylesterase/paraoxonase activity, serum albumin, sex, age, month of blood collection, and smoking) with plasma ChE specific activity. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 cancer-free controls from a nested case-control study, accounting for potential confounding. Results: Arylesterase activity had an independent, statistically significant positive association with ChE specific activity, and its magnitude was the greatest for the arylesterase phenotype corresponding to the QQ PON1192 genotype followed by phenotypes corresponding to QR and RR genotypes. Serum albumin was positively associated with ChE specific activity. Conclusions: Plasma arylesterase activity was positively associated with plasma ChE specific activity. This observation is consistent with protection conferred by a metabolic phenotype resulting in reduced internal dose. PMID:24473115

  3. Variation of Cholinesterase-Based Biosensor Sensitivity to Inhibition by Organophosphate Due To Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Koch, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    A cholinesterase based biosensor was constructed in order to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on exposed AChE. Although the primary objective of the experiment was to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of the biosensor, no changes in cholinesterase activity were observed. Current provided by oxidation of thiocholine previously created from acetylthiocholine by enzyme catalyzed reaction was in a range 395–455 nA. No significant influence of radiation on AChE activity was found, despite the current variation. However, a surprising phenomenon was observed when a model organophosphate paraoxon was assayed. Irradiated biosensors seem to be more susceptible to the inhibitory effects of paraoxon. Control biosensors provided a 94 ± 5 nA current after exposure to 1 ppm paraoxon. The biosensors irradiated by a 5 kGy radiation dose and exposed to paraoxon provided a current of 49 ± 6 nA. Irradiation by doses ranging from 5 mGy to 100 kGy were investigated and the mentioned effect was confirmed at doses above 50 Gy. After the first promising experiments, biosensors irradiated by 5 kGy were used for calibration on paraoxon and compared with the control biosensors. Limits of detection 2.5 and 3.8 ppb were achieved for irradiated and non-irradiated biosensors respectively. The overall impact of this effect is discussed. PMID:22346715

  4. In-silico identification of the binding mode of synthesized adamantyl derivatives inside cholinesterase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aboudi, Amal; Al-Qawasmeh, Raed A; Shahwan, Alaa; Mahmood, Uzma; Khalid, Asaad; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the binding mode of synthesized adamantly derivatives inside of cholinesterase enzymes using molecular docking simulations. Methods: A series of hybrid compounds containing adamantane and hydrazide moieties was designed and synthesized. Their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and (butyrylcholinesterase) BChE were assessed in vitro. The binding mode of the compounds inside cholinesterase enzymes was investigated using Surflex-Dock package of Sybyl7.3 software. Results: A total of 26 adamantyl derivatives were synthesized. Among them, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid hydrazide had an almost equal inhibitory activity towards both enzymes, whereas 10 other compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against BChE. The molecular docking studies demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions between the compounds and their surrounding residues in the active site played predominant roles, while hydrophilic interactions were also found. When the compounds were docked inside each enzyme, they exhibited stronger interactions with BChE over AChE, possibly due to the larger active site of BChE. The binding affinities of the compounds for BChE and AChE estimated were in agreement with the experimental data. Conclusion: The new adamantly derivatives selectively inhibit BChE with respect to AChE, thus making them good candidates for testing the hypothesis that BChE inhibitors would be more efficient and better tolerated than AChE inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25937631

  5. Chemical and molecular aspects on interactions of galanthamine and its derivatives with cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Gulcan, Hayrettin O; Orhan, Ilkay E; Sener, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Dual action of galanthamine as potent cholinesterase inhibitor and nicotinic modulator has attracted a great attention to be used in the treatment of AD. Consequently, galanthamine, a natural alkaloid isolated from a Galanthus species (snowdrop, Amaryllidaceae), has become an attractive model compound for synthesis of its novel derivatives to discover new drug candidates. Numerous studies have been done to elucidate interactions between galanthamine and its different derivatives and the enzymes; acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) using in vitro and in silico experimental models. The in vitro studies revealed that galanthamine inhibits AChE in strong, competitive, long-acting, and reversible manner as well as BChE, although its selectivity towards AChE is much higher than BChE. The in silico studies carried out by employing molecular docking experiments as well as molecular dynamics simulations pointed out to existence of strong interactions of galanthamine with the active gorge of AChE, mostly of Torpedo californica (the Pasific electric ray) origin. In this review, we evaluate the mainstays of cholinesterase inhibitory action of galanthamine and its various derivatives from the point of view of chemical and molecular aspects. PMID:25483718

  6. Chemical and molecular aspects on interactions of galanthamine and its derivatives with cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Gulcan, Hayrettin O; Orhan, Ilkay E; Sener, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Dual action of galanthamine as potent cholinesterase inhibitor and nicotinic modulator has attracted a great attention to be used in the treatment of AD. Consequently, galanthamine, a natural alkaloid isolated from a Galanthus species (snowdrop, Amaryllidaceae), has become an attractive model compound for synthesis of its novel derivatives to discover new drug candidates. Numerous studies have been done to elucidate interactions between galanthamine and its different derivatives and the enzymes; acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) using in vitro and in silico experimental models. The in vitro studies revealed that galanthamine inhibits AChE in strong, competitive, long-acting, and reversible manner as well as BChE, although its selectivity towards AChE is much higher than BChE. The in silico studies carried out by employing molecular docking experiments as well as molecular dynamics simulations pointed out to existence of strong interactions of galanthamine with the active gorge of AChE, mostly of Torpedo californica (the Pasific electric ray) origin. In this review, we evaluate the mainstays of cholinesterase inhibitory action of galanthamine and its various derivatives from the point of view of chemical and molecular aspects.

  7. Identification of a frameshift mutation responsible for the silent phenotype of human serum cholinesterase, Gly 117 (GGT----GGAG).

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, C P; McGuire, M C; Graeser, C; Bartels, C F; Arpagaus, M; Van der Spek, A F; Lightstone, H; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1990-01-01

    A frameshift mutation that causes a silent phenotype for human serum cholinesterase was identified in the DNA of seven individuals of two unrelated families. The mutation, identified using the polymerase chain reaction, causes a shift in the reading frame from Gly 117, where GGT (Gly)----GGAG (Gly+ 1 base) to a new stop codon created at position 129. This alteration is upstream of the active site (Ser 198), and, if any protein were made, it would represent only 22% of the mature enzyme found in normal serum. Results of analysis of the enzymatic activities in serum agreed with the genotypes inferred from the nucleotide sequence. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis using alpha-naphthyl acetate to detect enzymatic activity showed an absence of cross-reactive material, as expected. One additional individual with a silent phenotype did not show the same frameshift mutation. This was not unexpected, since there must be considerable molecular heterogeneity involved in causes for the silent cholinesterase phenotype. This is the first report of a molecular mechanism underlying the silent phenotype for serum cholinesterase. The analytical approach used was similar to the one we recently employed to identify the mutation that causes the atypical cholinesterase variant. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2339692

  8. Isolation and characterization of full-length cDNA clones coding for cholinesterase from fetal human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Prody, C.A.; Zevin-Sonkin, D.; Gnatt, A.; Goldberg, O.; Soreq, H.

    1987-06-01

    To study the primary structure and regulation of human cholinesterases, oligodeoxynucleotide probes were prepared according to a consensus peptide sequence present in the active site of both human serum pseudocholinesterase and Torpedo electric organ true acetylcholinesterase. Using these probes, the authors isolated several cDNA clones from lambdagt10 libraries of fetal brain and liver origins. These include 2.4-kilobase cDNA clones that code for a polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide and the N-terminal, active site, and C-terminal peptides of human BtChoEase, suggesting that they code either for BtChoEase itself or for a very similar but distinct fetal form of cholinesterase. In RNA blots of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from the cholinesterase-producing fetal brain and liver, these cDNAs hybridized with a single 2.5-kilobase band. Blot hybridization to human genomic DNA revealed that these fetal BtChoEase cDNA clones hybridize with DNA fragments of the total length of 17.5 kilobases, and signal intensities indicated that these sequences are not present in many copies. Both the cDNA-encoded protein and its nucleotide sequence display striking homology to parallel sequences published for Torpedo AcChoEase. These finding demonstrate extensive homologies between the fetal BtChoEase encoded by these clones and other cholinesterases of various forms and species.

  9. CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND HYPOTHERMIA FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO BINARY MIXTURES OF ANTICHOLINESTERASE AGENTS: LACK OF EVIDENCE FOR CAUSE-AND-EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-additivity has been the default assumption in risk assessments of pesticides with a common mechanism of action but it has been suspected that there could be non-additive effects. Inhibition of plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity and hypothermia were used as benchmarks of e...

  10. TIME COURSE OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN ADULT RATS TREATED ACUTELY WITH CARBARYL CARBOFURAN, FORMETANATE, METHOMYL, METHIOCARB, OXAMYL ON PROPOXUR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To compare the toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamates, time course profiles for brain and red blood cell (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were established for each. Adult, male, Long Evans rats (n=4-5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (30 mg/kg in corn oil); ...

  11. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TISSUE LEVELS OF CARBARYL, A PROTOTYPICAL CARBAMATE PESTICIDE, AND CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to link pharmacokinetics with biochemical and physiological endpoints, the relationships between cholinesterase (ChE) activity and tissue levels of a prototypical N-methyl carbamate pesticide were examined. In a dose-response study, carbaryl (0, 3, 7.5, 15, 3...

  12. INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE AND THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS PRODUCED BY CARBARYL IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response often used to detect central nervous system (CNS) changes following expos...

  13. Cholinesterase - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... to chemicals called organophosphates, which are used in pesticides. This test can help determine your risk of ... jaundice Poisoning from organophosphates (chemicals found in some pesticides) Inflammation that accompanies some diseases Smaller decreases may ...

  14. Cholinesterases inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Harpagophytum procumbens from in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Milen I; Alipieva, Kalina; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2012-02-01

    A previous report showed that extracts of cell suspension and transformed root cultures of Harpagophytum procumbens (commonly known as Devil's claw), an African plant with high medicinal value, exhibit strong antiinflammatory characteristics. The present work tests the ability of extracts, phenylethanoid-containing fractions and the major phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the Devil's claw cultures, to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, and the antioxidant activity in iron-related systems (e.g. ferric-reducing antioxidant power and ferrous ion-chelating capacity). The results indicated that the phenylethanoid fractions may be attractive for various commercial purposes since they displayed significant cholinesterase inhibitory activity (even higher than that of pure galanthamine in the case of butyrylcholinesterase inhibition assay). Crude methanolic extracts from cell and hairy root cultures of Devil's claw exhibited strong ferrous ion-chelating capacity (1.5-2 times higher than pure butylated hydroxyanisole, used as positive standard). PMID:21721061

  15. Diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning in birds: Effects of environmental temperature and underfeeding on cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity has been used extensively to monitor exposure to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides in wild birds. A series of factorial experiments was conducted to assess the extent to which noncontaminant-related environmental conditions might affect brain ChE activity and thereby confound the diagnosis of OP and CB intoxication. Underfeeding (restricting intake to 50% of control for 21 d or fasting for 1-3 d) or exposure to elevated temperature (36 + 1?C for 1 d) caused only slight reductions (10-17%) in brain AChE activity in adult male Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). This degree of 'reduction' in brain AChE activity is considerably less than the 50% 'inhibition' criterion employed in the diagnosis of insecticide-induced mortality, but nevertheless approaches the 20% 'inhibition' level used as a conservative estimate of sublethal exposure to a known insecticide application.

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E; Segerson, Nicholas A; Kannan, Latha; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  17. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets, and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbmate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increase with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night -herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas, and California also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  18. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  19. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  20. Action of the herbicide butachlor on cholinesterases in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Prasad, N S; Mohan, P M

    1996-11-01

    Butachlor action on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activates in central nervous tissue of the snail Pila globosa was assayed following the method of ELLMAN et al1, in vitro by adding butachlor directly (10-100 mu moles), to tissue homogenates and in in vivo by exposing the snails to sub-lethal concentration (26.6 ppm) and taking out the tissue for experimentation at different intervals (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h) of exposure. The enzyme activities decreased in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and up to 12-24 h in vivo after which they showed recovery towards the control. The inhibition of cholinesterases by butachlor in vitro indicates a direct action of the herbicide on these enzymes. Presumably butachlor exercises its neurotoxic effects through cholinergic impairment in a way similar to that of organophosphates and carbamates.

  1. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Ohlendorf, H M

    1989-07-01

    inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  2. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B

    2014-01-01

    Though the symptoms of Alzheimer disease go on for years, the phase 3 trials of the cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), the current mainstay of symptomatic pharmacotherapy for this condition, were typically of only 3- to 6-months’ duration. We have limited data on long-term (that is, a year or more) therapy with these agents. In this review, we explore the available information on the biological and clinical effects of long-term ChEI therapy, what happens when these agents are discontinued, and examine what others have recommended. An individualized approach to deciding on whether to carry on with a ChEI should be taken. If continued, treatment goals should be clarified and patients monitored over time, for both drug-related benefits and adverse effects. PMID:25702360

  3. Brain cholinesterase activities of birds from forests sprayed with trichlorfon (Dylox) and carbaryl (Sevin-4-oil)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; DeWeese, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in birds from forests sprayed with Dylox2 at 1.13 kg/hectare (1 lb/acre ? active ingredient [a.i.]) or Sevin-4-oil2 at 1.13 kg/hectare (1 lb/acre ? a.i.) for up to 5 days postspray. Of ten bird species evaluated from the Dylox spray area, four species represented by six individuals had values which were depressed more than 2 standard deviations below the mean. Three of these activities (two species) were about 20% less than the mean. Of 12 species evaluated from the Sevin-4-oil spraying, three individuals representing three species had depressed values. One value was depressed greater than 20% below the mean. Half of the depressed activities were in canopy-dwelling birds collected on the day of spray.

  4. Temperature: a prolonged confounding factor on cholinesterase activity in the tropical reef fish Acanthochromis polyacanthus.

    PubMed

    Botté, Emmanuelle S; Smith-Keune, Carolyn; Jerry, Dean R

    2013-09-15

    Cholinesterase activity usually decreases in fish exposed to anticholinesterase compounds such as organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Here we show that tropical reef fish Acanthochromis polyacanthus (or spiny damsel) also exhibits a decrease in ChE activity when exposed to elevated temperature from 28°C to 32°C or 34°C after 4 days. We further demonstrate that the decline persists even after 7 days of recovery at control temperature. This is the first report of a drop in ChE activity in fish as temperature increases. Our results strongly suggest the need for long-term monitoring of water temperature in the field prior to sampling A. polyacanthus for toxicology studies, as temperature is a prolonged and confounding factor for ChE activity in this species.

  5. Effects of repeated exposure of diazinon on cholinesterase activity and growth in snakehead fish (Channa striata).

    PubMed

    Cong, Nguyen Van; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The organophosphate insecticide diazinon is widely used in the Mekong river delta and often applied several times per rice crop. In the present study, juvenile snakehead fish Channa striata, which is a commercially important inhabitant of rice fields, were exposed twice to 4-day pulses of 0.016, 0.079 or 0.35mg/L of diazinon, separated by a 2 week interval to imitate the exposure conditions in the field. After the 4-day exposures to these environmentally realistic concentrations, the fish were moved to clean water for recovery. During this experiment, which lasted a total of 2 months, the individual growth rates and brain cholinesterase levels were measured. We show not only that diazinon caused long term inhibition of brain ChE activity, which was still significantly depressed at the termination of the experiment, but also that the highest of these realistic concentrations caused a significant 30% growth inhibition.

  6. Cholinesterase inhibitor soman increases inositol trisphosphate in rat brain. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, P.L.

    1990-12-31

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitor soman on the amount of inositol trisphosphate in the neocortex, striatum, cerebellum, and medulla-pons regions of rat brain in vivo. The studies indicate that treatment with soman increase inositol trisphosphate in the neocortex and striatum, but not in the cerebellum or medulla-pons region. In the neocortex the most pronounced increases were observed in animals with severe poisoning symptoms; however, inositol trisphophate was also found to be elevated in animals with only mild poisoning symptoms. A variety of evidence suggests that the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol results in the formation of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol, both of which function as intracellular signal messengers, and that this mechanism represents a major signal transduction system through which extracellular signals can influence intracellular events.

  7. Role of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Managing Behavioral Problems in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masterman, Donna L.

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive cognitive and functional decline and the emergence of behavioral disturbances. Behavioral symptoms, in particular, cause great distress to caregivers, creating an emotional and financial burden that often prompts the caregiver to place the patient in a nursing facility. The clinical deterioration in Alzheimer's disease is, in part, a result of deficits involving several neurochemical pathways. The cholinergic system, which is the most consistently and dramatically affected neurotransmitter system in Alzheimer's disease, has been strongly implicated in the emergence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. This article reviews evidence suggesting that, in addition to effects on cognition and function, the cholinesterase inhibitors benefit the behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment strategies for the management of behavioral symptoms are discussed. PMID:15361927

  8. Actions and interactions of cholinolytics and cholinesterase reactivators in the treatment of acute organophosphorus toxicity.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, S; Ghosh, A K; Chowdhri, B L; Asthana, S N; Batra, B S

    1991-01-01

    Different drug combinations consisting of cholinolytic and a cholinesterase (ChE) reactivator provide greater therapeutic efficacy in acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in mice than when used alone. Maximum protection, as determined by a shift of the LD50 for the two OP agents, was observed with the cholinolytic benactyzine. A protection index (P.I.) of 42 was obtained when benactyzine was given along with obidoxime in diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) intoxication. With the more toxic OP agent soman (o-pinacolylmethylphosphonofluoridate), the same cholinolytic only offered a maximum P.I. of 3.2 when administered with HS-6, another bispyridinium ChE reactivator. This beneficial effect of benactyzine is possibly due to its greater antimuscarinic effect in the central nervous system than atropine or dexetimide. PMID:1935707

  9. Effects of repeated exposure of diazinon on cholinesterase activity and growth in snakehead fish (Channa striata).

    PubMed

    Cong, Nguyen Van; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The organophosphate insecticide diazinon is widely used in the Mekong river delta and often applied several times per rice crop. In the present study, juvenile snakehead fish Channa striata, which is a commercially important inhabitant of rice fields, were exposed twice to 4-day pulses of 0.016, 0.079 or 0.35mg/L of diazinon, separated by a 2 week interval to imitate the exposure conditions in the field. After the 4-day exposures to these environmentally realistic concentrations, the fish were moved to clean water for recovery. During this experiment, which lasted a total of 2 months, the individual growth rates and brain cholinesterase levels were measured. We show not only that diazinon caused long term inhibition of brain ChE activity, which was still significantly depressed at the termination of the experiment, but also that the highest of these realistic concentrations caused a significant 30% growth inhibition. PMID:19054558

  10. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, Patricia; Boisvert, Susanne; Compton, Jaimee; Millard, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O?. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  11. Secondary metabolites of Seseli rigidum: Chemical composition plus antioxidant, antimicrobial and cholinesterase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Stankov-Jovanović, V P; Ilić, M D; Mitić, V D; Mihajilov-Krstev, T M; Simonović, S R; Nikolić Mandić, S D; Tabet, J C; Cole, R B

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of different polarity obtained from various plant parts (root, leaf, flower and fruit) of Seseli rigidum were studied by different antioxidant assays: DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, by total reducing power method as well as via total content of flavonoids and polyphenols. Essential oils of all plant parts showed weak antioxidant characteristics. The inhibitory concentration range of the tested extracts, against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger was 0.01-1.50 mg/mL and of a microbicidal 0.02-3.00 mg/mL. In the interaction with cholinesterase, all essential oils proved effective as inhibitors. The highest percentage of inhibition versus human and horse cholinesterase was shown by root essential oil (38.20% and 48.30%, respectively) among oils, and root hexane extract (40.56% and 50.65% respectively). Essential oils and volatile components of all plant parts were identified by GC, GC-MS and headspace/GC-MS. Statistical analysis of the ensemble of results showed that the root essential oil composition differed significantly from essential oils of other parts of the plant. Taking into account all of the studied activities, the root hexane extract showed the best overall properties. By means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, the 30 most abundant constituents were identified in extracts of different polarity. The presence of identified constituents was linked to observed specific biological activities, thus designating compounds potentially responsible for each exhibited activity. PMID:25863020

  12. Symptoms and cholinesterase activity among rural residents living near cotton fields in Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, M; Rivas, F; Moon, J D; Checkoway, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether symptoms resulted from pesticide spray drift on residentially exposed populations in rural Nicaragua. METHODS: 100 residents, each 10 years of age or older, were randomly selected from a Nicaraguan community surrounded by actively sprayed cotton fields (the exposed community) and from a socioeconomically similar community far from agricultural spraying (the control community). Subjects working with pesticides were excluded, and the study was conducted at the end of the 1990 cotton spraying season (August-December). Demographic information, exposure questions, and prevalence of 11 acute symptoms and 17 chronic symptoms were gathered from a structured interview. Finger stick erythrocyte cholinesterase (AChE) was measured with a portable colorimeter. Acute symptoms were grouped according to their previously known associations with cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors into four ordinal categories (asymptomatic, non-specific, possible, probable). RESULTS: Residents from the exposed community were significantly more likely to report recently sighting a spray plane near their community, exposure to pesticide from drift, crossing recently sprayed fields, eating home grown food, and feeling ill after drift exposure. The mean AChE value was significantly lower for residents of the exposed community (4.9 v 5.3 IU/dl). The proportion of subjects complaining of one or more chronic or acute symptoms was significantly higher for the exposed community (87%) than for the controls (53%). Odds ratios for residents in the exposed community, by symptom categories, were non-specific 1.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0-8 to 3.2), possible 4.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 10.2), and probable 9.93 (95% CI 2-9 to 34.4). CONCLUSION: These findings indicate a strong association between exposure to aerial pesticides and symptoms. This study should be replicated with more quantitative exposure measures, for if confirmed, the results have relevance for millions in rural

  13. Plasma and brain cholinesterase in methomyl-intoxicated free-ranging pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica).

    PubMed

    Villar, David; Balvin, Dubel; Giraldo, Carlos; Motas, Miguel; Olivera, Marta

    2010-03-01

    A mortality event caused by exposure to the carbamate insecticide methomyl was diagnosed in several hundred pigeons fed treated corn kernels in a city park. A cholinesterase inhibitor insecticide was initially suspected based on clinical signs and a significant inhibition (P < 0.05) of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity compared with normal values for the species. However, brain ChE activity was within the normal range in birds subsequently submitted in an advanced stage of autolysis. Two groups of 10 healthy pigeons were allocated into a control group and an experimental group, which was offered corn samples retrieved from the incident site. Within minutes of ingesting the contaminated corn, the birds became immobile, had transient wing fluttering, and developed profuse salivation immediately followed by death. Plasma ChE activity at death had declined by more than 95% of preexposure levels (0.04 +/- 0.02 vs. 1.56 +/- 0.23 micromol/min per milliliter). Brain activity in the sagittal brain sections that were immediately frozen after death was inhibited by > or =50% of control birds (13.5 +/- 2.2 vs. 27.5 +/- 1.8 micromol/min per gram). However, the sagittal sections left for 1.5 days at ambient temperature of 25 degrees C had normal or higher activity, an effect that was attributed to a combination of spontaneous reactivation and dehydration. After incubation of both plasma and brain homogenates for 1 hr at 37 degrees C, ChE activity recovered by 2- and 1.46-fold, respectively. An organophosphorus and carbamate screen conducted by 2 independent laboratories identified and quantified methomyl in treated kernels at 400 ppm. These results indicate that spontaneous reactivation and dehydration can mask previous reductions in ChE activity.

  14. Occupational determinants of serum cholinesterase inhibition among organophosphate-exposed agricultural pesticide handlers in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Keifer, Matthew C; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Fenske, Richard A; Furlong, Clement E; van Belle, Gerald; Checkoway, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify potential risk factors for serum cholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition among agricultural pesticide handlers exposed to organophosphate (OP) and N-methyl-carbamate (CB) insecticides. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study among 154 agricultural pesticide handlers who participated in the Washington State cholinesterase monitoring program in 2006 and 2007. BuChE inhibition was analyzed in relation to reported exposures before and after adjustment for potential confounders using linear regression. Odds ratios estimating the risk of ‘BuChE depression’ (>20% from baseline) were also calculated for selected exposures based on unconditional logistic regression analyses. Results An overall decrease in mean BuChE activity was observed among study participants at the time of follow-up testing during the OP/CB spray season relative to pre-season baseline levels (mean decrease of 5.6%, P < 0.001). Score for estimated cumulative exposure to OP/CB insecticides in the past 30 days was a significant predictor of BuChE inhibition (β = −1.74, P < 0.001). Several specific work practices and workplace conditions were associated with greater BuChE inhibition, including mixing/loading pesticides and cleaning spray equipment. Factors that were protective against BuChE inhibition included full-face respirator use, wearing chemical-resistant boots, and storing personal protective equipment in a locker at work. Conclusions Despite existing regulations, agricultural pesticide handlers continue to be exposed to OP/CB insecticides at levels resulting in BuChE inhibition. These findings suggest that modifying certain work practices could potentially reduce BuChE inhibition. Replication from other studies will be valuable. PMID:19819864

  15. Do cholinesterase inhibitors act primarily on attention deficit? A naturalistic study in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Laura; Bessi, Valentina; Padiglioni, Sonia; Marini, Sandro; Pepeu, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Attention is the first non-memory domain affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before deficits in language and visuo-spatial function, and it is claimed that attention deficits are responsible for the difficulties with daily living in early demented patients. The aim of this longitudinal study in a group of 121 Caucasian, community-dwelling, mild-to-moderate AD patients (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score >17) was to detect which cognitive domains were most affected by the disease and whether one year treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors was more effective in preserving attention than memory. All subjects were evaluated by a neuropsychological battery including global measurements (MMSE, Information-Memory-Concentration Test) and tasks exploring verbal long-term memory, language, attention, and executive functions. The comparison between two evaluations, made 12 months apart, shows statistically significant differences, indicating deterioration compared to baseline, in the following tests: MMSE (with no gender differences), Composite Memory Score, Short Story Delayed Recall, Trail-Making Test A, Semantic Fluency Test, and Token Test. Conversely, there were no differences in the two evaluations of the Digit Span, Corsi Tapping Test, Short Story Immediate Recall, and Phonemic Fluency Tests. It appears that the treatment specifically attenuated the decline in tests assessing attention and executive functions. A stabilization of the ability to pay attention, with the ensuing positive effects on executive functions, recent memory, and information acquisition which depend on attention, appears to be the main neuropsychological mechanism through which the activation of the cholinergic system, resulting from cholinesterase inhibition, exerts its effect on cognition. PMID:24577458

  16. The PRiMA-linked Cholinesterase Tetramers Are Assembled from Homodimers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vicky P.; Xie, Heidi Q.; Chan, Wallace K. B.; Leung, K. Wing; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is anchored onto cell membranes by the transmembrane protein PRiMA (proline-rich membrane anchor) as a tetrameric globular form that is prominently expressed in vertebrate brain. In parallel, the PRiMA-linked tetrameric butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is also found in the brain. A single type of AChE-BChE hybrid tetramer was formed in cell cultures by co-transfection of cDNAs encoding AChET and BChET with proline-rich attachment domain-containing proteins, PRiMA I, PRiMA II, or a fragment of ColQ having a C-terminal GPI addition signal (QN-GPI). Using AChE and BChE mutants, we showed that AChE-BChE hybrids linked with PRiMA or QN-GPI always consist of AChET and BChET homodimers. The dimer formation of AChET and BChET depends on the catalytic domains, and the assembly of tetramers with a proline-rich attachment domain-containing protein requires the presence of C-terminal “t-peptides” in cholinesterase subunits. Our results indicate that PRiMA- or ColQ-linked cholinesterase tetramers are assembled from AChET or BChET homodimers. Moreover, the PRiMA-linked AChE-BChE hybrids occur naturally in chicken brain, and their expression increases during development, suggesting that they might play a role in cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:20566626

  17. Hepatic cholinesterase of laying hens naturally infected by Salmonella Gallinarum (fowl typhoid).

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Boiago, Marcel M; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Alves, Mariana Sauzen; Boscato, Carla; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Casagrande, Renata A; Stefani, Lenita M

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that may cause foodborne gastroenteritis in humans and animals consisting of over 2000 serovars. The serovar Salmonella Gallinarum is an important worldwide pathogen of poultry. However, little is known on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Salmonella in chickens. The aim of this study was to evaluate cholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities in hepatic tissue of laying hens naturally infected by S. Gallinarum. Twenty positive liver samples for S. Gallinarum were collected, in addition to seven liver samples from healthy uninfected laying hens (control group). The right liver lobe was homogenized for analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the left lobe was divided into two fragments, one for histopathology and the other for Salmonella isolation. The results showed changes in AChE and BchE activity in the liver of infected laying hens compared to the control group (P < 0.05), i.e. reduced AChE and increased BChE activities in liver samples. Infected animals showed increased MPO activity compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the histopathological findings showed fibrinoid necrosis associated to the infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages,heterophils in the liver of infected hens. These findings suggest that the inflammatory process was attenuated providing a pro-inflammatory action of both enzyme analyzed in order to reduce the free ACh, a molecule which has an anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, our results lead to the hypothesis that cholinesterase plays an important role on the modulation of immune response against S. Gallinarum with an inflammatory effect, contributing to the response against this bacterium. This study should contribute to a better understanding on the pathogenic mechanisms involved in laying hens infected by S. Gallinarum.

  18. Adverse Effects of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Dementia, According to the Pharmacovigilance Databases of the United-States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Ali, Thibault B; Schleret, Thomas R; Reilly, Brian M; Chen, Winston Yuchen; Abagyan, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    This survey analyzes two national pharmacovigilance databases in order to determine the major adverse reactions observed with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors in dementia. We conducted a statistical analysis of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Database (CVARD) concerning the side effects of cholinesterase inhibitors. The statistics calculated for each adverse event were the frequency and the reporting odds ratios (ROR). A total of 9877 and 2247 reports were extracted from the FAERS and CVARD databases, respectively. A disproportionately higher frequency of reports of death as an adverse event for rivastigmine, compared to the other acetylcholinesterase inhibiting drugs, was observed in both the FAERS (ROR = 3.42; CI95% = 2.94-3.98; P<0.0001) and CVARD (ROR = 3.67; CI95% = 1.92-7.00; P = 0.001) databases. While cholinesterase inhibitors remain to be an important therapeutic tool against Alzheimer's disease, the disproportionate prevalence of fatal outcomes with rivastigmine compared with alternatives should be taken into consideration. PMID:26642212

  19. Size of the treatment effect on cognition of cholinesterase inhibition in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, K

    2004-01-01

    Background: Six cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) have been tested in people with Alzheimer's disease, using methods currently required for regulatory approval. The clinical importance of their treatment effects is controversial. Objective: To determine whether cholinesterase inhibition produces treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease that are large enough to be clinically detectable. Methods: Overview analysis of published trials of ChEIs in which the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale—Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) and a global clinical measure were primary outcomes. Two quantitative summary measures of the treatment effect (Cohen's d and the standardised response mean (SRM)) were calculated and presented as funnel plots. Observed cases analyses and intention to treat (ITT) with the last observation carried forward (LOCF) analyses were compared. Results: The median Cohen's d effect sizes (ES) using ITT samples with LOCF for the ADAS-Cog were: low dose of a ChEI (n = 8 studies) median ES = 0.15, range = 0.03–0.22; medium dose (n = 13) median ES = 0.23, range = 0.12–0.29; high dose (n = 9) median ES = 0.28, range = 0.01–0.31. In general, the ES were larger when calculated as SRMs (for example, high dose ChEI studies, median SRM = 0.47; range = 0.30–0.63) and highest in the observed cases analyses (for example, high dose median SRM = 0.56, range = 0.35–0.78). Global clinical scales produced similar estimates of ES (for example, high dose ChEI, ITT/LOCF median Cohen's d = 0.29, range = 0.20–0.47). Conclusions: ChEIs produce small-moderate effect sizes in clinical trials which are reproducible and demonstrate a dose response. Better descriptions of the patterns of treatment response are needed to guide individual patient decisions about the effectiveness of treatment, but group effects are evident and appear large enough to be clinically detectable. PMID:15090558

  20. Cholinesterase inhibition and behavioral toxicity of carbofuran on Oreochromis niloticus early life stages.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, P C; Luchmann, K H; Ribeiro, A B; Veras, M M; Correa, J R M B; Nogueira, A J; Bainy, A C D; Carvalho, P S M

    2011-10-01

    Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus at 9 days post-hatch were exposed in semi-static experiments to the carbamate insecticide carbofuran, which is applied in agricultural systems in Brazil. Although the molecular mechanism of carbofuran toxicity is well known, a detailed understanding of the ecological mechanisms through which carbofuran effects can propagate towards higher levels of biological organization in fish is incomplete. Mortality rates were quantified for larvae exposed for 96 h to 8.3, 40.6, 69.9, 140, 297 and 397 μg/L carbofuran, and the LC(50) 96 h was 214.7 μg/L. In addition, the biochemical biomarker cholinesterase inhibition and behavioral biomarkers related to vision, swimming, prey capture and predator avoidance were quantified in individual larvae, as well as their growth in weight. The behavioral parameters were quantified by analysis of digitally recorded videos of individual larvae within appropriate experimental setups. The activity of the enzyme cholinesterase decreased after exposure to carbofuran with a lowest observed effects concentration (LOEC) of 69.9 μg/L. Visual acuity deficits were detected after carbofuran exposure with a LOEC of 40.6 μg/L. Swimming speed decreased with carbofuran exposure, with a LOEC of 397.6 μg/L. The number of attacks to prey (Daphnia magna nauplii) decreased in larvae exposed to carbofuran, with a LOEC of 397.6 μg/L. Growth in weight was significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner, and all carbofuran groups exhibited a statistically significant decrease in growth when compared to controls (p<0.05). The number of predator attacks necessary to capture larvae decreased after exposure to carbofuran, and the LOEC was 69.9 μg/L. These results show that exposure of sensitive early life stages of tilapia O. niloticus to sublethal concentrations of carbofuran can affect fundamental aspects of fish larval ecology that are relevant to recruitment of fish populations, and that can be better understood by the

  1. PON1 status does not influence cholinesterase activity in Egyptian agricultural workers exposed to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Corie A.; Crane, Alice L.; Bonner, Matthew R.; Knaak, James B.; Browne, Richard W.; Lein, Pamela J.; Olson, James R.

    2012-12-15

    Animal studies have shown that paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genotype can influence susceptibility to the organophosphorus pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). However, Monte Carlo analysis suggests that PON1 genotype may not affect CPF-related toxicity at low exposure conditions in humans. The current study sought to determine the influence of PON1 genotype on the activity of blood cholinesterase as well as the effect of CPF exposure on serum PON1 in workers occupationally exposed to CPF. Saliva, blood and urine were collected from agricultural workers (n = 120) from Egypt's Menoufia Governorate to determine PON1 genotype, blood cholinesterase activity, serum PON1 activity towards chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPOase) and paraoxon (POase), and urinary levels of the CPF metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy). The PON1 55 (P ≤ 0.05) but not the PON1 192 genotype had a significant effect on CPOase activity. However, both the PON1 55 (P ≤ 0.05) and PON1 192 (P ≤ 0.001) genotypes had a significant effect on POase activity. Workers had significantly inhibited AChE and BuChE after CPF application; however, neither CPOase activity nor POase activity was associated with ChE depression when adjusted for CPF exposure (as determined by urinary TCPy levels) and stratified by PON1 genotype. CPOase and POase activity were also generally unaffected by CPF exposure although there were alterations in activity within specific genotype groups. Together, these results suggest that workers retained the capacity to detoxify chlorpyrifos-oxon under the exposure conditions experienced by this study population regardless of PON1 genotype and activity and that effects of CPF exposure on PON1 activity are minimal. -- Highlights: ► CPF exposure resulted in an increase in TCPy and decreases in BuChE and AChE. ► CPOase activity decreased in subjects with the PON1 55LM and PON1 55 MM genotypes. ► Neither PON1 genotype nor CPOase activity had an effect on BuChE or AChE inhibition.

  2. Cognitive and affective changes in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease patients undergoing switch of cholinesterase inhibitors: a 6-month observational study.

    PubMed

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Sorbi, Sandro; Attar, Mahmood; Colombo, Delia; Cravello, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease after an initial response to cholinesterase inhibitors may complain a later lack of efficacy. This, in association with incident neuropsychiatric symptoms, may worsen patient quality of life. Thus, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor could represent a valid therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the switch from one to another cholinesterase inhibitor on cognitive and affective symptoms in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients. Four hundred twenty-three subjects were included from the EVOLUTION study, an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study conducted on Alzheimer disease patients who switched to different cholinesterase inhibitor due either to lack/loss of efficacy or response, reduced tolerability or poor compliance. All patients underwent cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments, carried out before the switch (baseline), and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. A significant effect of the different switch types was found on Mini-Mental State Examination score during time, with best effectiveness on mild Alzheimer's disease patients switching from oral cholinesterase inhibitors to rivastigmine patch. Depressive symptoms, when measured using continuous Neuropsychiatric Inventory values, decreased significantly, while apathy symptoms remained stable over the 6 months after the switch. However, frequency of both depression and apathy, when measured categorically using Neuropsychiatric Inventory cut-off scores, did not change significantly during time. In mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients with loss of efficacy and tolerability during cholinesterase inhibitor treatment, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an important option for slowing cognitive deterioration. The evidence of apathy stabilization and the positive tendency of depressive symptom improvement should definitively be confirmed in double-blind controlled studies.

  3. Cognitive and Affective Changes in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Undergoing Switch of Cholinesterase Inhibitors: A 6-Month Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Sorbi, Sandro; Attar, Mahmood; Colombo, Delia; Cravello, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer’s disease after an initial response to cholinesterase inhibitors may complain a later lack of efficacy. This, in association with incident neuropsychiatric symptoms, may worsen patient quality of life. Thus, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor could represent a valid therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the switch from one to another cholinesterase inhibitor on cognitive and affective symptoms in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients. Four hundred twenty-three subjects were included from the EVOLUTION study, an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study conducted on Alzheimer disease patients who switched to different cholinesterase inhibitor due either to lack/loss of efficacy or response, reduced tolerability or poor compliance. All patients underwent cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments, carried out before the switch (baseline), and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. A significant effect of the different switch types was found on Mini-Mental State Examination score during time, with best effectiveness on mild Alzheimer’s disease patients switching from oral cholinesterase inhibitors to rivastigmine patch. Depressive symptoms, when measured using continuous Neuropsychiatric Inventory values, decreased significantly, while apathy symptoms remained stable over the 6 months after the switch. However, frequency of both depression and apathy, when measured categorically using Neuropsychiatric Inventory cut-off scores, did not change significantly during time. In mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients with loss of efficacy and tolerability during cholinesterase inhibitor treatment, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an important option for slowing cognitive deterioration. The evidence of apathy stabilization and the positive tendency of depressive symptom improvement should definitively be confirmed in double-blind controlled studies. PMID

  4. Attenuation of functional hyperemia to visual stimulation in mild Alzheimer's disease and its sensitivity to cholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Chaudhary, Simone; Dorr, Adrienne; Scouten, Amy; Schwindt, Graeme; Masellis, Mario; Stanisz, Greg J; Black, Sandra E; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2016-05-01

    Despite the growing recognition of the significance of cerebrovascular impairment in the etiology and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the early stage brain vascular dysfunction and its sensitivity to pharmacological interventions is still not fully characterized. Due to the early and aggressive treatment of probable AD with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI), which in and of themselves have direct effects on brain vasculature, the vast majority of hemodynamic measurements in early AD subjects reported hitherto have consequently been made only after the start of treatment, complicating the disentanglement of disease- vs. treatment-related effects on the cerebral vasculature. To address this gap, we used pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling MRI to measure resting perfusion and visual stimulation elicited changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood oxygenation dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal in a cohort of mild AD patients immediately prior to, 6months post, and 12months post commencement of open label cholinesterase inhibitor treatment. Although patients exhibited no gray matter atrophy prior to treatment and their resting perfusion was not distinguishable from that in age, education and gender-matched controls, the patients' visual stimulation-elicited changes in BOLD fMRI and blood flow were decreased by 10±4% (BOLD) and 23±2% (CBF), relative to those in controls. Induction of cholinesterase inhibition treatment was associated with a further, 7±2% reduction in patients' CBF response to visual stimulation, but it stabilized, at this new lower level, over the follow-up period. Likewise, MMSE scores remained stable during the treatment; furthermore, higher MMSE scores were associated with higher perfusion responses to visual stimulation. This study represents the initial step in disentangling the effects of AD pathology from those of the first line treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors on cerebral hemodynamics and supports the use of arterial spin

  5. Bird predation on cutworms (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in wheat fields and chlorpyrifos effects on brain cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, L.C.; DeWeese, L.R.; Schladweiler, P.

    1986-01-01

    Horned larks, Eremophila alpestris (L.), and McCown's longspurs, Calcarius mccownii (Lawrence), were collected at intervals from two winter wheat fields in Montana [USA] after aerial application of chlorpyrifos to control cutworms. Both bird species had a high (95-100%) incidence of Lepidoptera, mostly pale western cutworms, Agrotis orthogonia Morrison, in their stomachs at 3 days postspray. Incidence of cutworms and other insects in stomachs of birds from sprayed fields was lower at 9 and 16 days postspray than in control birds, presumably due to insecticide-caused reduction of insects. Effects of birds on population dynamics of insect pests in wheat are unknown, but birds do contribute to cutworm mortality. Predation is one of the limiting factors to cutworm increase and can supplement insecticidal control. Brain cholinesterase activity in horned larks collected from the sprayed fields at 3 and 9 days postspray was significantly lower than in unexposed larks, but at 16 days the difference was not significant. Although nontarget birds clearly were exposed to chlorpyrifos and manifested a sublethal physiological response, toxic effects were less severe than those resulting from endrin application for cutworm control in wheat. More study is needed of larger chlorpyrifos-treated fields under a variety of conditions to fully assess effects on nontarget life.

  6. Insights into cholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of five Juniperus species.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Nilufer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Ergun, Fatma

    2011-09-01

    In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the leaves, ripe fruits, and unripe fruits of Juniperus communis ssp. nana, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus sabina, Juniperus foetidissima, and Juniperus excelsa were investigated in the present study. Cholinesterase inhibition of the extracts was screened using ELISA microplate reader. Antioxidant activity of the extracts was tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging, ferrous ion-chelating, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. The extracts had low or no inhibition towards AChE, whereas the leaf aqueous extract of J. foetidissima showed the highest BChE inhibition (93.94 ± 0.01%). The leaf extracts usually exerted higher antioxidant activity. We herein describe the first study on anticholinesterase and antioxidant activity by the methods of ferrous ion-chelating, superoxide radical scavenging, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays of the mentioned Juniperus species.

  7. Cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase activities in freshwater invertebrates as biomarkers to assess pesticide contamination.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Inês; Agra, Ana Raquel; Monaghan, Kieran; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nogueira, António J A

    2010-01-01

    Studies investigating the use of biomarkers in pesticide risk assessment have greatly increased in recent years; however, issues concerning the ecological meaning of enzymatic responses have proved controversial. Ideally a good biomarker response should be modulated by the environmental contaminants alone and demonstrate a predictable behavior towards certain types of toxins. As these premises are rarely observed, the present study aims to outline research that has contributed to an understanding of the behavior of two widely used biomarkers, cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase, describing environmental and biotic factors that affect their response in freshwater invertebrates. Studies were performed in the main classes of aquatic invertebrates with these biomarkers and conclusions were reached concerning their behavior towards the main classes of pesticides. Links between biomarker responses and conventional endpoints were evaluated so that ecological relevance could be attributed to enzymatic responses. Toxicity of mixtures was investigated, and cases of synergism and antagonism were pointed out as factors changing the expected toxicity of aquatic systems and leading to misinterpretations of biomarker responses. Finally, the use of biomarkers as a tool for biomonitoring and in situ assays was investigated, with discussion of advantages and disadvantages of their use.

  8. The effects of chlorpyrifos on cholinesterase activity and foraging behavior in the dragonfly, Anax junius (Odonata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Atchison, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    We examined head capsule cholinesterase (ChE) and foraging behavior in nymphs of the dragonfly, Anax junius, exposed for 24 h to 0.2, 0.6 and 1.0 ??g l-1 of the organophosphorus (OP) insecticide, chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothioate]. The invertebrate community is an important component of the structure and function of wetland ecosystems, yet the potential effects of insecticides on wetland ecosystems are largely unknown. Our objectives were to determine if exposure to environmentally realistic concentrations of chlorpyrifos affected foraging behavior and ChE activity in head capsules of dragonfly nymphs. Nymphs were exposed to different concentrations of chlorpyrifos and different prey densities in a factorial design. ChE activities and foraging behaviors of treated nymphs were not statistically different (p ??? 0.05) from control groups. Prey density effects exerted a greater effect on dragonfly foraging than toxicant exposures. Nymphs offered higher prey densities exhibited more foraging behaviors but also missed their prey more often. High variability in ChE activities within the control group and across treated groups precluded determination of relationships between ChE and foraging behaviors. It appears that A. junius is relatively tolerant of chlorpyrifos, although the concentrations we tested have been shown in other work to adversely affect the prey base; therefore the introduction of this insecticide may have indirect adverse affects on top invertebrate predators such as Odonata.

  9. Plasma cholinesterase levels of mountain plovers (Charadrius montanus) wintering in central California, USA.

    PubMed

    Iko, William M; Archuleta, Andrew S; Knopf, Fritz L

    2003-01-01

    Declines of over 60% in mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) populations over the past 30 years have made it a species of concern throughout its current range and a proposed species for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Wintering mountain plovers spend considerable time on freshly plowed agricultural fields where they may potentially be exposed to anticholinesterase pesticides. Because of the population status and wintering ecology of plovers, the objectives of our study were to use nondestructive methods to report baseline plasma cholinesterase (ChE) levels in free-ranging mountain plovers wintering in California, USA, and to assess whether sampled birds showed signs of ChE inhibition related to anticholinesterase chemical exposure. We compared plasma ChE activity for mountain plovers sampled from the Carrizo Plain (an area relatively free of anticholinesterase pesticide use) with similar measures for plovers from the Central Valley (where anticholinesterase pesticides are widely used). Analyses for ChE inhibition indicated that none of the plovers had been recently exposed to these chemicals. However, mean ChE levels of plovers from the Central Valley were significantly higher (32%) than levels reported for plovers from the Carrizo Plain. This result differs from our original assumption of higher exposure risk to mountain plovers in the Central Valley but does suggest that some effect is occurring in the ChE activity of mountain plovers wintering in California.

  10. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon. PMID:24296242

  11. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  12. Simulating the impact of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides on non-target wildlife in irrigated crops

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pisani, J.M.; Grant, W.E.; Mora, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation model for risk assessment of the impact of insecticide inhibitors of cholinesterase (ChE) applied in irrigated agricultural fields on non-target wildlife. The model, which we developed as a compartment model based on difference equations (??t = 1 h), consists of six submodels describing the dynamics of (1) insecticide application, (2) insecticide movement into floodable soil, (3) irrigation and rain, (4) insecticide dissolution in water, (5) foraging and insecticide intake from water, and (6) ChE inhibition and recovery. To demonstrate application of the model, we simulated historical and "worst-case" scenarios of the impact of ChE-inhibiting insecticides on white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) inhabiting natural brushland adjacent to cotton and sugarcane fields in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, USA. Only when a rain event occurred just after insecticide application did predicted levels of ChE inhibition surpass the diagnostic level of 20% exposure. The present model should aid in assessing the effect of ChE-inhibiting insecticides on ChE activity of different species that drink contaminated water from irrigated agricultural fields, and in identifying specific situations in which the juxtaposition of environmental conditions and management schemes could result in a high risk to non-target wildlife. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroactive Multifunctional Tacrine Congeners with Cholinesterase, Anti-Amyloid Aggregation and Neuroprotective Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kozurkova, Maria; Hamulakova, Slavka; Gazova, Zuzana; Paulikova, Helena; Kristian, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes research into the highly relevant topics of cholinesterase and amyloid aggregation inhibitors connected to tacrine congeners, both of which are associated with neurogenerative diseases. Various opinions will be discussed regarding the dual binding site inhibitors which are characterized by increased inhibitor potency against acetylcholin/butyrylcholine esterase and amyloid formation. It is suggested that these compounds can both raise levels of acetylcholine by binding to the active site, and also prevent amyloid aggregation. In connection with this problem, the mono/dual binding of the multifunctional derivatives of tacrine, their mode of action and their neuroprotective activities are reported. The influence of low molecular compounds on protein amyloid aggregation, which might be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease is also reported. Finally, attention is paid to some physico-chemical factors, such as desolvation energies describing the transfer of the substrate solvated by water, the metal-chelating properties of biometals reacting with amyloid precursor protein, amyloid beta peptide and tau protein.

  14. Cholinesterase in porcine saliva: Analytical characterization and behavior after experimental stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Miró, Silvia; Hernández, Fuensanta; Contreras, María Dolores; Cerón, José Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and characterize the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) in porcine saliva, as well as to evaluate its behavior in experimental stressful conditions. The results of ChE characterization by using different substrates and the selective inhibitors ethopropazine and physostigmine showed that the main enzyme existing in porcine saliva was butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). An automated assay using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate was validated providing adequate reproducibility, linearity results and limit of detection. Salivary ChE was measured using the validated assay in two models of acute stress: twenty pigs stressed for 2min with a nasal snare and other twenty pigs subjected to a short-term road transport. Salivary ChE significantly increased after restraint and transport stress in pigs, as well as the ChE to total protein ratio. In conclusion, BChE is the predominant isoenzyme in porcine saliva, it can be measured by the fast, simple and automated method described in this paper and it increases in the models of stress used in this study. PMID:27234531

  15. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  16. Cytochemical localization of cholinesterase activity at the giant synapse of the squid.

    PubMed

    Brzin, M; Tennyson, V M; Dettbarn, W D

    1975-06-01

    The giant synapse of squid stellate ganglion is a chemical synapse where the transmitter substance is not known. The components of the ACh-system are present in squid nervous tissue in large quantities. However externally applied cholinergic drugs have no effect on junctional transmission. Using the Copper thiocholine method for electron microscopic cytochemistry the reaction product was found at the axolemmal surface, in the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons and occasionally between the infoldings of the sheat cells surounding the axons. Abundant deposits of end product are observed in the extracellular space in the proximity to junctional region. However, the localization of the cytochemical end product at the junctional region proper was observed frequently, but not consistently. Radiometric measurements of enzyme activity have revealed that neither specific inhibitors nor specific substrates generaly used for differentiation of cholinesterases in mammalian nervous tissue can be employed for differentiation of squid enzymes. Considering the permeability barriers imposed for external acetylcholine by cytoplasmic processes and the high enzyme activity of structures surrounding the giant synapse, the possibility that acetylcholine may still be a candidate for the missing transmitter is discussed.

  17. Effects of malathion, diazinon, and parathion on mallard embryo development and cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Eastin, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of external exposure of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs to malathion, diazinon, and parathion were examined using formulations and concentrations similar to field applications. Treatment with aqueous emulsion simulated exposure at the rate of 100 gal per acre (153 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound with treatment at 3 and 8 days of embryonic development. Treatment with a nontoxic oil vehicle simulated exposure at the rate of 11 gal per acre (16.8 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound. The order of embryotoxicity on a pounds-per-acre basis was parathion > diazinon > malathion with either vehicle. However, the potential hazard under conditions of up to five times the maximum field level of application was greater for malathion because of the high permissible level of application for malathion on certain crops. Parathion, the most embryotoxic of the three, had the most pronounced effects when an oil vehicle was used, as reflected by an LC50 of about 2 lb of active ingredient per acre, stunted growth, and a high frequency of malformations involving distortion of the axial skeleton, particularly in the cervical region. All three compounds resulted in significant depression of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity, but parathion caused the most depression throughout development, which was still apparent in hatchlings. Treatment with either distilled water or oil vehicle alone did not result in any of these effects seen with organophosphorous insecticides.

  18. Individualized evaluation of cholinesterase inhibitors effects in dementia with adaptive cognitive testing.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; Van Campen, Jos P C M; Appels, Bregje A; Beijnen, Jos H; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Van Gool, Willem A; Schmand, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) of cognitive function, selects for every individual patient, only items of appropriate difficulty to estimate his or her level of cognitive impairment. Therefore, CAT has the potential to combine brevity with precision. We retrospectively examined the evaluation of treatment effects of cholinesterase inhibitors by CAT using longitudinal data from 643 patients from a Dutch teaching hospital who were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or Lewy Body disease. The Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) was administered before treatment initiation and after intervals of six months of treatment. A previously validated CAT was simulated using 47 CAMCOG items. Results demonstrated that the CAT required a median number of 17 items (inter-quartile range 16-20), or a corresponding 64% test reduction, to estimate patients' global cognitive impairment levels. At the same time, intraclass correlations between global cognitive impairment levels as estimated by CAT or based on all 47 CAMCOG items, ranged from 0.93 at baseline to 0.91-0.94 at follow-up measurements. Slightly more people had substantial decline on the original CAMCOG (N = 31/285, 11%) than on the CAT (N = 17/285, 6%). We conclude that CAT saves time, does not lose much precision, and therefore deserves a role in the evaluation of treatment effects in dementia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Recovery of brain and plasma cholinesterase activities in ducklings exposed to organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to dicrotophos and fenthion. Recovery rates of brain ChE did not differ between ducklings administered a single oral dose vs. a 2-week dietary dose of these organophosphates. Exposure to the organophosphates, followed by recovery of brain ChE, did not significantly affect the degree of brain ChE inhibition or the recovery of ChE activity at a subsequent exposure. Recovery of brain ChE activity followed the general model Y = a + b(logX) with rapid recovery to about 50% of normal, followed by a slower rate of recovery until normal ChE activity levels were attained. Fenthion and dicrotophos-inhibited brain ChE were only slightly reactivated in vitro by pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide, which suggested that spontaneous reactivation was not a primary method of recovery of ChE activity. Recovery of brain ChE activity can be modeled for interpretation of sublethal inhibition of brain ChE activities in wild birds following environmental applications of organophosphates. Plasma ChE activity is inferior to brain ChE activity for environmental monitoring, because of its rapid recovery and large degree of variation among individuals.

  20. Characterization of catalytic efficiency parameters of brain cholinesterases in tropical fish.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Linhares, Amanda Guedes; Oliveira, Vagne Melo; França, Renata Cristina Penha; Santos, Juliana Ferreira; Marcuschi, Marina; Carvalho, Elba Verônica Matoso Maciel; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra

    2014-12-01

    Brain cholinesterases from four fish (Arapaima gigas, Colossoma macropomum, Rachycentron canadum and Oreochromis niloticus) were characterized using specific substrates and selective inhibitors. Parameters of catalytic efficiency such as activation energy (AE), k(cat) and k(cat)/k(m) as well as rate enhancements produced by these enzymes were estimated by a method using crude extracts described here. Despite the BChE-like activity, specific substrate kinetic analysis pointed to the existence of only acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in brain of the species studied. Selective inhibition suggests that C. macropomum brain AChE presents atypical activity regarding its behavior in the presence of selective inhibitors. AE data showed that the enzymes increased the rate of reactions up to 10(12) in relation to the uncatalyzed reactions. Zymograms showed the presence of AChE isoforms with molecular weights ranging from 202 to 299 kDa. Values of k(cat) and k(cat)/k(m) were similar to those found in the literature.

  1. Processing of cholinesterase-like α/β-hydrolase fold proteins: alterations associated with congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Comoletti, Davide; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-02-01

    The α/β hydrolase fold family is perhaps the largest group of proteins presenting significant structural homology with divergent functions, ranging from catalytic hydrolysis to heterophilic cell adhesive interactions to chaperones in hormone production. All the proteins of the family share a common three-dimensional core structure containing the α/β hydrolase fold domain that is crucial for proper protein function. Several mutations associated with congenital diseases or disorders have been reported in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain of cholinesterase-like proteins, neuroligins, butyrylcholinesterase and thyroglobulin. These mutations are known to disrupt the architecture of the common structural domain either globally or locally. Characterization of the natural mutations affecting the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in these proteins has shown that they mainly impair processing and trafficking along the secretory pathway causing retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Studying the processing of α/β-hydrolase fold mutant proteins should uncover new functions for this domain, that in some cases require structural integrity for both export of the protein from the ER and for facilitating subunit dimerization. A comparative study of homologous mutations in proteins that are closely related family members, along with the definition of new three-dimensional crystal structures, will identify critical residues for the assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold.

  2. Comparative analysis of cholinesterase activities in food animals using modified Ellman and Michel assays

    PubMed Central

    Askar, Kasim Abass; Kudi, A. Caleb; Moody, A. John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated correlations between modified Ellman and Michel assay methods for measuring cholinesterase (ChE) activities. It also established a foundation for the applicability of measuring ChE activities in food animal species as biochemical biomarkers for evaluating exposure to and effects of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Measuring ChE activities in blood and tissue is currently the most important method of confirming the diagnosis of such exposure. The study also characterized the level of ChE activity in the selected organs/tissues of these animals and determined the best organ/tissue in which to measure ChE activity. The ChE activities were found to be higher in cattle than in sheep and higher in erythrocytes than in plasma and serum. The anticoagulant heparin significantly affects AChE activity in plasma compared with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Of the different tissues tested, the mean of ChE activities was found to be highest in tissue from liver, followed by lung, muscle, kidney, and heart for sheep and cattle. In pigs, the ChE activities tested higher in kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and heart. The highest activities of ChE were found in pigs, followed by cattle and sheep. There was no significant difference between the modified Ellman and Michel method, but the percentage coefficient of variance (%CV) values were higher when the Michel method was used. PMID:22468023

  3. The Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors Across All Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, William James; Feen, Eliahu; Grossberg, George T

    2015-07-01

    Current pharmacological therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) includes the cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine and the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine. Based on the results of randomized controlled trials and several meta-analyses, ChEIs appear to show modest but statistically significant improvements on several measures, including cognition and global functioning. Given their modest effects, there is a lack of consensus among clinicians regarding issues related to initiation, optimal duration, and discontinuation of ChEI therapy across the spectrum of AD. There is evidence from long-term observational controlled studies that early initiation and persistent exposure to AD therapy lead to delays in nursing home admission and significantly slower rates of cognitive and functional impairment. In the moderate to severe stages of AD, therapeutic trials of higher dose ChEIs and the addition of memantine are recommended for patients who are no longer responding to lower doses. While side effects are generally mild and gastrointestinal in nature, these events can lead to significant morbidity in more susceptible patients with advanced disease. Patients should thus be regularly monitored for any potential serious side effects of ChEI therapy, which also may include syncope and bradycardia. At the terminal stages of AD, such as when patients become hospice eligible, attempts to cautiously discontinue all medications not necessary for quality of life, including AD drugs, should be made. PMID:26033268

  4. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon.

  5. Ultrastructural study and cholinesterase activity of paired capillaries in the newt brain.

    PubMed

    Ciani, F; Franceschini, V

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the ultrastructural and histochemical (AChE and BuChE) features of intracerebral vessels in newt. The blood vessels of the newt brain are paired and end in a closed loop. The two limbs, each of them has delineate the lumen by one endothelial cell, are enclosed within a single basement membrane and are separated from each other by a thin intercapillary wall. The brain capillaries are un-fenestrated and the overlapping endothelial cells were connected by clefts. Ependymal astrocytes extensively ensheath the surface of brain capillaries, but the sheats are incomplete. Pericytes and mast cells are frequently sandwiched in the endothelial basal lamina. Microglial cells are also present adjacent to cerebral vessels. The newt cerebral capillaries are characterized by high levels of AChE. This enzyme is localized in the basal membrane and in extracellular spaces between the overlapping endothelial cells. The vascular walls are instead deprived of BuChE activity. The non-nervous role of cholinesterases is discussed.

  6. Fish cholinesterases as biomarkers of sublethal effects of organophosphorus and carbamates in tissues of Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Ghazala; Mahboob, Shahid; Ahmad, L; Sultana, S; Alghanim, K; Al-Misned, F; Ahmad, Z

    2014-03-01

    Organophosphates and carbamates are major agrochemicals that strongly affect different neuroenzymes and the growth of various fish species. Here, we study the effect of sublethal concentrations of profenofos and carbofuran on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and the associated health risk in fish. Labeo rohita fingerlings were exposed to three sublethal concentrations of profenofos and carbofuran. The minimum cholinesterase activities in the brain, gills, muscle, kidney, liver, and blood were after exposure to profenofos (0.06 mg/L). The minimum AChE and BuChE activities in the brain, gills, muscle, kidney, liver, and blood were after exposure to carbofuran (0.28 and 0.198 mg/L). Exposure to both types of pesticides affected the functions of these organs, including metabolism and neurotransmission, to various extents at different exposure concentrations. These findings suggest that they are required to be properly monitored in the environment, to reduce their toxic effects on nontarget organisms. PMID:24357265

  7. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates or carbamates and morsodren in birds. II. Plasma and cholinesterase in quail fed morsodren and orally dosed with parathion or carbofuran.

    PubMed

    Dieter, M P; Ludke, J L

    1978-04-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  8. Novel N-allyl/propargyl tetrahydroquinolines: Synthesis via Three-component Cationic Imino Diels-Alder Reaction, Binding Prediction, and Evaluation as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yeray A; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bernal, Cristian C; Güiza, Fausto M; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R

    2016-10-01

    New N-allyl/propargyl 4-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines derivatives were efficiently synthesized using acid-catalyzed three components cationic imino Diels-Alder reaction (70-95%). All compounds were tested in vitro as dual acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitors and their potential binding modes, and affinity, were predicted by molecular docking and binding free energy calculations (∆G) respectively. The compound 4af (IC50 = 72 μm) presented the most effective inhibition against acetylcholinesterase despite its poor selectivity (SI = 2), while the best inhibitory activity on butyryl-cholinesterase was exhibited by compound 4ae (IC50 = 25.58 μm) with considerable selectivity (SI = 0.15). Molecular docking studies indicated that the most active compounds fit in the reported acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase active sites. Moreover, our computational data indicated a high correlation between the calculated ∆G and the experimental activity values in both targets.

  9. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates or carbamates and morsodren in birds. II. Plasma and cholinesterase in quail fed morsodren and orally dosed with parathion or carbofuran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  10. Different sensitivities of rat skeletal muscles and brain to novel anti-cholinesterase agents, alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Konstantin A; Yagodina, Lilia O; Valeeva, Guzel R; Lannik, Natalya I; Nikitashina, Alexandra D; Rizvanov, Albert A; Zobov, Vladimir V; Bukharaeva, Ellya A; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The rat respiratory muscle diaphragm has markedly lower sensitivity than the locomotor muscle extensor digitorum longus (EDL) to the new acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS). This study evaluated several possible reasons for differing sensitivity between the diaphragm and limb muscles and between the muscles and the brain. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Increased amplitude and prolonged decay time of miniature endplate currents were used to assess anti-cholinesterase activity in muscles. In hippocampal slices, induction of synchronous network activity was used to follow cholinesterase inhibition. The inhibitor sensitivities of purified AChE from the EDL and brain were also estimated. KEY RESULTS The intermuscular difference in sensitivity to ADEMS is partly explained caused by a higher level of mRNA and activity of 1,3-bis[5(diethyl-o-nitrobenzylammonium)pentyl]-6-methyluracildibromide (C-547)-resistant BuChE in the diaphragm. Moreover, diaphragm AChE was more than 20 times less sensitive to C-547 than that from the EDL. Sensitivity of the EDL to C-547 dramatically decreased after treadmill exercises that increased the amount of PRiMA AChE(G4), but not ColQ AChE(A12) molecular forms. The A12 form present in muscles appeared more sensitive to C-547. The main form of AChE in brain, PRiMA AChE(G4), was apparently less sensitive because brain cholinesterase activity was almost three orders of magnitude more resistant to C-547 than that of the EDL. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings suggest that ADEMS compounds could be used for the selective inhibition of AChEs and as potential therapeutic tools. PMID:21232040

  11. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity of isoquinoline alkaloids from three Cryptocarya species (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Wan Othman, Wan Nurul Nazneem; Liew, Sook Yee; Khaw, Kooi Yeong; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-09-15

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among older adults. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase are two enzymes involved in the breaking down of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Inhibitors for these enzymes have potential to prolong the availability of acetylcholine. Hence, the search for such inhibitors especially from natural products is needed in developing potential drugs for Alzheimer's disease. The present study investigates the cholinesterase inhibitory activity of compounds isolated from three Cryptocarya species towards acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Nine alkaloids were isolated; (+)-nornantenine 1, (-)-desmethylsecoantofine 2, (+)-oridine 3, (+)-laurotetanine 4 from the leaves of Cryptocarya densiflora BI., atherosperminine 5, (+)-N-methylisococlaurine 6, (+)-N-methyllaurotetanine 7 from the bark of Cryptocarya infectoria Miq., 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 and (+)-reticuline 9 from the bark of Cryptocarya griffithiana Wight. In general, most of the alkaloids showed higher inhibition towards BChE as compared to AChE. The phenanthrene type alkaloid; 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8, exhibited the most potent inhibition against BChE with IC50 value of 3.95μM. Analysis of the Lineweaver-Burk (LB) plot of BChE activity over a range of substrate concentration suggested that 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 exhibited mixed-mode inhibition with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 6.72μM. Molecular docking studies revealed that 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 docked well at the choline binding site and catalytic triad of hBChE (butyrylcholinesterase from Homo sapiens); hydrogen bonding with Tyr 128 and His 438 residues respectively. PMID:27492195

  12. A modular treatment of molecular traffic through the active site of cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Botti, SA; Felder, CE; Lifson, S; Sussman, JL; Silman, I

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for the molecular traffic of ligands, substrates, and products through the active site of cholinesterases (ChEs). First, we describe a common treatment of the diffusion to a buried active site of cationic and neutral species. We then explain the specificity of ChEs for cationic ligands and substrates by introducing two additional components to this common treatment. The first module is a surface trap for cationic species at the entrance to the active-site gorge that operates through local, short-range electrostatic interactions and is independent of ionic strength. The second module is an ionic-strength-dependent steering mechanism generated by long-range electrostatic interactions arising from the overall distribution of charges in ChEs. Our calculations show that diffusion of charged ligands relative to neutral isosteric analogs is enhanced approximately 10-fold by the surface trap, while electrostatic steering contributes only a 1.5- to 2-fold rate enhancement at physiological salt concentration. We model clearance of cationic products from the active-site gorge as analogous to the escape of a particle from a one-dimensional well in the presence of a linear electrostatic potential. We evaluate the potential inside the gorge and provide evidence that while contributing to the steering of cationic species toward the active site, it does not appreciably retard their clearance. This optimal fine-tuning of global and local electrostatic interactions endows ChEs with maximum catalytic efficiency and specificity for a positively charged substrate, while at the same time not hindering clearance of the positively charged products. PMID:10545346

  13. Brain cholinesterases: III. Future perspectives of AD research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z-X

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is initially and primarily associated with the degeneration and alteration in the metabolism of cholinesterases (ChEs). The use of ChEs inhibitors to treat Alzheimer's condition, on the basis of the cholinergic hypothesis of the disease, is, therefore, without grounds. Most disturbing is the fact that the currently available anti-ChEs are designed to inhibit normal ChEs in the brain and throughout the body, but not the abnormal ones. Based on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency theory, treatment should be designed to protect the cranial ChEs system from alteration and/or to help that system fight against degeneration through restoring its homeostatic action for brain structure and function instead. The overlap in the clinical, biochemical, molecular-cellular, and pathological alterations seen in patients with AD and individuals with many other brain disorders, which has bewildered many investigators, may now be explained by the shared underlying mismetabolism of brain ChEs. The abnormal metabolism of ChEs existing in asymptomatic subjects may indicate that the system is "at risk" and deserves serious attention. Future perspectives of ChEs research in vivo and in vitro in connection with AD and clinical diagnosis, prevention and treatment are proposed. Several potentially useful therapeutic and preventive means and pharmacological agents in this regard are identified and discussed, such as physical and intellectual stimulation, and a class of drugs including vitamin E, R-(-)-deprenyl (deprenyl, selegiline), acetyl L-carnitine, cytidine diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), centrophenoxine, L-phenylalanine, naloxone, galactose, and lithium, that have been proven to be able to stimulate AChE activity. Their working mechanisms may be through directly changing the configuration of AChE molecules and/or correcting micro- and overall environmental biological conditions for ChEs.

  14. Lactation performance of transgenic goats expressing recombinant human butyryl-cholinesterase in the milk.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Hernan; Hockley, Duncan K; Doré, Monique; Brochu, Eric; Hakier, Bernard; Zhao, Xin; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2008-02-01

    The production of recombinant proteins in the milk of transgenic animals has attracted significant interest in the last decade, as a valuable alternative for the production of recombinant proteins that cannot be or are inefficiently produced using conventional systems based on microorganisms or animal cells. Several recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical and biomedical interest have been successfully expressed in high quantities (g/l) in the milk of transgenic animals. However, this productivity may be associated with a compromised mammary physiology resulting, among other things, from the extraordinary demand placed on the mammary secretory cells. In this study we evaluated the lactation performance of a herd of 50 transgenic goats expressing recombinant human butyryl-cholinesterase (rBChE) in the milk. Our findings indicate that high expression levels of rBChE (range 1-5 g/l) are produced in these animals at the expense of an impaired lactation performance. The key features characterizing these transgenic performances were the decreased milk production, the reduced milk fat content which was associated with an apparent disruption in the lipid secretory mechanism at the mammary epithelium level, and a highly increased presence of leukocytes in milk which is not associated with mammary infection. Despite of having a compromised lactation performance, the amount of rBChE produced per transgenic goat represents several orders of magnitude more than the amount of rBChE present in the blood of hundreds of human donors, the only other available source of rBChE for pharmaceutical and biodefense applications. As a result, this development constitutes another successful example in the application of transgenic animal technology.

  15. Chemical reactivation and aging kinetics of organophosphorus-inhibited cholinesterases from two earthworm species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, Laura; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2007-09-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the ability of pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM) to recover organophosphorus (OP)-inhibited cholinesterase (ChE) activity of two earthworm species (Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris). After inhibition of ChE activity by OP pesticides, an alkyl group may be released from the OP-ChE complex. This reaction is termed aging, and the esterase cannot be reactivated either spontaneously or by the action of reactivating agents, such as 2-PAM. We also examined the aging kinetics of OP-inhibited ChE activity to evaluate the suitability of 2-PAM reactivation methodology for field monitoring. A 2-PAM concentration of 5 x 10(-4) M was enough to reactivate the OP-inhibited ChE activity after 60 min of incubation at 25 degrees C. Chemical reactivation kinetics followed an exponential rise to a maximum of 70 to 80% of normal enzyme activity when ChEs were inhibited with methyl paraoxon or dichlorvos and up to 60% for the chlorpyrifos-inhibited ChE of E. fetida. The aging rates (ka) of the inhibited ChEs were strongly affected by the OP type, and these rates decreased for both earthworm species in the following order: Methyl paraoxon (ka = 0.023-0.033/h) > dichlorvos (ka = 0.008-0.009/h) > chlorpyrifos oxon (ka = 0.003-0.006/h). In particular, chlorpyrifos-inhibited ChE activity of L. terrestris aged slowly (median aging time, 190 h), which means that chemical reactivation of esterase activity with 2-PAM seems feasible one week after exposure to OP pesticides. We conclude that reactivation of earthworm ChE activity by treatment with 2-PAM is a complementary and specific methodology for assessing exposure to OP pesticides. PMID:17705652

  16. Cholinesterases in development: AChE as a firewall to inhibit cell proliferation and support differentiation.

    PubMed

    Layer, Paul G; Klaczinski, Janine; Salfelder, Anika; Sperling, Laura E; Thangaraj, Gopenath; Tuschl, Corina; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a most remarkable protein, not only because it is one of the fastest enzymes in nature, but also since it appears in many molecular forms and is regulated by elaborate genetic networks. AChE is expressed in many tissues during development and in mature organisms, as well as in healthy and diseased states. In search for alternative, "non-classical" functions of cholinesterases (ChEs), AChE could either work within the frame of classic cholinergic systems, but in non-neural tissues ("non-synaptic function"), or act non-enzymatically. Here, we review briefly some of the major ideas and advances of this field, and report on some recent progress from our own experimental work, e.g. that (i) non-neural ChEs have pronounced, predominantly enzymatic effects on early embryonic (limb) development in chick and mouse, that (ii) retinal R28 cells of the rat overexpressing synaptic AChE present a significantly decreased cell proliferation, and that (iii) in developing chick retina ACh-synthesizing and ACh-degrading cells originate from the same postmitotic precursor cells, which later form two locally opposing cell populations. We suggest that such distinct distributions of ChAT(+) vs. AChE(+) cells in the inner half retina provide graded distributions of ACh, which can direct cell differentiation and network formation. Thus, as corroborated by works from many labs, AChE can be considered a highly co-opting protein, which can combine enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions within one molecule. PMID:23047026

  17. Treatment with endotracheal therapeutics after sarin microinstillation inhalation exposure increases blood cholinesterase levels in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Che, Magnus M; Song, Jian; Oguntayo, Samuel; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Rezk, Peter; Perkins, Michael W; Sciuto, Alfred M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2012-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were measured in the blood and tissues of animals that are treated with a number of endotracheally aerosolized therapeutics for protection against inhalation toxicity to sarin. Therapeutics included, aerosolized atropine methyl bromide (AMB), scopolamine or combination of AMB with salbutamol, sphingosine 1-phosphate, keratinocyte growth factor, adenosine A1 receptor antisense oligonucleotide (EPI2010), 2,3-diacetyloxybenzoic acid (2,3 DABA), oxycyte, and survanta. Guinea pigs exposed to 677.4 mg/m(3) or 846.5 mg/m(3) (1.2 LCt(50)) sarin for 4 min using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique and treated 1 min later with the aerosolized therapeutics. Treatment with all therapeutics significantly increased the survival rate with no convulsions throughout the 24 h study period. Blood AChE activity determined using acetylthiocholine as substrate showed 20% activity remaining in sarin-exposed animals compare to controls. In aerosolized AMB and scopolamine-treated animals the remaining AChE activity was significantly higher (45-60%) compared to sarin-exposed animals (p < 0.05). Similarly, treatment with all the combination therapeutics resulted in significant increase in blood AChE activity in comparison to sarin-exposed animals although the increases varied between treatments (p < 0.05). BChE activity was increased after treatment with aerosolized therapeutics but was lesser in magnitude compared to AChE activity changes. Various tissues showed elevated AChE activity after therapeutic treatment of sarin-exposed animals. Increased AChE and BChE activities in animals treated with nasal therapeutics suggest that enhanced breathing and reduced respiratory toxicity/lung injury possibly contribute to rapid normalization of chemical warfare nerve agent inhibited cholinesterases.

  18. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  19. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Docking Study of Hydrazone-Containing Pyridinium Salts as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Parlar, Sulunay; Bayraktar, Gulsah; Tarikogullari, Ayse Hande; Alptüzün, Vildan; Erciyas, Ercin

    2016-01-01

    A series of pyridinium salts bearing alkylphenyl groups at 1 position and hydrazone structure at 4 position of the pyridinium ring were synthesized and evaluated for the inhibition of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) enzymes. The cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitory activity studies were carried out by using the Ellman's colorimetric method. All compounds displayed considerable AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity and some of the compounds manifested remarkable anti-AChE activity compared to the reference compound, galantamine. Among the title compounds, the series including benzofuran aromatic ring exhibited the best inhibitory activity both on AChE and BuChE enzymes. Compound 3b, 4-[2-(1-(benzofuran-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinyl]-1-(3-phenylpropyl)pyridinium bromide, was the most active compound with IC50 value of 0.23 (0.24) µM against enantiomeric excess (ee)AChE (human (h)AChE) while compound 3a, 4-[2-(1-(benzofuran-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinyl]-1-phenethylpyridinium bromide, was the most active compound with IC50 value of 0.95 µM against BuChE. Moreover, 3a and b exhibited higher activity than the reference compound galantamine (eeAChE (hAChE) IC50 0.43 (0.52) µM; BuChE IC50 14.92 µM). Molecular docking studies were carried out on 3b having highest inhibitory activity against AChE. PMID:27581632

  20. Novel Cholinesterase Inhibitors Based on O-Aromatic N,N-Disubstituted Carbamates and Thiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Švarcová, Markéta; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2016-01-01

    Based on the presence of carbamoyl moiety, twenty salicylanilide N,N-disubstituted (thio)carbamates were investigated using Ellman's method for their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). O-Aromatic (thio)carbamates exhibited weak to moderate inhibition of both cholinesterases with IC50 values within the range of 1.60 to 311.0 µM. IC50 values for BChE were mostly lower than those obtained for AChE; four derivatives showed distinct selectivity for BChE. All of the (thio)carbamates produced a stronger inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, and five of them inhibited BChE more effectively than both established drugs rivastigmine and galantamine. In general, 5-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]benzamide, 2-hydroxy-N-phenylbenzamide as well as N-methyl-N-phenyl carbamate derivatives led to the more potent inhibition. O-{4-Chloro-2-[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} dimethylcarbamothioate was identified as the most effective AChE inhibitor (IC50 = 38.98 µM), while 2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl diphenylcarbamate produced the lowest IC50 value for BChE (1.60 µM). Results from molecular docking studies suggest that carbamate compounds, especially N,N-diphenyl substituted representatives with considerable portion of aromatic moieties may work as non-covalent inhibitors displaying many interactions at peripheral anionic sites of both enzymes. Mild cytotoxicity for HepG2 cells and consequent satisfactory calculated selectivity indexes qualify several derivatives for further optimization. PMID:26875979

  1. Influence of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Jenda, Malgorzata; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2014-07-15

    The influence of systemic administration of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was examined in rats. Additionally, this study aimed to compare the effects of donepezil, which selectively inhibits acetylcholinesterase, and rivastigmine, which inhibits both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase on morphine reward. Morphine-induced CPP (unbiased method) was induced by four injections of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Donepezil (0.5, 1, and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or rivastigmine (0.03, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were given 20 min before morphine during conditioning phase and 20 min before the expression or reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. Our results indicated that both inhibitors of cholinesterase attenuated the acquisition and expression of morphine CPP. The results were more significant after rivastigmine due to a broader inhibitory spectrum of this drug. Moreover, donepezil (1 mg/kg) and rivastigmine (0.5 mg/kg) attenuated the morphine CPP reinstated by priming injection of 5mg/kg morphine. These properties of both cholinesterase inhibitors were reversed by mecamylamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist but not scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. All effects of cholinesterase inhibitors were observed at the doses that had no effects on locomotor activity of animals. Our results suggest beneficial role of cholinesterase inhibitors in reduction of morphine reward and morphine-induced seeking behavior. Finally, we found that the efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors in attenuating reinstatement of morphine CPP provoked by priming injection may be due to stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  2. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  3. Regional inhibition of cholinesterase in free-ranging western pond turtles (Emys marmorata) occupying California mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erik; Sparling, Donald; Blumenshine, Steve

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the potential effects of cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides on western pond turtles (Emys marmorata) occupying streams in two regions of California, USA. The southern region was suspected of having increased exposure to atmospheric deposition of contaminants originating from Central Valley agriculture. The northern region represented reference ChE activities because this area was located outside of the prominent wind patterns that deposit pesticides into the southern region. Total ChE activity was measured in plasma from a total of 81 turtles from both regions. Cholinesterase activity of turtles was significantly depressed by 31% (p = 0.005) in the southern region after accounting for additional sources of variation in ChE activity. Male turtles had significantly increased ChE activity compared with females (p = 0.054). Cloaca temperature, length, mass, handling time, body condition, and lymph presence were not significant predictors of turtle ChE activity. In the southern region, 6.3% of the turtles were below the diagnostic threshold of two standard deviations less than the reference site mean ChE activity. Another diagnostic threshold determined that 75% of the turtles from the southern region had ChE activities depressed by 20% of the reference mean. The decrease in ChE activity in the southern region suggests sublethal effects of pesticide exposure, potentially altering neurotransmission, which can result in various deleterious behaviors.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  5. Cholinesterases as scavengers for organophosphorus compounds: Protection of primate performance against soman toxicity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, B.P.; Blick, D.W.; Caranto, G.; Castro, C.A.; Gentry, M.K.

    1993-12-31

    The present treatment for poisoning by organophosphates consists of multiple drugs such as carbamates, antimuscarinics, and reactivators in pre- and post-exposure modalities. Recently an anticonvulsant, diazapam, has been included as a post-exposure drug to reduce convulsions and increase survival. Most regimens are effective in preventing lethality from organophosphate exposure but do not prevent toxic effects and incapacitation observed in animals and likely to occur in humans. Use of enzymes such as cholinesterases as pretreatment drugs for sequestration of highly toxic organophosphate anticholinesterases and alleviation of side effects and performance decrements was successful in animals, including non-human primates. Pretreatment of rhesus monkeys with fetal bovine serum acetyleholinesterase protected them against lethal effects of soman (up to 5 LD50) and prevented signs of OP toxicity. Monkeys pretreated with fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase were devoid of behavioral incapacitation after soman exposure, as measured by serial probe recognition or primate equilibrium platform performance tasks. Use of acetylcholinesterase as a single pretreatment drug provided greater protection against both lethal and behavioral effects of potent organophosphates than current multicomponent drug treatments that prevent neither signs of toxicity nor behavioral deficits. Cholinesterases, Pretreatment, Toxicity, Organophosphates, Soman, Scavengers.

  6. Phytochemical profile of a blend of black chokeberry and lemon juice with cholinesterase inhibitory effect and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2012-10-15

    In this study, black chokeberry concentrate was added (5% w/v) to lemon juice, since previous reports suggested potential health benefits of this blend. The phytochemical composition, antioxidant capacity (scavenging of DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and hypochlorous acid), and inhibitory activity against cholinesterase of the new blend were determined and compared with those of lemon juice and chokeberry in citric acid (5%). The chokeberry concentrate, rich in cyanidin-glycosides, quercetin derivatives, and 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and lemon juice, possessing flavones, flavanones, quercetin derivates, and hydroxycinnamic acids, were characterised. The new drink showed a higher antioxidant effect than the chokeberry or lemon controls for all the tested methods, except for hypochlorous acid, in which lemon juice displayed higher activity. Both the lemon juice and chokeberry controls inhibited acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, and this effect was increased in the new mixtures. The results of the different radical scavenging assays indicate that the lemon-black chokeberry (5% w/v) mixture was more antioxidative than the respective controls separately. Moreover, their inhibition of cholinesterase is of interest regarding neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or senile dementia.

  7. Probing Gorge Dimensions of Cholinesterases by Freeze-Frame Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Radić, Zoran; Manetsch, Roman; Fournier, Didier; Sharpless, K. Barry; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-frame click chemistry is a proven approach for design in situ of high affinity ligands from bioorthogonal, reactive building blocks and macromolecular template targets. We recently described in situ design of femtomolar reversible inhibitors of fish and mammalian acetylcholinesterases (EC 3.1.1.7; AChEs) using several different libraries of acetylene and azide building blocks. Active center gorge geometries of those AChEs are rather similar and identical triazole inhibitors were detected in situ when incubating the same building block libraries in different AChEs. Drosophila melanogaster AChE crystal structure and other insect AChE homology models differ more in their overall 3D structure than other members of the cholinesterase family. The portion of the gorge proximal to the catalytic triad and choline binding site has a ~50% reduction in volume, and the gorge entrance at the peripheral anionic site (PAS) is more constricted than in the fish and mammalian AChE’s. In this communication we describe rationale for using purified recombinant Drosophila AChE as a template for in situ reaction of tacrine and propidium based libraries of acetylene and azide building blocks. The structures of resulting triazole inhibitors synthesized in situ are expected to differ appreciably from the fish and mammalian AChEs. While the latter AChEs exclusively promote synthesis of syn-substituted triazoles, the best Drosophila AChE triazole inhibitors were always anti-substituted. The anti- regioisomer triazoles were by about one order of magnitude better inhibitors of Drosophila than mammalian and fish AChEs. Moreover, the preferred site of acetylene + azide reaction in insect AChE and the resulting triazole ring formation shifts from near the base of the gorge to closer to its rim due to substantial differences of the gorge geometry in Drosophila AChE. Thus, in addition to synthesizing high affinity, lead inhibitors in situ, freeze-frame, click chemistry has capacity to

  8. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  9. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields

    PubMed Central

    Toral, Gregorio M.; Baouab, Riad E.; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S.; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  10. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife.

  11. Risk Factors for Nursing Home Placement in Alzheimer's Disease: A Longitudinal Study of Cognition, ADL, Service Utilization, and Cholinesterase Inhibitor Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Asa K.; Londos, Elisabet; Minthon, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify risk factors for early nursing home placement (NHP) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on the impact of longitudinal change in cognition, activities of daily living (ADL), service utilization, and cholinesterase inhibitor treatment (ChEI). Design and Methods: In an open, 3-year, prospective, multicenter study…

  12. Cholinesterase Inhibition and Depression of the Photic After Discharge of Flash Evoked Potentials Following Acute or Repeated Exposures to a Mixture of Carbaryl and Propoxur

    EPA Science Inventory

    While information exists regarding inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity, little is known about neurophysiological changes produced by a mixture of N-methyl carbamate pesticides. Previously, we reported that acute treatment with propoxur or carbaryl decreased the duration o...

  13. Effect of temperature and pH on carbamoylation and phosphorylation of serum cholinesterases. Theoretical interpretation of activation energies in complex reactions

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Vera; Reiner, Elsa; Vernon, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. The effect of temperature and pH was studied on the kinetics of inhibition of horse serum and human serum cholinesterase by four organophosphorus compounds and five carbamates. 2. For all compounds, and at each pH and temperature, the inhibition followed the kinetics of a bimolecular reaction with the inhibitor in excess, and with a negligible concentration of the Michaelis complex. 3. The second-order rate constants (ka) for inhibition of human serum cholinesterase by one organophosphate and one carbamate increased from 5° to 40°C with an apparent activation energy of 46kJ/mol (11kcal/mol). 4. The ka constant for inhibition of horse serum cholinesterase increased with temperature from 5° to 30°C, and then decreased from 30° to 40°C. The theoretical interpretation of such an unusual effect of temperature is derived. 5. The increase of ka with pH (human serum cholinesterase) followed the dissociation curve for a single group on the enzyme (pK7.5). 6. Rate constants for decarbamoylation (k+3) were determined, and the time-course of inhibition was calculated from the ka and k+3 constants. PMID:4677141

  14. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  15. BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION PRODUCED BY PROPOXUR AND DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propoxur is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response following stimulation of the visual system with flashes of light. They ar...

  16. New antimuscarinic agents for improved treatment of poisoning by cholinesterase inhibitors. Annual report, 1 November 1983-1 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    The object of this project is to find a more effective antimuscarinic agent than atropine for use as an antidote for poisoning by organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitors. To start this search, 30 structurally diverse antimuscarinic agents have been selected for initial testing. These compounds are to be evaluated for peripheral and central antimuscarinic activity in a variety of in vitro and in vivo tests in addition to determining their effectiveness as antidotes (in combination with an oxime reactivator) for poisoning by soman. Twenty-two of the compounds have now been evaluated for their ability to block acetylcholine-induced contractions in guinea pig intestinal smooth muscle when compared to atropine. Ability to displace radiolabeled quinuclidinyl benzilate from muscarinic receptors of mouse brain homogenate has been determined for atropine, hyoscine and 26 of the compounds. Only triflupromazine appeared to have a distinctly greater affinity for brain receptors than muscle receptors to atropine. Intestinal smooth muscle blockade; oxotremorine tremor inhibition; muscarinic receptor subtypes.

  17. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum argentinum and Their Cholinesterase-Inhibitory Activities: An in Vitro and in Silico Study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Javier E; Pigni, Natalia B; Andujar, Sebastián A; Roitman, German; Suvire, Fernando D; Enriz, Ricardo D; Tapia, Alejandro; Bastida, Jaume; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2016-05-27

    Two new alkaloids, 4-O-methylnangustine (1) and 7-hydroxyclivonine (2) (montanine and homolycorine types, respectively), and four known alkaloids were isolated from the bulbs of Hippeastrum argentinum, and their cholinesterase-inhibitory activities were evaluated. These compounds were identified using GC-MS, and their structures were defined by physical data analysis. Compound 2 showed weak butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)-inhibitory activity, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 67.3 ± 0.09 μM. To better understand the experimental results, a molecular modeling study was also performed. The combination of a docking study, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum theory of atoms in molecules calculations provides new insight into the molecular interactions of compound 2 with BuChE, which were compared to those of galantamine.

  18. Divergent effects of postmortem ambient temperature on organophosphorus- and carbamate-inhibited brain cholinesterase activity in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Time- and temperature-dependent postmortem changes in inhibited brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity may confound diagnosis of field poisoning of wildlife by anticholinesterase pesticide. Carbamate-inhibited ChE activity may return to normal within 1 to 2 days of exposure of intact carcass to moderate ambient temperature (18-32C). Organophosphorus-inhibited ChE activity becomes more depressed over the same time. Uninhibited ChE activity was resilient to above freezing temperature to 32C for 1 day and 25C for 3 days. Carbamate- and organophosphorus-inhibited ChE can be separated by incubation of homogenate for 1 hour at physiological temperatures; carbamylated ChE can be readily reactivated while phosphorylated ChE cannot.

  19. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  20. Ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds: Combination of cholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant and neuroprotection as multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Chen, Mohao; Liu, Zhikun; Fang, Xubin; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Li

    2016-02-15

    In order to search for novel multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents, a series of ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds were designed and synthesized. Ellman's assay revealed that the hybrid compounds showed moderate to potent inhibitory activity against the cholinesterases. Particularly, the AChE inhibition potency of compound 5k (IC50 1.9μM) was even 5-fold higher than that of galantamine. In addition, the target compounds showed pronounced antioxidant ability and neuroprotective property, especially against the ROS-induced toxicity. Notably, the neuroprotective effect of 5k was obviously superior to that of the mixture of ferulic acid and carbazole, indicating the therapeutic effect of the hybrid compound is better than the combination administration of the corresponding mixture.

  1. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum argentinum and Their Cholinesterase-Inhibitory Activities: An in Vitro and in Silico Study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Javier E; Pigni, Natalia B; Andujar, Sebastián A; Roitman, German; Suvire, Fernando D; Enriz, Ricardo D; Tapia, Alejandro; Bastida, Jaume; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2016-05-27

    Two new alkaloids, 4-O-methylnangustine (1) and 7-hydroxyclivonine (2) (montanine and homolycorine types, respectively), and four known alkaloids were isolated from the bulbs of Hippeastrum argentinum, and their cholinesterase-inhibitory activities were evaluated. These compounds were identified using GC-MS, and their structures were defined by physical data analysis. Compound 2 showed weak butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)-inhibitory activity, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 67.3 ± 0.09 μM. To better understand the experimental results, a molecular modeling study was also performed. The combination of a docking study, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum theory of atoms in molecules calculations provides new insight into the molecular interactions of compound 2 with BuChE, which were compared to those of galantamine. PMID:27096334

  2. Ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds: Combination of cholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant and neuroprotection as multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Chen, Mohao; Liu, Zhikun; Fang, Xubin; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Li

    2016-02-15

    In order to search for novel multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents, a series of ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds were designed and synthesized. Ellman's assay revealed that the hybrid compounds showed moderate to potent inhibitory activity against the cholinesterases. Particularly, the AChE inhibition potency of compound 5k (IC50 1.9μM) was even 5-fold higher than that of galantamine. In addition, the target compounds showed pronounced antioxidant ability and neuroprotective property, especially against the ROS-induced toxicity. Notably, the neuroprotective effect of 5k was obviously superior to that of the mixture of ferulic acid and carbazole, indicating the therapeutic effect of the hybrid compound is better than the combination administration of the corresponding mixture. PMID:26795115

  3. Characterization of plasma cholinesterase from the White stork (Ciconia ciconia) and its in vitro inhibition by anticholinesterase pesticides.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, Ana-Lourdes; Gravato, Carlos; Sánchez, Susana; Soler, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Blood plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity is a sensitive biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides in vertebrates. Several studies indicate that more than one ChE form may be present in blood of birds. In this study the predominant ChE activity (acetylcholinesterase - AChE- or butyrylcholinesterase - BChE-), the range of ChE activity as well as ChE age-dependent changes in non-exposed individuals of White stork (Ciconia ciconia) have been established. The in vitro sensitivity of ChE to OP and CB insecticides such as paraoxon-methyl, carbofuran and carbaryl was also investigated. Plasma ChE was characterised using three substrates (acetylthiocholine iodide, propionylthiocholine iodide, and S-butyrylthiocholine iodide) and three ChE inhibitors (eserine sulphate, BW284C51 and iso-OMPA). The results indicated that propionylthiocholine was the preferred substrate by plasma cholinesterase followed by acetylcholine and butyrylcholine and the predominant enzymatic activity in plasma of White storks was BChE. Normal plasma BChE activity in White stork was 0.32±0.01μmol/min/ml for adults and 0.28±0.03μmol/min/ml for juveniles. So, the age had no significant effect on the range of BChE activity. The study on the in vitro inhibitory potential of tested anticholinesterase pesticides on plasma ChE activity revealed that paraoxon-methyl is the most potent inhibitor followed by carbofuran and finally by carbaryl. The percentage of in vitro plasma ChE inhibition was observed to be similar between adults and juveniles.

  4. The Effect of Part D Coverage Restrictions for Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, and Cholinesterase Inhibitors on Related Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, David G.; O’Malley, A. James; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Zarowitz, Barbara J.; Chernew, Michael E.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Huskamp, Haiden A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In 2006, Medicare Part D transitioned prescription drug coverage for dual-eligible nursing home residents from Medicaid to Medicare and randomly assigned them to Part D prescription drug plans (PDPs). Because PDPs may differ in coverage, residents’ assigned plans may be relatively more or less restrictive for drugs they take. Taking advantage of the fact that randomization mitigates potential selection bias common in observational studies, this study seeks to assess the impact of PDP coverageon resident outcomes for three medication classes – antidepressants, antipsychotics, and cholinesterase inhibitors. Design, Setting, Participants Using Medicare claims, Minimum Data Set assessments, pharmacy claims, and PDP formulary information, we estimate the impact of coverage restrictions – including non-coverage and coverage with restrictions – on the following outcomes for dual-eligible nursing home residents randomized to PDPs in 2006–2008: depression; hallucinations/delusions; aggressive behaviors; cognitive performance; and activities of daily living. We further adjust for baseline health status to address any residual imbalances in the comparison groups. Results Across 5 outcomes in each of three medication classes of interest, PDP coverage restrictions impacted one resident health outcome: for cholinesterase inhibitor users, coverage restrictions were associated with a 0.04 point lower depression rating score relative to residents facing no restrictions. However, this result was not statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Our findings suggest that exogenous changes in coverage for three commonly-used medication classes had no detectable impact on nursing home resident health outcomes in 2006–2008. There are several possible explanations for this lack of association, including the role of policy protections for dual-eligible nursing home residents and the possibility that suitable clinical alternatives

  5. Possible long-term health effects of short-term exposure to chemical agents. Volume 2. Cholinesterase reactivators, psychochemicals, and irritants and vesicants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The present report evaluates toxicologic and epidemiologic data relevant to the testing of approximately 750 subjects exposed to cholinesterase reactivators, about 260 exposed to psychochemicals, and 1,500 exposed to irritants or vesicants. A remaining group of subjects used largely in tests involving placebo or innocuous chemicals or conditions is available for comparison and will be discussed later. The report is the work of three panels of scientists--the Panel on Cholinesterase Reactivator Chemicals, the Panel on Psychochemicals, and the Panel on Irritants and Vesicants. The chairman of each panel was selected from the Committee on Toxicology, and the members were selected on the basis of their knowledge of the compounds in question or because they represented required disciplines.

  6. Plasma cholinesterase inhibition in the clay-colored robin (Turdus grayi) exposed to diazinon in maradol papaya crops in Yucatan, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobos, V.M.; Mora, M.A.; Escalona, G.

    2006-01-01

    The use of organophosphorous pesticides in agriculture can result in intoxication of birds foraging in sprayed crops. Effects on birds resulting from pesticide intoxication are varied and include behavioral and reproductive effects, including death. One widely used insecticide in Maradol papaya crops is diazinon which has been associated with various incidents of intoxication and death of wild birds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of diazinon application to papaya crops on plasma cholinesterase activity of the clay-colored robin (Turdus grayi). We captured clay-colored robins foraging in a papaya crop the following day after the field had been sprayed with diazinon at a dose of 1.5 kg/ha during March and May, respectively. We took a blood sample from the brachialis vein of the birds captured and measured plasma enzymatic activity. The plasma samples from birds used as controls were taken during the same time period and were analyzed in a similar way. Enzymatic activity of males was greater than that of females (53,52%) and mean cholinesterase inhibition was 49.43%. Cholinesterase inhibition was greater during May than in March probably due to more continuous exposure and ingestion of the insecticide through food and possible absorption through the skin. This degree of enzymatic inhibition is possibly affecting the behavior of the clay-colored robin and could result in death in severe cases.

  7. Novel N-allyl/propargyl tetrahydroquinolines: Synthesis via Three-component Cationic Imino Diels-Alder Reaction, Binding Prediction, and Evaluation as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yeray A; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bernal, Cristian C; Güiza, Fausto M; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R

    2016-10-01

    New N-allyl/propargyl 4-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines derivatives were efficiently synthesized using acid-catalyzed three components cationic imino Diels-Alder reaction (70-95%). All compounds were tested in vitro as dual acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitors and their potential binding modes, and affinity, were predicted by molecular docking and binding free energy calculations (∆G) respectively. The compound 4af (IC50 = 72 μm) presented the most effective inhibition against acetylcholinesterase despite its poor selectivity (SI = 2), while the best inhibitory activity on butyryl-cholinesterase was exhibited by compound 4ae (IC50 = 25.58 μm) with considerable selectivity (SI = 0.15). Molecular docking studies indicated that the most active compounds fit in the reported acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase active sites. Moreover, our computational data indicated a high correlation between the calculated ∆G and the experimental activity values in both targets. PMID:27085663

  8. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates and heavy metals in birds. I. Plasma and brain cholinesterase in Coturnix quail fed methyl mercury and orally dosed with parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    We found that mercury potentiated the toxicity and biochemical effects of parathion. Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed a sublethal concentration of morsodren (4 ppm as methyl mercury) for 18 weeks. This resulted in an accumulation of 21.0 ppm of mercury in the liver and 8.4 ppm in the carcass. Birds fed clean feed and those fed morsodren-treated feed were orally dosed with 2, 4, 6, 8,and 10 mg/kg parathion, and their 48-h survival times compared. The computed LD50 was 5.86mg/kg in birds not fed morsodren and 4.24 in those fed the heavy metal. When challenged with a sublethal, oral dose of parathion (1.0 mg/kg), morsodren-fed birds exhibited significantly greater inhibition of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity than controls dosed with parathion. Brain cholinesterase activity was inhibited 41% in morsodren-fed birds and 26in clean-fed birds dosed with parathion, which suggested that the increase in parathion toxicity in the presence of morsodren was directly related to the inhibitation of brain cholinesterase.

  9. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke during gestation results in altered cholinesterase enzyme activity and behavioral deficits in adult rat offspring: potential relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zugno, Alexandra I; Fraga, Daiane B; De Luca, Renata D; Ghedim, Fernando V; Deroza, Pedro F; Cipriano, Andreza L; Oliveira, Mariana B; Heylmann, Alexandra S A; Budni, Josiane; Souza, Renan P; Quevedo, João

    2013-06-01

    Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) has been associated with physiological and developmental changes that may be related to an increased risk for childhood and adult neuropsychiatric diseases. The present study investigated locomotor activity and cholinesterase enzyme activity in rats, following PCSE and/or ketamine treatment in adulthood. Pregnant female Wistar rats were exposed to 12 commercially filtered cigarettes per day for a period of 28 days. We evaluated motor activity and cholinesterase activity in the brain and serum of adult male offspring that were administered acute subanesthetic doses of ketamine (5, 15 and 25 mg/kg), which serves as an animal model of schizophrenia. To determine locomotor activity, we used the open field test. Cholinesterase activity was assessed by hydrolysis monitored spectrophotometrically. Our results show that both PCSE and ketamine treatment in the adult offspring induced increase of locomotor activity. Additionally, it was observed increase of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in the brain and serum, respectively. We demonstrated that animals exposed to cigarettes in the prenatal period had increased the risk for psychotic symptoms in adulthood. This also occurs in a dose-dependent manner. These changes provoke molecular events that are not completely understood and may result in abnormal behavioral responses found in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

  10. Effects of stress pretreatment on the dynamics of blood cholinesterase activity after exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Slawomir; Swiercz, Radoslaw; Lutz, Piotr; Wiaderna, Dorota; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    A single i.p. administration of 1.0 mg/kg of chlorphenvinphos (CVP), an organophosphorus pesticide, results in an acute stress response, evidenced by a marked (6-7 fold) rise in plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and a diminished behavioural sensitivity to amphetamine (AMPH) three weeks postexposure. Surprisingly, in rats subjected to a single series of inescapable electric footshocks (60 10 msec triplets of 3.0 mA, 2 msec, square pulses during 20 min - IF ) two weeks prior to the CVP exposure, these effects are not observed. It has been assumed that the reduced effectiveness of CVP might be related to some persisting alterations in the functional state of the cholinergic system. The aim of the present work was to discover whether and in what way the IF pretreatment affects i) the cholinesterase activity in blood, and ii) the dynamics of the alterations in the cholinesterase (ChE) activity following the CVP exposure. The experiments were performed on 3 mo. old, male Wistar rats. In the first experiment, the blood samples were taken from the tail vein 15, 60 and 180 min after the IF. In the second experiment, the rats were pretreated with IF and 14 days later given 1.0 mg/kg of CVP i.p. Blood samples were taken 15 min, 60 min, 180 min, 24 h, 7 days, and 14 days after the CVP exposure. In the first experiment no differences in the ChE activity in plasma (pChE) and erythrocytes (rbcChE) were found between the shocked and control rats. In the second experiment, however, in rats pretreated with IF the rbcChE activity of was reduced by CVP less and pChE activity returned to normal faster than in rats not pretreated with IF. The results confirm that exposure to IF, a nonchemical stressor, induces some long-lasting adaptive changes which render the cholinergic system less susceptible to the harmful action of ChE inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that the changes consist in an increase of the antioxidant potential in blood and possibly other tissues. PMID

  11. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Hoy, Marjorie A

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  12. Isoindoline-1,3-dione derivatives targeting cholinesterases: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of potential anti-Alzheimer's agents.

    PubMed

    Guzior, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Rakoczy, Jurand; Brus, Boris; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder with a complex etiology. Because the available therapy brings limited benefits, the effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease remains the unmet challenge. Our aim was to develop a new series of donepezil-based compounds endowed with inhibitory properties against cholinesterases and β-amyloid aggregation. We designed the target compounds as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with N-benzylamine moiety interacting with the catalytic site of the enzyme and an isoindoline-1,3-dione fragment interacting with the peripheral anionic site of the enzyme. The results of pharmacological evaluation lead us to identify a compound 3b as the most potent and selective human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (hAChE IC50=0.361μM). Kinetic studies revealed that 3b inhibited acetylcholinesterase in non-competitive mode. The result of the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay for the blood-brain barrier indicated that the compound 3b would be able to cross the blood-brain barrier and reach its biological targets in the central nervous system. The selected compound 3b represents a potential lead structure for further development of anti-Alzheimer's agents. PMID:25707322

  13. Elevated cholinesterase activity and increased urinary excretion of inorganic fluorides in the workers producing fluorine-containing plastic (polytetrafluoroethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Baohui Xu |; Jiusun Zhang; Guaogeng Mao; Guifen Yang; Aini Chen; Aoyama, Kohji; Matsushita, Toshio; Ueda, Atsushi

    1992-07-01

    Fluoropolymers are widely used in thermal and electrical industries. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) plastic is a typical one. During its production, workers are occupationally exposed to many organic fluorides, especially tetrafluoroethylene, chlorodifluoromethane, PTFE and its thermal decomposition products. Of these compounds, it has been documented that following inhalation of combustion products of PTFE the focal hemorrhages, edema, fibrin deposition in lungs and renal infarcts were observed in rats. Odum and Green have demonstrated a marked damage to proximal tubule of kidney with no effects on the liver in rats exposed to 6000 ppm tetrafluoroethylene for 6 hr. The investigations of the hazards of these compounds to workers have been mainly focused on acute toxicity. There have been some reports that polymers and its pyrolysis caused polymer fume fever and pulmonary edema. In practice, workers engaged in PTFE manufacture are chronically exposed to the above-mentioned chemicals, but little was known about the hazards ascribed to these chemicals. To clarify the influences of the exposed chemicals on health in PTFE production we conducted a mass survey investigation in a PTFE production factory. As a result, in addition to the nephrotoxicity characterized by elevated ALP and NAG activities in urine, more interestingly, we have also found a reversible increase in cholinesterase (ChE) activity and enhanced urinary excretion of inorganic fluorides in workers engaged in PTFE production. We report here these findings and discuss their physiological significance. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. 7-Methoxytacrine-adamantylamine heterodimers as cholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease treatment--synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Spilovska, Katarina; Korabecny, Jan; Kral, Jan; Horova, Anna; Musilek, Kamil; Soukup, Ondrej; Drtinova, Lucie; Gazova, Zuzana; Siposova, Katarina; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-02-20

    A structural series of 7-MEOTA-adamantylamine thioureas was designed, synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE). The compounds were prepared based on the multi-target-directed ligand strategy with different linker lengths (n = 2-8) joining the well-known NMDA antagonist adamantine and the hAChE inhibitor 7-methoxytacrine (7-MEOTA). Based on in silico studies, these inhibitors proved dual binding site character capable of simultaneous interaction with the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of hAChE and the catalytic active site (CAS). Clearly, these structural derivatives exhibited very good inhibitory activity towards hBChE resulting in more selective inhibitors of this enzyme. The most potent cholinesterase inhibitor was found to be thiourea analogue 14 (with an IC₅₀ value of 0.47 µM for hAChE and an IC₅₀ value of 0.11 µM for hBChE, respectively). Molecule 14 is a suitable novel lead compound for further evaluation proving that the strategy of dual binding site inhibitors might be a promising direction for development of novel AD drugs.

  15. Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in agricultural waters and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruber, S.J.; Munn, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was used as a biomarker for assessing exposure of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides from irrigated agricultural waters. Carp were collected from a lake (Royal Lake) that receives most of its water from irrigation return flows and from a reference lake (Billy Clapp Lake) outside of the irrigation system. Results indicated that the mean whole-brain ChE activity of carp from Royal Lake (3.47 μmol/min/g tissue) was 34.2% less than that of carp from Billy Clapp Lake (5.27 μmol/min/g tissue) (p = 0.003). The depressed ChE activity in brain tissue of Royal Lake carp was in response to ChE-inhibiting insecticides detected in water samples in the weeks prior to tissue sampling; the most frequently detected insecticides included chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl, carbaryl, and ethoprop. Neither sex nor size appears to be a covariable in the analysis; ChE activity was not correlated with fish length or weight in either lake and there was no significant difference in ChE activity between the two sexes within each lake. Although organophosphate and carbamate insecticides can break down rapidly in the environment, this study suggests that in agricultural regions where insecticides are applied for extended periods of the year, nontarget aquatic biota may be exposed to high levels of ChE-inhibiting insecticides for a period of several months.

  16. Assessment of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaves.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Souchard, Jean Pierre; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of extracts with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) obtained from Punica granatum leaves. Total phenolics (8.8-127.3mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight), flavonoids (1.2-76.9mg quercetin equivalent/g dry weight), tannins (63.7-260.8mg catechin equivalent/kg dry weight) and anthocyanins (0.41-3.73mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dry weight) of different extracts were evaluated. The methanolic extract presented a good IC50 by DPPH and ABTS assays (5.62 and 1.31mg/l respectively). The strongest 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition activities were obtained for the ethanol extract (IC50 values of 6.20, 14.83 and 2.65mg/l, respectively) and the best cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cells was obtained for the methanol extract (IC50=31mg/l). These important biological activities showed that P. granatum leaves could be a potential source of the active molecules intended for applications in pharmaceutical industry, but only after additional in vivo experiments.

  17. Behavioral dysfunctions correlate to altered physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Little, E.E.; DeLonay, A.J.; Beauvais, S.L.; Jones, S.B.; Ellersieck, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    We selected four metrics of swimming behavior (distance swam, speed, rate of turning, and tortuosity of path) and the commonly used biochemical marker, brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity, to assess (1) the sensitivity and reliability of behavior as a potential biomarker in monitoring work, (2) the potential for these endpoints to be used in automated monitoring, and (3) the linkage between behavior and its underlying biochemistry. Malathion-exposed fish exhibited large decreases in distance and speed and swam in a more linear path than control fish after 24 h exposure. By 96 h exposure, fish still swam slower and traveled less distance; fish fully recovered after 48 h in clean water. Diazinon-exposed fish exhibited decreases in distance, speed, and turning rate compared to controls. After 48 h recovery in clean water, fish exposed to diazinon had not recovered to control levels. The behavioral responses provided measures of neurotoxicity that were easily quantifiable by automated means, implying that the inclusion of behavior in monitoring programs can be successful. Furthermore, correlations between behavior and biochemical endpoints, such as ChE inhibition, suggest that this approach can provide a meaningful link between biochemistry and behavior and can provide useful information on toxicant impacts.

  18. Acetyl cholinesterase activity and muscle contraction in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) following chronic phosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Boettger, S Anne; McClintock, James B

    2012-03-01

    The common shallow-water sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus is capable of surviving inorganic phosphate exposures as high as 3.2 mg L(-1) and organic phosphate exposures of 1000 mg L(-1) . Nonetheless, chronic exposure to low, medium, and high-sublethal concentrations of organic phosphate inhibits the muscle enzyme acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), responsible for the break down of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as well as inhibiting contractions in the muscles associated with the Aristotle's lantern. AChE activity, measured in both a static enzyme assay and by vesicular staining, displayed concentration-dependent declines of activity in individuals maintained in organic phosphate for 4 weeks. The activity of AChE was not adversely affected by exposure to inorganic phosphate or seawater controls over the same time period. Maximum force of muscle contraction and rates of muscle contraction and relaxation also decreased with chronic exposure to increasing concentrations of organic phosphate. Chronic exposure to inorganic phosphates elicited no response except at the highest concentration, where the maximum force of muscular contraction increased compared to controls. These findings indicate that shallow-water populations of Lytechinus variegatus subjected to organic phosphate pollutants may display impaired muscular activity that is potentially related to the inhibition of the muscle relaxant enzyme AChE, and subsequently muscular overstimulation, and fatigue.

  19. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J’ and J” clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J’ and J” clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  20. Behavioral dysfunctions correlate to altered physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Brewer, S K; Little, E E; DeLonay, A J; Beauvais, S L; Jones, S B; Ellersieck, M R

    2001-01-01

    We selected four metrics of swimming behavior (distance swam, speed, rate of turning, and tortuosity of path) and the commonly used biochemical marker, brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity, to assess (1) the sensitivity and reliability of behavior as a potential biomarker in monitoring work, (2) the potential for these endpoints to be used in automated monitoring, and (3) the linkage between behavior and its underlying biochemistry. Malathion-exposed fish exhibited large decreases in distance and speed and swam in a more linear path than control fish after 24 h exposure. By 96 h exposure, fish still swam slower and traveled less distance; fish fully recovered after 48 h in clean water. Diazinon-exposed fish exhibited decreases in distance, speed, and turning rate compared to controls. After 48 h recovery in clean water, fish exposed to diazinon had not recovered to control levels. The behavioral responses provided measures of neurotoxicity that were easily quantifiable by automated means, implying that the inclusion of behavior in monitoring programs can be successful. Furthermore, correlations between behavior and biochemical endpoints, such as ChE inhibition, suggest that this approach can provide a meaningful link between biochemistry and behavior and can provide useful information on toxicant impacts.

  1. Assessment of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaves.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Souchard, Jean Pierre; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of extracts with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) obtained from Punica granatum leaves. Total phenolics (8.8-127.3mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight), flavonoids (1.2-76.9mg quercetin equivalent/g dry weight), tannins (63.7-260.8mg catechin equivalent/kg dry weight) and anthocyanins (0.41-3.73mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dry weight) of different extracts were evaluated. The methanolic extract presented a good IC50 by DPPH and ABTS assays (5.62 and 1.31mg/l respectively). The strongest 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition activities were obtained for the ethanol extract (IC50 values of 6.20, 14.83 and 2.65mg/l, respectively) and the best cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cells was obtained for the methanol extract (IC50=31mg/l). These important biological activities showed that P. granatum leaves could be a potential source of the active molecules intended for applications in pharmaceutical industry, but only after additional in vivo experiments. PMID:23380204

  2. The effects of inhibition of plasma cholinesterase and hepatic microsomal enzyme activity on cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, and norcocaine blood levels in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kambam, J; Mets, B; Hickman, R M; Janicki, P; James, M F; Fuller, B; Kirsch, R E

    1992-08-01

    We measured the blood levels of cocaine and its three major metabolites, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, and norcocaine, in three groups of male pigs weighing about 26 kg (25.75 +/- 0.25 kg) to determine the effects of inhibition of plasma cholinesterase and hepatic microsomal enzyme activity on cocaine metabolism. In addition, systemic elimination half-life, volume of distribution, and clearance of cocaine were calculated for the three groups. Group 1 pigs (n = 4) were pretreated with normal saline solution, group 2 pigs (n = 4) were pretreated with tetraisopropyl pyrophosphoramide, a specific plasma cholinesterase inhibitor, and group 3 pigs (n = 4) were pretreated with cimetidine, a hepatic microsomal enzyme inhibitor, all administered intramuscularly. Pigs were anesthetized with intravenous sodium thiopental; a carotid arterial cannula and an external jugular catheter were then inserted for the administration of cocaine and for blood sampling. Forty-five minutes later, when pigs were again completely awake, cocaine 3 mg/kg was given intravenously. Arterial blood samples were collected for the analysis of cocaine and cocaine metabolite levels just before and at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120, 180, and 1440 minutes after the administration of cocaine. Cocaine and cocaine metabolite blood levels were analyzed with high-pressure liquid chromatography methods and plasma cholinesterase activity was measured with a colorimetric method. The blood levels of cocaine and cocaine metabolites were significantly different among the three groups (p less than 0.05, analysis of variance). Statistically significant differences in half-life, volume of distribution and clearance were also seen among the three groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Measurements of cholinesterase activity in the tropical freshwater cladoceran Pseudosida ramosa and its standardization as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Emanuela Cristina; Printes, Liane Biehl; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso; Rocha, Odete

    2014-03-01

    The activity of cholinesterases (ChE) has been recognized as a useful tool for assessing the toxicity in the environmental assessment programs. Nevertheless, the prior optimization of the experimental conditions for the appropriate measuring of the ChE activity enables us to get reliable results. Thus, the main objective of this study was to adapt and optimize a microplate assay for measuring the activity of ChE in the tropical cladoceran Pseudosida ramosa. The best readings for the reaction rates were obtained with buffers of pH 8.0 and molarity of 0.02M. The measurements of the reaction rates for the different substrate concentrations showed that the maximum reaction rate (32mODmin(-1)) was achieved by the final concentration of 2mM of substrate. In relation to the enzyme concentration, reaction rates were directly proportional to the protein concentration, which confirmed the linear kinetics for a maximum reaction rate. On the basis of the results of the assays for the effect of the number of individuals and homogenate dilution on the reaction rate of substrate hydrolysis and ChE activity, we recommend using of 30 individuals (3 days-old) in 250μL of buffer, 20 individuals (7 days-old) in 250μL of buffer and 15 individuals (both 14 and 21 days-old) in 300μL of buffer. The limits of quantitation obtained were 1.419mODmin(-1) (≤72h-old), 1.670mODmin(-1) (7 days-old), 0.943mODmin(-1) (14 days-old) and 0.797mODmin(-1) (21 days-old). In conclusion, it was possible to measure the ChE activity in P. ramosa with the methodology adapted, thus contributing to the implementation of a biochemical biomarker in freshwater toxicity assessments in tropical regions.

  4. Differences between male and female rhesus monkey erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase activity before and after exposure to sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.L.; Calamaio, C.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Anderson, D.R.; Harris, L.W.

    1993-05-13

    The female rhesus monkey has a menstrual cycle like the human. Additionally, several differences in enzyme levels between males and females and in the female during the menstrual cycle are present. Therefore we quantitated plasma cholinesterase (ChE/BuChE) and erythrocyte (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity before and after exposure to sarin (GB)(1 5 ug/kg, iv; a 0.75 LD50), in male and female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Twenty-eight-day preexposure baseline plasma ChE and RBC AChE values for six male and six female rhesus monkeys were compared for intra-animal, within sex and between sex differences. After these baseline values were obtained, the organophosphorus (OP) compound/Isopropyl methylphosphono-fluoridate (GB) was administered to atropinized monkeys to determine if there was a significant in vivo difference between the sexes in their response to this intoxication in regard to the rate of BuChE /AChE inhibition, pyridine-2-aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM) reactivation of the phosphonylated BuChE and the rate of aging of the phosphonylated:BuChE/AChE. In the pre-exposure portion of the protocol; the intra-animal and intra-group BuChE/AChE variations were found to be minimal; but there were significant differences between the male and female monkeys in both plasma BuChE and RBC AChE levels; although probably clinically insignificant in respect to an OP intoxication. No significant cyclic fluctuations were seen during the 28-day study in either sex.

  5. Transferable residues from dog fur and plasma cholinesterase inhibition in dogs treated with a flea control dip containing chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Boone, J S; Tyler, J W; Chambers, J E

    2001-11-01

    We studied chlorpyrifos, an insecticide present in a commercial dip for treating ectoparasites in dogs, to estimate the amount of transferable residues that children could obtain from their treated pets. Although the chlorpyrifos dip is no longer supported by the manufacturer, the methodology described herein can help determine transferable residues from other flea control insecticide formulations. Twelve dogs of different breeds and weights were dipped using the recommended guidelines with a commercial, nonprescription chlorpyrifos flea dip for 4 consecutive treatments at 3-week intervals (nonshampoo protocol) and another 12 dogs were dipped with shampooing between dips (shampoo protocol). The samples collected at 4 hr and 7, 14, and 21 days after treatment in the nonshampoo protocol averaged 971, 157, 70, and 26 microg chlorpyrifos, respectively; in the shampoo protocol the samples averaged 459, 49, 15, and 10 microg, respectively. The highest single sample was about 7,000 microg collected at 4 hr. The pretreatment specific activities in the plasma of the dogs were about 75 nmol/min/mg protein for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and 9 nmol/min/mg protein for acetylcholinesterase (AChE). BChE was inhibited 50-75% throughout the study, and AChE was inhibited 11-18% in the nonshampoo protocol; inhibition was not as great in the shampoo protocol. There was no correlation (pcholinesterase activity did not return to control levels during the 3-week period. The differences between the shampoo and nonshampoo protocols were explained by differences in the techniques of the dip

  6. Altered quantities and in vivo activities of cholinesterase from Daphnia magna in sub-lethal exposure to organophosphorus insecticides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcui; Yuan, Bingqiang; Li, Shaonan

    2012-06-01

    For investigating relationship between activity of cholinesterase (ChE) and ambient concentration of anticholinesterases, Daphnia magna had been exposed for 21 day to sub-lethal concentrations, i.e. 1/6 EC(50), 1/36 EC(50), and 1/216 EC(50), of either triazophos or chlorpyrifos. Samples were taken at different points of time for measuring total activity and immunoreactive content of ChE and actual concentrations of the anticholinesterases. A type of antigen formerly developed by immunizing mice with purified ChE was utilized in this study to establish an indirect non-competitive ELISA for measuring immunoreactive content of ChE in Daphnia. Studies showed that for apparent activity, i.e. activity that was scaled with total protein, the insecticides caused 5.2-6.9 percent inhibition and 17.0-17.7 percent inductions during the 21 d exposure, whereas for inherent activity, i.e. activity that was scaled with immunoreactive protein, no induction was detected during the exposure. Accompanied by up to 65.9 percent and 68.0 percent promotion in terms of the immunoreactive content, up to 42.8 percent and 44.6 percent inhibition in terms of the inherent activity was indicated, respectively, for triazophos and chlopyrifos. Judged by measured concentrations, the inherent activity recovered faster than the rate of dissipation of the anticholinesterases. Result of the study suggested that the inherent activity was more sensitive than the apparent one in predicting sub-lethal and/or long-term stress of anticholinesterases. It also suggested that apart from promotion in terms of content of the ChE, the Daphnia developed capacities to block bio-concentration of anticholinesterases, and these capacities would make it liable to underestimate ambient concentration of anticholinesterases along with the time of exposure.

  7. AGE-RELATED BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION KINETICS FOLLOWING IN VITRO INCUBATION WITH CHLORPYRIFOS-OXON AND DIAZINON-OXON

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2007-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos and diazinon are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, and their primary mechanism of action involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by their metabolites chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) and diazinon-oxon (DZO), respectively. The study objectives were to assess the in vitro age-related inhibition kinetics of neonatal rat brain cholinesterase (ChE) by estimating the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki) values for CPO and DZO. Brain ChE inhibition and ki values following CPO and DZO incubation with neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats rat brain homogenates were determined at post natal day (PND) -5, -12 and -17 and compared with the corresponding inhibition and ki values obtained in the adult rat. A modified Ellman method was utilized for measuring the ChE activity. Chlorpyrifos-oxon resulted in greater ChE inhibition than DZO consistent with the estimated ki values of both compounds. Neonatal brain ChE inhibition kinetics exhibited a marked age-related sensitivity to CPO, where the order of ChE inhibition was PND-5 > PND-7 > PND-17 with ki values of 0.95, 0.50 and 0.22 nM-1hr-1, respectively. In contrast, DZO did not exhibit an age-related inhibition of neonatal brain ChE, and the estimated ki value at all PND ages was 0.02 nM-1hr-1. These results demonstrated an age- and chemical-related OP-selective inhibition of rat brain ChE which may be critically important in understanding the potential sensitivity of juvenile humans to specific OP exposures.

  8. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-08

    An integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of post-exposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM. Based on this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values, but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  9. Influence of gender on thermoregulation and cholinesterase inhibition in the long-evans rat exposed to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Mack, Cina M

    2003-02-14

    Diazinon is an organophosphate (OP)-based, anticholinesterase insecticide that irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and produces cholinergic stimulation in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. Our laboratory has found that OPs administered orally in rats induce a transient period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever that persists for several days after exposure. There is little information on the thermoregulatory effects of diazinon. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radiotelemetry in male and female rats of the Long-Evans strain dosed orally with diazinon (0 [corn-oil vehicle], 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg in males and 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg in females). There was a dose-dependent decrease in Tc during the first night after treatment, with females exhibiting slightly greater sensitivity than males. MA was unaffected in females exposed to diazinon at doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg; MA of males was reduced during the first night after dosing with 300 mg/kg. There was a delayed elevation in Tc of males dosed with 200 and 300 mg/kg and females dosed with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg diazinon. The elevated Tc was only manifested during d 2 and 3 after diazinon. Administration of 200 mg/kg sodium salicylate to females 48 h after being treated with 200 mg/kg diazinon led to a rapid abatement of the fever. Diazinon doses of 50 to 300 mg/kg led to 40% to 50% inhibition in plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity 4 h after dosing, and females displayed a significantly slower recovery of ChE activity compared to males. When compared on a molar basis, the hypothermic response to diazinon was relatively small compared to other OPs such as chlorpyrifos. The delayed fever and efficacy of sodium salicylate to block diazinon-induced fever are similar to the effects of OPs chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate (DFP). PMID:12521673

  10. Muscular and brain cholinesterase sensitivities to azinphos methyl and carbaryl in the juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ana; Venturino, Andrés; Pechén de D'Angelo, Ana M

    2007-09-01

    The organophosphate azinphos methyl (AzMe) and the carbamate carbaryl are the insecticides mostly used in the irrigated valley of Río Negro and Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to AzMe and carbaryl and the sensitivity of skeletal muscular cholinesterase (ChE) and the time course of inhibition and recovery were evaluated. EC50 values demonstrated that AzMe was a stronger in vivo inhibitor of muscular ChE (1.05+/-0.23 microg/L) than carbaryl (270+/-62.23 microg/L). Muscular ChE was significantly less sensitive to both insecticides than brain ChE. EC50 values obtained for muscular ChE were closer than those for brain ChE to the respective pesticide lethal concentrations, pointing out the relevance of the muscular enzyme in determining acute toxicity. The recovery process of ChE activity after carbaryl exposure (500 microg/L) was fast, whereas no significant recovery was observed with AzMe (1 microg/L) after 21 days in uncontaminated media. Brain and muscular ChE were inhibited and showed a significant but not complete recovery after three consecutive 48-h exposures to AzMe (1 microg/L) followed by a recovery period of 7 days. This scheme mimics the periodical application of the insecticides in the region and suggests a certain probability of a sustained ChE inhibition under field conditions, affecting fish development and survival.

  11. Response and recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity in freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis (Decapoda: Atyidae) exposed to selected anti-cholinesterase insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Doan, H; Barnes, Mary; Chapman, J C; Kookana, R S

    2010-10-01

    The toxicity of carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and profenofos to the freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis was assessed by measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition after 96h exposures. Shrimp exposed to these pesticides exhibited significant AChE inhibition, with mortality in shrimp corresponding to 70-90% AChE inhibition. The sensitivity of P. australiensis to the four pesticides based on AChE inhibition can be given as chlorpyrifos > profenofos > carbaryl > dimethoate. Recovery of AChE activity was followed in shrimp after 96 h exposures to carbaryl, chlorpyrifos and dimethoate. Recovery after exposure to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl was more rapid than for the two organophosphorus pesticides, chlorpyrifos and dimethoate. The slow recovery of depressed AChE activity may mean that affected organisms in the natural system are unable to sustain physical activities such as searching for food or eluding predators. To investigate the ecological significance of AChE inhibition, chemotaxis behaviour was assessed in shrimp exposed to profenofos for 24h. Abnormal chemotaxis behaviour in the exposed shrimp was observed at concentrations representing 30-50% AChE inhibition. A clear relationship existed between the depression of AChE activity and observed chemotaxis responses, such as approaching and grasping the chemoattractant source. These results suggest that in vivo toxicity tests based on this specific biomarker are sensitive and present advantages over conventional acute tests based on mortality. Behavioural studies of test organisms conducted in conjunction with measurement of AChE inhibition will provide data to clarify the toxic effects caused by sublethal chemical concentrations of anti-cholinesterase compounds. PMID:20701973

  12. Effects of Gingko biloba supplementation in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cholinesterase inhibitors: data from the ICTUS study.

    PubMed

    Canevelli, Marco; Adali, Nawal; Kelaiditi, Eirini; Cantet, Christelle; Ousset, Pierre-Jean; Cesari, Matteo

    2014-05-15

    Ginkgo biloba (Gb) is currently the most investigated and adopted herbal remedy for cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nevertheless, its efficacy in the prevention and treatment of dementia still remains controversial. Specifically, the added effects of Gb in subjects already receiving "conventional" anti-dementia treatments have been to date very scarcely investigated. We evaluated whether the use of Gb is associated with additional cognitive and functional benefit in AD patients already in treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs). Data are from mild to moderate AD patients under ChEI treatment recruited in the Impact of Cholinergic Treatment USe (ICTUS) study. Mixed model analyses were performed to measure six-monthly modifications in the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) subscale score, and the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale over a follow-up of 1 year according to the additional Gb supplementation. A total of 828 subjects were considered for the present analyses. Significantly different modifications at the MMSE score over the 12-month follow-up were reported between patients on combined therapy compared to those only taking ChEIs. On the contrary, the modification of the ADAS-Cog score between the two groups did not show statistically significant differences, although similar trends were noticed. No significant modifications of the two adopted outcome measures were observed at the mid-term 6-month evaluation. The modifications over time of the ADL score did not show statistically significant differences between the two groups of interest. Our findings suggest that Gb may provide some added cognitive benefits in AD patients already under ChEIs treatment. The clinical meaningfulness of such effects remains to be confirmed and clarified.

  13. Recovery study of cholinesterases and neurotoxic signs in the non-target freshwater invertebrate Chilina gibbosa after an acute exposure to an environmental concentration of azinphos-methyl.

    PubMed

    Cossi, Paula Fanny; Beverly, Boburg; Carlos, Luquet; Kristoff, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    Azinphos-methyl belongs to the class of organophosphate insecticides which are recognized for their anticholinesterase action. It is one of the most frequently used insecticides in the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, where agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. It has been detected in water from this North Patagonian region throughout the year and the maximum concentration found was 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Chilina gibbosa is a freshwater gastropod widely distributed in South America, particularly in Patagonia, Argentina and in Southern Chile. Toxicological studies performed with C. gibbosa in our laboratory have reported neurotoxicity signs and cholinesterase inhibition after exposure to azinphos-methyl for 48 h. Recovery studies together with characterization of the enzyme and sensitivity of the enzyme to pesticides can improve the toxicological evaluation. However, little is known about recovery patterns in organisms exposed to organophosphates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the recovery capacity (during 21 days in pesticide-free water) of cholinesterase activity and neurotoxicity in C. gibbosa after 48 h of exposure to azinphos-methyl. Also, lethality and carboxylesterase activity were registered during the recovery period. Regarding enzyme activities, after a 48-h exposure to 20 μg L(-1) of azinphos-methyl, cholinesterases showed an inhibition of 85% with respect to control, while carboxylesterases were not affected. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, cholinesterases continued to be inhibited (70%). Severe neurotoxicity signs were observed after exposure: 82% of the snails presented lack of adherence to vessels, 11% showed weak adherence, and 96% exhibited an abnormal protrusion of the head-foot region from shell. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, only 15% of the snails presented severe signs of neurotoxicity. However, during the recovery period significant

  14. Recovery study of cholinesterases and neurotoxic signs in the non-target freshwater invertebrate Chilina gibbosa after an acute exposure to an environmental concentration of azinphos-methyl.

    PubMed

    Cossi, Paula Fanny; Beverly, Boburg; Carlos, Luquet; Kristoff, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    Azinphos-methyl belongs to the class of organophosphate insecticides which are recognized for their anticholinesterase action. It is one of the most frequently used insecticides in the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, where agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. It has been detected in water from this North Patagonian region throughout the year and the maximum concentration found was 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Chilina gibbosa is a freshwater gastropod widely distributed in South America, particularly in Patagonia, Argentina and in Southern Chile. Toxicological studies performed with C. gibbosa in our laboratory have reported neurotoxicity signs and cholinesterase inhibition after exposure to azinphos-methyl for 48 h. Recovery studies together with characterization of the enzyme and sensitivity of the enzyme to pesticides can improve the toxicological evaluation. However, little is known about recovery patterns in organisms exposed to organophosphates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the recovery capacity (during 21 days in pesticide-free water) of cholinesterase activity and neurotoxicity in C. gibbosa after 48 h of exposure to azinphos-methyl. Also, lethality and carboxylesterase activity were registered during the recovery period. Regarding enzyme activities, after a 48-h exposure to 20 μg L(-1) of azinphos-methyl, cholinesterases showed an inhibition of 85% with respect to control, while carboxylesterases were not affected. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, cholinesterases continued to be inhibited (70%). Severe neurotoxicity signs were observed after exposure: 82% of the snails presented lack of adherence to vessels, 11% showed weak adherence, and 96% exhibited an abnormal protrusion of the head-foot region from shell. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, only 15% of the snails presented severe signs of neurotoxicity. However, during the recovery period significant

  15. Influence of body size on swimming performance of four species of neonatal natricine snakes acutely exposed to a cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William A; Winne, Christopher T

    2006-05-01

    Locomotor performance is an important fitness-related trait in reptiles because of its potential influence on prey capture and predator avoidance. Because cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides disrupt neuromuscular signaling, reduction in performance seems to be a logical translation of this biochemical disruption to the organism level. In the present study, we compared the swimming performance of four species of natricine snakes acutely exposed to a formulation of carbaryl to determine whether neonatal body size or skin permeability influences responsiveness. Exposure to high concentrations of carbaryl (2.5-5.0 mg/L) resulted in reduced swimming performance in all four species of snakes, and species responded similarly to the pesticide once body size was accounted for allometrically. Using traditional methods in physiological ecology to estimate skin permeability (a parameter that influences the dose of contaminant absorbed), we found that water flux across the integument also scaled allometrically with body surface area and, therefore, was similar among species after controlling for this relationship. We suggest that future studies examining the effects of repeated low-dose exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors on performance parameters will be useful in assessing the ecological significance of our findings.

  16. Targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors, but not cholinesterase or neurotransmitter, in the neurotoxicity of TDCPP in Chinese rare minnow adults (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lilai; Li, Jiasu; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been detected at high concentrations in various environmental and biotic samples, but little is known about their toxicity. In this study, the potential neurotoxicity of three OPFRs (TCEP, TDCPP, and TPP) and Chlorpyrifos (CPF, an organophosphate pesticide) were compared in Chinese rare minnow using an acute toxicity test and a 21-day fish assay. The acute test demonstrated significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) by CPF. Although significant AChE inhibition at high concentration of TPP was also observed, none of the OPFRs had effects similar to CPF on these enzymes, indicating that their acute toxicities to Chinese rare minnow may be unrelated to cholinesterase inhibition. In addition, the 21-day fish assay with TDCPP demonstrated no significant effects on cholinesterase activities or neurotransmitter levels. Nonetheless, this OPFR exhibited widespread effects on the neurotrophic factors and their receptors (e.g., ntf3, ntrk1, ntrk2, ngfr, and fgf2, fgf11, fgf22, fgfr4), indicating that TDCPP or other OPFRs may elicit neurological effects by targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors in Chinese rare minnow. PMID:26552522

  17. Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Studies of 2,4-Disubstituted Pyrimidine Derivatives: Dual Activity as Cholinesterase and Aβ-Aggregation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Tarek; Zhao, Xiaobei; Habib, Lila K.; Yang, Jerry; Rao, Praveen P. N.

    2011-01-01

    A novel class of 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidines (7a–u, 8a–f, 9a–e) that possess substituents with varying steric and electronic properties at the C-2 and C-4 positions, were designed, synthesized and evaluated as dual cholinesterase and amyloid-β (Aβ)-aggregation inhibitors. In vitro screening identified N-(naphth-1-ylmethyl)-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrimidin-4-amine (9a) as the most potent AChE inhibitor (IC50 = 5.5 μM). Among this class of compounds, 2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)-N-(naphth-1-ylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-amine (9e) was identified as the most potent and selective BuChE inhibitor (IC50 = 2.2 μM, Selectivity Index = 11.7) and was about 5.7-fold more potent compared to the commercial, approved reference drug galanthamine (BuChE IC50 = 12.6 μM). In addition, the selective AChE inhibitor N-benzyl-2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)pyrimidin-4-amine (7d), exhibited good inhibition of hAChE-induced aggregation of Aβ1–40 fibrils (59% inhibition). Furthermore, molecular modeling studies indicate that a central pyrimidine ring serves as a suitable template to develop dual inhibitors of cholinesterase and AChE-induced Aβ aggregation thereby targeting multiple pathological routes in AD. PMID:21429752

  18. Muscular cholinesterase activities and lipid peroxidation levels as biomarkers in several Mediterranean marine fish species and their relationship with ecological variables.

    PubMed

    Solé, Montserrat; Baena, Miguel; Arnau, Susana; Carrasson, Maite; Maynou, Francesc; Cartes, Joan E

    2010-02-01

    Muscular cholinesterase activities, as potential markers of neurotoxic exposure, and lipid peroxidation levels, indicative of oxidative stress damage, both currently used in early-warning pollution monitoring, were characterised in eighteen fish species of ecologic and/or economic importance. These species comprise five orders and eleven families of teleosts and two species of elasmobranchs, feed using different strategies (benthic, epibenthic, endobenthic and pelagic), belong to different trophic levels and express different swimming behaviour. Their habitat ranges from 50 to 60 m (shallow or continental shelf) and 600 to 850 m (middle continental slope). Sampling took place in front of the Barcelona coast (NW Mediterranean) during four seasonal cruises in 2007. In the summer sampling, another site potentially exposed to a different pollution load (Vilanova) was included for comparison. Species, seasonal and site differences were tested and discussed in relation to chemical analysis of the local sediment, systematic position, habitat depth, feeding strategy, trophic level and swimming activity. Greater inter species differences rather than seasonal or site trends were seen in accordance to little pollution fluctuations. Higher cholinesterase activities were recorded in suprabenthos feeders, regardless of depth habitat, whereas LP levels were similar in all species except for the shark Scyliorhinus canicula in which they were consistently elevated. This study confirms and broadens former observations carried out with a more reduced number of fish species (Solé et al., 2008a). PMID:20022635

  19. Developing antibodies from cholinesterase derived from prokaryotic expression and testing their feasibility for detecting immunogen content in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-cui; Yuan, Bing-qiang; Li, Shao-nan

    2016-02-01

    To yield cholinesterase (ChE) from prokaryotic expression, the ChE gene that belongs to Daphnia magna was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using forward primer 5'-CCCYGGNGCSAT GATGTG-3' and reverse primer 5'-GYAAGTTRGCCCAATATCT-3'. To express the gene, one sequence of the amplified DNA, which was able to encode a putative protein containing two conserved carboxylesterase domains, was connected to the prokaryotic expression vector PET-29a(+). The recombinant vector was transformed into Escherichia coil BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced by isopropy-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed ChE was used as an immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. The obtained antibodies were tested for their specificity towards crude enzymes from species such as Alona milleri, Macrobrachium nipponense, Bombyx mori, Chironomus kiiensis, Apis mellifera, Eisenia foetida, Brachydanio rerio, and Xenopus laevis. Results indicated that the antibodies had specificity suitable for detecting ChE in Daphnia magna. A type of indirect and non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IN-ELISA) was used to test the immunoreactive content of ChE (ChE-IR) in Daphina magna. The detection limit of the IN-ELISA was found to be 14.5 ng/ml at an antiserum dilution of 1:22 000. Results from tests on Daphnia magna exposed to sublethal concentrations of triazophos indicated a maximal induction of 57.2% in terms of ChE-IR on the second day after the animals were exposed to a concentration of 2.10 μg/L triazophos. Testing on animals acclimatized to a temperature of 16 °C indicated that ChE-IR was induced by 16.9% compared with the ChE-IR content detected at 21 °C, and the rate of induction was 25.6% at 10 °C. The IN-ELISA was also used to test the stability of ChE-IR in collected samples. Repeated freezing and thawing had no influence on the outcome of the test. All these results suggest that the polyclonal antibodies developed against the recombinant ChE are as

  20. Time course of cholinesterase inhibition in adult rats treated acutely with carbaryl, carbofuran, formetanate, methomyl, methiocarb, oxamyl or propoxur.

    PubMed

    Padilla, S; Marshall, R S; Hunter, D L; Lowit, A

    2007-03-01

    To compare the toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamates, time course profiles for brain and red blood cell (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were established for each. Adult, male, Long Evans rats (n=4-5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (30 mg/kg in corn oil); carbofuran (0.5 mg/kg in corn oil); formetanate HCl (10 mg/kg in water); methomyl (3 mg/kg in water); methiocarb (25 mg/kg in corn oil); oxamyl (1 mg/kg in water); or propoxur (20 mg/kg in corn oil). This level of dosing produced at least 40% brain ChE inhibition. Brain and blood were taken from 0.5 to 24 h after dosing for analysis of ChE activity using two different methods: (1) a radiometric method which limits the amount of reactivation of ChE activity, and (2) a spectrophotometric method (Ellman method using traditional, unmodified conditions) which may encourage reactivation. The time of peak ChE inhibition was similar for all seven N-methyl carbamate pesticides: 0.5-1.0 h after dosing. By 24 h, brain and RBC ChE activity in all animals returned to normal. The spectrophotometric method underestimated ChE inhibition. Moreover, there was a strong, direct correlation between brain and RBC ChE activity (radiometric assay) for all seven compounds combined (r(2)=0.73, slope 1.1), while the spectrophotometric analysis of the same samples showed a poor correlation (r(2)=0.09). For formetanate, propoxur, methomyl, and methiocarb, brain and RBC ChE inhibitions were not different over time, but for carbaryl, carbofuran and oxamyl, the RBC ChE was slightly more inhibited than brain ChE. These data indicate (1) the radiometric method is superior for analyses of ChE activity in tissues from carbamate-treated animals (2) that animals treated with these N-methyl carbamate pesticides are affected rapidly, and recover rapidly, and (3) generally, assessment of RBC ChE is an accurate predictor of brain ChE inhibition for these seven pesticides.

  1. Developing antibodies from cholinesterase derived from prokaryotic expression and testing their feasibility for detecting immunogen content in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-cui; Yuan, Bing-qiang; Li, Shao-nan

    2016-02-01

    To yield cholinesterase (ChE) from prokaryotic expression, the ChE gene that belongs to Daphnia magna was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using forward primer 5'-CCCYGGNGCSAT GATGTG-3' and reverse primer 5'-GYAAGTTRGCCCAATATCT-3'. To express the gene, one sequence of the amplified DNA, which was able to encode a putative protein containing two conserved carboxylesterase domains, was connected to the prokaryotic expression vector PET-29a(+). The recombinant vector was transformed into Escherichia coil BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced by isopropy-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed ChE was used as an immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. The obtained antibodies were tested for their specificity towards crude enzymes from species such as Alona milleri, Macrobrachium nipponense, Bombyx mori, Chironomus kiiensis, Apis mellifera, Eisenia foetida, Brachydanio rerio, and Xenopus laevis. Results indicated that the antibodies had specificity suitable for detecting ChE in Daphnia magna. A type of indirect and non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IN-ELISA) was used to test the immunoreactive content of ChE (ChE-IR) in Daphina magna. The detection limit of the IN-ELISA was found to be 14.5 ng/ml at an antiserum dilution of 1:22 000. Results from tests on Daphnia magna exposed to sublethal concentrations of triazophos indicated a maximal induction of 57.2% in terms of ChE-IR on the second day after the animals were exposed to a concentration of 2.10 μg/L triazophos. Testing on animals acclimatized to a temperature of 16 °C indicated that ChE-IR was induced by 16.9% compared with the ChE-IR content detected at 21 °C, and the rate of induction was 25.6% at 10 °C. The IN-ELISA was also used to test the stability of ChE-IR in collected samples. Repeated freezing and thawing had no influence on the outcome of the test. All these results suggest that the polyclonal antibodies developed against the recombinant ChE are as

  2. Characterization of the In Vitro Kinetic Interaction of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon with Rat Salivary Cholinesterase: A Potential Biomonitoring Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A. ); Poet, Torka S. ); Timchalk, Charles

    2003-02-12

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphate insecticide (OP). The primary mechanism of action for CPF involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by the active metabolite, CPF-oxon, with subsequent accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) resulting in a wide range of neutotoxicity. CPF-oxon, can likewise inhibit other non-target cholinesterases (ChE) such as butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), which represents a detoxification mechanism and a potential biomarker of exposure/response. Biological monitoring for OPs has focused on measuring parent chemical or metabolite in blood and urine or blood ChE inhibition. Salivary biomonitoring has recently been explored as a practical method for examination of chemical exposure; however, there are a limited number of studies exploring its use for OPs. To evaluate the use of salivary ChE as a biological monitor for OP exposure, the current study characterized salivary ChE activity in Sprague-Dawley rats through its comparison with brain and plasma ChE using BW284C51 and iso-OMPA as selective inhibitors of AChE and BuChE, respectively. The study also estimated the kinetic constants describing BuChE interaction with CPF-oxon. A modified Ellman assay in conjunction with pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling was used to characterize the in vitro titration of diluted rat salivary ChE enzyme with CPF-oxon. The results indicated that, more than 95% of rat salivary ChE activity was associated with BuChE activity, total BuChE active site concentration was 0.0012 0.00013 nmol/ml saliva, reactivation rate constant (Kr) was 0.068 0.008 h-1 and inhibitory (Ki) rate constant of 8.825 and 9.80 nM-1h-1 determined experimentally and using model optimization respectively. These study results would be helpful for further evaluating the potential utility of salivary ChE as a practical tool for biological monitor of OP exposures.

  3. Binary mixtures of azinphos-methyl oxon and chlorpyrifos oxon produce in vitro synergistic cholinesterase inhibition in Planorbarius corneus.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Luis Claudio; Kristoff, Gisela; Verrengia Guerrero, Noemí R; Cochón, Adriana C

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CES) activities present in whole organism homogenates from Planorbarius corneus and their in vitro sensitivity to organophosphorous (OP) pesticides were studied. Firstly, a characterization of ChE and CES activities using different substrates and selective inhibitors was performed. Secondly, the effects of azinphos-methyl oxon (AZM-oxon) and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-oxon), the active oxygen analogs of the OP insecticides AZM and CPF, on ChE and CES activities were evaluated. Finally, it was analyzed whether binary mixtures of the pesticide oxons cause additive, antagonistic or synergistic ChE inhibition in P. corneus homogenates. The results showed that the extracts of P. corneus preferentially hydrolyzed acetylthiocholine (AcSCh) over propionylthiocholine (PrSCh) and butyrylthiocholine (BuSCh). Besides, AcSCh hydrolyzing activity was inhibited by low concentrations of BW284c51, a selective inhibitor of AChE activity, and also by high concentrations of substrate. These facts suggest the presence of a typical AChE activity in this species. However, the different dose-response curves observed with BW284c51 when using PrSCh or BuSCh instead of AcSCh suggest the presence of at least another ChE activity. This would probably correspond to an atypical BuChE. Regarding CES activity, the highest specific activity was obtained when using 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA), followed by 1-naphthyl acetate (1-NA); p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA), and p-nitrophenyl butyrate (p-NPB). The comparison of the IC(50) values revealed that, regardless of the substrate used, CES activity was approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive to AZM-oxon than ChE activity. Although ChE activity was very sensitive to CPF-oxon, CES activity measured with 1-NA, 2-NA, and p-NPA was poorly inhibited by this pesticide. In contrast, CES activity measured with p-NPB was equally sensitive to CPF-oxon than ChE activity. Several specific binary

  4. Developing antibodies from cholinesterase derived from prokaryotic expression and testing their feasibility for detecting immunogen content in Daphnia magna *

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-cui; Yuan, Bing-qiang; Li, Shao-nan

    2016-01-01

    To yield cholinesterase (ChE) from prokaryotic expression, the ChE gene that belongs to Daphnia magna was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using forward primer 5'-CCCYGGNGCSAT GATGTG-3' and reverse primer 5'-GYAAGTTRGCCCAATATCT-3'. To express the gene, one sequence of the amplified DNA, which was able to encode a putative protein containing two conserved carboxylesterase domains, was connected to the prokaryotic expression vector PET-29a(+). The recombinant vector was transformed into Escherichia coil BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced by isopropy-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed ChE was used as an immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. The obtained antibodies were tested for their specificity towards crude enzymes from species such as Alona milleri, Macrobrachium nipponense, Bombyx mori, Chironomus kiiensis, Apis mellifera, Eisenia foetida, Brachydanio rerio, and Xenopus laevis. Results indicated that the antibodies had specificity suitable for detecting ChE in Daphnia magna. A type of indirect and non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IN-ELISA) was used to test the immunoreactive content of ChE (ChE-IR) in Daphina magna. The detection limit of the IN-ELISA was found to be 14.5 ng/ml at an antiserum dilution of 1:22 000. Results from tests on Daphnia magna exposed to sublethal concentrations of triazophos indicated a maximal induction of 57.2% in terms of ChE-IR on the second day after the animals were exposed to a concentration of 2.10 μg/L triazophos. Testing on animals acclimatized to a temperature of 16 °C indicated that ChE-IR was induced by 16.9% compared with the ChE-IR content detected at 21 °C, and the rate of induction was 25.6% at 10 °C. The IN-ELISA was also used to test the stability of ChE-IR in collected samples. Repeated freezing and thawing had no influence on the outcome of the test. All these results suggest that the polyclonal antibodies developed against the recombinant ChE are as

  5. Inhibition of cholinesterases with cationic phosphonyl oximes highlights distinctive properties of the charged pyridine groups of quaternary oxime reactivators.

    PubMed

    Ashani, Yacov; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Leader, Haim; Saxena, Ashima; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2003-07-15

    Oxime-induced reactivation of phosphonylated cholinesterases (ChEs) produces charged phosphonyl pyridine oxime intermediates (POXs) that are most potent organophosphate (OP) inhibitors of ChEs. To understand the role of cationic pyridine oxime leaving groups in the enhanced anti-ChE activity of POXs, the bimolecular rate constants for the inhibition (k(i)) of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterases (BChE), and the rate of decomposition (k(d)) of authentic O-alkyl methylphosphonyl pyridine oximes (AlkMeP-POXs) and N,N-dimethylamidophosphoryl pyridine oximes (EDMP-POXs), were studied. Stability ranking order in aqueous solutions correlated well with the electronic features and optimized geometries that were obtained by ab initio calculations at 6-31G(**) basis set level. AlkMeP-POXs of the 2-pyridine oxime series were found to be 4- to 8-fold more stable (t(1/2)=0.7 to 1.5 min) than the homologous O,O-diethylphosphoryl (DEP) oxime. Results suggest that re-inhibition of enzyme activity by POX is less likely during the reactivation of DEP-ChEs (obtained by use of DEP-containing pesticides) by certain oximes, compared to nerve agent-inhibited ChEs. The greatest inhibition was observed for the O-cyclohexyl methylphosphonyl-2PAM derivative (4.0 x 10(9)M(-1)min(-1); mouse AChE) and is 10-fold higher than the k(i) of cyclosarin. Increasing the size of the O-alkyl substituent of AlkMeP-POXs had only a small to moderate effect on the k(i) of ChEs, signifying a major role for the cationic pyridine oxime leaving group in the inhibition reaction. The shape of plots of logk(i) vs. pK(a) of the leaving groups for AlkMeP-PAMs and DEP-PAMs, could be used as a diagnostic tool to highlight and rationalize the unique properties of the cationic moiety of pyridine oxime reactivators.

  6. Time course of cholinesterase inhibition in adult rats treated acutely with carbaryl, carbofuran, formetanate, methomyl, methiocarb, oxamyl or propoxur

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, S. . E-mail: Padilla.Stephanie@epa.gov; Marshall, R.S. . E-mail: Marshall.renee@epa.gov; Hunter, D.L. . E-mail: Hunter.deborah@epa.gov; Lowit, A. . E-mail: Lowit.anna@epa.gov

    2007-03-15

    To compare the toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamates, time course profiles for brain and red blood cell (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were established for each. Adult, male, Long Evans rats (n = 4-5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (30 mg/kg in corn oil); carbofuran (0.5 mg/kg in corn oil); formetanate HCl (10 mg/kg in water); methomyl (3 mg/kg in water); methiocarb (25 mg/kg in corn oil); oxamyl (1 mg/kg in water); or propoxur (20 mg/kg in corn oil). This level of dosing produced at least 40% brain ChE inhibition. Brain and blood were taken from 0.5 to 24 h after dosing for analysis of ChE activity using two different methods: (1) a radiometric method which limits the amount of reactivation of ChE activity, and (2) a spectrophotometric method (Ellman method using traditional, unmodified conditions) which may encourage reactivation. The time of peak ChE inhibition was similar for all seven N-methyl carbamate pesticides: 0.5-1.0 h after dosing. By 24 h, brain and RBC ChE activity in all animals returned to normal. The spectrophotometric method underestimated ChE inhibition. Moreover, there was a strong, direct correlation between brain and RBC ChE activity (radiometric assay) for all seven compounds combined (r {sup 2} = 0.73, slope 1.1), while the spectrophotometric analysis of the same samples showed a poor correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.09). For formetanate, propoxur, methomyl, and methiocarb, brain and RBC ChE inhibitions were not different over time, but for carbaryl, carbofuran and oxamyl, the RBC ChE was slightly more inhibited than brain ChE. These data indicate (1) the radiometric method is superior for analyses of ChE activity in tissues from carbamate-treated animals (2) that animals treated with these N-methyl carbamate pesticides are affected rapidly, and recover rapidly, and (3) generally, assessment of RBC ChE is an accurate predictor of brain ChE inhibition for these seven pesticides.

  7. TESTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM ADDITIVITY FOR A 2:1 MIXTURE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND CARBARYL ON CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN BRAIN, PLASMA, AND RED BLOOD CELLS OF LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detecting and characterizing interactions among chemicals is an important environmental issue. This study was conducted to test for the existence of a significant departure from additivity for a mixture of two cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides: chlorpyrifos (CPF), an org...

  8. BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE (PHAD) OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS (FEPS) IN LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING ACUTE OR REPEATED EXPOSURES TO A MIXTURE OF CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl and propoxur are N-methyl carbamate pesticides (NMCs) which are part of the EPA’s cumulative risk assessments for NMCs. These NMCs inhibit cholinesterase (ChE) activity and may lead to cholinergic disruption of CNS function. We used decreases in the PhAD of FEPs to indic...

  9. Effects of motor patterns on water-soluble and membrane proteins and cholinesterase activity in subcellular fractions of rat brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevzner, L. Z.; Venkov, L.; Cheresharov, L.

    1980-01-01

    Albino rats were kept for a year under conditions of daily motor load or constant hypokinesia. An increase in motor activity results in a rise in the acetylcholinesterase activity determined in the synaptosomal and purified mitochondrial fractions while hypokinesia induces a pronounced decrease in this enzyme activity. The butyrylcholinesterase activity somewhat decreases in the synaptosomal fraction after hypokinesia but does not change under the motor load pattern. Motor load causes an increase in the amount of synaptosomal water-soluble proteins possessing an intermediate electrophoretic mobility and seem to correspond to the brain-specific protein 14-3-2. In the synaptosomal fraction the amount of membrane proteins with a low electrophoretic mobility and with the cholinesterase activity rises. Hypokinesia, on the contrary, decreases the amount of these membrane proteins.

  10. Biochemical characterization of cholinesterases in Enchytraeus albidus and assessment of in vivo and in vitro effects of different soil properties, copper and phenmedipham.

    PubMed

    Howcroft, C F; Gravato, C; Amorim, M J B; Novais, S C; Soares, A M V M; Guilhermino, L

    2011-01-01

    Enchytraeus albidus are important organisms of the soil biocenosis, used as standard test species in environmental risk assessment. The inhibition of cholinesterases (ChE) activity of several species has been widely used to assess the exposure and effects of anti-cholinesterase environmental contaminants. Several studies have shown the association between ChE activity inhibition and adverse effects on behaviour and survival. Extensive studies addressing survival and behavioural endpoints, as well as other biomarkers, have been done in E. albidus with different types of soil contaminants. The main objectives of this study were: (1) to characterize biochemically the ChE present in the soluble post-mitochondrial fraction of E. albidus whole body homogenates, using different substrates and selective inhibitors; (2) to assess the in vivo effects of copper, phenmedipham and different soil properties (pH, organic matter, clay) on the ChE activity; (3) to assess the in vitro effects of copper and phenmedipham on the ChE activity. The results suggest the presence of one ChE in the soluble post-mitochondrial fraction of E. albidus whole body homogenates, which displays properties of both acetylcholinesterase and pseudocholinesterase considering the typical mammalian enzymes. It is also shown that ChE activity is not inhibited by exposure to different soil properties and that copper and phenmedipham inhibited ChE activity both in in vivo and in in vitro conditions and therefore ChE inhibition seems to be a robust biomarker for this herbicide and this heavy metal. This study showed that ChE activity in E. albidus might be correlated to previously determined higher level effects like survival and reproduction, as well as avoidance behaviour. PMID:21080225

  11. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer’s Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25–35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Balakrishnan; Sheeja Malar, Dicson; Sathya, Sethuraman; Pandima Devi, Kasi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25–35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG) was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml) with Aβ 25–35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml) and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26536106

  12. IN VITRO SENSITIVITY OF CHOLINESTERASES AND [3H]OXOTREMORINE-M BINDING IN HEART AND BRAIN OF ADULT AND AGING RATS TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ANTICHOLINESTERASES

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nikita; Pope, Carey N.

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides elicit toxicity via acetylcholinesterase inhibition, allowing acetylcholine accumulation and excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors. Some OP insecticides bind to additional macromolecules including butyrylcholinesterase and cholinergic receptors. While neurotoxicity from OP anticholinesterases has been extensively studied, effects on cardiac function have received less attention. We compared the in vitro sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and [3H]oxotremorine-M binding to muscarinic receptors in the cortex and heart of adult (3 months) and aging (18 months) rats to chlorpyrifos, methyl parathion and their active metabolites chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon. Using selective inhibitors, the great majority of cholinesterase in brain was defined as acetylcholinesterase, while butyrylcholinesterase was the major cholinesterase in heart, regardless of age. In the heart, butyrylcholinesterase was markedly more sensitive than acetylcholinesterase to inhibition by chlorpyrifos oxon, and butyrylcholinesterase in tissues from aging rats was more sensitive than enzyme from adults, possibly due to differences in A-esterase mediated detoxification. Relatively similar differences were noted in brain. In contrast, acetylcholinesterase was more sensitive than butyrylcholinesterase to methyl paraoxon in both heart and brain, but no age-related differences were noted. Both oxons displaced [3H]oxotremorine-M binding in heart and brain of both age groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Chlorpyrifos had no effect but methyl parathion was a potent displacer of binding in heart and brain of both age groups. Such OP and age-related differences in interactions with cholinergic macromolecules may be important because of potential for environmental exposures to insecticides as well as the use of anticholinesterases in age-related neurological disorders. PMID:18761328

  13. New antimuscarinic agents for improved treatment of poisoning by cholinesterase inhibitors. Annual progress report No. 1, 1 November 1982-31 October 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this project is to find a more effective antimuscarinic agent than atropine for use as an antidote for poisoning by organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitors. To start this search, 22 structurally-diverse antimuscarinic agents have been selected for initial testing. These compounds are to be evaluated for peripheral and central antimuscarinic activity in a variety of in vitro and in vivo tests in addition to determining their effectiveness as antidotes (in combination with an oxime reactivator) for poisoning by soman. Fifteen of the compounds have now been evaluated for ability to block acetylcholine-induced contractions in guinea pig intestinal smooth muscle compared to atropine. Ability to displace radiolabeled quinuclidinyl benzilate from muscarinic receptors of mouse brain homogenate has been determined for atropine, scopolamine and 19 of the compounds. Several of these compounds have a relatively stronger affinity for brain than for intestinal muscarinic receptors. Atropine, scopolamine and 12 of the compounds have also been examined as inhibitors of tremors induced by oxotremorine in mice. Two of the compounds are much more potent than atropine. None of the compounds have been tested as yet as antidotes for soman poisoning. Samples of the test compounds are being sent to the Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense for evaluation of this property.

  14. aCHEdb: the database system for ESTHER, the alpha/beta fold family of proteins and the Cholinesterase gene server.

    PubMed

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Giles, K; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase belongs to a family of proteins, the alpha/beta hydrolase fold family, whose constituents evolutionarily diverged from a common ancestor and share a similar structure of a central beta sheet surrounded by alpha helices. These proteins fulfil a wide range of physiological functions (hydrolases, adhesion molecules, hormone precursors) [Krejci,E., Duval,N., Chatonnet,A., Vincens,P. and Massoulié,J. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA , 88, 6647-6651]. ESTHER (for esterases, alpha/beta hydrolase enzymes and relatives) is a database aimed at collecting in one information system, sequence data together with biological annotations and experimental biochemical results related to the structure-function analysis of the enzymes of the family. The major upgrade of the database comes from the use of a new database management system: aCHEdb which uses the ACeDB program designed by Richard Durbin and Jean Thierry-Mieg. It can be found at http://www.ensam.inra.fr/cholinesterase

  15. Synthesis of new N-benzylpiperidine derivatives as cholinesterase inhibitors with β-amyloid anti-aggregation properties and beneficial effects on memory in vivo.

    PubMed

    Więckowska, Anna; Więckowski, Krzysztof; Bajda, Marek; Brus, Boris; Sałat, Kinga; Czerwińska, Paulina; Gobec, Stanislav; Filipek, Barbara; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-05-15

    Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease, multi-target-directed ligand approaches are one of the most promising strategies in the search for effective treatments. Acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and β-amyloid are the predominant biological targets in the search for new anti-Alzheimer's agents. Our aim was to combine both anticholinesterase and β-amyloid anti-aggregation activities in one molecule, and to determine the therapeutic potential in vivo. We designed and synthesized 28 new compounds as derivatives of donepezil that contain the N-benzylpiperidine moiety combined with the phthalimide or indole moieties. Most of these test compounds showed micromolar activities against cholinesterases and aggregation of β-amyloid, combined with positive results in blood-brain barrier permeability assays. The most promising compound 23 (2-(8-(1-(3-chlorobenzyl)piperidin-4-ylamino)octyl)isoindoline-1,3-dione) is an inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase (IC50=0.72 μM) that has β-amyloid anti-aggregation activity (72.5% inhibition at 10 μM) and can cross the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, in an animal model of memory impairment induced by scopolamine, the activity of 23 was comparable to that of donepezil. The selected compound 23 is an excellent lead structure in the further search for new anti-Alzheimer's agents. PMID:25868744

  16. Effect of APOE and CHRNA7 genotypes on the cognitive response to cholinesterase inhibitor treatment at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braga, Ianna Lacerda Sampaio; Silva, Patricia Natalia; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Pires, Belisa Caldana; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2015-03-01

    The loss of cholinergic transmission is considered to be an important cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) shows benefits; however, great heterogeneity has been observed in patient responses. We evaluated apolipoprotein E (APOE) and α7 nicotinic receptor (CHRNA7) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated these SNPs with pharmacological responses to ChEIs in a Brazilian population with AD. We studied 177 outpatients using ChEIs, and they were classified as responders and nonresponders according to variation in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) status. The analysis of APOE genotypes showed that patients with the ε4 allele had a worse response than those without the ε4 allele. We observed an association between the CHRNA7 T allele and a better response to treatment with ChEIs in patients with mild AD (MMSE ≥ 20). The SNP rs6494223 of CHRNA7 as well as APOEε4 could be useful for understanding the response to ChEI treatment in patients with AD. PMID:24951635

  17. aCHEdb: the database system for ESTHER, the alpha/beta fold family of proteins and the Cholinesterase gene server.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Giles, K; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase belongs to a family of proteins, the alpha/beta hydrolase fold family, whose constituents evolutionarily diverged from a common ancestor and share a similar structure of a central beta sheet surrounded by alpha helices. These proteins fulfil a wide range of physiological functions (hydrolases, adhesion molecules, hormone precursors) [Krejci,E., Duval,N., Chatonnet,A., Vincens,P. and Massoulié,J. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA , 88, 6647-6651]. ESTHER (for esterases, alpha/beta hydrolase enzymes and relatives) is a database aimed at collecting in one information system, sequence data together with biological annotations and experimental biochemical results related to the structure-function analysis of the enzymes of the family. The major upgrade of the database comes from the use of a new database management system: aCHEdb which uses the ACeDB program designed by Richard Durbin and Jean Thierry-Mieg. It can be found at http://www.ensam.inra.fr/cholinesterase PMID:9399841

  18. Structure-Based Design and Optimization of Multitarget-Directed 2H-Chromen-2-one Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors of Monoamine Oxidase B and Cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Farina, Roberta; Pisani, Leonardo; Catto, Marco; Nicolotti, Orazio; Gadaleta, Domenico; Denora, Nunzio; Soto-Otero, Ramon; Mendez-Alvarez, Estefania; Passos, Carolina S; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Altomare, Cosimo D; Nurisso, Alessandra; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-07-23

    The multifactorial nature of Alzheimer's disease calls for the development of multitarget agents addressing key pathogenic processes. To this end, by following a docking-assisted hybridization strategy, a number of aminocoumarins were designed, prepared, and tested as monoamine oxidases (MAOs) and acetyl- and butyryl-cholinesterase (AChE and BChE) inhibitors. Highly flexible N-benzyl-N-alkyloxy coumarins 2-12 showed good inhibitory activities at MAO-B, AChE, and BChE but low selectivity. More rigid inhibitors, bearing meta- and para-xylyl linkers, displayed good inhibitory activities and high MAO-B selectivity. Compounds 21, 24, 37, and 39, the last two featuring an improved hydrophilic/lipophilic balance, exhibited excellent activity profiles with nanomolar inhibitory potency toward hMAO-B, high hMAO-B over hMAO-A selectivity and submicromolar potency at hAChE. Cell-based assays of BBB permeation, neurotoxicity, and neuroprotection supported the potential of compound 37 as a BBB-permeant neuroprotective agent against H2O2-induced oxidative stress with poor interaction as P-gp substrate and very low cytotoxicity.

  19. Biomonitoring of Organophosphorus Agent Exposure by Reactivation of Cholinesterase Enzyme Based on Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Flow-Injection Amperometric Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-11-15

    A portable, rapid, and sensitive assessment of sub-clinical organophosphorus (OPs) agent exposure based on reactivation of cholinesterase (ChE) from OP-inhibited ChE using rat saliva (in vitro) was developed using an electrochemical sensor coupled with a microflow-injection system. The sensor was based on a carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPE), which was integrated into a flow cell. Due to the extent of inter-individual ChE activity variability, ChE biomonitoring often requires an initial base-line determination (non-inhibited) of enzyme activity which is then directly compared with activity after OP exposure. This manuscript described an alternative strategy where reactivation of the phosphorylated enzyme was exploited to enable measurement of both inhibited and baseline ChE activity (i.e. after reactivation) in the same sample. The use of CNT makes the electrochemical detection of the products from enzymatic reactions more feasible with extremely high sensitivity and at low potentials. Paraoxon was selected as a model OP compound for in vitro inhibition studies. Some experiment parameters, (e.g. inhibition and reactivation times), have been optimized such that, 92 - 95% ChE reactivation can be achieved over a broad range of ChE inhibition (5 - 94 %) with paraoxon. The extent of enzyme inhibition using this electrochemical sensor correlates well with conventional enzyme activity measurements.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF REFERENCE RANGES FOR PLASMA TOTAL CHOLINESTERASE AND BRAIN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN FREE-RANGING CARNABY'S BLACK-COCKATOOS (CALYPTORHYNCHUS LATIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca; Vitali, Simone; Reiss, Andrea; Besier, Shane; Hollingsworth, Tom; Smith, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Published avian reference ranges for plasma cholinesterase (ChE) and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) are numerous. However, a consistently reported recommendation is the need for species- and laboratory-specific reference ranges because of variables, including assay methods, sample storage conditions, season, and bird sex, age, and physiologic status. We developed normal reference ranges for brain AChE and plasma total ChE (tChE) activity for Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) using a standardized protocol (substrate acetylthiocholine at 25 C). We report reference ranges for brain AChE (19-41 μmol/min per g, mean 21±6.38) and plasma tChE (0.41-0.53 μmol/min per mL, mean 0.47±0.11) (n=15). This information will be of use in the ongoing field investigation of a paresis-paralysis syndrome in the endangered Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos, suspected to be associated with exposure to anticholinesterase compounds and add to the paucity of reference ranges for plasma tChE and brain AChE in Australian psittacine birds.

  1. Effect of APOE and CHRNA7 genotypes on the cognitive response to cholinesterase inhibitor treatment at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braga, Ianna Lacerda Sampaio; Silva, Patricia Natalia; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Pires, Belisa Caldana; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2015-03-01

    The loss of cholinergic transmission is considered to be an important cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) shows benefits; however, great heterogeneity has been observed in patient responses. We evaluated apolipoprotein E (APOE) and α7 nicotinic receptor (CHRNA7) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated these SNPs with pharmacological responses to ChEIs in a Brazilian population with AD. We studied 177 outpatients using ChEIs, and they were classified as responders and nonresponders according to variation in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) status. The analysis of APOE genotypes showed that patients with the ε4 allele had a worse response than those without the ε4 allele. We observed an association between the CHRNA7 T allele and a better response to treatment with ChEIs in patients with mild AD (MMSE ≥ 20). The SNP rs6494223 of CHRNA7 as well as APOEε4 could be useful for understanding the response to ChEI treatment in patients with AD.

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:27376896

  3. Synthesis, biological evaluation, QSAR study and molecular docking of novel N-(4-amino carbonylpiperazinyl) (thio)phosphoramide derivatives as cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Khodayar; Ebrahimi Valmoozi, Ali Asghar; Bonsaii, Mahyar

    2014-06-01

    Novel (thio)phosphoramidate derivatives based on piperidincarboxamide with the general formula of (NH2-C(O)-C5H9N)-P(X=O,S)R1R2 (1-5) and (NH2-C(O)-C5H9N)2-P(O)R (6-9) were synthesized and characterized by (31)P, (13)C, (1)H NMR, IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the crystal structure of compound (NH2-C(O)-C5H9N)2-P(O)(OC6H5) (6) was investigated. The activities of derivatives on cholinesterases (ChE) were determined using a modified Ellman's method. Also the mixed-type mechanisms of these compounds were evaluated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. Molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) were used to understand the relationship between molecular structural features and anti-ChE activity, and to predict the binding affinity of phosphoramido-piperidinecarboxamides (PAPCAs) to ChE receptors. From molecular docking analysis, noncovalent interactions especially hydrogen bonding as well as hydrophobic was found between PAPCAs and ChE. Based on the docking results, appropriate molecular structural parameters were adopted to develop a QSAR model. DFT-QSAR models for ChE enzymes demonstrated the importance of electrophilicity parameter in describing the anti-AChE and anti-BChE activities of the synthesized compounds. The correlation matrix of QSAR models and docking analysis confirmed that electrophilicity descriptor can control the influence of the hydrophobic properties of P=(O, S) and CO functional groups of PAPCA derivatives in the inhibition of human ChE enzymes.

  4. Enzymatic reaction modulated gold nanorod end-to-end self-assembly for ultrahigh sensitively colorimetric sensing of cholinesterase and organophosphate pesticides in human blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linlin; Xia, Yunsheng

    2015-08-18

    We present herein the first reported self-assembly modulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) by enzymatic reaction, which is further employed for colorimetric assays of cholinesterase (ChE) and organophosphate pesticides (OPs) in human blood. ChE catalyzes its substrate (acetylthiocholine) and produces thiocholine and acetate acid. The resulting thiols then react with the tips of the AuNRs by S-Au conjunction and prevent subsequent cysteine-induced AuNR end-to-end (EE) self-assembly. Correspondingly, the AuNR surface plasmon resonance is regulated, which results in a distinctly ratiometric signal output. Under optimal conditions, the linear range is 0.042 to 8.4 μU/mL, and the detection limit is as low as 0.018 μU/mL. As ChE is incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity is inhibited. So, the cysteine-induced assembly is observed again. On the basis of this principle, OPs can be well determined ranging from 0.12 to 40 pM with a 0.039 pM detection limit. To our knowledge, the present quasi pU/mL level sensitivity for ChE and the quasi femtomolar level sensitivity for OPs are at least 500 and 7000 times lower than those of previous colorimetric methods, respectively. The ultrahigh sensitivity results from (1) the rational choice of anisotropic AuNRs as building blocks and reporters and (2) the specific structure of the enzymatic thiocholine. Because of ultrahigh sensitivity, serum samples are allowed to be extremely diluted in the assay. Accordingly, various nonspecific interactions, even from glutathione/cysteine, are well avoided. So, both ChE and OPs in human blood can be directly assayed without any prepurification, indicating the simplicity and practical promise of the proposed method.

  5. Cholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activities of three mollusc species from the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill.

    PubMed

    Tim-Tim, Ana L S; Morgado, Fernando; Moreira, Susana; Rangel, Rui; Nogueira, António J A; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2009-12-01

    In November 2002, the tanker 'Prestige' released about 19,000 tonnes of a heavy fuel oil (no. 6) before sinking with about 58,000 tonnes of its cargo, 135 miles from Cabo Finisterra (Spain). A considerable part of the released fuel oil reached the Galician coast, causing a heavy black tide and an ecological disaster. Although the black tide did not reach the NW coast of Portugal, it is possible that some of the fuel oil or its components also arrived to this area directly through the sea water and/or indirectly through the food chain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in two widely used biomarkers, the activity of the enzymes cholinesterases (ChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST), of three molluscs (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Nucella lapillus and Monodonta lineata) from wild populations of the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill. Molluscs were collected seasonally before (autumn 2002) and after (winter 2002/2003), spring and summer 2003) the oil spill at several sites along the Portuguese NW coast. Enzymatic activities determined before the accident were compared with those determined at different times after the oil spill taking into consideration abiotic factors. Information from different parameters was integrated by Redundancy Analysis and Principal Response Curves (PRC). Results show that GST and ChE activities were influenced by abiotic factors. Despite this influence, the results of PRC analysis also suggest that some of the fuel oil reached the NW Portuguese coast changing the patterns of ChE and GST activities of local populations of rocky shore species. Furthermore, the present study highlights the need of long-term monitoring with wild populations to assess both historical and punctual effects of pollution in the marine environment.

  6. Differential protection of black-seed oil on econucleotidase, cholinesterases and aminergic catabolizing enzyme in haloperidol-induced neuronal damage of male rats

    PubMed Central

    Akintunde, Jacob K.; Irechukwu, C. Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antipsychotic, haloperidol, is extremely efficient in the treatment of schizophrenia but its application is constrained because of irreversible adverse drug reactions. Hence, in this study, we investigate the differential effects of black seed oil on cholinesterase [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BuChE), ectonucleotidase (5′-nucleotidase), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and monoamine oxidase (MAO)] activities and relevant markers of oxidative stress in the cerebrum of haloperidol-induced neuronal-damaged rats. Methods: The animals were divided into six groups (n = 10): normal control rats; haloperidol-induced rats: induced rats were pre-, co- and post-treated with black-seed oil respectively, while the last group was treated with extract oil only. The treatment was performed via oral administration and the experiment lasted 14 days. Results: The results revealed an increase in 5I nucleotidase, a marker of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) hydrolysis, as well as AChE, BuChE and MAO activities, with concomitant decrease in LDH activity of cerebrum in induced rats when compared with controls. Also, administration of haloperidol caused systemic oxidative damage and adverse histopathological changes in neuronal cells, indications of mental disorder. The differential treatments with black-seed oil prevented these alterations by increasing LDH and decreasing 5I nucleotidase, AChE, BuChE and MAO activities in the cerebrum. Essential oil post-treatment is most efficacious in reversing haloperidol-induced neuronal damage in rat; followed by pre- and cotreatment, respectively. Conclusions: We concluded that essential black-seed oil enhanced the wellness of aminergic, purinergic and cholinergic neurotransmissions of haloperidol-induced neuronal damage in rats. PMID:27493717

  7. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the other’s in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  8. The ASCOMALVA (Association between the Cholinesterase Inhibitor Donepezil and the Cholinergic Precursor Choline Alphoscerate in Alzheimer's Disease) Trial: interim results after two years of treatment.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Francesco; Carotenuto, Anna; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria; Rea, Raffaele; Traini, Enea

    2014-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChE-Is) are used for symptomatic treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), but long-term effects of these compounds are mild and not always obvious. Preclinical studies have shown that combination of ChE-Is and the cholinergic precursor choline alphoscerate increases brain acetylcholine levels more effectively than single compounds alone. ASCOMALVA (Effect of association between a ChE-I and choline alphoscerate on cognitive deficits in AD associated with cerebrovascular injury) is a double-blind trial investigating if the ChE-I donepezil and choline alphoscerate in combination are more effective that donepezil alone. The trial has recruited AD patients suffering from ischemic brain damage documented by neuroimaging and has completed 2 years of observation in 113 patients of the 210 planned. Patients were randomly allotted to an active treatment group (donepezil + choline alphoscerate) or to a reference group (donepezil + placebo). Cognitive functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive subscale. Daily activity was evaluated by the basic and instrumental activities of daily living tests. Behavioral symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Over the 24-month observation period, patients of the reference group showed a moderate time-dependent worsening in all the parameters investigated. Treatment with donepezil plus choline alphoscerate significantly slowed changes of the different items analyzed. These findings suggest that the combination of choline alphoscerate with a ChE-I may prolong/increase the effectiveness of cholinergic therapies in AD with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular injury.

  9. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  10. Sensitivity of brain cholinesterase activity to diazinon (BASUDIN 50EC) and fenobucarb (BASSA 50EC) insecticides in the air-breathing fish Channa striata (Bloch, 1793).

    PubMed

    Van Cong, Nguyen; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2006-05-01

    With the expansion of agricultural areas within the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam, a concurrent, dramatic increase has occurred in agrochemical usage. To date, little consideration has been given to the negative impacts of this agricultural activity on the aquatic resources of the region. Both acute toxicity and subacute effects on brain cholinesterase (ChE) of two of the most commonly used insecticides, diazinon and fenobucarb, on adult native snakehead (Channa striata) were evaluated in a static, nonrenewable system, the environmental parameters of which, such as dissolved oxygen, water temperature, and pH, fluctuated similarly to field conditions. Four levels of insecticides, from 0.008 to 0.52 mg/L (for diazinon) and from 0.11 to 9.35 mg/L (for fenobucarb), were tested to assess the effects on the brain ChE activity of the snakehead up to 30 and 10 d for diazinon and fenobucarb, respectively. Diazinon was highly toxic to this fish species, with a 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of only 0.79 mg/L, and it also caused long-term ChE inhibition, with activity still significantly inhibited by 30% after 30 d for the three highest concentrations. Fenobucarb was less toxic to this species, with a 96-h LC50 of 11.4 mg/L. Fenobucarb caused more rapid ChE inhibition but also rapid recovery. The results of the present study indicate an urgent need to regulate the usage of these pesticides in the Mekong River Delta. PMID:16704077

  11. Qualitative and quantitative two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography/high performance liquid chromatography/diode-array/electrospray-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Tomasz

    2016-09-10

    Recently launched thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) interface enabling extraction of compounds directly from TLC plates into MS ion source was unusually extended into two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography/high performance liquid chromatography (2D, TLC/HPLC) system by its a direct connection to a rapid resolution 50×2.1mm, I.D. C18 column compartment followed by detection by diode array (DAD) and electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). In this way, even not separated bands of complicated mixtures of natural compounds could be analysed structurally, only within 1-2min after development of TLC plates. In comparison to typically applied TLC-MS interface, no ion suppression for acidic mobile phases was observed. Also, substantial increase in ESI-TOF-MS sensitivities and quality of spectra, were noticed. It has been utilised in combination with TLC- based bioautographic approaches of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, However, it can be also applied in any other procedures related to bioactivity (e.g. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-DPPH screen test for radicals). This system has been also used for determination of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values) of the active inhibitor-galanthamine, as an example. Moreover, AChE inhibitory potencies of some of purified plant extracts, never studied before, have been quantitatively measured. This is first report of usage such the 2D TLC/HPLC/MS system both for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of cholinesterase inhibitors in biological matrices.

  12. Cholinesterase activity in the tissues of bivalves Noah's ark shell (Arca noae) and warty venus (Venus verrucosa): characterisation and in vitro sensitivity to organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon.

    PubMed

    Perić, Lorena; Ribarić, Luka; Nerlović, Vedrana

    2013-08-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity was investigated in gills and adductor muscle of two bivalve species: Arca noae and Venus verrucosa. The properties of ChEs were investigated using acetylcholine iodide (ASCh), butyrylcholine iodide (BSCh) and propionylcholine iodide (PrSCh) as substrates and eserine, BW254c51 and iso-OMPA as specific inhibitors. The highest level of ChE activity in crude tissue extracts was detected with PrSCh followed by ASCh, while values obtained with BSCh were apparently low, except in A. noae adductor muscle. The enzyme activity in A. noae gills and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle was significantly inhibited by BW254c51, but not with iso-OMPA. ChE activity in adductor muscle of A. noae was significantly reduced by both diagnostic inhibitors. The effect of organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon on ChE activity was investigated in vitro in both species as well as in the gills of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. The highest sensitivity of ChE to trichlorfon was observed in A. noae gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.6×10(-7)M and 1.1×10(-7)M, respectively), followed by M. galloprovincialis gills (IC50 1.0×10(-6)M) and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.7×10(-5)M and 0.9×10(-5)M, respectively). The results of this study suggest the potential of ChE activity measurement in the tissues of A. noae as effective biomarker of OP exposure in marine environment.

  13. Resistance to Inhibitors of Cholinesterase 3 (Ric-3) Expression Promotes Selective Protein Associations with the Human α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Matthew J.; Blattman, Sydney B.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Lukas, Ronald J.; Hawrot, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is a ligand-gated ion channel widely expressed in vertebrates and is associated with numerous physiological functions. As transmembrane ion channels, α7-nAChRs need to be expressed on the surface of the plasma membrane to function. The receptor has been reported to associate with proteins involved with receptor biogenesis, modulation of receptor properties, as well as intracellular signaling cascades and some of these associated proteins may affect surface expression of α7-nAChRs. The putative chaperone resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 3 (Ric-3) has been reported to interact with, and enhance the surface expression of, α7-nAChRs. In this study, we identified proteins that associate with α7-nAChRs when Ric-3 is expressed. Using α-bungarotoxin (α-bgtx), we isolated and compared α7-nAChR-associated proteins from two stably transfected, human tumor-derived cell lines: SH-EP1-hα7 expressing human α7-nAChRs and the same cell line further transfected to express Ric-3, SH-EP1-hα7-Ric-3. Mass spectrometric analysis of peptides identified thirty-nine proteins that are associated with α7-nAChRs only when Ric-3 was expressed. Significantly, and consistent with reports of Ric-3 function in the literature, several of the identified proteins are involved in biological processes that may affect nAChR surface expression such as post-translational processing of proteins, protein trafficking, and protein transport. Additionally, proteins affecting the cell cycle, the cytoskeleton, stress responses, as well as cyclic AMP- and inositol triphosphate-dependent signaling cascades were identified. These results illuminate how α-bgtx may be used to isolate and identify α7-nAChRs as well as how the expression of chaperones such as Ric-3 can influence proteins associating with α7-nAChRs. These associating proteins may alter activities of α7-nAChRs to expand their functionally-relevant repertoire as well as to affect

  14. Depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials by physostigmine, carbaryl and propoxur, and the relationship to inhibition of brain cholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Finley, Dana; Spivey, Christopher L; Graff, Jaimie E; Herr, David W

    2008-01-01

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physostigmine (s.c.) 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3mg/kg (free base), in an ascorbic acid/saline vehicle, carbaryl (p.o.) 0, 1, 3, 10, 30, 50 or 75 mg/kg, or propoxur (p.o.) 0, 0.3, 3, 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg in a corn oil vehicle. Physostigmine served as positive control based on literature data. Early (e.g. peak N(36)) and late FEP components (peak N(166) and PhAD) are related to the initial retino-geniculate afferent volley and higher cortical processing of visual information, respectively. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased following treatment with 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg physostigmine, 7 5 mg/kg carbaryl or 30 mg/kg propoxur. Lesser changes were noted in FEP amplitudes or peak latencies. Treatment with 0.2 or 0.3 mg/kg physostigmine increased peak N(36) latency. Peak N(166) latency increased only following exposure to 40 mg/kg propoxur. None of the compounds altered peak N(36) or N(166) amplitudes. Hypothermia was observed at doses greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, at 30 or 50 mg/kg carbaryl, and after treatment with 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg propoxur. Inhibition of brain ChE activity occurred at dosages greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, 1mg/kg carbaryl, and 0.3 mg/kg propoxur. Linear regression analysis indicated that the decrease in PhAD duration correlated with decrease in brain ChE activity. The results indicate that at 30 min after treatment, inhibition of brain ChE activity did not affect cortical processing of the input from the retino-geniculate volley (evidenced by unaltered peak N(36) amplitude). However, the data suggest that disruption of cortical processing of visual signals related to FEP late components, as indicated by depression of the PhAD, was related to inhibition

  15. Effects of the organophosphate fenthion for control of the red-billed quelea Quelea quelea on cholinesterase and haemoglobin concentrations in the blood of target and non-target birds.

    PubMed

    Cheke, Robert A; McWilliam, Andrew N; Mbereki, Collen; van der Walt, Etienne; Mtobesya, Boaz; Magoma, Richard N; Young, Stephen; Eberly, J Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The red-billed quelea bird Quelea quelea is one of sub-Saharan Africa's most damaging pests, attacking small-grain crops throughout semi-arid zones. It is routinely controlled by spraying its breeding colonies and roosts with organophosphate pesticides, actions often associated with detrimental effects on non-target organisms. Attributions of mortality and morbidity of non-targets to the sprays are difficult to confirm unequivocally but can be achieved by assessing depressions in cholinesterase activities since these are reduced by exposure to organophosphates. Here we report on surveys of birds caught before and after sprays that were examined for their blood cholinesterase activities to assess the extent to which these became depressed. Blood samples from birds were taken before and after sprays with fenthion against red-billed quelea in colonies or roosts, and at other unsprayed sites, in Botswana and Tanzania and analysed for levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and activities of whole blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Background activities of AChE, BChE and Hb concentrations varied with bird species, subspecies, mass, age and gender. Contrary to expectation, since avian erythrocytes are often reported to lack cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase activities in pre-spray samples of adult birds were positively correlated with Hb concentrations. When these factors were taken into account there were highly significant declines (P < 0.0001) in AChE and BChE and increases in Hb after contact with fenthion in both target and non-target birds. BChE generally declined further (up to 87 % depression) from baseline levels than AChE (up to 83 % depression) but did so at a slower rate in a sample of quelea nestlings. Baseline activities of AChE and BChE and levels of Hb were higher in the East African subspecies of the red-billed quelea Q. q. aethiopica than in the southern African subspecies Q. q. lathamii, with the exception of BChE activities for

  16. Cholinesterases and neurotoxicity as highly sensitive biomarkers for an organophosphate insecticide in a freshwater gastropod (Chilina gibbosa) with low sensitivity carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Karina; Yusseppone, María Soledad; Otero, Sofía; Luquet, Carlos; Ríos de Molina, María Del Carmen; Kristoff, Gisela

    2013-11-15

    In the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. Azinphos-methyl has been found in water from this region throughout the year at a maximum concentration of 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Toxicological studies on local non-target species have been performed mostly on vertebrates, while mollusks, which could be more sensitive, have not been studied so far. This work aims to characterize cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxilesterase (CE) activities of Chilina gibbosa, a freshwater gastropod native to southern Argentina and Chile. These enzymes, together with neurotoxicity signals, are evaluated herein after as sensitive biomarkers of exposure to azinphos-methyl at environmentally relevant concentrations. Effects of azinphos-methyl on antioxidant defenses: glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are also studied in order to complete a set of biomarkers with different sensitivity and specificity, to propose C. gibbosa as a sentinel species. The highest specific activity was obtained with acetylthiocholine as substrate, followed by propionylthiocholine (83% in comparison to acetylthiocholine) and butyrylthiocholine (19%).The lowest Km and the highest efficiency for ChE were obtained with acetylthiocholine. Regarding CEs activities, a higher efficiency was obtained with p-nitrophenyl butyrate than with p-nitrophenyl acetate. Eserine produced significant inhibition of ChE activity (81% with 0.001 mM and 98% with 1mM) while iso-OMPA did not produce any significant effect on ChE. Our results show that C. gibbosa ChE is very sensitive to azinphos-methyl (CI50 0.02 μg L(-1)) while CEs are inhibited at higher concentrations (CI50 1,000 μg L(-1)). CEs have been reported to be more sensitive to OPs than ChEs in most of the aquatic invertebrates protecting the organisms from neurotoxic effects. In contrast, C. gibbosa, has Ch

  17. Cholinesterases and neurotoxicity as highly sensitive biomarkers for an organophosphate insecticide in a freshwater gastropod (Chilina gibbosa) with low sensitivity carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Karina; Yusseppone, María Soledad; Otero, Sofía; Luquet, Carlos; Ríos de Molina, María Del Carmen; Kristoff, Gisela

    2013-11-15

    In the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. Azinphos-methyl has been found in water from this region throughout the year at a maximum concentration of 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Toxicological studies on local non-target species have been performed mostly on vertebrates, while mollusks, which could be more sensitive, have not been studied so far. This work aims to characterize cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxilesterase (CE) activities of Chilina gibbosa, a freshwater gastropod native to southern Argentina and Chile. These enzymes, together with neurotoxicity signals, are evaluated herein after as sensitive biomarkers of exposure to azinphos-methyl at environmentally relevant concentrations. Effects of azinphos-methyl on antioxidant defenses: glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are also studied in order to complete a set of biomarkers with different sensitivity and specificity, to propose C. gibbosa as a sentinel species. The highest specific activity was obtained with acetylthiocholine as substrate, followed by propionylthiocholine (83% in comparison to acetylthiocholine) and butyrylthiocholine (19%).The lowest Km and the highest efficiency for ChE were obtained with acetylthiocholine. Regarding CEs activities, a higher efficiency was obtained with p-nitrophenyl butyrate than with p-nitrophenyl acetate. Eserine produced significant inhibition of ChE activity (81% with 0.001 mM and 98% with 1mM) while iso-OMPA did not produce any significant effect on ChE. Our results show that C. gibbosa ChE is very sensitive to azinphos-methyl (CI50 0.02 μg L(-1)) while CEs are inhibited at higher concentrations (CI50 1,000 μg L(-1)). CEs have been reported to be more sensitive to OPs than ChEs in most of the aquatic invertebrates protecting the organisms from neurotoxic effects. In contrast, C. gibbosa, has Ch

  18. Brain cholinesterase reactivation as a marker of exposure to anticholinesterase pesticides: a case study in a population of yellow-legged gull Larus michahellis (Naumann, 1840) along the northern coast of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cátia S A; Monteiro, Marta S; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Between late 2010 to early 2011, an increased mortality in gulls was observed along the northern coast of Portugal, with individuals exhibiting neurologic disorders consistent with an eventual anticholinesterase pesticide poisoning event. To clarify if this mortality was related to organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate (CB) poisoning, chemical and spontaneous cholinesterase (ChE) reactivation was tested in the brain of the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis). Initial brain ChE activity in L. michahellis was 40.92 ± 5.23 U/mg of protein (average ± SE). Following chemical and spontaneous reactivation, ChE activity increased in average 70.38 ± 48.59% and 131.95 ± 92.64%, respectively. ChE reactivation was found to decrease at increasing concentrations of the oxime pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride and dilution factor, underscoring the importance of first optimizing the assay conditions prior to its use on bird species. These results suggest that birds analysed could have been exposed to OP and CB pesticide compounds and that in most cases CB exposure appeared to be the main cause of birds poisoning. These results are an important contribution to environmental monitoring as it demonstrates the suitability of L. michaellis as sentinel species of OP and CB pesticides within an urban environment.

  19. Brain cholinesterase reactivation as a marker of exposure to anticholinesterase pesticides: a case study in a population of yellow-legged gull Larus michahellis (Naumann, 1840) along the northern coast of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cátia S A; Monteiro, Marta S; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Between late 2010 to early 2011, an increased mortality in gulls was observed along the northern coast of Portugal, with individuals exhibiting neurologic disorders consistent with an eventual anticholinesterase pesticide poisoning event. To clarify if this mortality was related to organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate (CB) poisoning, chemical and spontaneous cholinesterase (ChE) reactivation was tested in the brain of the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis). Initial brain ChE activity in L. michahellis was 40.92 ± 5.23 U/mg of protein (average ± SE). Following chemical and spontaneous reactivation, ChE activity increased in average 70.38 ± 48.59% and 131.95 ± 92.64%, respectively. ChE reactivation was found to decrease at increasing concentrations of the oxime pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride and dilution factor, underscoring the importance of first optimizing the assay conditions prior to its use on bird species. These results suggest that birds analysed could have been exposed to OP and CB pesticide compounds and that in most cases CB exposure appeared to be the main cause of birds poisoning. These results are an important contribution to environmental monitoring as it demonstrates the suitability of L. michaellis as sentinel species of OP and CB pesticides within an urban environment. PMID:26564198

  20. Rosemary tea consumption results to anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like behavior of adult male mice and inhibits all cerebral area and liver cholinesterase activity; phytochemical investigation and in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Katsikoudi, Antigoni; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Kellici, Tahsin F; Iatrou, Grigoris; Lamari, Fotini N; Tzakos, Andreas G; Margarity, Marigoula

    2015-07-25

    Our aim was to investigate the possible effects of regular drinking of Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf infusion on behavior and on AChE activity of mice. Rosemary tea (2% w/w) phytochemical profile was investigated through LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n). Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups: "Rosemary-treated" that received orally the rosemary tea for 4weeks and "control" that received drinking water. The effects of regular drinking of rosemary tea on behavioral parameters were assessed by passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests. Moreover, its effects on cerebral and liver cholinesterase (ChE) isoforms activity were examined colorimetricaly. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of diterpenes, flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives in rosemary tea; the major compounds were quantitatively determined. Its consumption rigorously affected anxiety/fear and depression-like behavior of mice, though memory/learning was unaffected. ChE isoforms activity was significantly decreased in brain and liver of "rosemary treated" mice. In order to explain the tissue ChE inhibition, principal component analysis, pharmacophore alignment and molecular docking were used to explore a possible relationship between main identified compounds of rosemary tea, i.e. rosmarinic acid, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, caffeic acid and known AChE inhibitors. Results revealed potential common pharmacophores of the phenolic components with the inhibitors. Our findings suggest that rosemary tea administration exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects on mice and inhibits ChE activity; its main phytochemicals may function in a similar way as inhibitors.

  1. Multipotent cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: design, synthesis, biochemical evaluation, ADMET, molecular modeling, and QSAR analysis of novel donepezil-pyridyl hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M; Esteban, Gerard; Chioua, Mourad; Nikolic, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica; Moraleda, Ignacio; Iriepa, Isabel; Soriano, Elena; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Unzeta, Mercedes; Marco-Contelles, José

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biochemical evaluation of donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (DPHs) as multipotent cholinesterase (ChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is reported. The 3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship study was used to define 3D-pharmacophores for inhibition of MAO A/B, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) enzymes and to design DPHs as novel multi-target drug candidates with potential impact in the therapy of AD. DPH14 (Electrophorus electricus AChE [EeAChE]: half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] =1.1±0.3 nM; equine butyrylcholinesterase [eqBuChE]: IC50 =600±80 nM) was 318-fold more potent for the inhibition of AChE, and 1.3-fold less potent for the inhibition of BuChE than the reference compound ASS234. DPH14 is a potent human recombinant BuChE (hBuChE) inhibitor, in the same range as DPH12 or DPH16, but 13.1-fold less potent than DPH15 for the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hAChE). Compared with donepezil, DPH14 is almost equipotent for the inhibition of hAChE, and 8.8-fold more potent for hBuChE. Concerning human monoamine oxidase (hMAO) A inhibition, only DPH9 and 5 proved active, compound DPH9 being the most potent (IC50 [MAO A] =5,700±2,100 nM). For hMAO B, only DPHs 13 and 14 were moderate inhibitors, and compound DPH14 was the most potent (IC50 [MAO B] =3,950±940 nM). Molecular modeling of inhibitor DPH14 within EeAChE showed a binding mode with an extended conformation, interacting simultaneously with both catalytic and peripheral sites of EeAChE thanks to a linker of appropriate length. Absortion, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity analysis showed that structures lacking phenyl-substituent show better druglikeness profiles; in particular, DPHs13–15 showed the most suitable absortion, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity properties. Novel donepezil-pyridyl hybrid DPH14 is a potent, moderately selective h

  2. New Cholinesterase Inhibitory Constituents from Lonicera quinquelocularis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Khan, Farmanullah; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Khan, Abdul Samad; Samad, Abdul; Ali, Farman; Khan, Ihsanullah; Muhammad, Nawshad

    2014-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation on the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis (whole plant) led to the first time isolation of one new phthalate; bis(7-acetoxy-2-ethyl-5-methylheptyl) phthalate (3) and two new benzoates; neopentyl-4-ethoxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (4) and neopentyl-4-hydroxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (5) along with two known compounds bis (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (1) and dioctyl phthalate (2). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with available data in the literature. All the compounds (1–5) were tested for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities in dose dependent manner. The IC50 (50% inhibitory effect) values of compounds 3 and 5 against AChE were 1.65 and 3.43 µM while the values obtained against BChE were 5.98 and 9.84 µM respectively. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak inhibition profile. PMID:24733024

  3. New cholinesterase inhibitory constituents from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Khan, Farmanullah; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Khan, Abdul Samad; Samad, Abdul; Ali, Farman; Khan, Ihsanullah; Muhammad, Nawshad

    2014-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation on the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis (whole plant) led to the first time isolation of one new phthalate; bis(7-acetoxy-2-ethyl-5-methylheptyl) phthalate (3) and two new benzoates; neopentyl-4-ethoxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (4) and neopentyl-4-hydroxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (5) along with two known compounds bis (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (1) and dioctyl phthalate (2). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with available data in the literature. All the compounds (1-5) were tested for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities in dose dependent manner. The IC50 (50% inhibitory effect) values of compounds 3 and 5 against AChE were 1.65 and 3.43 µM while the values obtained against BChE were 5.98 and 9.84 µM respectively. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak inhibition profile.

  4. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of benzo[e][1,2,4]triazin-7(1H)-one and [1,2,4]-triazino[5,6,1-jk]carbazol-6-one derivatives as dual inhibitors of beta-amyloid aggregation and acetyl/butyryl cholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Catto, Marco; Berezin, Andrey A; Lo Re, Daniele; Loizou, Georgia; Demetriades, Marina; De Stradis, Angelo; Campagna, Francesco; Koutentis, Panayiotis A; Carotti, Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset and progression are associated with the dysregulation of multiple and complex physiological processes and a successful therapeutic approach should therefore address more than one target. Two new chemical entities, the easily accessible heterocyclic scaffolds 1,3-diphenylbenzo[e][1,2,4]triazin-7(1H)-one (benzotriazinone I) and 2-phenyl-6H-[1,2,4]triazino[5,6,1-jk]carbazol-6-one (triazafluoranthenone II), were explored for their multitarget-directed inhibition of beta-amyloid (Aβ) fibrillization and acetyl- (AChE) and/or butyryl- (BChE) cholinesterase, three valuable targets for AD therapy. Introduction of appropriate amine substituents at positions 6 and 5 on scaffold I and II, respectively, allowed the preparation of a series of compounds that were tested as Aβ(1-40) aggregation and cholinesterase inhibitors. Potent inhibitors of Aβ self-aggregation were discovered and among them benzotriazinone 7 exhibited an outstanding IC(50) equal to 0.37 μM. Compounds bearing a basic amine linked to the heterocyclic scaffold through a linear alkyl chain of varying length also afforded good ChE inhibitors. In particular, benzotriazinone 24 and triazafluoranthenone 38 were endowed with an interesting multiple activity, the former displaying IC(50) values of 1.4, 1.5 and 1.9 μM on Aβ aggregation and AChE and BChE inhibition, respectively, and the latter showing IC(50) values of 1.4 and an outstanding 0.025 μM in the Aβ aggregation and BChE inhibition, respectively. Benzotriazinone 24 and triazafluoranthenone 29, selected owing to their suitable aqueous solubility and Aβ aggregation inhibition, were submitted to a time course kinetic assay followed with thioflavin T (ThT) spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Experimental data indicated that 24 acted at a low concentration ratio (10 μM 24 vs. 50 μM Aβ), stabilizing the unstructured Aβ peptide and inhibiting fibrillogenesis, and that 29

  5. Esterase metabolism of cholinesterase inhibitors using rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals, such as organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides, nerve agents, and industrial chemicals, inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to overstimulation of the cholinergic nervous system. The resultant neurotoxicity is similar across mammalian species...

  6. Salivary cholinesterase activity in children with organic and convential diets

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: Previous efforts to determine the health effects of pesticides have focused on quantifying acetylcholinesterase activity in blood. However, since blood draws can be difficult in young children, saliva biomonitoring has recently been explored as a feasible alternative....

  7. Can cholinesterase inhibitors provide additional effects to cholinergic neurotransmission enhancement?

    PubMed

    López, Manuela G; Arias, Esperanza; Sobrado, Mónica; Lorrio, Silvia; Roda, José M; García, Antonio G

    2006-01-01

    The most frequent of the primary degenerative dementias is Alzheimer's disease (AD). The gradual loss of memory and attention in patients suffering from this illness are accompanied by aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, and alterations in visual-spatial perception. This group of symptoms is completed by emotional alterations, psychic instability, and changes in personality that appear in advanced phases of the illness. Different histopathological alterations have been described, like marked atrophy of the cerebral cortex with loss of cortical and subcortical neurons. Other histopathological hallmarks are the formation of senile plaques composed of beta-amyloid (Abeta) and neuro fibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. PMID:17192661

  8. [Ligands of cholinesterases of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine structure].

    PubMed

    Basova, N E; Kormilitsin, B N; Perchenok, A Yu; Rozengatt, E V; Saakov, V S; Suvorov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of literature data on interaction of the mammalian erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and blood serum butyrylcholinesterase with a group of isomer complex ester derivatives (acetates, propionates, butyrates, valerates, and isobutyrates) of bases and iodomethylates of ephedrine and its enantiomer pseudoephedrine. For 20 alkaloid monoesters, parameters of enzymatic hydrolysis are determined and their certain specificity toward acetylcholinesterase is revealed, whereas 5 diesters of iodomethylates of pseudoephedrine were hydrolyzed only by butyrylcholinesterase. The studied 20 aklaloid diesters and 10 trimethylammonium derivatives turned out to be non-competitive reversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and competitive inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase. The performed for the first time isomer and enantiomer analysis "structure-efficiency" has shown that in most cases it is possible to state the greater comlementarity of the catalytical surface of enzymes for ligands of the pseudoephedrine structure, such differentiation being realized more often at the reversible inhibition of enzymes. pseudoephedrine.

  9. Molecular Docking Study on Galantamine Derivatives as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Mariyana; Yordanov, Nikola; Dimitrov, Ivan; Berkov, Strahil; Doytchinova, Irini

    2015-06-01

    A training set of 22 synthetic galantamine derivatives binding to acetylcholinesterase was docked by GOLD and the protocol was optimized in terms of scoring function, rigidity/flexibility of the binding site, presence/absence of a water molecule inside and radius of the binding site. A moderate correlation was found between the affinities of compounds expressed as pIC50 values and their docking scores. The optimized docking protocol was validated by an external test set of 11 natural galantamine derivatives and the correlation coefficient between the docking scores and the pIC50 values was 0.800. The derived relationship was used to analyze the interactions between galantamine derivatives and AChE. PMID:27490385

  10. Gypsogenin derivatives: an unexpected class of inhibitors of cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lucie; Schwarz, Stefan; Weber, Björn A; Csuk, René

    2014-10-01

    Gypsogenin (1) was obtained by acidic hydrolysis from its saponin. While the parent compound 1 acted as a selective inhibitor for butyrylcholinesterase (from equus) possessing a moderate mixed-type inhibition of the enzyme, Ki values as low as 2.67 ± 0.59 μM were determined for (3β,4α) 3-O-acetyl-olean-12-ene-23,28-dinitrile (11) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE, from electric eel). Thus, 11 possesses one-fifth of the inhibitory activity of the "gold standard" galantamine hydrobromide; this compound is one of the first pentacyclic triterpenoids described as a potent AChE-selective inhibitor. PMID:25042600

  11. Differential swimming performance of two natricine snakes exposed to a cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, W A; Winne, C T; DuRant, S E

    2005-02-01

    Environmental contaminants have direct effects on organisms at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, but the net results of these sub-organismal effects are only consequential to exposed populations if they alter organism-level traits that ultimately influence fitness (e.g., growth, locomotor performance, reproduction, and survival). Here, we explore the possibility that the swimming performance of neonate black swamp snakes (Seminatrix pygaea) and diamondback water snakes (Nerodia rhombifer) may be affected by exposure to carbaryl (2.5 and 5.0 mg/L). The highest concentration of carbaryl caused greater reductions in swim velocity in S. pygaea than in N. rhombifer. Most individuals recovered from the effects of carbaryl on swimming performance within 96 h, but recovery was significantly slower in S. pygaea than in N. rhombifer. We hypothesize that the sensitivity of S. pygaea may arise from its highly permeable integument compared to other natricines. Our findings suggest that performance can serve as an ecologically relevant response to contaminant exposure in reptiles and warrants further study.

  12. ACUTE PHARMACOLOGICAL INHIBITION OF CHOLINESTERASE RESULTS IN MINIMAL NEUROMUSCULAR JITTER CHANGES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over the lack of available endpoints to assess peripheral nervous system dysfunction after pesticide exposure has led to the search for new laboratory models. Recently our lab adapted the in vivo clinical practice of stimulation single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) for u...

  13. Microwave assisted synthesis, cholinesterase enzymes inhibitory activities and molecular docking studies of new pyridopyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Alireza; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Osman, Hasnah; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Kia, Yalda; Ali, Mohamed Ashraf

    2013-06-01

    A series of hitherto unreported pyrido-pyrimidine-2-ones/pyrimidine-2-thiones were synthesized under microwave assisted solvent free reaction conditions in excellent yields and evaluated in vitro for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzymes inhibitory activity. Among the pyridopyrimidine derivatives, 7e and 7l displayed 2.5- and 1.5-fold higher enzyme inhibitory activities against AChE as compared to standard drug, galanthamine, with IC50 of 0.80 and 1.37 μM, respectively. Interestingly, all the compounds except 6k, 7j and 7k displayed higher inhibitory potential against BChE enzyme in comparison to standard with IC50 ranging from 1.18 to 18.90 μM. Molecular modeling simulations of 7e and 7l was performed using three-dimensional structure of Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE) and human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) enzymes to disclose binding interaction and orientation of these molecule into the active site gorge of respective receptors.

  14. PATTERN OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN ADULT, MALE RATS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO DIETARY CHLORPYRIFOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very little is known about the effects of chronic exposure to relatively low levels of anticholinesterase insecticides or how the effects of chronic exposure compare to higher, intermittent exposure of the same compound for the same duration. To that end, we exposed adult male ra...

  15. QSAR for cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus esters and CNDO/2 calculations for organophosphorus ester hydrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were derived for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by various organophosphorus esters. Bimolecular inhibition rate constants correlate well with hydrophobic substituent constants, and with the presence or absence of catonic groups on the inhibitor, but not with steric substituent constants. CNDO/2 calculations were performed on a separate set of organophosphorus esters, RR'P(O)X, where R and R' are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. For each subset with the same X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom in the ester correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant. For the whole set of esters with different X, two equations were derived that relate either charge and leaving group steric bulk, or orbital energy and bond order to the hydrogen hydrolysis rate constant.

  16. Behavioral changes in adult and young rats as indications of cholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase has long been accepted as the basis for neurotoxicity produced by organophosphorus (OP) and N-methyl carbamate chemicals. Functional or behavioral alterations result from acute exposure to these chemicals. We have evaluated behavioral changes an...

  17. Effect of temephos on cholinesterase activity in the earthworm Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae).

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Branimir K; Jarić-Perkusić, Davorka; Stepić, Sandra

    2008-10-01

    In this study, adult Eisenia fetida earthworms were exposed to the sub-lethal concentrations of temephos using the contact filter paper test procedure. Since temephos is an organophosphate pesticide, its effects on earthworms were determined by measuring ChE inhibition--a known biomarker of exposure. The ChE activity was measured after a short time of exposure--1 and 2 h. As expected, the lowest ChE activity (72.70% and 38.03% inhibition) was measured at the highest concentration of temephos (120 ng cm(-2)) applied. More interestingly, at the 0.12 ng cm(-2) concentration the ChE activity increased up to 36.28% of activity in the control in all three conducted experiments. Dose-response curves showed an inverted U-shape characteristic for hormesis. This hormetic-like effect could be important for health status of an earthworm.

  18. A novel and highly sensitive acetyl-cholinesterase biosensor modified with hollow gold nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Zhai, Chen; Wang, Xiangyou

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a highly sensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition-based amperometric biosensor has been developed. Firstly, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with chitosan (Chits). Then, hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) were absorbed onto the surface of chitosan based on the strong affinity through electrostatic adsorption. After that, L-cysteine (L-cys) was assembled on HGNs through Au-S bond. The hollow gold nanospheres were prepared by using Co nanoparticles as sacrificial templates and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet spectra, respectively. Finally, AChE was immobilized with covalent binding via -COOH groups of L-cysteine onto the modified GCE. The AChE biosensor fabrication process was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods with the use of ferricyanide as an electrochemical redox indicator. Under optimum conditions, the inhibition rates of pesticides were proportional to their concentrations in the range of 0.1-150 and 0.1-200 μg L(-1) for chlorpyrifos and carbofuran, respectively, the detection limits were 0.06 μg L(-1) for chlorpyrifos and 0.08 μg L(-1) for carbofuran. Moreover, the biosensor exhibited a good stability and reproducibility and was suitable for trace detection of pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits.

  19. AN APPROACH FOR SCREENING CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS IN DRINKING WATER USING AN IMMOBILIZED ENZYME ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, inexpensive and sensitive method for detecting organophosphate and carbamate insecticides is reported. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized to PorexR Lateral-FloTM membrane material and remained active for several months at room temperature. The assay was sensitive ...

  20. Abietane-type diterpenoids from the roots of Caryopteris mongolica and their cholinesterase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Murata, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Saruul, Erdenebileg; Selenge, Erdenechimeg; Sasaki, Kenroh; Umehara, Kaoru; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko; Batkhuu, Javzan

    2016-10-01

    Eleven abietane-type diterpenoids and two known abietanes were isolated from the roots of Caryopteris mongolica, and their structures were characterized. The absolute configurations at C-5 and C-10 were determined from the NMR data, including from the nuclear Overhauser effect and CD spectra, and the absolute configuration of C-16 in the hydroxypropyl group was determined via a modified Mosher's method. Furthermore, the previously unknown absolute configuration of the C-15 of cyrtophyllone B was determined to be in an R-configuration using X-ray crystallography. To estimate the preventive effects of the isolates for neurodegenerative disease development, their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from human erythrocytes and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from horse serum were evaluated.

  1. Refinement of structural leads for centrally acting oxime reactivators of phosphylated cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Radić, Zoran; Sit, Rakesh K; Kovarik, Zrinka; Berend, Suzana; Garcia, Edzna; Zhang, Limin; Amitai, Gabriel; Green, Carol; Radić, Bozica; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-04-01

    We present a systematic structural optimization of uncharged but ionizable N-substituted 2-hydroxyiminoacetamido alkylamine reactivators of phosphylated human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) intended to catalyze the hydrolysis of organophosphate (OP)-inhibited hAChE in the CNS. Starting with the initial lead oxime RS41A identified in our earlier study and extending to the azepine analog RS194B, reactivation rates for OP-hAChE conjugates formed by sarin, cyclosarin, VX, paraoxon, and tabun are enhanced severalfold in vitro. To analyze the mechanism of intrinsic reactivation of the OP-AChE conjugate and penetration of the blood-brain barrier, the pH dependence of the oxime and amine ionizing groups of the compounds and their nucleophilic potential were examined by UV-visible spectroscopy, (1)H NMR, and oximolysis rates for acetylthiocholine and phosphoester hydrolysis. Oximolysis rates were compared in solution and on AChE conjugates and analyzed in terms of the ionization states for reactivation of the OP-conjugated AChE. In addition, toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies in mice show significantly improved CNS penetration and retention for RS194B when compared with RS41A. The enhanced intrinsic reactivity against the OP-AChE target combined with favorable pharmacokinetic properties resulted in great improvement of antidotal properties of RS194B compared with RS41A and the standard peripherally active oxime, 2-pyridinealdoxime methiodide. Improvement was particularly noticeable when pretreatment of mice with RS194B before OP exposure was combined with RS194B reactivation therapy after the OP insult.

  2. Isolation of cholinesterase and β-secretase 1 inhibiting compounds from Lycopodiella cernua.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Thu; To, Dao Cuong; Tran, Manh Hung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jeong Ah; Ali, Md Yousof; Woo, Mi-Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-07-01

    Three new serratene-type triterpenoids (1-3) and a new hydroxy unsaturated fatty acid (13) together with nine known compounds (4-12) were isolated from Lycopodiella cernua. The chemical structures were established using NMR, MS, and Mosher's method. Compound 13 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with an IC50 value of 0.22μM. For butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity, 5 showed the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 0.42μM. Compound 2 showed the most potent activity with an IC50 of 0.23μM for BACE-1 inhibitory activity. The kinetic activities were investigated to determine the type of enzyme inhibition involved. The types of AChE inhibition shown by compounds 4, 5, and 13 were mixed; BChE inhibition by 5 was competitive, while 2 and 6 showed mixed-types. In addition, molecular docking studies were performed to investigate the interaction of these compounds with the pocket sites of AChE. The docking results revealed that the tested inhibitors 3, 4, and 13 were stably present in several pocket domains of the AChE residue. PMID:26003344

  3. Cholinesterase activity in black-crowned night-herons exposed to fenthion-treated water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fenthion, (O,O-Dimethyl O-(3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl) phosphorothioate), a widely used mosquito control agent, has caused wildlife mortality. To simulate a shallow wetland environment, an exposure chamber was used containing water treated with fenthion at 1 and 10 times the field application rate of 112 g active ingredient (AI)/ha. This system permitted an evaluation of exposure routes and the effects of fenthion in a representative species of wading bird, the black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax). The results suggested that herons received only a dermal exposure, and that their brain acetylcholinesterase activity was not significantly inhibited. In contrast, however, plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity was inhibited, suggesting the herons were exposed to the insecticide. The application rates and types of exposures were not life-threatening in this species.

  4. A long-acting cholinesterase inhibitor reverses spatial memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, J E; Höhmann, C F; Moran, T H; Coyle, J T

    1988-09-01

    The effects of the long-acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, galanthamine, on spatial memory were investigated in mice. Mice received ibotenic acid or sham lesions to the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nBM). Groups of nBM-lesioned and control mice were then trained on a modified Morris swim maze task. Each mouse was first placed on a platform and then into quadrants of the swim tank in a random order. Time required to find the hidden platform was measured. In different phases of testing, the animal had to find a platform that either remained in the same quadrant (reference memory component) or was moved daily (working memory component). The nBM-lesioned mice took significantly longer to find the platform as compared to controls on the working, but not on the reference, memory component of the task. Galanthamine (5.0 mg/kg, IP), given 3.5 hours before testing, improved performance on the working memory task in nBM-lesioned mice by 70% and strikingly impaired performance in controls. Galanthamine's ability to reverse cognitive deficits induced by nBM lesions and its comparatively long half-life suggest that it may be effective in treating the central cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer's disease patients.

  5. Chemical Compositionand Anti-acetyl cholinesterase Activity of Flower Essential Oils of Artemisiaannuaat Different Flowering Stage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhengwen; Wang, Bochu; Yang, Fumei; Sun, Qianyun; Yang, Zhannan; Zhu, Liancai

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of flower at the pre-flowering, full-flowering and post-flowering stage of A. annua was analyzed by GC and GC/MS and sixty-two components were identified. The main compounds in the pre-flowering oil were β-myrcene (37.71%), 1, 8-cineole (16.11%) and camphor (14.97%). The full-flowering oil contained predominantly caryophyllene (19.4%), germacrene D (18.1%), camphor (15.84%), 1, 8-cineole (10.6%) and (Z)-β-farnesene (9.43%). The major constituents identified in the post-flowering oil were camphor (16.62%), caryophyllene (16.27%), β-caryophyllene oxide (15.84%), β-farnesene (9.05%) and (-)-spathulenol (7.21%). The variety of anti-AChE activity of flower oil of A. annua at three flowering stage might be a result of the variety of the content and interaction of those terpenoids with anti-AChE activity. The greatest acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.13 ± 0.02 mg mL-1) was exhibited by the essential oil of flower of A. annua at post-flowering stage. PMID:24250353

  6. Memantine and cholinesterase inhibitors: complementary mechanisms in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Chris G; Danysz, Wojciech; Dekundy, Andrzej; Pulte, Irena

    2013-10-01

    This review describes the preclinical mechanisms that may underlie the increased therapeutic benefit of combination therapy-with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine, and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI)-for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Memantine, and the AChEIs target two different aspects of AD pathology. Both drug types have shown significant efficacy as monotherapies for the treatment of AD. Furthermore, clinical observations indicate that their complementary mechanisms offer superior benefit as combination therapy. Based on the available literature, the authors have considered the preclinical mechanisms that could underlie such a combined approach. Memantine addresses dysfunction in glutamatergic transmission, while the AChEIs serve to increase pathologically lowered levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. In addition, preclinical studies have shown that memantine has neuroprotective effects, acting to prevent glutamatergic over-stimulation and the resulting neurotoxicity. Interrelations between the glutamatergic and cholinergic pathways in regions of the brain that control learning and memory mean that combination treatment has the potential for a complex influence on disease pathology. Moreover, studies in animal models have shown that the combined use of memantine and the AChEIs can produce greater improvements in measures of memory than either treatment alone. As an effective approach in the clinical setting, combination therapy with memantine and an AChEI has been a welcome advance for the treatment of patients with AD. Preclinical data have shown how these drugs act via two different, but interconnected, pathological pathways, and that their complementary activity may produce greater effects than either drug individually.

  7. Trigeminal antidromic vasodilatation and plasma extravasation in the rat: effects of acetylcholine antagonists and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Couture, R.; Cuello, A. C.; Henry, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Antidromic stimulation of sensory peripheral branches of the trigeminal system (mental nerve) leads to cutaneous vasodilatation and increases vascular permeability in the rat. Antidromic vasodilatation is observed only at high intensity stimulation (10 V, 15 Hz, 0.2 or 5 ms) supporting the participation of afferent C-fibres in cutaneous dilator responses. Both antidromic vasodilatation and neurogenic plasma extravasation are significantly reduced by muscarinic antagonists suggesting that a cholinergic component may be involved in these trigeminal neurogenic responses. Neurogenic plasma extravasation remains unchanged by hexamethonium while antidromic vasodilatation is reduced. This latter effect may be merely a consequence of the dramatic fall in arterial pressure produced by the ganglion blocker. Antidromic vasodilatation is increased or unaffected by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. On the other hand, the reduction of the plasma extravasation observed with these drugs could be due to their known ability to decrease the amount of acetylcholine released. PMID:3986430

  8. Cholinesterase (ChE) response and related mortality among birds fed ChE inhibitors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludke, J.L.; Hill, E.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1975-01-01

    Patterns of mortality and inhibition of brain and plasma ChE in birds treated with ChE inhibitors were studied in an attempt to determine the validity of using ChE activity as a monitoring and diagnostic technique. Analysis of brain ChE activity proved to be reliable for diagnosing and monitoring effects of selected ChE inhibitors in birds. Brain ChE inhibition exceeding 20% indicated exposure, and inhibition greater than 50% was sufficient for diagnosing cause of death. Individuals that died from dietary exposure to parathion or carbofuran had brain ChE activities below 55% of normal; although individuals could survive with brain ChE activity lower than 50%. Problems associated with collection, storage, and analysis of tissues for ChE activity are discussed.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of dithiocarbamates as new cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Altıntop, Mehlika D; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Ozkay, Yusuf; Kaplancıklı, Zafer A

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a novel series of dithiocarbamates was synthesized via the treatment of 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl chloride with appropriate sodium salts of N,N-disubstituted dithiocarbamic acids. The chemical structures of the compounds were elucidated by (1) H NMR, mass spectral data, and elemental analyses. Each derivative was evaluated for its ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) using a modification of Ellman's spectrophotometric method. The most potent AChE inhibitor was found as compound 2g (IC50  = 0.53 ± 0.001 µM) followed by compounds 2f (IC50  = 0.74 ± 0.001 µM) and 2j (IC50  = 0.89 ± 0.002 µM) when compared with donepezil (IC50  = 0.048 ± 0.001 µM). Compounds 2f and 2g were more effective than donepezil (IC50  = 7.88 ± 0.52 µM) on BuChE inhibition. Compounds 2f and 2g exhibited the inhibitory effect on BuChE with IC50 values of 1.39 ± 0.041 and 3.64 ± 0.072 µM, respectively. PMID:23881696

  10. Development and Structural Modifications of Cholinesterase Reactivators against Chemical Warfare Agents in Last Decade: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Singh, Namrata; Acharya, J R; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Ghosh, Kallol Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents are responsible for suicidal and accidental poisonings. The acute toxicity of nerve agents leads to progressive inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphylation of serine residue at the active site of gorge. The recent massive destruction of Syrian civilians by nerve gas sarin, has again renewed the research attention of global science fraternity towards nerve agents, their mode of action and most prominently their therapeutic treatment. This review is principally focused on nerve agent intoxication. The common approach to deal with OP-intoxication is, application of antimuscarinic drug (atropine), anticonvulsant drug (diazepam) and clinically used oximes (pralidoxime, trimedoxime, obidoxime and asoxime). However, the existing therapeutic approach is arguable and has several failings to cure all kinds of nerve agent poisonings. Considering this issue, numerous oximes have been synthesized and screened through various in-vitro and in-vivo studies in last decade to overcome the downsides. At present, only a few oximes (bis pyridinum-oximes) exhibit sound efficacy against selective OPs. In spite of extensive efforts, till date no oxime is available as a universal antidote against all the classes of OPs. This review is centered on the recent developments and structural modification of AChE reactivators against nerve agent toxicity. In particular, a deeper look has been taken into chemical modifications of the reactivators by incorporation of different structural moieties targeted towards the increased reactivation affinity and improved blood brain barrier (BBB) penetration.

  11. Behavioral changes in young and adult rats: Indications of cholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has long been accepted as the basis for neurotoxicity produced by organophosphorus (OP) and N-methyl carbamate chemicals. Functional or behavioral alterations result from acute exposure to these chemicals. We have conducted behavioral eva...

  12. Labdane-type diterpenoids from Leonurus heterophyllus and their cholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Luan, Tran Cong; Vinh, Bui The; Cuong, To Dao; Min, Byung Sun

    2011-04-01

    In the course of screening plants used in natural medicines as memory enhancers, a 70% ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Leonurus heterophyllus showed significant AChE inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation and repeated column chromatography led to the isolation of a new labdane-type diterpenoids (1), named leoheteronin F, and six known compounds (2-7). The chemical structures of isolated compounds were elucidated based on extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The isolates 1-7 were investigated in vitro for their anticholinesterase activity using mouse cortex AChE enzyme. Leoheteronin A (5) and leopersin G (7), which possess a 15,16-epoxy group at the side chain, were found to be potent in the inhibition of AChE.

  13. Reduced expression of exocytotic proteins caused by anti-cholinesterase pesticides in Brachionus calyciflorus (Rotifera: Monogononta).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Legaspi, I A; Rico-Martínez, R; Quintanar, J L

    2015-08-01

    The organophosphate and carbamate pesticides methyl-parathion and carbaryl have a common action mechanism: they inhibit acetylcholinesterase enzyme by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses. However, they can alter the expression of exocytotic membrane proteins (SNARE), by modifying release of neurotransmitters and other substances. This study evaluated the adverse effects of the pesticides methyl-parathion and carbaryl on expression of SNARE proteins: Syntaxin-1, Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 in freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. Protein expression of these three proteins was analyzed before and after exposure to these two pesticides by Western Blot. The expression of Syntaxin-1, Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 proteins in B. calyciflorussignificantly decreases with increasing concentration of either pesticides. This suggests that organophosphates and carbamates have adverse effects on expression of membrane proteins of exocytosis by altering the recognition, docking and fusion of presynaptic and vesicular membranes involved in exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Our results demonstrate that the neurotoxic effect of anticholinesterase pesticides influences the interaction of syntaxins and SNAP-25 and the proper assembly of the SNARE complex.

  14. Innervation of the skin of camel (Camelus dromedarius) as revealed by cholinesterase technique.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, A H; El-Shafey, S M; Al-Shaikaly, A K

    1982-01-01

    Skin samples from 4 body sites were taken from 10 camels and histochemically treated for the localization of AChE and BuChE enzymes. The sebaceous and sewat glands were active site for both enzymes. The weat gland were innervated by a plexus of AChE-positive nerve fibers. In the papillary layer, the nerve breaks to form a plexus supplying the blood vessels, from this plexus fibers end in the deep interface of the epidermis. End bulbs and free intraepidermal nerve ending reactive for AChE were demonstrated.

  15. The Assessment of Cholinesterase from the Liver of Puntius Javanicus as Detection of Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Sulaiman, Mohd Rosni; Shukor, Mohd Yunus Abd; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2014-01-01

    Crude extract of ChE from the liver of Puntius javanicus was purified using procainamide-sepharyl 6B. S-Butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTC) was selected as the specific synthetic substrate for this assay with the highest maximal velocity and lowest biomolecular constant at 53.49 µmole/min/mg and 0.23 mM, respectively, with catalytic efficiency ratio of 0.23. The optimum parameter was obtained at pH 7.5 and optimal temperature in the range of 25 to 30°C. The effect of different storage condition was assessed where ChE activity was significantly decreased after 9 days of storage at room temperature. However, ChE activity showed no significant difference when stored at 4.0, 0, and −25°C for 15 days. Screening of heavy metals shows that chromium, copper, and mercury strongly inhibited P. javanicus ChE by lowering the activity below 50%, while several pairwise combination of metal ions exhibited synergistic inhibiting effects on the enzyme which is greater than single exposure especially chromium, copper, and mercury. The results showed that P. javanicus ChE has the potential to be used as a biosensor for the detection of metal ions. PMID:25401148

  16. Abietane-type diterpenoids from the roots of Caryopteris mongolica and their cholinesterase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Murata, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Saruul, Erdenebileg; Selenge, Erdenechimeg; Sasaki, Kenroh; Umehara, Kaoru; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko; Batkhuu, Javzan

    2016-10-01

    Eleven abietane-type diterpenoids and two known abietanes were isolated from the roots of Caryopteris mongolica, and their structures were characterized. The absolute configurations at C-5 and C-10 were determined from the NMR data, including from the nuclear Overhauser effect and CD spectra, and the absolute configuration of C-16 in the hydroxypropyl group was determined via a modified Mosher's method. Furthermore, the previously unknown absolute configuration of the C-15 of cyrtophyllone B was determined to be in an R-configuration using X-ray crystallography. To estimate the preventive effects of the isolates for neurodegenerative disease development, their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from human erythrocytes and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from horse serum were evaluated. PMID:27298275

  17. CORRELATIONS OF PESTICIDE-INDUCED CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND MOTOR ACTIVITY CHANGES IN ADULT RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute neurobehavioral effects of acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides are primarily due to overstimulation of the cholinergic system. Lowered motor activity levels represent a sensitive endpoint with which to monitor functional changes in laboratory animals exposed to ...

  18. Accumulation of tetrahedral intermediates in cholinesterase catalysis: a secondary isotope effect study.

    PubMed

    Tormos, Jose R; Wiley, Kenneth L; Wang, Yi; Fournier, Didier; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian; Quinn, Daniel M

    2010-12-22

    In a previous communication, kinetic β-deuterium secondary isotope effects were reported that support a mechanism for substrate-activated turnover of acetylthiocholine by human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) wherein the accumulating reactant state is a tetrahedral intermediate ( Tormos , J. R. ; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005 , 127 , 14538 - 14539 ). In this contribution additional isotope effect experiments are described with acetyl-labeled acetylthiocholines (CL(3)COSCH(2)CH(2)N(+)Me(3); L = H or D) that also support accumulation of the tetrahedral intermediate in Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (DmAChE) catalysis. In contrast to the aforementioned BuChE-catalyzed reaction, for this reaction the dependence of initial rates on substrate concentration is marked by pronounced substrate inhibition at high substrate concentrations. Moreover, kinetic β-deuterium secondary isotope effects for turnover of acetylthiocholine depended on substrate concentration, and gave the following: (D3)k(cat)/K(m) = 0.95 ± 0.03, (D3)k(cat) = 1.12 ± 0.02 and (D3)βk(cat) = 0.97 ± 0.04. The inverse isotope effect on k(cat)/K(m) is consistent with conversion of the sp(2)-hybridized substrate carbonyl in the E + A reactant state into a quasi-tetrahedral transition state in the acylation stage of catalysis, whereas the markedly normal isotope effect on k(cat) is consistent with hybridization change from sp(3) toward sp(2) as the reactant state for deacylation is converted into the subsequent transition state. Transition states for Drosophila melanogaster AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine were further characterized by measuring solvent isotope effects and determining proton inventories. These experiments indicated that the transition state for rate-determining decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate is stabilized by multiple protonic interactions. Finally, a simple model is proposed for the contribution that tetrahedral intermediate stabilization provides to the catalytic power of acetylcholinesterase.

  19. Malathion-induced inhibition of human plasma cholinesterase studied by the fluorescence spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelkić, V. M.; Krinulović, K. S.; Savić, J. Z.; Ilić, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The in vitro effect of technical grade malathion was assessed via the kinetic parameters of human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) using N-methylindoxyl acetate as a substrate for BChE. An inhibitor kinetics study demonstrated the existence of a biphasic inhibition curve, indicating high-and low-affinity binding sites of malathion. The IC 50 values as calculated from the experimental inhibition curves were 1.33 × 10-9 and 1.48 × 10-5 M for the high-and low-affinity binding sites, respectively; Hill’s analysis gave 1.29 × 10-9 and 1.38 × 10-6 M. The Cornish-Bowden plots and their secondary plots indicated that the nature of inhibition was of mixed type with the predominant competitive character of both affinity binding sites.

  20. Application of a cholinesterase biosensor to screen for organophosphorus pesticides extracted from soil.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, S; Morita, M

    1995-04-01

    Based on the principle of enzyme inactivation, a butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8.) biosensor, to determine some organophosphorus (ORP) pesticides (Fenitrothion, Diazinon, Parathion ethyl, Mevinphos and Heptenophos) in soil extracts, is presented. The enzyme was immobilized on pre-activated Pall Biodyne(TM) transfer membranes, which were physically attached to the sensitive ends of glass pH electrodes. Contact of the enzyme with pesticide samples results in specific inhibition of enzyme activity. Sensor calibration was possible by correlating the inhibition of enzyme activity (monitored by observing reduction in electrode potential changes with substrate additions) with varying concentrations of pesticide compounds in a buffer solution. A simple procedure was designed to extract ORP pesticides from spiked soil samples using a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone as the extraction solvent mixture. The sensor was successfully used to determine pesticide concentrations ranging from a low of 35 ppb (Diazinon) to 21 ppm (Fenitrothion) in soil, with resultant relative standard deviations of percentage enzyme inactivation less than 12%. The complete extraction and analytical procedure is simple, inexpensive and rapid. Mass production of the enzyme membranes and their easy attachment to the electrodes, render them disposable after a single use. The biosensor is seen as a potential analytical instrument for early warning against pesticide contaminations in soil. PMID:18966276

  1. Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and β-Amyloid: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation of Heterodimeric Compounds with Benzylamine Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Szałaj, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Dudek, Katarzyna; Brus, Boris; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal and complex neurodegenerative disorder for which effective treatment remains the unmet challenge. Using donepezil as a starting point, we aimed to develop novel potential anti-AD agents with a multidirectional biological profile. We designed the target compounds as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, where the N-benzylamine pharmacophore is responsible for interactions with the catalytic anionic site of the enzyme. The heteroaromatic fragment responsible for interactions with the peripheral anionic site was modified and three different heterocycles were introduced: isoindoline, isoindolin-1-one, and saccharine. Based on the results of the pharmacological evaluation, we identified compound 8b with a saccharine moiety as the most potent and selective human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (IC50  = 33 nM) and beta amyloid aggregation inhibitor. It acts as a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro. We believe that compound 8b represents an important lead compound for further development as potential anti-AD agent. PMID:26032855

  2. Multi-target tacrine-coumarin hybrids: cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase B inhibition properties against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sai-Sai; Wang, Xiaobing; Jiang, Neng; Yu, Wenying; Wang, Kelvin D G; Lan, Jin-Shuai; Li, Zhong-Rui; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel tacrine-coumarin hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as multi-target agents against Alzheimer's disease. The biological assays indicated that most of compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity toward AChE and BuChE, and clearly selective inhibition for MAO-B. Among these compounds, 14c exhibited strong inhibitory activity for AChE (IC50 values of 33.63 nM for eeAChE and 16.11 nM for hAChE) and BuChE (IC50 values of 80.72 nM for eqBuChE and 112.72 nM for hBuChE), and the highest inhibitory activity against hMAO-B (IC50 value of 0.24 μM). Kinetic and molecular modeling studies revealed that 14c was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic, peripheral and mid-gorge sites of AChE. It was also a competitive inhibitor, which covered the substrate and entrance cavities of MAO-B. Moreover, 14c could penetrate the CNS and show low cell toxicity. Overall, these results suggested that 14c might be an excellent multi-target agent for AD treatment. PMID:25812965

  3. QSAR, docking, dynamic simulation and quantum mechanics studies to explore the recognition properties of cholinesterase binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, J; Bello, M; Rosales-Hernández, M C; Hernández-Rodríguez, M; Nicolás-Vázquez, I; Rojo-Domínguez, A; Trujillo-Ferrara, J G; Miranda, René; Flores-Sandoval, C A

    2014-02-25

    A set of 84 known N-aryl-monosubstituted derivatives (42 amides: series 1 and 2, and 42 imides: series 3 an 4, from maleic and succinic anhydrides, respectively) that display inhibitory activity toward both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (ChEs) was considered for Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies. These QSAR studies employed docking data from both ChEs that were previously submitted to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Donepezil and galanthamine stereoisomers were included to analyze their quantum mechanics properties and for validating the docking procedure. Quantum parameters such as frontier orbital energies, dipole moment, molecular volume, atomic charges, bond length and reactivity parameters were measured, as well as partition coefficients, molar refractivity and polarizability were also analyzed. In order to evaluate the obtained equations, four compounds: 1a (4-oxo-4-(phenylamino)butanoic acid), 2a ((2Z)-4-oxo-4-(phenylamino)but-2-enoic acid), 3a (2-phenylcyclopentane-1,3-dione) and 4a (2-phenylcyclopent-4-ene-1,3-dione) were employed as independent data set, using only equations with r(m(test))²>0.5. It was observed that residual values gave low value in almost all series, excepting in series 1 for compounds 3a and 4a, and in series 4 for compounds 1a, 2a and 3a, giving a low value for 4a. Consequently, equations seems to be specific according to the structure of the evaluated compound, that means, series 1 fits better for compound 1a, series 3 or 4 fits better for compounds 3a or 4a. Same behavior was observed in the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Therefore, obtained equations in this QSAR study could be employed to calculate the inhibition constant (Ki) value for compounds having a similar structure as N-aryl derivatives described here. The QSAR study showed that bond lengths, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier orbital energies are important in both ChE targets. Docking studies revealed that despite the multiple conformations obtained through MD simulations on both ChEs, the ligand recognition properties were conserved. In fact, the complex formed between ChEs and the best N-aryl compound reproduced the binding mode experimentally reported, where the ligand was coupled into the choline-binding site and stabilized through π-π interactions with Trp82 or Trp86 for BChE and AChE, respectively, suggesting that this compound could be an efficient inhibitor and supporting our model. PMID:24321698

  4. Activity of cholinesterases of blood and heart in rats of different sex and age during muscular loads and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanova, V. D.; Antonova, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The activity of acetylcholinesterase (Ache) and butyrilcholinesterase (Bche) in the blood and the heart of 3 and 13 month old control male rats is considerably lower than in female rats. In 25 month old rats, no sex differences in the Ache and Bche were revealed in the heart. In 3 and 13 month old male and female rats, under conditions of muscular exercises, the Ache and Bche activity is lower, and in hypokinetic male rats -- higher than that in respective control animals. In all the rats, irrespective of sex, age, and motor conditions, Ache and Bche activity tended to decrease from the sinoatrial node to the heart apex.

  5. Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and β-Amyloid: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation of Heterodimeric Compounds with Benzylamine Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Szałaj, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Dudek, Katarzyna; Brus, Boris; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal and complex neurodegenerative disorder for which effective treatment remains the unmet challenge. Using donepezil as a starting point, we aimed to develop novel potential anti-AD agents with a multidirectional biological profile. We designed the target compounds as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, where the N-benzylamine pharmacophore is responsible for interactions with the catalytic anionic site of the enzyme. The heteroaromatic fragment responsible for interactions with the peripheral anionic site was modified and three different heterocycles were introduced: isoindoline, isoindolin-1-one, and saccharine. Based on the results of the pharmacological evaluation, we identified compound 8b with a saccharine moiety as the most potent and selective human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (IC50  = 33 nM) and beta amyloid aggregation inhibitor. It acts as a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro. We believe that compound 8b represents an important lead compound for further development as potential anti-AD agent.

  6. Comparative brain cholinesterase-inhibiting activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra, Myristica fragrans, ascorbic acid, and metrifonate in mice.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Dinesh; Parle, Milind; Kulkarni, S K

    2006-01-01

    The central cholinergic pathways play a prominent role in the learning and memory processes. Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that inactivates acetylcholine. The present study was undertaken to estimate the acetylcholinesterase- inhibiting activity of extracts of Glycyrrhiza glabra, Myristica fragrans seeds, and ascorbic acid and compare these values with a standard acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting drug, metrifonate. Aqueous extract of G. glabra (150 mg/kg p.o. for 7 successive days), n-hexane extract of M. fragrans seeds (5 mg/kg p.o. for 3 successive days), ascorbic acid (60 mg/kg i.p. for 3 successive days), and metrifonate (50 mg/kg i.p.) were administered to young male Swiss albino mice. Acetylcholinesterase enzyme was estimated in brains of mice. G. glabra, M. fragrans, ascorbic acid, and metrifonate significantly decreased acetylcholinesterase activity as compared with their respective vehicle-treated control groups.

  7. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of cholinesterase inhibitors derived from water layer of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (II).

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Joo Sang; Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Jeong Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors increase the availability of acetylcholine in central cholinergic synapses and are the most promising drugs currently available for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our screening study indicated that the water fraction of the methanolic extract of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. significantly inhibited AChE in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new lignan glycoside, lycocernuaside A (12), and fourteen known compounds (1-11 and 13-15). Compound 7 exhibited the most potent AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 μM. Compound 15 had the most potent inhibitory activity against BChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 0.62 and 2.16 μM, respectively. Compounds 4 and 7 showed mixed- and competitive-type AChE inhibition. Compound 7 noncompetitively inhibited BChE whereas 15 showed competitive and 8, 13, and 14 showed mixed-type inhibition. The docking results for complexes with AChE or BChE revealed that inhibitors 4, 7, and 15 stably positioned themselves in several pocket/catalytic domains of the AChE and BChE residues. PMID:26297990

  8. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuChE and IC50 values in the nanomolar concentration scale were obtained. AChE molecular modeling studies of these hybrids indicated that tacrine moiety interacts in the bottom of the gorge with the catalytic active site (CAS) while tianeptine binds to peripheral anionic site (PAS). Furthermore, the compounds 2g and 2e were able to reduce the in vitro basal secretion of S100B, suggesting its therapeutic action in some cases or stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Haruo . E-mail: hk1664@iwate-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [{sup 3}H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [{sup 3}H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected.

  10. De novo amplification within a silent human cholinesterase gene in a family subjected to prolonged exposure to organophosphorus insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Prody, C.A.; Dreyfus, P.; Soreq, H. ); Zamir, R. Tel-Aviv Univ. ); Zakut, H. )

    1989-01-01

    A 100-fold DNA amplification in the CHE gene, coding for serum butyrylcholinesterase (BtChoEase), was found in a farmer expressing silent CHE phenotype. Individuals homozygous for this gene display a defective serum BtChoEase and are particularly vulnerable to poisoning by agricultural organophosphorus insecticides, to which all members of this family had long been exposed. DNA blot hybridization with regional BtChoEase cDNA probes suggested that the amplification was most intense in regions encoding central sequences within BtChoEase cDNA, whereas distal sequences were amplified to a much lower extent. This is in agreement with the onion skin model, based on amplification of genes in cultured cells and primary tumors. The amplification was absent in the grandparents but present at the same extent in one of their sons and in a grandson, with similar DNA blot hybridization patterns. In situ hybridization experiments localized the amplified sequences to the long arm of chromosome 3, close to the site where the authors previously mapped the CHE gene. Altogether, these observations suggest that the initial amplification event occurred early in embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, or oogenesis, where the CHE gene is intensely active and where cholinergic functioning was indicated to be physiologically necessary. These findings demonstrate a de novo amplification in apparently healthy individuals within an autosomal gene producing a target protein to an inhibitor.

  11. Anti-oxidative and cholinesterase inhibitory effects of leaf extracts and their isolated compounds from two closely related Croton species.

    PubMed

    Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Aderogba, Mutalib A; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    A comparative evaluation of the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the leaf extracts of Croton gratissimus and Croton zambesicus (subgratissimus) and compounds isolated from the extracts was carried out to determine their potential and suitability or otherwise as a substitute for each other in the management of oxidative and neurodegenerative conditions. Different antioxidant assays (DPPH, FRAP, β-carotene-linoleic and the lipid peroxidation models) and the microplate assay for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition were carried out separately to study the activities of the crude leaf extracts and four solvent fractions from each of the two Croton species. Bioassay guided fractionation was used to target antioxidant constituents of the crude extracts and ethyl acetate fractions of 20% aqueous methanol extract of C. gratissimus on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 columns resulted in the isolation of kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2), apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3) and kampferol (4). The extract of C. zambesicus yielded quercetin-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside-3'-methyl ether (helichrysoside- 3'-methyl ether, 1), kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2) and apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3). Three of the isolated compounds and their different combinations were also included in the bioassays. In all the assays performed, the antioxidant capacity and AChE inhibitory effects of C. zambesicus extracts were weaker than those of C. gratissimus. This suggests that C. gratissimus may not be substituted by C. zambesicus, despite the similarity in some of their constituents. Generally, the combinations made from the isolated compounds showed better activities in most of the assays compared to the individual isolated compounds. This suggests mechanisms such as synergism and/or additive effects to be taking place. This study established low, moderate and high antioxidant activities as well as AChE inhibitory effects by the crude extracts, fractions, compounds and compound combinations. This means some of the extracts, isolated compounds and compound combinations could be useful in the management of neurodegenerative conditions and serve as sources of natural neurodegenerative agents.

  12. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuChE and IC50 values in the nanomolar concentration scale were obtained. AChE molecular modeling studies of these hybrids indicated that tacrine moiety interacts in the bottom of the gorge with the catalytic active site (CAS) while tianeptine binds to peripheral anionic site (PAS). Furthermore, the compounds 2g and 2e were able to reduce the in vitro basal secretion of S100B, suggesting its therapeutic action in some cases or stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27392529

  13. Susceptibility of the aging Brown Norway rat to carbaryl, an anti-cholinesterase-based insecticide: Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proportion of aged in the United States is projected to expand markedly for the next several decades. Hence, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses of young adult, mature adult, a...

  14. Ionic liquid mediated synthesis and molecular docking study of novel aromatic embedded Schiff bases as potent cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abd Razik, Basma M; Osman, Hasnah; Basiri, Alireza; Salhin, Abdussalam; Kia, Yalda; Ezzat, Mohammed Oday; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2014-12-01

    Novel aromatic embedded Schiff bases have been synthesized in ionic liquid [bmim]Br and evaluated in vitro for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzymes inhibitory activities. Among the newly synthesized compounds, 5f, 5h and 7j displayed higher AChE enzyme inhibitory activities than standard drug, galanthamine, with IC50 values of 1.88, 2.05 and 2.03μM, respectively. Interestingly, all the compounds except for compound 5c displayed higher BChE inhibitories than standard with IC50 values ranging from 3.49 to 19.86μM. Molecular docking analysis for 5f and 7j possessing the most potent AChE and BChE inhibitory activities, disclosed their binding interaction templates to the active site of AChE and BChE enzymes, respectively. PMID:25462993

  15. Multi-target tacrine-coumarin hybrids: cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase B inhibition properties against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sai-Sai; Wang, Xiaobing; Jiang, Neng; Yu, Wenying; Wang, Kelvin D G; Lan, Jin-Shuai; Li, Zhong-Rui; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel tacrine-coumarin hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as multi-target agents against Alzheimer's disease. The biological assays indicated that most of compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity toward AChE and BuChE, and clearly selective inhibition for MAO-B. Among these compounds, 14c exhibited strong inhibitory activity for AChE (IC50 values of 33.63 nM for eeAChE and 16.11 nM for hAChE) and BuChE (IC50 values of 80.72 nM for eqBuChE and 112.72 nM for hBuChE), and the highest inhibitory activity against hMAO-B (IC50 value of 0.24 μM). Kinetic and molecular modeling studies revealed that 14c was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic, peripheral and mid-gorge sites of AChE. It was also a competitive inhibitor, which covered the substrate and entrance cavities of MAO-B. Moreover, 14c could penetrate the CNS and show low cell toxicity. Overall, these results suggested that 14c might be an excellent multi-target agent for AD treatment.

  16. Alterations in the cholinesterase and adenosine deaminase activities and inflammation biomarker levels in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Polachini, C R N; Spanevello, R M; Casali, E A; Zanini, D; Pereira, L B; Martins, C C; Baldissareli, J; Cardoso, A M; Duarte, M F; da Costa, P; Prado, A L C; Schetinger, M R C; Morsch, V M

    2014-04-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the main chronic inflammatory diseases of the CNS that cause functional disability in young adults. It has unknown etiology characterized by the infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages into the brain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in lymphocytes and whole blood, as well as butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in serum. We also checked the levels of nucleotides, nucleosides, biomarkers of inflammation such as cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and IL-10) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum from 29 patients with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS) and 29 healthy subjects as the control group. Results showed that AChE in lymphocytes and whole blood as well as BChE, and ADA activities in serum were significantly increased in RRMS patients when compared to the control group (P<0.05). In addition, we observed a decrease in ATP levels and a significant increase in the levels of ADP, AMP, adenosine and inosine in serum from RRMS patients in relation to the healthy subjects (P<0.05). Results also demonstrated an increase in the IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and CRP (P<0.05) and a significant decrease in the IL-10 (P<0.0001) in RRMS patients when compared to control. Our results suggest that alterations in the biomarkers of inflammation and hydrolysis of nucleotides and nucleosides may contribute to the understanding of the neurological dysfunction of RRMS patients.

  17. Acrylonitrile has Distinct Hormetic Effects on Acetyl-Cholinesterase Activity in Mouse Brain and Blood that are Modulated by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yuanqing, He; Suhua, Wang; Guangwei, Xing; Chunlan, Ren; Hai, Qian; Wenrong, Xu; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael; Milatovic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Acrylonitrile(AN) is a neurotoxin both in animals and humans, but its effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remain controversial. This study aimed to determine the dose-response effects of AN on AChE activity and the modulatory role of ethanol pre-treatment. A total of 144 Kunming mice were randomly divided into 18 groups: nine groups received 5% ethanol in their drinking water, and the remaining nine groups received regular tap water. One week later, both the ethanol and tap water only groups were given an intraperitoneal injection of AN at the following doses: 0 (control), 0.156, 0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg AN/kg body weight. AChE activity was determined on whole blood and brain 24 h later. Blood AChE activity was higher in AN-injected mice than in controls at all doses. AChE activity in blood increased in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 0.156 mg/kg, after which a gradual decrease ensued, displaying a β-typed dose-response relationship. In contrast, brain AChE activity, following a single AN injection, was consistently lower than in control mice, and continued to fall up to a dose of 0.313 mg/kg, and thereafter increased gradually with higher doses. Mice receiving a 20 mg/kg dose of AN exhibited AChE brain activity indistinguishable from that of control mice, demonstrating a typical U-typed dose-response relationship. The activity of AChE in the blood and brain of the AN + ethanol-treated groups displayed a shift to the right, and the magnitude of the decrease in AChE activity induced by AN was attenuated relative to the AN-only group. These results suggest that AN affects AChE activity in both mouse blood and brain in a hormetic manner. Pretreatment with ethanol modifies the effect of AN on AChE, indicating that parent AN has a more prominent role than its metabolites in modulating enzyme activity. PMID:23550232

  18. Evidence for the presence of a mammalian-like cholinesterase in Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) developmental cycle.

    PubMed

    Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Trielli, F; Angelini, C; Falugi, C

    1999-01-01

    By histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the presence of cholinergic-like molecules has previously been demonstrated in Paramecium primaurelia, and their functional role in mating-cell pairing was suggested. In this work, both true acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities were electrophoretically investigated, and the presence of molecules immunologically related to BuChE was checked by immunoblotting. The AChE activity, shown in the membrane protein fraction of mating-competent cells and in the cytoplasmic fraction of immature cells, is due to a 260-kDa molecular form, similar to the membrane-bound tetrameric form present in human erythrocytes. This AChE activity does not appear in either the cytoplasmic fraction of mating-competent cells or in the membrane protein fraction of immature cells. No evidence was found for the presence or the activity of BuChE-like molecules. The role of AChE in P. primaurelia developmental cycle is discussed. PMID:9990739

  19. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of cholinesterase inhibitors derived from water layer of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (II).

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Joo Sang; Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Jeong Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors increase the availability of acetylcholine in central cholinergic synapses and are the most promising drugs currently available for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our screening study indicated that the water fraction of the methanolic extract of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. significantly inhibited AChE in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new lignan glycoside, lycocernuaside A (12), and fourteen known compounds (1-11 and 13-15). Compound 7 exhibited the most potent AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 μM. Compound 15 had the most potent inhibitory activity against BChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 0.62 and 2.16 μM, respectively. Compounds 4 and 7 showed mixed- and competitive-type AChE inhibition. Compound 7 noncompetitively inhibited BChE whereas 15 showed competitive and 8, 13, and 14 showed mixed-type inhibition. The docking results for complexes with AChE or BChE revealed that inhibitors 4, 7, and 15 stably positioned themselves in several pocket/catalytic domains of the AChE and BChE residues.

  20. Species-specific patterns of swimming escape performance and cholinesterase activity in a guild of aquatic insects exposed to endosulfan.

    PubMed

    Trekels, Hendrik; Van de Meutter, Frank; Stoks, Robby

    2012-04-01

    Next to imposing direct lethal effects, pollutants may also indirectly impose mortality by making prey organisms more vulnerable to predation. We report that four water boatmen species differed strongly in direct endosulfan-imposed mortality, and only the species that suffered highest mortality, Sigara iactans, also showed a reduction in escape swimming speed. While head AChE activity was inhibited in all four species, body ChE was only inhibited in S. iactans where it covaried with escape swimming speed, indicating a mechanistic link between body ChE and swimming speed. Our study underscores the need for risk assessment to consider sublethal pollutant effects, which may considerably affect survival rates under natural conditions, also when testing concentrations of a pesticide that cause direct mortality. Such sublethal effects may generate discrepancies between laboratory and field studies and should be considered when designing safety factors for toxicants where the risk assessment is solely based on LC50 values.

  1. COMPARISON BETWEEN ELLMAN AND RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR ASSESSING CHOLINESTERASE (CHE) INHIBITION IN RATS TREATED WITH N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbamylated ChE is unstable and readily reactivates. This reactivation, promoted by increasing temperature and dilution, could have an impact on ex vivo ChE assays by decreasing apparent ChE inhibition. To assess the best method for measuring ChE inhibition in brain and RBCs f...

  2. New cholinesterase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease: Structure Activity Studies (SARs) and molecular docking of isoquinolone and azepanone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bacalhau, Patrícia; San Juan, Amor A; Marques, Carolina S; Peixoto, Daniela; Goth, Albertino; Guarda, Cátia; Silva, Mara; Arantes, Sílvia; Caldeira, A Teresa; Martins, Rosário; Burke, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    A library of isoquinolinone and azepanone derivatives were screened for both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity. The strategy adopted included (a) in vitro biological assays, against eel AChE (EeAChE) and equine serum BuChE (EqBuChE) in order to determine the compounds IC50 and their dose-response activity, consolidated by (b) molecular docking studies to evaluate the docking poses and interatomic interactions in the case of the hit compounds, validated by STD-NMR studies. Compound (1f) was identified as one of these hits with an IC50 of 89.5μM for EeAChE and 153.8μM for EqBuChE, (2a) was identified as a second hit with an IC50 of 108.4μM (EeAChE) and 277.8μM (EqBuChE). In order to gain insights into the binding mode and principle active site interactions of these molecules, (R)-(1f) along with 3 other analogues (also as the R-enantiomer) were docked into both RhAChE and hBuChE models. Galantamine was used as the benchmark. The docking study was validated by performing an STD-NMR study of (1f) with EeAChE using galantamine as the benchmark. PMID:27231829

  3. QSAR, docking, dynamic simulation and quantum mechanics studies to explore the recognition properties of cholinesterase binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, J; Bello, M; Rosales-Hernández, M C; Hernández-Rodríguez, M; Nicolás-Vázquez, I; Rojo-Domínguez, A; Trujillo-Ferrara, J G; Miranda, René; Flores-Sandoval, C A

    2014-02-25

    A set of 84 known N-aryl-monosubstituted derivatives (42 amides: series 1 and 2, and 42 imides: series 3 an 4, from maleic and succinic anhydrides, respectively) that display inhibitory activity toward both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (ChEs) was considered for Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies. These QSAR studies employed docking data from both ChEs that were previously submitted to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Donepezil and galanthamine stereoisomers were included to analyze their quantum mechanics properties and for validating the docking procedure. Quantum parameters such as frontier orbital energies, dipole moment, molecular volume, atomic charges, bond length and reactivity parameters were measured, as well as partition coefficients, molar refractivity and polarizability were also analyzed. In order to evaluate the obtained equations, four compounds: 1a (4-oxo-4-(phenylamino)butanoic acid), 2a ((2Z)-4-oxo-4-(phenylamino)but-2-enoic acid), 3a (2-phenylcyclopentane-1,3-dione) and 4a (2-phenylcyclopent-4-ene-1,3-dione) were employed as independent data set, using only equations with r(m(test))²>0.5. It was observed that residual values gave low value in almost all series, excepting in series 1 for compounds 3a and 4a, and in series 4 for compounds 1a, 2a and 3a, giving a low value for 4a. Consequently, equations seems to be specific according to the structure of the evaluated compound, that means, series 1 fits better for compound 1a, series 3 or 4 fits better for compounds 3a or 4a. Same behavior was observed in the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Therefore, obtained equations in this QSAR study could be employed to calculate the inhibition constant (Ki) value for compounds having a similar structure as N-aryl derivatives described here. The QSAR study showed that bond lengths, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier orbital energies are important in both ChE targets. Docking studies revealed that despite the multiple conformations obtained through MD simulations on both ChEs, the ligand recognition properties were conserved. In fact, the complex formed between ChEs and the best N-aryl compound reproduced the binding mode experimentally reported, where the ligand was coupled into the choline-binding site and stabilized through π-π interactions with Trp82 or Trp86 for BChE and AChE, respectively, suggesting that this compound could be an efficient inhibitor and supporting our model.

  4. Inhibitory evaluation of oligonol on α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, cholinesterase, and β-secretase 1 related to diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Bhakta, Himanshu Kumar; Fujii, Hajime; Min, Byung-Sun; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2016-03-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol that is derived from lychee fruit extract and contains catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins. This study investigates the anti-diabetic activities of oligonol via α-glucosidase and human recombinant protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) assays, as well as its anti-Alzheimer activities by evaluating the ability of this compound to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Oligonol exhibited potent concentration-dependent anti-diabetic activities by inhibiting α-glucosidase and PTP1B with IC50 values of 23.14 µg/mL and 1.02 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, a kinetics study revealed that oligonol inhibited α-glucosidase (K i = 22.36) and PTP1B (K i = 8.51) with characteristics typical of a mixed inhibitor. Oligonol also displayed potent concentration-dependent inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 4.34 µg/mL and 2.07 µg/mL, respectively. However, oligonol exhibited only marginal concentration-dependent BACE1 inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 130.45 µg/mL. A kinetics study revealed mixed-type inhibition against AChE (K i = 4.65) and BACE1 (K i = 58.80), and noncompetitive-type inhibition against BChE (K i = 9.80). Furthermore, oligonol exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. These results indicate that oligonol has strong preventative potential in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26724817

  5. QSAR for cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus esters and CNDO/2 calculations for organophosphorus ester hydrolysis. [quantitative structure-activity relationship, complete neglect of differential overlap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were derived for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by various organophosphorus esters. Bimolecular inhibition rate constants correlate well with hydrophobic substituent constants, and with the presence or absence of cationic groups on the inhibitor, but not with steric substituent constants. CNDO/2 calculations were performed on a separate set of organophosphorus esters, RR-primeP(O)X, where R and R-prime are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. For each subset with the same X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom in the ester correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant. For the whole set of esters with different X, two equations were derived that relate either charge and leaving group steric bulk, or orbital energy and bond order to the hydrolysis rate constant.

  6. In vitro antioxidant and inhibitory activity of water decoctions of carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua L.) on cholinesterases, α-amylase and α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Patarra, João; Alberício, Fernando; Neng, Nuno Rosa; Nogueira, José Manuel Florêncio; Romano, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the in vitro inhibitory activity of water decoctions of leaves, germ flour, pulp, locust bean gum and stem bark of carob tree on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. The antioxidant activity and the chemical characterisation of the extracts made by spectrophotometric assays and by high-performance liquid chromatography are also reported. Leaves and stem bark decoctions strongly inhibited all the enzymes tested, had significant antioxidant activity and the highest total phenolics content. The major compounds were identified as gallic acid in the leaves and gentisic acid in the stem bark.

  7. Cholinesterase inhibition and depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials following acute or repeated exposures to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur.

    PubMed

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Lyke, Danielle F; Hertzberg, Richard C; Haber, Lynne; Kohrman-Vincent, Melissa; Li, Ruosha; Pan, Yi; Lyles, Robert H; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Macmillan, Denise K; Zehr, R Dan; Swank, Adam E; Herr, David W

    2012-06-01

    Previously, we reported that acute treatment with propoxur or carbaryl decreased the duration of the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs). In the current studies, we compared the effects of acute or repeated exposure to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur (1:1.45 ratio; propoxur:carbaryl) on the duration of the PhAD and brain ChE activity in Long Evans rats. Animals were exposed (po) either to a single dose (0, 3, 10, 45 or 75 mg/kg), or 14 daily dosages (0, 3, 10, 30, 45 mg/kg), of the mixture. Acute and repeated treatment with 3mg/kg (or greater) of the mixture produced dose-related inhibition of brain ChE activity. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased after acute administration of 75 mg/kg or repeated treatment with 30 mg/kg of the mixture. The linear relationship between the percent of control brain ChE activity and the PhAD duration was similar for both exposure paradigms. Dose-response models for the acute and repeated exposure data did not differ for brain ChE activity or the duration of the PhAD. Repeated treatment with the mixture resulted in slightly less (13-22%) erythrocyte ChE inhibition than acute exposure. Both acute and repeated treatment resulted in dose-additive results for the PhAD duration and less than dose-additive responses (6-16%) for brain ChE activity for the middle range of dosages. Acute treatment resulted in greater than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (15-18%) at the highest dosages. In contrast, repeated treatment resulted in less than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (16-22%) at the middle dosages. Brain and plasma levels of propoxur and carbaryl did not differ between the acute and repeated dosing paradigms. In summary, a physiological measure of central nervous system function and brain ChE activity had similar responses after acute or repeated treatment with the carbamate mixture, and brain ChE showed only small deviations from dose-additivity. Erythrocyte ChE activity had larger differences between the acute and repeated treatment paradigms, and showed slightly greater deviations from dose-additivity. Because these treatments utilized larger dosages than anticipated environmental exposures, concern for non-additive effects in humans is minimized. The small magnitude of the deviations from dose-additivity also suggest that in the absence of repeated exposure data, results from an acute study of readily reversible carbamate toxicity can be used to estimate the response to repeated daily exposures.

  8. Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase and Their Potential Impact on the Risk of Toxicity from Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the physiologically important target for organophosphorus toxicants (OP) including nerve agents and pesticides. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in blood serves as a bioscavenger that protects AChE in nerve synapses from inhibition by OP. Mass spectrometry methods can detect exposure to OP by measuring adducts on the active site serine of plasma BChE. Genetic variants of human AChE and BChE do exist, but loss of function mutations have been identified only in the BCHE gene. The most common AChE variant, His353Asn (H322N), also known as the Yt blood group antigen, has normal AChE activity. The most common BChE variant, Ala567Thr (A539T) or the K-variant in honor of Werner Kalow, has 33% reduced plasma BChE activity. The genetic variant most frequently associated with prolonged response to muscle relaxants, Asp98Gly (D70G) or atypical BChE, has reduced activity and reduced enzyme concentration. Early studies in young, healthy males, performed at a time when it was legal to test nerve agents in humans, showed that individuals responded differently to the same low dose of sarin with toxic symptoms ranging in severity from minimal to moderate. Additionally, animal studies indicated that BChE protects from toxicants that have a higher reactivity with AChE than with BChE (e.g., nerve agents) but not from toxicants that have a higher reactivity with BChE than with AChE (e.g., OP pesticides). As a corollary, we hypothesize that individuals with genetic variants of BChE may be at increased risk of toxicity from nerve agents but not from OP pesticides. PMID:27551784

  9. Synthesis of Novel 3-Aryl-N-Methyl-1,2,5,6-Tetrahydropyridine Derivatives by Suzuki coupling: As Acetyl Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S.B. Benaka; Kumar, Y.C. Sunil; Kumar, C.S. Ananda; Sadashiva, C.T; Vinaya, K; Rangappa, K.S

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting the central nervous system, which is also associated with progressive loss of memory and cognition. The development of numerous structural classes of compounds with different pharmacological profile could be an evolving, promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. Thus, providing a symptomatic treatment for this disease are cholinomimetics with the pharmacological profile of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In view of this, we have synthesized novel 3-aryl-N-methyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine derivatives 5a-k by Suzuki coupling and screened the efficacy of these derivatives for their AChE inhibitor activity. PMID:19662135

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE IN VITRO KINETIC INTERACTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS-OXON WITH RAT SALIVARY CHOLINESTERASE: A POTENTIAL BIOMONITORING MATRIX. (R828608)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides such as chlorpyrifos (CPF) involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by their active oxon metabolites resulting in a wide range of neurotoxic effects. These oxons also inhibit other cholinester...

  11. Plasma cholinesterase activity as a biomarker for quantifying exposure of green sturgeon to carbaryl following applications to control burrowing shrimp in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Alexandra T; Grue, Christian E

    2016-08-01

    Willapa Bay (Washington State, USA) has been 1 of the rare intertidal locations where large-scale pesticide applications occur. Until recently, carbaryl was applied to control burrowing shrimp that decrease commercial oyster productivity. The bay is a critical habitat for green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris), an anadromous species listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. However, the hazard that carbaryl poses is unknown. Surrogate seawater-acclimated white sturgeon (A. transmontanus) were exposed to 0 μg L(-1) , 30 μg L(-1) , 100 μg L(-1) , 300 μg L(-1) , 1000 μg L(-1) , and 3000 μg L(-1) carbaryl for 6 h, and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were measured. Enzyme recovery was measured in an additional cohort exposed to 1000 μg L(-1) carbaryl for 6 h. Activity of AChE was reduced (p ≤ 0.001) at concentrations ≥ 100 μg L(-1) with recovery in the 1000 μg L(-1) cohort by 72 h. Surprisingly, BChE activity was greater than controls at concentrations ≥ 300 μg L(-1) (p > 0.05), a finding confirmed in additional fish exposed to 3000 μg L(-1) for 6 h (+30%, p < 0.001) with apparent recovery by 48 h. Plasma samples were collected from free-living green sturgeon before and 4 d to 5 d after application of carbaryl in Willapa Bay. Activity of BChE after application was reduced 28% (p < 0.001), indicating exposure to the pesticide. However, the lack of congruence between BChE and AChE activity in captive white sturgeon exposed to carbaryl indicates that further studies are needed to better understand the risk carbaryl exposure poses to green sturgeon. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2003-2015. © 2015 SETAC.

  12. Galanthamine, an anti-cholinesterase drug, effects plant growth and development in Artemisia tridentata Nutt. via modulation of auxin and neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Turi, Christina E; Axwik, Katarina E; Smith, Anderson; Jones, A Maxwell P; Saxena, Praveen K; Murch, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Galanthamine is a naturally occurring acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitor that has been well established as a drug for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease, but the role of the compound in plant metabolism is not known. The current study was designed to investigate whether galanthamine could redirect morphogenesis of Artemisia tridentata Nutt. cultures by altering concentration of endogenous neurosignaling molecules acetylcholine (Ach), auxin (IAA), melatonin (Mel), and serotonin (5HT). Exposure of axenic A. tridentata cultures to 10 µM galanthamine decreased the concentration of endogenous Ach, IAA, MEL, and AchE, and altered plant growth in a manner reminiscent of 2-4D toxicity. Galanthamine itself demonstrated IAA activity in an oat coleoptile elongation bioassay, 20 µM galanthamine showed no significant difference compared with 5 μM IAA or 5 μM 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Metabolomic analysis detected between 20,921 to 27,891 compounds in A. tridentata plantlets and showed greater commonality between control and 5 µM treatments. Furthermore, metabolomic analysis putatively identified coumarins scopoletin/isoscopoletin, and scopolin in A. tridentata leaf extracts and these metabolites linearly increased in response to galanthamine treatments. Overall, these data indicate that galanthamine is an allelopathic phytochemical and support the hypothesis that neurologically active compounds in plants help ensure plant survival and adaptation to environmental challenges.

  13. Galanthamine, an anti-cholinesterase drug, effects plant growth and development in Artemisia tridentata Nutt. via modulation of auxin and neurotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Turi, Christina E; Axwik, Katarina E; Smith, Anderson; Jones, A Maxwell P; Saxena, Praveen K; Murch, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Galanthamine is a naturally occurring acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitor that has been well established as a drug for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease, but the role of the compound in plant metabolism is not known. The current study was designed to investigate whether galanthamine could redirect morphogenesis of Artemisia tridentata Nutt. cultures by altering concentration of endogenous neurosignaling molecules acetylcholine (Ach), auxin (IAA), melatonin (Mel), and serotonin (5HT). Exposure of axenic A. tridentata cultures to 10 µM galanthamine decreased the concentration of endogenous Ach, IAA, MEL, and AchE, and altered plant growth in a manner reminiscent of 2–4D toxicity. Galanthamine itself demonstrated IAA activity in an oat coleoptile elongation bioassay, 20 µM galanthamine showed no significant difference compared with 5 μM IAA or 5 μM 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Metabolomic analysis detected between 20,921 to 27,891 compounds in A. tridentata plantlets and showed greater commonality between control and 5 µM treatments. Furthermore, metabolomic analysis putatively identified coumarins scopoletin/isoscopoletin, and scopolin in A. tridentata leaf extracts and these metabolites linearly increased in response to galanthamine treatments. Overall, these data indicate that galanthamine is an allelopathic phytochemical and support the hypothesis that neurologically active compounds in plants help ensure plant survival and adaptation to environmental challenges. PMID:24690897

  14. TRANSFERABLE RESIDUES FROM DOG FUR AND PLASMA CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN DOGS TREATED WITH A FLEA CONTROL DIP CONTAINING CHLORPYRIFOS. (R825170)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Use of cholinesterase activity as a biomarker of pesticide exposure used on Costa Rican banana plantations in the native tropical fish Astyanax aeneus (Günther, 1860).

    PubMed

    Mena, F; Azzopardi, M; Pfennig, S; Ruepert, C; Tedengren, M; Castillo, L E; Gunnarsson, J S

    2014-01-01

    In Costa Rica, thousands of tones of agricultural pesticides have been used for decades and their use is continuously increasing due to intensive and expanding production of coffee, pineapple, rice, ornamental plants and bananas. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether choline esterase (ChE) activity could be used as a biomarker of exposure to pesticides in the Costa Rican native fish Astyanax aeneus (characidae). Three methods used in order to evaluate the ChE biomarker were as follows: Laboratory studies where A. aeneus was exposed to organophosphate pesticide (ethoprophos); In situ 48 hr exposure assessment using caging experiments with fish exposed upstream and downstream of banana plantations and ChE activity estimation of in fish captured directly at sites with different degrees of pesticide exposure. Results from the laboratory studies showed that ChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue was significantly lower in fish exposed to ethoprophos than in controls. Fish from the caging experiments showed no difference in ChE activity neither in brain nor in muscle tissue between the four tested sites and was attributed to the short duration of the exposure. Asignificant difference in ChE activity was determined in muscle of fish captured from Laguna Madre de Dios compared to fish from Canal Batán. Although our laboratory results revealed that ChE activity in A. aeneus was highly responsive to ethoprophos, results from field experiments were less conclusive and showed that the captured fish showed large variability in ChE activity and that more research is needed before ChE activity can be used as reliable biomarker of pesticide exposure. PMID:24579519

  16. Lead-induced effects on learning/memory and fear/anxiety are correlated with disturbances in specific cholinesterase isoform activity and redox imbalance in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Avgoustatos, Dionisis; Kokkosis, Alexandros G; Protonotarios, Vasilis; Constantinou, Caterina; Margarity, Marigoula

    2014-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the underlying mechanism of lead (Pb)-induced effects on learning/memory and fear/anxiety behavior involves changes either on AChE G4 (most abundant in brain) or on G1 isoform activity, and/or to a putative local disruption of oxidant/antioxidant balance. Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups (18 animals/group): a vehicle group [500ppm (mg/L) CH3COONa/day for 4weeks in their drinking water] and a Pb-treated group [500ppm Pb(CH3COO)2/day for 4weeks in their drinking water]. At the end of the treatment period, mice were subjected to the behavioral tasks. Learning/memory was tested by step-through passive avoidance test, whereas fear/anxiety was studied using the elevated plus-maze and thigmotaxis tests. Pb levels in mice brain were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically, and GSH and MDA levels fluorometrically in whole brain minus cerebellum, cerebral cortex, midbrain, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum. The possible correlations between learning/memory or fear/anxiety behavior with the AChE activity and/or the lipid peroxidation levels and GSH content were also examined. Pb consumption caused significant deficits on mice learning/memory ability and increased anxiety. The consumption of the Pb solution inhibited the activity of the two AChE isoforms in all brain regions tested. Moreover, Pb exposure increased lipid peroxidation and decreased GSH levels in all brain regions examined. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the coefficients between the particular behaviors, AChE activity and redox balance were brain region- and AChE isoform-specific. PMID:24768645

  17. Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase and Their Potential Impact on the Risk of Toxicity from Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lockridge, Oksana; Norgren, Robert B; Johnson, Rudolph C; Blake, Thomas A

    2016-09-19

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the physiologically important target for organophosphorus toxicants (OP) including nerve agents and pesticides. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in blood serves as a bioscavenger that protects AChE in nerve synapses from inhibition by OP. Mass spectrometry methods can detect exposure to OP by measuring adducts on the active site serine of plasma BChE. Genetic variants of human AChE and BChE do exist, but loss of function mutations have been identified only in the BCHE gene. The most common AChE variant, His353Asn (H322N), also known as the Yt blood group antigen, has normal AChE activity. The most common BChE variant, Ala567Thr (A539T) or the K-variant in honor of Werner Kalow, has 33% reduced plasma BChE activity. The genetic variant most frequently associated with prolonged response to muscle relaxants, Asp98Gly (D70G) or atypical BChE, has reduced activity and reduced enzyme concentration. Early studies in young, healthy males, performed at a time when it was legal to test nerve agents in humans, showed that individuals responded differently to the same low dose of sarin with toxic symptoms ranging in severity from minimal to moderate. Additionally, animal studies indicated that BChE protects from toxicants that have a higher reactivity with AChE than with BChE (e.g., nerve agents) but not from toxicants that have a higher reactivity with BChE than with AChE (e.g., OP pesticides). As a corollary, we hypothesize that individuals with genetic variants of BChE may be at increased risk of toxicity from nerve agents but not from OP pesticides. PMID:27551784

  18. Use of cholinesterase activity as a biomarker of pesticide exposure used on Costa Rican banana plantations in the native tropical fish Astyanax aeneus (Günther, 1860).

    PubMed

    Mena, F; Azzopardi, M; Pfennig, S; Ruepert, C; Tedengren, M; Castillo, L E; Gunnarsson, J S

    2014-01-01

    In Costa Rica, thousands of tones of agricultural pesticides have been used for decades and their use is continuously increasing due to intensive and expanding production of coffee, pineapple, rice, ornamental plants and bananas. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether choline esterase (ChE) activity could be used as a biomarker of exposure to pesticides in the Costa Rican native fish Astyanax aeneus (characidae). Three methods used in order to evaluate the ChE biomarker were as follows: Laboratory studies where A. aeneus was exposed to organophosphate pesticide (ethoprophos); In situ 48 hr exposure assessment using caging experiments with fish exposed upstream and downstream of banana plantations and ChE activity estimation of in fish captured directly at sites with different degrees of pesticide exposure. Results from the laboratory studies showed that ChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue was significantly lower in fish exposed to ethoprophos than in controls. Fish from the caging experiments showed no difference in ChE activity neither in brain nor in muscle tissue between the four tested sites and was attributed to the short duration of the exposure. Asignificant difference in ChE activity was determined in muscle of fish captured from Laguna Madre de Dios compared to fish from Canal Batán. Although our laboratory results revealed that ChE activity in A. aeneus was highly responsive to ethoprophos, results from field experiments were less conclusive and showed that the captured fish showed large variability in ChE activity and that more research is needed before ChE activity can be used as reliable biomarker of pesticide exposure.

  19. Muscarinic M1 receptor partially modulates higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death in primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase variants dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadon, María José; Díaz, María Jesús; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, Gloria Gómez; García, Jimena; Lobo, Margarita; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Cadmium is a toxic compound reported to produce cognitive dysfunctions, though the mechanisms involved are unknown. In a previous work we described how cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces greater cell death in primary cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain. It also induces cell death in SN56 cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain through M1R blockage, alterations in the expression of AChE variants and GSK-3β, and an increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated Tau protein levels. It was observed that the silencing or blockage of M1R altered ChAT activity, GSK-3β, AChE splice variants gene expression, and Aβ and Tau protein formation. Furthermore, AChE-S variants were associated with the same actions modulated by M1R. Accordingly, we hypothesized that cholinergic transmission blockage and higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death of primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is mediated by M1R blockage, which triggers this effect through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. To prove this hypothesis, we evaluated, in primary culture from the basal forebrain region, whether M1R silencing induces greater cell death in cholinergic neurons than cadmium does, and whether in SN56 cells M1R mediates the mechanisms described so as to play a part in the cadmium induction of cholinergic transmission blockage and cell death in this cell line through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. Our results prove that M1R silencing by cadmium partially mediates the greater cell death observed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Moreover, all previously described mechanisms for blocking cholinergic transmission and inducing cell death on SN56 cells after cadmium exposure are partially mediated by M1R through the alteration of AChE expression. Thus, our results may explain cognitive dysfunctions observed in cadmium toxicity. PMID:27377441

  20. Activity of cholinesterases, pyruvate kinase and adenosine deaminase in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica: Influences of these enzymes on inflammatory response and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Bottari, Nathieli B; Mendes, Ricardo E; Schwertz, Claiton I; Lucca, Neuber J; Dalenogare, Diessica; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Rech, Virginia C; Jaques, Jeandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in total blood and liver tissue; butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in serum and liver tissue; adenosine deaminase (ADA) in serum and liver tissue; and pyruvate kinase (PK) in liver tissue of rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica. Animals were divided into two groups with 12 animals each, as follows: group A (uninfected) and group B (infected). Samples were collected at 20 (A1 and B1;n=6 each) and 150 (A2 and B2; n=6 each) days post-infection (PI). Infected animals showed an increase in AChE activity in whole blood and a decrease in AChE activity in liver homogenates (P<0.05) at 20 and 150 days PI. BChE and PK activities were decreased (P<0.05) in serum and liver homogenates of infected animals at 150 days PI. ADA activity was decreased in serum at 20 and 150 days PI, while in liver homogenates it was only decreased at 150 days PI (P<0.05). Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in serum were increased (P<0.05), while concentrations of total protein and albumin were decreased (P<0.05) when compared to control. The histological analysis revealed fibrous perihepatitis and necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that the liver fluke is associated with cholinergic and purinergic dysfunctions, which in turn may influence the pathogenesis of the disease.

  1. Effects of the insecticide, orthene, on unconfined populations of the meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus). I. Capture/recapture procedures; II. Residues and cholinesterase inhibition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 and 1983. the population demography of M. pennsylvanicus was not altered significantly by single or double applications of Orthene. Although inconsistencies in population size, survival, and recruitment were not explained by differences between control and experimental grids in breeding, emigration, interspecific competition, or pesticide-induced mortality, there may have been fundamental microhabitat differences between grids in both years, and this is supported by prespray data. Slight differences between grids may also reflect the random error associated with the models used to estimate parameters. No evidence was found to indicate an effect on relative weight change or average distances moved. The level of brain AChE in 1982 during sequential days after spraying was significantly lower than control levels. However, this inhibition was not enough to cause direct mortality. Recovery of brain AChe was gradual, probably reflecting continual re-exposure through the diet. Acephate and methamidophos residues were present in the vegetation collected from sprayed areas immediately following treatment, but were reduced or absent after 8 days. AChE inhibition in 1982 and 1983 extended beyond the disappearance of residues in the vegetation. Residues were only present in the G.l. tracts of voles collected immediately following treatment due to rapid metabolism and excretion. Levels in the vegetation and G.l. tracts in 1982 and 1983 were well below the rat oral LD50 of acephate. It is concluded that Orthene applied at recommended levels, in a single or double treatment, should not affect unconfined populations of M. pennsylvanicus in Maryland old-field habitats. Furthermore, this study confirms this method as a sensitive means to determine the overall impact of insecticides on wildlife populations. However, caution must be exercised to insure that all control and experimental areas are closely scrutinized for habitat differences.

  2. Gulf War illness: Effects of repeated stress and pyridostigmine treatment on blood-brain barrier permeability and cholinesterase activity in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amourette, Christine; Lamproglou, Ioannis; Barbier, Laure; Fauquette, William; Zoppe, Amélie; Viret, Roselyne; Diserbo, Michel

    2009-11-01

    After the first Persian Gulf War, many soldiers have complained of a variety of symptoms designated as "Gulf War Illness". Among several factors, implication of pyridostigmine (PB) in late cognitive dysfunction is highly likely. As a hypothesis to explain these behavioural disorders is a potentiation of the operational stress effects by pyridostigmine. We have previously described that repeated stress combined to pyridostigmine treatment induces learning dysfunction linked to genomic cerebral modifications [Barbier L, Diserbo M, Lamproglou I, Amourette C, Peinnequin A, Fauquette W. Repeated stress in combination with pyridostigmine: part II-changes in selected cerebral genes expression. Behav Brain Res 2009;197:292-300; Lamproglou I, Barbier L, Diserbo M, Fauvelle F, Fauquette W, Amourette C. Repeated stress in combination with pyridostigmine: part I-long-term behavioural consequences. Behav Brain Res 2009;197:301-10]. In the present study, using the same experimental model, we attempted to determine if such modifications are linked to a central passage of pyridostigmine under stress. Indeed it is known that exposure to stress can disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBB) and thereby increase the neurotoxicity induced by chemicals in many cerebral areas. Adult rats were subjected to repeated stress based on a modification of the pole climbing avoidance technique and treated daily by PB (1.5mg/kg/day, oral in water), for two 5-day periods separated by 2-day rest. Just after the last stress session, (3)H-pyridostigmine was administered as a tracer to evaluate BBB breakdown. In brain micro-punches and brain coronal cryosections, we failed to detect any radioactivity in animals chronically stressed and treated by pyridostigmine. Accordingly, no change of ChE activity was noted in any brain area studied. It thus appears that, in our experimental model, pyridostigmine induces effects on central nervous system, but these effects do not seem to be mediated by a central passage of pyridostigmine linked to a BBB opening under stress. These results suggest that pyridostigmine may have central effects, under stress, via indirect mechanisms emerging from a peripheral pathway.

  3. Tetrahydroaminoacridine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, and D-cycloserine, a partial NMDA receptor-associated glycine site agonist, enhances acquisition of spatial navigation.

    PubMed

    Riekkinen, P; Ikonen, S; Riekkinen, M

    1998-05-11

    The present study examines the efficacy of single and combined treatments with an antiocholinesterase, tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA, i.p.), and a glycine-B site partial agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS, i.p.) to alleviate water maze (WM) spatial navigation defect induced by medial septal (MS) lesion. THA 3 and DCS at 3 or 10 mg/kg improved acquisition of the WM test, but only DCS improved spatial bias. These drugs had no effect on consolidation. A combination of THA 3 and DCS 10 mg/kg enhanced WM acquisition more effectively than either of the treatments on their own. This suggests that combined modulation of acetylcholine and NMDA mechanisms may have greater therapeutic effect to stimulate cognitive dysfunctions.

  4. In vitro antioxidant and inhibitory activity of water decoctions of carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua L.) on cholinesterases, α-amylase and α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Patarra, João; Alberício, Fernando; Neng, Nuno Rosa; Nogueira, José Manuel Florêncio; Romano, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the in vitro inhibitory activity of water decoctions of leaves, germ flour, pulp, locust bean gum and stem bark of carob tree on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. The antioxidant activity and the chemical characterisation of the extracts made by spectrophotometric assays and by high-performance liquid chromatography are also reported. Leaves and stem bark decoctions strongly inhibited all the enzymes tested, had significant antioxidant activity and the highest total phenolics content. The major compounds were identified as gallic acid in the leaves and gentisic acid in the stem bark. PMID:25582851

  5. TIME COURSE AND DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHOLINESTERASE (CHE) INHIBITION IN ADULT RATS TREATED ACUTELY WITH CARBARYL, METHOMYL, METHIOCARB, OXAMYL, OR PROPOXUR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To compare the toxicity of 5 N-methyl carbamates, the time course and dose response profiles for ChE inhibition were established for each. For the time course comparison, adult male Long Evans rats (n=5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (CB; 30 mg/kg in corn oi...

  6. Plasma cholinesterase activity as a biomarker for quantifying exposure of green sturgeon to carbaryl following applications to control burrowing shrimp in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Alexandra T; Grue, Christian E

    2016-08-01

    Willapa Bay (Washington State, USA) has been 1 of the rare intertidal locations where large-scale pesticide applications occur. Until recently, carbaryl was applied to control burrowing shrimp that decrease commercial oyster productivity. The bay is a critical habitat for green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris), an anadromous species listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. However, the hazard that carbaryl poses is unknown. Surrogate seawater-acclimated white sturgeon (A. transmontanus) were exposed to 0 μg L(-1) , 30 μg L(-1) , 100 μg L(-1) , 300 μg L(-1) , 1000 μg L(-1) , and 3000 μg L(-1) carbaryl for 6 h, and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were measured. Enzyme recovery was measured in an additional cohort exposed to 1000 μg L(-1) carbaryl for 6 h. Activity of AChE was reduced (p ≤ 0.001) at concentrations ≥ 100 μg L(-1) with recovery in the 1000 μg L(-1) cohort by 72 h. Surprisingly, BChE activity was greater than controls at concentrations ≥ 300 μg L(-1) (p > 0.05), a finding confirmed in additional fish exposed to 3000 μg L(-1) for 6 h (+30%, p < 0.001) with apparent recovery by 48 h. Plasma samples were collected from free-living green sturgeon before and 4 d to 5 d after application of carbaryl in Willapa Bay. Activity of BChE after application was reduced 28% (p < 0.001), indicating exposure to the pesticide. However, the lack of congruence between BChE and AChE activity in captive white sturgeon exposed to carbaryl indicates that further studies are needed to better understand the risk carbaryl exposure poses to green sturgeon. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2003-2015. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26678014

  7. Galanthamine, an anti-cholinesterase drug, effects plant growth and development in Artemisia tridentata Nutt. via modulation of auxin and neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Turi, Christina E; Axwik, Katarina E; Smith, Anderson; Jones, A Maxwell P; Saxena, Praveen K; Murch, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Galanthamine is a naturally occurring acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitor that has been well established as a drug for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease, but the role of the compound in plant metabolism is not known. The current study was designed to investigate whether galanthamine could redirect morphogenesis of Artemisia tridentata Nutt. cultures by altering concentration of endogenous neurosignaling molecules acetylcholine (Ach), auxin (IAA), melatonin (Mel), and serotonin (5HT). Exposure of axenic A. tridentata cultures to 10 µM galanthamine decreased the concentration of endogenous Ach, IAA, MEL, and AchE, and altered plant growth in a manner reminiscent of 2-4D toxicity. Galanthamine itself demonstrated IAA activity in an oat coleoptile elongation bioassay, 20 µM galanthamine showed no significant difference compared with 5 μM IAA or 5 μM 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Metabolomic analysis detected between 20,921 to 27,891 compounds in A. tridentata plantlets and showed greater commonality between control and 5 µM treatments. Furthermore, metabolomic analysis putatively identified coumarins scopoletin/isoscopoletin, and scopolin in A. tridentata leaf extracts and these metabolites linearly increased in response to galanthamine treatments. Overall, these data indicate that galanthamine is an allelopathic phytochemical and support the hypothesis that neurologically active compounds in plants help ensure plant survival and adaptation to environmental challenges. PMID:25764435

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one, and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives as potential cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gulcan, Hayrettin Ozan; Unlu, Serdar; Esiringu, Ilker; Ercetin, Tugba; Sahin, Yasemin; Oz, Demet; Sahin, Mustafa Fethi

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxylated 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives (i.e., urolithins) are the main bioavailable metabolites, and biomarkers of ellagitannins present in various nutrition. Although these dietaries, the sources of urolithins, are employed in folk medicine as cognitive enhancer in the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease, urolithins have negligible potential to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes, the validated targets of Alzheimer's Disease. Therefore, within this research, a series of 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one, and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives has been designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated as potential acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors. The compounds synthesized exerted comparable activity in comparison to rivastigmine, galantamine, and donepezil both in in vitro and in vivo studies.

  9. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one, and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives as potential cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gulcan, Hayrettin Ozan; Unlu, Serdar; Esiringu, Ilker; Ercetin, Tugba; Sahin, Yasemin; Oz, Demet; Sahin, Mustafa Fethi

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxylated 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives (i.e., urolithins) are the main bioavailable metabolites, and biomarkers of ellagitannins present in various nutrition. Although these dietaries, the sources of urolithins, are employed in folk medicine as cognitive enhancer in the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease, urolithins have negligible potential to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes, the validated targets of Alzheimer's Disease. Therefore, within this research, a series of 6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one, and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[c]chromen-6-one derivatives has been designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated as potential acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors. The compounds synthesized exerted comparable activity in comparison to rivastigmine, galantamine, and donepezil both in in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:25189690

  10. 40 CFR 799.5055 - Hazardous waste constituents subject to testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... count. (2) Certain clinical biochemistry determinations on blood shall be carried out at least two times..., hormones, acid/base balance, methemoglobin, and cholinesterase activity. Additional clinical...

  11. 40 CFR 799.5075 - Drinking water contaminants subject to testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... count. (13) Clinical biochemical determinations. Certain clinical biochemistry determinations on blood... cholinesterase activity. Additional clinical biochemistry may be employed, where necessary, to extend...

  12. 40 CFR 799.5075 - Drinking water contaminants subject to testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... count. (13) Clinical biochemical determinations. Certain clinical biochemistry determinations on blood... cholinesterase activity. Additional clinical biochemistry may be employed, where necessary, to extend...

  13. 40 CFR 799.5055 - Hazardous waste constituents subject to testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... count. (2) Certain clinical biochemistry determinations on blood shall be carried out at least two times..., hormones, acid/base balance, methemoglobin, and cholinesterase activity. Additional clinical...

  14. 40 CFR 799.9325 - TSCA 90-day dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... triglycerides, hormones, methemoglobin, and cholinesterases. (iii) Optionally, the following...

  15. 40 CFR 799.9325 - TSCA 90-day dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... triglycerides, hormones, methemoglobin, and cholinesterases. (iii) Optionally, the following...

  16. Differentiation between organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, M; Shefi, M; Dany, S; Dore, I; Tirosh, M; Almog, S

    1995-01-31

    We propose a novel and simple assay for the real-time differentiation between carbamate and organophosphate inhibition of cholinesterase, based on our observations of the kinetic behavior of inhibited enzyme. The assay of carbamylated cholinesterase activity over time follows a non-linear kinetic pattern, whereas that of phosphorylated enzyme activity is linear. This feature can be exploited to differentiate between carbamate and organophosphate cholinesterase inhibition. The non-linear pattern characteristic of carbamates is easily discernible at degrees of inhibition of 40% or more. In this setting, cholinesterase activity ought to be measured continuously for about 1 h to obtain the kinetic pattern of enzyme activity. The initial activity, measured during the first 5 min of assay, represents the activity of enzyme in vivo. In vitro reactivation of inhibited cholinesterase allows the estimation of full potential activity of enzyme prior to poisoning, so that percentage of inhibition can be calculated. Reactivation of carbamylated cholinesterase is obtained by the incubation of diluted enzyme at 37 degrees C for 2.5 h prior to assay, whereas phosphorylated (non-aged) enzyme is reactivated by a 30 min incubation with oximes. In cases of mild exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors (< 40% inhibition), the response of enzyme to in vitro reactivation serves as a complementary test for exposure and for the nature of the inhibitor. All the results presented in this work refer to plasma cholinesterase. Erythrocyte cholinesterase was found to behave very similarly to plasma enzyme and its results have not been reported here.

  17. Age-related behavioral effects of methomyI in Brown Norway rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methomyl is a cholinesterase-inhibiting carbamate pesticide that is used in the field on cotton and a variety of fruits and vegetables. Concerns have been raised generally about age-related differences in susceptibility to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, especially for chil...

  18. 40 CFR 180.349 - Fenamiphos; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)phosphoramidate, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the following table... cholinesterase inhibiting metabolites ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl 1-(methylethyl)phosphoramidate...

  19. 40 CFR 180.349 - Fenamiphos; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)phosphoramidate, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the following table... cholinesterase inhibiting metabolites ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl 1-(methylethyl)phosphoramidate...

  20. 40 CFR 180.349 - Fenamiphos; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)phosphoramidate, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the following table... cholinesterase inhibiting metabolites ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl 1-(methylethyl)phosphoramidate...

  1. 40 CFR 180.349 - Fenamiphos; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)phosphoramidate, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities in the following table... cholinesterase inhibiting metabolites ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl 1-(methylethyl)phosphoramidate...

  2. Donepezil

    MedlinePlus

    ... AD; a brain disease that slowly destroys the memory and the ability to think, learn, communicate and ... cholinesterase inhibitors. It improves mental function (such as memory, attention, the ability to interact with others, speak, ...

  3. Design, synthesis and evaluation of carbamate-modified (-)-N(1)-phenethylnorphysostigmine derivatives as selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Hijikuro, Ichiro; Kihara, Takeshi; Murugesh, Modachur G; Fuse, Shinichiro; Tsumura, Yoshinori; Akaike, Akinori; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Takahashi, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-03-01

    We synthesized carbamate-modified (-)-N(1)-phenethylnorphysostigmine derivatives 3a-u and evaluated their anti-cholinesterase activities. In vitro evaluation showed that cyclohexylmethylcarbamate derivative 3u potently and selectively inhibits butyrylcholinesterase.

  4. DECREASED HEART RATE IS ASSOCIATED WITH CARBAMATE-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY SERUM PROTEINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we reported that chlorpyrifos (CHP), an irreversible cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor, induces hypertension in rats. Concomitant with hypertension, we found an increase in C-reactive protein, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 , monocyte chemotactic protein-5 and interfer...

  5. Single Fiber Electromyographic Jitter to Detect Acute Changes in Neuromuscular Function in Young and Adult Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Exposure to irreversible cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting compounds, such as organophosphates may produce neuromuscular dysfunction. However, less is known about changes in neuromuscular transmission after treatment with reversible ChE-inhibitors. These studies adapt...

  6. Use of Single Fiber Electromyographic Jitter to Detect Acute Changes in Neuromuscular Function in Young and Adult Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: Exposure to irreversible cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting compounds, such as organophosphates may produce neuromuscular dysfunction. However, less is known about changes in neuromuscular transmission after treatment with reversible ChE-inhibitors. These studies adapt...

  7. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  8. Understanding Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhibitors. Scientists believe they prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine, a brain chemical that may be important for ... Alzheimer's progresses, the brain produces less and less acetylcholine; therefore, cholinesterase inhibitors may eventually lose their effect. ...

  9. 21 CFR 520.531 - Cythioate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, insecticides... stress, or recovering from surgery. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of...

  10. 21 CFR 520.531 - Cythioate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, insecticides... stress, or recovering from surgery. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of...

  11. A Method for Fast Assessment of OP/CB Exposure in the Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) Using Combined Esterases Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Abass, Kasim Sakran

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of different esterase activities in plasma and liver for Japanese quail and to combine determination of both carboxylesterase and cholinesterase as biochemical biomarker in order to identify the effects of carbamate and organophosphate compounds exposure. Carboxylesterase exhibits larger sensitivity to carbamate and organophosphate compounds than to cholinesterase and is present at higher levels. This permitted nature and distribution of carboxylesterase or cholinesterase to be measured. One predominant toxicological form of enzyme level constant in its patterns of motivation and inhibition with cholinesterase was identified in plasma with an apparent Michaelis constant for butyrylthiocholine iodide of 0.394 mM. Carboxylesterase activity in liver was considered by its preferential hydrolysis of the S-phenyl thioacetate. A concentration dependent decrease of carboxylesterase and cholinesterase has demonstrated during in vitro incubation of malathion, parathion, and trichlorfon in the range 0.125–2 mM, while with methomyl was in the range 0.25–4 mM. When quail (n = 15) was exposed orally for 48 h to concentrations of carbamate or organophosphate compounds of 3–200 mg/kg, the percentage inhibition of cholinesterase was in each case larger than that of carboxylesterase and reached statistical significance (P < 0.05) at lower concentrations. PMID:24527206

  12. Acute behavioral toxicity of carbaryl and propoxur in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, P H; Cook, L L; Dean, K F; Reiter, L W

    1983-04-01

    Motor activity and neuromotor function were examined in adult CD rats exposed to either carbaryl or propoxur, and behavioral effects were compared with the time course of cholinesterase inhibition. Rats received an IP injection of either 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 mg/kg propoxur or 0, 4, 8, 16 or 28 mg/kg carbaryl in corn oil 20 min before testing. All doses of propoxur reduced 2 hr activity in a figure-eight maze, and crossovers and rears in an open field. For carbaryl, dosages of 8, 16 and 28 mg/kg decreased maze activity whereas 16 and 28 mg/kg reduced open field activity. In order to determine the time course of effects, rats received a single IP injection of either corn oil, 2 mg/kg propoxur or 16 mg/kg carbaryl, and were tested for 5 min in a figure-eight maze either 15, 30, 60, 120 or 240 min post-injection. Immediately after testing, animals were sacrificed and total cholinesterase was measured. Maximum effects of propoxur and carbaryl on blood and brain cholinesterase and motor activity were seen within 15 min. Maze activity had returned to control levels within 30 and 60 min whereas cholinesterase levels remained depressed for 120 and 240 min for propoxur and carbaryl, respectively. These results indicate that both carbamates decrease motor activity, but behavioral recovery occurs prior to that of cholinesterase following acute exposure.

  13. Some pharmacological correlations of hypothermia induced by anticholinesterasics.

    PubMed

    Voicu, V; Jiquidi, M; Sitcal, N; Bruja, N

    1976-01-01

    The investigations have been performed on Wistar rats intoxicated with paraoxon in toxic sublethal doses. There have been measured the variations of rectal temperature at various time periods following the anticholinesterase agent. The authors established the pharmacodynamic correlations of paraoxon-induced hypothermia with cholinesterase reactivators (toxogonin, isonitrosine), anticholinergic substances (atropine, butylscopolamine), carbamic anticholinesterase (eserine, neoeserine) and chlorpromazine. The efficiency of atropine and cholinesterase reactivators in antagonization of hypothermia induced by organophosphorics on the one hand, and only of atropine against hypothermia induced by carbamates on the other hand allow the hypothesis of a central cholinergic mechanism, predominantly muscarinic, involved in hypothermia induced by anticholinesterasics and of a direct correlation of this mechanism with phosphorylation or carbamylation processes of cerebral cholinesterases.

  14. Responses of the iguanid lizard Anolis carolinensis to four organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.J.; Clark, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dose related mortality and cholinesterase effects of parathion, methyl parathion, azinphos-methyl and malathion on Anolis carolinensis were investigated. The comparative effects of the four compounds on fish, birds and mammals are well known, but the effects of organophosphates on reptiles have not been studied critically. Sensitivity and patterns of mortality from exposure to the pesticides resemble those of birds and mammals rather than those of other poikilothermic vertebrates. Possible symptoms of epinephrine accumulation were observed in exposed animals; this side effect is consistent with the known mechanisms of the pesticides. Our findings indicate that brain cholinesterase activity is related to dose, that 50% inhibition of cholinesterase is associated with death and that 40% inhibition indicates sublethal exposure. Anolis lizards are frequently exposed to pesticides in the field and they may be useful in monitoring the hazards posed to a variety of wildlife species.

  15. Continuously recording body temperature in terrestrial chelonians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Tracy, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  16. Monitoring acetylcholinesterase levels in migrant agricultural workers and their children using a portable test kit.

    PubMed

    Higgins, G M; Muñiz, J F; McCauley, L A

    2001-02-01

    The EQM Research, Inc., portable test kit was evaluated as a surveillance tool for blood cholinesterase levels among migrant workers and their children. Laboratory validation demonstrated a linear relationship between the reference Ellman and kit methods (Ellman = 0.95 x kit result + 0.82, r2 = 0.98). Pre- and post-season cholinesterase levels measured in 70 farm workers were within normal ranges, but significantly different at 28.5 and 29.7 U/g Hb, respectively (paired t-test, p = 0.014). Results from 98 migrant farm worker children and a comparison group of 53 age-matched non-agricultural children showed that cholinesterase levels were not significantly different between the agricultural and non-agricultural children (ANOVA, p = 0.69). These data demonstrate that a portable test kit can provide useful data pesticide exposures when measurements are made in a temperature-controlled setting. PMID:11398901

  17. Is plasma {beta}-glucuronidase a novel human biomarker for monitoring anticholinesterase pesticides exposure? A Malaysian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan H. |. E-mail: salmaan@mib.gov.my; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Ali, Noor Suhailah; El Sersi, Magdi; Toong, Lee Mun; Zainal, Awang Mat; Hashim, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Mohd Shariman; Saidin, Mohd Nazri; Rahman, Ab Razak Ab; Rafaai, Mohd Jamil Mohd; Omar, Sollahudin; Rapiai, Rafiah; Othman, Radziah; Chan, Lee Tiong; Johari, Amran; Soon, Wong Hing; Salleh, Abdul Rahim; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the effects of acute and chronic pesticide exposure on the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity among five patients of acute pesticide poisoning in Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital, Klang, 230 farmers in the MADA area, Kedah and 49 fishermen in Setiu, Terengganu. The duration of pesticide exposure among the patients was unknown, but the plasma samples from patients were collected on day one in the hospital. The duration of pesticide exposure among the farmers was between 1 and 45 years. The {beta}-glucuronidase activity was compared with plasma cholinesterase activity in the same individual. The plasma cholinesterase activity was measured using Cholinesterase (PTC) Reagent set kit (Teco Diagnostics, UK) based on colorimetric method, while the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity was measured fluorometrically based on {beta}-glucuronidase assay. The plasma cholinesterase activity was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) among the patients (1386.786 {+-} 791.291 U/L/min) but the inhibition in plasma cholinesterase activity among the farmers (7346.5 {+-} 1860.786 U/L/min) was not significant (p > 0.05). The plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers was significantly elevated (p < 0.05) (0.737 {+-} 0.425 {mu}M/h) but not significant among the patients (p > 0.05). The plasma cholinesterase activity was positively correlated with the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers (r = 0.205, p < 0.01) but not among the patients (r = 0.79, p > 0.05). Thus, plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity can be measured as a biomarker for the chronic exposure of pesticide. However, further studies need to be performed to confirm whether plasma {beta}-glucuronidase can be a sensitive biomarker for anticholinesterase pesticide poisoning.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase activity in Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Denker, Elsa; Chatonnet, Arnaud; Rabet, Nicolas

    2008-09-25

    Cholinesterase activity is known in representatives of all living organisms phyla but the origin of the cholinergic system as known in bilaterian animals is still undeciphered. In particular the implication of cholinesterases in the nervous system of non-bilaterian Metazoa is not well known. We thus chose to investigate this activity in the Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria) medusa. In toto histochemical staining revealed an acetylcholinesterase activity in the tentacle bulbs but not in the nervous system. Sequences homologous to acetylcholinesterase were searched within Clytia ESTs and compared to other sequences found in public databases.

  19. Organophosphate inhibition of avian salt gland Na, K-ATPase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eastin, W.C.; Fleming, W.J.; Murray, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    1. Adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were given freshwater or saltwater (1.5% NaCl) for 11 days and half of each group was also given an organophosphate (17 p.p.m. fenthion) in the diet on days 6-11. 2. After 11 days, ducks drinking saltwater had lost more weight and had higher plasma Na and uric acid concentrations and osmolalities than birds drinking freshwater. 3. Saltwater treatment stimulated the salt gland to increased weight and Na, K-ATPase activity. 4. Fenthion generally reduced plasma and brain cholinesterase activity and depressed cholinesterase and Na, K-ATPase activities in salt glands of birds drinking saltwater.

  20. Assessment of the effect of varying soil organic matter content on the bioavailability of malathion to the common nightcrawler, Lumbricus terrestris L.

    PubMed

    Henson-Ramsey, Heather; Shea, Damian; Levine, Jay F; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne; Taylor, Sharon K; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of soil organic matter content on the bioavailability of malathion to the common nightcrawler, Lumbricus terrestris. Earthworms were exposed for 72 h to malathion on two soil types, 8% organic matter and 55% organic matter. Two different measures of bioavailability, malathion body burdens and tissue cholinesterase activities, were then measured in the malathion exposed animals. There were no significant differences in body burden or cholinesterase levels in L. terrestris exposed to malathion on soils with differing organic matter content. This suggests that absorption into organic matter is not a limiting factor of malathion bioavailability to earthworm species. PMID:18202811

  1. Prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment of intoxications caused by nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Musilek, Kamil; Pohanka, Miroslav; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Soukup, Ondrej

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of intoxications caused by nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides consists of different approaches. The first approach is called prophylaxis or pre-exposure administration of antidotes such as cholinesterase reactivators or bioscavengers. The second, post-exposure treatment consists of anticholinergic drugs, acetylcholinesterase reactivators and anticonvulsants. This article is aimed at both mentioned approaches, especially focused on cholinesterase reactivators, which are a broad group of structurally different compounds that can be used in prophylaxis (separately or in combination with butyrylcholinesterase) and also as post-exposure treatment.

  2. [Effects of repeated sevoflurane anesthesia on hepatic and renal function in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, M; Mitsuhata, H; Shimizu, R; Akazawa, S; Fukuda, H; Saitoh, K; Hirabayashi, Y; Togashi, H

    1994-10-01

    A 10-yr-old boy with an injured lower extremity received sevoflurane anesthesia 5 times within 40 days. Laboratory tests for hepatic and renal function i.e., serum transaminase (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), serum cholinesterase, plasma protein, serum cholinesterase, serum bilirubine, serum lactic dehydrogenase, serum prothrombin time, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, beta 2-microglobulin, N-acetyl-D-glucosamidase and 24 hr-creatinine clearance remained within normal ranges throughout his perioperative period. Repeated sevoflurane anesthesia did not exert any adverse effect on hepatic and renal function in this patient.

  3. Use of a novel radiometric method to assess the inhibitory effect of donepezil on acetylcholinesterase activity in minimally diluted tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Arai, Takuya; Obata, Takayuki; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cholinesterase inhibitors have been widely used for the treatment of patients with dementia. Monitoring of the cholinesterase activity in the blood is used as an indicator of the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors in the brain. The selective measurement of cholinesterase with low tissue dilution is preferred for accurate monitoring; however, the methods have not been established. Here, we investigated the effect of tissue dilution on the action of cholinesterase inhibitors using a novel radiometric method with selective substrates, N-[14C]methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate ([14C]MP4A) and (R)-N-[14C]methylpiperidin-3-yl butyrate ([14C]MP3B_R), for AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) respectively. Experimental approach: We investigated the kinetics of hydrolysis of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]-MP3B_R by cholinesterases, and evaluated the selectivity of [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R for human AChE and BChE, respectively, compared with traditional substrates. Then, IC50 values of cholinesterase inhibitors in minimally diluted and highly diluted tissues were measured with [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R. Key results: AChE and BChE activities were selectively measured as the first-order hydrolysis rates of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R respectively. The AChE selectivity of [14C]MP4A was an order of magnitude higher than traditional substrates used for the AChE assay. The IC50 values of specific AChE and BChE inhibitors, donepezil and ethopropazine, in 1.2-fold diluted human whole blood were much higher than those in 120-fold diluted blood. In addition, the IC50 values of donepezil in monkey brain were dramatically decreased as the tissue was diluted. Conclusions and implications: This method would effectively monitor the activity of cholinesterase inhibitors used for therapeutics, pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:20401964

  4. Ag electrode modified with polyhexamethylene biguanide stabilized silver nanoparticles: a new type of SERS substrates for detection of enzymatically generated thiocholine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepanov, A. A.; Nechaeva, N. L.; Prokopkina, T. A.; Kudrinskiy, A. A.; Kurochkin, I. N.; Lisichkin, G. V.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of thiocholine is one of the most widespread techniques for estimation of the cholinesterase activity - acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Both cholinesterases can be inhibited by organophosphates and carbamates and accordingly can be considered for estimation of these pollutants in the environment. In the current work, SERS spectroscopy was applied for the thiocholine detection. The Ag electrodes modified with silver nanoparticles stabilized by polyhexamethylene biguanide were for the first time suggested as SERS-substrates for that purpose. Such electrodes can be applicable for SERS detection of submicromolar concentrations of thiocholine.

  5. A new coumarin from Murraya paniculata.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Azizuddin; Khalid, Asaad; Sultani, Shaikh Ziauddin; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2002-01-01

    A new natural product, 2'-O-ethylmurrangatin (1) was isolated along with two previously known compounds murranganone (2) and paniculatin (3) from the leaves of Murraya paniculata. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated with the help of spectroscopic studies and by chemical reactions. Compounds 2 and 3 have been found to be cholinesterase inhibitors.

  6. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF ENZYMATIC TEST KITS FOR WARFARE AGENTS AND PESTICIDES IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatic test kits, generally designed to be handheld and portable, detect the presence of chemical agents, carbamate pesticides, and/or organophosphate pesticides by relying on the reaction of the cholinesterase enzyme. Under normal conditions, the enzyme reacts as expected wi...

  7. Ataxia, depression, and dermatitis associated with the use of dichlorvos-impregnated collars in the laboratory cat.

    PubMed

    Bell, T G; Farrell, R K; Padgett, G A; Leendertsen, L W

    1975-10-01

    Ataxia and depression developed in 21 of 50 (42%) laboratory cats wearing flea collars impregnated with 2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (dichlorvos or DDVP) in a warm dry environment. Five (10%) of the cats died. Whole blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly (P smaller than 0.001) reduced in all cats and cervical dermatitis occurred in 37 (74%) of them.

  8. Possible Overlapping Time Frames of Acquisition and Consolidation Phases in Object Memory Processes: A Pharmacological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkerman, Sven; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) are able to improve object memory by enhancing acquisition processes. On the other hand, only PDE-Is improve consolidation processes. Here we show that the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil also improves memory performance when…

  9. EFFECTS OF CARBARYL ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SHR) AND NORMOTENSIVE (WKY) RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    SHR rats have been widely used to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of hypertension. Recent evidence suggests SHR rats have an increased sensitivity to cholinesterase inhibitors. In an effort to develop animal models of susceptibility for use in risk assessment, this ex...

  10. Age-related differences in acute neurotoxicity produced by mevinphos, monocrotophos, dicrotophos, and phosphamidon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-related differences in the acute neurotoxicity of cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides have been well-studied for a few organophosphates, but not for many others. In this study, we directly compared dose-responses using brain and red blood cell (RBC) ChE measurements, a...

  11. Effects of selected metal oxide nanoparticles on Artemia salina larvae: evaluation of mortality and behavioural and biochemical responses.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, Chiara; Mesarič, Tina; Milivojević, Tamara; Sepčić, Kristina; Gallus, Lorenzo; Carbone, Serena; Ferrando, Sara; Faimali, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to investigate the toxicity of selected metal oxide nanoparticles (MO-NPs) on the brine shrimp Artemia salina, by evaluating mortality and behavioural and biochemical responses. Larvae were exposed to tin(IV) oxide (stannic oxide (SnO2)), cerium(IV) oxide (CeO2) and iron(II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) NPs for 48 h in seawater, with MO-NP suspensions from 0.01 to 1.0 mg/mL. Mortality and behavioural responses (swimming speed alteration) and enzymatic activities of cholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase were evaluated. Although the MO-NPs did not induce any mortality of the larvae, they caused changes in behavioural and biochemical responses. Swimming speed significantly decreased in larvae exposed to CeO2 NPs. Cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase activities were significantly inhibited in larvae exposed to SnO2 NPs, whereas cholinesterase activity significantly increased after CeO2 NP and Fe3O4 NP exposure. Catalase activity significantly increased in larvae exposed to Fe3O4 NPs. In conclusion, swimming alteration and cholinesterase activity represent valid endpoints for MO-NP exposure, while glutathione-S-transferase and catalase activities appear to be NP-specific. PMID:24590232

  12. 21 CFR 524.920 - Fenthion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (4) Related tolerances. See 40 CFR... tolerances. See 40 CFR 180.214. (5) Conditions of use. (i) The drug is used for control of cattle grubs and...-parasite reactions such as bloat, salivation, staggering and paralysis may sometimes occur when cattle...

  13. 21 CFR 524.920 - Fenthion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (4) Related tolerances. See 40 CFR... tolerances. See 40 CFR 180.214. (5) Conditions of use. (i) The drug is used for control of cattle grubs and...-parasite reactions such as bloat, salivation, staggering and paralysis may sometimes occur when cattle...

  14. 21 CFR 524.920 - Fenthion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (4) Related tolerances. See 40 CFR... tolerances. See 40 CFR 180.214. (5) Conditions of use. (i) The drug is used for control of cattle grubs and...-parasite reactions such as bloat, salivation, staggering and paralysis may sometimes occur when cattle...

  15. 76 FR 38037 - Mevinphos; Data Call-in Order for Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ..., strawberries, grapes, lettuce, melons, watermelon, peas, peppers, summer squash, cucumbers, and tomatoes (40... tolerances for that pesticide under section 408 of the FFDCA, 21 U.S.C. 346a. (75 FR 44181). The proposed data call-in order included the following studies: 1. Comparative Cholinesterase Assay (870.6300);...

  16. Evaluating age-related sensitivity to carbaryl-induced behavorial changes by PBPK/PD modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to its reversible inhibition of cholinesterases (ChEs), acute neurotoxicity is the primary effect of concern for carbaryl. Sensitivity to acute behavioral neurotoxicity of carbaryl was observed to be greater in aged rats, which was not fully attributable to differences in ChE...

  17. BRAIN ACONITASE ACTIVITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SHR) AND WISTAR-KYOTO (WKY) RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models of susceptibility are critical for human health risk assessment. Previous studies indicate that spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats are more sensitive than Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats to the cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors such as carbaryl and chlorpyrifos. This diffe...

  18. 21 CFR 524.920 - Fenthion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.920 Fenthion. (a... considerations. Do not use on animals simultaneously or within a few days before or after treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (4) Related tolerances. See 40...

  19. 21 CFR 524.900 - Famphur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.900 Famphur. (a... treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (e) Related... shoulder to the tail head as a single treatment. It is applied as soon as possible after heel fly...

  20. 21 CFR 524.920 - Fenthion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paragraph (d)(3) of this section. (c) Related tolerances. See 40 CFR 180.214. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Beef cattle and nonlactating dairy cattle—(i) Amount. It is used at the rate of one-half fluid ounce per 100... with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. Host-parasite...

  1. 40 CFR 799.9310 - TSCA 90-day oral toxicity in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the following specific information must be reported: (i... performance of laboratory equipment. The study must be conducted in compliance with 40 CFR Part 792—Good... include calcium, phosphorus, fasting triglycerides, hormones, methemoglobin, and cholinesterases....

  2. 40 CFR 799.9310 - TSCA 90-day oral toxicity in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the following specific information must be reported: (i... performance of laboratory equipment. The study must be conducted in compliance with 40 CFR Part 792—Good... include calcium, phosphorus, fasting triglycerides, hormones, methemoglobin, and cholinesterases....

  3. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Donald P.

    This manual aids health professionals in recognizing and treating pesticide poisonings. Suggested treatments are appropriate for implementation in the small hospitals and clinics which usually receive the victims of pesticide poisoning. Classes of compounds covered include: (1) organophosphate cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides; (2) carbamate…

  4. A Novel Approach for Evaluating Carbamate Mixtures for Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two mathematical approaches were used to test the hypothesis ofdose-addition for a binary and a seven-chemical mixture ofN-methyl carbamates, toxicologically similar chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase (ChE). In the more novel approach, mixture data were not included in the ana...

  5. CARBARYL EFFECTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN REGIONS OF ADOLESCENT AND SENESCENT BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is crucial in assessing the human health risks of chemicals. Growing evidence implicates as in carbamate toxicity in addition to cholinesterase-inhibit...

  6. Weakened Cholinergic Blockade of Inflammation Associates with Diabetes-Related Depression

    PubMed Central

    Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Toker, Sharon; Shapira, Itzhak; Rogowski, Ori; Berliner, Shlomo; Ritov, Yaacov; Soreq, Hermona

    2016-01-01

    —Melancholia: Fears and despondencies, if they last a long time.” —Hippocrates, Aphorisms, Section 6.23 Emerging evidence demonstrates association of depression with both immune malfunctioning and worsened course of diverse aging-related diseases, but there is no explanation for the pathway(s) controlling this dual association. Here, we report that in post-reproductive and evolutionarily –blind” years, depression may weaken pathogen–host defense, compatible with the antagonistic pleiotropy hypothesis. In 15,532 healthy volunteers, depression scores associated with both inflammatory parameters and with increased circulation cholinesterase activities, implicating debilitated cholinergic blockade of inflammation as an underlying mechanism; furthermore, depression, inflammation and cholinesterase activities all increased with aging. In the entire cohort, combined increases in inflammation and the diabetic biomarker hemoglobin A1c associated with elevated depression. Moreover, metabolic syndrome patients with higher risk of diabetes showed increased cholinesterase levels and pulse values, and diabetic patients presented simultaneous increases in depression, inflammation and circulation cholinesterase activities, suggesting that cholinergic impairment precedes depression. Our findings indicate that dysfunctioning cholinergic regulation weakens the otherwise protective link between depression and pathogen–host defense, with global implications for aging-related diseases. PMID:27257683

  7. Distribution of sup 125 I-neurotensin binding sites in human forebrain: Comparison with the localization of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, E.; Quirion, R.; Beaudet, A. )

    1990-07-22

    The distribution of 125I-neurotensin binding sites was compared with that of acetylcholinesterase reactivity in the human basal forebrain by using combined light microscopic radioautography/histochemistry. High 125I-neurotensin binding densities were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, islands of Calleja, claustrum, olfactory tubercle, and central nucleus of the amygdala; lower levels were seen in the caudate, putamen, medial septum, diagonal band nucleus, and nucleus basalis of Meynert. Adjacent sections processed for cholinesterase histochemistry demonstrated a regional overlap between the distribution of labeled neurotensin binding sites and that of intense acetylcholinesterase staining in all of the above regions, except in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, claustrum, and central amygdaloid nucleus, where dense 125I-neurotensin labeling was detected over areas containing only weak to moderate cholinesterase staining. At higher magnification, 125I-neurotensin-labeled binding sites in the islands of Calleja, supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, medial septum, diagonal band nucleus, and nucleus basalis of Meynert were selectively associated with neuronal perikarya found to be cholinesterase-positive in adjacent sections. Moderate 125I-neurotensin binding was also apparent over the cholinesterase-reactive neuropil of these latter three regions. These data suggest that neurotensin (NT) may directly influence the activity of magnocellular cholinergic neurons in the human basal forebrain, and may be involved in the physiopathology of dementing disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, in which these neurons have been shown to be affected.

  8. Anticholinesterases: Medical applications of neurochemical principles

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, C.B.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Cholinesterases form a family of serine esterases that arise in animals from at least two distinct genes. Multiple forms of these enzymes can be precisely localized and regulated by alternative mRNA splicing and by co- or posttranslational modifications. The high catalytic efficiency of the cholinesterases is quelled by certain very selective reversible and irreversible inhibitors. Owing largely to the important role of acetylcholine hydrolysis in neurotransmission, cholinesterase and its inhibitors have been studied extensively in vivo. In parallel, there has emerged an equally impressive enzyme chemistry literature. Cholinesterase inhibitors are used widely as pesticides; in this regard the compounds are beneficial with concomitant health risks. Poisoning by such compounds can result in an acute but usually manageable medical crisis and may damage the ONS and the PNS, as well as cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue. Some inhibitors have been useful for the treatment of glaucoma and myasthenia gravis, and others are in clinical trials as therapy for Alzheimer`s dementia. Concurrently, the most potent inhibitors have been developed as highly toxic chemical warfare agents. We review treatments and sequelae of exposure to selected anticholinesterases, especially organophosphorus compounds and carbamates, as they relate to recent progress in enzyme chemistry.

  9. 21 CFR 520.1120a - Haloxon drench.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haloxon drench. 520.1120a Section 520.1120a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL..., pesticide, or other chemical having cholinesterase-inhibiting activity either simultaneously or within a...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1120a - Haloxon drench.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haloxon drench. 520.1120a Section 520.1120a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL..., pesticide, or other chemical having cholinesterase-inhibiting activity either simultaneously or within a...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1120a - Haloxon drench.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haloxon drench. 520.1120a Section 520.1120a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL..., pesticide, or other chemical having cholinesterase-inhibiting activity either simultaneously or within a...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1120a - Haloxon drench.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haloxon drench. 520.1120a Section 520.1120a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL..., pesticide, or other chemical having cholinesterase-inhibiting activity either simultaneously or within a...

  13. Dose-additivity modeling for acute and repeated exposure to a mixture of N-methycarbamate Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of N-methylcarbamate pesticides is attributed to the reversible inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous system. The inhibition of ChE following a single exposure to this class of pesticides has been modeled using a dose-additi...

  14. 40 CFR 180.330 - S-(2-(Ethylsulfinyl)ethyl) O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.330 S-(2-(Ethylsulfinyl)ethyl) O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate... oxydemeton-methyl sulfone in or on the following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Alfalfa...) and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites in or on the following food commodities: Commodity...

  15. Cholinergic Enhancement of Frontal Lobe Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Wishart, Heather A.; Rabin, Laura A.; Flashman, Laura A.; McHugh, Tara L.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors positively affect cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions, but no controlled functional MRI studies have examined where their effects occur in the brain. We examined the effects of donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept[Registered sign]) on cognition and brain activity in patients with amnestic mild cognitive…

  16. Effect of prolonged hypodynamia on certain physiological functions in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaremenko, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of 20 dogs whose mobility was restricted was experimentally investigated. Their reactions to hypodynamia were either active behavior or progressive general depression and increased muscular weakness. Arterial pressure, pressor sinocarotid reflex valve, body weight, pulse rate, body temperature, and plasma cholinesterase activity were monitered for 28 days. Results are reported.

  17. COMPARISON OF ACUTE NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute neurobehavioral and cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting effects of N-methyl carbamate insecticides have not been systematically compared. We evaluated five carbamates - carbaryl (CB), propoxur (PP), oxamyl (OM), methomyl (MM), and methiocarb (MC). Adult male Long-Evans ra...

  18. Effects of dieldrin treatment on physiological and biochemical aspects of the toad embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Gauna, L.; Caballero de Castro, A.; Chifflet de Llamas, M.; Pechen de D'Angelo, A.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Dieldrin is a cylclodiene insecticide highly persistent in nature due to its chemical stability. The exposure of toad embryos to Dieldrin induces hyperactivity in the swimming larvae and inhibition of cholinesterases. However, the inhibition of these enzymes during early development is not life threatening. The present report provides a physiological and biochemical study of the noxious effect of Dieldrin on the toad embryonic development.

  19. Mutagenesis of essential functional residues in acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, G; Camp, S; Dionne, M; MacPhee-Quigley, K; Taylor, P

    1990-01-01

    The cholinesterases are serine hydrolases that show no global similarities in sequence with either the trypsin or the subtilisin family of serine proteases. The cholinesterase superfamily includes several esterases with distinct functions and other proteins devoid of the catalytic serine and known esterase activity. To identify the residues involved in catalysis and conferring specificity on the enzyme, we have expressed wild-type Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) and several site-directed mutants in a heterologous system. Mutation of serine-200 to cysteine results in diminished activity, while its mutation to valine abolishes detectable activity. Two conserved histidines can be identified at positions 425 and 440 in the cholinesterase family; glutamine replacement at position 440 eliminates activity whereas the mutation at 425 reduces activity only slightly. The assignment of the catalytic histidine to position 440 defines a rank ordering of catalytic residues in cholinesterases distinct from trypsin and subtilisin and suggests a convergence of a catalytic triad to form a third, distinct family of serine hydrolases. Mutation of glutamate-199 to glutamine yields an enzyme with a higher Km and without the substrate-inhibition behavior characteristic of acetylcholinesterase. Hence, modification of the acidic amino acid adjacent to the serine influences substrate association and the capacity of a second substrate molecule to affect catalysis. Images PMID:2217185

  20. 21 CFR 524.900 - Famphur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or within a few days before or after treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs... shoulder to the tail head as a single treatment. Apply as soon as possible after heel fly activity ceases... reduce cattle lice infestations. (3) Limitations. Do not slaughter within 35 days after treatment. Do...

  1. 21 CFR 524.900 - Famphur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. (e) Related... shoulder to the tail head as a single treatment. It is applied as soon as possible after heel fly activity... animals. Animals may become dehydrated and under stress following shipment. Do not treat until they are...

  2. A study of effectiveness of fresh frozen plasma in organophosphorous compound poisoning in reducing length of Intensive Care Unit stay and in reducing need for tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Dayananda, V. P.; Bhaskara, B.; Pateel, G.N.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main stay of treatment in organophophosphorous [OP] poisoning is with atropine, oximes and supportive therapy. Despite the therapy, no improvement in mortality and morbidity. Fresh frozen plasma [FFP] a source of serum cholinesterase act as bio-scavenger to neutralise organophosphate toxins to improve the patients out come. Methods: The prospective study was conducted in 80 patients with acute OP poisoning. Patients with moderate to severe grade of OP poisoning with serum cholinesterase level <1000 IU/L were included in the study. Study group received atropine and oximes along with FFP given as 4 units first day, 3units on 2nd day, 2 units on 3rd day. Control group was given atropine and oximes only. Serum cholinesterase enzymes level, consumption of atropine per day, number of days on ventilator, length of ICU stay, and need for tracheostomy were assessed. Results: There was a significant increase in the serum cholinesterase levels after FFP infusion in the study group in comparison to the control group. Mean duration of Intensive Care Unit [ICU] stay was 8.35±4.3 in the study group and 12.45±4.13 in the control group. 06 patients in the control group succumbed whereas there were no fatalities in the study group. Conclusion: Daily reducing dose of FFP therapy for 3 consecutive days has beneficial effect in acute OP poisoning by increasing serum cholinesterase enzymes in blood with reduction in total dose of atropine consumption per day. It also reduces the ICU stay with zero mortality in OP poisoning. PMID:27212759

  3. Persistent Cognitive Alterations in Rats after Early Postnatal Exposure to Low Doses of the Organophosphate Pesticide, Diazinon

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Olga A.; Roegge, Cindy S.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Levin, Edward D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphorous insecticides (OPs) involves multiple mechanisms in addition to cholinesterase inhibition. We have found persisting effects of developmental chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) on cholinergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems and gene expression as well as behavioral function. Both molecular/neurochemical and behavioral effects of developmental OP exposure have been seen at doses below those which cause appreciable cholinesterase inhibition. Objectives We sought to determine if developmental DZN exposure at doses which do not produce significant acetylcholinesterase inhibition cause cognitive deficits. Methods Rats were exposed to DZN on postnatal days 1-4 at doses (0.5 and 2 mg/kg/d) that span the threshold for cholinesterase inhibition. They were later examined with a cognitive battery tests similar to that used with CPF. Results In the T-maze DZN caused significant hyperactivity in the initial trials of the session, but not later. In a longer assessment of locomotor activity no DZN-induced changes were seen over a 1-hour session. Prepulse inhibition was reduced by DZN exposure selectively in males vs. females; DZN eliminated the sex difference present in controls. In the radial maze, the lower but not higher DZN dose significantly impaired spatial learning. This has previously been seen with CPF as well. The lower dose DZN group also showed significantly greater sensitivity to the memory-impairing effects of the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. Conclusions Neonatal DZN exposure below the threshold for appreciable cholinesterase inhibition caused neurocognitive deficits in adulthood. The addition of some inhibition of AChE with a higher dose reversed the cognitive impairment. This non-monotonic dose-effect function has also been seen with neurochemical effects. Some of the DZN effects on cognition resemble those seen earlier for CPF, some differ. Our data suggest that DZN and CPF affect

  4. Acute pesticide poisoning among cut-flower farmers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2007-09-01

    The study reported here looked at adverse health effects associated with pesticide exposure among cut-flower farmers in La Trinidad, Philippines. Survey questionnaires and detailed physical and laboratory examinations were administered to 114 and 102 respondents, respectively, to determine pesticide exposure, work and safety practices, individual and family illnesses, and cholinesterase levels. Results showed that pesticide application was the activity most frequently associated with pesticide exposure, and entry was mostly ocular and dermal. Involvement of the skin was noted, with 21 percent of farmers having integumentary abnormalities. Upon physical examination, 90 respondents, or 88.2 percent of those examined, were found to have abnormal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Abnormal temperature was found in 81.3 percent, and the next most frequent finding was abnormal general-survey results, at 75.5 percent. In 51 percent, cholinesterase levels were below the mean value of 0.7 delta pH/hour. (The unit of measure A pH/hour refers to the change in cholinesterase activity as measured by the difference between the initial pH and the final pH when acetylcholine solution has been added to the red blood cell for 1 1/2 hours. A decrease in cholinesterase activity will produce a low delta pH/hour level) In 25.5 percent, a more than 10 percent depression in the level of RBC cholinesterase was found. Certain hematological parameters were also abnormal, namely hemoglobin, hematocrit, and eosinophil count. Using Pearson's r, the author found that factors strongly associated with illness due to pesticides include use of a contaminated piece of fabric to wipe off sweat (p = .01) and reuse of pesticide containers to store water (p = .01), Recycling of containers poses great health hazards and risks of contamination, and the current recommendation is that used containers should be buried. There was a moderate relationship between illness and average number of years of pesticide

  5. Development of pretreatment compounds against nerve-gas agents. Annual report (Final), 16 May 88-30 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, F.I.; Abraham, P.

    1990-09-30

    The U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command is interested in research directed toward the development of countermeasures to chemical warfare (CW) agents such as the nerve gas poison soman. Soman and other nerve gas poisons are extremely potent cholinesterase inhibitors. This inhibition leads to a buildup of excess acetylcholine resulting in over-stimulation of both the peripheral and central nervous system and can lead to death. Standard therapy for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning is based on co-administration of an anticholinergic agent such as atropine to antagonize the effects of accumulated acetylcholine and a cholinesterase reactivator such as 2-PAM to dephosphorylate the inhibited enzyme. However, since many problems remain in the treatment of organophosphate nerve agent poisoning, there is considerable interest and need to develop new pretreatment and treatment drugs, particularly for soman poisoning.

  6. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  7. Daphnia intoxicated by nerve agent tabun can be treated using human antidotes.

    PubMed

    Vesela, Sarka; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Application of human antidotes against nerve agent intoxications to microcrustacean Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) intoxicated by a nerve agent tabun (O-ethyl-N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate) and their efficacy was investigated. It was found that antidotes can be successfully applied to intoxicated daphnids. Three different treatment regimens were tested: the combination of atropine and acetylcholinesterase reactivator (trimedoxime was chosen), atropine only and trimedoxime alone, too. The most efficient was the combination of atropine and trimedoxime followed by treatment with atropine only. The proportion of recovered animals increased with time not only in treated groups but also in the control as well. This can be explained by a spontaneous reactivation of tabun-inhibited cholinesterase in daphnids probably indicating a difference between mammalian and crustacean cholinesterases.

  8. Kindling: a pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Wasterlain, C G; Morin, A M; Jonec, V

    1982-01-01

    Injection of a few nanomoles of the muscarinic agonists carbamylcholine, muscarine or (+)-acetyl-beta-methylcholine once a day into the rat amygdala was initially subconvulsive, but on repetition led to the progressive development of kindled epileptic seizures. This behaviour was stereospecific, was potentiated by the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine, and was blocked by the muscarinic antagonists atropine, QNB and scopolamine. The kindling potencies of cholinergic muscarinic agonists and antagonists paralleled their relative affinities for muscarinic receptors in vitro. No changes in muscarinic receptors, in cholinesterase or in choline acetyltransferase were observed in kindled brains after a stimulation-free period of at least 1 week. These data support the aggregate hypothesis of epileptogenesis and suggest that abnormal activity through a particular group of muscarinic synapses can be sufficient to generate an epileptic focus.

  9. [Dementia of the Alzheimer type: non-drug and drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Kressig, Reto W

    2015-04-01

    The optimal management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves a close alliance with AD caregivers and requires early diagnosis, multimodal management, including non-drug and drug interventions, and multispecialty care. Non-pharmacological approaches such as cognitive stimulation programs mostly benefit behavior and psychiatric symptoms in dementia patients. Pharmacologic management of AD consists of eliminating therapeutic redundancies and potentially deleterious medications (Beers Criteria). A pharmacologic foundation of Ginkgo Biloba and combination therapy with a cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine reduces decline in cognition and function, decreases and/or delays the emergence and impact of neuropsychiatric symptoms, postpones institutionalization, and works best when appropriately instituted early and maintained. Despite an existing reimbursement limitation by the health-insurance system in Switzerland, the combination of cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine is possible within the admitted MMSE ranges.

  10. Human subject experiments to estimate reentry periods for monocrotophos-treated tobacco.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, F E; Domanski, J J; Chasson, A L; Bradway, D E; Monroe, R J

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen to fifteen human volunteers worked for eight-hr periods in tobacco fields treated 96, 72, and 48 hr previously with monocrotophos (3-hydroxy-N-methyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate). At the 48-hr reentry period, during which time no rainfall occurred, both post-exposure plasma and red blood cell cholinesterase levels of the worker group were depressed from pre-exposure levels although the decline was less than 9% in both cases. Rainfall in excess of one inch fell during the 96- and 72-hr reentry intervals, and no important change in cholinesterase levels was noted. Experiments with mice were in general agreement with the human tests. Dimethyl phosphoric acid in urine of the worker group collected prior to, and three hr after, exposure was unchanged in all cases. Rain appeared to have markedly reduced dislodgable residues.

  11. Establishment of reentry intervals for organophosphate-treated cotton fields based on human data: III. 12 To 72 hours post-treatment exposure to monocrotophos, ethyl- and methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Ware, G W; Morgan, D P; Estesen, B J; Cahill, W P

    1975-01-01

    Five human volunteers entered methyl parathion, ethyl parathion, or monocrotophos treated cotton fields for five-hr exposure periods when the residues of the respective pesticides had aged 12 hr, 24 and 48 hr and 72 hr. Foliage residues of methyl parathion disappeared fastest, those of monocrotophos slowest. Personal exposure to pesticide was evaluated from contamination of skin, clothing, and ambient air, while actual absorption of chemical was assessed from pesticide concentration in blood, urinary metabolite excretion, and effects on blood cholinesterase activities. There was good correspondence between magnitudes of foliar residue, estimates of personal contamination, and measures of chemical absorption. Field exposures caused no symptoms or clinical signs of organophosphate poisoning and depressed averaged blood cholinesterase activities by no more than 14% of pre-exposure levels.

  12. Comparative toxicity of chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion and their oxon derivatives to larval Rana boylii.

    PubMed

    Sparling, D W; Fellers, G

    2007-06-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and are highly toxic to amphibians. They deactivate cholinesterase, resulting in neurological dysfunction. Most chemicals in this group require oxidative desulfuration to achieve their greatest cholinesterase-inhibiting potencies. Oxon derivatives are formed within liver cells but also by bacterial decay of parental pesticides. This study examines the toxicity of chlorpyrifos, malathion and diazinon and their oxons on the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii). R. boylii is exposed to agricultural pesticides in the California Central Valley. Median lethal concentrations of the parental forms during a 96 h exposure were 3.00 mg/L (24h) for chlorpyrifos, 2.14 mg/L for malathion and 7.49 mg/L for diazinon. Corresponding oxons were 10 to 100 times more toxic than their parental forms. We conclude that environmental concentrations of these pesticides can be harmful to R. boylii populations.

  13. Neuroprotective Tri- and Tetracyclic BChE Inhibitors Releasing Reversible Inhibitors upon Carbamate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tri- and tetracyclic nitrogen-bridgehead compounds were designed and synthesized to yield micromolar cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. Structure–activity relationships identified potent compounds with butyrylcholinesterase selectivity. These compounds were selected as starting points for the design and synthesis of carbamate-based (pseudo)irreversible inhibitors. Compounds with superior inhibitory activity and selectivity were obtained and kinetically characterized also with regard to the velocity of enzyme carbamoylation. Structural elements were identified and introduced that additionally showed neuroprotective properties on a hippocampal neuronal cell line (HT-22) after glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. We have identified potent and selective pseudoirreversible butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors that release reversible inhibitors with neuroprotective properties after carbamate transfer to the active site of cholinesterases. PMID:24900407

  14. Sulfonamides as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bag, Seema; Tulsan, Rekha; Sood, Abha; Cho, Hyejin; Redjeb, Hana; Zhou, Weihong; LeVine, Harry; Török, Béla; Török, Marianna

    2015-02-01

    Sulfonamide linker-based inhibitors with extended linear structure were designed and synthesized with the aim of producing multifunctional agents against several processes involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The potency of the compounds were assessed in the inhibition of Aβ self-assembly (fibril and oligomer formation), in modulating cholinesterase (AChE, BuChE) activity, and scavenging free radicals. Several compounds exhibited promising Aβ self-assembly and cholinesterase inhibition and in parallel, showed good free radical scavenging properties. The investigation of the scaffold described in this study resulted in the identification of three compounds (14, 19 and 26) as promising leads for the further design of multifunctional drug candidates for AD.

  15. Diagnosis of Intoxication by the Organophosphate VX: Comparison Between an Electrochemical Sensor and Ellman´s Photometric Method

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Hrabinova, Martina; Kuca, Kamil

    2008-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor is introduced as a tool applicable for diagnosis of intoxication by cholinesterase inhibitors caused by the well-known nerve agent VX. The traditional Ellman method was chosen for comparison with the sensor's analytical parameters. Both methods are based on estimation of blood cholinesterase inhibition as a marker of intoxication. While Ellman's method provided a limit of detection of 5.2×10-7 M for blood containing VX, the electrochemical sensor was able to detect 4.0×10-7 M. Good correlation between both methods was observed (R = 0.92). The electrochemical sensor could be considered a convenient tool for a fast yet accurate method, easily available for field as well as laboratory use. Time and cost savings are key features of the sensor-based assay.

  16. Beverages of lemon juice and exotic noni and papaya with potential for anticholinergic effects.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.) juice beverages enriched either with noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) (LN) or papaya (Carica papaya L.) (LP), were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n), the antioxidant capacity was evaluated by (DPPH·), superoxide (O2(·-)), hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) assays, and their potential as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitors was also assessed. The fruits are rich in a wide range of bioactive phenolics. Regarding DPPH·, ·OH and HOCl assays, the LP displayed strong activity, and LN was the most active against O2(·-). Concerning cholinesterases, LP was the most active, mainly due to lemon juice contribution. The effect on the cholinesterases was not as strong as in previous reports on purified extracts, but the bioactive-rich beverages offer the possibility of dietary coadjutants for daily consumption of health-promoting substances by adults with aging-related cognitive or physical disorders.

  17. Progress in drug development for Alzheimer's disease: An overview in relation to mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2016-10-01

    Current possibilities of Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment are very limited and are based on administration of cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine. Newly synthesized drugs affect multiple AD pathophysiological pathways and can act as inhibitors of cholinesterases (AChE, BuChE), inhibitors of monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), modulators of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, modulators of amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase and antioxidants. Effects of clinically used as well as newly developed AD drugs were studied in relation to energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions, including oxidative phosphorylation, activities of enzymes of citric acid cycle or electron transfer system, mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium homeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species and MAO activity. PMID:27094132

  18. Comparative toxicity of chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion and their oxon derivatives to larval Rana boylii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Fellers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and are highly toxic to amphibians. They deactivate cholinesterase, resulting in neurological dysfunction. Most chemicals in this group require oxidative desulfuration to achieve their greatest cholinesterase-inhibiting potencies. Oxon derivatives are formed within liver cells but also by bacterial decay of parental pesticides. This study examines the toxicity of chlorpyrifos, malathion and diazinon and their oxons on the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii). R. boylii is exposed to agricultural pesticides in the California Central Valley. Median lethal concentrations of the parental forms during a 96 h exposure were 3.00 mg/L (24 h) for chlorpyrifos, 2.14 mg/L for malathion and 7.49 mg/L for diazinon. Corresponding oxons were 10 to 100 times more toxic than their parental forms. We conclude that environmental concentrations of these pesticides can be harmful to R. boylii populations. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactions of cyclodextrins and their derivatives with toxic organophosphorus compounds

    PubMed Central

    Letort, Sophie; Balieu, Sébastien; Erb, William; Gouhier, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to provide an update on the current use of cyclodextrins against organophosphorus compound intoxications. Organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents play a determinant role in the inhibition of cholinesterases. The cyclic structure of cyclodextrins and their toroidal shape are perfectly suitable to design new chemical scavengers able to trap and hydrolyze the organophosphorus compounds before they reach their biological target. PMID:26977180

  20. Searching for the Cases of Acute Organophosphorus Pesticides Poisoning by JOIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futagami, Kojiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Horioka, Masayoshi; Asakura, Hajime; Fukagawa, Mitsuro

    Cholinesterase reactivator PAM (Pralidoxime) is used in the treatment of organophosphates poisoning with anticholinergic agent atropine. However, some reports demonstrated recently that PAM has inefficacy in some cases of so-called low toxicity organophosphates poisoning. So, to atempt to discuss the efficacy of PAM in clinical treatment, we searched for the case reports of these poisoning by JOIS. In this time, we compared with the specificity of each data bases and presented some examples in this on-line information retrieval.

  1. Symptomatic treatments in Alzheimer's disease in 2016: a study from Memory centers in France.

    PubMed

    Hommet, Caroline; Novella, Jean-Luc; Auriacombe, Sophie; Vercelletto, Martine; Berrut, Gilles; Belliard, Serge; Desmidt, Thomas; Ceccaldi, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are used from 15 years, in Alzheimer's disease. Benefits have been demonstrated according to cognition, activities of daily living, affective symptoms and behavior, and global impression of change. The aims of this paper are: 1) to describe how these treatments are used in France with a sample survey managed by the national federation of the french CMRR; 2) to study data about efficacy, safety, medicoeconomic impacts and how they are used in Europe. PMID:27651009

  2. Model systems in neurotoxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Shahar, A. ); Goldberg, A.M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Establishment of cell lines from primary cultures by transfection with SV40 large T antigen gene; Molecular cloning of human cholinesterase genes: Potential applications in neurotoxicology; Neurotoxicity testing of chlorinated hydrocarbons by measuring specific neuronal and glial cell functions; Genetic and pharmacological models of muscle inactivity; and Overexpression of the human CuZnSOD gene in transfected cells: Implication to Down Syndrome.

  3. Design, synthesis, evaluation and QSAR analysis of N(1)-substituted norcymserine derivatives as selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Hijikuro, Ichiro; Kihara, Takeshi; Murugesh, Modachur G; Fuse, Shinichiro; Kunimoto, Ryo; Tsumura, Yoshinori; Akaike, Akinori; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Okuno, Yasushi; Takahashi, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-03-01

    We synthesized a series of N(1)-substituted norcymserine derivatives 7a-p and evaluated their anti-cholinesterase activities. In vitro evaluation showed that the pyridinylethyl derivatives 7m-o and the piperidinylethyl derivative 7p improved the anti-butyrylcholinesterase activity by approximately threefold compared to N(1)-phenethylnorcymserine (PEC, 2). A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study indicated that logS might be a key feature of the improved compounds.

  4. Association of in Utero Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Fetal Growth and Length of Gestation in an Agricultural Population

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Harley, Kim; Bradman, Asa; Weltzien, Erin; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Barr, Dana B.; Furlong, Clement E.; Holland, Nina T.

    2004-01-01

    Although pesticide use is widespread, little is known about potential adverse health effects of in utero exposure. We investigated the effects of organophosphate pesticide exposure during pregnancy on fetal growth and gestational duration in a cohort of low-income, Latina women living in an agricultural community in the Salinas Valley, California. We measured nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates) and metabolites specific to malathion (malathion dicarboxylic acid), chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) phosphoro-thioate], and parathion (4-nitrophenol) in maternal urine collected twice during pregnancy. We also measured levels of cholinesterase in whole blood and butyryl cholinesterase in plasma in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We failed to demonstrate an adverse relationship between fetal growth and any measure of in utero organophosphate pesticide exposure. In fact, we found increases in body length and head circumference associated with some exposure measures. However, we did find decreases in gestational duration associated with two measures of in utero pesticide exposure: urinary dimethyl phosphate metabolites [βadjusted = −0.41 weeks per log10 unit increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.75–−0.02; p = 0.02], which reflect exposure to dimethyl organophosphate compounds such as malathion, and umbilical cord cholinesterase (βadjusted = 0.34 weeks per unit increase; 95% CI, 0.13–0.55; p = 0.001). Shortened gestational duration was most clearly related to increasing exposure levels in the latter part of pregnancy. These associations with gestational age may be biologically plausible given that organophosphate pesticides depress cholinesterase and acetylcholine stimulates contraction of the uterus. However, despite these observed associations, the rate of preterm delivery in this population (6.4%) was lower than in a U.S. reference population. PMID:15238287

  5. [Specific features of the anticonvulsant effect of memantine in mice intoxicated with a model organic phosphate].

    PubMed

    Iudin, M A; Chepur, S V; Bykov, V N; Kurpiakova, A F; Subbotina, S N; Nikiforov, A S; Ivanov, I M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of memantine administration has been studied on the model of mice poisoning with an anticholinesterase compound. It is established that the memantine action is due to its influence on the cholinesterase activity in the brain, blood plasma, and erythrocytes in addition to its NMDA-blocking action. Memantine promotes oxime-induced erythrocyte enzyme reactivation on the model of mice poisoning with anticholinesterase compound (0.8 LD50).

  6. Photometric microdetermination of malathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallman, B.J.

    1962-01-01

    Carboxylic esters and lactones react with alkaline hydroxylamine to yield hydroxamates; these in acidic solution form colored iron(III) complexes. A photometric determination of such esters and lactones is thus permitted and has been extensively applied ( I-6). Hestrin ( 3) utilized this method for the microdetermination of acetylcholine and his procedure is much used for the in vitro study of cholinesterase activity and inhibition (4-6).

  7. (+)-Chenabinol (Revised NMR Data) and Two New Alkaloids from Berberis vulgaris and their Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Novák, Zdenĕk; Hošt'álková, Anna; Opletal, Lubomír; Nováková, Lucie; Hrabinová, Martina; Kuneš, Jiří; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2015-10-01

    A known alkaloid (+)-chenabinol (1) and two new secobisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids were isolated by standard chromatographic methods from the root bark of Berberis vulgaris L. The structures of the new alkaloids, named berkristine (2) and verfilline (3), were established by spectroscopic (including 2D NMR), and HRMS (ESI) methods. The alkaloids were tested for their inhibition activity of human cholinesterases and prolyl oligopeptidase. Compound 1 inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase with an IC50 value of 44.8 ± 5.4 μM.

  8. Polyketides from the plant endophytic fungus Cladosporium sp. IFB3lp-2.

    PubMed

    Wuringege; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Wei, Wei; Jiao, Rui-Hua; Yan, Tong; Zang, Le-Yun; Jiang, Rong; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Ge, Hui-Ming

    2013-09-01

    Chemical study of the ethyl acetate extract of the plant endophytic fungus Cladosporium sp. (strain no. IFB3lp-2) yielded three new polyketides (1-3), together with nine known compounds. All of the structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The isolated compounds were screened for their cytotoxic, antiviral, and acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory activities. Regretfully, no compounds showed any significant activity in these assays.

  9. Functional Consequences of Repeated Organophosphate Exposure: Potential Non-Cholinergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Terry, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The class of chemicals known as the “organophosphates” (OPs) comprises many of the most common agricultural and commercial pesticides that are used worldwide as well as the highly toxic chemical warfare agents. The mechanism of the acute toxicity of OPs in both target and non-target organisms is primarily attributed to inhibitory actions on various forms of cholinesterase leading to excessive peripheral and central cholinergic activity. However, there is now substantial evidence that this canonical (cholinesterase-based) mechanism cannot alone account for the wide-variety of adverse consequences of OP exposure that have been described, especially those associated with repeated exposures to levels that produce no overt signs of acute toxicity. This type of exposure has been associated with prolonged impairments in attention, memory, and other domains of cognition, as well as chronic illnesses where these symptoms are manifested (e.g., Gulf War Illness, Alzheimer’s disease). Due to their highly reactive nature, it is not surprising that OPs might alter the function of a number of enzymes and proteins (in addition to cholinesterase). However, the wide variety of long-term neuropsychiatric symptoms that have been associated with OPs suggests that some basic or fundamental neuronal process was adversely affected during the exposure period. The purpose of this review is to discuss several non-cholinesterase targets of OPs that might affect such fundamental processes and includes cytoskeletal and motor proteins involved in axonal transport, neurotrophins and their receptors, and mitochondria (especially their morphology and movement in axons). Potential therapeutic implications of these OP interactions are also discussed. PMID:22465060

  10. Toxicological effects of aerial application of monocrotophos.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Quadros, F; Mazmudar, R M; Marathe, M R; Gangoli, S D

    1980-01-01

    Aerial application of the insecticide Nuvacron 40% (monocrotophos) had no significant effect on the cholinesterase level of plasma and erythrocytes of cattle, chicken, buffaloes, and human volunteers exposed to the spray. Contamination of canal water with the pesticide was completely eliminated within 24 hr, whereas that in the soil was reduced by 80% in 72 hr. The degradation of insecticide residue in grass was about 90% in seven days and in cotton leaves about 85% for the same period.

  11. Health aspects of organophosphorous pesticides in asian countries.

    PubMed

    Balali-Mood, M; Balali-Mood, K; Moodi, M; Balali-Mood, B

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are used frequently in agriculture, particularly in Asian countries over the past decades. Poisoning by these agents, either as acute or chronic in these nations, is a serious health problem. OP pesticides residue in fruits and vegetables that may not induce early clinical features, could also affect the human health. Therefore, medical and health professionals should be aware and learn more on the toxicology, prevention and proper management of OP poisoning. The well-known mechanism of OP toxicity is the inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase, resulting in an accumulation of acetylcholine and continued stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, they are also called anticholinesterase agents. Determination of blood acetyl cholinesterase and butyryl cholinesterase activities remains a mainstay for the rapid initial screening of OP pesticides. Quantitative analysis of OP and their degradation products in plasma and urine by mass spectrometric methods is a more specific method, but is expensive and limited to specialized laboratories. Therefore, history of OP pesticides exposure and clinical manifestations of a cholinergic syndrome is sufficient for management of the exposed patients. However, electrophysiological tests may be required for the diagnosis of delayed neuropathy of OP poisoning. The standard management of OP poisoning includes decontamination, atropine sulphate with an oxime. Recent advances focus on blood alkalinisation and magnesium sulphate as promising adjunctive therapies. Preventive measures in OP exposure are of great importance in human health in developing countries. Therefore, regulations and controls on safe use of OP particularly in Asian countries are recommended.

  12. Dual inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes by allicin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The brain of mammals contains two major form of cholinesterase enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The dual inhibition of these enzymes is considered as a promising strategy for the treatment of neurological disorder such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), senile dementia, ataxia, and myasthenia gravis. The present study was undertaken to explore the anticholinesterase inhibition property of allicin. Materials and Methods: An assessment of cholinesterase inhibition was carried out by Ellman's assay. Results: The present study demonstrates allicin, a major ingredient of crushed garlic (Allium sativum L.) inhibited both AChE and BuChE enzymes in a concentration-dependent manner. For allicin, the IC50 concentration was 0.01 mg/mL (61.62 μM) for AChE and 0.05 ± 0.018 mg/mL (308.12 μM) for BuChE enzymes. Conclusions: Allicin shows a potential to ameliorate the decline of cognitive function and memory loss associated with AD by inhibiting cholinesterase enzymes and upregulate the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain. It can be used as a new lead to target AChE and BuChE to upregulate the level of ACh which will be useful in alleviating the symptoms associated with AD. PMID:26288480

  13. Blood α-Synuclein in Agricultural Pesticide Handlers in Central Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Susan Searles; Checkoway, Harvey; Zhang, Jing; Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Keifer, Matthew C.; Paulsen, Michael; Farin, Federico M.; Cook, Travis J.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that occupational exposure to pesticides might increase Parkinson disease risk. Some pesticides, such as the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos, appear to increase the expression of α-synuclein, a protein critically involved in Parkinson disease. Therefore, we assessed total blood cell α-synuclein in 90 specimens from 63 agricultural pesticide handlers, mainly Hispanic men from central Washington State, who participated in the state’s cholinesterase monitoring program in 2007–2010. Additionally, in age-adjusted linear regression models for repeated measures, we assessed whether α-synuclein levels were associated with butyrylcholinesterase-chlorpyrifos adducts or cholinesterase inhibition measured in peripheral blood, or with self-reported pesticide exposure or paraoxonase (PON1) genotype. There was no evidence by any of those indicators that exposure to chlorpyrifos was associated with greater blood α-synuclein. We observed somewhat greater α-synuclein with the PON1 -108T (lower paraoxonase enzyme) allele, and with ≥10 hours of exposure to cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides in the preceding 30 days, but neither of these associations followed a clear dose-response pattern. These results suggest that selected genetic and environmental factors may affect α-synuclein blood levels. However, longitudinal studies with larger numbers of pesticide handlers will be required to confirm and elucidate the possible associations observed in this exploratory cross-sectional study. PMID:25460623

  14. Skin decontamination of mustards and organophosphates: comparative efficiency of RSDL and Fuller's earth in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Daulon, S; Delamanche, S; Bellier, B; Breton, P

    2007-02-01

    Research in skin decontamination and therapy of chemical warfare agents has been a difficult problem due to the simultaneous requirement of rapid action and non-aggressive behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of two decontaminating systems: the Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) and the Fuller's Earth (FE). The experiment was conducted with domestic swine, as a good model for extrapolation to human skin. RSDL and FE were tested against sulphur mustard (SM), a powerful vesicant, and VX, a potent and persistent cholinesterase inhibitor. When used 5 min after contamination, the results clearly showed that both systems were active against SM (10.1 mg/cm(2)) and VX (0.06 mg/cm(2)). The potency of the RSDL/sponge was statistically better than FE against skin injury induced by SM, observed 3 days post-exposure. RSDL was rather more efficient than FE in reducing the formation of perinuclear vacuoles and inflammation processes in the epidermis and dermis. Against a severe inhibition (67%) of plasmatic cholinesterases induced by VX poisoning, the potencies of the RSDL/sponge and FE were similar. Both systems completely prevented cholinesterase inhibition, which indirectly indicates a prevention of toxic absorption through the skin.

  15. Skin decontamination of mustards and organophosphates: comparative efficiency of RSDL and Fuller's earth in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Daulon, S; Delamanche, S; Bellier, B; Breton, P

    2007-02-01

    Research in skin decontamination and therapy of chemical warfare agents has been a difficult problem due to the simultaneous requirement of rapid action and non-aggressive behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of two decontaminating systems: the Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) and the Fuller's Earth (FE). The experiment was conducted with domestic swine, as a good model for extrapolation to human skin. RSDL and FE were tested against sulphur mustard (SM), a powerful vesicant, and VX, a potent and persistent cholinesterase inhibitor. When used 5 min after contamination, the results clearly showed that both systems were active against SM (10.1 mg/cm(2)) and VX (0.06 mg/cm(2)). The potency of the RSDL/sponge was statistically better than FE against skin injury induced by SM, observed 3 days post-exposure. RSDL was rather more efficient than FE in reducing the formation of perinuclear vacuoles and inflammation processes in the epidermis and dermis. Against a severe inhibition (67%) of plasmatic cholinesterases induced by VX poisoning, the potencies of the RSDL/sponge and FE were similar. Both systems completely prevented cholinesterase inhibition, which indirectly indicates a prevention of toxic absorption through the skin. PMID:17370872

  16. Acetylcholinesterase-Fc Fusion Protein (AChE-Fc): A Novel Potential Organophosphate Bioscavenger with Extended Plasma Half-Life.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Cohen, Ofer; Ehrlich, Sharon; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-08-19

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the physiological target of organophosphate nerve agent compounds. Currently, the development of a formulation for prophylactic administration of cholinesterases as bioscavengers in established risk situations of exposure to nerve agents is the incentive for many efforts. While cholinesterase bioscavengers were found to be highly effective in conferring protection against nerve agent exposure in animal models, their therapeutic use is complicated by short circulatory residence time. To create a bioscavenger with prolonged plasma half-life, compatible with biotechnological production and purification, a chimeric recombinant molecule of HuAChE coupled to the Fc region of human IgG1 was designed. The novel fusion protein, expressed in cultured cells under optimized conditions, maintains its full enzymatic activity, at levels similar to those of the recombinant AChE enzyme. Thus, this novel fusion product retained its binding affinity toward BW284c5 and propidium, and its bioscavenging reactivity toward the organophosphate-AChE inhibitors sarin and VX. Furthermore, when administered to mice, AChE-Fc exhibits exceptional circulatory residence longevity (MRT of 6000 min), superior to any other known cholinesterase-based recombinant bioscavengers. Owing to its optimized pharmacokinetic performance, high reactivity toward nerve agents, and ease of production, AChE-Fc emerges as a promising next-generation organophosphate bioscavenger.

  17. Blood α-synuclein in agricultural pesticide handlers in central Washington State.

    PubMed

    Searles Nielsen, Susan; Checkoway, Harvey; Zhang, Jing; Hofmann, Jonathan N; Keifer, Matthew C; Paulsen, Michael; Farin, Federico M; Cook, Travis J; Simpson, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that occupational exposure to pesticides might increase Parkinson disease risk. Some pesticides, such as the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos, appear to increase the expression of α-synuclein, a protein critically involved in Parkinson disease. Therefore, we assessed total blood cell α-synuclein in 90 specimens from 63 agricultural pesticide handlers, mainly Hispanic men from central Washington State, who participated in the state's cholinesterase monitoring program in 2007-2010. Additionally, in age-adjusted linear regression models for repeated measures, we assessed whether α-synuclein levels were associated with butyrylcholinesterase-chlorpyrifos adducts or cholinesterase inhibition measured in peripheral blood, or with self-reported pesticide exposure or paraoxonase (PON1) genotype. There was no evidence by any of those indicators that exposure to chlorpyrifos was associated with greater blood α-synuclein. We observed somewhat greater α-synuclein with the PON1-108T (lower paraoxonase enzyme) allele, and with ≥ 10 h of exposure to cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides in the preceding 30 days, but neither of these associations followed a clear dose-response pattern. These results suggest that selected genetic and environmental factors may affect α-synuclein blood levels. However, longitudinal studies with larger numbers of pesticide handlers will be required to confirm and elucidate the possible associations observed in this exploratory cross-sectional study.

  18. [Cholinergic system of the heart].

    PubMed

    Kučera, Matej; Hrabovská, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The cholinergic system of the heart can be either of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. The neuronal cholinergic system in the heart is represented by preganglionic parasympathetic pathways, intracardiac parasympathetic ganglia and postganglionic parasympathetic neurons projecting to the atria, SA node and AV node. The non-neuronal cholinergic system consists of cardiomyocytes that have complete equipment for synthesis and secretion of acetylcholine. Current knowledge suggests that the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the heart affects the regulation of the heart during sympathetic activation. The non-neuronal cholinergic system of the heart plays also a role in the energy metabolism of cardimyocites. Acetylcholine of both neuronal and non-neuronal origin acts in the heart through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The effect of acetylcholine in the heart is terminated by cholinesterases acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Recently, papers suggest that the increased cholinergic tone in the heart by cholinesterase inhibitors has a positive effect on some cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure. For this reason, the cholinesterase inhibitors might be used in the treatment of certain cardiovascular disorders in the future.

  19. Galantamine improves sleep quality in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Naharci, Mehmet Ilkin; Ozturk, Ahmet; Yasar, Halit; Cintosun, Umit; Kocak, Necmettin; Bozoglu, Ergun; Tasci, Ilker; Doruk, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influences of cholinesterase inhibitors on sleep pattern and sleep disturbance. A total of 87 mild to moderate stage dementia patients who were not on cholinesterase enzyme inhibitor and memantine treatment were included in the study. The dementia patients were treated with donepezil, galantamine or rivastigmine, depending on the preference of the clinician. Fifty-five dementia patients (63.2 %) completed the study. Twenty-three elderly subjects, who had normal cognitive functions, were included in the study as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used for evaluating the sleep quality at the beginning and at the final assessment. The improvement in sleep quality was better with regard to changes in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores with galantamine treatment compared to the donepezil and the control groups. A significant decrease in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores was detected in the galantamine group after treatment. Although statistically not significant, rivastigmine decreased and donepezil increased the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores after treatment. Dementia patients who had a poor sleep quality (n: 36), the rate of improvement in sleep disturbance was 81.8 % in the galantamine group, 75 % in the rivastigmine, and 50 % in the donepezil group. Galantamine may be the first choice of cholinesterase inhibitor in mild to moderate dementia patients in terms of improving sleep quality.

  20. Sublethal responses of wolf spiders (Lycosidae) to organophosphorous insecticides.

    PubMed

    Van Erp, S; Booth, L; Gooneratne, R; O'Halloran, K

    2002-10-01

    The activities of cholinesterase (ChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes were assessed in the wolf spider (Lycosa hilaris) as biomarkers of organophosphate contamination in agricultural ecosystems. Spiders were exposed to simulated field rates of two commercially available organophosphorous insecticides [Basudin (diazinon) and Lorsban (chlorpyrifos)] under laboratory conditions. In terms of survival, chlorpyrifos and diazinon were more toxic to male than to female wolf spiders, but gender-specific differences in ChE activities were not evident. Cholinesterase activity in male spiders was inhibited to 14% and 61% of control activity by Basudin and Lorsban, respectively. Gluthathione S-transferase activity was not affected by either pesticide. Mortality and biomarker responses in the wolf spider were further investigated following the application of Basudin to pasture. Wolf spiders were deployed into field mesocosms; after 24 h mortality was 40%, and surviving spiders displayed significant inhibition of ChE activity (87%) compared with controls. Cholinesterase activity in spiders exposed for subsequent 24- or 48-h time periods was monitored until it returned to control levels 8 days post-application. Inhibition of ChE activity after a single application of Basudin indicate the potential use of this enzyme in wolf spiders as a biomarker for evaluating organophosphate contamination.