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Sample records for chorda tympani fibers

  1. Response properties of macaque monkey chorda tympani fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Many of the chorda tympani fibers of crab-eating monkeys respond to more than one of the four basic stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, HCl, and quinine hydrochloride) as well as cooling or warming of the tongue. Fibers could be classified into four categories depending on their best sensitivity to any one of the four basic stimuli. Sucrose-best and quinine-best fibers are rather specifically sensitive to sucrose and quinine, respectively, while salt-best and acid-best fibers respond relatively well to HCl and NaCl, respectively. Saccharin, dulcin, and Pb acetate produce a good response in sucrose-best fibers, but quinine- best and salt-best fibers also respond to saccharin. Highly significant positive correlations exist between amounts of responses to sucrose and those to saccharin, dulcin, and Pb acetate, indicating that these substances produce in the monkey a taste quality similar to that produced by sucrose. Compared with chroda tympani fibers of rats, hamsters, and squirrel monkeys, macaque monkey taste fibers are more narrowly tuned to one of the four basic taste stimuli and more highly developed in sensitivity to various sweet-tasting substances. Also LiCl and NaCl are more effective stimuli for gustatory receptors in macaque monkeys than NH4Cl and KCl. This contrasts with a higher sensitivity to KCl and NH4Cl than to NaCl in chorda tympani fibers of squirrel monkeys. PMID:811758

  2. Taste in chimpanzees II: single chorda tympani fibers.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; Ninomiya, Y; Danilova, V

    1997-06-01

    Data are presented from 48 taste fibers in chorda tympani nerves of 10 chimpanzees during taste stimulation with 29 stimuli. The results demonstrated a higher taste fiber specificity than in any other mammalian species reported; breadth of tuning equals 0.3. Hierarchical cluster analysis separated an S-cluster (50% of all fibers), an N-cluster (31%), and a Q-cluster (19%). The S-cluster showed the highest specificity. Its fibers responded, with few exceptions, to every sweetener tested, including the sweet proteins brazzein and monellin. The response grew with increasing sweetener concentration. A large response to one sweetener was generally accompanied by a large response to all other sweeteners, and vice versa. Except for one broadly tuned fiber, the fibers of the S-cluster never responded to the bitter compounds. The fibers of the Q-cluster were more broadly tuned than any other fibers. Quinine hydrochloride was their best stimulus, but most fibers were also stimulated by KCl and NaCl with amiloride. Acids stimulated some of these fibers. The N-cluster could be divided into 3 subclusters: an Na-subcluster (3 fibers), Na-K subcluster (10 fibers), and M-subcluster (3 fibers). The Na-fibers responded strongly to, and were quite specific to, NaCl and LiCl stimulation but not to KCl, and fibers of the Na-K subcluster responded equally well to NaCl and KCl. The response to NaCl was suppressed by amiloride in the fibers of the Na-subcluster, but not in the fibers of the Na-K subcluster. Umami compounds elicited the strongest responses in the M-subcluster.

  3. Responses of Single Chorda Tympani Taste Fibers of the Calf (Bos taurus)

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas; Elmer, Donald; Cragin, Tiffany; Danilova, Vicktoria

    2010-01-01

    In spite of a wealth of information on feed and nutrition in cattle, there little is published of what they actually can taste. Here, we attempt to remedy some of this deficiency by presenting recordings of the chorda tympani proper nerve of young Holstein calves during stimulation of approximately 30 compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 46 single taste fibers separated 4 fiber clusters: N (salt best), H (sour best), and 2 clusters, which could not be related to any human taste quality. The N fibers responded best to LiCl, NaCl, urea, monosodium glutamate, and KCl, whereas the H fibers responded strongly to citric and ascorbic acid. Interestingly, propionic and butyric acid stimulated best the 3rd cluster, whereas the 4th cluster responded best to denatonium benzoate and only to a small extent to quinine hydrochloride. Sweeteners stimulated moderately all clusters. Beginning with the largest response to sweet, the order between the responses was: acesulfame-K, saccharin, D-phenylalanine, glycine, sucrose, fructose, erythritol, cyclamate, and lactose. Alitame, aspartame, and super-aspartame evoked no or little responses. Three and 5 M ethanol stimulated all clusters. Comparison with taste fibers in other species suggests that the taste world of cattle is quite different from other species’. PMID:20212013

  4. Responses of single chorda tympani taste fibers of the calf (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Hellekant, Göran; Roberts, Thomas; Elmer, Donald; Cragin, Tiffany; Danilova, Vicktoria

    2010-06-01

    In spite of a wealth of information on feed and nutrition in cattle, there little is published of what they actually can taste. Here, we attempt to remedy some of this deficiency by presenting recordings of the chorda tympani proper nerve of young Holstein calves during stimulation of approximately 30 compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 46 single taste fibers separated 4 fiber clusters: N (salt best), H (sour best), and 2 clusters, which could not be related to any human taste quality. The N fibers responded best to LiCl, NaCl, urea, monosodium glutamate, and KCl, whereas the H fibers responded strongly to citric and ascorbic acid. Interestingly, propionic and butyric acid stimulated best the 3rd cluster, whereas the 4th cluster responded best to denatonium benzoate and only to a small extent to quinine hydrochloride. Sweeteners stimulated moderately all clusters. Beginning with the largest response to sweet, the order between the responses was: acesulfame-K, saccharin, D-phenylalanine, glycine, sucrose, fructose, erythritol, cyclamate, and lactose. Alitame, aspartame, and super-aspartame evoked no or little responses. Three and 5 M ethanol stimulated all clusters. Comparison with taste fibers in other species suggests that the taste world of cattle is quite different from other species'.

  5. The organization of taste sensibilities in hamster chorda tympani nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Frank, ME; Bieber, SL; Smith, DV

    1988-01-01

    Electrophysiological measurements of nerve impulse frequencies were used to explore the organization of taste sensibilities in single fibers of the hamster chorda tympani nerve. Moderately intense taste solutions that are either very similar or easily discriminated were applied to the anterior lingual surface. 40 response profiles or 13 stimulus activation patterns were considered variables and examined with multivariate statistical techniques. Three kinds of response profiles were seen in fibers that varied in their overall sensitivity to taste solutions. One profile (S) showed selectivity for sweeteners, a second (N) showed selectivity for sodium salts, and a third (H) showed sensitivity to salts, acids, and other compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that profiles fell into discrete classes. Responses to many pairs of effective stimuli were covariant across profiles within a class, but some acidic stimuli had more idiosyncratic effects. Factor analysis of profiles identified two common factors, accounting for 77% of the variance. A unipolar factor was identified with the N profile, and a bipolar factor was identified with the S profile and its opposite, the H profile. Three stimulus activation patterns were elicited by taste solutions that varied in intensity of effect. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that the patterns fell into discrete classes. Factor analysis of patterns identified three common unipolar factors accounting for 82% of the variance. Eight stimuli (MgSO4, NH4Cl, KCl, citric acid, acetic acid, urea, quinine HCl, HCl) selectively activated fibers with H profiles, three stimuli (fructose, Na saccharin, sucrose) selectively activated fibers with S profiles, and two stimuli (NaNO3, NaCl) activated fibers with N profiles more strongly than fibers with H profiles. Stimuli that evoke different patterns taste distinct to hamsters. Stimuli that evoke the same pattern taste more similar. It was concluded that the hundreds of peripheral

  6. Responses of single taste fibers and whole chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerve in the domestic pig, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Danilova, V; Roberts, T; Hellekant, G

    1999-06-01

    Whole nerve, as well as single fiber, responses in the chorda tympani proper (CT) and glossopharyngeal (NG) nerves of 1- to 7-week-old pigs were recorded during taste stimulation. In the CT acids and in the NG bitter compounds gave the largest responses. Both nerves exhibited large responses to monosodium glutamate (MSG), MSG with guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) and MSG with inositine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) as well as to glycine, xylitol, sucrose, fructose and glucose. Alitame, aspartame, betaine, neohesperedin dihydrochalcone (NHDHC), super-aspartame, saccharin and thaumatin elicited no or little response. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 49 CT fibers separated four major clusters. The M cluster, comprising 28.5% of all fibers, is characterized by strong responses to MSG, KCl, LiCl and NaCl. The responses to NaCl and LiCl were unaffected by amiloride. The H cluster (24.5%) includes units responding principally to acids. The Q cluster (18.5%) responds to quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), sucrose octaacetate (SOA) and salts with amiloride. The S cluster (28.5%) exhibits strong responses to xylitol, glycine and the carbohydrates as well as to MSG alone and to MSG with GMP or IMP. In 31 NG fibers, hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four clusters: the M cluster (10%), responding to MSG and MSG with GMP or IMP; the H cluster (13%), responding to acids; the Q cluster (29%), responding strongly to QHCl, SOA and tilmicosinR; and the S cluster (48%), responding best to xylitol, carbohydrates and glycine but also to the umami compounds. Multidimensional scaling analysis across fiber responses to all stimuli showed the best separation between compounds with different taste qualities when information from both nerves was utilized.

  7. Clinical anatomy of the chorda tympani: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McManus, L J; Dawes, P J D; Stringer, M D

    2011-11-01

    The chorda tympani is at risk of iatrogenic injury throughout its course. This paper reviews the clinical anatomy of the nerve in adults. Systematic literature review. Relevant English-language articles were identified using five electronic databases and one search engine. Data from approximately 70 scientific papers were supplemented with information from selected reference texts. The anatomy of the chorda tympani differs from standard descriptions, particularly regarding its exit from the middle ear and area of lingual innervation. Whilst it is known to convey taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and parasympathetic innervation to the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands, the chorda tympani probably has additional sensory and secretomotor functions. A detailed understanding of the anatomy of the chorda tympani may help to reduce the risk of iatrogenic injury during head, neck and middle-ear surgery, and to explain the variable consequences of such injury.

  8. GLIAL RESPONSES AFTER CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Dianna L.

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT) nerve innervates lingual taste buds and is susceptible to damage during dental and inner ear procedures. Interruption of the CT results in a disappearance of taste buds, which can be accompanied by taste disturbances. Because the CT usually regenerates to reinnervate taste buds successfully in a few weeks, a persistence of taste disturbances may indicate alterations in central nervous function. Peripheral injury to other sensory nerves leads to glial responses at central terminals, which actively contribute to abnormal sensations arising from nerve damage. Therefore, the current study examined microglial and astrocytic responses in the first central gustatory relay -the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS)- after transection of the CT. Damage to the CT resulted in significant microglial responses in terms of morphological reactivity and an increased density of microglial cells from 2-20 days after injury. This increased microglial population primarily resulted from microglial proliferation from 1.5-3 days, which was supplemented by microglial migration within sub-divisions of the nTS between days 2-3. Unlike other nerve injuries, CT injury did not result in recruitment of bone marrow-derived precursors. Astrocytes also reacted in the nTS with increased levels of GFAP by 3 days, although none showed evidence of cell division. GFAP levels remained increased at 30 days by which time microglial responses had resolved. These results show that nerve damage to the CT results in central glial responses, which may participate in long lasting taste alterations following CT lesion. PMID:22315167

  9. Anion modulation of taste responses in sodium-sensitive neurons of the hamster chorda tympani nerve

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Beidler's work in the 1950s showed that anions can strongly influence gustatory responses to sodium salts. We have demonstrated "anion inhibition" in the hamster by showing that the chorda tympani nerve responds more strongly to NaCl than to Na acetate over a wide range of concentrations. Iontophoretic presentation of Cl- and acetate to the anterior tongue elicited no response in the chorda tympani, suggesting that these anions are not directly stimulatory. Drugs (0.01, 1.0, and 100 microM anthracene-9-carboxylate, diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, 4- acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate, and furosemide) that interfere with movements of Cl- across epithelial cells were ineffective in altering chorda tympani responses to 0.03 M of either NaCl or Na acetate. Anion inhibition related to movements of anions across epithelial membranes therefore seems unlikely. The chorda tympani contains a population of nerve fibers highly selective for Na+ (N fibers) and another population sensitive to Na+ as well as other salts and acids (H fibers). We found that N fibers respond similarly to NaCl and Na acetate, with spiking activity increasing with increasing stimulus concentration (0.01-1.0 M). H fibers, however, respond more strongly to NaCl than to Na acetate. Furthermore, H fibers increase spiking with increases in NaCl concentration, but generally decrease their responses to increasing concentrations of Na acetate. It appears that anion inhibition applies to taste cells innervated by H fibers but not by N fibers. Taste cells innervated by N fibers use an apical Na+ channel, whereas those innervated by H fibers may use a paracellularly mediated, basolateral site of excitation. PMID:8473851

  10. The sweet taste quality is linked to a cluster of taste fibers in primates: lactisole diminishes preference and responses to sweet in S fibers (sweet best) chorda tympani fibers of M. fascicularis monkey

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Danilova, Vicktoria; Cragin, Tiffany; Roberts, Thomas W; Koposov, Alexey; Hellekant, Göran

    2009-01-01

    Background Psychophysically, sweet and bitter have long been considered separate taste qualities, evident already to the newborn human. The identification of different receptors for sweet and bitter located on separate cells of the taste buds substantiated this separation. However, this finding leads to the next question: is bitter and sweet also kept separated in the next link from the taste buds, the fibers of the taste nerves? Previous studies in non-human primates, P. troglodytes, C. aethiops, M. mulatta, M. fascicularis and C. jacchus, suggest that the sweet and bitter taste qualities are linked to specific groups of fibers called S and Q fibers. In this study we apply a new sweet taste modifier, lactisole, commercially available as a suppressor of the sweetness of sugars on the human tongue, to test our hypothesis that sweet taste is conveyed in S fibers. Results We first ascertained that lactisole exerted similar suppression of sweetness in M. fascicularis, as reported in humans, by recording their preference of sweeteners and non- sweeteners with and without lactisole in two-bottle tests. The addition of lactisole significantly diminished the preference for all sweeteners but had no effect on the intake of non-sweet compounds or the intake of water. We then recorded the response to the same taste stimuli in 40 single chorda tympani nerve fibers. Comparison between single fiber nerve responses to stimuli with and without lactisole showed that lactisole only suppressed the responses to sweeteners in S fibers. It had no effect on the responses to any other stimuli in all other taste fibers. Conclusion In M. fascicularis, lactisole diminishes the attractiveness of compounds, which taste sweet to humans. This behavior is linked to activity of fibers in the S-cluster. Assuming that lactisole blocks the T1R3 monomer of the sweet taste receptor T1R2/R3, these results present further support for the hypothesis that S fibers convey taste from T1R2/R3 receptors, while

  11. The sweet taste quality is linked to a cluster of taste fibers in primates: lactisole diminishes preference and responses to sweet in S fibers (sweet best) chorda tympani fibers of M. fascicularis monkey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Danilova, Vicktoria; Cragin, Tiffany; Roberts, Thomas W; Koposov, Alexey; Hellekant, Göran

    2009-02-18

    Psychophysically, sweet and bitter have long been considered separate taste qualities, evident already to the newborn human. The identification of different receptors for sweet and bitter located on separate cells of the taste buds substantiated this separation. However, this finding leads to the next question: is bitter and sweet also kept separated in the next link from the taste buds, the fibers of the taste nerves? Previous studies in non-human primates, P. troglodytes, C. aethiops, M. mulatta, M. fascicularis and C. jacchus, suggest that the sweet and bitter taste qualities are linked to specific groups of fibers called S and Q fibers. In this study we apply a new sweet taste modifier, lactisole, commercially available as a suppressor of the sweetness of sugars on the human tongue, to test our hypothesis that sweet taste is conveyed in S fibers. We first ascertained that lactisole exerted similar suppression of sweetness in M. fascicularis, as reported in humans, by recording their preference of sweeteners and non- sweeteners with and without lactisole in two-bottle tests. The addition of lactisole significantly diminished the preference for all sweeteners but had no effect on the intake of non-sweet compounds or the intake of water. We then recorded the response to the same taste stimuli in 40 single chorda tympani nerve fibers. Comparison between single fiber nerve responses to stimuli with and without lactisole showed that lactisole only suppressed the responses to sweeteners in S fibers. It had no effect on the responses to any other stimuli in all other taste fibers. In M. fascicularis, lactisole diminishes the attractiveness of compounds, which taste sweet to humans. This behavior is linked to activity of fibers in the S-cluster. Assuming that lactisole blocks the T1R3 monomer of the sweet taste receptor T1R2/R3, these results present further support for the hypothesis that S fibers convey taste from T1R2/R3 receptors, while the impulse activity in non

  12. Topography of the chorda tympani nerve and the tensor tympani muscle in carnivores provides a new synapomorphy for Herpestidae (Carnivora, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Ruf, Irina; Maier, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The topographical relationship of the chorda tympani nerve (chorda tympani) to the tensor tympani muscle in the middle ear of carnivores provides new phylogenetic information. The examination of histological serial sections of 16 carnivore species representing most families revealed two distinct character states concerning the course of the chorda tympani: a hypotensoric state with the nerve running below the insertion tendon of the tensor tympani muscle, and an epitensoric state with the nerve running above the tendon. The shift from the plesiomorphic hypotensoric chorda tympani to the apomorphic epitensoric condition occurred once in carnivore phylogeny: Only in the herpestid species under study does the chorda tympani cross above the tensor tympani muscle. Therefore, we introduce the epitensoric pattern as a new synapomorphy for herpestids. Within the herpestids we find the following structural distinctions: Herpestes javanicus and Galerella sanguinea have a chorda tympani running in a sulcus directly above the insertion of the tensor tympani muscle, whereas in the eusocial herpestid species Suricata suricatta and Mungos mungo the chorda tympani lies far above the insertion of the muscle.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF DIETARY PROTEIN RESTRICTION ON CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE TASTE RESPONSES AND TERMINAL FIELD ORGANIZATION

    PubMed Central

    THOMAS, J. E.; HILL, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal dietary sodium restriction produces profound developmental effects on rat functional taste responses and formation of neural circuits in the brainstem. Converging evidence indicates that the underlying mechanisms for these effects are related to a compromised nutritional state and not to direct stimulus-receptor interactions. We explored whether early malnourishment produces similar functional and structural effects to those seen following dietary sodium restriction by using a protein deficient, sodium replete diet. To determine if early dietary protein-restriction affects the development of the peripheral gustatory system, multi-fiber neurophysiological recordings were made from the chorda tympani nerve and anterograde track tracing of the chorda tympani nerve into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) was accomplished in rats fed a protein-restricted or a control diet (6% and 20%, respectively). The dietary regimens began on embryonic day 7 and continued until rats were used for neurophysiological recordings (postnatal days (P) 35–50) or for chorda tympani terminal field labeling (P40–50). Responses to a concentration series of NaCl, sodium acetate, KCl, and to 0.50 M sucrose, 0.03 M quinine-HCl, and 0.01 N HCl revealed attenuated responses (30–60%) to sodium-specific stimuli in rats fed the 6% protein diet compared with those fed the 20% protein diet. Responses to all other stimuli were similar between groups. Terminal field volumes were nearly twofold larger in protein-restricted rats compared with controls, with the differences located primarily in the dorsal-caudal zone of the terminal field. These results are similar to the results seen previously in rats fed a sodium-restricted diet throughout pre- and postnatal development, suggesting that dietary sodium- and protein-restriction share similar mechanisms in altering gustatory development. PMID:18845228

  14. The effects of dietary protein restriction on chorda tympani nerve taste responses and terminal field organization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J E; Hill, D L

    2008-11-19

    Prenatal dietary sodium restriction produces profound developmental effects on rat functional taste responses and formation of neural circuits in the brainstem. Converging evidence indicates that the underlying mechanisms for these effects are related to a compromised nutritional state and not to direct stimulus-receptor interactions. We explored whether early malnourishment produces similar functional and structural effects to those seen following dietary sodium restriction by using a protein deficient, sodium replete diet. To determine if early dietary protein-restriction affects the development of the peripheral gustatory system, multi-fiber neurophysiological recordings were made from the chorda tympani nerve and anterograde track tracing of the chorda tympani nerve into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) was accomplished in rats fed a protein-restricted or a control diet (6% and 20%, respectively). The dietary regimens began on embryonic day 7 and continued until rats were used for neurophysiological recordings (postnatal days (P) 35-50) or for chorda tympani terminal field labeling (P40-50). Responses to a concentration series of NaCl, sodium acetate, KCl, and to 0.50 M sucrose, 0.03 M quinine-HCl, and 0.01 N HCl revealed attenuated responses (30-60%) to sodium-specific stimuli in rats fed the 6% protein diet compared with those fed the 20% protein diet. Responses to all other stimuli were similar between groups. Terminal field volumes were nearly twofold larger in protein-restricted rats compared with controls, with the differences located primarily in the dorsal-caudal zone of the terminal field. These results are similar to the results seen previously in rats fed a sodium-restricted diet throughout pre- and postnatal development, suggesting that dietary sodium- and protein-restriction share similar mechanisms in altering gustatory development.

  15. Effects of binary taste stimuli on the neural activity of the hamster chorda tympani

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Binary mixtures of taste stimuli were applied to the tongue of the hamster and the reaction of the whole corda tympani was recorded. Some of the chemicals that were paired in mixtures (HCl, NH4Cl, NaCl, CaCl2, sucrose, and D-phenylalanine) have similar tastes to human and/or hamster, and/or common stimulatory effects on individual fibers of the hamster chorda tympani; other pairs of these chemicals have dissimilar tastes and/or distinct neural stimulatory effects. The molarity of each chemical with approximately the same effect on the activity of the nerve as 0.01 M NaCl was selected, and an established relation between stimulus concentration and response allowed estimation of the effect of a "mixture" of two concentrations of one chemical. Each mixture elicited a response that was smaller than the sum of the responses to its components. However, responses to some mixtures approached this sum, and responses to other mixtures closely approached the response to a "mixture" of two concentrations of one chemical. Responses of the former variety were generated by mixtures of an electrolyte and a nonelectrolyte and the latter by mixtures of two electrolytes or two nonelectrolytes. But, beyond the distinction between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes, the whole-nerve response to a mixture could not be predicted from the known neural or psychophysical effects of its components. PMID:7411114

  16. [Global and Spatial Gustatory Function after Proven Unilateral Transsection of the Chorda Tympani].

    PubMed

    Gudziol, H; Schönherr, A; Bitter, T; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2015-12-01

    A transection of the chorda tympani results in loss of spatial gustatory function on the ipsilateral tongue. Most patients do not notice anymore this alteration. The cause is unclear. Do adjacent gustatory areas become more sensitive or is the gustatory perception rather independent of the size of stimulated area? 51 patients with proven unilateral transection of the chorda tympani and 51 healthy subjects were tested for gustatory recognition thresholds. The methods used were the "three-drops-choice-technique" by Henkin to evaluate the whole mouth taste (global taste examination) and the "spatial taste test" to evaluate the local gustatory function on 4 areas of the tongue. The taste solutions were sweet, sour, salty and bitter with increasing concentrations. The global gustatory function of the patients and of the control group did not differ in either the 4 taste qualities but the composite score was increased within the group of patients. Most patients did not realize that. The spatial taste examination showed reduction of taste perception on 3 of the 4 gustatory areas of the tongue in the patients. The decreased gustatory function on the area of the transected chorda remained unchanged over time. The taste attenuation on the ipsilateral back area and the contralateral front area improved over time. Transection of chorda tympani also leads to an attenuation of spatial gustatory function in adjacent areas. Therefore, adjacent areas cannot be taken as reference. Instead, taste function has to be compared to the results of healthy probands. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Chorda tympani nerve modulates the rat’s avoidance of calcium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Glen J.; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Tordoff, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium intake depends on orosensory factors, implying the presence of a mechanism for calcium detection in the mouth. To better understand how information about oral calcium is conveyed to the brain, we examined the effects of chorda tympani nerve transection on calcium chloride (CaCl2) taste preferences and thresholds in male Wistar rats. The rats were given bilateral transections of the chorda tympani nerve (CTX) or control surgery. After recovery, they received 48-h two-bottle tests with an ascending concentration series of CaCl2. Whereas control rats avoided CaCl2 at concentrations of 0.1 mM and higher, rats with CTX were indifferent to CaCl2 concentrations up to 10 mM. Rats with CTX had significantly higher preference scores for 0.316 and 3.16 mM CaCl2 than did control rats. The results imply that the chorda tympani nerve is required for the normal avoidance of CaCl2 solution. PMID:22230254

  18. Automatic segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda tympani using image registration and statistical priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Jack H.; Warren, Frank M.; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    In cochlear implant surgery, an electrode array is permanently implanted in the cochlea to stimulate the auditory nerve and allow deaf people to hear. A minimally invasive surgical technique has recently been proposed--percutaneous cochlear access--in which a single hole is drilled from the skull surface to the cochlea. For the method to be feasible, a safe and effective drilling trajectory must be determined using a pre-operative CT. Segmentation of the structures of the ear would improve trajectory planning safety and efficiency and enable the possibility of automated planning. Two important structures of the ear, the facial nerve and chorda tympani, present difficulties in intensity based segmentation due to their diameter (as small as 1.0 and 0.4 mm) and adjacent inter-patient variable structures of similar intensity in CT imagery. A multipart, model-based segmentation algorithm is presented in this paper that accomplishes automatic segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda tympani. Segmentation results are presented for 14 test ears and are compared to manually segmented surfaces. The results show that mean error in structure wall localization is 0.2 and 0.3 mm for the facial nerve and chorda, proving the method we propose is robust and accurate.

  19. Model-based segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda tympani in pediatric CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Fitsum A.; Noble, Jack H.; Rivas, Alejandro; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2011-03-01

    In image-guided cochlear implant surgery an electrode array is implanted in the cochlea to treat hearing loss. Access to the cochlea is achieved by drilling from the outer skull to the cochlea through the facial recess, a region bounded by the facial nerve and the chorda tympani. To exploit existing methods for computing automatically safe drilling trajectories, the facial nerve and chorda tympani need to be segmented. The effectiveness of traditional segmentation approaches to achieve this is severely limited because the facial nerve and chorda are small structures (~1 mm and ~0.3 mm in diameter, respectively) and exhibit poor image contrast. We have recently proposed a technique to achieve this task in adult patients, which relies on statistical models of the structures. These models contain intensity and shape information along the central axes of both structures. In this work we use the same method to segment pediatric scans. We show that substantial differences exist between the anatomy of children and the anatomy of adults, which lead to poor segmentation results when an adult model is used to segment a pediatric volume. We have built a new model for pediatric cases and we have applied it to ten scans. A leave-one-out validation experiment was conducted in which manually segmented structures were compared to automatically segmented structures. The maximum segmentation error was 1 mm. This result indicates that accurate segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda in pediatric scans is achievable, thus suggesting that safe drilling trajectories can also be computed automatically.

  20. The effect of early division of the chorda tympani on gustatory function.

    PubMed

    Kenway, Bruno; Kasbekar, Anand; Donnelly, Neil; Axon, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to assess dysgeusia in patients who have undergone middle ear surgery for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) when the surgeon's practice was to cleanly divide the chorda tympani without prior manipulation, if it in any way hindered operative access or the aims of surgery. We wanted to determine whether lower rates of taste disturbance might be obtained by early, clean division of the nerve. We followed 110 patients prospectively and asked them to complete a postoperative dysgeusia questionnaire 1 year after surgery. The "cut nerve" group included 81 patients, and the "uncut nerve" group included 29 patients. In the uncut group, the nerve was untouched or underwent minimal handling. In the cut nerve group, 68% of patients had no taste disturbance after surgery; 4% of patients in this group had ongoing symptoms at 1 year postoperatively. In the uncut nerve group, 67% were asymptomatic, while 11% had ongoing taste disturbance at 1 year. Statistical analysis of symptoms beyond 1 year showed a mean difference of 7%, but this is not statistically significant (p = 0.38). These results suggest that early division of the chorda tympani without prior manipulation in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media does not result in higher rates of taste disturbance than in patients with uncut nerves. Indeed rates of taste disturbance in our cut group were lower than in the uncut group, and lower than or comparable to those seen in other studies.

  1. Regeneration of the Nerves in the Aerial Cavity with an Artificial Nerve Conduit -Reconstruction of Chorda Tympani Nerve Gaps-

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Murai, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takehiko; Inada, Yuji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Due to its anatomical features, the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) is sometimes sacrificed during middle ear surgery, resulting in taste dysfunction. We examined the effect of placing an artificial nerve conduit, a polyglycolic acid (PGA)-collagen tube, across the gap in the section of the resected chorda tympani nerve (CTN) running through the tympanic cavity. Methods The CTN was reconstructed with a PGA-collagen tube in three patients with taste disturbance who underwent CTN resection. To evaluate the effect of the reconstruction procedure on the patients' gustatory function, we measured the patients' electrogustometry (EGM) thresholds. The patients were followed-up for at least two years. Results Gustatory function was completely restored in all of the patients after the reconstruction. The patients' EGM thresholds exhibited early improvements within one to two weeks and had returned to their normal ranges within three months. They subsequently remained stable throughout the two-year follow-up period. In a patient who underwent a second surgical procedure, it was found that the PGA-collagen tube used in the first surgical procedure had been absorbed and replaced by new CTN fibers with blood vessels on their surfaces. Conclusion These results suggest that reconstruction of the CTN with an artificial nerve conduit, a PGA-collagen tube, allows functional and morphological regeneration of the nerve and facilitates the recovery of taste function. PGA-collagen tubes might be useful for repairing CTNs that are resected during middle ear surgery. Further research is required to confirm these preliminary results although this is the first report to describe the successful regeneration of a nerve running through an aerial space. PMID:24691095

  2. Possible involvement of undissociated acid molecules in the acid response of the chorda tympani nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, K; Shimizu, Y; Watanabe, K; Tonosaki, K

    2000-05-01

    To test whether undissociated acid is capable of exciting the chorda tympani nerves in rats, we have used buffered acid solutions as taste stimuli. These solutions were prepared by adding alkali to weak acids, such as acetic acid, so that the proportion of undissociated and dissociated acids was varied whereas keeping the total acid concentration constant. When acetic acid solutions, adjusted to wide ranges of pH by NaOH, were applied to the tongue, the response magnitude of the chorda tympani nerves was not varied systematically with pH changes. However, if the sodium effect was eliminated by amiloride or replacement of cation by potassium or Tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane; NH(2)C(CH(2)OH)(3) (Tris-base), the chorda tympani response was reduced systematically as pH increased. Similar results were obtained with citric acid and ascorbic acid. This pH-dependent change in taste nerve response to acid cannot be solely attributed to the proton gradient because the response magnitude induced by hydrogen itself, which was estimated from responses to strong acids, was much smaller than that by equi-pH acetic acid ( approximately 85%). Thus we cannot explain the pH-dependent responses of the chorda tympani nerves to weak acids unless effects of undissociated acid molecules are postulated. It is therefore concluded that undissociated acids in weak acid solutions can be a stimulant to taste receptor cells.

  3. Sense of taste in a new world monkey, the common marmoset: recordings from the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Vicktoria; Danilov, Yuri; Roberts, Thomas; Tinti, Jean-Marie; Nofre, Claude; Hellekant, Göran

    2002-08-01

    Whole nerve, as well as single fiber, responses in the chorda tympani proper (CT) and glossopharyngeal (NG) nerves of common marmosets were recorded during taste stimulation with three salts, four acids, six bitter compounds and more than 30 sweeteners. We recorded responses of 49 CT and 41 NG taste fibers. The hierarchical cluster analysis distinguished three major clusters in both CT and NG: S, Q, and H. The S(CT) fibers, 38% of all CT fibers, responded only to sweeteners. The S(CT) fibers did not respond during stimulation with salts, acids, and bitter compounds but exhibited OFF responses after citric and ascorbic acids, quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), and salts (in 80% of S(CT) fibers). S(NG) fibers, 50% of all NG fibers, also responded to sweeteners but not to stimuli of other taste qualities (except for citric acid, which stimulated 70% of the S(NG) fibers). Some sweeteners, including natural (the sweet proteins brazzein, monellin) and artificial [cyclamate, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDHC), N-3,5-dichlorophenyl-N'-(S)-alpha-methylbenzylguanidineacetate (DMGA), N-4-cyanophenylcarbamoyl-(R,S)-3-amino-3-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl) propionic acid (CAMPA)] did not elicit responses in the S fibers. In general, the response profiles of the S(CT) and S(NG) clusters were very similar, the correlation coefficient between the responses to sweeteners in these clusters was 0.94. Both the Q(CT) and the Q(NG) fibers (40 and 46% of all fibers) were predominantly responsive to bitter compounds, although their responses to the same set of bitter compounds were quite different. Sweeteners with sweet/bitter taste for humans also stimulated the Q clusters. The H clusters (22 and 3% of all fibers) were predominantly responsive to acids and did not respond to stimuli of other taste qualities. However, bitter stimuli, mainly QHCl, inhibited activity in 70% of H(CT) fibers. Among a total of 90 fibers from both nerves there was only 1 NaCl-best fiber in CT. We found, however, that

  4. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism.

  5. Effect of Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection on Salt Taste Perception in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwatari, Yutaka; Theodorides, Maria L.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of gustatory nerve transection on salt taste have been studied extensively in rats and hamsters but have not been well explored in the mouse. We examined the effects of chorda tympani (CT) nerve transection on NaCl taste preferences and thresholds in outbred CD-1 mice using a high-throughput phenotyping method developed in our laboratory. To measure taste thresholds, mice were conditioned by oral self-administration of LiCl or NaCl and then presented with NaCl concentration series in 2-bottle preference tests. LiCl-conditioned and control NaCl-exposed mice were given bilateral transections of the CT nerve (LiCl-CTX, NaCl-CTX) or were left intact as controls (LiCl-CNT, NaCl-CNT). After recovery from surgery, mice received a concentration series of NaCl (0–300 mM) in 48-h 2-bottle tests. CT transection increased NaCl taste thresholds in LiCl-conditioned mice and eliminated avoidance of concentrated NaCl in control NaCl-exposed mice. This demonstrates that in mice, the CT nerve is important for detection and recognition of NaCl taste and is necessary for the normal avoidance of high concentrations of NaCl. The results of this experiment also show that the method of high-throughput phenotyping of salt taste thresholds is suitable for detecting changes in the taste periphery in mouse genetic studies. PMID:21743094

  6. Gustatory responses of the mouse chorda tympani nerve vary based on region of tongue stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Different parts of the mouth vary in their taste responsiveness and gustatory transduction components. However, there have been few attempts to consider regional variation among areas innervated by a single nerve branch or containing only one type of gustatory papilla. Here, we examined whether taste-elicited responses of a single nerve, the chorda tympani (CT), depend on where taste solutions are delivered on the tongue in mice. In experiment 1, multiunit CT responses to NaCl and sucrose were larger if sapid taste solutions were applied to the tongue tip, which contains the anterior-most fungiform papillae, than if they were flowed over fungiform and foliate papillae on the posterior tongue. Further, the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker amiloride suppressed NaCl responses to a greater degree for the tongue tip. In experiment 2, CT nerve responses were compared between the tongue tip and a region further back that contained only fungiform papillae. NaCl and sucrose solutions applied to posterior fungiform papillae produced smaller responses than did those elicited by the same taste stimuli applied to anterior fungiform papillae on the tongue tip. Amiloride suppressed the response to NaCl delivered to the anterior fungiform but not posterior fungiform papillae. These results indicate that the CT response is tongue-region dependent in the mouse. Furthermore, the spatial location of a fungiform papilla provides important information about its properties, such as whether sodium taste transduction is mediated by amiloride-sensitive ENaCs.

  7. CT-scan imaging of iron marked chorda tympani nerve: anatomical study and educational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Trost, Olivier; Rouchy, René-Charles; Teyssier, Charles; Kazemi, Apolline; Zwetyenga, Narcisse; Malka, Gabriel; Cheynel, Nicolas; Trouilloud, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    The chorda tympani nerve (CTN) is the last collateral branch of the facial nerve in its third intraosseous portion just over the stylomastoid foramen. After a curved course against the medial aspect of the tympanum where it is likely to be injured in middle ear surgery, CTN reaches the lingual nerve in the infratemporal fossa. Knowledge of CTN topographic anatomy is not easily achieved by the students because of the deep location of this thin structure. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial relationships of the CTN in the infratemporal fossa. Therefore, ten nerves were dissected in five fresh cadavers. All the nerves were catheterized with a 3/0 wire. After a meticulous repositioning of surrounding structures, standard X-ray and CT scan examinations were performed with multiplanar acquisitions and three-dimensional surface rendering reconstructions. Ventral projection of the CTN corresponded to the middle of the maxillary sinus. Lateral landmark was the mandibular condyle. The CTN was present and unique in all the dissections. The average length of the nerve, as measured on CT scans, was 31.8 mm (29-34, standard deviation of 1.62); the anastomosis of the CTN to the lingual nerve was located at a mean 24.9 mm below the skull base (24-27, standard deviation of 0.99), approximately in the same horizontal plane as the lower part of the mandibular notch. The acute angle opened dorsally and cranially between CTN and LN measured mean 63.2° (60-65, standard deviation of 1.67). Three-dimensional volumetric reconstructions using surface rendering technique provided realistic educational support at the students' disposal.

  8. Sweet taste and chorda tympani transection alter capsaicin-induced lingual pain perception in adult human subjects.

    PubMed

    Schöbel, N; Kyereme, J; Minovi, A; Dazert, S; Bartoshuk, L; Hatt, H

    2012-10-10

    Sweetness signals the nutritional value of food and may moreover be accompanied by a sensory suppression that leads to higher pain tolerance. This effect is well documented in infant rats and humans. However, it is still debated whether sensory suppression is also present in adult humans. Thus, we investigated the effects of sweet taste on the perception of the painful trigeminal stimulus capsaicin in two groups of healthy adult human subjects. A solution of 100 μM capsaicin was applied to the tip of the subject's tongues in order to stimulate trigeminal Aδ- and C-fiber nociceptors. When swallowed, 1M sucrose reduced the capsaicin-induced burning sensation by 29% (p ≤ 0.05) whereas a solution of similar taste intensity containing 1 μM quinine did not. Similarly, sucrose application to the frontal hemitongue suppressed the perception of the burning sensation induced by contralaterally applied capsaicin by 25% (p ≤ 0.01). We furthermore investigated the effects of documented unilateral transection of the chorda tympani nerve on capsaicin perception. In accordance with the ipsi-to-contralateral effect of sucrose on capsaicin perception in healthy subjects, hemiageusic subjects were more sensitive for capsaicin on the tongue contralateral to the taste nerve lesion (+38%; p ≤ 0.01). Taken together, these results argue I) for the existence of food intake-induced sensory suppression, if not analgesia, in adult humans and II) a centrally mediated suppression of trigeminal sensation by taste inputs that III) becomes disinhibited upon peripheral taste nerve lesion.

  9. [Anatomical study on the facial nerve innervating the floor of the mouth in chondrichthyes. Homology of the chorda tympani].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kobayashi, K

    1989-10-01

    This paper deals with the results of the investigation of the facial nerves of chondrichthyes in order to consider the phylogenetic origin of the Chorda tympani in human. Six species of elasmobranchs (Chlamydoselachus anguineus, Cephaloscyllium umbratile, Squalus acanthias, Dasyatis akajei, Raja kwangtungensis and Mobura diabolus) were dissected under a stereoscopic microscope for this purpose, and the following results were obtained. Ramus palatinus and R. pre-spiracularis were observed as pre-trematic branches, while R. mandibularis externus, R. mandibularis internus and R. hyoideus originating from R. hyomandibularis were observed as post-trematicus of the facial proper in chondrichtyes. The rami intermedii indicated by Tanaka and Nakao (1979) were observed only in Dasyatis akajei. The R. hyomandibularis of Squalus acanthias had cutaneous branches, and the same branches were described in Chimaera by Takahashi and Kobayashi (1988). R. pre-spiracularis and R. mandibularis internus supply the floor of mouth in Squalus acanthias. As for the other chondrichthyes, R. mandibularis internus was only the one that could be found at the floor of mouth cavity under a stereoscopic microscope. From the observations described above and from previous studies, it may be concluded that the problem of whether the Chorda tympani is homologous with whether the pre- or post-trematicus of branchial nerves seems to depend on the animal species.

  10. TRPM5-dependent amiloride- and benzamil-insensitive NaCl chorda tympani taste nerve response.

    PubMed

    Ren, ZuoJun; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2013-07-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) cation channel is involved in sensing sweet, bitter, umami, and fat taste stimuli, complex-tasting divalent salts, and temperature-induced changes in sweet taste. To investigate if the amiloride- and benzamil (Bz)-insensitive NaCl chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve response is also regulated in part by TRPM5, CT responses to 100 mM NaCl + 5 μM Bz (NaCl + Bz) were monitored in Sprague-Dawley rats, wild-type (WT) mice, and TRP vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice in the presence of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a TRPV1 agonist. In rats, NaCl + Bz + RTX CT responses were also monitored in the presence of triphenylphosphine oxide, a specific TRPM5 blocker, and capsazepine and N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamid (SB-366791), specific TRPV1 blockers. In rats and WT mice, RTX produced biphasic effects on the NaCl + Bz CT response, enhancing the response at 0.5-1 μM and inhibiting it at >1 μM. The NaCl + Bz + SB-366791 CT response in rats and WT mice and the NaCl + Bz CT response in TRPV1 KO mice were inhibited to baseline level and were RTX-insensitive. In rats, blocking TRPV1 by capsazepine or TRPM5 by triphenylphosphine oxide inhibited the tonic NaCl + Bz CT response and shifted the relationship between RTX concentration and the magnitude of the tonic CT response to higher RTX concentrations. TRPM5 KO mice elicited no constitutive NaCl + Bz tonic CT response. The relationship between RTX concentration and the magnitude of the tonic NaCl + Bz CT response was significantly attenuated and shifted to higher RTX concentrations. The results suggest that pharmacological or genetic alteration of TRPM5 activity modulates the Bz-insensitive NaCl CT response and its modulation by TRPV1 agonists.

  11. Chorda Tympani Nerve Terminal Field Maturation and Maintenance Is Severely Altered Following Changes To Gustatory Nerve Input to the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Dudgeon, Sara L.; Hill, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Neural competition among multiple inputs can affect the refinement and maintenance of terminal fields in sensory systems. In the rat gustatory system, the chorda tympani, greater superficial petrosal, and glossopharyngeal nerves have distinct but overlapping terminal fields in the first central relay, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). This overlap is largest at early postnatal ages followed by a significant refinement and pruning of the fields over a three-week period, suggesting that competitive mechanisms underlie the pruning. Here, we manipulated the putative competitive interactions among the three nerves by sectioning the greater superficial petrosal and glossopharyngeal nerves at postnatal day 15 (P15), P25, or at adulthood, while leaving the chorda tympani nerve intact. The terminal field of the chorda tympani nerve was assessed 35 days following nerve sections, a period before the sectioned nerves functionally regenerated. Regardless of the age when the nerves were cut, the chorda tympani nerve terminal field expanded to a volume four times larger than sham controls. Terminal field density measurements revealed that the expanded terminal field was similar to P15 control rats. Thus, it appears that the chorda tympani nerve terminal field defaults to its early postnatal field size and shape when the nerves with overlapping fields are cut, and this anatomical plasticity is retained into adulthood. These findings not only demonstrate the dramatic and lifelong plasticity in the central gustatory system, but also suggest that corresponding changes in functional and taste-related behaviors will accompany injury-induced changes in brainstem circuits. PMID:21613473

  12. Loss of sensitivity to low concentrations of NaCl following bilateral chorda tympani nerve sections in rats.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, G B; Schumm, J; Smith, J C

    1994-04-01

    A reliable short-term NaCl taste test was developed for rats which resulted in differential responding to a variety of concentrations. The rats were required to exist on a low sodium diet for 8-10 days prior to the initiation of testing. The peak response in this test was to isotonic NaCl with lesser responding to hyper- and hypotonic solutions. After stable responding was obtained, bilateral sections were made of the chorda tympani nerves. This surgery resulted in a loss of sensitivity to the lowest hypotonic solutions (0.03 and 0.06 M NaCl). Little, if any, effect was noted in the perception of sucrose following these nerve sections.

  13. Influences of age, tongue region, and chorda tympani nerve sectioning on signal detection measures of lingual taste sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Heidt, Julie M; MacGillivray, Michael R; Dsouza, Merle; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Mirza, Natasha; Bigelow, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Although the ability to taste is critical for ingestion, nutrition, and quality of life, a clear understanding of the influences of age, sex, and chorda tympani (CT) resection on taste function in different regions of the anterior tongue is generally lacking. In this study we employed criterion-free signal detection analysis to assess electric and chemical taste function on multiple tongue regions in normal individuals varying in age and sex and in patients with unilateral CT resections. The subjects were 33 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, and 9 persons, 27 to 77 years of age, with unilateral CT lesions. The influences of age, sex, tongue region, and chorda tympani resections on signal detection sensitivity (d') and response bias (β) measures was assessed in 16 tongue regions to weak electric currents and solutions of sucrose, sodium chloride, and caffeine. Significant age-related decrements in d' were found for sucrose (p=0.012), sodium chloride (p=0.002), caffeine (p=0.006), and electric current (EC) (p=0.0001). Significant posterior to anterior, and medial to lateral, gradients of increasing performance were present for most stimuli. β was larger on the anterior than the posterior tongue for the electrical stimulus in the youngest subjects, whereas the opposite was true for sucrose in the oldest subjects. No sex differences were apparent. d' was depressed ipsilateral to the CT lesion side to varying degrees in all tongue regions, with the weakest influences occurring on the medial and anterior tongue. CT did not meaningfully influence β. This study is the first to employ signal detection analysis to assess the regional sensitivity of the tongue to chemical and electrical stimuli. It clearly demonstrates that tongue regions differ from one another in terms of their age-related sensitivity and their susceptibility to CT lesions.

  14. Responses of the Hamster Chorda Tympani Nerve to Sucrose+Acid and Sucrose+Citrate Taste Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsung; Hettinger, Thomas P.; Frank, Marion E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of taste receptor cells, chorda tympani (CT) neurons, and brainstem neurons show stimulus interactions in the form of inhibition or enhancement of the effectiveness of sucrose when mixed with acids or citrate salts, respectively. To investigate further the effects of acids and the trivalent citrate anion on sucrose responses in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), we recorded multifiber CT responses to 100 mM sucrose; a concentration series of HCl, citric acid, acetic acid, sodium citrate (with and without amiloride added), potassium citrate, and all binary combinations of acids and salts with 100 mM sucrose. Compared with response additivity, sucrose responses were increasingly suppressed in acid + sucrose mixtures with increases in titratable acidity, but HCl and citric acid were more effective suppressors than acetic acid. Citrate salts suppressed sucrose responses and baseline CT neural activity to a similar degree. Citrate salts also elicited prolonged, concentration-dependent, water-rinse responses. The specific loss in sucrose effectiveness as a CT stimulus with increasing titratable acidity was confirmed; however, no increase in sucrose effectiveness was found with the addition of citrate. Further study is needed to define the chemical basis for effects of acids and salts in taste mixtures. PMID:19620386

  15. Changes in taste receptor cell [Ca2+]i modulate chorda tympani responses to salty and sour taste stimuli

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, John A.; Ren, ZuoJun; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Heck, Gerard L.; Mummalaneni, Shobha

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between taste receptor cell (TRC) Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to salty [NaCl and NaCl+benzamil (Bz)] and sour (HCl, CO2, and acetic acid) taste stimuli was investigated before and after lingual application of ionomycin+Ca2+, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), U73122 (phospholipase C blocker), and thapsigargin (Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor) under open-circuit or lingual voltage-clamp conditions. An increase in TRC [Ca2+]i attenuated the tonic Bz-sensitive NaCl CT response and the apical membrane Na+ conductance. A decrease in TRC [Ca2+]i enhanced the tonic Bz-sensitive and Bz-insensitive NaCl CT responses and apical membrane Na+ conductance but did not affect CT responses to KCl or NH4Cl. An increase in TRC [Ca2+]i did not alter the phasic response but attenuated the tonic CT response to acidic stimuli. A decrease in [Ca2+]i did not alter the phasic response but attenuated the tonic CT response to acidic stimuli. In a subset of TRCs, a positive relationship between [H+]i and [Ca2+]i was obtained using in vitro imaging techniques. U73122 inhibited the tonic CT responses to NaCl, and thapsigargin inhibited the tonic CT responses to salty and sour stimuli. The results suggest that salty and sour taste qualities are transduced by [Ca2+]i-dependent and [Ca2+]i-independent mechanisms. Changes in TRC [Ca2+]i in a BAPTA-sensitive cytosolic compartment regulate ion channels and cotransporters involved in the salty and sour taste transduction mechanisms and in neural adaptation. Changes in TRC [Ca2+]i in a separate subcompartment, sensitive to inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin but inaccessible to BAPTA, are associated with neurotransmitter release. PMID:22956787

  16. Changes in taste receptor cell [Ca2+]i modulate chorda tympani responses to salty and sour taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Desimone, John A; Ren, Zuojun; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Heck, Gerard L; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Lyall, Vijay

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between taste receptor cell (TRC) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to salty [NaCl and NaCl+benzamil (Bz)] and sour (HCl, CO(2), and acetic acid) taste stimuli was investigated before and after lingual application of ionomycin+Ca(2+), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), U73122 (phospholipase C blocker), and thapsigargin (Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor) under open-circuit or lingual voltage-clamp conditions. An increase in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) attenuated the tonic Bz-sensitive NaCl CT response and the apical membrane Na(+) conductance. A decrease in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) enhanced the tonic Bz-sensitive and Bz-insensitive NaCl CT responses and apical membrane Na(+) conductance but did not affect CT responses to KCl or NH(4)Cl. An increase in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) did not alter the phasic response but attenuated the tonic CT response to acidic stimuli. A decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) did not alter the phasic response but attenuated the tonic CT response to acidic stimuli. In a subset of TRCs, a positive relationship between [H(+)](i) and [Ca(2+)](i) was obtained using in vitro imaging techniques. U73122 inhibited the tonic CT responses to NaCl, and thapsigargin inhibited the tonic CT responses to salty and sour stimuli. The results suggest that salty and sour taste qualities are transduced by [Ca(2+)](i)-dependent and [Ca(2+)](i)-independent mechanisms. Changes in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) in a BAPTA-sensitive cytosolic compartment regulate ion channels and cotransporters involved in the salty and sour taste transduction mechanisms and in neural adaptation. Changes in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) in a separate subcompartment, sensitive to inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin but inaccessible to BAPTA, are associated with neurotransmitter release.

  17. Ethanol modulates the VR-1 variant amiloride-insensitive salt taste receptor. II. Effect on chorda tympani salt responses.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Vijay; Heck, Gerard L; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Malik, Shahbaz A; Vinnikova, Anna K; Desimone, John A

    2005-06-01

    The effect of ethanol on the amiloride- and benzamil (Bz)-insensitive salt taste receptor was investigated by direct measurement of intracellular Na(+) activity ([Na(+)](i)) using fluorescence imaging in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) and by chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve recordings. CT responses to KCl and NaCl were recorded in Sprague-Dawley rats, and in wild-type (WT) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR-1) knockout mice (KO). CT responses were monitored in the presence of Bz, a specific blocker of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). CT responses were also recorded in the presence of agonists (resiniferatoxin and elevated temperature) and antagonists (capsazepine and SB-366791) of VR-1 that similarly modulate the Bz-insensitive VR-1 variant salt taste receptor. In the absence of mineral salts, ethanol induced a transient decrease in TRC volume and elicited only transient phasic CT responses. In the presence of mineral salts, ethanol increased the apical cation flux in TRCs without a change in volume, increased transepithelial electrical resistance across the tongue, and elicited CT responses that were similar to salt responses, consisting of both a phasic component and a sustained tonic component. At concentrations <50%, ethanol enhanced responses to KCl and NaCl, while at ethanol concentrations >50%, those CT responses were inhibited. Resiniferatoxin and elevated temperature increased the sensitivity of the CT response to ethanol in salt-containing media, and SB-366791 inhibited the effect of ethanol, resiniferatoxin, and elevated temperature on the CT responses to mineral salts. VR-1 KO mice demonstrated no Bz-insensitive CT response to NaCl and no sensitivity to ethanol. We conclude that ethanol increases salt taste sensitivity by its direct action on the Bz-insensitive VR-1 variant salt taste receptor.

  18. Changes in taste receptor cell [Ca2+]i modulate chorda tympani responses to bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Desimone, John A; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Ren, Zuojun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Lyall, Vijay

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between taste receptor cell (TRC) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) and rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to bitter (quinine and denatonium), sweet (sucrose, glycine, and erythritol), and umami [monosodium glutamate (MSG) and MSG + inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP)] taste stimuli was investigated before and after lingual application of ionomycin (Ca(2+) ionophore) + Ca(2+), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM; Ca(2+) chelator), U73122 (phospholipase C blocker), thapsigargin (Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker), and diC8-PIP(2) (synthetic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate). The phasic CT response to quinine was indifferent to changes in [Ca(2+)](i). However, a decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) inhibited the tonic part of the CT response to quinine. The CT responses to sweet and umami stimuli were indifferent to changes in TRC [Ca(2+)](i). However, a decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) attenuated the synergistic effects of ethanol on the CT response to sweet stimuli and of IMP on the glutamate CT response. U73122 and thapsigargin inhibited the phasic and tonic CT responses to bitter, sweet, and umami stimuli. Although diC8-PIP(2) increased the CT response to bitter and sweet stimuli, it did not alter the CT response to glutamate but did inhibit the synergistic effect of IMP on the glutamate response. The results suggest that bitter, sweet, and umami taste qualities are transduced by [Ca(2+)](i)-dependent and [Ca(2+)](i)-independent mechanisms. Changes in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) in the BAPTA-sensitive cytosolic compartment regulate quality-specific taste receptors and ion channels that are involved in the neural adaptation and mixture interactions. Changes in TRC [Ca(2+)](i) in a separate subcompartment, sensitive to inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin but inaccessible to BAPTA and ionomycin + Ca(2+), are associated with neurotransmitter release.

  19. Changes in taste receptor cell [Ca2+]i modulate chorda tympani responses to bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, John A.; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Ren, ZuoJun; Mummalaneni, Shobha

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between taste receptor cell (TRC) intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to bitter (quinine and denatonium), sweet (sucrose, glycine, and erythritol), and umami [monosodium glutamate (MSG) and MSG + inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP)] taste stimuli was investigated before and after lingual application of ionomycin (Ca2+ ionophore) + Ca2+, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM; Ca2+ chelator), U73122 (phospholipase C blocker), thapsigargin (Ca2+-ATPase blocker), and diC8-PIP2 (synthetic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate). The phasic CT response to quinine was indifferent to changes in [Ca2+]i. However, a decrease in [Ca2+]i inhibited the tonic part of the CT response to quinine. The CT responses to sweet and umami stimuli were indifferent to changes in TRC [Ca2+]i. However, a decrease in [Ca2+]i attenuated the synergistic effects of ethanol on the CT response to sweet stimuli and of IMP on the glutamate CT response. U73122 and thapsigargin inhibited the phasic and tonic CT responses to bitter, sweet, and umami stimuli. Although diC8-PIP2 increased the CT response to bitter and sweet stimuli, it did not alter the CT response to glutamate but did inhibit the synergistic effect of IMP on the glutamate response. The results suggest that bitter, sweet, and umami taste qualities are transduced by [Ca2+]i-dependent and [Ca2+]i-independent mechanisms. Changes in TRC [Ca2+]i in the BAPTA-sensitive cytosolic compartment regulate quality-specific taste receptors and ion channels that are involved in the neural adaptation and mixture interactions. Changes in TRC [Ca2+]i in a separate subcompartment, sensitive to inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin but inaccessible to BAPTA and ionomycin + Ca2+, are associated with neurotransmitter release. PMID:22993258

  20. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M.; DeSimone, John A.; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. PMID:26039516

  1. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  2. Regulatory Effects of Ca2+ and H+ on the Rat Chorda Tympani Response to NaCl and KCl.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, John A; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Heck, Gerard L; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-07-01

    Modulatory effects of pHi and [Ca(2+)]i on taste receptor cell (TRC) epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) were investigated by monitoring chorda tympani (CT) responses to NaCl and KCl at various lingual voltages, before and after lingual application of ionomycin and with 0-10mM CaCl2 in the stimulus and rinse solutions adjusted to pHo 2.0-9.7. 0.1 and 0.5M KCl responses varied continuously with voltage and were fitted to an apical ion channel kinetic model using the same parameters. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT response was fitted to the same channel model but with parameters characteristic of ENaC. A graded increase in TRC [Ca(2+)]i decreased the ENaC-dependent NaCl CT response, and inhibited and ultimately eliminated its pH sensitivity. CT responses to KCl were pHi- and [Ca(2+)]i-independent. Between ±60 mV applied lingual potential, the data were well described by a linear approximation to the nonlinear channel equation and yielded 2 parameters, the open-circuit response and the negative of the slope of the line in the CT response versus voltage plot, designated the response conductance. The ENaC-dependent NaCl CT response conductance was a linear function of the open-circuit response for all pHi-[Ca(2+)]i combinations examined. Analysis of these data shows that pHi and [Ca(2+)]i regulate TRC ENaC exclusively through modulation of the maximum CT response.

  3. Intracellular pH Modulates Taste Receptor Cell Volume and the Phasic Part of the Chorda Tympani Response to Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L.; Vinnikova, Anna K.; DeSimone, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 μM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid–sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid–sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  4. Intracellular pH modulates taste receptor cell volume and the phasic part of the chorda tympani response to acids.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L; Vinnikova, Anna K; DeSimone, John A

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 microM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid-sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid-sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  5. Development of rat chorda tympani sodium responses: evidence for age-dependent changes in global amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, S J; Stewart, R E; Heck, G L; DeSimone, J A; Hill, D L

    2000-09-01

    In rat, chorda tympani nerve taste responses to Na(+) salts increase between roughly 10 and 45 days of age to reach stable, mature magnitudes. Previous evidence from in vitro preparations and from taste nerve responses using Na(+) channel blockers suggests that the physiological basis for this developmental increase in gustatory Na(+) sensitivity is the progressive addition of functional, Na(+) transduction elements (i.e., amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels) to the apical membranes of fungiform papilla taste receptor cells. To avoid potential confounding effects of pharmacological interventions and to permit quantification of aggregate Na(+) channel behavior using a kinetic model, we obtained chorda tympani nerve responses to NaCl and sodium gluconate (NaGlu) during receptive field voltage clamp in rats aged from 12-14 to 60 days and older (60+ days). Significant, age-dependent increases in chorda tympani responses to these stimuli occurred as expected. Importantly, apical Na(+) channel density, estimated from an apical Na(+) channel kinetic model, increased monotonically with age. The maximum rate of Na(+) response increase occurred between postnatal days 12-14 and 29-31. In addition, estimated Na(+) channel affinity increased between 12-14 and 19-23 days of age, i.e., on a time course distinct from that of the maximum rate of Na(+) response increase. Finally, estimates of the fraction of clamp voltage dropped across taste receptor apical membranes decreased between 19-23 and 29-31 days of age for NaCl but remained stable for NaGlu. The stimulus dependence of this change is consistent with a developmental increase in taste bud tight junctional Cl(-) ion permeability that lags behind the developmental increase in apical Na(+) channel density. A significant, indirect anion influence on apical Na(+) channel properties was present at all ages tested. This influence was evident in the higher apparent apical Na(+) channel affinities obtained for NaCl relative to Na

  6. Monosynaptic convergence of chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal afferents onto ascending relay neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract: A high-resolution confocal and correlative electron microscopy approach

    PubMed Central

    Corson, James A.; Erisir, Alev

    2014-01-01

    While physiological studies suggested convergence of chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal afferent axons onto single neurons of the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNTS), anatomical evidence has been elusive. The current study uses high-magnification confocal microscopy to identify putative synaptic contacts from afferent fibers of the two nerves onto individual projection neurons. Imaged tissue is re-visualized with electron microscopy, confirming that overlapping fluorescent signals in confocal z-stacks accurately identify appositions between labeled terminal and dendrite pairs. Monte Carlo modeling reveals that the probability of overlapping fluorophores is stochastically unrelated to the density of afferent label suggesting that convergent innervation in the rNTS is selective rather than opportunistic. Putative synaptic contacts from each nerve are often compartmentalized onto dendrite segments of convergently innervated neurons. These results have important implications for orosensory processing in the rNTS, and the techniques presented here have applications in investigations of neural microcircuitry with an emphasis on innervation patterning. PMID:23640852

  7. Whole-nerve chorda tympani responses to sweeteners in C57BL/6ByJ and 129P3/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Masashi; McCaughey, Stuart A.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    The C57BL/6ByJ (B6) strain of mice exhibits higher preferences than does the 129P3/J (129) strain for a variety of sweet-tasting compounds. We measured gustatory afferent responses of the whole chorda tympani nerve in these two strains using a broad array of sweeteners and other taste stimuli. Neural responses were greater in B6 than in 129 mice to the sugars sucrose and maltose, the polyol D-sorbitol, and the non-caloric sweeteners NaSaccharin, acesulfame-K, SC-45647, and sucralose. Lower neural response thresholds were also observed in the B6 strain for most of these stimuli. The strains did not differ on their neural responses to amino acids that are thought to taste sweet to mice, with the exception of L-proline, which evoked larger responses in the B6 strain. Aspartame and thaumatin, which taste sweet to humans but are not strongly preferred by B6 or 129 mice, did not evoke neural responses that exceeded threshold in either strain. The strains generally did not differ in their neural responses to NaCl, quinine, and HCl. Thus, variation between the B6 and 129 strains in the peripheral gustatory system may contribute to differences in their consumption of many sweeteners. PMID:11555486

  8. The K+-H+ Exchanger, Nigericin, Modulates Taste Cell pH and Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Acidic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sturz, Gregory R.; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Ren, ZuoJun; DeSimone, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between acidic pH, taste cell pHi, and chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses was investigated before and after incorporating the K+-H+ exchanger, nigericin, in the apical membrane of taste cells. CT responses were recorded in anesthetized rats in vivo, and changes in pHi were monitored in polarized fungiform taste cells in vitro. Under control conditions, stimulating the tongue with 0.15 M potassium phosphate (KP) or 0.15 M sodium phosphate (NaP) buffers of pHs between 8.0 and 4.6, KP or NaP buffers did not elicit a CT response. Post-nigericin (500 × 10−6 M), KP buffers, but not NaP buffers, induced CT responses at pHs ≤ 6.6. The effect of nigericin was reversed by the topical lingual application of carbonyl cyanide 3-chloro-phenylhydrazone, a protonophore. Post-nigericin (150 × 10−6 M), KP buffers induced a greater decrease in taste cell pHi relative to NaP buffers and to NaP and KP buffers under control conditions. A decrease in pHi to about 6.9 induced by KP buffers was sufficient to elicit a CT response. The results suggest that facilitating apical H+ entry via nigericin decreases taste cell pHi and demonstrates directly a strong correlation between pHi and the magnitude of the CT response. PMID:21257734

  9. Effects of gymnemic acid on the chorda tympani proper nerve responses to sweet, sour, salty and bitter taste stimuli in the chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; af Segerstad, C H; Roberts, T; van der Wel, H; Brouwer, J N; Glaser, D; Haynes, R; Eichberg, J W

    1985-07-01

    In man gymnemic acid is able to abolish the sweet taste. Also in man, the neural correlate of that effect is a disappearance of the response to sweet stimuli in the taste nerves, as indicated by the observations of Diamant et al. (1965). Although a variety of other mammals also show neural responses to sweet-tasting compounds, the corresponding effect of gymnemic acid has not been demonstrated. This study presents chorda tympani proper nerve recordings from the chimpanzee before and after gymnemic acid. On the chimpanzee tongue, application of 2 ml gymnemic acid (3-10 mg X ml-1 for 3-4 min) completely abolished the taste responses to 0.0035 M acesulfam-K, 0.0018 M aspartame, 0.015 M D-tryptophan, 0.02% monellin, and 0.02% thaumatin, reduced by 75% the response to 0.3 M sucrose, and by 50% that of 0.76 M xylitol. No decrease was recorded in the responses to 0.001 M quinine, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.02 and 0.04 M ascorbic acid, 0.02 and 0.04 M citric acid. The response to the sweeteners recovered with time and the recovery was complete or nearly complete after one and a half hours. It was also found that after application of 2 ml miraculin, 3 mg X ml-1 for 3 min to the tongue the neural response to acids was about 1.5 times as large as before. Gymnemic acid applied before miraculin prevented this enhancement and gymnemic acid after miraculin depressed the enhancement by miraculin of the response to citric and ascorbic acid.

  10. The K+-H+ exchanger, nigericin, modulates taste cell pH and chorda tympani taste nerve responses to acidic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Gregory R; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Ren, Zuojun; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between acidic pH, taste cell pH(i), and chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses was investigated before and after incorporating the K(+)-H(+) exchanger, nigericin, in the apical membrane of taste cells. CT responses were recorded in anesthetized rats in vivo, and changes in pH(i) were monitored in polarized fungiform taste cells in vitro. Under control conditions, stimulating the tongue with 0.15 M potassium phosphate (KP) or 0.15 M sodium phosphate (NaP) buffers of pHs between 8.0 and 4.6, KP or NaP buffers did not elicit a CT response. Post-nigericin (500 × 10(-6) M), KP buffers, but not NaP buffers, induced CT responses at pHs ≤ 6.6. The effect of nigericin was reversed by the topical lingual application of carbonyl cyanide 3-chloro-phenylhydrazone, a protonophore. Post-nigericin (150 × 10(-6) M), KP buffers induced a greater decrease in taste cell pH(i) relative to NaP buffers and to NaP and KP buffers under control conditions. A decrease in pH(i) to about 6.9 induced by KP buffers was sufficient to elicit a CT response. The results suggest that facilitating apical H(+) entry via nigericin decreases taste cell pH(i) and demonstrates directly a strong correlation between pH(i) and the magnitude of the CT response.

  11. Effects of voltage perturbation of the lingual receptive field on chorda tympani responses to Na+ and K+ salts in the rat: implications for gustatory transduction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Taste sensory responses from the chorda tympani nerve of the rat were recorded with the lingual receptive field under current or voltage clamp. Consistent with previous results (Ye, Q., G. L. Heck, and J. A. DeSimone. 1993. Journal of Neurophysiology. 70:167-178), responses to NaCl were highly sensitive to lingual voltage clamp condition. This can be attributed to changes in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ ions through apical membrane transducer channels in taste cells. In contrast, responses to KCl over the concentration range 50-500 mM were insensitive to the voltage clamp condition of the receptive field. These results indicate the absence of K+ conductances comparable to those for Na+ in the apical membranes of taste cells. This was supported by the strong anion dependence of K salt responses. At zero current clamp, the potassium gluconate (KGlu) threshold was > 250 mM, and onset kinetics were slow (12 s to reach half-maximal response). Faster onset kinetics and larger responses to KGlu occurred at negative voltage clamp (-50 mV). This indicates that when K+ ion is transported as a current, and thereby uncoupled from gluconate mobility, its rate of delivery to the K+ taste transducer increases. Analysis of conductances shows that the paracellular pathway in the lingual epithelium is 28 times more permeable to KCl than to KGlu. Responses to KGlu under negative voltage clamp were not affected by agents that are K+ channel blockers in other systems. The results indicate that K salt taste transduction is under paracellular diffusion control, which limits chemoreception efficiency. We conclude that rat K salt taste occurs by means of a subtight junctional transducer for K+ ions with access limited by anion mobility. The data suggest that this transducer is not cation selective which also accounts for the voltage and amiloride insensitive part of the response to NaCl. PMID:7876827

  12. Taste discrimination between NaCl and KCl is disrupted by amiloride in inbred mice with amiloride-insensitive chorda tympani nerves.

    PubMed

    Eylam, Shachar; Spector, Alan C

    2005-05-01

    The amiloride-sensitive salt transduction pathway is thought to be critical for the discrimination between sodium and nonsodium salts in rodents. In rats, lingual application of amiloride appears to render NaCl qualitatively indistinguishable from KCl. In this study, we tested four strains of mice for salt discriminability. In one strain (C57BL/6J), chorda tympani nerve (CT) responses to NaCl are attenuated by amiloride, and in the other three strains (BALB/cByJ, 129P3/J, DBA/2J) they are not. Under water-restriction conditions, these mice (7 mice/strain) were trained in a gustometer to lick for water from one reinforcement spout in response to a five-lick presentation of NaCl and to lick from another in response to KCl [salt concentration was varied (0.1-1 M) to render intensity irrelevant]. Mice were then tested with the stimuli dissolved in amiloride hydrochloride, and the latter was used as the reinforcer as well. Each concentration of amiloride (0.1-100 microM) was used on 2 separate days with control sessions interposed. Mice from all four strains were able to discriminate NaCl from KCl reliably. Amiloride impaired this discrimination in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, performance on NaCl trials appeared to be more affected by amiloride than that on KCl trials in all four strains. Thus, in contrast to the predictions based on CT recordings, discrimination in all four strains appeared to depend on the amiloride-sensitive transduction pathway, which, in the case of BALB/cByJ, 129P3/J, and DBA/2J (and perhaps C57BL/6 as well), may exist in taste buds innervated by nerves other than the CT.

  13. Nucleus of the solitary tract in the C57BL/6J mouse: Subnuclear parcellation, chorda tympani nerve projections, and brainstem connections

    PubMed Central

    Ganchrow, Donald; Ganchrow, Judith R; Cicchini, Vanessa; Bartel, Dianna L; Kaufman, Daniel; Girard, David; Whitehead, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) processes gustatory and related somatosensory information rostrally and general viscerosensory information caudally. To compare its connections with those of other rodents, this study in the C57BL/6J mouse provides a subnuclear cytoarchitectonic parcellation (Nissl stain) of the NST into rostral, intermediate, and caudal divisions. Subnuclei are further characterized by NADPH staining and P2X2 immunoreactivity (IR). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) labeling revealed those NST subnuclei receiving chorda tympani nerve (CT) afferents, those connecting with the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and reticular formation (RF), and those interconnecting NST subnuclei. CT terminals are densest in the rostral central (RC) and medial (M) subnuclei; less dense in the rostral lateral (RL) subnucleus; and sparse in the ventral (V), ventral lateral (VL), and central lateral (CL) subnuclei. CTb injection into the PBN retrogradely labels cells in the aforementioned subnuclei; RC and M providing the largest source of PBN projection neurons. Pontine efferent axons terminate mainly in V and rostral medial (RM) subnuclei. CTb injection into the medullary RF labels cells and axonal endings predominantly in V at rostral and intermediate NST levels. Small CTb injections within the NST label extensive projections from the rostral division to caudal subnuclei. Projections from the caudal division primarily interconnect subnuclei confined to the caudal division of the NST; they also connect with the area postrema. P2X2-IR identifies probable vagal nerve terminals in the central (Ce) subnucleus in the intermediate/caudal NST. Ce also shows intense NADPH staining and does not project to the PBN. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1565–1596, 2014. PMID:24151133

  14. Closure of the middle ear with special reference to the development of the tegmen tympani of the temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Verdugo-López, Samuel; Abe, Shin-ichi; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2011-01-01

    Closure of the middle ear is believed to be closely related to the evolutionary development of the mammalian jaw. However, few comprehensive descriptions are available on fetal development. We examined paraffin-embedded specimens of 20 mid-term human fetuses at 8–25 weeks of ovulation age (crown-rump length or CRL, 38–220 mm). After 9 weeks, the tympanic bone and the squamous part of the temporal bone, each of which was cranial or caudal to Meckel's cartilage, grew to close the lateral part of the tympanosquamosal fissure. At the same time, the cartilaginous tegmen tympani appeared independently of the petrous part of the temporal bone and resulted in the petrosquamosal fissure. Subsequently, the medial part of the tympanosquamosal fissure was closed by the descent of a cartilaginous inferior process of the tegmen tympani. When Meckel's cartilage changed into the sphenomandibular ligament and the anterior ligament of the malleus, the inferior process of the tegmen tympani interposed between the tympanic bone and the squamous part of the temporal bone, forming the petrotympanic fissure for the chorda tympani nerve and the discomalleolar ligament. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in accordance with the regression of Meckel's cartilage, the rapidly growing temporomandibular joint provided mechanical stress that accelerated the growth and descent of the inferior process of the tegmen tympani via the discomalleolar ligament. The usual diagram showing bony fissures around the tegmen tympani may overestimate the role of the tympanic bone in the fetal middle-ear closure. PMID:21477146

  15. Scala tympani cochleostomy survey: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Iseli, Claire; Adunka, Oliver F; Buchman, Craig A

    2014-08-01

    To reassess cochleostomy techniques among North American cochlear implant surgeons after a 6-year period of widespread education and research on the topic. Prospective cohort study. A multiple-choice survey of cochlear implant techniques was distributed to surgeons attending the William House Cochlear Implant Study Group in 2006 and 2012. This survey contained questions regarding routine surgical access and cochleostomy techniques. Responses were anonymous, and >50% were repeat respondents. Statistical analysis sought changes in technique in the past 6 years. Comparisons between 2006 and 2012 responses revealed no significant changes in the proportion of surgeons identifying the facial nerve or chorda tympani. By contrast, respondents in 2012 were more likely to drill off the round window niche overhang (P < .001), use a round window insertion (P < .001), or make a smaller cochleostomy (P = .003). In two images of a transfacial recess approach, there was a significant increase in the proportion choosing an inferior or anterior cochleostomy site over a superior location (image 1, 76% in 2006 to 92% in 2012, P = .003; image 3, 78% to 90%, respectively, P = .044). This repeat survey documents a change in practice among cochlear implant surgeons. Specifically, scala tympani access techniques now appear to be more consistent with known anatomical relationships in the round window region. These findings may have resulted from the concerted education and research efforts over the past 6 years. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. The use of a high-power laser on swine mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nathali Cordeiro; Chavantes, M Cristina; Zezell, Denise; Deana, Alessandro; Benetti, Carolina; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes, Luciana Almeida; Martins, Rodrigo A B Lopes; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M A

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, rheumatic fever remains a significant cause of mitral valve insufficiency. It is responsible for approximately 90 % of early childhood valvular surgeries in Brazil. Elongated or flail chordae are frequently responsible and require surgical correction. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the histological tissues of the mitral valve chordae and the mechanical resistance generated by the chordae, both with and without the application of a high-power laser. Twenty normal porcine mitral valve chordae were measured and divided randomly into the following two groups: control group (not subjected to a high-power laser) and laser group (subjected to photonic irradiation). Laser surgery was performed under controlled conditions, using following parameters: λ = 980-nm wavelength, power = 3 W, and energy = 60 J. A mechanical test machine was used in combination with a subsequent histological study to measure chordae tensile properties. A histological analysis demonstrated a typical collagen bundle arrangement in the control group; however, under a particular reached temperature range (48), the collagen bundles assumed different arrangements in the laser group. Significant reductions in the chordae tendineae lengths and changes in their resistance in the laser group were observed, as these chordae exhibited less rigid fibers. The chordae tendineae of normal porcine valves subjected to a high-power laser exhibited its length reduction and less stiffness compared to the control group. A histological analysis of the laser treatment specimens demonstrated differences in collagen bundle spatial organization, following slight changes into tissue temperature.

  17. [Impedance between modiolus and different walls of scala tympani].

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Wang, Zhengmin

    2008-10-01

    To compare the impedance between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani with that between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani. The impedances between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani and the impedance between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani were measured, calculated and compared under different stimulating rates 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 kHz. The impedance between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani is less than that between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani (P < 0.05). To effectively stimulate the residual neurons in the spiral ganglion, the electrodes should be kept close to the inner wall of scale tympani.

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Ruptured Mitral Chordae Tendineae.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Bloodworth, Charles H; Pierce, Eric L; Einstein, Daniel R; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2017-03-01

    The chordal structure is a part of mitral valve geometry that has been commonly neglected or simplified in computational modeling due to its complexity. However, these simplifications cannot be used when investigating the roles of individual chordae tendineae in mitral valve closure. For the first time, advancements in imaging, computational techniques, and hardware technology make it possible to create models of the mitral valve without simplifications to its complex geometry, and to quickly run validated computer simulations that more realistically capture its function. Such simulations can then be used for a detailed analysis of chordae-related diseases. In this work, a comprehensive model of a subject-specific mitral valve with detailed chordal structure is used to analyze the distinct role played by individual chordae in closure of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral closure was simulated for 51 possible chordal rupture points. Resultant regurgitant orifice area and strain change in the chordae at the papillary muscle tips were then calculated to examine the role of each ruptured chorda in the mitral valve closure. For certain subclassifications of chordae, regurgitant orifice area was found to trend positively with ruptured chordal diameter, and strain changes correlated negatively with regurgitant orifice area. Further advancements in clinical imaging modalities, coupled with the next generation of computational techniques will enable more physiologically realistic simulations.

  19. Neonatal myosin in bovine and pig tensor tympani muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Scapolo, P A; Rowlerson, A; Mascarello, F; Veggetti, A

    1991-01-01

    In previous studies of middle ear muscles, the classification of fibre types by histochemical methods was particularly difficult in the bovine and porcine tensor tympani muscle, suggesting the presence of immature fibres. We therefore reexamined the tensor tympani from pigs and cattle of various ages immunohistochemically, using a panel of antimyosin antibodies, including one (anti-NE) specific for neonatal and embryonic myosins. Fibres positive to anti-NE were found in tensor tympani in both species in all ages examined; only a few of these fibres reacted exclusively with this antibody; some also contained slow myosin and the majority also contained adult fast (type IIA) myosin. Furthermore, although the remaining fibres included some of the classical types I and IIA, the majority of them showed a mismatch between their histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles. The morphological appearance of the muscle, the widespread presence of neonatal myosin (often together with another myosin in the same fibre) and the persistence of this composition from birth to adulthood, could be explained by an incomplete development of the muscle fibres, resulting in a 'muscle' much better suited to the role of a ligament. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1810932

  20. Effects of tensor tympani muscle contraction on the middle ear and markers of a contracted muscle.

    PubMed

    Bance, Manohar; Makki, Fawaz M; Garland, Philip; Alian, Wael A; van Wijhe, Rene G; Savage, Julian

    2013-04-01

    Many otologic disorders have been attributed to dysfunction of the tensor tympani muscle, including tinnitus, otalgia, Meniere's disease and sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of this study was to determine adequate stimuli for tensor tympani contraction in humans and determine markers of the hypercontracted state that could be used to detect this process in otologic disease. Multiple types of studies. Studies included 1) measuring middle ear impedance changes in response to orbital puffs of air, facial stroking, and self-vocalization; 2) measuring changes in stapes and eardrum vibrations and middle ear acoustic impedance in response to force loading of the tensor tympani in fresh human cadaveric temporal bones; 3) measuring changes in acoustic impedance in two subjects who could voluntarily contract their tensor tympani, and performing an audiogram with the muscle contracted in one of these subjects; and 4) developing a lumped parameter computer model of the middle ear while simulating various levels of tensor tympani contraction. Orbital jets of air are the most effective stimuli for eliciting tensor tympani contraction. As markers for tensor tympani contraction, all investigations indicate that tensor tympani hypercontraction should result in a low-frequency hearing loss, predominantly conductive, with a decrease in middle ear compliance. These markers should be searched for in otologic pathology states where the tensor tympani is suspected of being hypercontracted. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Artificial chordae for degenerative mitral valve disease: critical analysis of current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Michael; Rao, Christopher; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2012-01-01

    The surgical repair of degenerative mitral valve disease involves a number of technical points of importance. The use of artificial chordae for the repair of degenerative disease has increased as a part of the move from mitral valve replacement to repair of the mitral valve. The use of artificial chordae provides an alternative to the techniques pioneered by Carpentier (including the quadrangular resection, transfer of native chordae and papillary muscle shortening/plasty), which can be more technically difficult. Despite a growth in their uptake and the indications for their use, a number of challenges remain for the use of artificial chordae in mitral valve repair, particularly in the determination of the correct length to ensure optimal leaflet coaptation. Here, we analyse over 40 techniques described for artificial chordae mitral valve repair in the setting of degenerative disease. PMID:22962321

  2. Pharyngeal neuromuscular dysfunction associated with bilateral guttural pouch tympany in a foal

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A 2-month-old warmblood filly was presented for a 1-week history of a large, nonpainful, fluctuant swelling of the parotid and laryngeal area. Bilateral guttural pouch tympany was diagnosed. Surgical correction resolved the guttural pouch tympany; however, postoperative pharyngeal neuromuscular dysfunction developed. PMID:17334035

  3. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of suture versus porcine mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Cochran, R P; Kunzelman, K S

    1991-12-01

    Recent reports have advocated the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) suture for replacement or reinforcement of ruptured or elongated mitral valve chordae tendineae. The mechanical properties of PTFE (Gore-Tex) and other sutures were determined and compared to those of porcine mitral valve chordae. The results were analyzed to assess how closely chordal mechanical function may be simulated by synthetic suture materials. Chordae tendineae and suture samples were tested in uniaxial tension using an INSTRON Model 1000 at strain rates of 5 and 10 mm/min. The stress (g/mm2) was plotted versus strain, and the elastic modulus determined as the slope of the curve. Chordae tendineae exhibited a nonlinear viscoelastic stress/strain behavior. The elastic modulus of both suture types tested was significantly higher than that of the chordae. However, the PTFE suture did exhibit some viscoelastic characteristics (hysteresis and creep) that begin to approach the chordal behavior. Chordal viscoelastic behavior results from the inherent composite structure (collagen, elastin, endothelium, water, and ground substance). As yet, no synthetic materials are able to imitate this behavior with the appropriate tensile strength and fatigue resistant characteristics. At present, PTFE appears to be the best synthetic alternative for chordal replacement, due to its limited viscoelastic capabilities. Nevertheless, the need to more nearly approximate the mechanical behavior of mitral valve chordae tendineae with synthetic material warrants further investigation.

  4. [Applied anatomy of scala tympani inlet related to cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Zou, Tuanming; Guo, Menghe; Zhang, Hongzheng; Shu, Fan; Xie, Nanping

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the related parameters of the temporal bone structure for determining the position of implanting electrode into the scala tympani in cochlear implantation surgery through the facial recess and epitympanum approach. In a surgical simulation experiment, 20 human temporal bones were studied and measured to determine the related parameters of the temporal bone structure. The distance 5.91∓0.29 mm between the short process of the incus and the round window niche, 2.11∓0.18 mm between the stapes and the round window niche, 6.70∓0.19 mm between the facial nerve in the perpendicular paragraph and the round window niche, 2.22∓0.21 mm from the pyramidal eminence to the round window, and 2.16∓0.14 mm between the stapes and the round window. The minimal distance between the implanting electrode and the vestibular window was 2.12∓0.19 mm. The distance between the cochleariform process and the round window niche was 3.79∓0.17 mm. The position of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.25∓0.13 mm under the stapes. The location of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.28∓0.20 mm inferior to the pyramidal eminence. These parameters provide a reference value to determine the different positions of cochlear electrode array insertion into the scale tympani in different patients.

  5. Collagen birefringence assessment in heart chordae tendineae through PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Revuelta, José M.; González-Vargas, Nieves; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo-Díez, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2017-02-01

    Degenerative mitral regurgitation is a serious and frequent human heart valve disease. Malfunctioning of this valve brings the left-sided heart through a significant increase of pressure and volume overload. Severe degenerative mitral incompetence generally requires surgical repair or valve replacement with a bioprosthesis or mechanical heart valve. Degenerative disease affects the leaflets or/and the chordae tendineae, which link both leaflets to the papillary muscles. During mitral valve surgical repair, reconstruction of the valve leaflets, annulus and chordae are provided to prevent postoperative recurrence of valve regurgitation. The operative evaluation of the diseased and apparently normal chordae tendineae mainly depends of the surgeońs experience, without any other objective diagnosis tool. In this work, PS-OCT (Polarization Sensitive-Optical Coherence Tomography) is applied for the first time to evaluate the pathological condition of human chordae coming from the mitral valve. It consists on a prospective study to test the viability of this technique for the evaluation of the collagen core of chords. This core presents a strong birefringence due to the longitudinal and organized arrangement of its collagen bundles. Different densities and organizations of the collagen core translate into different birefringence indicators whose measurement become an objective marker of the core structure. Ex-vivo mitral degenerative chordae tendineae have been analyzed with PS-OCT. Intensity OCT is used to obtain complementary morphological information of the chords. Birefringence results correlate with the previously reported values for human tendinous tissue.

  6. Genetically-increased taste cell population with Gα-gustducin-coupled sweet receptors is associated with increase of gurmarin-sensitive taste nerve fibers in mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The peptide gurmarin is a selective sweet response inhibitor for rodents. In mice, gurmarin sensitivity differs among strains with gurmarin-sensitive C57BL and gurmarin-poorly-sensitive BALB strains. In C57BL mice, sweet-responsive fibers of the chorda tympani (CT) nerve can be divided into two distinct populations, gurmarin-sensitive (GS) and gurmarin-insensitive (GI) types, suggesting the existence of two distinct reception pathways for sweet taste responses. By using the dpa congenic strain (dpa CG) whose genetic background is identical to BALB except that the gene(s) controlling gurmarin sensitivity are derived from C57BL, we previously found that genetically-elevated gurmarin sensitivity in dpa CG mice, confirmed by using behavioral response and whole CT nerve response analyses, was linked to a greater taste cell population co-expressing sweet taste receptors and a Gα protein, Gα-gustducin. However, the formation of neural pathways from the increased taste cell population to nerve fibers has not yet been examined. Results Here, we investigated whether the increased taste cell population with Gα-gustducin-coupled sweet receptors would be associated with selective increment of GS fiber population or nonselective shift of gurmarin sensitivities of overall sweet-responsive fibers by examining the classification of GS and GI fiber types in dpa CG and BALB mice. The results indicated that dpa CG, like C57BL, possess two distinct populations of GS and GI types of sweet-responsive fibers with almost identical sizes (dpa CG: 13 GS and 16 GI fibers; C57BL: 16 GS and 14 GI fibers). In contrast, BALB has only 3 GS fibers but 18 GI fibers. These data indicate a marked increase of the GS population in dpa CG. Conclusion These results suggest that the increased cell population expressing T1r2/T1r3/Gα-gustducin in dpa CG mice may be associated with an increase of their matched GS type fibers, and may form the distinct GS sweet reception pathway in mice. G

  7. Round window electrode insertion potentiates retention in the scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Connor, Stephen E J; Holland, N Julian; Agger, Andreas; Leong, Annabelle C; Varghese, Re Ajay; Jiang, Dan; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Alec

    2012-09-01

    The round window membrane (RWM)-intentioned approach is superior to the traditional bony cochleostomy (BC) approach in obtaining electrode placement within the scala tympani (ST). Cochlear implant outcome is influenced by several factors, including optimal placement and retention of the electrode array within the ST. The present study aimed to assess whether the RWM route is superior to a traditional BC for placement and retention of the electrode array in the ST. This was a prospective consecutive non-randomized comparison study. All patients were implanted with the Advanced Bionics 1J electrode array. The RWM approach (n = 32) was compared with a traditional BC group (n = 33). The outcome measure was the electrode position as judged within the scalar chambers at four points along the basal turn using postoperative computed tomography (CT). When the mean position scores were compared, the RWM-intentioned group had significantly more electrodes directed towards the ST compartment than the BC group (p < 0.001). The RWM electrodes achieved 94% ST retention compared with 64% for the BC group (p < 0.05). All electrodes stayed in the ST in the RWM group, whereas in the BC group 9% crossed from the ST to the scala vestibuli.

  8. Inheritance of guttural pouch tympany in the arabian horse.

    PubMed

    Blazyczek, I; Hamann, H; Ohnesorge, B; Deegen, E; Distl, O

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the mode of inheritance of guttural pouch tympany (GPT) using pedigrees of Arabian horses. Complex segregation analyses were employed to test for the significance of nongenetic transmission and for monogenic, polygenic, and mixed monogenic-polygenic modes of inheritance. Horses affected by GPT comprised 27 Arabian purebred foals. Of these 27 animals, 22 were patients at the Clinic for Horses, School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany, between 1994 and 2001 and 5 Arabian foals were from stud farms. Information on the pedigrees of these patients allowed us to classify the affected foals into four families with a total of 276 animals. The regressive logistic model analysis took into account the nonrandomness of the pedigrees through multiple single ascertainment correction. The complex segregation analysis showed that, among all other models employed, a polygenic and a mixed monogenic-polygenic model best explained the segregation of Arabian foals with GPT. Models including only nongenetic distributions and monogenic inheritance could be significantly rejected. This is the first report in which a genetic component could be shown to be responsible for GPT in horses.

  9. Association Between Tegmen Tympani Status and Superior Semicircular Canal Pattern.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jaime; Tejedor, Maria Teresa; Fraile, Jesús José; Cisneros, Ana; Crovetto, Rafael; Monteagudo, Luis Vicente; Whyte, Ana; Crovetto, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying the possible association between tegmen tympani (TT) status and superior semicircular canal (SSC) pattern. Observational study. Study conducted in three tertiary Spanish hospitals. Nonselected consecutive patients of all ages (607 temporal bones). Thin-section multidetector row computed axial tomography (CAT scan) of the temporal bones. Thickness of SSC bone coverture adjacent to the middle fossa, and TT status as a dichotomous variable: dehiscence (TTD) or integrity (TTI). The observed SSC patterns were dehiscence (3.79%), papyraceous or thin (11.20%), normal (76.77%), thick (4.94%), and pneumatized (3.29%). The observed TT statuses were TTD (10.87%) and TTI (89.13%). TTD was associated with SSCD and papyraceous patterns, and TTI percentages were higher in normal and thick patterns (χ2 = 11.102; p = 0.001). The TTD probability was estimated as a function of SSC pattern and age by a multivariate binary logistics regression model (χ2 = 45.939; p < 0.001). SSC pattern was significantly associated with TT status. Age influenced this association. The risk for TTD increased by 4.1% per each year of increasing age, did not differ significantly for normal and thick patterns, and increased 12 times and 20 times for papyraceous and SSCD patterns, respectively.

  10. [Tensor veli palatini and tensor tympani muscles: anatomical, functional and symptomatic links].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Aristeguieta, Luis Miguel; Ballesteros Acuña, Luis Ernesto; Sandoval Ortiz, Germán Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are associated with symptoms such as tinnitus, vertigo, sensation of hearing loss, ear fullness and otalgia. The connection and dysfunction of the tensor tympani and tensor veli palatini muscles seems to be associated with the aforementioned symptoms. We seek to demonstrate and explain this connection through the morphometry of these structures. We studied 22 paired blocks and 1 left side of human temporal bone. Digital measurements were made of the tensor tympani muscles and stapes. The average length of the stapedial muscle was 5.8 mm SD 0.61, and that of the tensor tympani was 19.69 mm SD 1.07. Anatomical connections were found in all the samples between the tensor veli palatini muscles through a common tendon. There is a need for an interdisciplinary management between physician and specialized dentist in cases of craniofacial pain. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial neo-chordae to correct mitral regurgitation: the TACT Trial (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Seeburger, Joerg; Rinaldi, Mauro; Nielsen, Sten Lyager; Salizzoni, Stefano; Lange, Ruediger; Schoenburg, Markus; Alfieri, Ottavio; Borger, Michael Andrew; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Aidietis, Audrius

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and performance of the NeoChord DS1000 system (NeoChord, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota). There is an increasing interest in transcatheter mitral valve (MV) treatment. The NeoChord DS 1000 system enables off-pump beating heart transapical MV repair with implantation of artificial neo-chordae. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to isolated posterior prolapse were included in this TACT (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) trial. All patients were scheduled for off-pump transapical implantation of neo-chordae. Thirty patients at 7 centers were enrolled. Major adverse events included 1 death due to post-cardiotomy syndrome and concomitant sepsis and 1 minor stroke with the patient fully recovered at the 30-day follow-up visit. Additional patients experienced procedural major adverse events related to a reoperation or conversion to standard of care. Acute procedural success (placement of at least 1 neo-chord and reduction of MR from 3+ or 4+ to ≤2+) was achieved in 26 patients (86.7%). In 4 patients neo-chordae were not placed for technical and/or patient-specific reasons. These patients underwent intraoperative (3 patients) or post-operative (1 patient) standard MV repair. At 30 days, 17 patients maintained an MR grade ≤2+. Four patients who developed recurrent MR were successfully treated with open MV repair during 30-day follow-up. Results improved with experience: durable reduction in MR to ≤2+ at 30 days was achieved in 5 (33.3%) of the first 15 patients and 12 (85.7%) of the last 14 patients. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial chordae to correct MR is technically safe and feasible; however, it yields further potential for improvement of efficacy and durability. (Safety and Performance Study of the NeoChord Device [TACT]; NCT01777815). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ontogenetic explanation for tegmen tympani dehiscence and superior semicircular canal dehiscence association.

    PubMed

    Fraile Rodrigo, Jesús José; Cisneros, Ana I; Obón, Jesús; Yus, Carmen; Crovetto, Rafael; Crovetto, Miguel A; Whyte, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the ontogeny of the superior semicircular canal and tegmen tympani and determine if there are common embryological factors explaining both associated dehiscence. We analyzed 77 human embryological series aged between 6 weeks and newborn. Preparations were serially cut and stained with Masson's trichrome technique. The tegmental prolongation of tegmen tympani and superior semicircular canal originate from the same structure, the otic capsule, and have the same type of endochondral ossification; while the extension of the squamous prolongation of tegmen tympani runs from the temporal squama and ossification is directly of intramembranous type. The nuclei of ossification of the superior and external semicircular canals and accessory of tegmen collaborate in the ossification of the tegmental extension and by growth extend to the tegmental prolongation. This fact plus the fact that both structures share a common layer of external periosteum could explain the coexistence of lack of bone coverage in tegmen and superior semicircular canal. The development of the semicircular canal and tegmen tympani could explain the causes of the association of both dehiscences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Seamless reconstruction of mitral leaflet and chordae with one piece of pericardium.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Aoki, Masakazu; Hoshino, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yasunari; Sawaki, Sadanari; Yanagisawa, Junji; Tokoro, Masayoshi

    2014-06-01

    Mitral valve repair is challenging when enough pliable mitral leaflets and chordae are not left intact because of extensive infective endocarditis or chronic sclerotic degeneration. For those cases, we developed a simple method to reconstruct defective leaflets and chordae en bloc with a piece of pericardium, and the mid-term results were evaluated. From January 2009 to November 2013, 25 patients with the mean age of 63 (range 20-88) years underwent this operation. The causes of mitral regurgitation were infective endocarditis in 8, sclerotic degeneration in 8, leaflet dehiscence of previous repair in 2, mitral annular calcification in 3, rheumatic in 2 and congenital in 2. After complete debridement of infected or consolidated tissue, we reconstructed defective mitral leaflets and chordae en bloc with a piece of glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardium. To substitute posterior leaflet and chordae, the pericardium was trimmed into a narrow pentagonal shape. The pointed end was attached directly to the corresponding papillary muscle, basal side edges to remnant leaflets on both sides, and the base to the annulus. For anterior leaflet, the pericardium was trimmed into a triangular shape if the lesion was confined in the left or right half or into a double-triangle shape if the lesion involved whole anterior leaflet. The summit of triangle was fixed to corresponding papillary muscle, and the base to remnant anterior leaflet, thus reconstructing coaptation zone and chordae seamlessly. There was no hospital death, and mitral regurgitation at discharge was none or trivial in all patients. During 1-59 months (mean 12.7) of complete follow-up, death, infection or hemolysis was not observed. In one patient, mitral regurgitation recurred 8 months postoperatively because the fixation suture of the pericardium to the papillary muscle broke. The valve was re-repaired with re-attaching the leg of the pericardium. Regurgitation was less than moderate in all other patients

  14. Visualization of spiral ganglion neurites within the scala tympani with a cochlear implant in situ

    PubMed Central

    Chikar, Jennifer A.; Batts, Shelley A.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Current cochlear histology methods do not allow in situ processing of cochlear implants. The metal components of the implant preclude standard embedding and mid-modiolar sectioning, and whole mounts do not have the spatial resolution needed to view the implant within the scala tympani. One focus of recent auditory research is the regeneration of structures within the cochlea, particularly the ganglion cells and their processes, and there are multiple potential benefits to cochlear implant users from this work. To facilitate experimental investigations of auditory nerve regeneration performed in conjunction with cochlear implantation, it is critical to visualize the cochlear tissue and the implant together to determine if the nerve has made contact with the implant. This paper presents a novel histological technique that enables simultaneous visualization of the in situ cochlear implant and neurofilament – labeled nerve processes within the scala tympani, and the spatial relationship between them. PMID:19428528

  15. In vitro modifications of the scala tympani environment and the cochlear implant array surface.

    PubMed

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Scheper, Verena; Wissel, Kirsten; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Paasche, Gerrit

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of alterations of the scala tympani environment and modifications of the surface of cochlear implant electrode arrays on insertion forces in vitro. Research experimental study. Fibroblasts producing neurotrophic factors were cultivated on the surface of Nucleus 24 Contour Advance electrodes. Forces were recorded by an Instron 5542 Force Measurement System as three modified arrays were inserted into an artificial scala tympani model filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The recorded forces were compared to control groups including three unmodified electrodes inserted into a model filled with PBS (unmodified environment) or Healon (current practice). Fluorescence microscopy was used before and after the insertions to identify any remaining fibroblasts. Additionally, three Contour Advance electrodes were inserted into an artificial model, filled with alginate/barium chloride solution at different concentrations, while insertion forces were recorded. Modification of the scala tympani environment with 50% to 75% alginate gel resulted in a significant decrease in the insertion forces. The fibroblast-coated arrays also led to decreased forces comparable to those recorded with Healon. Fluorescence microscopy revealed fully cell-covered arrays before and partially covered arrays after the insertion; the fibroblasts on the arrays' modiolar surface remained intact. Modifications of the scala tympani's environment with 50% to 75% alginate/barium chloride and of the cochlear implant electrode surface with neurotrophic factor-producing fibroblasts drastically reduce the insertion forces. As both modifications may serve future intracochlear therapies, it is expected that these might additionally reduce possible insertion trauma. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. ATP-gamma-S shifts the operating point of outer hair cell transduction towards scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Bobbin, Richard P; Salt, Alec N

    2005-07-01

    ATP receptor agonists and antagonists alter cochlear mechanics as measured by changes in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Some of the effects on DPOAEs are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP affects mechano-electrical transduction and the operating point of the outer hair cells (OHCs). This hypothesis was tested by monitoring the effect of ATP-gamma-S on the operating point of the OHCs. Guinea pigs anesthetized with urethane and with sectioned middle ear muscles were used. The cochlear microphonic (CM) was recorded differentially (scala vestibuli referenced to scala tympani) across the basal turn before and after perfusion (20 min) of the perilymph compartment with artificial perilymph (AP) and ATP-gamma-S dissolved in AP. The operating point was derived from the cochlear microphonics (CM) recorded in response low frequency (200 Hz) tones at high level (106, 112 and 118 dB SPL). The analysis procedure used a Boltzmann function to simulate the CM waveform and the Boltzmann parameters were adjusted to best-fit the calculated waveform to the CM. Compared to the initial perfusion with AP, ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) enhanced peak clipping of the positive peak of the CM (that occurs during organ of Corti displacements towards scala tympani), which was in keeping with ATP-induced displacement of the transducer towards scala tympani. CM waveform analysis quantified the degree of displacement and showed that the changes were consistent with the stimulus being centered on a different region of the transducer curve. The change of operating point meant that the stimulus was applied to a region of the transducer curve where there was greater saturation of the output on excursions towards scala tympani and less saturation towards scala vestibuli. A significant degree of recovery of the operating point was observed after washing with AP. Dose response curves generated by perfusing ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) in a cumulative manner yielded an EC(50) of 19.8 micro

  17. Left atrial myxoma, ruptured chordae tendinae causing mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Raj, Ravi; Jayant, Aveek; Kuthe, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation is uncommon with left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic assessment of presence of mitral regurgitation and its severity are impaired by the presence of left atrial myxoma. We describe an uncommon association of left atrial myxoma with coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation. MR was reported as mild on pre-operative transthoracic echocardiography but found to be severe due to ruptured chordae tendinae during intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography, which lead to change in the surgical plan to mitral valve replacement in addition to excision of myxoma.

  18. Responses of single facial taste fibers in the sea catfish, Arius felis, to amino acids.

    PubMed

    Michel, W; Caprio, J

    1991-07-01

    1. Taste buds in catfish are found not only within the oropharyngeal cavity, as in mammals, but are also located along the external body surface of the animal from the barbels and lips to the caudal fin. Because these taste buds are innervated by the facial (cranial VII) nerve, the extraoral taste system of catfish is analogous to the mammalian taste system of the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, which contains taste buds innervated by the chorda tympani nerve, and of the soft palate and nasoincisor ducts, which contain taste buds innervated by the greater superficial petrosal nerve. 2. The majority of information concerning the specificity of individual taste fibers in vertebrates has been obtained primarily in mammals to stimuli representing the four basic human taste qualities (i.e., salty, sweet, sour, and bitter). In the present report, we examine the evidence for gustatory fiber types within the stimulus class of amino acids, compounds known to be especially relevant gustatory stimuli for catfish and other teleosts. 3. Action potentials were recorded from 60 individual facial taste neurons obtained from 28 sea catfish (Arius felis). Stimuli were 10(-4) M concentrations of L-alanine, D-alanine, glycine, L-proline, L-histidine, and L-arginine, compounds selected from an original stimulus list of 28 amino acids. Responses were quantified as the number of action potentials evoked at various time intervals from the first 0.5 s up to 10 s of response time. 4. The spontaneous activity of 42 fully characterized neurons was 0.8 +/- 2.1 SD spikes/3 s. The average rate of spike discharge increased 50-fold during stimulation with the most effective amino acid (42 +/- 31 spikes/3 s, mean +/- SD). The majority of the sampled neurons were not narrowly tuned to the amino acid stimulants tested (mean breadth of responsiveness, H = 0.60; range 0-0.95). 5. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the fully characterized neurons identified two large and two small groups of cells. The

  19. Durability of Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation with Conventional-Length Electrodes and Scala Tympani Insertion.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Alex D; Hunter, Jacob B; Carlson, Matthew L; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L; Gifford, Rene H; Noble, Jack H; Haynes, David S; Labadie, Robert F; Wanna, George B

    2016-05-01

    To analyze factors that influence hearing preservation over time in cochlear implant recipients with conventional-length electrode arrays located entirely within the scala tympani. Case series with planned chart review. Single tertiary academic referral center. A retrospective review was performed to analyze a subgroup of cochlear implant recipients with residual acoustic hearing. Patients were included in the study only if their electrode arrays remained fully in the scala tympani after insertion and serviceable acoustic hearing (≤80 dB at 250 Hz) was preserved. Electrode array location was verified through a validated radiographic assessment tool. Patients with <6 months of audiologic follow-up were excluded. The main outcome measure was change in acoustic hearing thresholds from implant activation to the last available follow-up. A total of 16 cases met inclusion criteria (median age, 70.6 years; range, 29.4-82.2; 50% female). The average follow-up was 18.0 months (median, 16.1; range, 6.2-36.4). Patients with a lateral wall electrode array were more likely to have stable acoustic thresholds over time (P < .05). Positive correlations were seen between continued hearing loss following activation and larger initial postoperative acoustic threshold shifts, though statistical significance was not achieved. Age, sex, and noise exposure had no significant influence on continued hearing preservation over time. To control for hearing loss associated with interscalar excursion during cochlear implantation, the present study evaluated patients only with conventional electrode arrays located entirely within the scala tympani. In this group, the style of electrode array may influence residual hearing preservation over time. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  20. Durability of Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation with Conventional-Length Electrodes and Scala Tympani Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Alex D.; Hunter, Jacob B.; Carlson, Matthew L.; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L.; Gifford, Rene H.; Noble, Jack H.; Haynes, David S.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyze factors that influence hearing preservation over time in cochlear implant recipients with conventional-length electrode arrays located entirely within the scala tympani. Study Design Case series with planned chart review. Setting Single tertiary academic referral center. Subjects and Methods A retrospective review was performed to analyze a subgroup of cochlear implant recipients with residual acoustic hearing. Patients were included in the study only if their electrode arrays remained fully in the scala tympani after insertion and serviceable acoustic hearing (≤80 dB at 250 Hz) was preserved. Electrode array location was verified through a validated radiographic assessment tool. Patients with <6 months of audiologic follow-up were excluded. The main outcome measure was change in acoustic hearing thresholds from implant activation to the last available follow-up. Results A total of 16 cases met inclusion criteria (median age, 70.6 years; range, 29.4–82.2; 50% female). The average follow-up was 18.0 months (median, 16.1; range, 6.2–36.4). Patients with a lateral wall electrode array were more likely to have stable acoustic thresholds over time (P < .05). Positive correlations were seen between continued hearing loss following activation and larger initial postoperative acoustic threshold shifts, though statistical significance was not achieved. Age, sex, and noise exposure had no significant influence on continued hearing preservation over time. Conclusions To control for hearing loss associated with inter-scalar excursion during cochlear implantation, the present study evaluated patients only with conventional electrode arrays located entirely within the scala tympani. In this group, the style of electrode array may influence residual hearing preservation over time. PMID:26908553

  1. Animal model of cochlear third window in the scala vestibuli or scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Attias, Joseph; Preis, Michal; Shemesh, Rafi; Hadar, Tuvia; Nageris, Ben I

    2010-08-01

    The auditory impact of a cochlear third window differs by its location in the scala vestibuli or scala tympani. Pathologic third window has been investigated primarily in the vestibular apparatus of animals and humans. Dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal is the clinical model. Fat sand rats (n = 11) have a unique inner-ear anatomy that allows easy surgical access. A window was drilled in the bony labyrinth over the scala vestibuli in 1 group (12 ears) and over the scala tympani in another (7 ears) while preserving the membranous labyrinth. Auditory brain stem responses to high- and low-frequency stimuli delivered by air and bone conduction were recorded before and after the procedure. Scala vestibuli group: preoperative air-conduction thresholds to clicks and tone-bursts averaged 8.3 and 9.6 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, 4.6 and 3.3 dB, respectively; after fenestration, air-conduction thresholds averaged 40.4 and 41.8 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, -1 and 5.6 dB, respectively. Scala tympani group: preoperative air-conduction thresholds to clicks and tone-bursts averaged 8.6 dB each, and bone-conduction thresholds, 7.9 dB and 7.1 dB, respectively; after fenestration, air-conduction thresholds averaged 11.4 and 9.3 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, 9.3 and 4.2 dB, respectively. The changes in air- (p = 0.0001) and bone-conduction (p = 0.04) thresholds were statistically significant only in the scala vestibuli group. The presence of a cochlear third window over the scala vestibuli, but not over the scala tympani, causes a significant increase in air-conduction auditory thresholds. These results agree with the theoretic model and clinical findings and contribute to our understanding of vestibular dehiscence.

  2. Morphology of chordae tendianeae of atrioventricular heart valves of newborns and infants in terms of laser polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentelejchuk, N. P.; Chala, K. M.; Yermolenko, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    The paper studied the morphological features of the structure and polarization properties of tendon tissue strings atrioventricular valvular of newborns and infants on histological sections. Analysis of the obtained results showed high diagnostic sensitivity of statistic moments of coordinate distributions of matrix elements of both types of chordae tendianeae of atrioventricular valves hearts tissue to the changes of optical-geometric structure.

  3. Concentration gradient along scala tympani following the local application of gentamicin to the round window membrane

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, Stefan K.; Mynatt, Robert; Gill, Ruth M.; Borgmann, Stefan; Salt, Alec N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The distribution of gentamicin along the fluid spaces of the cochlea following local applications has never previously been demonstrated. Computer simulations have predicted that significant basal-apical concentration gradients might be expected and histological studies indicate that hair cell damage is greater at the base than at the apex following local gentamicin application. In the present study, gradients of gentamicin along the cochlea were measured. Methods A recently-developed method of sampling perilymph from the cochlear apex of guinea pigs was used, in which the samples represent fluid originating from different regions along scala tympani. Gentamicin concentration was determined in sequential apical samples which were taken following up to three hours of local application to the round window niche. Results Substantial gradients of gentamicin along the length of scala tympani were demonstrated and quantified, averaging more than 4000 times greater concentration at the base compared to the apex at the time of sampling. Peak concentrations and gradients for gentamicin varied considerably between animals, likely resulting from variations in round window membrane permeability and rates of perilymph flow. Conclusions The large gradients for gentamicin demonstrated here in guinea pigs account for how it is possible to suppress vestibular function in some patients with a local application of gentamicin without damaging auditory function. Variations in round window membrane permeability and in perilymph flow could account for why hearing losses are observed in some patients. PMID:17603318

  4. Different ways to repair the mitral valve with artificial chordae: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral regurgitation (type II Carpentier's functional classification) affects about 1-2% of the population. This represents a very common indication for valve surgery resulting in a low percentage of repairs compared to replacement which is actually performed. In the last decades, several methods for mitral valve repair have been developed, to make the surgical feasibility easier, improve the long-term follow-up thus avoiding the need for reoperations. A very interesting method is represented by the combination of various valve repair techniques, depending on the involvement of the anterior, posterior, or both leaflets, and the use of PTFE artificial chordae tendineae when excessive chordal elongation or rupture due to myxomatous degeneration co-exists. The aim of this review is to summarize the evolution of these techniques from the beginning till now. PMID:20377866

  5. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 213. National Research Council. Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein, and amino acids (macronutrients). The National Academies Press. ...

  6. Dexamethasone concentration gradients along scala tympani after application to the round window membrane

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N

    2008-01-01

    Hypothesis Local application of dexamethasone-21-dihydrogene-phosphate (Dex-P) to the round window membrane (RWM) of guinea pigs produces a substantial basal-apical concentration gradient in scala tympani (ST) perilymph. Background In recent years, intratympanically-applied glucocorticoids are increasingly being used for the treatment of inner ear disease. Although measurements of intracochlear concentrations after round window (RW) application exist, there is limited information on the distribution of these drugs in the inner ear fluids. It has been predicted from computer simulations that substantial concentration gradients will occur with lower concentrations expected in apical turns after RW application. Concentration gradients of other substances along the cochlea have recently been confirmed using a sequential apical sampling method to obtain perilymph. Methods Dex-P (10mg/ml) was administered to the RWM of guinea pigs (n=9) in vivo for 2 to 3 hours. Perilymph was then collected using a protocol in which ten samples, each of approximately 1μl, were taken sequentially from the cochlear apex into capillary tubes. Dex-P concentration of the samples was determined by HPLC. Interpretation of sample data using a finite element model allowed the longitudinal gradients of Dex-P in scala tympani to be quantified. Results The Dex-P content of the first sample in each experiment (dominated by perilymph from apical regions) was substantially lower than that of the third and fourth sample (dominated by basal turn perilymph). These findings qualitatively demonstrated the existence of a concentration gradient along scala tympani (ST). After detailed analysis of the measured sample concentrations using an established finite element computer model, the mean basal-apical concentration gradient was estimated to be 17•103. Both absolute concentrations of Dex-P in ST and the basal-apical gradients were found to vary substantially. Conclusion The existence of substantial basal

  7. Dimensions of the sinus tympani and its surgical access via a retrofacial approach.

    PubMed

    Ozturan, O; Bauer, C A; Miller, C C; Jenkins, H A

    1996-10-01

    The sinus tympani (ST) is a critical anatomic region of the temporal bone. It lies medial to the facial nerve, between the ponticulus and the subiculum, and therefore is not easily visualized by routine surgical approaches to the middle ear and mastoid. This limited access makes the ST a site that is notorious for residual cholesteatoma. An extensive evaluation of the anatomic dimensions of the ST was made from human temporal bones. Three hundred twenty-seven bones were examined at four standardized levels to describe the dimensions and anatomic relationships of the ST with other structures of the temporal bone. The region of the stapedial tendon was found to be the most limited anatomic substructure in the vicinity of the ST. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a retrofacial approach to the ST as an aid in eradication of otherwise hidden disease.

  8. Tonic tensor tympani syndrome in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients: a multi-clinic prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Myriam; Sanchez, Tanit Ganz; Diges, Isabel; Saba, Clarice; Dineen, Ross; McNeill, Celene; Chiam, Alison; O'Keefe, Mary; Sharples, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS) is an involuntary, anxiety-based condition where the reflex threshold for tensor tympani muscle activity is reduced, causing a frequent spasm. This can trigger aural symptoms from tympanic membrane tension, middle ear ventilation alterations and trigeminal nerve irritability. TTTS is considered to cause the distinctive symptoms of acoustic shock (AS), which can develop after exposure to an unexpected loud sound perceived as highly threatening. Hyperacusis is a dominant AS symptom. Aural pain/blockage without underlying pathology has been noted in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients, without wide acknowledgment. This multiclinic study investigated the prevalence of TTTS symptoms and AS in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients. This study included consecutive patients with tinnitus and/or hyperacusis seen in multiple clinics. Symptoms consistent with TTTS (pain/numbness/burning in and around the ear; aural "blockage"; mild vertigo/nausea; "muffled" hearing; tympanic flutter; headache); onset or exacerbation from exposure to loud/intolerable sounds; tinnitus/hyperacusis severity. All patients were medically cleared of underlying pathology, which could cause these symptoms. 60.0% of the total sample (345 patients), 40.6% of tinnitus only patients, 81.1% of hyperacusis patients had ≥ 1 symptoms (P < 0.001). 68% of severe tinnitus patients, 91.3% of severe hyperacusis patients had ≥ 1 symptoms (P < 0.001). 19.7% (68/345) of patients in the total sample had AS. 83.8% of AS patients had hyperacusis, 41.2% of non-AS patients had hyperacusis (P < 0.001). The high prevalence of TTTS symptoms suggests they readily develop in tinnitus patients, more particularly with hyperacusis. Along with AS, they should be routinely investigated in history-taking.

  9. Comparison of the Outcomes of Modified Artificial Chordae Technique for Mitral Regurgitation through Right Minithoracotomy or Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao-Lei; Feng, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Nan; Zhu, Jia-Quan; Zhang, Li; Ding, Fang-Bao; Bao, Chun-Rong; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Right minithoracotomy (RM) has been proven to be a safe and effective approach for mitral valve surgery, but the differences of artificial chordae technique between RM and median sternotomy (MS) were seldom reported. Here, we compared the outcomes of modified artificial chordae technique for mitral regurgitation (MR) through RM or MS approaches. Methods: One hundred and eighteen consecutive adult patients who received mitral valve repair with artificial chordae and annuloplasty for MR through RM (n = 58) or MS (n = 60) from January 2006 to January 2015 were analyzed. Results: All of the selected patients underwent mitral valve repair successfully without any complication during the surgery. There was no significant difference between RM group and MS group in cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, and early postoperative complications. However, compared with the MS group, the RM group had shorter hospital stay and faster surgical recovery. At a mean follow-up of 44.8 ± 25.0 months, the freedom from more than moderate MR was 93.9% ± 3.5% in RM group and 94.8% ± 2.9% in MS group at 3 years postoperatively. Log-rank test showed that there was no significant difference in the freedom from recurrent significant MR between the two groups (χ2 = 0.247, P = 0.619). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of mild MR at discharge was the independent risk factor for the recurrent significant MR. Conclusion: Right minithoracotomy can achieve the similar therapeutic effects with MS for the patients who received modified artificial chordae technique for treating MR. PMID:27625084

  10. Ideal site for ventricular anchoring of artificial chordae in mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alberto; Hurni, Samuel; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Wahl, Andreas; Aymard, Thierry; Vogel, Rolf; Carrel, Thierry

    2012-04-01

    Surgical treatment of mitral leaflet prolapse using artificial neochordae shows excellent outcomes. Upcoming devices attempt the same treatment in a minimally invasive way but target the left ventricular apex as an anchoring point, rather than the tip of the corresponding papillary muscle. In this study, cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare these 2 different anchoring positions and their dynamic relationship with the mitral leaflets. Eleven healthy volunteers (mean age, 31 years; 6 female; mean ejection fraction, 62%) were examined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla, cine steady free precession technique with retrospective gating), whereby dedicated software enabled assessment of the physiologic distances among 3 anchoring sites (anterior papillary muscle, posterior papillary muscle, and apex) and the plane of the mitral annulus at the level of leaflet coaptation. These distances were measured in systole and diastole, and the performance of virtual neochordae was analyzed for the 3 potential anchoring sites. Length difference between systole and diastole for the 3 measured distances were 0.19 ± 0.11 cm (5.9% ± 3.4%) for the anterior papillary muscle, 0.19 ± 0.09 cm (6.7% ± 3.6%) for the posterior papillary muscle, and 1.52 ± 0.18 cm (17.8% ± 2.8%) for the left ventricular apex (P = .001). Virtual neochordae between the leaflet and the left ventricular apex were first adjusted in systole to achieve leaflet coaptation. Leaflet tear in diastole can only be avoided if the width of the attached leaflet is larger than the systole-diastole length difference. On the other hand, if virtual neochordae are adjusted in diastole to avoid leaflet tear, residual leaflet prolapse during systole can result. Because the systole-diastole length difference for papillary muscle anchored chordae is smaller than for apical chordae by a factor 10, there is a strongly reduced risk of prolapse or tearing and the leaflet width is unimportant

  11. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Mitral Chordae Tendineae Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kalayci Yigin, Aysel; Bulent Vatan, Mehmet; Akdemir, Ramazan; Necati Murat Aksoy, Muhammed; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Kilic, Harun; Erkorkmaz, Unal; Karacan, Keziban; Kaleli, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in Lys939Gln XPC gene may diminish DNA repair capacity, eventually increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance of polymorphism Lys939Gln in XPC gene in patients with mitral chordae tendinea rupture (MCTR). Twenty-one patients with MCTR and thirty-seven age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism was carried out using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR-) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The frequencies of the heterozygote genotype (Lys/Gln-AC) and homozygote genotype (Gln/Gln-CC) were significantly different in MCTR as compared to control group, respectively (52.4% versus 43.2%, p = 0.049; 38.15% versus 16.2%, p = 0.018). Homozygote variant (Gln/Gln) genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 2.059; 95% CI: 1.097–3.863; p = 0.018). Heterozygote variant (Lys/Gln) genotype was also highly significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 1.489; 95% CI: 1.041–2.129; p = 0.049). The variant allele C was found to be significantly associated with MCTR (OR = 1.481; 95% CI: 1.101–1.992; p = 0.011). This study has demonstrated the association of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism with MCTR, which is significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR. PMID:26604426

  12. Preservation of auditory brainstem response thresholds after cochleostomy and titanium microactuator implantation in the lateral wall of cat scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, S George; Prewitt, Jessica; Bray, Victor; Aravamudhan, Radhika; Bermeo Blanco, Oscar A; Farmer-Fedor, Brenda L; Ward, Jonette A

    2014-04-01

    The safety of implanting a titanium microactuator into the lateral wall of cat scala tympani was assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds for 1 to 3 months. The safety of directly stimulating cochlear perilymph with an implantable hearing system requires maintaining preoperative hearing levels. This cat study is an essential step in the development of the next generation of fully implantable hearing devices for humans. Following GLP surgical standards, a 1-mm cochleostomy was drilled into the lateral wall of the scala tympani, and a nonfunctioning titanium anchor/microactuator assembly was inserted in 8 cats. The scala media was damaged in the 1 cat. ABR thresholds with click and 4- and 8-kHz stimuli were measured preoperatively and compared with postoperative thresholds at 1, 2, and 3 months. Nonimplanted ear thresholds were also measured to establish statistical significance for threshold shifts (>28.4 dB). Two audiologists independently interpreted thresholds. Postoperatively, 7 cats implanted in the scala tympani demonstrated no significant ABR threshold shift for click stimulus; one shifted ABR thresholds to 4- and 8-kHz stimuli. The eighth cat, with surgical damage to the scala media, maintained stable click threshold but had a significant shift to 4- and 8-kHz stimuli. This cat study provides no evidence of worsening hearing thresholds after fenestration of the scala tympani and insertion of a titanium anchor/microactuator, provided there is no surgical trauma to the scala media and the implanted device is securely anchored in the cochleostomy. These 2 issues have been resolved in the development of a fully implantable hearing system for humans. The long-term hearing stability (combined with histologic studies) reaffirm that the microactuator is well tolerated by the cat cochlea.

  13. Whole-genome scan for guttural pouch tympany in Arabian and German warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, A; Spötter, A; Blazyczek, I; Diesterbeck, U; Ohnesorge, B; Deegen, E; Distl, O

    2009-12-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary disease in foals of several breeds, including thoroughbreds, Arabian, Quarter and warmblood horses. We performed a whole-genome scan for GPT in 143 horses from five Arabian and five German warmblood families and genotyped 257 microsatellites. Chromosome-wide significant linkage was detected on ECA2 and ECA15 using multipoint non-parametric linkage analyses. Analyses stratified by sex revealed chromosome-wide significant linkage on ECA2 for fillies and chromosome-wide significant linkage on ECA15 for colts. For Arabian colts, the quantitative trait locus (QTL) on ECA15 was genome-wide significant. Haplotypes including two to four microsatellites within the QTL on ECA2 and 15 in fillies and colts, respectively, were significantly associated with GPT for both breeds. Thus, our analysis indicated sex-specific QTL, a fact which is in agreement with a two- to fourfold higher incidence of GPT in females. This is the first report of QTL for equine GPT and a first step towards identifying genes responsible for GPT.

  14. An optical coherence tomography study for imaging the round window niche and the promontorium tympani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, T.; Lankenau, E.; Hüttmann, G.; Pau, H. W.

    2010-02-01

    An optical coherence tomography study for imaging the round window niche and the promontorium tympani Tympanosclerosis may involve the tympanic membrane, the ossicles, and the oval and round window niche, respectively. The surgical treatment of the obliterated oval window niche is most challenging. Beside stapesplasty, vibroplasty coupling the floating mass transducer (FMT) onto the round window niche and into a new, so-called third window is indicated. In the latter situation, drilling a hole into the promontorium is necessary to couple the FMT close to the membranous endosteum. Damage of the membranous inner ear must be avoided. The question was whether OCT is useful to identify the endosteum and to provide microanatomical information of the round window niche. OCT was carried out on human temporal bone preparations, in which a third window was drilled leaving the membranous labyrinth and the fluid-filled inner ear intact and the overhang of the round window niche was removed. An especially equipped operating microscope with integrated OCT prototype (spectral-domain-OCT) was used. The OCT images and 3D reconstructions demonstrate the usefulness of OCT to measure the drilling cavity, to visualize the inner ear structures, and to obtain microanatomical information of the round and oval window niche. These findings may have an impact on stapes surgery, on cochlea implantation, and on vibroplasty coupling the FMT onto the round and third window. OCTguided drilling allows for more precise identification of the intact inner ear.

  15. A pig model of ischemic mitral regurgitation induced by mitral chordae tendinae rupture and implantation of an ameroid constrictor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong-Chun; Li, Kai; Tian, Yi; Yuan, Wei-Min; Peng, Peng; Yang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Bao-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Wu, Ai-Li; Tang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    A miniature pig model of ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) was developed by posterior mitral chordae tendinae rupture and implantation of an ameroid constrictor. A 2.5-mm ameroid constrictor was placed around the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) of male Tibetan miniature pigs to induce ischemia, while the posterior mitral chordae tendinae was also ruptured. X-ray coronary angiography, ECG analysis, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to evaluate heart structure and function in pigs at baseline and one, two, four and eight weeks after the operation. Blood velocity of the mitral regurgitation was found to be between medium and high levels. Angiographic analyses revealed that the LCX closure was 10-20% at one week, 30-40% at two weeks and 90-100% at four weeks subsequent ameroid constrictor implantation. ECG analysis highlighted an increase in the diameter of the left atria (LA) at two weeks post-operation as well as ischemic changes in the left ventricle (LV) and LA wall at four weeks post-operation. Echocardiography and MRI further detected a gradual increase in LA and LV volumes from two weeks post-operation. LV end diastolic and systolic volumes as well as LA end diastolic and systolic volume were also significantly higher in pig hearts post-operation when compared to baseline. Pathological changes were observed in the heart, which included scar tissue in the ischemic central area of the LV. Transmission electron microscopy highlighted the presence of contraction bands and edema surrounding the ischemia area, including inflammatory cell infiltration within the ischemic area. We have developed a pig model of IMR using the posterior mitral chordae tendineae rupture technique and implantation of an ameroid constrictor. The pathological features of this pig IMR model were found to mimic the natural history and progression of IMR in patients.

  16. Ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve as a cause of tricuspid regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, J; de Marchi, C H; Bestetti, R B; Corbucci, H A; Pavarino, P R

    2001-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy suffered a blunt chest trauma. Some hours later, a pulsatile bilateral jugular venous distension, a holosystolic murmur heard at the low parasternal border and hepatomegaly were observed. On echocardiography, ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve, as well as tricuspid regurgitation were detected. He remained asymptomatic during hospital stay and was discharged home in good condition. Thus, isolated ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve is another cause of tricuspid regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

  17. The Effect of Scala Tympani Morphology on Basilar Membrane Contact With a Straight Electrode Array: A Human Temporal Bone Study.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Juul; Risi, Frank; Campbell, Luke; Chambers, Scott; O'Leary, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of straight electrode arrays. Hearing preservation is the goal of cochlear implantation with current thin straight electrode arrays. These hug the lateral wall, facilitating full, atraumatic insertions. However, most studies still report some postoperative hearing loss. This study explores the influence of scala tympani morphology on array position relative to the basilar membrane and its possible contribution to postoperative hearing loss. Twenty-six fresh-frozen human temporal bones implanted with a straight electrode array were three-dimensionally reconstructed from micro-photographic histological sections. Insertion depth and the proximity between the array and basilar membrane were recorded. Lateral wall shape was quantified as a curvature ratio. Insertion depths ranged from 233 to 470 degrees. The mean first point of contact between the array and basilar membrane was 185 degrees; arrays tended to remain in contact with the membrane after first contacting it. Eighty-nine and 93% of arrays that reached the upper basal (>240-360 degrees) and second (>360-720 degrees) turns respectively contacted the basilar membrane in these regions. Scalar wall curvature ratio decreased significantly (the wall became steeper) from the basal to second turns. This shift correlated with a reduced distance between the array and basilar membrane. Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of a straight electrode array. In addition to gross trauma of cochlear structures, contact between the array and basilar membrane and how this impacts membrane function should be considered in hearing preservation cases.

  18. Fetal development of the pulley for muscle insertion tendons: A review and new findings related to the tensor tympani tendon.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Honkura, Yohei; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The existence of hard tissue pulleys that act to change the direction of a muscle insertion tendon is well known in the human body. These include (1) the trochlea for the extraocular obliquus superior muscle, (2) the pterygoid hamulus for the tensor veli palatini muscle, (3) the deep sulcus on the plantar aspect of the cuboid bone for the peroneus longus tendon, (4) the lesser sciatic notch for the obturator internus muscle, and (5) the bony trochleariformis process for the tensor tympani muscle tendon. In addition, (6) the stapedius muscle tendon shows a lesser or greater angulation at the pyramidal eminence of the temporal bone. Our recent studies have shown that the development of pulleys Nos. 1 and 2 can be explained by a change in the topographical relationship between the pulley and the tendon, that of pulley No. 3 by the rapidly growing calcaneus pushing the tendon, and that of pulley No. 4 by migration of the insertion along the sciatic nerve and gluteus medius tendon. Therefore, in Nos. 1-4, an initially direct tendon curves secondarily and obtains an attachment to the pulley. In case No. 6, the terminal part of the stapedius tendon originates secondarily from the interzone mesenchymal tissue of the incudostapedial joint. In the case of pulley No. 5, we newly demonstrated that its initial phase of development was similar to No. 6, but the tensor tympani tendon achieved a right-angled turn under guidance by a specific fibrous tissue and it migrated along the growing malleus manubrium.

  19. The Crista Fenestra and Its Impact on the Surgical Approach to the Scala Tympani during Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Roberto D; Lavinsky, Joel; Setogutti, Enio T; Lavinsky, Luiz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the dimensions of the crista fenestra and determine its presence by means of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) for the purpose of cochlear implantation via the round window approach. A series of 10 adult human temporal bones underwent high-resolution CT scanning and were further dissected for microscopic study of the round window niche. In all of the specimens, the round window membrane was fully visualized after the complete removal of bony overhangs. The crista fenestra was identified as a sharp bony crest located in the anterior and inferior borders of the niche; its area ranged from 0.28 to 0.80 mm2 (mean 0.51 ± 0.18). The proportion of the area occupied by the crista fenestra in the whole circumference of the round window ranged from 23 to 50% (mean 36%). We found a moderate positive correlation between the area of the niche and the dimensions of the crista fenestra (Spearman rho: 0.491). In every case, high-resolution CT scanning was unable to determine the presence of the crista fenestra. The crista fenestra occupies a variable but expressive area within the bony round window niche. Narrower round window niches tended to house smaller crests. The presence of the crista fenestra is an important obstacle to adequate access to the scala tympani. Nevertheless, a high-resolution CT scan provides no additional preoperative information with regard to its presence for the purpose of surgical access to the scala tympani via the round window niche. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The image variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in congenital aural atresia by HRCT and 3D VR CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Hou, Qian; Wang, Pu; Sun, Zhaoyong; Fan, Yue; Wang, Yun; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Chen, Xiaowei

    2015-09-01

    To find the variations of middle ear structures including the spatial pattern of mastoid segment of facial nerve and the shapes of the sinus tympani in patients with congenital aural atresia (CAA) by using the high-resolution (HR) CT and 3D volume rendered (VR) CT images. HRCT was performed in 25 patients with congenital aural atresia including six bilateral atresia patients (n=25, 21 males, 4 females, mean age 13.8 years, range 6-19). Along the long axis of the posterior semicircular canal ampulla, the oblique axial multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) was set to view the depiction of the round window and the mastoid segment of facial nerve. Volumetric rending technique was used to demonstrate the morphologic features. HRCT and 3D VR findings in atresia ears were compared with those in 19 normal ears of the unilateral ears of atresia patients. On the basic plane, the horizontal line distances between the mastoid segment of the facial nerve and the round window (h-RF) in atresia ears significantly decreased compared to the control ears (P<0.05). There was a significant negative correlation between the sinus tympani area (a-ST) and the distance between the horizontal lines of FN and RW midpoint (h-RF) (P<0.05). The mean area of sinus tympani in atresia group is larger (P<0.05). The shapes of the sinus tympani were classified into three categories: the cup-shaped, the pear-shaped and the boot-shaped. Area measurement indicated that the boot-shaped sinus tympani was a special variation with a large area, which only appears in CAA group. There were a significant difference between the area of the boot-shaped group and the other two groups (P<0.05). The morphologic differences of ST and other middle ear structures can also be observed visually in 3D VR CT images. HRCT and 3D VR CT could help a better understanding of different kinds of variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in CAA ears. And it may further help surgeons to make the correct decision

  1. Length of second-order chordae as a predictor of systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Roshanali, Farideh; Naderan, Mohammad; Shoar, Saeed; Vedadian, Ali; Sandoughdaran, Saleh; Shoar, Nasrin; Mandegar, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether the length of anterior mitral leaflet second-order chordae (SOC) could be considered as a predictor of the incidence of post-repair systolic anterior motion (SAM) and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) in patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease. With the implementation of preoperative transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE), the length of anterior mitral leaflet SOC, anterior leaflet (AL) and posterior leaflet (PL) as well as the distance from the coaptation point to the septum (C-S distance) before and after mitral valve repair (MVR) surgery were measured in 190 patients, comprising 12 who developed SAM and 178 who did not. The results revealed that, in patients who developed SAM, SOC were significantly higher (2.76 ± 0.15 vs 1.83 ± 0.32 mm, P < 0.001) and the C-S distance was significantly lower (2.18 ± 0.36 vs 2.91 ± 0.36 mm, P < 0.001) in comparison to the obtained results for those who did not develop SAM. SOC and the C-S distance were independent risk factors of developing SAM and had the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (P < 0.001). With application of a cut-off ROC curve analysis, the cut-offs selected for the two variables of C-S distance and SOC were 2.5 and 2.6, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of SAM development were 100% [95% confidence interval (CI): 73.5-100] and 87.1% (95% CI: 81.0-91.4) for SOC ≥2.6 and 83.3% (95% CI: 51.6-97.9) and 73.6% (95% CI: 66.4-79.9) for the C-S distance ≤2.5. The two variables of the second-order chordae and the distance from the coaptation point to the septum were associated with an increased risk of the post-repair systolic anterior motion after mitral valve repair. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. The Edible Marine Alga Gracilariopsis chorda Alleviates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohibbullah, Md; Hannan, Md Abdul; Choi, Ji-Young; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-09-01

    Age-related neurological disorders are of growing concern among the elderly, and natural products with neuroprotective properties have been attracting increasing attention as candidates for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders induced by oxidative stress. In an effort to explore natural resources, we collected some common marine seaweed from the Korean peninsula and Indonesia and screened them for neuroprotective activity against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced oxidative stress. Of the 23 seaweeds examined, the ethanol extract of Gracilariopsis chorda (GCE) provided maximum neuroprotection at an optimum concentration of 15 μg/mL, followed by Undaria pinnatifida. GCE increased cell viability after H/R, decreased the formation of reactive oxygen species (measured by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate [DCF-DA] staining), and inhibited the double-stranded DNA breaks (measured by H2AX immunocytochemistry), apoptosis (measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining), internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (measured by DNA laddering), and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 staining). Using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantitated the arachidonic acid (AA) in GCE, which provides neuroprotection against H/R-induced oxidative stress. This neuroprotective effect of AA was comparable to that of GCE. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GCE against H/R-induced neuronal death is due, at least in part, to the AA content that suppresses neuronal apoptosis.

  3. The Edible Marine Alga Gracilariopsis chorda Alleviates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mohibbullah, Md.; Hannan, Md. Abdul; Choi, Ji-Young; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age-related neurological disorders are of growing concern among the elderly, and natural products with neuroprotective properties have been attracting increasing attention as candidates for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders induced by oxidative stress. In an effort to explore natural resources, we collected some common marine seaweed from the Korean peninsula and Indonesia and screened them for neuroprotective activity against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced oxidative stress. Of the 23 seaweeds examined, the ethanol extract of Gracilariopsis chorda (GCE) provided maximum neuroprotection at an optimum concentration of 15 μg/mL, followed by Undaria pinnatifida. GCE increased cell viability after H/R, decreased the formation of reactive oxygen species (measured by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate [DCF-DA] staining), and inhibited the double-stranded DNA breaks (measured by H2AX immunocytochemistry), apoptosis (measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining), internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (measured by DNA laddering), and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 staining). Using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantitated the arachidonic acid (AA) in GCE, which provides neuroprotection against H/R-induced oxidative stress. This neuroprotective effect of AA was comparable to that of GCE. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GCE against H/R-induced neuronal death is due, at least in part, to the AA content that suppresses neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26106876

  4. Expanded Terminal Fields of Gustatory Nerves Accompany Embryonic BDNF Overexpression in Mouse Oral Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chengsan; Dayal, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed in gustatory epithelia and is required for gustatory neurons to locate and innervate their correct target during development. When BDNF is overexpressed throughout the lingual epithelium, beginning embryonically, chorda tympani fibers are misdirected and innervate inappropriate targets, leading to a loss of taste buds. The remaining taste buds are hyperinnervated, demonstrating a disruption of nerve/target matching in the tongue. We tested the hypothesis here that overexpression of BDNF peripherally leads to a disrupted terminal field organization of nerves that carry taste information to the brainstem. The chorda tympani, greater superficial petrosal, and glossopharyngeal nerves were labeled in adult wild-type (WT) mice and in adult mice in which BDNF was overexpressed (OE) to examine the volume and density of their central projections in the nucleus of the solitary tract. We found that the terminal fields of the chorda tympani and greater superficial petrosal nerves and overlapping fields that included these nerves in OE mice were at least 80% greater than the respective field volumes in WT mice. The shapes of terminal fields were similar between the two groups; however, the density and spread of labels were greater in OE mice. Unexpectedly, there were also group-related differences in chorda tympani nerve function, with OE mice showing a greater relative taste response to a concentration series of sucrose. Overall, our results show that disruption in peripheral innervation patterns of sensory neurons have significant effects on peripheral nerve function and central organization of their terminal fields. PMID:25568132

  5. Expanded terminal fields of gustatory nerves accompany embryonic BDNF overexpression in mouse oral epithelia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengsan; Dayal, Arjun; Hill, David L

    2015-01-07

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed in gustatory epithelia and is required for gustatory neurons to locate and innervate their correct target during development. When BDNF is overexpressed throughout the lingual epithelium, beginning embryonically, chorda tympani fibers are misdirected and innervate inappropriate targets, leading to a loss of taste buds. The remaining taste buds are hyperinnervated, demonstrating a disruption of nerve/target matching in the tongue. We tested the hypothesis here that overexpression of BDNF peripherally leads to a disrupted terminal field organization of nerves that carry taste information to the brainstem. The chorda tympani, greater superficial petrosal, and glossopharyngeal nerves were labeled in adult wild-type (WT) mice and in adult mice in which BDNF was overexpressed (OE) to examine the volume and density of their central projections in the nucleus of the solitary tract. We found that the terminal fields of the chorda tympani and greater superficial petrosal nerves and overlapping fields that included these nerves in OE mice were at least 80% greater than the respective field volumes in WT mice. The shapes of terminal fields were similar between the two groups; however, the density and spread of labels were greater in OE mice. Unexpectedly, there were also group-related differences in chorda tympani nerve function, with OE mice showing a greater relative taste response to a concentration series of sucrose. Overall, our results show that disruption in peripheral innervation patterns of sensory neurons have significant effects on peripheral nerve function and central organization of their terminal fields. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350409-13$15.00/0.

  6. Adeno-associated virus transformation into the normal miniature pig and the normal guinea pigs cochlea via scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xunbei; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Yue; Guo, Weiwei; Lin, Chang; Yang, Shiming

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the expression of the miniature pig cochlea after AAV1 transfect into the cochlea via round window membrane (RWM). Twenty miniature pigs are equally divided into four experimental groups. Twelve miniature pigs are equally divided into four control groups. Each pig was transfected with the AAV1 in the experimental group via RWM and each pig was transduced with the artificial perilymph in the control group. The expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was observed at 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. Likewise, AAV1 was delivered into the guinea pigs cochleas using the same method, and the results were compared with that of the miniature pigs. The expression was mainly in the inner hair cells of the miniature pig. The expression of GFP began to appear at 2 weeks, reached the peak at 3 weeks. It also expressed in Hensen's cells, inner pillar cells, outer pillar cells, spiral limbus, and spiral ligament. In the meanwhile, AAV1 was delivered into guinea pig cochlea via the same method, and AAV1 was also expressed in the inner hair cells. But the expression peaked at 2 weeks, and the efficiency of the inner hair cell transfection was higher than that of the pig. AAV1 can be transformed into miniature pig cochlea via scala tympani by the RWM method efficiently.

  7. Neurons in the Cochlear Nuclei Controlling the Tensor Tympani Muscle in the Rat: a Study Using Pseudorabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Billig, I.; Yeager, M.S.; Blikas, A.; Raz, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle reflex has been implicated in modulation of auditory input and protection of the inner ear from acoustic trauma. However, the identification of neurons in the cochlear nuclei participating in this reflex has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we injected the retrograde transynaptic tracer pseudorabies virus into single tensor tympani (TT) muscles, and identified transynaptically labeled cochlear nucleus neurons at multiple survival times. Motoneurons controlling TT were located ventral to the ipsilateral motor trigeminal nucleus and extended rostrally towards the medial aspect of the lateral lemniscus. Transynaptically-labeled neurons were observed bilaterally in the dorsal and dorso-medial parts of ventral cochlear nuclei as early as 48 h after virus injection, and had morphological features of radiate multipolar cells. After ≥ 69 h, labeled cells of different types were observed in all cochlear nuclei. At those times, labeling was also detected bilaterally in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body and periolivary cell groups in the superior olivary complex. Based on the temporal course of viral replication, our data strongly suggest the presence of a direct projection of neurons from the ventral cochlear nuclei bilaterally to the TT motoneuron pool in rats. The influence of neurons in the cochlear nuclei upon TT activity through direct and indirect pathways may account for multifunctional roles of this muscle in auditory functions. PMID:17482147

  8. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease.

  9. Characterisation of the fatigue life, dynamic creep and modes of damage accumulation within mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Gillian M; Murphy, Bruce P

    2015-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is often caused by either elongated or ruptured chordae tendineae (CT). In many cases, rupture is spontaneous, meaning there is no underlying cause. We hypothesised that spontaneous rupture may be due to mechanical fatigue. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested porcine marginal CT: in uniaxial tension, and in fatigue at a range of peak stresses (n=12 at 15, 10 and 7.5MPa respectively, n=6 at 5MPa). The rupture surfaces of failed CT were observed histologically, under polarised light microscopy, and SEM. The cycles to failure for 15, 10, 7.5 and 5 MPa peak stresses were: (average±SD): 5077±4366, 49513±56414, 99927±108908, 197099±69103. A Weibull plot was constructed and from this, the number of cycles at 50% probability of failure was established in order to approximate the fatigue life, which was found to be 2.43MPa at 10 million cycles. The rate of creep increases exponentially with increasing peak stress. Under histological examination it was observed that CT which have been fatigued at low stress partially lose their organised collagen structure and can sustain micro-cracks that can be linked to increases in the creep rate. Furthermore our SEM images closely matched descriptions from the literature of spontaneous in vivo rupture. In conclusion, we believe that the mechanical test results we present strongly suggest that spontaneous chordal rupture and chordal elongation in vivo can be caused by mechanical fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Beating-heart implantation of adjustable length mitral valve chordae: acute and chronic experience in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Francesco; Cioni, Micaela; Seeburger, Joerg; Falk, Volkmar; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Mack, Michael J; Alfieri, Ottavio; Vanermen, Hugo

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the acute and chronic performance of a new system designed to conduct beating-heart implantation and off-pump adjustment of neochordal length. In 14 adult sheep (group A) selected to undergo beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass, the left atrium was opened through a left thoracotomy. Two or more primary chordae in the A2 region were severed to produce a model of a flail leaflet. A chordal adjustment mechanism (V-Chordal, Valtech Cardio Ltd., Or-Yehuda, Israel) was affixed to the head of the papillary muscle. The system includes two adjustable neochordae. The distal end of the neochordae was sutured to the flail segment without estimating the appropriate length. The neochordal length was adjusted off-pump under real-time echo-guidance. The adjustment tool was removed and the atriotomy was closed with a purse-string suture. Control animals (group B, n=4) were implanted with the conventional neochordae. Animals in both groups were sacrificed 3 months after the procedure. In both groups, prior to repair, mitral regurgitation (MR) was severe in all animals. In group A, following adjustment of neochordae, MR was absent in all animals, with the exception of two animals that had residual 2+ MR irresponsive to neochordae adjustments. In group B, MR was 2+ in two of the four animals following repair. At 3 months, mitral competence was stable in all animals. At necropsy, normal healing of the papillary head and leaflet was observed in both the groups. The V-Chordal system simplifies the process of neochordal implantation and precise off-pump adjustment of the neochordal length to correct MR occurring due to a flail leaflet. This technology may improve the technical feasibility for adoption of chordal repair during open or minimally invasive surgical procedures. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors Affecting Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients Implanted With a Perimodiolar Electrode Array Located in Scala Tympani.

    PubMed

    Holden, Laura K; Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Uchanski, Rosalie M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Holden, Timothy A

    2016-12-01

    To identify primary biographic and audiologic factors contributing to cochlear implant (CI) performance variability in quiet and noise by controlling electrode array type and electrode position within the cochlea. Although CI outcomes have improved over time, considerable outcome variability still exists. Biographic, audiologic, and device-related factors have been shown to influence performance. Examining CI recipients with consistent array type and electrode position may allow focused investigation into outcome variability resulting from biographic and audiologic factors. Thirty-nine adults (40 ears) implanted for at least 6 months with a perimodiolar electrode array known (via computed tomography [CT] imaging) to be in scala tympani participated. Test materials, administered CI only, included monosyllabic words, sentences in quiet and noise, and spectral ripple discrimination. In quiet, scores were high with mean word and sentence scores of 76 and 87%, respectively; however, sentence scores decreased by an average of 35 percentage points when noise was added. A principal components (PC) analysis of biographic and audiologic factors found three distinct factors, PC1 Age, PC2 Duration, and PC3 Pre-op Hearing. PC1 Age was the only factor that correlated, albeit modestly, with speech recognition in quiet and noise. Spectral ripple discrimination strongly correlated with speech measures. For these recipients with consistent electrode position, PC1 Age was related to speech recognition performance. Consistent electrode position may have contributed to high speech understanding in quiet. Inter-subject variability in noise may have been influenced by auditory/cognitive processing, known to decline with age, and mechanisms that underlie spectral resolution ability.

  12. Effect of embedded dexamethasone in cochlear implant array on insertion forces in an artificial model of scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yann; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Miroir, Mathieu; Vauchel, Thomas; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Loading otoprotective drug into cochlear implant might change its mechanical properties, thus compromising atraumatic insertion. This study evaluated the effect of incorporation of dexamethasone (DXM) in the silicone of cochlear implant arrays on insertion forces. Local administration of DXM with embedded array can potentially reduce inflammation and fibrosis after cochlear implantation procedure to improve hearing preservation and reduce long-term impedances. Four models of arrays have been tested: 0.5-mm distal diameter array (n = 5) used as a control, drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array (n = 5), 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 1% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5), and 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 10% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5). Via a motorized insertion bench, each array has been inserted into an artificial scala tympani model. The forces were recorded by a 6-axis force sensor. Each array was tested seven times for a total number of 140 insertions. During the first 10-mm insertion, no difference between the four models was observed. From 10- to 24-mm insertion, the 0.5-mm distal diameter array presented higher insertion forces than the drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter arrays, with or without DXM. Friction forces for drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array and 0.4-mm distal diameter DXM eluded arrays were similar on all insertion lengths. Incorporation of DXM in silicone for cochlear implant design does not change electrode array insertion forces. It does not raise the risk of trauma during array insertion, making it suitable for long-term in situ administration to the cochlea.

  13. Demonstration of a Longitudinal Concentration Gradient Along Scala Tympani by Sequential Sampling of Perilymph from the Cochlear Apex

    PubMed Central

    Mynatt, Robert; Hale, Shane A.; Gill, Ruth M.; Plontke, Stefan K.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Local applications of drugs to the inner ear are increasingly being used to treat patients' inner ear disorders. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the inner ear fluids is essential for a scientific basis for such treatments. When auditory function is of primary interest, the drug's kinetics in scala tympani (ST) must be established. Measurement of drug levels in ST is technically difficult because of the known contamination of perilymph samples taken from the basal cochlear turn with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, we reported a technique in which perilymph was sampled from the cochlear apex to minimize the influence of CSF contamination (J. Neurosci. Methods, doi: http://10.1016/j.jneumeth.2005.10.008). This technique has now been extended by taking smaller fluid samples sequentially from the cochlear apex, which can be used to quantify drug gradients along ST. The sampling and analysis methods were evaluated using an ionic marker, trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA), that was applied to the round window membrane. After loading perilymph with TMPA, 10 1-μL samples were taken from the cochlear apex. The TMPA content of the samples was consistent with the first sample containing perilymph from apical regions and the fourth or fifth sample containing perilymph from the basal turn. TMPA concentration decreased in subsequent samples, as they increasingly contained CSF that had passed through ST. Sample concentration curves were interpreted quantitatively by simulation of the experiment with a finite element model and by an automated curve-fitting method by which the apical–basal gradient was estimated. The study demonstrates that sequential apical sampling provides drug gradient data for ST perilymph while avoiding the major distortions of sample composition associated with basal turn sampling. The method can be used for any substance for which a sensitive assay is available and is therefore of high relevance for the development of preclinical

  14. Demonstration of a longitudinal concentration gradient along scala tympani by sequential sampling of perilymph from the cochlear apex.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Robert; Hale, Shane A; Gill, Ruth M; Plontke, Stefan K; Salt, Alec N

    2006-06-01

    Local applications of drugs to the inner ear are increasingly being used to treat patients' inner ear disorders. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the inner ear fluids is essential for a scientific basis for such treatments. When auditory function is of primary interest, the drug's kinetics in scala tympani (ST) must be established. Measurement of drug levels in ST is technically difficult because of the known contamination of perilymph samples taken from the basal cochlear turn with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, we reported a technique in which perilymph was sampled from the cochlear apex to minimize the influence of CSF contamination (J. Neurosci. Methods, doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2005.10.008 ). This technique has now been extended by taking smaller fluid samples sequentially from the cochlear apex, which can be used to quantify drug gradients along ST. The sampling and analysis methods were evaluated using an ionic marker, trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA), that was applied to the round window membrane. After loading perilymph with TMPA, 10 1-muL samples were taken from the cochlear apex. The TMPA content of the samples was consistent with the first sample containing perilymph from apical regions and the fourth or fifth sample containing perilymph from the basal turn. TMPA concentration decreased in subsequent samples, as they increasingly contained CSF that had passed through ST. Sample concentration curves were interpreted quantitatively by simulation of the experiment with a finite element model and by an automated curve-fitting method by which the apical-basal gradient was estimated. The study demonstrates that sequential apical sampling provides drug gradient data for ST perilymph while avoiding the major distortions of sample composition associated with basal turn sampling. The method can be used for any substance for which a sensitive assay is available and is therefore of high relevance for the development of preclinical and clinical

  15. An Analysis of Hamster Afferent Taste Nerve Response Functions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marion

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivities to moderately intense stimuli representing four taste qualities to man were determined for 79 hamster chorda tympani fibers. Some fibers were very sensitive to sucrose, sodium chloride, or hydrochloric acid, but none were very sensitive to quinine. These sensitivities were not randomly distributed among fibers: the sucrose sensitivity was separated from and negatively correlated with the other sensitivities which were associated and positively correlated with each other. Moreover, there were a limited number of sensitivity patterns: (a) fibers responding best to sucrose responded second-best to salt, less to acid, not to quinine; (b) fibers responding best to salt either responded second-best to sucrose and not to acid or quinine; or second-best to acid, less to quinine, and not to sucrose; and (c) fibers responding best to acid responded second-best to salt, more to quinine, and less to sucrose than other fibers. Therefore, if four stimuli of different taste qualities are ordered from acceptable to unacceptable, neural response functions of most hamster chorda tympani taste fibers peak at one point. Sensitivities to nine other moderately intense stimuli which vary in quality to man were also determined for 46–49 of the fibers. Sensitivities to sweet stimuli were always associated with each other and separated from sensitivities to nonsweet stimuli. Sensitivities to nonsweet stimuli were all associated with each other; however, the strongest correlations were between sensitivities to stimuli of like quality, e.g., the three acids or the two sodium salts. PMID:4705639

  16. The effects of decellularization and cross-linking techniques on the fatigue life and calcification of mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Gillian M; Murphy, Bruce P

    2016-04-01

    In cases of severely diseased mitral valves (MV), the required treatment is often valve replacement. Bioprosthetic and stentless replacement valves are usually either fully or partially composed of animal derived tissue treated with a decellularization process, a cross-linking process, or both. In this study, we analysed the effects of these treatments on the fatigue properties of porcine MV chordae tendineae (CT), as well as on the calcification of the CT using an in vitro technique. CT were tested in 4 groups; (1) native, (2) decellularized (DC), (3) decellularized and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (DC-GTH), and (4) decellularized and cross-linked with 1-ehtyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)(DC-EDC). CT were tested in both uniaxial tension, and in fatigue at 10MPa peak stress (1Hz). The cycles to failure (mean±SD) for the four groups are as follows; Native- 53,397±55,798, DC- 28,013±30,634, DC-GTH- 97,665±133,556, DC-EDC- 318,601±322,358. DC-EDC CT were found to have a slightly longer fatigue life than the native and DC groups. The DC-EDC group also had a marginally lower dynamic creep rate, meaning those CT elongate more slowly. After in vitro calcification, X-ray microtomography was used to determine relative levels of calcification. The DC-EDC and DC-GTH groups had the lowest volume of calcific deposits. Under uniaxial testing, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the DC-GTH CT was statistically significantly reduced after calcification, while the UTS was relatively unchanged for the DC-EDC group. Overall, these results indicate that a treatment of decellularization plus cross-linking with EDC may improve the fatigue life of porcine CT, reduce the rate of elongation, and help the CT resist the negative effects of calcification. This may be a preferable treatment in the preparation of porcine MVs for the replacement of diseased MVs.

  17. Taste placodes are primary targets of geniculate but not trigeminal sensory axons in mouse developing tongue.

    PubMed

    Mbiene, Joseph-Pascal

    2004-12-01

    Tongue embryonic taste buds begin to differentiate before the onset of gustatory papilla formation in murine. In light of this previous finding, we sought to reexamine the developing sensory innervation as it extends toward the lingual epithelium between E 11.5 and 14.5. Nerve tracings with fluorescent lipophilic dyes followed by confocal microscope examination were used to study the terminal branching of chorda tympani and lingual nerves. At E11.5, we confirmed that the chorda tympani nerve provided for most of the nerve branching in the tongue swellings. At E12.5, we show that the lingual nerve contribution to the overall innervation of the lingual swellings increased to the extent that its ramifications matched those of the chorda tympani nerve. At E13.0, the chorda tympani nerve terminal arborizations appeared more complex than those of the lingual nerve. While the chorda tympani nerve terminal branching appeared close to the lingual epithelium that of the trigeminal nerve remained rather confined to the subepithelial mesenchymal tissue. At E13.5, chorda tympani nerve terminals projected specifically to an ordered set of loci on the tongue dorsum corresponding to the epithelial placodes. In contrast, the lingual nerve terminals remained subepithelial with no branches directed towards the placodes. At E14.5, chorda tympani nerve filopodia first entered the apical epithelium of the developing fungiform papilla. The results suggest that there may be no significant delay between the differentiation of embryonic taste buds and their initial innervation.

  18. Trans-apical beating-heart implantation of neo-chordae to mitral valve leaflets: results of an acute animal study.

    PubMed

    Seeburger, Joerg; Leontjev, Sergej; Neumuth, Michael; Noack, Thilo; Höbartner, Michael; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2012-01-01

    Trans-apical beating-heart implantation of neo-chordae is yet an experimental procedure for mitral valve (MV) repair. We aimed to assess the performance of a new device in an acute animal study. A total of four domestic adolescent pigs were used as an acute model. The MV was assessed on the beating heart through a conventional trans-apical access. The NeoChord DS1000 device was used to implant polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sutures to the MV leaflets. Procedural performance of the device was assessed and completed with surgical workflow analysis. Overall 57 implantations using epicardial echocardiography guidance were performed (mean 14.3 implantations per animal). The MV leaflets were successfully grasped every second attempt (mean 2.3±1.9) with no difference between the anterior and the posterior leaflet. A significant difference between an 'expert' surgeon (n>20 implantations) and beginner surgeon was detected with regard to the duration for successful leaflet grasping (65±73 vs 127±105 s; p=0.02) and the overall duration for implantation (130±86 vs 230±119 s; p=0.002). Gross anatomy did not show major tear of leaflets. There were no device-related technical problems. The NeoChord DS1000 device for trans-apical beating-heart implantation of neo-chordae to the MV valve showed a high procedural success. A significant difference between an expert and beginner surgeon was detected, which emphasizes the importance of training before introduction of this new technique into clinical practice. Surgical workflow analysis proved to be a valuable tool to assess the performance of this new technique.

  19. Dexamethasone levels and base-to-apex concentration gradients in the scala tympani perilymph after intracochlear delivery in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hartmut; Salt, Alec N; Biegner, Thorsten; Kammerer, Bernd; Delabar, Ursular; Hartsock, Jared J; Plontke, Stefan K

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether intracochlearly applied dexamethasone will lead to better control of drug levels, higher peak concentrations, and lower base-to-apex concentration gradients in the scala tympani (ST) of the guinea pig than after intratympanic (round window [RW]) application. Local application of drugs to the RW results in substantial variation of intracochlear drug levels and significant base-to-apex concentration gradients in ST. Two microliters of dexamethasone-phosphate (10 mg/ml) were injected into ST either through the RW membrane, which was covered with 1% sodium hyaluronate gel or through a cochleostomy with a fluid tight seal of the micropipette. Perilymph was sequentially sampled from the apex at a single time point for each animal, at 20, 80, or 200 min after the injection ended. Results were mathematically interpreted by means of an established computer model and compared with previous experiments performed by our group with the same experimental techniques but using intratympanic applications. Single intracochlear injections of 20 minutes resulted in approximately 10 times higher peak concentrations (on average) than 2 to 3 hours of intratympanic application to the RW niche. Intracochlear drug levels were less variable and could be measured for over 220 minutes. Concentration gradients along the scala tympani were less pronounced. The remaining variability in intracochlear drug levels was attributable to perilymph and drug leak from the injection site. With significantly higher, less variable drug levels and smaller base-to-apex concentration gradients, intracochlear applications have advantages to intratympanic injections. For further development of this technique, it is of importance to control leaks of perilymph and drug from the injection site and to evaluate its clinical feasibility and associated risks.

  20. Fiber-optic bending sensor for cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Cochlear implantation has been proved as a great success in treating profound sensorineural deafness in both children and adults. Cochlear electrode array implantation is a complex and delicate surgical process. Surgically induced damage to the inner wall of the scala tympani could happen if the insertion angle of the electrode is incorrect and an excessive insertion force is applied to the electrode. This damage could lead to severe degeneration of the remaining neural elements. It is therefore of vital importance to monitor the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation surgery. In this paper, we report a fiber-optic bending sensor which can be integrated with the electrode and used to guide the implantation process. The sensor consists of a piece of optical fiber. The end of the fiber is coated with aluminum layer to form a mirror. Bending the fiber with the electrode introduces loss to the light transmitting in the fiber. By detecting the power of the reflected light, we can detennine the bending happened to the fiber, and consequently measure the curved shape of the electrode. Experimental results show that the proposed fiber sensor is a promising technique to make in-situ monitoring of the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation process.

  1. A clinical evaluation of the hypothesis that rupture of the left ventricle following mitral valve replacement can be prevented by preservation of the chordae of the mural leaflet.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, F C; Galloway, A C; Colvin, S B

    1985-01-01

    Experiences with 14 patients undergoing rupture of the left ventricle following mitral valve replacement over a period of 9 years have been described. Three different types have been recognized. Before 1978, most injuries occurred in the atrioventricular groove, apparently resulting from traction that insidiously avulsed the mitral annulus from the underlying left ventricular muscle. Several changes in operative technique, described in the text, were made to prevent this traction avulsion. Following the adoption of these principles, rupture in the atrioventricular groove virtually disappeared. A second type of injury, strut perforation, has been recognized in only one patient, a small 81-year-old female in whom the prosthesis inserted was too large for the ventricular cavity. Translucent obturators were subsequently developed not only to size the left ventricle but also to note the location of the post of the porcine prosthesis before insertion. Further problems of this type have not been seen. The most puzzling, and currently the most significant, problem is a third type of rupture, the mid-ventricular rupture, suggested as Type III by Miller in 1978 and described in detail by Cobbs in 1977 and 1980. The phenomenon seems to be a true spontaneous rupture of a thin left ventricle, usually occurring in small elderly women with mitral valve disease. If the friability of the left ventricle is transiently increased with potassium cardioplegia, such ventricles may spontaneously rupture following division of the chordae to the annulus of the mural leaflet. If this concept is correct, a rupture in some patients can best be prevented by preserving these chordae. It is well realized, of course, that a fortunate narrative experience of 3 1/2 years does not have any statistical value concerning a complication that occurs in 1 to 2% of operations. The experiences are reported, however, because to our knowledge, the untethered loop hypothesis has not been previously evaluated in

  2. Role of the ectonucleotidase NTPDase2 in taste bud function

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Anderson, Catherine B.; Parnes, Jason; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Robson, Simon C.; Finger, Thomas E.; Kinnamon, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are unusual in requiring ATP as a transmitter to activate sensory nerve fibers. In response to taste stimuli, taste cells release ATP, activating purinergic receptors containing the P2X2 and P2X3 subunits on taste nerves. In turn, the released ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP by a plasma membrane nucleoside triphosphate previously identified as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2 (NTPDase2). In this paper we investigate the role of this ectonucleotidase in the function of taste buds by examining gene-targeted Entpd2-null mice globally lacking NTPDase2. RT-PCR confirmed the absence of NTPDase2, and ATPase enzyme histochemistry reveals no reaction product in taste buds of knockout mice, suggesting that NTPDase2 is the dominant form in taste buds. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that in knockout mice all cell types are present in taste buds, even those cells normally expressing NTPDase2. In addition, the overall number and size of taste buds are normal in Entpd2-null mice. Luciferin/luciferase assays of circumvallate tissue of knockout mice detected elevated levels of extracellular ATP. Electrophysiological recordings from two taste nerves, the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal, revealed depressed responses to all taste stimuli in Entpd2-null mice. Responses were more depressed in the glossopharyngeal nerve than in the chorda tympani nerve and involved all taste qualities; responses in the chorda tympani were more depressed to sweet and umami stimuli than to other qualities. We suggest that the excessive levels of extracellular ATP in the Entpd2-knockout animals desensitize the P2X receptors associated with nerve fibers, thereby depressing taste responses. PMID:23959882

  3. Application of a TNF-alpha-inhibitor into the scala tympany after cochlear electrode insertion trauma in guinea pigs: preliminary audiologic results.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Pelz, Sabrina; Coors, Melanie; Matthias, Christoph; Canis, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Cochlear implantation trauma causes both macroscopic and inflammatory trauma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the TNF-alpha inhibitor etanercept applied after cochlear implantation trauma on the preservation of acoustic hearing. Guinea pigs were randomly assigned to three groups receiving cochlear implantation trauma by cochleostomy. In one group, the site was sealed by bone cement with no further treatment. A second group was additionally implanted with an osmotic minipump delivering artificial perilymph into the scala tympani for seven days. In the third group, etanercept 1 mg/ml was added to artificial perilymph. Hearing was assessed by auditory brainstem responses at 2, 4, 6, and 8 kHz prior to and after surgery and on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 28. Fifteen healthy guinea pigs. The trauma led to threshold shifts from 50.3 dB ± 16.3 dB to 68.0 dB ± 19.3 dB. Hearing thresholds were significantly lower in etanercept-treated animals compared to controls on day 28 at 8 kHz and from day 3 onwards at 4 and 2 kHz (p < 0.01; two-way RM ANOVA / Bonferroni t-test). The application of etanercept led to preservation of acoustic hearing after cochlear implantation trauma.

  4. Fetal Tendinous Connection Between the Tensor Tympani and Tensor Veli Palatini Muscles: A Single Digastric Muscle Acting for Morphogenesis of the Cranial Base.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Hiroshi; Amano, Osamu; Murakami, Gen

    2016-04-01

    Some researchers contend that in adults the tensor tympani muscle (TT) connects with the tensor veli palatini muscle (TVP) by an intermediate tendon, in disagreement with the other researchers. To resolve this controversy, we examined serial sections of 50 human embryos and fetuses at 6-17 weeks of development. At 6 weeks, in the first pharyngeal arch, a mesenchymal connection was found first to divide a single anlage into the TT and TVP. At and after 7 weeks, the TT was connected continuously with the TVP by a definite tendinous tissue mediolaterally crossing the pharyngotympanic tube. At 11 weeks another fascia was visible covering the cranial and lateral sides of the tube. This "gonial fascia" had two thickened borders: the superior one corresponded to a part of the connecting tendon between the TT and TVP; the inferior one was a fibrous band ending at the os goniale near the lateral end of the TVP. In association with the gonial fascia, the fetal TT and TVP seemed to provide a functional complex. The TT-TVP complex might first help elevate the palatal shelves in association with the developing tongue. Next, the tubal passage, maintained by contraction of the muscle complex, seems to facilitate the removal of loose mesenchymal tissues from the tympanic cavity. Third, the muscle complex most likely determined the final morphology of the pterygoid process. Consequently, despite the controversial morphologies in adults, the TT and TVP seemed to make a single digastric muscle acting for the morphogenesis of the cranial base.

  5. Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Analysis Identifies Major Gene Loci for Guttural Pouch Tympany in Arabian and German Warmblood Horses

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Julia; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary condition affecting foals in their first months of life. Complex segregation analyses in Arabian and German warmblood horses showed the involvement of a major gene as very likely. Genome-wide linkage and association analyses including a high density marker set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed to map the genomic region harbouring the potential major gene for GPT. A total of 85 Arabian and 373 German warmblood horses were genotyped on the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses showed genome-wide significance on horse chromosomes (ECA) 3 for German warmblood at 16–26 Mb and 34–55 Mb and for Arabian on ECA15 at 64–65 Mb. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed the linked regions for both breeds. In Arabian, genome-wide association was detected at 64 Mb within the region with the highest linkage peak on ECA15. For German warmblood, signals for genome-wide association were close to the peak region of linkage at 52 Mb on ECA3. The odds ratio for the SNP with the highest genome-wide association was 0.12 for the Arabian. In conclusion, the refinement of the regions with the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip is an important step to unravel the responsible mutations for GPT. PMID:22848553

  6. Genome-wide linkage and association analysis identifies major gene loci for guttural pouch tympany in Arabian and German warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Julia; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary condition affecting foals in their first months of life. Complex segregation analyses in Arabian and German warmblood horses showed the involvement of a major gene as very likely. Genome-wide linkage and association analyses including a high density marker set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed to map the genomic region harbouring the potential major gene for GPT. A total of 85 Arabian and 373 German warmblood horses were genotyped on the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses showed genome-wide significance on horse chromosomes (ECA) 3 for German warmblood at 16-26 Mb and 34-55 Mb and for Arabian on ECA15 at 64-65 Mb. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed the linked regions for both breeds. In Arabian, genome-wide association was detected at 64 Mb within the region with the highest linkage peak on ECA15. For German warmblood, signals for genome-wide association were close to the peak region of linkage at 52 Mb on ECA3. The odds ratio for the SNP with the highest genome-wide association was 0.12 for the Arabian. In conclusion, the refinement of the regions with the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip is an important step to unravel the responsible mutations for GPT.

  7. Fiber webs

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  8. Elucidating coding of taste qualities with the taste modifier miraculin in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Vicktoria; Hellekant, Göran

    2006-01-30

    To investigate the relationships between the activity in different types of taste fibers and the gustatory behavior in marmosets, we used the taste modifier miraculin, which in humans adds a sweet taste quality to sour stimuli. In behavioral experiments, we measured marmosets' consumption of acids before and after tongue application of miraculin. In electrophysiological experiments responses of single taste fibers in chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves were recorded before and after tongue application of miraculin. We found that after miraculin marmosets consumed acids more readily. Taste nerve recordings showed that after miraculin taste fibers which usually respond only to sweeteners, S fibers, became responsive to acids. These results further support our hypothesis that the activity in S fibers is translated into a hedonically positive behavioral response.

  9. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2013-01-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development. PMID:23560235

  10. Endolymphatic sac surgery versus tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles in the management of patients with unilateral definite Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Albu, Silviu; Babighian, Gregorio; Amadori, Maurizio; Trabalzini, Franco

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to compare the outcomes of patients with Meniere's disease submitted to either endolymphatic mastoid shunt (ES) or tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles (TSTM). This is a retrospective chart review of patients treated with ES or TSTM between 2000 and 2010 and followed up for at least 12 months. The main outcomes were represented by: (1) vertigo class, hearing stage and functional level according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria; (2) adjustment of dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) and (3) complete and substantial vertigo control using the Kaplan-Meier survival method. Sixty-three patients met the inclusion criteria: 34 underwent ES and 29 TSTM. The baseline demographic characteristics, the hearing stage, the functional level, the DHI and hearing levels were not different between the two groups. No significant difference in vertigo class was demonstrated: 66 % of TSTM patients attained class A compared to 44 % in the ES group (p = 0.14). Kaplan-Meier survival curves specific to class A showed significant differences, favoring TSTM (log-rank test, p = 0.022). TSTM patients demonstrated significantly improved functional level (p = 0.0004) and improved DHI scores (p = 0.001). Eight ES patients (25 %) demanded a second surgical attempt compared to none in the TSTM. Aural fullness was significantly improved in TSTM group (p = 0.01), while the difference in tinnitus improvement was non-significant. Hearing preservation was significantly better in TSTM group (p = 0.001). TSTM is a safe surgical procedure, with significant vertigo control rates, and important hearing preservation rates. More patients and longer follow-up are needed to support our preliminary findings.

  11. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  12. Fiber diffraction without fibers.

    PubMed

    Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Saldin, D K

    2013-06-28

    Postprocessing of diffraction patterns of completely randomly oriented helical particles, as measured, for example, in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments with an x-ray free electron laser can yield "fiber diffraction" patterns expected of fibrous bundles of the particles. This will allow "single-axis alignment" to be performed computationally, thus obviating the need to do this by experimental means such as forming fibers and laser or flow alignment. The structure of such particles may then be found by either iterative phasing methods or standard methods of fiber diffraction.

  13. Fiber biology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  14. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and plant-based bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement....

  15. Fetal development of the elastic-fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Kawase, Tetsuaki

    2013-10-01

    In the human middle ear, the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint and the insertions of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles contain abundant elastic fibers; i.e., the elastic-fiber-mediated entheses. Hyaluronan also coexists with the elastic fibers. In the present study using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated the distribution of elastin not only in the incudostapedial joint but also in the other two joints of the middle ear in adults and fetuses. In adults, the expression of elastin did not extend out of the annular ligament composed of mature elastic fibers but clearly overlapped with it. Electron microscopic observations of the annular ligament demonstrated a few microfibrils along the elastic fibers. Thus, in contrast to the vocal cord, the middle ear entheses seemed not to contain elaunin and oxytalan fibers. In mid-term fetuses (at approximately 15-16 weeks of gestation) before opening of the external acoustic meatus, the incudostapedial joint showed abundant elastic fibers, but the incudomalleolar and stapediovestibular joints did not. At this stage, hyaluronan was not colocalized, but distributed diffusely in loose mesenchymal tissues surrounding the ear ossicles. Therefore, fetal development of elastin and elastic fibers in the middle ear entheses is unlikely to require acoustic oscillation. In late-stage fetuses (25-30 weeks), whose ear ossicles were almost the same size as those in adults, we observed bundling and branching of elastic fibers. However, hyaluronan expression was not as strong as in adults. Colocalization between elastic fibers and hyaluronan appeared to be a result of postnatal maturation of the entheses.

  16. Fiber Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalle, Leona

    1976-01-01

    Describes a course in fiber techniques, which covers design methods involving fibers and fabric, that students in the Art Department at Sleeping Giant Junior High School had the opportunity to learn. (Author/RK)

  17. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  18. Modulation of taste peripheral signal through interpapillar inhibition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurélie; Pillias, Anne-Marie; Faurion, Annick

    2004-03-25

    Single taste buds from fungiform papillae were iontophoretically stimulated with chemicals filling glass microelectrodes while a single unit was recorded in the taste pore of a neighbor papilla. High signal-to-noise ratio responses were observed in the recorded papilla as antidromic action potentials. These responses were possibly modulated by the simultaneous stimulation of another adjacent papilla. A decrease in the frequency of firing and/or both decrementing spikes were observed during such dual papillae stimulations. These inhibitory effects were not modified by the section of the chordo-lingual nerve, suggesting the tongue is able to process the gustatory information thanks to interpapillar negative feedback, prior to transmitting the signal to the central nervous system. Branched chorda tympani fibers can account for responses observed for single papillae stimulations; inhibitions and decrementing spikes may suggest the contribution of another mechanism of interaction between two different single fibers.

  19. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  20. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  1. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  2. Vacuum fiber-fiber coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrici, Axel; Bjelajac, Goran; Jonkers, Jeroen; Jakobs, Stefan; Olschok, Simon; Reisgen, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Research and development carried out by the ISF Welding and Joining Institute of RWTH Aachen University has proven that combining high power laser and low vacuum atmosphere provides a welding performance and quality, which is comparable to electron beam welding. The developed welding machines are still using a beam forming which takes place outside the vacuum and the focusing laser beam has to be introduced to the vacuum via a suitable window. This inflexible design spoils much of the flexibility of modern laser welding. With the target to bring a compact, lightweight flying optics with flexible laser transport fibers into vacuum chambers, a high power fiber-fiber coupler has been adapted by II-VI HIGHYAG that includes a reliable vacuum interface. The vacuum-fiber-fiber coupler (V-FFC) is tested with up to 16 kW sustained laser power and the design is flexible in terms of a wide variety of laser fiber plug systems and vacuum flanges. All that is needed to implement the V-FFC towards an existing or planned vacuum chamber is an aperture of at least 100 mm (4 inch) diameter with any type of vacuum or pressure flange. The V-FFC has a state-of-the-art safety interface which allows for fast fiber breakage detection for both fibers (as supported by fibers) by electric wire breakage and short circuit detection. Moreover, the System also provides connectors for cooling and electric signals for the laser beam optics inside the vacuum. The V-FFC has all necessary adjustment options for coupling the laser radiation to the receiving fiber.

  3. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  4. Nanocomposite Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    attempts to prepare carbon nanotube , CNT, containing fiber material. Modulus and tenacity tests on experimentally prepared nanosilica filled PET...individual entities of nanofibers, such as carbon nanotubes and SiC whiskers, silica and clay, into polymers with the goal of producing new forms of...if carbon nanotube (CNT) particle implanted fibers are used, one would expect a great increase in the electrical conductivity of the so-reinforced

  5. Dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Madar, Z; Thorne, R

    1987-01-01

    Studies done on dietary fiber (DF) over the past five years are presented in this Review. The involvement of dietary fiber in the control of plasma glucose and lipid levels is now established. Two dietary fiber sources (soybean and fenugreek) were studied in our laboratory and are discussed herein. These sources were found to be potentially beneficial in the reduction of plasma glucose in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects. They are shown to be acceptable by human subjects and are easy to use either in a mixture of milk products and in cooking. The mechanism by which dietary fiber alters the nutrient absorption is also discussed. The effect of DF on gastric emptying, transit time, adsorption and glucose transport may contribute to reducing plasma glucose and lipid levels. DF was found to be effective in controlling blood glucose and lipid levels of pregnant diabetic women. Dietary fiber may also be potentially beneficial in the reduction of exogenous insulin requirements in these subjects. However, increased consumption of DF may cause adverse side effects; the binding capabilities of fiber may affect nutrient availability, particularly that of minerals and prolonged and high DF dosage supplementation must be regarded cautiously. This is particularly true when recommending such a diet for pregnant or lactating women, children or subjects with nutritional disorders. Physiological effects of DF appear to depend heavily on the source and composition of fiber. Using a combination of DF from a variety of sources may reduce the actual mass of fiber required to obtain the desired metabolic effects and will result in a more palatable diet. Previously observed problems, such as excess flatus, diarrhea and mineral malabsorption would also be minimized.

  6. Hyposalivation: the roles of radioactive iodine and stapes surgery.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Louis

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to call attention to the role that radioactive iodine ((131)I) and stapes surgery may play in causing hyposalivation. The manner in which (131)I and stapes surgery can cause salivary damage was reviewed. A case report is presented to illustrate the involved pathophysiology. The case report clearly shows the significant injury to the parotid glands caused by the (131)I. However, subjective symptoms of oral dryness only developed after injury to the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) during stapes surgery. The loss of function of both parotid glands after (131)I therapy for thyroid cancer was initially compensated by the secretions of the more radiation-resistant submandibular and sublingual salivary glands (SMSG/SLSG). Damage to the CTN's secretory fibers in one SMSG/SLSG complex led to subjective oral dryness by accentuating an existing objective hyposalivation. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  8. Fiber resources

    Treesearch

    P. J. Ince

    2004-01-01

    In economics, primary inputs or factors of production define the term ‘resources.’ Resources include land resources (plants, animals, and minerals), labor, capital, and entrepreneurship. Almost all pulp and paper fiber resources are plant materials obtained from trees or agricultural crops. These resources encompass plant materials harvested directly from the land (...

  9. Fiber crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much research continues to develop renewable, recyclable, sustainable, and bio-based products from agricultural feed stocks such as cotton and flax fiber. Primary requirements are sustainable production, low cost, and consistent and known quality. To better understand these products, research contin...

  10. Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Fay, Catharine C. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polyimide fiber having textile physical property characteristics and the process of melt extruding same from a polyimide powder. Polyimide powder formed as the reaction product of the monomers 3.4'-ODA and ODPA, and endcapped with phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight thereof, is melt extruded in the temperature range of 340? C. to 360? C. and at heights of 100.5 inches, 209 inches and 364.5 inches. The fibers obtained have a diameter in the range of 0.0068 inch to 0.0147 inch; a mean tensile strength in the range of 15.6 to 23.1 ksi; a mean modulus of 406 to 465 ksi; and a mean elongation in the range of 14 to 103%.

  11. Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Fay, Catharine C. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A polyimide fiber having textile physical property characteristics and the process of melt extruding same from a polyimide powder. Polyimide powder formed as the reaction product of the monomers 3.4'-ODA and ODPA, and end- capped with phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight thereof, is melt extruded in the temperature range of 340 C. to 360 C. and at heights of 100.5 inches. 209 inches and 364.5 inches. The fibers obtained have a diameter in the range of 0.0068 inch to 0.0147 inch; a mean tensile strength in the range of 15.6 to 23.1 ksi; a mean modulus of 406 to 465 ksi, and a mean elongation in the range of 14 to 103%.

  12. Composite Fiber Hazards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    During grinding on carbon fiber composites , most of the fibers fragment into a nonfibrous dust. Of those particles retaining a fibrous shape...quantity and type of airborne carbon fibers generated from the burning of carbon fiber composites in an airplane crash. In a simulated aircraft fire...It was estimated that following an aiicraft crasl in which carbon fiber composites burned, there would be a release of 5 x 10 fibers ( ɛ om diameter

  13. Variation in the response to ductal obstruction of feline submandibular and sublingual salivary glands and the importance of the innervation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Fouad, H M; Garrett, J R

    2001-01-01

    A variable response following ductal ligation of feline salivary glands corresponds to the human condition but contrasts with a predictable atrophy in obstructed salivary glands of rodents popularly used as a model for human salivary problems. The present investigation is concerned with a possible reason for the variable response, namely the preservation of the innervation. Ducts of feline submandibular and sublingual salivary glands were ligated with or without the inclusion of the chorda tympani. Inclusion led to a delayed initial response followed by progressive atrophy until the parenchyma was extremely atrophic, whereas avoidance of the chorda led to the variable response in which variable numbers of acini of a similar form to normal persisted. The results establish the atrophic effect of inclusion of the chorda tympani in ductal ligation and indicate the caution that should be exercised in the extrapolation of the rodent model to the human condition.

  14. Functional plasticity of regenerated and intact taste receptors in adult rats unmasked by dietary sodium restriction.

    PubMed

    Hill, D L; Phillips, L M

    1994-05-01

    Unilateral chorda tympani nerve sectioning was combined with institution of a sodium-restricted diet in adult rats to determine the role that environment has on the functional properties of regenerating taste receptor cells. Rats receiving chorda tympani sectioning but no dietary manipulation (cut controls) and rats receiving only the dietary manipulation (diet controls) had normal responses to a concentration series of NaCl, sodium acetate (NaAc), and NH4Cl. However, responses from the regenerated nerve in NaCl-restricted rats (40-120 d postsectioning) to NaCl and NaAc were reduced by as much as 30% compared to controls, indicating that regenerating taste receptors are influenced by environmental (dietary) factors. Responses to NH4Cl were normal; therefore, the effect appears specific to sodium salts. Surprisingly, in the same rats, NaCl responses from the contralateral, intact chorda tympani were up to 40% greater than controls. Thus, in the same rat, there was over a twofold difference in sodium responses between the right and left chorda tympani nerves. A study of the time course of the functional alterations in the intact nerve revealed that responses to NaCl were extremely low immediately following sectioning (about 20% of the normal response), and then increased monotonically during the following 50 d until relative response magnitudes became supersensitive. This function occurred even when the cut chorda tympani was prevented from reinnervating lingual epithelia, demonstrating that events related to regeneration do not play a role in the functional properties of the contralateral side of the tongue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  16. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  17. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  18. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  19. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  20. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  1. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  2. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  3. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  4. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  5. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  6. Sources of fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to avoid constipation. Vegetables, fresh fruits (especially dried fruits) and whole wheat, bran, or oatmeal cereals are excellent sources of fiber. To reap the benefits of fiber, it is very important to drink ...

  7. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  8. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  9. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  10. High-fiber foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a good source of fiber. Eat more: Lettuce, Swiss chard, raw carrots, and spinach Tender cooked ... WJ, Stewart ML. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: health implications of dietary fiber. J ...

  11. Fiber length distributions and fiber quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is grown in Georgia on ~1 million acres by producers as a raw material input for textile mills. Georgia cotton fiber qualities continue to improve through crop management, genetic, and ginning improvements. Competition from synthetic fibers, mill modernization, and g...

  12. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  13. Superlattice Microstructured Optical Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Cho, Lok-Hin; Lu, Chao; Wai, Ping-Kong Alex; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-01-01

    A generic three-stage stack-and-draw method is demonstrated for the fabrication of complex-microstructured optical fibers. We report the fabrication and characterization of a silica superlattice microstructured fiber with more than 800 rhomboidally arranged air-holes. A polarization-maintaining fiber with a birefringence of 8.5 × 10−4 is demonstrated. The birefringent property of the fiber is found to be highly insensitive to external environmental effects, such as pressure. PMID:28788693

  14. Superlattice Microstructured Optical Fiber.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Cho, Lok-Hin; Lu, Chao; Wai, Ping-Kong Alex; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-06-16

    A generic three-stage stack-and-draw method is demonstrated for the fabrication of complex-microstructured optical fibers. We report the fabrication and characterization of a silica superlattice microstructured fiber with more than 800 rhomboidally arranged air-holes. A polarization-maintaining fiber with a birefringence of 8.5 × 10(-4) is demonstrated. The birefringent property of the fiber is found to be highly insensitive to external environmental effects, such as pressure.

  15. Fiber pulling apparatus modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Four flights have been completed to date during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated zero, high, and lunar gravity environments. In addition simulated lunar soil samples were tested for their fiber producing properties using the FPA.

  16. Graphite Fibers from Pitch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    yarn filaments may cause early fiber failure, particularly when the crack follows a tight spiral along the fiber axis, as it was observed in isolated...ray Results 4. Mechanical Properties 5. Conclusions V. STRUCTURE OF FILAMENTS IN TYPE P YARN 1. Fiber Structure Terminology 2. Correlation of...Fiber Structure with Single Filament Properties 3. Optical Microscopy of Filaments with Variable Structure 4. SEM Studies of Yarn Samples with

  17. Graphite Fibers from Pitch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    r»dJ ^ ^improve fiber properties by modified thermosetting methods or by processing with tension were not fruitful. Many structural features of... PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES OF TYPE-P FIBERS 1. Thermosetting of Pitch Fibers 2. Single Filament Properties 3. Single Filament Strength as a Function of...Gauge Length 4. Sinclair Loop Test 5. Processing Under Tension 6. Continuous Processing and Composite Properties SECTION V FIBER STRUCTURE 1

  18. Oil sorption by lignocellulosic fibers

    Treesearch

    Beom-Goo. Lee; James S. Han; Roger M. Rowell

    1999-01-01

    The oil sorption capacities of cotton fiber, kenaf bast fiber, kenaf core fiber, and moss fiber were compared after refining, extraction, and reduction in particle sizes. The tests were conducted on diesel oil in a pure form. Cotton fiber showed the highest capacity, followed by kenaf core and bast fibers. Wetting, extraction, and reduction in particle size all...

  19. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  20. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  1. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  2. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  3. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  4. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  5. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  6. SYNTHETIC FIBERS, 1965,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The following groups of fibers are each briefly discussed: Glass and other inorganic fibers, viscose rayon, cuprammonium rayon, saponified acetate rayon, alginate rayon, regenerated protein fibers, cellulose nitrate, cellulose acetate rayon, cellulose triacetate, polyamides, acrylics, modacrylics, polyvinyls, polyvinylidenes, polyesters, polyolefins, polyurethanes, fluorocarbons.

  7. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  8. Traveling waves on the organ of Corti of the chinchilla cochlea: spatial trajectories of inner hair cell depolarization inferred from responses of auditory-nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Temchin, Andrei N.; Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Cai, Hongxue; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial magnitude and phase profiles for inner hair cell depolarization throughout the chinchilla cochlea were inferred from responses of auditory-nerve fibers to threshold- and moderate-level tones and tone complexes. Firing-rate profiles for frequencies ≤ 2 kHz are bimodal, with the major peak at the characteristic place and a secondary peak at 3–5 mm from the extreme base. Response-phase trajectories are synchronous with peak outward stapes displacement at the extreme cochlear base and accumulate 1.5-period lags at the characteristic places. High-frequency phase trajectories are very similar to the trajectories of basilar-membrane peak velocity toward scala tympani. Low-frequency phase trajectories undergo a polarity flip in a region, 6.5–9 mm from the cochlear base, where traveling-wave phase velocity attains a local minimum and a local maximum and where the onset latencies of near-threshold impulse responses computed from responses to near-threshold white noise exhibit a local minimum. That region is the same where frequency-threshold tuning curves of auditory-nerve fibers undergo a shape transition. Since depolarization of inner hair cells presumably indicates the mechanical stimulus to their stereocilia, the present results suggest that distinct low-frequency forward waves of organ of Corti vibration are launched simultaneously at the extreme base of the cochlea and at the 6.5–9 mm transition region, from where antiphasic reflections arise. PMID:22855802

  9. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  10. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  11. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  12. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  13. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  14. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  15. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  16. Splicing of aged fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotinen, Tarja T.; Yuce, Hakan H.; Bonanno, Nicholas; Frantz, Rolf A.; Duffy, Sean

    1993-11-01

    The deployment of fiber in the subscriber loop will require that an optical fiber network maintain the highest possible level of reliability over time, despite being subjected to extremes of temperature, humidity, and other environmental and mechanical stresses imposed on the outside plant. At the same time, both the initial cost and the ongoing maintenance expenses for loop equipment must be kept low. Fiber in the Loop (FITL) applications will entail increased fiber handling. Cable lengths will be shorter, and fiber counts higher, than has been the case so far in long-distance applications. There will also be more cable sheath openings per unit length of cable and/or fiber, as well as more splicing and connectorization. It may become a common practice that a customer is connected to a cable installed many years earlier. In subscriber loops, cables and fibers will be installed in harsher and more varying environments. Fibers will be exposed to higher humidity and temperature, particularly in splice boxes mounted on building walls, in pedestal cabinets, and in other similar enclosures. Corrosive gases and/or liquids may also be present at some locations and will adversely affect the fibers. The combination of increased handling, greater exposure, and more stressful environments may give rise to a need for new, more stringent requirements for fiber mechanical reliability. These can include increaSed fiber strength, increased aging resistance, and increased fatigue resistance.

  17. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  18. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  19. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  20. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  1. Fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palais, J. C.

    A description of fiber optic communications systems and an optics review are provided, taking into account the historical perspective, the basic communications system, the nature of light, advantages of fibers, the applicatins of fiber optic communications, ray theory and applications, lenses, imaging, numerical aperture, and diffraction. Other subjects examined are related to integrated optic waveguides, lightwave fundamentals, optic fiber waveguides, light sources, light detectors, couplers and connectors, distribution systems, modulation, noise and detection, and system design. Attention is given to electromagnetic waves, dispersion, pulse distortion, polarization, integrated optic networks, the step-index fiber, the graded-index fiber, optic fiber cables, light-emitting diodes, laser principles, laser diodes, splices, source coupling, distribution networks, directional couplers, star couplers, switches, analog and digital modulation formats, optic heterodyne receives, thermal and shot noise, error rates, receiver circuit design, and analog and digital system design.

  2. Fiber draw synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Orf, Nicholas D.; Shapira, Ofer; Sorin, Fabien; Danto, Sylvain; Baldo, Marc A.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of a high-melting temperature semiconductor in a low-temperature fiber drawing process is demonstrated, substantially expanding the set of materials that can be incorporated into fibers. Reagents in the solid state are arranged in proximate domains within a fiber preform. The preform is fluidized at elevated temperatures and drawn into fiber, reducing the lateral dimensions and bringing the domains into intimate contact to enable chemical reaction. A polymer preform containing a thin layer of selenium contacted by tin–zinc wires is drawn to yield electrically contacted crystalline ZnSe domains of sub-100-nm scales. The in situ synthesized compound semiconductor becomes the basis for an electronic heterostructure diode of arbitrary length in the fiber. The ability to synthesize materials within fibers while precisely controlling their geometry and electrical connectivity at submicron scales presents new opportunities for increasing the complexity and functionality of fiber structures.

  3. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  4. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  5. Advanced Optical Fibers for High power Fiber lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-24

    0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU 24-08-2015 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Advanced Optical Fibers for...0946 ABSTRACT Advanced Optical Fibers for High power Fiber lasers Report Title A review of recent fiber developement for high power fiber lasers...Chapter 7 Advanced Optical Fibers for High Power Fiber Lasers Liang Dong Additional information is available at the end of the chapter http://dx.doi.org

  6. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  7. Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  8. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  9. Optical Fiber Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, T. L.

    2017-01-01

    Preface; Dedication; List of figures; List of tables; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; 2. Basics of optical fibers; 3. Optical sources and transmitters; 4. Optical receivers; 5. Optical amplifiers; 6. Dispersion management techniques; 7. WDM concepts and components; 8. Optical measurements; Appendix A. Fiber optic sensors; Appendix B. Radio over fiber; Appendix C. Wireless optics; Appendix D. Model test papers; Appendix E. Abbreviations and acronyms; References; Index.

  10. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  11. Fiber Optic Feed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-06

    Naval Research Laboratory IIK Washington, DC,20375 5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6741 0 N Fiber Optic Feed DENZIL STILWELL, MARK PARENT AND LEw GOLDBERG...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Fiber Optic Feed 53-0611-A0 6. AUTHOR(S) P. D. Stilwell, M. G. Parent, L. Goldberg 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This report details a Fiber Optic Feeding

  12. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  13. Nanotailored Carbon Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-27

    precursor fiber and also utilize bi- component spinning along with gel spinning, to obtain small diameter fibers. Various processing parameters during...shape of the fiber. In this regard, we have also conducted single component gel spinning using different gelation bath temperatures (100% methanol). SEM...domestic dishwashing detergent, Palmolive antibacterial , 3 wt% detergent and 97% water) for about a week and retested. *** For 5th trial, tungsten

  14. Insulated Fiber Brush.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An insulated-strand fiber brush is provided for a DC motor /generator. The brush is comprised of a plurality of fiber segments which are insulated from one another near the contact surface of a rotor bar. In one embodiment, insulating spacers are fixed to a brush assembly and wear with the fibers, and in another embodiment insulation is provided by a separate shell. (Author)

  15. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  16. Apparatus Impregnates Weak Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfield, Clarence E.; Wilson, Maywood L.

    1989-01-01

    Low-cost apparatus developed for use in conventional drum winding machine to impregnate fibrous materials having very low tensile strengths. Fiber fitted onto freely-spinning unwinding creel. Unwinds from creel between two tension bars onto guide spools, aligns fiber so properly enters sealed reservoir of resin. Stainless-steel metering die at entrance to reservoir aligns fiber and seals reservoir. Beneficial results obtained by use of reservoir made of polyethylene. Composite material made from resin matrices reinforced by fibers have great potential for solving challenging and often critical problems in design of spacecraft, space structures, and terrestrial structures.

  17. Microstructured polarizing fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergo, Pawel; Wójcik, Jan; Czyzewska, Lidia; Walewski, Aleksander

    2005-09-01

    Introduction of metal elements into the optical fiber's structure creates new possibilities of waveguides' parameters' modification especially permit to obtain polarizing fibers. A known solution is introducing of molten metal into a hole situated along a single-mode fibre's core. The alternative manner is deposition of metal layers on the internal surface of those holes. In our laboratory we manufactured new kind of optical fibers named side metal pipe (SMP) optical fiber. Its structure is similar to that of the side-hole optical fiber but the internal surface of the two open holes placed on the both sides of the core is covered with silver. The silver layers were deposited with elaborated in our laboratory static method deposition from liquid phase. The measured polarizing efficiency of this fiber of 1 m length was equal to 25% for 633nm wavelength. In the last time we manufactured the high birefringent single mode SMP fiber with elliptical core (SMK HB). Paper presents the basis of technology of SMK HB optical fiber, description of the static method of preparation of silver layers by liquid phase deposition and geometrical and optical parameters of the SMK HB optical fiber.

  18. Optical Fiber Cutting Machine for Rectangular and Circular Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    OPTICAL FIBER CUTTING MACHINE FOR RECTANGULAR AND CIRCULAR FIBERS Gordon L. Mitchell -June 30,’1977 Principal Investigators Gordon L. Mitchell and...bet) An optical fiber cutting machine for use with rectangular or round cros- section fibers has been developed. It combines a sliding-weight tension...OP* THIS PAGE (When 13.fe Afn(-’-d) ii Abstract An optical fiber cutting machine for use with rectangular or round cross section fibers has been

  19. Taste in chimpanzees. III: Labeled-line coding in sweet taste.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; Ninomiya, Y; Danilova, V

    1998-11-15

    In peripheral taste the coding mechanism remains an enigma. Among coding theories the "across-fiber pattern" argues that activity across fibers codes for taste, whereas the "labeled line" claims that activity in a particular set of fibers underlies a taste quality. We showed previously that chimpanzee chorda tympani taste fibers grouped according to human taste qualities into an S-cluster, responding predominantly to sweet stimuli, a Q-cluster, sensitive to bitter tastants, and an N-cluster, stimulated by salts. The analysis showed that information in the S-line suffices to distinguish stimuli of one taste quality from the others. However, one condition for the labeled line remained: that blockage of activity in a particular line must cause blockage of one taste quality, but of no other, or its onset give rise to the sensation of a taste quality. Here we studied this requirement with gymnemic acids and miraculin. In humans and chimpanzees, gymnemic acids suppress the sweet taste of all sweeteners whereas miraculin adds a sweet taste quality to sour stimuli. Gymnemic acids also abolish miraculin-induced sweet taste. We found that gymnemic acids practically abolished the response to every sweetener in the chimpanzee S-cluster. Equally important, they had no effect on the responses of the Q- and N-clusters. After miraculin, the S-cluster fibers responded to acids as well as to sweeteners, although they had not responded to acids before miraculin. Gymnemic acids abolished this miraculin-induced response to acids and responses to sweeteners in the S-fibers. These results link the sweet taste quality to activity in fibers of the S-cluster. Thus the S-cluster fibers satisfy the definition of the labeled-line theory: "that activity in a particular fiber type represents a specific taste quality."

  20. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  1. USDA Flax fiber utilization research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The United States is pursuing natural fibers as sustainable, environmentally friendly sources for a variety of industrial applications. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) fiber offers many possibilities towards this goal. Research on flax fiber production, processing, and standards development is urgen...

  2. Ultrafine PBI fibers and yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leal, J. R.; Tan, M.

    1979-01-01

    Gentle precisely controlled process is used to draw polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to denier as low as 0.17 per fiber. Yarns of lightweight fibers could be useful in applications where lightweight textiles must withstand high temperatures, corrosion, or radiation.

  3. Ultrafine PBI fibers and yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leal, J. R.; Tan, M.

    1979-01-01

    Gentle precisely controlled process is used to draw polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to denier as low as 0.17 per fiber. Yarns of lightweight fibers could be useful in applications where lightweight textiles must withstand high temperatures, corrosion, or radiation.

  4. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  5. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  6. Fiber Laser Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    telecommunications market and do not emphasize high powers. Because high power applications are of significant interest to the Air Force, we were interested in fiber...available from NTIC . 9. T.B. Simpson, A. Gavrielides and P. Peterson, “Extraction Characteristics of a Dual Fiber Compound Cavity,” Optics Express 10

  7. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  8. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  9. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  10. RF Fiber Optic Link.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    CONTENTS (Continued) 0 o p- Paragraph Title Page 4.6.3 Laser Diode and Single Mode Fiber Interface ....... 68 0 4.6.4 Laser Noise Discussion...A111-4. 2. 0. Marcuse and C. L. Lin, "Low Dispersion Single-Mode Fiber Transmission - The Question of Practical Versus Theoretical Maxlimum...001/0161A 68 ,.-. .- ,-... -. ..- , .. -............. . ............... • :q

  11. Multimode optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  12. ROLE OF FIBER MODIFICATION IN NATURAL FIBER COMPOSITE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Gutowska, Anna; Simmons, Kevin L.; Holbery, Jim

    2005-11-03

    The prediction and characterization of the adhesion between fiber, surface treatment, and polymer is critical to the success of large-scale natural fiber based polymer composites in automotive semi-structural application. The two primary factors limiting the use of natural fiber in polymer composites are fiber moisture uptake and fiber degradation during high-temperature processing. In this study, we have developed several fiber surface modification techniques and analyzed the fiber-polymer adhesion of modified fibers to more clearly understand the critical parameters controlling moisture uptake, swelling, and fiber degradation due to interfacial structure. We will present a overview of surface modification techniques we have applied to date for hemp fiber sources, and illustrate a path to characterize surface modification effects on natural fiber adhesion in thermoplastic composites.

  13. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  14. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  15. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  16. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  17. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  18. Remote optical fiber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Justus, B. L.; Falkenstein, P. L.; Miller, R. W.; Ning, H.; Altemus, R.

    2001-09-01

    Optical fibers offer a unique capability for remote monitoring of radiation in difficult-to-access and/or hazardous locations. Optical fiber sensors can be located in radiation hazardous areas and optically interrogated from a safe distance. A variety of remote optical fiber radiation dosimetry methods have been developed. All of the methods take advantage of some form of radiation-induced change in the optical properties of materials such as: radiation-induced darkening due to defect formation in glasses, luminescence from native defects or radiation-induced defects, or population of metastable charge trapping centers. Optical attenuation techniques are used to measure radiation-induced darkening in fibers. Luminescence techniques include the direct measurement of scintillation or optical excitation of radiation-induced luminescent defects. Optical fiber radiation dosimeters have also been constructed using charge trapping materials that exhibit thermoluminescence or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  19. Woven fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A C; Courtney-Pratt, J S; Ross, E A

    1975-02-01

    In this paper we describe how the art of weaving can be applied to fiber optics in order to produce precisely controlled reproducible image guides and image dissectors. As examples of the types of device for which woven fiber optics are applicable, we describe a 3:1 interleaver for use with a cathode-ray tube to produce color images, and a high speed alpha numeric output device. The techniques of weaving fiber optics are discussed in sufficient detail in order to allow for further work. Although, in principle, one might be able to weave glass optical fibers, all the work described here made use of plastic optical fibers 0.25 mm in diameter.

  20. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  1. Splicing plastic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Susan D.; Salazar, Roberto A.

    1991-12-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic optical fiber (500 micrometers diameter, fluoropolymer cladding) has been spliced using a fused silica sleeve and a variety of solvent/PMMA solutions as adhesives. Mechanical splicing using index matching fluid has also been investigated. To ensure good bonding and minimize scattering, fiber ends are polished prior to application of adhesive. Using an LED ((lambda) max approximately 640 nm), losses are routinely less than 1.0 dB/splice, and some adhesive formulations have exhibited losses as low as 0.2 dB/splice. Five-meter fibers with as many as ten splices/fiber have been monitored over a period of several months. No fiber has exhibited an increase in optical loss with time.

  2. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  3. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  4. Fiber optic attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  5. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  6. Longitudinally Graded Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evert, Alexander George

    Described herein, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, are optical fibers possessing significant compositional gradations along their length due to longitudinal control of the core glass composition. More specifically, MCVD-derived germanosilicate fibers were fabricated that exhibited a gradient of up to about 0.55 weight percent GeO2 per meter. These gradients are about 1900 times greater than previously reported for fibers possessing longitudinal changes in composition. The refractive index difference is shown to change by about 0.001, representing a numerical aperture change of about 10%, over a fiber length of less than 20 m. The lowest attenuation measured from the present longitudinally-graded fiber (LGF) was 82 dB/km at a wavelength of 1550 nm, though this is shown to result from extrinsic process-induced factors and could be reduced with further optimization. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectrum from the LGF exhibited a 4.4 dB increase in the spectral width, and thus reduction in Brillouin gain, relative to a standard commercial single mode fiber, over a fiber length of only 17 m. Fibers with longitudinally uniform (i.e., not gradient) refractive index profiles but differing chemical compositions among various core layers were also fabricated to determine acoustic effects of the core slug method. The refractive index of the resulting preform varies by about +/- 0.00013 from the average. Upon core drilling, it was found that the core slugs had been drilled off-center from the parent preform, resulting in semi-circular core cross sections that were unable to guide light. As a result, optical analysis could not be conducted. Chemical composition data was obtained, however, and is described herein. A third fiber produced was actively doped with ytterbium (Yb3 ) and fabricated similarly to the previous fibers. The preforms were doped via the solution doping method with a solution of 0.015 M Yb 3 derived from ytterbium chloride

  7. High fiber-low matrix composites: kenaf fiber/polypropylene.

    Treesearch

    Anand R. Sanadi; J.F. Hunt; D.F. Caulfield; G. Kovacsvolgyi; B. Destree

    2002-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in the use of lignocellulosic fibers and wastes (both agricultural and wood based) as fillers and reinforcements in thermoplastics. In general, present technologies limit fiber loading in thermoplastics to about 60 percent by weight of fiber. To produce high fiber content composites for commercial use while maintaining adequate...

  8. Optical fiber sensor interrogation improved by active fiber loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Han, Qun; Xiao, Hai

    2012-06-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress of improving optical fiber sensor interrogation technique by introducing acitve fiber loop into demodulation system. Various types of sensors including multimode interferometer chemical vapor sensor and etc are implemented in the active fiber loop interrogation system. The experiments show an improved signal to noise ratio by active fiber loop.

  9. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  11. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  13. Single-fiber electromyography.

    PubMed

    Tanhehco, Justina L

    2003-05-01

    Single-fiber EMG is a technique introduced in 1963 by Stålberg and Ekstedt for recording single muscle fiber action potentials by means of a specially constructed needle with a 25-microm recording surface. The needle is positioned in the muscle to record from two or more time-locked potentials belonging to the same motor unit. Jitter is the variability in the arrival time of action potentials to the recording electrode between consecutive discharges. This variability reflects end-plate conduction and is measured along with fiber density, which is the average number of fibers belonging to the same motor unit that is in the recording area. An abnormal test is one in which more than 10%, or the mean, of 20 fiber pairs has increased jitter when compared with normal reference values. Increased fiber density is seen with reinnervation. Single-fiber EMG is more sensitive than conventional EMG and is the most sensitive, but not specific, test for myasthenia gravis. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and other neuromusculasr junction pathology. It has been useful in the evaluation of some neuropathies and myopathies and has provided valuable information on the motor unit spatial arrangement, territory, microphysiology, and pathophysiology.

  14. Chiral fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Victor I.; Churikov, Victor M.; Singer, Jonathan; Neugroschl, Daniel; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2010-04-01

    We have fabricated a variety of chiral fiber sensors by twisting one or more standard or custom optical fibers with noncircular or nonconcentric core as they pass though a miniature oven. The resulting structures are as stable as the glass material and can be produced with helical pitch ranging from microns to hundreds of microns. The polarization selectivity of the chiral gratings is determined by the geometry of the fiber cross section. Single helix structures are polarization insensitive, while double helix gratings interact only with a single optical polarization component. Both single and double helix gratings may function as a fiber long period grating, coupling core and cladding modes or as a diffraction grating scattering light from the fiber core out of the fiber. The resulting dips in the transmission spectrum are sensitive to fiber elongation, twist and temperature, and (in the case of the long period gratings) to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. The suitability of chiral gratings for sensing temperature, elongation, twist and liquid levels will be discussed. Gratings made of radiation sensitive glass can be used to measure the cumulative radiation dose, while gratings made of radiation-hardened glass are suitable for stable sensing of the environment in nuclear power plants. Excellent temperature stability up to 900°C is found in pure silica chiral diffraction grating sensors.

  15. Hybrid Fiber Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Simpson, John T; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Instruments and devices based on optical fiber were originally simple and passive. That has changed. A variety of devices uses optical fiber for sensing, communications and various optoelectronic functions. This paper discusses the creation of a hybrid optical fiber that incorporates not just the light transmission function but other types of materials and new multiple fiber arrangements. Recent experiences with a fiber draw tower reveal new possibilities for achieving multifunctional devices able to perform diverse instrumentation sensing applications. This is achievable even with feature sizes, when desired, on the nanoscale. For instance, fiber comprised of one or more light guides and one or more electrically conducting wires is feasible. This combination of optical fiber and metal wire may be termed a wiber . The wiber could determine temperature and proximity to surfaces, detect radio-frequency radiation, and provide electrical power. At the same time, a wiber would have the capability to simultaneously transmit light where the light is utilized to sense temperature and proximity and give illumination. There are many possible uses--depending on design and configuration--cutting across many technologies and programs.

  16. Fiber optic spanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-10-01

    Rotation is a fundamental function in nano/biotechnology and is being useful in a host of applications such as pumping of fluid flow in microfluidic channels for transport of micro/nano samples. Further, controlled rotation of single cell or microscopic object is useful for tomographic imaging. Though conventional microscope objective based laser spanners (based on transfer of spin or orbital angular momentum) have been used in the past, they are limited by the short working distance of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate development of a fiber optic spanner for rotation of microscopic objects using single-mode fiber optics. Fiber-optic trapping and simultaneous rotation of pin-wheel structure around axis perpendicular to fiber-optic axis was achieved using the fiber optic spanner. By adjusting the laser beam power, rotation speed of the trapped object and thus the microfluidic flow could be controlled. Since this method does not require special optical or structural properties of the sample to be rotated, three-dimensional rotation of a spherical cell could also be controlled. Further, using the fiber optic spanner, array of red blood cells could be assembled and actuated to generate vortex motion. Fiber optical trapping and spinning will enable physical and spectroscopic analysis of microscopic objects in solution and also find potential applications in lab- on-a-chip devices.

  17. Fiber Optic Microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  18. Fiber Bragg grating inscription in optical multicore fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Martin; Elsmann, Tino; Lorenz, Adrian; Spittel, Ron; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Rothhardt, Manfred; Latka, Ines; Dochow, Sebastian; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2015-09-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings as key components in telecommunication, fiber lasers, and sensing systems usually rely on the Bragg condition for single mode fibers. In special applications, such as in biophotonics and astrophysics, high light coupling efficiency is of great importance and therefore, multimode fibers are often preferred. The wavelength filtering effect of Bragg gratings in multimode fibers, however is spectrally blurred over a wide modal spectrum of the fiber. With a well-designed all solid multicore microstructured fiber a good light guiding efficiency in combination with narrow spectral filtering effect by Bragg gratings becomes possible.

  19. Kinetics of stress fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-02-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  20. Nanotailored Carbon Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-07

    Chae, Han Gi, Ph.D. Nano Engineered Materials Corporation 2349 Lake Forest Trail Lawrenceville, GA 30043 Air Force Office of Scientific...0065, AF08‐T028  Nanotailored Carbon Fibers  Nano  Engineered Materials Corp    Nanotailored Carbon Fibers (STTR Phase I final technical report...14   FA9550‐08‐C‐0065, AF08‐T028  Nanotailored Carbon Fibers  Nano

  1. Photochromic glass optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, Bilal A.; Israr, Amber; Asif, Muhammad; Aamir, Muhammad; Rehan, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and analysis of novel twin cored fiber which contains a transparent and silver halide doped photochromic core in same cladding. The Photochromic core fibers were fabricated in twin cored structure by rode and tube method. The diameter of photochromic core and transparent core is around 15 m. The distance between two cores is 1.5m. The transparent core was used to guide the probe beam and photochromic core was excited by UV source. The interaction of the probe beam with the excited photochromic core showed the photochromic behavior of the fiber.

  2. Optical fiber phase discriminator.

    PubMed

    Danielson, B L

    1978-11-15

    Phase discriminators are devices widely used at rf and microwave frequencies to convert phase, or frequency, changes to amplitude changes. They find widespread use in generating audio feedback signals for frequency stabilization of oscillators and in angle demodulation applications. This paper demonstrates that similar devices, with similar functions, can be constructed in the visible region using optical fibers as delay-line elements. The operating principles of an optical-fiber delay-line phase discriminator are discussed. The sensitivity is shown to be proportional to the fiber propagation-delay time. A device working at 0.6328 microm is described and compared with predictions.

  3. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  4. Fiber optic communication links

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber optics is a new, emerging technology which offers relief from many of the problems which limited past communications links. Its inherent noise immunity and high bandwidth open the door for new designs with greater capabilities. Being a new technology, certain problems can be encountered in specifying and installing a fiber optic link. A general fiber optic system is discussed with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages. It is not intended to be technical in nature, but a general discussion. Finally, a general purpose prototype Sandia communications link is presented.

  5. Optical fiber metamagnetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Venugopal, Gayatri; Zeng, Jinwei; Chen, Yinnan; Lee, Dong Ho; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Cartwright, Alexander N

    2011-10-10

    To date, magnetic and negative-index metamaterials at optical frequencies were realized on bulk substrates in the form of thin films with thicknesses on the order of, or less than, optical wavelengths. In this work, we design and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, fiber-coupled magnetic metamaterials integrated on the transverse cross-section of an optical fiber. Such fiber-metamaterials integration may provide fundamentally new solutions for photonic-on-a-chip systems for sensing, subwavelength imaging, image processing, and biomedical applications.

  6. Details of the intralingual topography and morphology of the lingual nerve.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Nimigean, V; Podoleanu, L; Ivaşcu, R V; Niculescu, M C

    2008-09-01

    The lingual nerve supplies the tongue with trigeminal sensory fibers and sensory fibers that originate from the chorda tympani. The aim of this study was to investigate, by dissection, the anatomical features of the lingual nerve at the level of the tongue and to correlate the findings with existing data. Six human adult cadavers dissected bilaterally and 6 specimens of tongue-pharynx-larynx from autopsied adult cadavers were studied. The lingual nerve gives off its terminal branches at the anterior border of the hyoglossus muscle where the anastomotic loops between the lingual and hypoglossal nerves are found. Two morphological types of terminal division of the lingual nerve were seen: a single primary trunk or two primary trunks, a medial one distributed in the middle third of the tongue and a lateral one for the anterior third of the tongue. The primary terminal branches of the lingual nerve were located on the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle, forming a nervous layer over the deep artery of the tongue. The following emerged from the primary trunk(s): thin branches for the ipsilateral mucosa of the ventral surface of the tongue and 4-9 thick secondary trunks, with palisade disposition and translingual courses that followed the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle towards the dorsal mucosa of the ipsilateral part of the tongue, anterior to the circumvallate papillae.

  7. Monkey electrophysiological and human psychophysical responses to mutants of the sweet protein brazzein: delineating brazzein sweetness.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zheyuan; Danilova, Vicktoria; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Markley, John L; Hellekant, Göran

    2003-07-01

    Responses to brazzein, 25 brazzein mutants and two forms of monellin were studied in two types of experiments: electrophysiological recordings from chorda tympani S fibers of the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta, and psychophysical experiments. We found that different mutations at position 29 (changing Asp29 to Ala, Lys or Asn) made the molecule significantly sweeter than brazzein, while mutations at positions 30 or 33 (Lys30Asp or Arg33Ala) removed all sweetness. The same pattern occurred again at the beta-turn region, where Glu41Lys gave the highest sweetness score among the mutants tested, whereas a mutation two residues distant (Arg43Ala) abolished the sweetness. The effects of charge and side chain size were examined at two locations, namely positions 29 and 36. The findings indicate that charge is important for eliciting sweetness, whereas the length of the side-chain plays a lesser role. We also found that the N- and C-termini are important for the sweetness of brazzein. The close correlation (r = 0.78) between the results of the above two methods corroborates our hypothesis that S fibers convey sweet taste in primates.

  8. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  9. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  10. Comparison of fiber length analyzers

    Treesearch

    Don Guay; Nancy Ross Sutherland; Walter Rantanen; Nicole Malandri; Aimee Stephens; Kathleen Mattingly; Matt Schneider

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several fiber new fiber length analyzers have been developed and brought to market. The new instruments provide faster measurements and the capability of both laboratory and on-line analysis. Do the various fiber analyzers provide the same length, coarseness, width, and fines measurements for a given fiber sample? This paper provides a comparison of...

  11. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  12. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  13. Chemistry Research of Optical Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-27

    BROADENING IN OPTICAL FIBERS Herbert B. Rosenstock* Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375 ABSTRACT A light pulse transmitted through a fiber...Marcatili, Marcuse , and Personick, "Dispersion Properties of Fibers" (Ch. 4 in "Optical Fiber Telecommunications," S. E. Miller and A. C. Chynoweth, eds

  14. Robust fiber clustering of cerebral fiber bundles in white matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xufeng; Wang, Yongxiong; Zhuang, Songlin

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI-FT) has been widely accepted in the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. During the rendering pipeline of specific fiber tracts, the image noise and low resolution of DTI would lead to false propagations. In this paper, we propose a robust fiber clustering (FC) approach to diminish false fibers from one fiber tract. Our algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, the optimized fiber assignment continuous tracking (FACT) is implemented to reconstruct one fiber tract; and then each curved fiber in the fiber tract is mapped to a point by kernel principal component analysis (KPCA); finally, the point clouds of fiber tract are clustered by hierarchical clustering which could distinguish false fibers from true fibers in one tract. In our experiment, the corticospinal tract (CST) in one case of human data in vivo was used to validate our method. Our method showed reliable capability in decreasing the false fibers in one tract. In conclusion, our method could effectively optimize the visualization of fiber bundles and would help a lot in the field of fiber evaluation.

  15. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  16. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-08-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  17. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Drews, M. J.; Ellison, M. S.; Gantt, B. W.

    1989-01-01

    A process is being developed which evenly coats individual carbon fibers with thermoplastic polymers. In this novel, continuous coating process, the fiber tow bundle is first spread cover a series of convex rollers and then evenly coated with a fine powder of thermoplastic matrix polymer. Next, the fiber is heated internally by passing direct current through the powder coated fiber. The direct current is controlled to allow the carbon fiber temperature to slightly exceed the flow temperature of the matrix polymer. Analysis of the thermoplastic coated carbon fiber tows produced using this continuous process indicates that 30 to 70 vol pct fiber prepregs can be obtained.

  18. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  19. Optical fiber magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarzello, John F.; Finkel, Jack

    1991-08-01

    An optical fiber magnetometer having omnidirectional capability is disclosed herein for measuring a total magnetic field independent of its physical orientation or the direction of the field or fields. A relatively long optical fiber defining a sensing arm for exposure to a magnetic field is wound in the form of a spheroid (like rubber bands on a golf ball or yarn threads on a baseball) to provide optical lengths of substantially the same total length in every direction through the spheroid winding. The plane of polarization of light transmitted through the optical fiber winding is caused to rotate (Faraday effect) when the fiber or components thereof is exposed parallel to a magnetic field. The extent of plane rotation is determined, inter alia, by the total magnetic field passing through the spheroid winding.

  20. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  1. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  2. Ways to Boost Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... Third, it helps prevent constipation and diverticulosis. And fourth, adequate fiber from food helps keep blood sugar ... the other benefits they provide as well. Reviewed July 2017 Holly Larson, MS, RD, is a nutrition ...

  3. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  4. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R. ); Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E. )

    1994-08-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1[degree]--7[degree]). The 7 [lambda] deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented.

  5. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  6. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  7. Carbon Fibers and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic nature of composite materials is considered. Carbon fiber composites and their area of current and planned application in civil aircraft are discussed, specifically within the framework of the various aspects of risk analysis.

  8. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  9. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  10. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  11. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  12. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  13. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  14. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  15. Glass fiber insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, E.J.; Ngo, T.M.

    1993-06-29

    A composition for a glass fiber insulation is described comprising a loose mat of glass fibers having at least a portion of the surface coated with a water insoluble, non-hygroscopic, amorphous aluminum phosphate polymer having a molar ratio of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] to P[sub 2]O[sub 5] of less than 1 and providing a substantial thermal resistance.

  16. Fiber optics welder

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  17. Production of mullite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor); Sparks, J. Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed here is a process for making mullite fibers wherein a hydrolizable silicon compound and an aluminum compound in the form of a difunctional aluminum chelate are hydrolized to form sols using water and an alcohol with a catalytic amount of hydrochloric acid. The sols are mixed in a molar ratio of aluminum to silicon of 3 to 1 and, under polycondensation conditions, a fibrous gel is formed. From this gel the mullite fibers can be produced.

  18. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Extending fiber resources : fiber loading recycled fiber and mechanical pulps for lightweight, high opacity paper

    Treesearch

    Marguerite Sykes; John Klungness; Freya Tan; Mathew Stroika; Said Abubakr

    1999-01-01

    Production of a lightweight, high opacity printing paper is a common goal of papermakers using virgin or recycled fibers. Fiber loading is an innovative, commercially viable process that can substantially upgrade and extend most types of wood fibers. Fiber loading, a process carried out at high consistency and high alkalinity, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in...

  20. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  1. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  2. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  3. Cladded single crystal fibers for high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Shaw, B.; Bayya, S.; Askins, C.; Peele, J.; Rhonehouse, D.; Meyers, J.; Thapa, R.; Gibson, D.; Sanghera, J.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the recent progress in the development of cladded single crystal fibers for high power single frequency lasers. Various rare earth doped single crystal YAG fibers with diameters down to 17 μm with length > 1 m have been successfully drawn using a state-of-the-art Laser Heated Pedestal Growth system. Single and double cladding on rare earth doped YAG fibers have been developed using glasses where optical and physical properties were precisely matched to doped YAG core single crystal fiber. The double clad Yb:YAG fiber structures have dimensions analogous to large mode area (LMA) silica fiber. We also report successful fabrications of all crystalline core/clad fibers where thermal and optical properties are superior over glass cladded YAG fibers. Various fabrication methods, optical characterization and gain measurements on these cladded YAG fibers are reported.

  4. Fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion in natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. Q. N.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fuentes, C.; van Vuure, A. W.; Verpoest, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interface between natural fibers and thermoplastic matrices is studied, in which fiber-matrix wetting analysis and interfacial adhesion are investigated to obtain a systematic understanding of the interface. In wetting analysis, the surface energies of the fibers and the matrices are estimated using their contact angles in test liquids. Work of adhesion is calculated for each composite system. For the interface tests, transverse three point bending tests (3PBT) on unidirectional (UD) composites are performed to measure interfacial strength. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization on the fibers is also carried out to obtain more information about the surface chemistry of the fibers. UD composites are examined to explore the correlation between the fiber-matrix interface and the final properties of the composites. The results suggest that the higher interfacial adhesion of the treated fiber composites compared to untreated fiber composites can be attributed to higher fiber-matrix physico-chemical interaction corresponding with the work of adhesion.

  5. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using a muzzle brake fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, David A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam profile allows coupling of higher power into smaller fibers than multimode Holmium laser beam, without proximal fiber tip degradation. A smaller fiber provides more space in ureteroscope working channel for increased saline irrigation and allows maximum ureteroscope flexion. However, distal fiber tip burnback increases as fiber diameter decreases. Previous studies utilizing hollow steel sheaths around recessed distal fiber tips reduced fiber burnback, but increased retropulsion. In this study, a "fiber muzzle brake" was tested for reducing fiber burnback and stone retropulsion. TFL lithotripsy studies were performed at 1908 nm, 35 mJ, 500 μs, and 300 Hz using a 100-μm-core fiber. The optimal stainless steel muzzle brake tip tested consisted of a 1-cm-long, 560-μm-OD, 360-μm-ID tube with 275-μm thru hole located 250-μm from the distal end. The fiber tip was recessed a distance of 500 μm. Stone phantom retropulsion, fiber tip burnback, and calcium oxalate stone ablation studies were performed, ex vivo. Small stones with a mass of 40 +/- 4 mg and 4-mm-diameter were ablated over a 1.5-mm sieve in 25 +/- 4 s (n=10), without distal fiber tip burnback. Reduction in stone phantom retropulsion distance by 50% and 85% was observed when using muzzle brake tips versus 100-μm-core bare fibers and hollow steel tip fibers. The muzzle brake fiber tip provided efficient stone ablation, reduced stone retropulsion, and minimal fiber degradation during TFL lithotripsy.

  6. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  7. Evaluation of the flexural strength of carbon fiber-, quartz fiber-, and glass fiber-based posts.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Graziela Avila; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; de Melo, Renata Marques; Scotti, Roberto; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2005-03-01

    This study investigated the flexural strength of eight fiber posts (one carbon fiber, one carbon/quartz fiber, one opaque quartz fiber, two translucent quartz fiber, and three glass fiber posts). Eighty fiber posts were used and divided into eight groups (n = 10): G1: C-POST (Bisco); G2: AESTHETI-POST (Bisco); G3: AESTHETI-PLUS (Bisco); G4: LIGHT-POST (Bisco); G5: D.T. LIGHT-POST (Bisco); G6: PARAPOST WHITE (Coltene); G7: FIBERKOR (Pentron); G8: REFORPOST (Angelus). All of the samples were tested using the three-point bending test. The averages obtained were submitted to the ANOVA and to Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The mean values (MPa) of the groups AESTHETI-POST-carbon/quartz fiber post (Bisco) and AESTHETI-PLUS-quartz fiber post (Bisco) were statistically similar and higher than the mean values of the other groups. The mean values of the groups C-POST-carbon fiber post (Bisco), LIGHT-POST-translucent quartz fiber post (Bisco), D.T. LIGHT-POST-double tapered translucent quartz fiber post (Bisco), PARAPOST WHITE-glass fiber post (Coltene) and FIBREKOR--glass fiber post (Pentron) were similar and higher than the group REFORPOST-glass fiber post (Angelus).

  8. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  9. Toward high performance graphene fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; He, Yuling; Chai, Songgang; Qiang, Hong; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2013-07-07

    Two-dimensional graphene and graphene-based materials have attracted tremendous interest, hence much attention has been drawn to exploring and applying their exceptional characteristics and properties. Integration of graphene sheets into macroscopic fibers is a very important way for their application and has received increasing interest. In this study, neat and macroscopic graphene fibers were continuously spun from graphene oxide (GO) suspensions followed by chemical reduction. By varying wet-spinning conditions, a series of graphene fibers were prepared, then, the structural features, mechanical and electrical performances of the fibers were investigated. We found the orientation of graphene sheets, the interaction between inter-fiber graphene sheets and the defects in the fibers have a pronounced effect on the properties of the fibers. Graphene fibers with excellent mechanical and electrical properties will yield great advances in high-tech applications. These findings provide guidance for the future production of high performance graphene fibers.

  10. Electrospun cross linked rosin fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Woo-il; Nirmala, R.; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; El-Newehy, Mohamed H.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we describe the first reported preparation of rosin in fiber form through use of an electrospinning technique utilizing various solvent systems. The polymer concentration of the formed fiber was studied by using various solvents such as chloroform, ethanol, N-N dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetone, and methylene chloride (MC). An electrospray of the solution resulted in the beaded form of the rosin. By varying the polymer concentration with MC, we were then able to obtain uniform fibers. However, the fibers exhibited large diameter. We believe that it is possible to reduce the diameter of the rosin fibers through appropriate selection of electrospinning parameters. In addition, the morphological transitions from beads, to beaded fiber, to fiber were studied at different polymer concentrations. We propose a possible physical cross linking mechanism for the formation of rosin fibers during the electrospinning process. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of producing fiber nanostructures of rosin by using an electrospinning technique.

  11. Longitudinally graded optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evert, A.; James, A.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Dong, L.; Stolen, R.; Ballato, J.; Dragic, P.; Rice, R.

    2013-03-01

    Described herein, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, are results on optical fibers possessing significant compositional gradations along its length due to longitudinal control of the core glass composition. More specifically, MCVD-derived germanosilicate fibers were fabricated that exhibited a gradient of up to about 0.55 weight % GeO2 per meter. These gradients are about 1900 times greater than previously reported fibers possessing longitudinal changes in composition. The refractive index difference is shown to change by about 0.001, representing a numerical aperture change of about 10%, over a fiber length of less than 20 m. The lowest attenuation measured from the present longitudinally-graded fiber (LGF) was 82 dB/km at a wavelength of 1550 nm, though this is shown to result from extrinsic process-induced factors and could be reduced with further optimization. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectrum from the LGF exhibited a 4.4 dB increase in the spectral width, and thus reduction in Brillouin gain, relative to a standard commercial single mode fiber, over a fiber length of only 17 m. The method employed is very straight-forward and provides for a wide variety of longitudinal refractive index and acoustic velocity profiles, as well as core shapes, which could be especially valuable for SBS suppression in high-energy laser systems. Next generation analogs, with longitudinally-graded compositional profiles that are very reasonable to fabricate, are shown computationally to be more effective at suppressing SBS than present alternatives, such as externally-applied temperature or strain gradients.

  12. Lack of functional and morphological susceptibility of the greater superficial petrosal nerve to developmental dietary sodium restriction.

    PubMed

    Sollars, S I; Hill, D L

    2000-12-01

    Restriction of dietary sodium during gestation has major effects on taste function and anatomy in the offspring. The chorda tympani nerve of offspring that are maintained on sodium-reduced chow throughout life (NaDep) has reduced neurophysiological responses to sodium and altered morphology of its terminal field in the nucleus of the solitary tract. There are many anatomical and physiological similarities between the chorda tympani nerve that innervates taste buds on the anterior tongue and the greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP) that innervates taste buds on the palate. To determine if the GSP is similarly susceptible to the effects of dietary sodium restriction, the present study examined neurophysiological responses and the terminal field of the GSP in NaDep and control rats. Neurophysiological responses of the GSP to a variety of sodium and non-sodium stimuli did not differ between NaDep and control rats. Furthermore, the volume and shape of the GSP terminal field in the nucleus of the solitary tract did not differ between the groups. Therefore, despite the high degree of functional and anatomical correspondence between the chorda tympani nerve and the GSP, the GSP does not appear to be susceptible to the effects of lifelong dietary sodium restriction.

  13. Effects of fiber manipulation methods on optical fiber properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert O.; Bechter, Andrew; Crass, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Optical fibers are routinely used to couple high-resolution spectrographs to modern telescopes, enabling important advantages in areas such as the search for extrasolar planets using spectroscopic radial velocity measurements of candidate stars. Optical fibers partially scramble the input illumination, and this feature enables a fiber feed to provide more uniform illumination to the spectrograph optics, thereby reducing systematic errors in radial velocity measurements. However fibers suffer from focal ratio degradation (FRD), a spreading of the beam at the output of the fiber with respect to that at the fiber input, which results in losses in throughput and resolution. Modal noise, a measurement uncertainty caused by inherent fiber properties and evident as a varying spatial intensity at the fiber exit plane, reduces the signal to noise ratio in the data. Devices such as double scramblers are often used to improve scrambling, and better fiber end preparation can mitigate FRD. Many instruments agitate the fiber during an observation to reduce modal noise, and stretching the fiber during use has been shown to offer a greater reduction in that noise. But effects of agitation and stretching on fiber parameters such as total transmission and focal ratio degradation have not been adequately studied. In this paper we present measurements of transmission loss and focal ratio degradation for both agitated and stretched fibers.

  14. Integrated Optofluidic Multimaterial Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Alexander Mark

    The creation of integrated microphotonic devices requires a challenging assembly of optically and electrically disparate materials into complex geometries with nanometer-scale precision. These challenges are typically addressed by mature wafer-based fabrication methods, which while versatile, are limited to low-aspect-ratio structures and by the inherent complexity of sequential processing steps. Multimaterial preform-to-fiber drawing methods on the other hand present unique opportunities for realizing optical and optoelectronic devices of extended length. Importantly, these methods allow for monolithic integration of all the constituent device components into complex architectures. My research has focused on addressing the challenges and opportunities associated with microfluidic multimaterial fiber structures and devices. Specifically: (1) A photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber is demonstrated for single mode transmission at 1.55 microm with 4 dB/m losses. This fiber transmits laser pulses with peak powers of 13.5 MW. (Chapter 2) (2) A microfluidic fiber laser, characterized by purely radia l emission is demonstrated. The laser cavity is formed by an axially invariant, 17-period annular PBG structure with a unit cell thickness of 160nm. This laser is distinct from traditional lasers with cylindrically symmetric emission, which rely almost exclusively on whispering gallery modes, characterized by tangential wavevectors. (Chapter 4) (3) An array of independently-controlled liquid-crystal microchannels flanked by viscous conductors is integrated in the fiber cladding and encircles the PBG laser cavity in (2). The interplay between the radially-emitting laser and these liquid-crystal modulators enables controlled directional emission around a full azimuthal angular range. (Chapter 4) (4) The electric potential profile along the length of the electrodes in (3) is characterized and found to depend on frequency. This frequency dependence presents a new means to tune the

  15. Fiber-optic technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 ..mu..m and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths.

  16. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  17. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  18. ZBLAN Fiber Phase B Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1997-01-01

    A Phase B feasibility study will be performed for the study of the effects of microgravity on the preform processing and fiber pulling of ZBLAN optical glass. Continuing from the positive results achieved in the fiber annealing experiments in 20 second intervals at 0.001 g on the KC-135 and the 5 minute experiments on the SPAR rocket, experiments will continue to work towards design of a fiber sting to initiate fiber pulling operations in space. Anticipated results include less homogeneous nucleation than ground-based annealed fibers. Infrared Fiber Systems and Galileo are the participating industrial investigators.

  19. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  20. Continuous fiber thermoplastic prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L. (Inventor); Johnson, Gary S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pultrusion machine employing a corrugated impregnator vessel to immerse multiple, continuous strand, fiber tow in an impregnating material, and an adjustable metered exit orifice for the impregnator vessel to control the quantity of impregnating material retained by the impregnated fibers, is provided. An adjustable height insert retains transverse rod elements within each depression of the corrugated vessel to maintain the individual fiber tows spread and in contact with the vessel bottom. A series of elongated heating dies, transversely disposed on the pultrusion machine and having flat heating surfaces with radiused edges, ensure adequate temperature exposed dwell time and exert adequate pressure on the impregnated fiber tows, to provide the desired thickness and fiber/resin ratio in the prepreg formed. The prepreg passing through the pulling mechanism is wound on a suitable take-up spool for subsequent use. A formula is derived for determining the cross sectional area opening of the metering device. A modification in the heating die system employs a heated nip roller in lieu of one of the pressure applying flat dies.

  1. Optical fiber interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Baosheng; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yufeng; Wang, An

    2006-02-01

    We design an optical fiber spectrometer based on optical fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In optical fiber Fourier transform spectrometer spectra information is obtained by Fourier transform of interferogram, which recording intensity change vs. optical path difference. Optical path difference is generated by stretching one fiber arm which wound around fiber stretch drive by high power supply. Information from detector is linear with time rather than with optical path difference. In order to obtain high accuracy wavenumber, reference beam is used to control the optical path difference. Optical path difference is measured by reference laser interference fringe. Interferogram vs. optical path difference is resampled by Brault algorithm with information from reference beam and test beam. In the same condition, one-sided interferogram has higher resolution than that of two-sided interferogram. For one-sided interferogram, zero path difference position must be determined as accurately as possible, small shift will result in phase error. For practical experiment in laboratory, position shift is inevitable, so phase error correction must be considered. Zero order fringe is determined by curve fitting. Spectrum of light source is obtained from one-sided interferogram by Fourier cosine transform. A spectral resolution of about ~3.1 cm -1 is achieved. In practice, higher resolution is needed. This compact equipment will be used in emission spectra and absorption spectra, especially in infrared region.

  2. Measurement of fiber orientation in short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, L.M.; Cumbrera, F.L.; Sanchez-Bajo, F.; Pajares, A. . Dept. de Fisica)

    1994-03-01

    The degree of fiber orientation in short-fiber composites plays an important role in determining many properties of these materials. In order to predict the toughening of a composite by using fiber reinforcements, the authors must consider the orientation of fibers as described probabilistically by the distribution function f([psi]), where [psi] is the angle which each fiber makes with the normal to the crack face. Here, a method for the characterization of the fiber orientation is built up in successive steps. In a first step the measurements of a planar array of fibers is afforded by extracting the important statistical information contained in a calculated Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the fiber distribution. Subsequently, a method is proposed allowing us to derive the relevant f([psi]) distribution from the two-dimensional characterization of two orthogonal plane sections of the composite.

  3. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  4. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  5. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  6. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  7. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  8. Fiber-based optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domachuk, P.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2007-05-01

    Optofluidics is the combination of photonic and microfluidic technologies to achieve enhanced functionality and compactness in devices with applications in sensing, chemistry, biomedical engineering, photonic devices and fundamental microfluidics research. Such a broad definition of the field lends itself many embodiments. Fiber optics provides a unique and versatile platform for building optofluidic devices. Optical fibers can be used not only in their traditional role, acting as a high quality waveguide for delivering light to an optofluidic device. Microstructured optical fibers and the voids that constitute them can provide a home for the fluid phase. Photonic crystal fibers, for example, can be filled with fluids to change the band gap properties of the fiber. The use of the fluid phase to tune photonic structures has several benefits. The fluid phase is inherently mobile allowing the tuning medium to be dynamically reconfigured through any connected aperture of the device. The nature of the fluid can also be adjusted through its chemistry, allowing for a very broad range of optical properties thus further enhancing tunability. Very high refractive index contrasts can be obtained between the fluid phase and the surrounding air, which can lead to great compactness in interferometric devices and novel, tunable, interferometric structures such as the single beam interferometer presented here. One of the great utilities of optofluidic devices is that where a photonic structure is tuned using microfluidics, the same structure can be used in reverse, where a photonic structure is exposed to an unknown fluid and can act as a sensor. A fiber Fabry-Perot is utilized here to measure the concentration of saline.

  9. Characterization of OAM fibers using fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Vaity, P; Ung, B; Messaddeq, Y; Rusch, L A; LaRochelle, S

    2014-06-30

    The reflectogram of a fiber grating is used to characterize vector modes of an optical fiber supporting orbital angular momentum states. All modes, with a minimal effective index separation around 10(-4), are simultaneously measured. OAM states are reflected by the FBG, along with a charge inversion, at the center wavelength of the Bragg reflection peak of the corresponding fiber vector mode.

  10. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    d AFWU.-TR-83-niO 00 H CO CO iH <^ DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER Edward L. Glnzton Laboratory Stanford University Stanford, California 94305...RECIPIf NT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE Cand Sub(i(/e; DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Interim Report...external optical cavity made of two miniature flat mirrors, and end- pumped either at 514.5 nm (argon-ion laser ) or near 818 nm ( laser diode ). Coherent

  11. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1956-04-17

    This patent pertains to quartz fiber electroscopes of small size for use by personnel to monitor nuclear radiation. The invention resides tn a novel way of charging the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope is carried out without obtaining contact with the fiber system or its support and the electroscope can therefore be constructed without a protective cap to prevent wrongful discharge. The electroscope is charged by placing a voltage between an electrode located in close proximity to the element to be charged and the electroscope me metallic case. ABSTRACTS

  12. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    molybdium oxide ( GMO ). The best diameter variations obtained so far are on the order of 1%. It is expected that these fibers should exhibit lower...that the absorbed pump power at threshold is given by "P:" hvp 6, 1Pth = (9) O-rf 21 J(0) where SJ 1(0) =J 1(0, 0, ) =ffj soI (x, y, z) ro(x, y, z) dv...epoxy, the argon laser bean ) was first aligned through a fiber at a low power level and then slowly increased. For preliminary tests the laser cavity

  13. Tunable random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Babin, S. A.; Podivilov, E. V.; El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2011-08-15

    An optical fiber is treated as a natural one-dimensional random system where lasing is possible due to a combination of Rayleigh scattering by refractive index inhomogeneities and distributed amplification through the Raman effect. We present such a random fiber laser that is tunable over a broad wavelength range with uniquely flat output power and high efficiency, which outperforms traditional lasers of the same category. Outstanding characteristics defined by deep underlying physics and the simplicity of the scheme make the demonstrated laser a very attractive light source both for fundamental science and practical applications.

  14. Geophysical Fiber Interferometer Gyroscope.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-31

    gravitational antenna. Basically, their device was a Twyman -Green laser interferometer that was allegedly well-isolated from its thermal and...r ~AD-AO92 913 UTAH UNIV RESEARCH INST SALT LAKE CITY GEOSPACE SCIE-EYC F/B 20/6 GEOPHYSICAL FIBER INTERFEROMETER GYROSCOPE(U) .S DEC 79 L 0 WEAVER...ACCESSION no: S, 111CIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AF6ii M_ __ _ __I_ _ 4. TItLIL (eovm4jk"IU .TYEo nPaTawn.ocoet GEOPHYSICAL FIBER INTERFEROMETER GYROSCOPE. / 9

  15. Photoconductivity in Carbon Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-30

    4191 728 PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY IN CARBON FJ9KRS(U) INARS S INST OF TECH CANMRIDGE J STEINBECK ET RL 39 OCT 87 RFOSR-TR-88-6228 F49929-85-C-8i47...r ’ r y ... : SS f3l~f lJ Photoconductivity - in Graohite Fibers J. Steinbeck , F.Yu, G.Braunstein, G.Dresselhaus, M.S.Dresselhaus and T.VenkaLesan...8217I iFOSR’ 88 - 0228 Photoconductivity in Carbon Fibers J. Steinbeck , F. Yu, G. Braunstein, G. Dresselhaus, M.S. Dresselhaus, Massachusetts Institute

  16. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  17. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  18. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Pocha, Michael D.; Swierkowski, Steve P.; Wood, Billy E.

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  19. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  20. Low-Loss Fiber Waveguides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    low- loss fibers requires producing fiber from unconventional, non-oxide materials such as the metal halides or some special fluoride glasses...hot rolling over extrusion is that there is less friction between the fiber and forming surface (roller or die) and smaller reductions per pass. At...quality was poor, exhibiting a fish- scale appearance that resulted from friction between the die and the surface of the fiber. We have to conclude

  1. Optical Fibers for Nonlinear Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    wavelength, showing structure due to water absorption bands .............................. 21 11 Schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus for phase...Figure 10. (b) Spectrum of PK3 fiber attenuation versus wavelength, showing structure due to water absorption bands. -L -L1 D C- LCL 0 (0 o o wj 0 00zzo...crystal fibers (ADP). 1984 Development of traveling zone method converting polycrystalline extruded fiber to single-crystal fiber (AgCl, AgBr, CuCl

  2. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  3. In-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai; Sun, Jiaxing

    2006-09-01

    A novel fiber-optic in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. It consists of a segment of two-core fiber with a mirrored fiber end. The sensing characteristics based on the two-core fiber bending, corresponding to the shift of the phase of the two-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer, are investigated.

  4. In-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai; Sun, Jiaxing

    2006-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. It consists of a segment of two-core fiber with a mirrored fiber end. The sensing characteristics based on the two-core fiber bending, corresponding to the shift of the phase of the two-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer, are investigated.

  5. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  6. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  7. Procedure for dispersing fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fiber bundles are dispersed and fibers are cleaned within enclosed container; therefore, safety clothing, masks, and eye protection are not required. Procedure also could be used wherever materials, such as fiberglass or insulation, require dispersion, fluffing, or cleaning. Process could be automated into continuous operation for handling large quantities of fiber.

  8. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  9. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  10. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  11. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  12. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  13. Polymer Bonding of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W.; Nelson, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    Optical waveguies coupled through their sides. In fiber etching process bonded length for coupling determined by observing optical output powers in two fibers. Surface tension of etchant remaining between two fibes holds then in contact when raised from solution for power measurement. When fibers reimmersed, they separate allowing free access by etchant.

  14. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  15. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  16. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  17. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  18. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  19. Asbestos fibers in parenteral medication.

    PubMed

    Addison, J; Browne, K; Davis, J M; Gruber, U F

    1993-12-01

    The adequacy of current regulations for the control of particulate matter in injectable medicines has been brought into question by a recent television program which reported that asbestos fibers had been found in a number of such preparations. The fibers were identified as chrysotile, which occurs very widely as a secondary mineral in rocks, and is almost ubiquitous among minerals derived from natural erosion. Fibers are found in almost all drinking water and air samples unrelated to any contamination of fiber resulting from industrial exploitation. Because of this, even extreme laboratory precautions may fail to eliminate every fine fiber. A normal person living in an urban environment inhales about 10(5) asbestos fibers daily and ingests 10(10). There is evidence that a small proportion of these fibers regularly enters the circulation, and some fibers may be excreted in the urine. Elimination also occurs because retained chrysotile fibers fragment and disappear relatively quickly from human tissues, probably through macrophage action. Fiber length and dose are also important in disease causation. Established evidence on fiber length, durability, and quantitative exposure required for disease production does not indicate that the fibers reported to have been found in parenteral preparations constitute any hazard.

  20. Optical fiber sensors measurement system and special fibers improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Michal; Hrabina, Jan; Hola, Miroslava; Hucl, Vaclav; Cizek, Martin; Rerucha, Simon; Lazar, Josef; Mikel, Bretislav

    2017-06-01

    We present method for the improvement of the measurement accuracy in the optical frequency spectra measurements based on tunable optical filters. The optical filter was used during the design and realization of the measurement system for the inspection of the fiber Bragg gratings. The system incorporates a reference block for the compensation of environmental influences, an interferometric verification subsystem and a PC - based control software implemented in LabView. The preliminary experimental verification of the measurement principle and the measurement system functionality were carried out on a testing rig with a specially prepared concrete console in the UJV Řež. The presented system is the laboratory version of the special nuclear power plant containment shape deformation measurement system which was installed in the power plant Temelin during last year. On the base of this research we started with preparation other optical fiber sensors to nuclear power plants measurement. These sensors will be based on the microstructured and polarization maintaining optical fibers. We started with development of new methods and techniques of the splicing and shaping optical fibers. We are able to made optical tapers from ultra-short called adiabatic with length around 400 um up to long tapers with length up to 6 millimeters. We developed new techniques of splicing standard Single Mode (SM) and Multimode (MM) optical fibers and splicing of optical fibers with different diameters in the wavelength range from 532 to 1550 nm. Together with development these techniques we prepared other techniques to splicing and shaping special optical fibers like as Polarization-Maintaining (PM) or hollow core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) and theirs cross splicing methods with focus to minimalize backreflection and attenuation. The splicing special optical fibers especially PCF fibers with standard telecommunication and other SM fibers can be done by our developed techniques. Adjustment

  1. Development of fiber-to-fiber connectors for scintillating tile/fiber calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aota, S.; Bossert, R. C.; Fukuda, S.; Hara, K.; Kawamoto, H.; Kim, S.; Kondo, K.; Mishina, M.; Nakada, H.; Sato, H.; Seiya, Y.; Takikawa, K.

    1995-02-01

    We have developed fiber-to-fiber connectors for plastic fibers of 0.83, 0.90, and 1.00 mm in diameter. Such a connector is essential for detectors that use a large number of optical fibers, scintillating or clear. Typical applicators are unscintillating tile/fiber calorimetry and scintillating fiber tracking. We describe the design and performance of two types of small 10-fiber connectors which were developed for the CDF endplug tile/fiber calorimeter. The connectors showed a light transmission of 85-90% with a uniformity of 2.5-3.1%, and a reproducibility of 1%. Use of optical matching material at the joints could further improve the transmission and uniformity but showed instability after heat cycles.

  2. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, William H. (Inventor); August, Rudolf R. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Strahan, Jr., Virgil H. (Inventor); Nichols, Donald K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight fiber optic micro-sensor that is suitable for applications which may require remote temperature sensing. The disclosed temperature sensor includes a phosphor material that, after receiving incident light stimulation, is adapted to emit phosphorescent radiation output signals, the amplitude decay rate and wavelength of which are functions of the sensed temperature.

  3. Fiber farming with insecticidal

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer

    1997-01-01

    Naturally regenerated forests are the primary source of timber, fiber, and fuel throughout much of the world today. In the United States, however, public outcry over increasing forest fragmentation and habitat loss is reducing timber harvests in many areas. As our demand for forest products exceeds supplies, reliance on international timber resources will escalate,...

  4. Optical Fiber Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  5. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  6. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  7. Bluebonnet Fiber Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses stitching and applique techniques to create a fiber collage in which every child is successful with high-quality work. This lesson was inspired by Tomie dePaola's "The Legend of the Bluebonnet." The back cover had a lovely illustration of the bluebonnet flower the author thought would translate easily to a…

  8. Fiber and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber-rich sandwich with whole-grain bread, peanut butter, and bananas. Serve whole-grain rolls with dinner ... and muffins. Top whole-wheat crackers with peanut butter or low-fat cheese. Offer air-popped popcorn — ...

  9. Bluebonnet Fiber Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses stitching and applique techniques to create a fiber collage in which every child is successful with high-quality work. This lesson was inspired by Tomie dePaola's "The Legend of the Bluebonnet." The back cover had a lovely illustration of the bluebonnet flower the author thought would translate easily to a…

  10. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair. PMID:22736961

  11. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  12. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  13. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  14. Infrared Fibers for Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    they can be used to demonstrate broadband supercontinuum sources in the infrared (figure 3) when pumped with suitable lasers. They can also be used for...doped chalcogenide glasses. Figure 3. The supercontinuum emission from preliminary IR fibers. Figure 4. Chalcogenide glass based photonic

  15. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  16. Carbon fiber study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated Federal Government action plan for dealing with the potential problems arising from the increasing use of graphite fiber reinforced composite materials in both military and civilian applications is presented. The required dissemination of declassified information and an outline of government actions to minimize the social and economic consequences of proliferated composite materials applications were included.

  17. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  18. Saccharification of Okara fiber by plant dietary fiber hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masako

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, the saccharification process of okara fiber with pectinase, xylanase and cellulase was investigated as a preliminary attempt to effectively utilize okara fiber. The solubilization of okara fiber was raised in proportion to the number of enzymes used; that is, by a single enzyme, two enzymes and three enzymes, in that order. The saccharification of okara fiber was much more completed by a combination of pectinase, xylanase and cellulase than by using individual preparations. This multi-enzyme system liberated sugars equivalent to 80% of the original okara fiber by weight. Moreover the structure of okara fiber gradually disintegrated by hydrolytic reactions with pectinase, xylanase and cellulase in turns. These results suggest that the saccharification of okara fiber progresses by the cooperative action of pectinase, xylanase and cellulase.

  19. Flexural behavior of a glass fiber reinforced wood fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Smulski, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The static and dynamic flexural properties of a wood fiber matrix internally reinforced with continuous glass fibers were investigated. When modeled as sandwich composite, the static flexural modulus of elasticity (MOE) of glass fiber reinforced hardboard could be successfully predicted from the static flexural MOE of the wood fiber matrix, and the tensile MOE and effective volume fraction of the glass fiber reinforcement. Under the same assumption, the composite modulus of rupture (MOR) was a function of the reinforcement tensile MOE and effective volume fraction, and the matrix stress at failure. The composite MOR was predicted on this basis with limited success. The static flexural modulus of elasticity, dynamic modulus of elasticity, and modulus of rupture of glass fiber reinforced hardboard increased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The logarithmic decrement of the composite decreased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The short-term flexural creep behavior of glass fiber reinforced hardboard was accurately described by a 4-element linear viscoelastic model.

  20. Multiwavelength fiber laser for the fiber link monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng-Chun; Lee, Wei-Yun; Wu, Shin-Shian; Hu, Hsuan-Lun

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes a novel fiber link monitoring system that uses a multiwavelength fiber laser for wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) passive optical network (PON). The multiwavelength fiber laser is based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Experimental results show the feasibility using the system to monitor a fiber link with a high and stable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of over 26 dB. The link quality of downstream signals as well as the fiber link on WDM channels can be monitored in real time. Favorable carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple beat (CTB) performance metrics were obtained for cable television (CATV) signals that were transported through 25 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF).

  1. Fiber Bragg filters For laser- and multicore fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Martin; Elsmann, Tino; Lorenz, Adrian; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) have widespread applications in security, information, structural health monitoring, and biophotonics. In telecom applications, FBG inscription has reached a high level of maturity, but remains mainly limited to germanium doped photosensitive single mode fibers. Special applications, like filtering in light harvesting fibers or resonator mirrors for fiber lasers have to deal with special aspects which make the design and realization of FBGs a challenging task. One aspect is the extended wavelength range of these applications. Another aspect is the increasing demand to inscribe fiber Bragg gratings in non-photosensitive germanium-free fibers. Therefore, novel concepts of photosensitivity are proposed. Finally, to increase the amount of captured light the size of the fiber core and the numerical aperture have also to be increased. This goes along with multimode operation and prevents good filtering properties of Bragg gratings.

  2. CALHM1 Deletion in Mice Affects Glossopharyngeal Taste Responses, Food Intake, Body Weight, and Life Span.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, Göran; Schmolling, Jared; Marambaud, Philippe; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A

    2015-07-01

    Stimulation of Type II taste receptor cells (TRCs) with T1R taste receptors causes sweet or umami taste, whereas T2Rs elicit bitter taste. Type II TRCs contain the calcium channel, calcium homeostasis modulator protein 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) transmitter to taste fibers. We have previously demonstrated with chorda tympani nerve recordings and two-bottle preference (TBP) tests that mice with genetically deleted Calhm1 (knockout [KO]) have severely impaired perception of sweet, bitter, and umami compounds, whereas their sour and salty tasting ability is unaltered. Here, we present data from KO mice of effects on glossopharyngeal (NG) nerve responses, TBP, food intake, body weight, and life span. KO mice have no NG response to sweet and a suppressed response to bitter compared with control (wild-type [WT]) mice. KO mice showed some NG response to umami, suggesting that umami taste involves both CALHM1- and non-CALHM1-modulated signals. NG responses to sour and salty were not significantly different between KO and WT mice. Behavioral data conformed in general with the NG data. Adult KO mice consumed less food, weighed significantly less, and lived almost a year longer than WT mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sweet taste majorly influences food intake, body weight, and life span.

  3. Hyposalivation after undergoing stapedectomy.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for otosclerosis involves patients' undergoing stapedectomy. Inadvertent damage to the chorda tympani nerve's (CTN's) secretory fibers during stapedectomy can result in inadequate secretory stimulation of the submandibular salivary glands (SMSGs) and sublingual salivary glands (SLSGs). Because most saliva originates from these glands, hyposalivation and subjective xerostomia manifest during resting periods when parotid gland secretions are minimal. Stimulation with food increases parotid gland salivation enough to overcome the subjective sense of dryness. The author examined a 52-year-old man who had undergone bilateral stapedectomy because of hearing loss; his rheumatologist referred him to the Salivary Gland Center (New York City) because of a complaint of dry mouth. After the author examined the patient, he concluded that the patient had decreased SMSG and SLSG secretion and recommended that the patient use sugarless chewing gum or sour candy frequently to stimulate his parotid glands and use oral lubricants and sip water as needed. Stimulation of parotid gland secretion is independent of SMSG and SLSG activation. Therefore, the dental practitioner must become aware of the innervation of the salivary glands and each gland's secretory production during periods of oral stimulation and of rest.

  4. CALHM1 Deletion in Mice Affects Glossopharyngeal Taste Responses, Food Intake, Body Weight, and Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Schmolling, Jared; Marambaud, Philippe; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of Type II taste receptor cells (TRCs) with T1R taste receptors causes sweet or umami taste, whereas T2Rs elicit bitter taste. Type II TRCs contain the calcium channel, calcium homeostasis modulator protein 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) transmitter to taste fibers. We have previously demonstrated with chorda tympani nerve recordings and two-bottle preference (TBP) tests that mice with genetically deleted Calhm1 (knockout [KO]) have severely impaired perception of sweet, bitter, and umami compounds, whereas their sour and salty tasting ability is unaltered. Here, we present data from KO mice of effects on glossopharyngeal (NG) nerve responses, TBP, food intake, body weight, and life span. KO mice have no NG response to sweet and a suppressed response to bitter compared with control (wild-type [WT]) mice. KO mice showed some NG response to umami, suggesting that umami taste involves both CALHM1- and non-CALHM1-modulated signals. NG responses to sour and salty were not significantly different between KO and WT mice. Behavioral data conformed in general with the NG data. Adult KO mice consumed less food, weighed significantly less, and lived almost a year longer than WT mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sweet taste majorly influences food intake, body weight, and life span. PMID:25855639

  5. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  6. Health Benefits of Fiber Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Agro, Nicole C; Eliasson, Åsa M; Mialki, Kaley L; Olivera, Joseph D; Rusch, Carley T; Young, Carly N

    2017-02-01

    Although fiber is well recognized for its effect on laxation, increasing evidence supports the role of fiber in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the health benefits of fiber and its fermentation, and describe how the products of fermentation may influence disease risk and treatment. Higher fiber intakes are associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. Fiber may also have a role in lowering blood pressure and in preventing obesity by limiting weight gain. Fiber is effective in managing blood glucose in type 2 diabetes, useful for weight loss, and may provide therapeutic adjunctive roles in kidney and liver disease. In addition, higher fiber diets are not contraindicated in inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome and may provide some benefit. Common to the associations with disease reduction is fermentation of fiber and its potential to modulate microbiota and its activities and inflammation, specifically the production of anti-inflammatory short chain fatty acids, primarily from saccharolytic fermentation, versus the deleterious products of proteolytic activity. Because fiber intake is inversely associated with all-cause mortality, mechanisms by which fiber may reduce chronic disease risk and provide therapeutic benefit to those with chronic disease need further elucidation and large, randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm causality.Teaching Points• Strong evidence supports the association between higher fiber diets and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer.• Higher fiber intakes are associated with lower body weight and body mass index, and some types of fiber may facilitate weight loss.• Fiber is recommended as an adjunctive medical nutritional therapy for type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and certain liver diseases.• Fermentation and the resulting shifts in

  7. Polarization and fiber nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiang

    This thesis is devoted to a thorough investigation of various nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers over a variety of length, time, and power scales. It presents a unified theoretical description of fiber nonlinearities, their applications, existing problems, and possible solutions, particularly focusing on the polarization dependence of nonlinearities. The thesis begins with an investigation of quantum-correlated photon pair generation in the extremely low-power regime, and fundamental quantum noise properties of dual-pump parametric amplfiers in the very high gain regime. It then focuses on two experimental demonstrations of applications based on four-wave mixing: an ultrafast all-optical switching scheme with the capability of multi-band wavelength casting, and a subpicosecond parametric oscillator with broadband tunability. The thesis next deals with the theoretical and experimental investigation of a novel phenomenon of vector soliton fission during supercontinuum generation in a tapered fiber in the femtosecond regime. The vectorial nature of Raman scattering is discussed next. In particular, I propose a vector form of the Raman response function to descibe accurately the Raman-related phenomena during ultrashort pulse propagation inside optical fibers. The thesis also presents a unified theory to describe nonlinearities in long fibers with random birefringence and polarization-mode dispersion. It focuses on the statistical nature of the interactions between random polarization-mode disperion and various nonlinear effects like stimulated Raman scattering, cross-phase modulation, four-wave mixing, and self-phase modulation. In particular, I quantify their impacts on various nonlinear photonic functionalities such as Raman amplification, nonlinear optical switching, parametric amplfication, wavelength conversion, soliton stability, etc.

  8. Thulium Fiber Laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard Leious, Jr.

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) has been studied as a potential alternative to the conventional Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is more ideally suited for laser lithotripsy because of the higher absorption coefficient of the emitted wavelength in water, the superior Gaussian profile of the laser beam, and the ability to operate at arbitrary temporal pulse profiles. The higher absorption of the TFL by water helps translate into higher ablation of urinary stones using less energy. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple into fibers much smaller than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. Lastly, the ability of arbitrary pulse operation by the TFL allows energy to be delivered to the stone efficiently so as to avoid negative effects (such as burning or bouncing of the stone) while maximizing ablation. Along with these improvements, the unique properties of the TFL have led to more novel techniques that have currently not been used in the clinic, such as the ability to control the movement of stones based on the manner in which the laser energy is delivered. Lastly, the TFL has led to the development of novel fibers, such as the tapered fiber and removable tip fiber, to be used for lithotripsy which can lead to safer and less expensive treatment of urinary stones. Overall, the TFL has been demonstrated as a viable alternative to the conventional Ho:YAG laser and has the potential to advance methods and tools for treatment of kidney stones.

  9. Gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F. (Inventor); Ramohalli, Kumar N. R. (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Fine, carbon-graphite fibers do not combust during the combustion of a composite and are expelled into the air as fine conductive particles. Coating of the fibers with a salt of a metal having a work function below 4.2 eV such as an alkaline earth metal salt, e.g., calcium acetate, catalytically enhances combustion of the fibers at temperatures below 1000.degree. C. such that the fibers self-support combustion and burn to produce a non-conductive ash. Fire-polishing the fibers before application of the coating is desirable to remove sizing to expose the carbon surface to the catalyst.

  10. Fiber pad for pressure mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, H.; Fitriani, U. R.; Dwijosutomo, A.; Marzuki, A.

    2016-11-01

    Optical fiber sandwiched pad designed as a pressure mapping sensor has been configured and characterized. Optical fiber sensor was aligned to form a web-like configuration (x- y matrix). Several fibers were positioned to form lines parallel to y-axis while others are in parallel to x-axis. When a mass with a particular surface contour was loaded on the fiber pad, we have shown the dependence of the magnitude of light attenuation on the mass surface contour. Combining these light attenuation results we have successfully constructed a three dimensional contours showing the pressure distribution given by the mass to the fiber pad.

  11. Optical-Fiber Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kosten, Susan E.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical-fiber sensor detects small changes in pressure in elastomeric O-ring or similar pressure seal, which may indicate deterioration of seal and interpreted as indications of incipient failure. According to concept, length of optical fiber embedded in seal. Light-emitting diode illuminates one end of fiber; photodetector measures intensity of light emerging from other end. Pressure-induced changes in seal bend fiber slightly, altering microbending-induced loss of light from fiber and alter intensity of light at photodetector. Change in intensity approximately proportional to change in pressure.

  12. Multimetallic Electrodeposition on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger-Hiller, F.; Kleiber, J.; Böttger, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lightweight design requires intelligent materials that meet versatile functions. One approach is to extend the range of properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by plating the fiber component. Electroplating leads to metalized layers on carbon fibers. Herein only cyanide-free electrolytes where used. Until now dendrite-free layers were only obtained using current densities below 1.0 A dm-2. In this work, dendrite-free tin and copper coatings were achieved by pre-metalizing the carbon fiber substrates. Furthermore, applying a combination of two metals with different sized thermal expansion coefficient lead to a bimetallic coating on carbon fiber rovings, which show an actuatory effect.

  13. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  14. Fano resonances in kagome fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincetti, L.; Setti, V.; Zoboli, M.

    2012-06-01

    Confinement Loss of microstructured fibers whose cladding is composed by a triangular arrangement of tubes of various shapes is theoretically and numerically investigated. Kagome Fibers belong from this family of fibers with cladding tubes with hexagonal shape. The shape of the cladding tubes is proved to strongly affect the performance of the microstructured fiber. In order to understand the reasons for this behavior, the spectral properties of the tubes that constitute the cladding are investigated first. It is proved that also these tubes suffer from additional Fano Resonances when they are given a polygonal shape. It is proved that, by using the analytical model developed for the stand alone polygonal tubes, it is possible to predict the spectral position of Fano Resonances also in microstructured fibers. This is extremely important since it suggest new ways to reduce confinement loss in kagome fibers and microstructured fibers in general.

  15. Scintillating glass fiber neutron senors

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1994-04-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched {sup 6} Li , these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over {sup 3}He or BF{sub 3} proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths (1/e) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  16. Fiber-optic voltage sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. B.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, and a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

  17. Reliability of fiber in fiber Bragg grating devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gajawalli V.; Webb, J. E.

    1999-12-01

    Among several possible failure modes in a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) device, fracture of the optical fiber is one of great importance. Reliability of fiber in such a device has to be ascertained and assured. A technique to evaluate the fiber strength in this device has been developed, and the extent of degradation due to processing and handling has been established. The impact of mechanical failures in other parts of the device on fiber failure is also addressed and evaluated. The failure mechanisms and its implications on fiber reliability are discussed. A proof stress level has been determined and implemented in the fabrication to assure mechanical reliability of the fiber against time. Based on the fiber strength distribution, proof stress level used, and the applied stress, a FIT rate is calculated using power law crack growth model for silica fibers. This study estimates an average FIT of 0.06 at ambient room temperature over a 25 year life for fiber failure in FBG devices fabricated by Corning Inc.

  18. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  19. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  20. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  1. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  2. Optomechanical fiber gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Onur; Akkaya, Onur Can; Ra, Hyejun; Digonnet, Michel; Kino, Gordon; Solgaard, Olav

    2009-10-01

    We report a miniature mechanical gyroscope that utilizes optical means to detect rotation-induced displacements in a mechanical structure. It utilizes the Foucault pendulum principle used in some existing MEMS gyroscopes: a rotating reference frame induces a Coriolis force that oscillates the structure about an axis orthogonal to the driving-mode axis. The main difference with similar MEMS gyroscopes is that this rotation-induced oscillation is sensed using a pair of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot displacement sensors instead of a capacitive device. The drive axis is also driven by radiation pressure inside a set of auxiliary fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, making this device immune to electromagnetic interference. Calculations predict that a rotation sensitivity on the order of 1°/h/Hz1/2 is achievable. We show that this structure solves several problems associated with MEMS gyroscopes utilizing electrostatic sensing methods.

  3. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  4. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  5. High Power Fiber Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-02

    was measured using a Fabry Perot interferometer. Resonance wavelength output varied from 1975 to 1989 nm with an average value of 1983 nm while...wavefront sensor ,” Directed Energy Professional Society (DEPS) Solid State Diode Laser Technology Review (SSDLTR) 2011. 45. R.A. Sims, P. Kadwani, C.C.C...for all fiber diameters, pressure driven coating system using pressures from 0.8 to 1.0 bar with coating head die sizes; 375 m (entrance die) with

  6. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    mounting fixture beeame soft and gradually come out of the fixture. S)me chemical reaction was takin- place between the epoxy and the dye solvent , which...loose. The solvent apparenlly did no)t affect the bonding agent used to attach the fibers inside the capillarie,. \\lthmigh individual capillarv tubes...pure solvent . was added to the cavity laser oscillation ceased, and was onlv re, ,t()red after readjuisting the orientation of the output coupler, as

  7. Genetics of Fiber Initiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To study the cellular mechanisms involved in fiber initiation, three fiberless lines were crossed with wildtype and fuzzless seed cotton and the F1, F2 and BC1 progeny ratios are presently being evaluated. The three fiberless lines included: MD17 (N1N1n2n2), SL1-7-1 (N1N1fl1fl1n3n3) and XZ142w. XZ...

  8. Infrared Fiber Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    solid lubricants (anthacene, p-terphenyl). To date, the best lubricants have been Parafilm and beeswax . Using these materials to coat the KC1 billets...fabrication involves both extruding KCl fibers and also preparing the starting billet used in the extrusion. The billets are then usually coated with a...8217C) and be removable after extrusion. This has limited the choice of lubricants to waxes (parafin, beeswax ), polyethelene mixtures (Parafilm M), and

  9. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  10. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  11. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  12. Intercalated Graphite Fiber Conductor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Lightweight electrical conductors were developed from graphitic fibers inter- calated with highly electrophilic intercalants. Conductance increases of...intercalated with highly electrophilic molecules ("intercalants") to en- hance their electrical conductivity. Evaluation of the elec- trical resistance of two...corrosion resistant to fluorine containing chemicals. Since the moisture permeability of the TFE is much less than that of the FEP, attempts were made to

  13. Fiber Optic Attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Mike Buzzetti designed a fiber optic attenuator while working at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended for use in NASA's Deep Space Network. Buzzetti subsequently patented and received an exclusive license to commercialize the device, and founded Nanometer Technologies to produce it. The attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss, and is relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  14. Hydrogen loading to the optic fibers for fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chun; Zhang, Wen-yu; Zhu, Yuan; Pan, Zhi-yong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, fibers with different depths of hermetically coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and it's found that too thick of carbon layer around fiber can't bring best radiation-resistant properties, because the thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult although it can help to stop the hydrogen escaping. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the temperature of 60°C and 100°C respectively, and it's found that after 120h and 48h, the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat. We also reload hydrogen into the fibers which have been loaded once, and these fibers are etched then, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings.

  15. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber.

  16. [Small fiber neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Langlois, V; Bedat Millet, A-L; Lebesnerais, M; Miranda, S; Marguet, F; Benhamou, Y; Marcorelles, P; Lévesque, H

    2017-04-11

    Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is still unknown. Characterised by neuropathic pain, it typically begins by burning feet, but could take many other expression. SFN affects the thinly myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers, by an inherited or acquired mechanism, which could lead to paresthesia, thermoalgic disorder or autonomic dysfunction. Recent studies suggest the preponderant role of ion channels such as Nav1.7. Furthermore, erythromelalgia or burning mouth syndrome are now recognized as real SFN. Various aetiologies of SFN are described. It could be isolated or associated with diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, vitamin deficiency, alcohol, auto-immune disease, sarcoidosis etc. Several mutations have recently been identified, like Nav1.7 channel leading to channelopathies. Diagnostic management is based primarily on clinical examination and demonstration of small fiber dysfunction. Laser evoked potentials, Sudoscan(®), cutaneous biopsy are the main test, but had a difficult access. Treatment is based on multidisciplinary management, combining symptomatic treatment, psychological management and treatment of an associated etiology. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Fiber pixelated image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of physically inaccessible parts of the body such as the colon at micron-level resolution is highly important in diagnostic medical imaging. Though flexible endoscopes based on the imaging fiber bundle are used for such diagnostic procedures, their inherent honeycomb-like structure creates fiber pixelation effects. This impedes the observer from perceiving the information from an image captured and hinders the direct use of image processing and machine intelligence techniques on the recorded signal. Significant efforts have been made by researchers in the recent past in the development and implementation of pixelation removal techniques. However, researchers have often used their own set of images without making source data available which subdued their usage and adaptability universally. A database of pixelated images is the current requirement to meet the growing diagnostic needs in the healthcare arena. An innovative fiber pixelated image database is presented, which consists of pixelated images that are synthetically generated and experimentally acquired. Sample space encompasses test patterns of different scales, sizes, and shapes. It is envisaged that this proposed database will alleviate the current limitations associated with relevant research and development and would be of great help for researchers working on comb structure removal algorithms.

  18. Applications of electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Ding, Bin

    2008-01-01

    The simplicity of the electrospinning fabrication process, the diversity of electrospinnable materials, and the unique features associated with electrospun fibers make this technique and resultant structures attractive for various applications. The past few years witnessed the significant progresses in the application areas of electrospun fibers, which were demonstrated by the numbers of the recent published patents on electrospinning. It is very apparent that the current focus has been shifted from studying the modification of the electrospinning conditions and apparatus for obtaining fibers with different sizes, shapes, morphologies, structures, alignments before 2000 to looking for the possible applications of these resultant nanofibers with broad functionalities after 2001. The current paper presents a systematic review on the recent applications of electrospun nanofibers in a broad range of fields including biomedical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound dressing and cosmetics, functional materials and devices such as composite reinforcement, filters, protective clothing and smart textiles, and energy and electronics such as batteries/cells and capacitors, sensors and catalysts. Although some of these applications may be still remained in the laboratory in the current stage, plenty of successful examples have proved that electrospun nanofibers have a bright future in a variety of industries.

  19. Nematic droplets on fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, V. M. O.; Silvestre, N. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of new techniques for the fabrication of nematic droplets with nontrivial topology provides new routes for the assembly of responsive devices. Here we explore some of the properties of nematic droplets on fibers, which constitute the basic units of a type of device that is able to respond to external stimuli, including the detection of gases. We perform a numerical study of spherical nematic droplets on fibers. We analyze the equilibrium textures for homogeneous and hybrid boundary conditions and find that in some cases the nematic avoids the nucleation of topological defects, which would provide a different optical response. We consider in detail a homeotropic nematic droplet wrapped around a fiber with planar anchoring. We investigate the effect of an electric field on the texture of this droplet. In the presence of a dc field, the system undergoes an orientational transition above a given threshold Ec, for which a ring defect is transformed into a figure-eight defect. We also consider ac fields, at high and low frequencies, and find that the textures are similar to those observed for static fields, in contrast with recently reported experiments.

  20. Fiber Bragg grating regeneration temperature in standard fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Quintela, A.; Roufael, H. G. S.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the regeneration process of FBGs written into both standard and bend-insensitive fiber has been studied. Several dopants present in these fibers lead to different regeneration properties which, based on previous experiments, have been tested, paying special attention to the regeneration temperature. The achieved results suggest a reduction on the regeneration temperature for FBGs written into bend-insensitive fiber that favors mechanical properties of silica.

  1. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  2. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered.

  3. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Optical fiber grating tuning device and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fei; Yeh, T.

    2008-12-01

    A new design for tuning optical fiber grating is proposed. The fiber grating is placed in the grooves between a pair of slides, in which one end of the fiber is bonded on the bottom slide, and the other end of the fiber is bonded on the top slide, the grating section of the fiber is confined in grooves, so that the fiber grating is remaining straight without buckling during axial compressive force applied to the fiber. An actuator is used for driving slide to apply force on fiber to axially compress or stretch the fiber grating. The wavelength of the fiber grating is tuned according to applied stress on the fiber. The applications of the device include tunable fiber laser, tunable fiber filter etc.

  5. Impact resistance of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-strain curves are obtained for a variety of glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced plastics in dynamic tension, over the stress-strain range of 0.00087-2070/sec. The test method is of the one-bar block-to-bar type, using a rotating disk or a pendulum as the loading apparatus and yielding accurate stress-strain curves up to the breaking strain. In the case of glass fiber reinforced plastic, the tensile strength, strain to peak impact stress, total strain and total absorbed energy all increase significantly as the strain rate increases. By contrast, carbon fiber reinforced plastics show lower rates of increase with strain rate. It is recommended that hybrid composites incorporating the high strength and rigidity of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with the high impact absorption of glass fiber reinforced plastics be developed for use in structures subjected to impact loading.

  6. Direct spinning of fiber supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tong; Ding, Xiaoteng; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-06-01

    A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics.A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Design of the microfluidic spinneret and operation of the spinneret (movie). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03116a

  7. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  8. Fiber Laser Development for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  9. Multichannel laser-fiber vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, Grzegorz; Waz, Adam; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Antonczak, Arkadiusz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Krzempek, Karol; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2013-01-01

    For the last few years we were elaborating the laser-fiber vibrometer working at 1550 nm. Our main stress was directed towards different aspects of research: analysis of scattered light, efficient photodetection, optimization of the fiber-free space interfaces and signal processing. As a consequence we proposed the idea of a multichannel fiber vibrometer based on well developed telecommunication technique - Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. We present the results of finished project "Developing novel laser-fiber monitoring technologies to prevent environmental hazards from vibrating objects" where we have constructed a 4-channel WDM laser-fiber vibrometer.

  10. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  11. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  12. Dynamic drainage of froth with wood fibers

    Treesearch

    J.Y. Zhu; Freya Tan

    2005-01-01

    Understanding froth drainage with fibers (or simply called fiber drainage in froth) is important for improving fiber yield in the flotation deinking operation. In this study, the data of water and fiber mass in foams collected at different froth heights were used to reconstruct the time dependent and spatially resolved froth density and fiber volumetric concentration...

  13. Pressure Sensing with Fiber Optics and Interferometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    fiber optic pressure sensor could be commercially useful. Besides the changes already mentioned, the diaphragms must be etched...4 Michelson Interferometer ............. 4 Diaphragm mechanics................6 Fiber Optics ...................8 ANIII. Fiber Optic Pressure...achieved by mounting the diaphragm on the end of a single mode optical fiber ; the coupling apparatus used permits interference to occur with the fiber

  14. Low-Bending-Loss Single-Mode Fibers for Fiber-to-the-Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeno, Kuniharu; Matsuo, Shoichiro; Guan, Ning; Wada, Akira

    2005-11-01

    Recent progress on low-bending-loss single-mode optical fibers for fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) is reviewed. Designing and manufacturing for three types of fibers-a step-index-profile fiber, a trench-index-profile fiber, and a holey fiber-are discussed. The trench-index-profile fibers and the holey fibers are confirmed to be candidates for indoor wiring because of their low bending losses, as well as splice losses.

  15. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  16. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, J.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector. 2 figs.

  17. Measurements of nonlinear optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2003-10-01

    The paper is a tutorial and literature digest of chosen problems connected with specific measurement techniques of nonlinear optical fibers. Such fibers are used more and more frequently in active photonic devices and sources, nonlinear sensors and photonic functional devices. Nonlinear effects in optical fibers are also of concern in optical communications systems. This tutorial bases on (31) report and is supplemented with references digest.

  18. Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Muscle Fiber Composition, and Power Performance.

    PubMed

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Karandreas, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), fiber type composition, and power performance in participants with different training background. Thirty-eight young males with different training background participated: sedentary (n = 10), endurance runners (n = 9), power trained (n = 10), and strength trained (n = 9). They performed maximal countermovement jumps (CMJ) and maximal isometric leg press for the measurement of the rate of force development (RFD). Resting vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes on a different occasion, whereas muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA) of vastus lateralis were evaluated through muscle biopsies 1wk later. MFCV, CMJ power, RFD, and % CSA of type II and type IIx fibers were higher for the power-trained group (P < 0.001). No difference was found between sedentary participants and endurance runners in these variables, but both of these groups performed worse than strength/power participants. Close correlations were found between MFCV and fiber CSA as well as the % CSA of all fiber types as well as with RFD and CMJ power (r = 0.712-0.943, P < 0.005). Partial correlations revealed that the % CSA of IIx fibers dictates a large part of the correlation between MFCV and RFD, power performance. Significant models for the prediction of the % CSA of type IIa and type II as well as the CSA of all muscle fibers based upon MFCV, RFD, and CMJ were revealed (P = 0.000). MFCV is closely associated with muscle fiber % CSA. RFD and jumping power are associated with the propagation of the action potentials along the muscle fibers. This link is regulated by the size and the distribution of type II, and especially type IIx muscle fibers.

  19. Health benefits of prebiotic fibers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Diederick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the various compounds that can act as prebiotic fibers: their structure, occurrence, production, and physiological effects (health effects) will be presented. The basis for the description is the latest definitions for dietary fibers and for prebiotics. Using as much as possible data from human studies, both the fiber and the prebiotic properties will be described of a variety of compounds. Based on the presented data the latest developments in the area of prebiotics, fibers and gut and immune health will be discussed in more detail as they show best what the potential impact of prebiotics on health of the human host might be.

  20. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  1. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  2. Fiber laser based hydrophone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Asrul Izam; Leung, Ian; Chen, Xiaobao; Zhou, Shaoling; Zhu, Qing; Gao, Kan; Childs, Paul; Peng, Gangding

    2011-09-01

    We report our recent work on distributed feedback fiber laser based hydrophones. Some issues related to sensitivity, such as fiber laser phase condition, demodulation, and packaging, are also discussed. With the development of appropriate digital signal processing (DSP) techniques and packaging designs, an interferometric-type distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser hydrophone system with acoustic sensitivity of 58.0 dB·re·μPa·Hz-0.5 at 1 kHz or a minimum detectable acoustic pressure below 800 μPa during field test is attained. We have also investigated an intensity-type DFB fiber laser hydrophone system and its performance.

  3. Electrospinning of semicrystalline polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Shuang; Li, Chunhua; Dimasi, Elaine; Marom, Gad; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning of polymeric fibers has been attracted increased interest in recent years. However, the research for ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and linear polyethylene (PE) is still limited, due to their relatively poor solubility in conventional solvent systems at ambient temperature. In this study, EVA and PE fibers were electrospun with different fiber diameter when the electrospinning solution was kept at a temperature greater than that of the solidification temperature of the polymer solutions. The effects of the fiber physical dimension to its crystallization and mechanical properties were thus detected. The morphology of the fibers was measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The shear modulation force microscopy technique (SMFM) was used to measure the melting point, Tm, which was found to increase with increased fiber diameter and crystallinity. AFM three-point bending test demonstrated that the Young's modulus of the fibers drastically increased as fiber diameter decreased.Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAX) showed that, compared to the bulk material, the crystallinity of the electrospun fibers had been changed.

  4. Density of intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1989-01-01

    The density of Amoco P-55, P-75, P-100, and P-120 pitch-based graphite fibers and their intercalation compounds with bromine, iodine monochloride, and copper (II) chloride have been measured using a density gradient column. The distribution of densities within a fiber type is found to be a sensitive indicator of the quality of the intercalation reaction. In all cases the density was found to increase, indicating that the mass added to the graphite is dominant over fiber expansion. Density increases are small (less than 10 percent) giving credence to a model of the intercalated graphite fibers which have regions which are intercalated and regions which are not.

  5. Density of intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1990-01-01

    The density of Amoco P-55, P-75, P-100, and P-120 pitch-based graphite fibers and their intercalation compounds with bromine, iodine monochloride, and copper (II) chloride have been measured using a density gradient column. The distribution of densities within a fiber type is found to be a sensitive indicator of the quality of the intercalation reaction. In all cases the density was found to increase, indicating that the mass added to the graphite is dominant over fiber expansion. Density increases are small (less than 10 percent) giving credence to a model of the intercalated graphite fibers which have regions which are intercalated and regions which are not.

  6. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  7. Carbon Fibers in Reinforced Plastics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-18

    etc. The present high prices of carbon fibers have restrictive effect on the broadeninv of fiber applications. It appears that a condition for...7A-A92 554 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WR1HT-PATTERSON AFB ON F/ 11/9 CARBON FIBERS IN REINFORCED PL S ICS, (U) APR 80 Z GUZEK UNCLASSIFIED FTD-D(RS)RT...177349 CARBON FIBERS IN REINIORCED PLASTICS By: Zbigniew Guzek English pages: 22 Source: Przeglad Elektrotechniczny, Vol. 54, A Hr. 7, 1978, pp. 321

  8. In-fiber integrated accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Xingliang; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2011-06-01

    A compact in-fiber integrated fiber-optic Michelson interferometer based accelerometer is proposed and investigated. In the system, the sensing element consists of a twin-core fiber acting as a bending simple supported beam. By demodulating the optical phase shift, we obtain that the acceleration is proportional to the force applied on the central position of the twin-core fiber. A simple model has been established to calculate the sensitivity and resonant frequency. The experimental results show that such an accelerometer has a sensitivity of 0.09 rad/g at the resonant frequency of 680 Hz.

  9. Compression Testing of Carbon Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    ksi (2205 MPa) (17:217). The cross section texture of pitch fibers will vary depending on the spinning process. Some fibers exhibit a radial texture...while others exhibit onion skin or random textures. Radial TeAture Onion-Skin iexture Ranom Texiure Figure 3 Textures of Pitch Fibers Reprinted From (17...18 JUL 89 iST Fiber (tension to compresion ) 300 200 -00 200 T- ]-- r -F _ -1 OOE-02 -2 0OE-] ,nnE r -6 OOE-03 2 20E -0 1, ME 02 STRAIN Figure 50

  10. Fiber-matrix interface failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, Lew; Marcus, Harris L.; Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Brown, Lloyd D.

    1989-01-01

    Interface fractures of aluminum-graphite composites under transverse loading are expected to occur within the graphite fibers, but very near the interface. Residual stresses in aluminum, reinforced with the new high modulus pitch-based fibers, are much lower than would be expected based on simple elasticity calculations. The excess stress may be relaxed by shearing internal to the fibers or at the interface rather than by plastic flow of the matrix. The internal shearing also occurs during repeated thermal cycling of these composites; the fibers are repeatedly intruded, then extruded, during repeated temperature excursions.

  11. Short-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Tekkanat, B.

    1987-01-01

    One of the objectives of this study was to explore the simplest predictive theories for composite stiffness and strength in injection-molded SFRTP materials which would be easy to use and would be accurate over a wide range of materials. The intention was also to try to understand the predicted dependence of stiffness and strength on fiber length for SFRTP's. The effects of matrix ductility on the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of SFRTP's were investigated by controlling the matrix ductility via composition in PS-PPO system. In addition to matrix ductility, consideration was given to the following parameters: fiber-length distribution (FLD), fiber-orientation distribution (FOD), fiber-volume fraction, aspect ratio, and fiber-end configuration to understand the role they play on the mechanical properties, efficiency of reinforcement, and failure mechanisms of SFRTP's. Sub-surface analysis by transmission optical microscopy under polarized light was utilized along with fracture surface analysis and found to be a useful technique in determining the detailed microdeformation mechanisms of both matrix and short-fiber-reinforced systems. Fiber-reinforcement efficiency in terms of both stiffness and strength was found to be strongly dependent on the fiber length and fiber-volume fraction.

  12. Surface-core fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Mosquera, L.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Heidarialamdarloo, Jamshid; Bilro, Lúcia; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the induction of long-period and Bragg gratings on surface-core optical fibers. Surface-core fibers described herein were fabricated from commercial silica tubes and germanium-doped silica rods by employing a very simple procedure. Being the core on the fiber surface, it can be sensitive to refractive index variations in the environment in which the fiber is immersed. Thus, results concerning the sensitivity of these gratings to environmental refractive index variations are presented. Besides, simulation data are presented for comparison to the experimental behavior and for projecting future steps in this research.

  13. Advanced fiber lasers and related all-fiber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji

    2000-11-01

    Fiber lasers based on rare-earth ions now play an important role in several applications ranging from communications and surgery to spectroscopic sensing because of their efficiency and compactness, and their intrinsic compatibility with single mode communication fibers. As such, there is a strong need to investigate key issues related to the design and fabrication of ``rugged'' state-of-the-art fiber lasers, and in particular to fabricate versatile high-performance fiber lasers based on ``all-fiber'' devices, i.e. using only in-fiber devices. This dissertation addresses some of these needs. One such issue is the polarization property of lasers and amplifiers based on polarization preserving fibers. A dedicated study of the polarization properties of amplifiers and lasers based on rare-earth doped elliptical core fibers has been performed. The results indicate a polarization dependent gain, with a larger gain at the polarization parallel to the major axis of the ellipse. This gain anisotropy is attributed to the differences in the confinement of the two orthogonally polarized fundamental modes of the fiber. Another issue that has been driven by several medical, sensing, and data storage applications is that of efficient laser transitions in the mid-infrared and visible spectral regions. Such lasers are difficult to achieve in conventional fibers based on silica glass hosts due to their relatively large phonon energies. A fluoride based glass host (ZBLAN) with low phonon energy was chosen to enable green and blue laser transitions using upconversion schemes in erbium and thulium respectively, and realize an efficient mid-infrared transition in erbium. Specifically, the following results have been demonstrated: (1)Green (544 nm) fiber laser with the highest combination of power (50 mW) and efficiency (37%) in Er:ZBLAN; (2)Novel Raman fiber laser-pumped 22 mW blue (490 nm) laser in Tm:ZBLAN; (3)Diode-pumped mid-infrared (2.7 μm) laser with 660 mW output in Er

  14. Fiber Tracking Cylinder Nesting

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1999-03-30

    The fiber tracker consists of 8 concentric carbon fiber cylinders of varying diameters, from 399mm to 1032.2mm and two different lengths. 1.66 and 2.52 meters. Each completed cylinder is covered over the entire o.d. with scintillating fiber ribbons with a connector on each ribbon. These ribbons are axial (parallel to the beam line) at one end and stereo (at 3 deg. to the beam line) at the other. The ribbon connectors have dowel pins which are used to match with the connectors on the wave guide ribbons. These dowel pins are also used during the nesting operation, locating and positioning measurements. The nesting operation is the insertion of one cylinder into another, aligning them with one another and fastening them together into a homogeneous assembly. For ease of assembly. the nesting operation is accomplished working from largest diameter to smallest. Although the completed assembly of all 8 cylinders glued and bolted together is very stiff. individual cylinders are relatively flexible. Therefore. during this operation, No.8 must be supported in a manner which maintains its integrity and yet allows the insertion of No.7. This is accomplished by essentially building a set of dummy end plates which replicate a No.9 cylinder. These end plates are mounted on a wheeled cart that becomes the nesting cart. Provisions for a protective cover fastened to these rings has been made and will be incorporated in finished product. These covers can be easily removed for access to No.8 and/or the connection of No.8 to No.9. Another wheeled cart, transfer cart, is used to push a completed cylinder into the cylinder(s) already mounted in the nesting cart.

  15. Compact fiber optic immunosensor using tapered fibers and acoustic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chonghua; Pivarnik, Philip E.; Auger, Steven; Rand, Arthur G.; Letcher, Stephen V.

    1997-06-01

    A compact fiber-optic sensing system that features all-fiber optical design and semiconductor-laser excitation has been developed and tested. A 2X2 fiber coupler directs the input light to the SMA connected sensing fiber tip and the fluorescent signal back to a CCD fiber spectrophotometer. In this system, the fluorescent signal is confined in the fiber system so the signal-to-noise ratio is greatly improved and the system can be operate in ambient light conditions. The utilization of a red laser diode has reduced the background signal of non-essential biomolecules. The fluorescent dye used is Cy5, which has an excitation wavelength of 650 nm and a fluorescent center wavelength of 680 nm. To illustrate the biosensor's diagnostic capabilities, a sandwich immunoassay to detect Salmonella is presented. Tapered fiber tips with different shapes and treatments were studied and optimized. An enhancement system employing ultrasonic concentration of target particles has also been developed and applied to the detection of Salmonella. The immunoassay was conducted in a test chamber that also serves as an ultrasonic standing-wave cell and allows microspheres to be concentrated in a column along the fiber probe. The system demonstrates broad promise in future biomedical application.

  16. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  17. Experiments on room temperature optical fiber-fiber direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinping; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qirong; Wang, Yaping; Gong, Mali

    2012-08-01

    High quality permanent connection between optical fibers is a significant issue in optics and communication. Studies on room temperature optical large diameter fiber-fiber direct bonding, which is essentially surface interactions of glass material, are presented here. Bonded fiber pairs are obtained for the first time through the bonding technics illustrated here. Two different kinds of bonding technics are provided-fresh surface (freshly grinded and polished) bonding and hydrophobic surface (activated by H2SO4 and HF) bonding. By means of fresh surface bonding, a bonded fiber pair with light transmitting efficiency of 98.1% and bond strength of 21.2 N is obtained. Besides, in the bonding process, chemical surface treatment of fibers' end surfaces is an important step. Therefore, various ways of surface treatment are analyzed and compared, based on atomic force microscopy force curves of differently disposed surfaces. According to the comparison, fresh surfaces are suggested as the prior choice in room temperature optical fiber-fiber bonding, owing to their larger adhesive force, attractive force, attractive distance, and adhesive range.

  18. Fiber sample presentation system for spectrophotometer cotton fiber color measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) is used to class U.S. cotton for fiber color, yielding the industry accepted, cotton-specific color parameters Rd and +b. The HVI examines a 9 square inch fiber sample, and it is also used to test large AMS standard cotton “biscuits” or rectangles. Much inte...

  19. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  20. Improved Graphite Fiber Adhesion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Borovetz, "Scanning Electron Microscopic and Surface Analytical Study of an Isotropic Vapor Deposited Carbon Film on Microporous Membranes," SEM, 2, 85...probably associated with the spreading pressure (n) of an adsorbed film of water or glycerol on the fiber surface. While values of H can be... Polypropylene Glycol 17 ± 7 2 t 2 3 t 3 3 ± 3 n-Octane 12 t 7 11 t 8 ...... n-Hexadecane --- --- 18 t 8 22 ± 7 I, TABLE 9 POLAR AND DISPERSIVE COMPONENTS OF THE

  1. Fiber optic sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer utilizes a low coherence light emitting diode (LED) laser as a light source which is filtered and driven at two RF frequencies, high and low, that are specific to the initial length of the resonator chamber. A displacement of a reflecting mirror changes the length traveled by the nonreferencing signal. The low frequency light undergoes destructive interference which reduces the average intensity of the wave while the high frequency light undergoes constructive interference which increases the average intensity of the wave. The ratio of these two intensity measurements is proportional to the displacement incurred.

  2. Fiber reinforced superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Signorelli, Robert A.; Caulfield, Thomas; Tien, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Improved performance of heat engines is largely dependent upon maximum cycle temperatures. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) are the first of a family of high temperature composites that offer the potential for significantly raising hot component operating temperatures and thus leading to improved heat engine performance. This status review of TFRS research emphasizes the promising property data developed to date, the status of TFRS composite airfoil fabrication technology, and the areas requiring more attention to assure their applicability to hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines.

  3. Fiber optic and laser sensors VII

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E.; De Paula, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains articles on fiber optic and laser sensors. Included are these topics: Fiber optic sensor development at universities, Fiber optic sensing techniques, Magnetics, and Acoustics and pressure sensors.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  5. Stronger Carbon Fibers for Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R.

    1983-01-01

    Process makes fibers 70 percent stronger at lower carbonization temperature. Stronger carbon fibers result from benzoic acid pretreatment and addition of acetylene to nitrogen carbonizing atmosphere. New process also makes carbon fibers of higher electrical resistance -- an important safety consideration.

  6. Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

  7. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  8. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  9. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10(-8)) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10(-4)), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  10. Monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Zefeng; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we present the design, construction, and testing of a monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling applications. The collimator is based on a large-sized fiber end cap and a spherical lens design on the output facet. Values of the spot size and working distance are theoretically analyzed based on Gaussian approximation and ABCD transmission matrix. The free-space fiber-fiber coupling process is also analyzed for different lens curvature radii and coupling distances. In the experiment, a collimated laser beam is obtained with Rayleigh length of about 400 mm. A high-power laser with 1.1 kW output is tested on the end cap collimator, which only heats up by 7°C at the output facet without active cooling. Free-space fiber-fiber coupling between two 20/400 μm fibers is achieved based on these collimators, with measured coupling loss lower than 0.3 dB.

  11. Multiplexed fiber-ring laser sensors for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Han, Ming

    2013-12-16

    We propose and demonstrate a multiplexing method for ultrasonic sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that are included inside the laser cavity of a fiber-ring laser. The multiplexing is achieved using add-drop filters to route the light signals, according to their wavelengths, into different optical paths, each of which contains a separate span of erbium-doped fiber (EDF) as the gain medium. Because a specific span of EDF only addresses a single wavelength channel, mode completion is avoided and the FBG ultrasonic sensors can be simultaneously demodulated. The proposed method is experimentally demonstrated using a two-channel system with two sensing FBGs in a single span of fiber.

  12. Graphite fiber intercalation: Basic properties of copper chloride intercalated fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Miller, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In situ resistance measurements were used to follow the intercalation of copper chloride in pitch-based fibers. Subsequent single fiber resistivity measurements reveal a large range of resistivities, from 13 to 160 micro-ohms cm. Additional density measurements reveal a bimodal distribution of mass densities. The dense fibers have lower resistivities and correspond to the stage III compound identified by X-ray diffraction. Neither resistivity nor density correlate with diameter. Both energy dispersive spectroscopy and mass density data suggest that excess chlorine resides in the intercalated fiber, resulting in a stoichiometry of C4.9n CuCl2.5 (where n is the stage number) for the denser fibers. Finally, thermogravimetric analysis shows a 33 percent loss in mass upon heating to 700C. This loss in mass is attributed to loss of both chlorine and carbon.

  13. Mode-locked fiber lasers based on doped fiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Song, Yanrong

    2014-05-10

    We designed a new kind of mode-locked fiber laser based on fiber arrays, where the central core is doped. A theoretical model is given for an all-fiber self-starting mode-locked laser based on this kind of doped fiber array. Two different kinds of fiber lasers with negative dispersion and positive dispersion are simulated and discussed. The stable mode-locked pulses are generated from initial noise conditions by the realistic parameters. The process of self-starting mode-locking multipulse transition and the relationship between the energy of the central core and the propagation distance of the pulses are discussed. Finally, we analyze the difference between the averaged mode-locked laser and the discrete mode-locked laser.

  14. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  15. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  16. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  17. Optical Fiber Communications Cable Connector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    incorp- oration of the TRW Cinch Optalign 4 double elbow " fiber alignment guide concept. Means for connecting either Siecor or ITT six fiber cable were...the guide, and forced toward the top cusp by the double elbow con- figuration. The geometry of the guide is such that normal tolerances of molded or

  18. Fiber-optic Solc filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lukash, D.G.; Filippov, V.N.; Nikolaev, V.M.

    1994-04-01

    A novel design of a fiber-optic Solc filter is proposed based on the coupling between polarization modes in an anisotropic single-mode fiber. A theoretical model of the filter is developed that agrees well with experimental results. The Solc filter for the wavelength 640 nm with the transmission bandwidth 45 nm is experimentally demonstrated. 4 refs.

  19. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-12-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  20. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  1. Single mode glass fiber welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. D.; Fearnehough, H. T.; Goldstein, R.; Goss, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The electric-arc welding of commercially available single-mode optical fiber has been demonstrated. A mean transmission of 92% and a maximum transmission of 98% are reported for welds of fiber waveguide of 4.5 microns core diameter.

  2. The Future of Modified Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.; Buschle-Diller, Gisela

    2006-06-30

    The future of fiber technology for medical and specialty applications depends largely on the future needs of our civilization. It has been said that unmet needs drive the funding that sparks ideas. In this regard recent emphasis on United States homeland security has encouraged new bio-fiber research, resulting in the development of anti-bacterial fibers for producing clothing and filters to eliminate pathogens and enzyme-linked fibers to facilitate decontamination of nerve toxins from human skin [1]. Magnetic fibers may also have future security applications including fiber-based detectors for individual and material recognition. Interest in smart and interactive textiles is increasing with a projected average annual growth rate of 36% by 2009 [2]. More specific markets including medical textiles and enzymes will grow even more rapidly. Among the medical textiles are interactive wound dressings, implantable grafts, smart hygienic materials, and dialysis tubing. Some of the medical and specialty fibers inclusive of these types of product areas are discussed in this book. A recent review of the surface modification of fibers as therapeutic and diagnostic systems relevant to some of these new product areas has been published by Gupta [3]. In his review he examined current technology for medical textile structures [3] with a focus on woven medical textile materials.

  3. Simulations of flexible fiber suspensions

    Treesearch

    Emilio J. Tozzi; Daniel J. Klingenberg; C. Tim Scott; Pasi Miettinen

    2005-01-01

    Fiber-level simulations are employed to probe the relationships between various properties and macroscopic behavior of flexible fiber suspensions. Issues addressed include flocculation, suspension rheology, and handsheet formation and testing. Results show that such simulations can be useful tools for understanding the factors that control the behavior of suspensions...

  4. Monolithic blue upconversion fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Volker; Eichler, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    We report a monolithic low threshold 482nm Tm:ZBLAN upconversion fiber laser. The laser cavity consists of a directly coated single-mode fluoride fiber. The vapor deposit coatings significantly reduce the coupling losses and are suitable to be pumped by laser diodes. The laser operation and threshold characteristics have been investigated. The output stability and beam quality was tested.

  5. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Terence J.; Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

  6. Plasma vitrification of asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Asbestos is a mineral in the form of long, thread-like fibers. Asbestos fibers have been among the best insulators of pipes, boilers, ducts, tanks, etc., in buildings, ships, and industrial furnaces. Over 150,000 metric tons of asbestos were consumed in the United States in 1984. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared asbestos fibers a known human carcinogen. And today, asbestos insulators are being replaced by manmade non-hazardous fibers. Millions of tons of replaced asbestos fiber insulators are in storage, awaiting the demonstration of effective alternative disposal technologies. Plasma vitrification has been demonstrated during May, June and July 1995 as a viable, cost-effective, safe technology for asbestos fiber disposal. A low-mass plasma arc heater is submerged under the waste asbestos insulating materials, and the intense heat of the plasma flame heats and melts the fibers. The by-product is dark, non-hazardous glass pellets. The vitrification process renders the asbestos waste safe for use as road construction aggregates or other fill materials. This paper will describe the results of start-up of a 1 ton-per-hour Plasma Mobile Asbestos Vitrification (MAV) Plant at a DOD Site in Port Clinton, Ohio. The Plasma MAV Plant is being demonstrated for the on-site disposal of 1.5 million pounds of Amosite asbestos fibers.

  7. Stretchable polymer solar cell fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhitao; Yang, Zhibin; Deng, Jue; Zhang, Ye; Guan, Guozhen; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-02-11

    Power yourself up: a sweater made from solar cells! Stretchable and wearable fibers are shown to be highly efficient polymer solar cells. Their stable energy conversion efficiency variation is below 10% even after 1000 bending cycles or stretching under a strain of 30%. These fibers can easily be woven into fabric from which any type of clothing can be made.

  8. Supercontinuum Generation in Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Taylor, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction and history J. R. Taylor; 2. Supercontinuum generation in microstructure fiber - an historical note J. K. Ranka; 3. Nonlinear fiber optics overview J. C. Travers, M. H. Frosz and J. M. Dudley; 4. Fiber supercontinuum generation overview J. M. Dudley; 5. Silica fibers for supercontinuum generation J. C. Knight and W. Wadsworth; 6. Supercontinuum generation and nonlinearity in soft glass fibers J. H. V. Price and D. J. Richardson; 7. Increasing the blue-shift of a picosecond pumped supercontinuum M. H. Frosz, P. M. Moselund, P. D. Rasmussen, C. L. Thomsen and O. Bang; 8. Continuous wave supercontinuum generation J. C. Travers; 9. Theory of supercontinuum and interactions of solitons with dispersive waves D. V. Skryabin and A. V. Gorbach; 10. Interaction of four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering in optical fibers S. Coen, S. G. Murdoch and F. Vanholsbeeck; 11. Nonlinear optics in emerging waveguides: revised fundamentals and implications S. V. Afshar, M. Turner and T. M. Monro; 12. Supercontinuum generation in dispersion varying fibers G. Genty; 13. Supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide glass waveguides Dong-Il Yeom, M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther Davies and B. J. Eggleton; 14. Supercontinuum generation for carrier-envelope phase stabilization of mode-locked lasers S. T. Cundiff; 15. Biophotonics applications of supercontinuum generation C. Dunsby and P. M. W. French; 16. Fiber sources of tailored supercontinuum in nonlinear microspectroscopy and imaging A. M. Zheltikov; Index.

  9. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  10. Safety Precautions in Fiber Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marcia

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the potential hazards of working with fibers, dyes, and wax in textile art projects: bacteria, dust, poisons, allergies, and fumes. Safety precautions for working with dyes are listed. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  11. Experimental optical fiber communications link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    An optical fiber communications link 1.5 kilometers in length was installed between the Interim Frequency Standard Test Facility and the Timing and Frequency Systems Research Laboratory at JPL. It is being used to develop optical fiber technology for use in the DSN and particularly for precise time and frequency distribution.

  12. Safety Precautions in Fiber Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marcia

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the potential hazards of working with fibers, dyes, and wax in textile art projects: bacteria, dust, poisons, allergies, and fumes. Safety precautions for working with dyes are listed. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  13. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  14. Development of novel fibers for telecoms application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Kazunori; Imamura, Katsunori; Takahashi, Masanori; Yagi, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the current situations of optical fibers used for terrestrial and submarine transmission systems as well as up-to-date R&D on these fibers. The current fibers include standard single mode fibers (SMFs), non-zero dispersion shifted fibers (NZ-DSFs), and dispersion managed lines (DMLs). Even though these fibers show quite high and matured properties, the internet traffic is continuously growing, and around 2015-2020, it is expected that the current transmission fibers would become inadequate. To prepare for the future ultra high-capacity transmission, there are three important R&D directions for transmission fibers. (1) Reducing non-linearity by means of enlarging Aeff and/or reducing attenuation loss. It is very important in the case of transmission systems using new multi-level signal formats. (2) Expanding the transmission band more than the current C- and/or L-Band by utilizing new transmission fibers. For example, holey fibers (HFs), which have an endlessly single mode (ESM) property, are one of the interesting candidates of the new transmission fibers. (3) Using Space Division Multiplexing (SDM) by using multi-core fibers. The multi-core fiber literally multiples the core number within a fiber dimension, which enables multiple transmission capacity per one fiber. In addition to the developments of transmission fibers, component fibers have also been studied and developed. Examples of R&D on these component fibers will be also discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  15. EXPLORATORY INVESTIGATION OF GLASSMETAL COMPOSITE FIBERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLASS , FIBERS , COMPOSITE MATERIALS, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, BERYLLIUM, COPPER, DRAWING(FORMING), MELTING, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES, BORON COMPOUNDS, NITRIDES, TEST METHODS, ENCAPSULATION, FIBER METALLURGY.

  16. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  17. Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric

    2003-07-29

    Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

  18. Coherent fiber supercontinuum for biophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Biophotonics and nonlinear fiber optics have traditionally been two independent fields. Since the discovery of fiber-based supercontinuum generation in 1999, biophotonics applications employing incoherent light have experienced a large impact from nonlinear fiber optics, primarily because of the access to a wide range of wavelengths and a uniform spatial profile afforded by fiber supercontinuum. However, biophotonics applications employing coherent light have not benefited from the most well-known techniques of supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few key techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. Despite their relative independence, these techniques are the focus of this review, because they can be integrated into a low-cost portable biophotonics source platform. This platform can be shared across many different areas of research in biophotonics, enabling new applications such as point-of-care coherent optical biomedical imaging. PMID:24358056

  19. Sensored fiber reinforced polymer grate

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Michael P.; Mack, Thomas Kimball

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a sensored grate that can be utilized for various security fencing applications. The sensored grate includes a grate framework and an embedded optical fiber. The grate framework is formed of a molded polymer such as, for instance, molded fiber reinforced polymer. Further, the grate framework includes a set of elongated elements, where the elongated elements are spaced to define apertures through the grate framework. The optical fiber is embedded in the elongated elements of the grate framework. Moreover, bending or breaking of one or more of the elongated elements can be detected based on a change in a characteristic of input light provided to the optical fiber compared to output light received from the optical fiber.

  20. Fiber optic combiner and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of the possible development of two optical devices, one to take two images as inputs and to present their arithmetic sum as a single output, the other to take one image as input and present two identical images as outputs is described. Significant engineering time was invested in establishing precision fiber optics drawing capabilities, real time monitoring of the fiber size and exact measuring of fiber optics ribbons. Various assembly procedures and tooling designs were investigated and prototype models were built and evaluated that established technical assurance that the device was feasible and could be fabricated. Although the interleaver specification in its entirety was not achieved, the techniques developed in the course of the program improved the quality of images transmitted by fiber optic arrays by at least an order of magnitude. These techniques are already being applied to the manufacture of precise fiber optic components.