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Sample records for chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone

  1. Sex hormone-binding globulin response to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in children with cryptorchidism, anorchia, male pseudohermaphroditism, and micropenis.

    PubMed

    Belgorosky, A; Rivarola, M A

    1982-04-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin serum concentrations (SHBG) were measured before and after a 5-day hCG stimulation test in 11 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism, 6 with anorchia, 5 with male pseudohermaphroditism, and 5 with micropenis. Cryptorchid boys had decreased SHBG levels after hCG, by 55 +/- 17% (mean +/- SE) of the basal concentration. Patients with anorchia, who did not show an elevation in serum androgens, did not have decreased SHBG concentrations. Four of the 5 patients with male pseudohermaphroditism had an adequate elevation of serum androgens, did not have decreased SHBG concentrations. Four of the 5 patients with male pseudohermaphroditism had an adequate elevation of serum androgens after hCG, but in only 3 of them did SHBG decrease. None of the 5 patients with micropenis had decreased serum SHBG levels despite normal increments in serum androgens. The administration of a long-acting preparation of testosterone to sexually infantile subjects produce a similar decrease in the SHBG concentration. This change in SHBG concentration after hCG or testosterone in prepubertal boys could be used as a convenient test of biological response to androgens.

  2. Mosaic tetrasomy 9p case with the phenotype mimicking Klinefelter syndrome and hyporesponse of gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Wakako; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Mariko; Oka, Nobutoshi; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tetrasomy 9p is a rare clinical syndrome and about 30% of known cases exhibit chromosome mosaicism. The cases with tetrasomy 9p mosaicism have been reported to show the various phenotypes. On the other hand, Klinefelter syndrome is well recognized chromosomal abnormality caused by an additional X chromosome in males (47,XXY), and the characteristic clinical findings include tall stature, immaturity of external genitalia, testicular dysfunction. Here, we report a 10-year-old male with tetrasomy of 9p mosaicism, whose phenotypic feature is mimicking Klinefelter syndrome. He was referred to our hospital for inconspicuous penis. He showed tall height (+2.5 SD). Endocrinological examination revealed the poor testosterone response to human chorionic gonadotropin administration, which indicated the testicular hypofunction, whereas MRI revealed concealed penis as a cause of inconspicuous penis. Because of the phenotype mimicking Klinefelter syndrome, karyotype of his blood lymphocytes was analyzed, and an additional marker chromosome was detected in 6% of the investigated metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the marker chromosome was an isochromosome 9p, which resulted in tetrasomy 9p. Chromosome analysis of buccal smear also showed mosaicism for two karyotypes: 5% of cells had the isochromosome of 9p, and the other cells showed normal. This case is the second case with tetrasomy 9p mosaicism mimicking Klinefelter syndrome phenotype in the world. Our case, together with previously reported cases with the same association, indicates the possibility of testicular hypofunction and urogenital anomalies induced by overexpression of some genes on chromosome 9p. PMID:17932453

  3. Regulation of serum testosterone in men with steroid sulfatase deficiency: response to human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, A; Oikarinen, A; Vihko, R

    1986-07-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 5000 IU) was administered to 6 control men and 6 patients with recessive x-linked ichthyosis (RXLI) with verified 3 beta-hydroxysteroid sulfate sulfatase (3 beta-HSS) deficiency in their skin biopsy samples. Concentrations of steroids and their sulfate conjugates were determined in peripheral serum specimens collected a day before and 4 days after hCG administration. Testosterone concentrations were identical in patients and controls. Baseline serum LH concentrations were also identical in the 2 groups showing that there were no major differences in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The significantly increased (31-82%) serum concentrations of sulfated pregnenolone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol in patients compared with controls indicated that their circulating concentrations were regulated by 3 beta-HSS. This is in line with the fact that the baseline concentrations of the same unconjugated steroids were significantly lower (32-90%) in patients with RXLI, suggesting that a proportion of these circulating steroids were derived from the corresponding sulfated precursors. The response patterns and actual concentrations of testosterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and estradiol were similar in the patients and the controls after hCG. The decreased concentrations of testosterone sulfated at carbon 17 under baseline conditions and after hCG in patients with RXLI remains enigmatic. In conclusion, testosterone production and the response to hCG seem to be identical in patients with RXLI and controls despite the fact that significant differences were observed in the circulating concentrations of several unconjugated and sulfated testosterone precursors.

  4. Aspirin inhibits androgen response to chorionic gonadotropin in humans.

    PubMed

    Conte, D; Romanelli, F; Fillo, S; Guidetti, L; Isidori, A; Franceschi, F; Latini, M; di Luigi, L

    1999-12-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis; less clear is their role in testicular steroidogenesis. To evaluate the involvement of cyclooxygenase metabolites, such as prostaglandins, in the regulation of human testicular steroidogenesis, we examined the effects of a prostaglandin-blocker, aspirin, on plasma testosterone, pregnenolone, progesterone, 17OH-progesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 17beta-estradiol response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in normal male volunteers in a placebo-controlled, single-blinded study. To test the efficacy of aspirin, seminal prostaglandin E(2) levels were also determined. hCG stimulation increased peripheral levels of testosterone, 17OH-progesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 17beta-estradiol, without affecting circulating pregnenolone and progesterone values. Aspirin significantly lowered seminal prostaglandin E(2) levels, whereas it did not modify steroid concentrations not exposed to exogenous hCG. Moreover, the drug significantly reduced the response of testosterone, 17OH-progesterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone to hCG, as assessed by the mean integrated area under the curve, whereas it did not influence 17beta-estradiol response. In conclusion, aspirin treatment inhibits androgen response to chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in normal humans. The action of aspirin is probably mediated via an effective arachidonate cyclooxygenase block.

  5. Ketoconazole inhibition of testicular secretion of testosterone and displacement of steroid hormones from serum transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, D S; Boyden, T W; Pamenter, R W; Johnson, D G; Stevens, D A; Galgiani, J N

    1983-01-01

    In vivo perfusion of canine testes with ketoconazole inhibited the stimulation of testosterone production by human chorionic gonadotropin in a dose-dependent manner. Ketoconazole also selectively displaced steroids from serum-binding globulins. Dihydrotestosterone and estradiol binding to sex hormone-binding globulin were inhibited by ketoconazole. Cortisol binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin was unaffected. The concentrations of ketoconazole that inhibited human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation of testicular androgen production and displaced sex steroids from sex hormone-binding globulin were in the range of blood levels found in patients on higher therapeutic dosage regimens. Suppression of testicular testosterone synthesis and displacement of estrogens from sex hormone-binding globulin may decrease the androgen/estrogen ratio of the blood and contribute to the development of gynecomastia that has been reported in some ketoconazole-treated patients. PMID:6301363

  6. [Serum testosterone response to chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) injection in normal and cryptorchid children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fideleff, H L; Baigorri, A M; Guitelman, A; Hollander, T; Villuendas, V; Espínola, B

    1980-01-01

    Plasma testosterone (ng/ml) was measured in a group of prepuberal children with intrascrotal testes (n = 15) and in a group of prepuberal cryptorchid children (7 unilateral and 3 bilateral; n = 10) before and after stimulus with 3000IU of HCG (Group A) and with 5000IU (Group B). The serum testosterone before HCG stimulus was similar in normal (Group A: 1.10 +/- 0.03: Group B: 1.18 +/- 0.31) as well as in those of the cryptorchid children (Group A: 1 +/- 0.28; Group B: 1.19 +/- 0.36). The stimulus with 3000IU of HCG did not significantly raise the plasma testosterone in both normal (2.42 +/- 1.09) and cryptorchid children (1.70 +/- 0.5). The stimulus with 5000IU of HCG increased the plasma testosterone to 3.52 +/- 1 in normal children and 3.26 +/- 1.2 in cryptorchid children (p less than 0.05 with respect to the pre HCG values), with no difference in the response between the normal and the cryptorchid children.

  7. Impact of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist addition on pregnancy rates in gonadotropin-stimulated intrauterine insemination cycles

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shikha; Majumdar, Abha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in improving clinical pregnancy rate in gonadotropin-stimulated intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in patients of unexplained infertility. STUDY DESIGN: This was a prospective, randomized case-controlled study. SETTINGS: The study was conducted in the infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred twenty-seven women undergoing IUI following controlled ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins (recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone [r-FSH] 75 IU/day) were randomly divided into two groups. Women in Group I received GnRH antagonist (Cetrorelix 0.25 mg/day) in a multiple dose flexible protocol. Women in Group II received r-FSH alone. Ovulatory trigger was given with human chorionic gonadotropin 5000 IU when dominant follicle was ≥18 mm. IUI was performed within 44–48 h. Both groups received similar luteal phase support. Primary outcome measure was clinical pregnancy rate. The trial was powered to detect an absolute increase in clinical pregnancy rate by 13% from an assumed 20% clinical pregnancy rate in the control group, with an alpha error level of 0.05 and a beta error level of 0.20. RESULTS: Clinical pregnancy rate in Groups I and II was 27.6% (n = 56) and 26.5% (n = 54), respectively (P=0.800). Ongoing pregnancy and multiple pregnancy rates were likewise similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of GnRH antagonist to gonadotropin-stimulated IUI cycles results in no significant difference in clinical pregnancy rate. PMID:27803582

  8. Gonadotropin-regulated Testicular RNA Helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a Negative Regulator of Luteinizing/Chorionic Gonadotropin Hormone-induced Steroidogenesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH−/−) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH−/− mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH−/− mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH−/− mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male. PMID:21719703

  9. Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a negative regulator of luteinizing/chorionic gonadotropin hormone-induced steroidogenesis in Leydig cells: central role of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L

    2011-08-26

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH(-/-)) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH(-/-) mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH(-/-) mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male.

  10. GnRH agonist Lupron (leuprolide acetate) pre-treatments prevent ovulation in response to gonadotropin stimulation in the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa).

    PubMed

    Pelican, Katharine M; Wildt, David E; Howard, Jo Gayle

    2006-10-01

    In many species, controlling the ovary prior to induction of ovulation improves the success of ovarian response and artificial insemination (AI). We assessed the impact of suppression of estrus with the GnRH agonist, Lupron, on ovarian sensitivity to equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the clouded leopard. Seven female clouded leopards were given two injections of Lupron (3.75 mg IM) 23 d apart, followed 44 d later by eCG and hCG. Daily fecal samples were collected from 60 d before Lupron to 60 d after hCG. Fecal metabolites of estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Lupron decreased (P < 0.05) the number of E peaks during Lupron treatment compared to pre-Lupron. All females had baseline E and six of seven (86%) had nadir P on day of eCG. Exogenous gonadotropins induced E elevations in all females. However, mean E in the gonadotropin-provoked estrus was decreased (P < 0.05) compared to pre-Lupron estrous periods. Only one of seven (14%) females ovulated after eCG/hCG. In conclusion, estrous cycle control with Lupron resulted in predictable ovarian suppression prior to gonadotropin stimulation but altered ovarian sensitivity by an as yet unknown mechanism so that ovulation was inhibited, even when using a proven exogenous gonadotropin protocol.

  11. Effects of high-dose and multiple-dose gonadotropin stimulation on mouse oocyte quality as assessed by preimplantation development following in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Edgar, D H; Whalley, K M; Mills, J A

    1987-10-01

    The effects of increasing the level of ovarian stimulation on preimplantation embryonic development were assessed using a mouse in vitro fertilization system. When F1 hybrid (C57BL/6 X CBA/Ca) mice received a single injection of 5 IU pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) followed 60 hr later by 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) approximately 50% of the resultant postovulatory oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage following in vitro fertilization. Increasing the single dose of PMSG to 10 or 15 IU resulted in significant reductions in the frequency of development to the blastocyst stage. When one or two additional doses of 5 IU PMSG were administered 24 and 48 hr after an initial injection of 5 IU, lower frequencies of oocytes with the potential for full preimplantation development were again observed. This reduction in gamete quality was significantly greater when the final dose of PMSG was administered only 12 hr prior to hCG. The results suggest that excessive gonadotropin stimulation may compromise the quality of the preimplantation embryos obtained following in vitro fertilization and that the timing of gonadotropin administration may also be critical.

  12. Pubertal administration of DEHP delays puberty, suppresses testosterone production, and inhibits reproductive tract development in male Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Nigel C; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Furr, Jonathan; Lambright, Christy R; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, L Earl

    2009-09-01

    Although is clear that exposure to high dosage levels of some phthalates delays the onset of puberty in the male rat, it has been hypothesized that low levels of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) accelerate puberty by enhancing testicular androgen synthesis. The current study was designed to determine if the dose response to DEHP was nonmonotonic, as hypothesized. Pubertal administration of DEHP delayed the onset of puberty and reduced androgen-dependent tissue weights in both Long-Evans (LE) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats 300 and 900 mg DEHP/kg/day. These effects were generally of greater magnitude in LE than SD rats. By contrast, alterations in testis histopathology (300 and 900 mg/kg/day) were more severe in SD than in LE rats. Taken together, these results suggest that DEHP may be acting on the pubertal male rat testis via two modes of action; one via the Leydig cells and the other via the Sertoli cells. Treatment with DEHP generally reduced serum testosterone and increased serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, demonstrating that the reduction in testosterone was due to the effect of DEHP on the testis and not via an inhibition of LH from hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Testosterone production ex vivo (with and without human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation) was consistently reduced in males at the time of puberty and shortly thereafter. DEHP treatment did not accelerate the age at puberty or enhance testosterone levels at 10 or 100 mg/kg/day in either LE or SD rats, as some have hypothesized. Taken together, these results do not provide any evidence of a nonmonotonic dose response to DEHP during puberty.

  13. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  14. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters.

  15. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters. PMID:27132576

  16. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  17. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  18. Familial functional anorchism: a review of etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Connors, M H; Styne, D M

    1985-06-01

    Identical male twins with small penes and bilateral unpalpable gonads were unresponsive to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. Both infants had elevated levels of gonadotropins. The size of the penis did not meet fully the criteria for micropenis and the organ was responsive to testosterone therapy. The use of primary human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation followed by testosterone measurements is indicated for children with cryptorchidism in whom the etiology of micropenis is in doubt. We report the first observation of anorchism in identical twins. PMID:3999209

  19. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed after 12 hours.You may brush your teeth; use mouthwash; use tobacco products; chew gum; eat; and drink alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages while you are wearing a testosterone buccal system. ...

  20. Testosterone Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . ^ Back to top What does the test result ... are normally low. Increased testosterone levels can indicate: PCOS Ovarian or adrenal gland tumor Congenital adrenal hyperplasia ^ ...

  1. Prenatal testosterone excess reduces sperm count and motility.

    PubMed

    Recabarren, Sergio E; Rojas-García, Pedro P; Recabarren, Mónica P; Alfaro, Victor H; Smith, Rosita; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Sir-Petermann, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    The reproductive system is extremely susceptible to insults from exposure to exogenous steroids during development. Excess prenatal testosterone exposure programs neuroendocrine, ovarian, and metabolic deficits in the female, features seen in women with polycystic ovary disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether prenatal testosterone excess also disrupts the male reproductive system, using sheep as a model system. The extent of reproductive disruption was tested by assessing sperm quantity and quality as well as Leydig cell responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin. Males born to mothers treated with 30 mg testosterone propionate twice weekly from d 30 to 90 and with 40 mg testosterone propionate from d 90 to 120 of pregnancy (T-males) showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in body weight, scrotal circumference, and sperm count compared with control males. Mean straight line velocity of sperms was also lower in T-males (P < 0.05). Circulating testosterone levels in response to the human chorionic gonadotropin did not differ between groups. These findings demonstrate that exposure to excess testosterone during fetal development has a negative impact on reproductive health of the male offspring, raising concerns relative to unintended human exposure to steroidal mimics in the environment.

  2. Inhibition of cytochrome P-450 C17 enzyme by a GnRH agonist in ovarian follicles from gonadotropin-stimulated rats.

    PubMed

    Irusta, Griselda; Parborell, Fernanda; Tesone, Marta

    2007-05-01

    Our objective was to study the direct action of a GnRH-I agonist, leuprolide acetate (LA), on ovarian steroidogenesis in preovulatory follicles obtained from equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG)-treated rats. Previously, we have demonstrated an inhibitory effect of LA on steroidogenesis and follicular development. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) exerts its negative effect on follicular development by inhibiting thecal cytochrome P-450 C17 (P450C17) alpha-hydroxylase expression and, consequently, androgen synthesis. Studies were carried out in prepubertal female rats injected with either eCG (control) or eCG plus LA (LA) and killed at different time points. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that LA induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression mainly in theca cells of preantral and antral follicles. In addition, serum progesterone levels increased significantly (P < 0.05), whereas those of androsterone decreased (P < 0.05) after 8 h of LA treatment. This inhibition caused by LA seemed to be a consequence of the decreased expression of follicular P450C17 alpha-hydroxylase, as demonstrated by Western blot and RT-PCR techniques. In vitro studies using follicles isolated from 48-h-eCG-treated rats and cultured with LA showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of FSH-induced androsterone follicular content as well as P450C17 alpha-hydroxylase protein levels, as determined by Western analysis. However, LA increased StAR protein expression in these follicles without significant changes in P450scc enzyme levels. Taking all these findings into account, we suggest that GnRH-I exerts a direct inhibitory action on gonadotropin-induced follicular development by decreasing the temporal expression of the P450C17 enzyme and, consequently, androgen production, thus reducing the supply of estrogens available to developing follicles. PMID:17468395

  3. Recent trends in the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bum Sik; Ahn, Tai Young

    2007-11-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS) is defined as a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age and is characterized by typical symptoms and deficiency in serum testosterone levels. TDS is a result of the interaction of hypothalamo-pituitary and testicular factors. Now, treatment of TDS with testosterone is still controversial due to a lack of large, controlled clinical trials on efficacy. The risks of treatment with testosterone appear to be minimal, although long-term studies on the safety of testosterone therapy are lacking. The aim of the therapy is to establish a physiological concentration of serum testosterone in order to correct the androgen deficiency, relieve its symptoms and prevent long-term sequelae. All of the available products, despite their varying pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles, are able to reach this goal. Newer testosterone patches seem not to cause severe skin irritation. Testosterone gels minimize the skin irritation while providing flexibility in dosing and a low discontinuation rate. Oral testosterone undecanoate (TU) is free of liver toxicity. Recent formulation of oral TU markedly increased shelf-live, a major drawback in the older preparation. Producing swings in testosterone levels rising rapidly to the supraphysiological range is not the case with the new injectable long-acting preparation of TU. To be able to rapidly react and stop treatment in cases where side-effects and contraindications are detected, the short-acting transdermal and oral delivery modes have certain advantages. However, there is no evidence that the use of an injectable long-acting TU in men with TDS has limitations in clinical application for this reason. The use of dehydroepiandrosterone is still controversial because of a lack of well designed long-term trials, although some recent studies suggest positive effects on various body systems. Only a few studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of hCG (human

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as “middle”, and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  5. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as "middle", and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  6. LepChorionDB, a database of Lepidopteran chorion proteins and a set of tools useful for the identification of chorion proteins in Lepidopteran proteomes.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Nikolaos G; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Papandreou, Nikos C; Malatras, Apostolos; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2013-02-01

    Chorion proteins of Lepidoptera have a tripartite structure, which consists of a central domain and two, more variable, flanking arms. The central domain is highly conserved and it is used for the classification of chorion proteins into two major classes, A and B. Annotated and unreviewed Lepidopteran chorion protein sequences are available in various databases. A database, named LepChorionDB, was constructed by searching 5 different protein databases using class A and B central domain-specific profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs), developed in this work. A total of 413 Lepidopteran chorion proteins from 9 moths and 1 butterfly species were retrieved. These data were enriched and organised in order to populate LepChorionDB, the first relational database, available on the web, containing Lepidopteran chorion proteins grouped in A and B classes. LepChorionDB may provide insights in future functional and evolutionary studies of Lepidopteran chorion proteins and thus, it will be a useful tool for the Lepidopteran scientific community and Lepidopteran genome annotators, since it also provides access to the two pHMMs developed in this work, which may be used to discriminate A and B class chorion proteins. LepChorionDB is freely available at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/LepChorionDB.

  7. Effects of prolonged physical exercise and fasting upon plasma testosterone level in rats.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, C Y; Ferre, P; Serrurier, B; Merino, D; Pesquies, P C

    1982-01-01

    Prolonged physical exercise and fasting in male rats were studied to determine the effect of these two treatments on plasma testosterone level. Blood and tissue samples were drawn after 1 h, 3 h, 5 h, and 7 h treadmill running, and after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of fasting. Both treatments resulted in a significant fall in plasma testosterone, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), plasma Insulin (IRI) and in liver and muscle glycogen stores. In the course of these two treatments the injection of a supra maximal dose of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) produced a rise in plasma testosterone similar to that in control rats. This indicates that the decrease of plasma LH may be responsible for the decrease in plasma testosterone, which is time-related with the decrease in glycogen stores. The possible metabolic role of the decrease in plasma testosterone is discussed. PMID:6889494

  8. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH. PMID:25578932

  9. Spontaneous cell death in the chorion laeve.

    PubMed

    Parmley, T H

    1990-06-01

    The granulosa cells of the dominant follicle grow, differentiate, and die in a roughly predictable amount of time. Because the simultaneous death of this population of cells results in menstruation, one may say that the life span of this population of cells "times" the menstrual cycle. Metamorphosis in amphibians and morphogenesis in several vertebrates are other examples of developmental milestones that are "timed" by the life span of specific cell populations. In all these examples, cell death is associated with a specific histology, apoptosis. Apoptosis characterizes the cell death that produces the progressive disappearance of the trophoblast in the chorion laeve as term is approached. Therefore, the histology of trophoblastic death in the near-term chorion laeve corresponds to that of populations of cells with life spans that "time" developmental events. The trophoblastic cell population of the chorion laeve is prematurely destroyed by infiltrating maternal leukocytes in cases of chorioamnionitis.

  10. The chorionic bump: Etiologic insights from two pathologic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Wax, Joseph R; Blaszyk, Hagen; Jones, Michael; Cartin, Angelina; Pinette, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The clinical significance and etiology of the chorionic bump remain unclear. We describe two pregnancies characterized by chorionic bumps, which subsequently were diagnosed with a complete mole and trisomy 18, respectively. We hypothesize that placental pathology, including edema and hydropic villi, may contribute to or cause the sonographic finding of some chorionic bumps. An association between chorionic bumps and aneuploidy awaits future study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:452-454, 2016. PMID:27220064

  11. Tissue-specific expression of squirrel monkey chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Hubler, Tina R.; Boston, Lori; Scammell, Jonathan G.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH play central roles in reproductive function. In Old World primates, LH stimulates ovulation in females and testosterone production in males. Recent studies have found that squirrel monkeys and other New World primates lack expression of LH in the pituitary. Instead, chorionic gonadotropin (CG), which is normally only expressed in the placenta of Old World primates, is the active luteotropic pituitary hormone in these animals. The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue-specific regulation of squirrel monkey CG. We isolated the squirrel monkey CGβ gene and promoter from genomic DNA from squirrel monkey B-lymphoblasts and compared the promoter sequence to that of the common marmoset, another New World primate, and human CGβ and LHβ. Using reporter gene assays, we found that a squirrel monkey CGβ promoter fragment (−1898/+9) is active in both mouse pituitary LβT2 and human placenta JEG3 cells, but not in rat adrenal PC12 cells. Furthermore, within this construct separate cis-elements are responsible for pituitary- and placenta-specific expression. Pituitary-specific expression is governed by Egr-1 binding sites in the proximal 250 bp of the promoter, whereas placenta-specific expression is controlled by AP-2 sites further upstream. Thus, selective expression of the squirrel monkey CGβ promoter in pituitary and placental cells is governed by distinct cis-elements that exhibit homology with human LHβ and marmoset CGβ promoters, respectively. PMID:21130091

  12. [Ultrasonic diagnosis of chorionicity in multiple pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Levy, R; Arfi, J-S; Mirlesse, V; Jacob, D

    2003-11-01

    The management of multiple pregnancies requires a correct diagnosis of chorionicity. This assessment is easy and reliable before 15 weeks of gestation by ultrasonography, but becomes much more difficult during the second and third trimester for same sex foetuses. From 5 to 8 weeks of gestation, the visualization of two gestational sacs assesses bichorionicity. From 8 to 14 weeks, the diagnosis of chorionicity is based on the presence of the lambda sign, completed by the evaluation of the thickness of the inter-twin membrane and the placenta localisation. From 15 weeks onward, the twin peak (or lambda) sign remains the best predictor of dichorionicity but is valuable only if it is present. The measurement of the thickness of the inter-twin membrane and the count of its layers are not available in all cases. From March 1999 to March 2000, we studied 31 multiple pregnancies with same sex foetuses, referred to our centre during the second trimester. The patients were asked for their former ultrasound reports. Chorionicity was mentioned only in 77% of the cases and when mentioned the information was correct in 85% of the cases. Thus, improving on that point is necessary. Prospective studies focusing on ultrasound determination of chorionicity show accuracy close to 100% when the ultrasonography is correctly realized before 15 weeks of gestation. PMID:14623562

  13. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  14. Testosterone and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D M; Jones, T H

    2015-07-01

    Testosterone is a key hormone in the pathology of metabolic diseases such as obesity. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased fat mass (particularly central adiposity) and reduced lean mass in males. These morphological features are linked to metabolic dysfunction, and testosterone deficiency is associated with energy imbalance, impaired glucose control, reduced insulin sensitivity and dyslipidaemia. A bidirectional relationship between testosterone and obesity underpins this association indicated by the hypogonadal-obesity cycle and evidence weight loss can lead to increased testosterone levels. Androgenic effects on enzymatic pathways of fatty acid metabolism, glucose control and energy utilization are apparent and often tissue specific with differential effects noted in different regional fat depots, muscle and liver to potentially explain the mechanisms of testosterone action. Testosterone replacement therapy demonstrates beneficial effects on measures of obesity that are partially explained by both direct metabolic actions on adipose and muscle and also potentially by increasing motivation, vigour and energy allowing obese individuals to engage in more active lifestyles. The degree of these beneficial effects may be dependent on the treatment modality with longer term administration often achieving greater improvements. Testosterone replacement may therefore potentially be an effective adjunctive treatment for weight management in obese men with concomitant hypogonadism. PMID:25982085

  15. Testosterone and mortality.

    PubMed

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T Hugh

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that men with low or low normal endogenous testosterone are at an increased risk of mortality than those with higher levels. Cardiovascular disease accounts for the greater proportion of deaths in those with low testosterone. Cancer and respiratory deaths in some of the studies are also significantly more prevalent. Disease-specific studies have identified that there are higher mortality rates in men with cardiovascular, respiratory and renal diseases, type 2 diabetes and cancer with low testosterone. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and inflammatory disorders are all associated with an increased prevalence of testosterone deficiency. Two major questions that arise from these findings are (1) is testosterone deficiency directly involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions and/or a contributory factor impairing the body's natural defences or is it merely a biomarker of ill health and the severity of underlying disease process? (2) Does testosterone replacement therapy retard disease progression and ultimately enhance the clinical prognosis and survival? This review will discuss the current state of knowledge and discuss whether or not there are any answers to either of these questions. There is convincing evidence that low testosterone is a biomarker for disease severity and mortality. Testosterone deficiency is associated with adverse effects on certain cardiovascular risk factors that when combined could potentially promote atherosclerosis. The issue of whether or not testosterone replacement therapy improves outcomes is controversial. Two retrospective studies in men with diagnosed hypogonadism with or without type 2 diabetes have reported significantly improved survival. PMID:25041142

  16. Effects of resistance training on testosterone metabolism in younger and older men.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Juha P; Nyman, Kai; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Parviainen, Tapani; Helste, Mika; Rannikko, Antti; Kraemer, William J; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) on the metabolism of testosterone (T) in younger (n=5, 28±3yrs.) and older (n=8, 70±2yrs.) men. Experimental heavy resistance exercises (5×10RM leg presses) were performed before and after a 12-month of RT. No age differences were found in the production or metabolic clearance rate of T (determined by stable isotope dilution method), skeletal muscle androgen receptor content or serum LH concentrations due to acute or chronic RT. The T production capacity response to gonadotropin stimulation and the concentrations of the urinary T metabolites (androsterone and etiocholanolone) were lower in the older compared to younger men (p<0.05-0.01). This study further showed that RT may have acute effect on T production and clearance rates, while the exercise-induced increases in serum T appeared to be induced by decreased metabolic clearance rate of T. Attenuated T production capacity and urinary excretion of T metabolites in older men may reflect the known reduction in testicular steroidogenesis upon aging. No changes were observed in T metabolism due to RT indicating a homeostatic stability for this hormone in men of different ages.

  17. Testosterone and Sexual Function.

    PubMed

    Gannon, John R; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone and sexual function are related. Current evidence suggests that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may improve sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in men who are hypogonadal, mixed, or eugonadal have all been examined through numerous studies. The most recent large analysis showed an overall improvement in sexual function outcomes in men treated with TRT. This improvement is difficult to measure and seems to differ based on the baseline hormonal status of the patient at the beginning of treatment. PMID:27132579

  18. Advances in testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Gooren, Louis J G

    2009-01-01

    The major goal of androgen substitution is to replace testosterone at levels as close to physiological concentrations as is possible. The mainstay of testosterone susbstitution are parenteral testosterone esters (enanthate and cypionate) to be administered every 2-3 weeks. A major disadvantage is the strongly fluctuating levels of plasma testosterone which are at least 50% of the time not in the physiological range. A significant improvement is parenteral testosterone undecanoate producing normal plasma testosterone for 12 weeks. Subcutaneous testosterone implants provide the patient, depending on the dose of implants, with normal plasma testosterone for 3-6 months. Its use is, however, not widespread. Oral testosterone undecanoate dissolved in oil bypasses the liver via its lymphatic absorption, but resulting plasma levels are erratic. Transdermal testosterone preparations have already been available for two decades. Transdermal testosterone gel produces attractive pharmocokinetic serum testosterone profiles and offers greater flexibility in dosing. Transdermal gel has been recommended in elderly males. In case of complications its use can be discontinued immediately. Oromucosal testosterone preparations are being developed. Testosterone replacement is usually of long duration, and patient compliance is of utmost importance. Therefore, the patient must be involved in the selection of the type of testosterone preparation. PMID:19011287

  19. Maturity and fertility of rhesus monkey oocytes collected at different intervals after an ovulatory stimulus (human chorionic gonadotropin) in in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Alexander, M; Zelinski-Wooten, M; Stouffer, R L

    1996-01-01

    In rhesus monkeys undergoing ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF), a midcycle injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) substitutes for the LH surge and induces preovulatory oocyte maturation. The time interval between injection and oocyte collection, ideally, allows for the completion of oocyte maturation without ovulation, which would reduce the number of oocytes available for harvest. To evaluate the influence of this time interval on oocyte parameters following hCG administration, we conducted a series of gonadotropin treatment protocols in 51 animals in which the interval from hCG administration to follicular aspiration was systematically varied from 27 to 36 hr. Follicle number and size, evaluated prior to hCG administration by sonography, did not vary significantly or consistently with preovulatory maturation time. Oocytes were harvested by laparotomy or laparoscopy, and scored for maturity before insemination. The percentage of mature, metaphase II (MII) oocytes at recovery increased significantly with increasing preovulatory time and was inversely proportional to that of metaphase I (MI) oocytes. However, oocyte yield tended toward a progressive decrease with increasing preovulatory maturation times from a high of 27 oocytes at 27 hr to a low of 17 oocytes/animal at the 36 hr time interval. Fertilization levels declined significantly from a high of 50% at 27 hr to a low of 30% at 36 hr. Thus, although higher percentages of mature oocytes were recovered at the longer time intervals, optimal oocytes/embryo harvests were realized after the shorter time intervals (27 and 32 hr) and are most compatible with the goal of achieving high yields of fertile oocytes and embryos following gonadotropin stimulation in rhesus monkeys. PMID:8720116

  20. CSD mRNA expression in rat testis and the effect of taurine on testosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiancheng; Wu, Gaofeng; Feng, Ying; Sun, Changmian; Lin, Shumei; Hu, Jianmin

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) mRNA expression was detected in rat testis by RT-PCR. The results showed that CSD mRNA was expressed in rat testis, and the putative encoded-amino acid sequence was exactly the same as that in rat liver which was already known. At the same time, the effects of taurine on testosterone secretion were investigated both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, taurine were administered to male rats by tap water. The results showed that taurine obviously stimulated the secretion of FSH, LH and testosterone in serum, but showed no significant effect on the secretion of estradiol. Taurine administered in water could significantly increase the concentration of taurine in the blood and testis of rats. In vitro, cultured Leydig cells were treated with taurine independently or incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and progesterone. The results showed that taurine had biphasic effects on basal testosterone secretion in cultured Leydig cells. Low concentrations of taurine (0.1-100 microg/ml) could stimulate testosterone secretion, whereas high concentration of taurine (400 microg/ml) could inhibit testosterone secretion. Testosterone secretion stimulated by HCG was significantly increased by 10 and 100 microg/ml of taurine administration, and obviously decreased by treating with 400 microg/ml of taurine. Testosterone secretion induced by progesterone was significantly stimulated by treating with 1.0 and 10 microg/ml of taurine, however, it was significantly inhibited when treated with 400 microg/ml of taurine. Meanwhile, the effect of silencing CSD mRNA by siRNA on testosterone secretion was analyzed. The results showed that testosterone secretion was obviously decreased after the inhibition of CSD mRNA expression in cultured Leydig cells. These results indicated that taurine can be synthesized in rat testis by CSD pathway, and it plays important roles in testosterone secretion both in vivo and in vitro which

  1. Compounded Testosterone Troches TO OPTIMIZE HEALTH AND THE TESTOSTERONE CONTROVERSY.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    As men age, testosterone levels progressively fall and inflammatory biomarkers increase. The gradual decline in testosterone production with aging, known as andropause, is common and may have deleterious effects on men including decreased overall well-being, increased sarcopenia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, reduced sexual function, and bone loss. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that an increasing number of men worldwide have begun requesting testosterone replacement therapy from their physicians. Occasionally, physicians discourage male patients from getting testosterone replacement therapy based on a few recent studies indicating the therapy causes cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarctions. Yet, an extensive review of the testosterone replacement therapy literature reveals that the majority of clinical studies show that properly administered testosterone replacement therapy, in which estradiol and dihydrotestosterone levels are also controlled, has no adverse effects on myocardial infarction risk. The current state-of-the-art in testosterone replacement therapy comprises compounded testosterone troches; an aromatase inhibitor, such as generic Anastrazole, to control estradiol levels; and a 5α-reductase inhibitor, such as beneric Dutasteride or Finasteride, to control dihydrotestosterone. Compounded testosterone troches easily raise serum testosterone levels to the optimal range, are highly cost effective at $82 for a 180-day supply, and provide affordable access to testosterone replacement therapy to millions of men requesting it. Yet, the Blue Cross Blue Shield-associated firms have largely denied requests for coverage of compounded medications, including testosterone troches. Despite data demonstrating strong links between testosterone deficiency and significant comorbid conditions (including Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic syndrome diseases) as well as the health benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, some physian have

  2. The Prenatal Environment in Twin Studies: A Review on Chorionicity.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; McMaster, Minni T B; Smith, Taylor F; Daams, Joost G; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-05-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify articles examining the association of chorionicity (e.g., whether twins share a single chorion and thus placenta or have separate chorions/placentas) and genetics, psychiatry/behavior, and neurological manifestations in humans twins and higher-order multiples. The main aim was to assess how frequently chorionicity has been examined in relation to heritability estimates, and to assess which phenotypes may be most sensitive to, or affected by, bias in heritability estimates because of chorionicity. Consistent with the theory that some chorionicity effects could lead to overestimation and others to underestimation of heritability, there were instances of each across the many phenotypes reviewed. However, firm conclusions should not be drawn since some of the outcomes were only examined in one or few studies and often sample sizes were small. While the evidence for bias due to chorionicity was mixed or null for many outcomes, results do, however, consistently suggest that heritability estimates are underestimated for measures of birth weight and early growth when chorionicity is not taken into account.

  3. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicles. It is important for a man's sex drive and physical appearance. Certain health conditions, medicines, or ... drops with age. Low testosterone can affect sex drive, mood, and the body. Treatment with testosterone therapy ...

  4. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tambo, Amos; Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease [CVD] is a leading cause of mortality accounting for a global incidence of over 31%. Atherosclerosis is the primary pathophysiology underpinning most types of CVD. Historically, modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were suggested to precipitate CVD. Recently, epidemiological studies have identified emerging risk factors including hypotestosteronaemia, which have been associated with CVD. Previously considered in the realms of reproductive biology, testosterone is now believed to play a critical role in the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The actions of testosterone as they relate to the cardiac vasculature and its implication in cardiovascular pathology is reviewed. PMID:27014372

  5. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  6. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Shetty, K R; Kalkhoff, R K

    1977-02-01

    After a nine-day control period, six hospitalized obese women were placed on 500 calorie diets and were given 125 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) intramuscularly daily for 30 days. Another five obese women received injections of diluent only and consumed identical diets for the same period. Mean weight loss in the HCG-treated group was nearly identical to that achieved by women given the placebo. Reduction of triceps skinfold thickness or circumferential body measurements of the chest, waist, hips, and thighs were not different. Patters of change of a variety of plasma and urine substrates, electrolytes, and hormones were similar in the two groups and consistent with semistarvation and weight loss. These results indicate that HCG has no effects on chemical and hormonal parameters measured and offers no advantage over calorie restriction in promoting weight loss. PMID:836112

  7. Testosterone and the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men are closely Linked. Epidemiological studies have shown that Low testosterone Levels are associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an adverse Lipid profile in men. Conversely in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have a high prevalence of hypogonadism. Metabolic syndrome and Low testosterone status are both independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Observational and experimental data suggest that physiological replacement of testosterone produces improvement in insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidae-mia and sexual dysfunction along with improved quality of Life. However, there are no Long-term interventional studies to assess the effect of testosterone replacement on mortality in men with Low testosterone Levels. This article reviews the observational and interventional clinical data in relation to testosterone and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23148165

  8. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  9. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  10. Successful treatment of acquired undescended testes with human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Meijer, R W; Hack, W W; Haasnoot, K

    2001-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotrophin therapy may have its place in the management of acquired undescended testes and surgery should be reserved for those who fail to respond to therapy. Further studies are necessary to evaluate these preliminary results.

  11. The chorion ultrastructure of ova of Lophius spp.

    PubMed

    Colmenero, A I; Tuset, V M; Fortuño, J-M; Sánchez, P

    2015-06-01

    The chorion surface ultrastructure of unfertilized eggs of black anglerfish Lophius budegassa and white anglerfish Lophius piscatorius was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Species-specific differences were observed. PMID:25943723

  12. Delivery of testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Asjad; Brothwood, Theresa; Bouloux, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    Optimal testosterone replacement therapy remains a considerable challenge for the estimated five out of 1000 men in the general community with androgen deficiency. Oral delivery is not possible due to rapid first pass metabolism and short half-life. Testosterone derivatives have been developed to enhance intrinsic androgenic potency, prolong duration of action, or improve oral bioavailability of synthetic androgens. Structural modification of testosterone include 17 beta-esterification, 17 alpha-alkylation, 1-methylation, addition of a 19-normethyl group, and 7 alpha-methylation. Currently, oral (testosterone undecanoate), transcutaneous (Andropatch, Virormone, Testoderm (ALZA Corp), Testogel), sublingual (testosterone cyclodextrin), intramuscular (Sustanon, Primoteston Depot), and fused crystalline testosterone pellet preparations are available for clinical use. Transbuccal testosterone systems have also been developed for clinical use and require twice daily application. Suspensions of biodegradable microspheres consisting of a polyglycolide-lactide matrix laden with testosterone can deliver stable, physiological levels of testosterone for 2 to 3 months. Micronized testosterone has low oral bioavailability requiring high daily doses. 7 alpha-Methyl 19-nortestosterone, a potent, synthetic androgen free of hepatotoxicity, has tissue-specific selectivity, being susceptible to aromatization but not 5 alpha-reduction, thereby potentially avoiding intraprostatic androgen amplification. PMID:14649214

  13. The effect of oestrogen administration on plasma testosterone, FSH and LH levels in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and normal men.

    PubMed

    Smals, A G; Kloppenborg, P W; Lequin, R M; Benraad, T J

    1974-12-01

    The effect of varying doses of ethinyl estradiol (15, 30, and 150 mcg/day for 7 days) on plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was evaluated in 6 patients (ages 18-38) with Klinefelter's syndrome and compared with the results obtained in 6 eugonadal males (ages 26-41). Mean pretreatment testosterone levels in the Klinefelter patients were significantly (p less than .05) lower than in the eugonadal patients, whereas LH and FSH levels in the Klinefelter patients were significantly higher (p less than .05). 3 of the Klinefelter patients had normal testosterone levels and elevated FSH and LH levels. A dose-dependent decrease of FSH and testosterone followed the estrogen administration in all subjects, whereas the LH decrease was only dose-dependent in the Klinefelter patients. Despite a significant testosterone decrease (p less than .05) after 30 and 150 mcg estrogen, LH and FSH in the Klinefelter patients remained supranormal. 15 mcg decreased LH and testosterone in normal males but not in Klinefelter patients. When human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was administered after 150 mcg estrogen/day for 7 days, testosterone decreased in the controls from 522 ng% to 111 ng% and in the Klinefelter patients from 324 to 141 ng%. It is concluded that small amounts of estrogens play a role in the pituitary-gonadal axis in normal males. In Klinefelter's syndrome the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal feedback is operative at a higher setting, comparable with that found in eugonadal males.

  14. A unique case of growth hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin treatment in a 45,X male with Y: autosome translocation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mareri, Arianna; Iezzi, MariaLaura; Salvatore, Alessia; Ligas, Claudio; D'Alessandro, Elvira

    2016-07-01

    Maleness associated with a 45,X karyotype is a rare condition in childhood. It is usually diagnosed in adult age because of infertility. We report a unique case of an unbalanced translocation t(Y;21) in a 14-year-old boy with 45,X karyotype referred because of short stature, thin habitus and puberty delay. Hormone analysis showed low serum levels of basal testosterone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and gonadotrophins. Diagnosis of GH deficiency and puberty delay were made. He was treated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and GH therapy, respectively, for 6 and 24 months. PMID:27054600

  15. Human chorionic gonadotropin measurements in parathyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Bilezikian, John P; Birken, Steven; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2010-01-01

    Objective Preoperatively, it is difficult to differentiate between parathyroid cancer (PtCa) and severe primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) due to a benign tumor. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a tumor marker in trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic cancers and hyperglycosylated hCG is increased in hCG-secreting malignancies. We investigated whether hCG can distinguish PtCa cancer from benign disease and add prognostic information. Design Observational study. Methods Measurement of urinary hCG (total and malignant isoforms) and serum malignant hCG in 8 subjects with PtCa and in 18 subjects with PHPT (measurement of urine in ten and serum in eight). Results Total urinary hCG was normal in the benign PHPT control subjects (range: 0–17 fmol/mg Cr; nl < 50). In the PtCa subjects, three had normal total urinary hCG levels and survived complication free for at least 2 years; three had persistently elevated total urinary hCG levels (range: 217–1986 fmol/mg Cr) and sustained hip fracture (n = 3) and died (n = 2) within 3 and 6 months respectively; two had a rise in total urinary hCG and had hip fracture (n = 1) and died (n = 2) within 4 and 10 months respectively. Elevated urinary hCG was of the malignant hyperglycosylated isoform. Serum malignant hyperglycosylated hCG values in all of the cancer patients exceeded the maximal serum malignant hCG level of the PHPT subjects with benign disease (3.77 pmol/l). Conclusion hCG, especially itshyperglycosylated isoform, might add diagnostic and prognostic information in PtCa. Further studies would help to elucidate the role of hCG as a potential tumor marker in this disease. PMID:18625691

  16. Vitelline envelope, chorion, and micropyle of Fundulus heteroclitus eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, J.N.; Brummet, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The architecture and transformation of the vitelline envelope of the developing oocyte into the chorion of the mature egg of Fundulus heteroclitus have been examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mature vitelline envelope is structurally complex and consists of about nine strata. The envelope is penetrated by pore canals that contain microvilli arising from the oocyte and macrovilli from follicle cells. During the envelope's transformation into the chorion, the pore canals are lost and the envelope becomes more fibrous and compact and its stratified nature less apparent. The micropyle, or pore, through which the sperm gains access to the enclosed egg is located at the bottom of a small funnel-shaped depression in the envelope. Internally, the micropyle opens on the apex of a cone-like elevation of the chorion. During the development of the envelope, structured chorionic fibrils, the components of which are presumed to be synthesized by the follicle cells, become attached to its surface. These chorionic fibrils are thought to aid in the attachment of the egg to the substratum and perhaps to help prevent water loss during low tides when the egg may be exposed.

  17. Visualization of Drosophila melanogaster chorion genes undergoing amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Osheim, Y.N.; Miller, O.L. Jr.; Beyer, A.L.

    1988-07-01

    The authors visualized by electron microscopy the preferential amplification of Drosophila chorion genes in late-stage follicle cells. Chromatin spreads revealed large clusters of actively transcribed genes of the appropriate size, spacing, and orientation for chorion genes that were expressed with the correct temporal specificity. Occasionally the active genes were observed within or contiguous with intact replicons and replication forks. In every case, our micrographs are consistent with the hypothesis that the central region of each chorion domain contains a replication origin(s) used during the amplification event. In one case, a small replication bubble was observed precisely at the site of the essential region of the X chromosome amplification control element. The micrographs also suggest that forks at either end of a replicon frequently progress very different distances, presumably due to different times in initiation or different rates of movement. It appears that all chorion genes (even those coding for minor proteins) are transcribed in a ''fully on'' condition, albeit for varied durations, and that if replication fork passage does inactivate a promoter, it does so very transiently. Furthermore, a DNA segment containing one active gene is likely to have an additional active gene(s). Surprisingly, during the time frame of expected maximum activity, approximately half of the chorion sequences appear transciptionally inactive.

  18. Testosterone and sport: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I; Stanton, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition.

  19. The development of a testosterone stimulation test in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) and its use in evaluating deslorelin contraception.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Camacho, F C; Carrillo, L; Guy, N; Govea, J; Martinez, O; Parãs, A; Lisle, A T; D'Occhio, M

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the variability of testosterone secretion in the Virginia Opossum over a 24 h period and to develop a testosterone stimulation test that would provide an index of the prevailing testosterone biosynthetic capacity of the testes; the latter was used to clinically evaluate the efficacy of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist contraceptive. Sexually-mature captive opossums (n = 12) located in Africam Safari (Mexico) sampled every 12 h over 24 h consistently showed basal (<0.21 ng mL(-1)) blood testosterone concentrations. Intra-muscular injection of buserelin (2 microg mL(-1)) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG; 1000 IU) resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) of plasma testosterone concentrations with maximal concentrations (3.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.8 ng mL(-1) respectively) occurring 120 min after injection. Plasma testosterone declined relatively rapidly to basal concentrations after 240 min with hCG but remained elevated after the same period of time with buserelin. Male opossums treated with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) a controlled-release deslorelin implant (Suprelorin; 4.7 mg deslorelin) were evaluated over a 10-week period for changes in testosterone secretion (hCG stimulation test) and sperm production (spermatorrhea). At the end of this period, the animals were hemi-castrated and their relative testicular quantitative histology compared. Testosterone concentration decreased over the course of the study in both treated and control animals (P < 0.0001) but there was no apparent effect of deslorelin on testosterone secretion, testicular histology (relative proportions of testicular cell types and seminiferous tubule diameter), or sperm production (presence of sperm in the cauda epididymis or urine).

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin beta based recombinant antibodies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Talwar, G P; Vyas, Hemant K; Purswani, Shilpi; Gupta, Jagdish C

    2009-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are unique targets for the control of fertility. Immunological approaches to neutralizing these hormones have additional utility in cancer treatment. Vaccines have been developed against both GnRH and hCG and these have undergone Phase I/II clinical trials documenting their safety, reversibility and efficacy. The heterospecies dimer hCG vaccine prevented pregnancy in women of proven fertility without impairment of ovulation or derangement of menstrual regularity and bleeding profiles. The protective threshold of antibody titers to achieve efficacy was determined in these first-ever trials. Recently, a recombinant vaccine against the beta subunit of hCG linked to the B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin has been made and expressed as a glycosylated conjugate in Pichia pastoris. Experiments indicate its ability to generate antibodies above the protective threshold in all immunized Balb/c mice. Ectopic expression of hCG/hCGbeta is observed in many advanced stage cancers of various origins. A chimeric high affinity and specific recombinant antibody against hCGbeta linked to curcumin kills hCGbeta expressing T lymphoblastic leukemia cells without any deleterious effect. Several synthetic and recombinant vaccines have been developed against GnRH. These reduce serum testosterone to castration levels causing atrophy of the prostate. Three Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in India and Austria have shown that these vaccines elicit non-surgical reduction of testosterone, a fall in prostate specific antigen and clinical improvement of prostate carcinoma patients. A multimer recombinant vaccine against GnRH has high efficacy for sterilization of pigs and other animals. PMID:19854518

  1. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. PMID:26846952

  2. The ball's in your court: testosterone 101.

    PubMed

    Horn, T; Cooper, S

    1997-11-01

    Testosterone, a hormone, plays several important functions in nutrition, libido, and the development of masculine traits. Studies have shown that testosterone levels in both men and women with HIV and AIDS are generally very low. The definition of normal testosterone is broad and determining when a person has low levels is difficult since individuals have different testosterone baselines. Testosterone replacement therapy, available for men but not for women yet, is used to increase body mass and prevent wasting. Testosterone is available in several forms, including a patch, and the advantages of each form are discussed. Testosterone level tests are readily available and are generally covered by insurance and Medicaid. PMID:11365205

  3. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism. PMID:25652628

  4. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (i) Gilts. For induction of fertile estrus (heat) in healthy prepuberal (noncycling) gilts. (ii)...

  5. EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON HUMAN TROPHOBLAST CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Bromodichloromethane on Human Trophoblast Chorionic Gonadotrophin Secretion

    Jiangang Chen1, Twanda L. Thirkill1, Peter N. Lohstroh1, Susan R. Bielmeier2, Michael G. Narotsky3, Deborah S. Best3, Randy A. Harrison3, Kala Natarajan1, Rex A. Pegram3, Gordon C. Dougla...

  6. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2-3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels. [1],[2],[3] There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa) after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone. PMID:25652639

  7. Free β-human chorionic gonadotropin, total human chorionic gonadotropin and maternal risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toriola, Adetunji T; Tolockiene, Egle; Schock, Helena; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Wadell, Goran; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva; Grankvist, Kjell; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) would provide additional information to that provided by total hCG alone and thus be useful in future epidemiological studies relating hCG to maternal breast cancer risk. Materials & methods Cases (n = 159) and controls (n = 286) were a subset of our previous study within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort on total hCG during primiparous pregnancy and breast cancer risk. Results The associations between total hCG (hazard ratio: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.27), free β-hCG (hazard ratio: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.33–2.18) and maternal risk of breast cancer were very similar in all analyses and mutual adjustment for either one had minor effects on the risk estimates. Conclusion In the absence of a reliable assay on intact hCG, total hCG alone can be used in epidemiological studies investigating hCG and breast cancer risk, as free β-hCG does not appear to provide any additional information. PMID:24559445

  8. A potential role for zinc transporter 7 in testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qingqing; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuemei; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element which is involved in male reproduction. The zinc transporter (ZnT) family, SLC30a, is involved in the maintenance of Zn homeostasis and in mediating intracellular signaling events; however, relatively little is known regarding the effect of ZnTs on testosterone synthesis. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of Zn transporter 7 (ZnT7) on testosterone synthesis in male CD-1 mice and mouse Leydig cells. The findings of the present study revealed that the concentrations of Zn in the testes and Leydig cells were significantly lower in mice fed a Zn-deficient diet compared with the control mice fed a Zn-adequate diet. In addition, ZnT7 was principally expressed and colocalized with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the Leydig cells of male CD-1 mice. ZnT7 expression was downregulated in the mice fed a Zn-deficient diet, which led to decreases in the expression of the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis namely cholesterol side‑chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/D5-D4 isomerase (3β-HSD) as well as decreased serum testosterone levels. These results suggested that Znt7 may be involved in testosterone synthesis in the mouse testes. To examine this hypothesis, we used the mouse Leydig tumor cell line (MLTC-1 cell line) in which the ZnT7 gene had been silenced, in order to gauge the impact of changes in ZnT7 expression on testosterone secretion and the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis. The results demonstrated that ZnT7 gene silencing downregulated the expression of StAR, P450scc and 3β-HSD as well as progesterone concentrations in the human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)-stimulated MLTC-1 cells. Taken together, these findings reveal that ZnT7 may play an important role in the regulation of testosterone synthesis by modulating steroidogenic enzymes, and may represent a therapeutic target in

  9. Testosterone Deficiency - Establishing A Biochemical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Yonah

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is a common and often unrecognized disorder impacting the lives of many men. Symptoms related to low testosterone are relatively non-specific and clinicians must therefore ensure that a patients’ symptomatology is supported by a biochemical profile suggestive of testosterone deficiency. There are many options available to determine a patient’s testosterone level and laboratories will vary in the type of biochemical assessment they provide. In assessing patients with suspected low testosterone, the presence of symptoms and a low total testosterone is usually sufficient to initiate therapy. In equivocal cases, measurement of free or bioavailable testosterone with a reliable assay can further clarify the clinical picture. By understanding the differences between total, free and bioavailable testosterone, and the accuracy and reliability of their measurement, clinicians can better interpret their patients’ biochemical testosterone profile.

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta1 null mutation causes infertility in male mice associated with testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Robertson, Sarah A

    2007-08-01

    TGFbeta1 is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in gonad and secondary sex organ development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis. To determine the physiological requirement for TGFbeta1 in male reproduction, Tgfb1 null mutant mice on a Prkdc(scid) immunodeficient background were studied. TGFbeta1-deficient males did not deposit sperm or induce pseudopregnancy in females, despite an intact reproductive tract with morphologically normal penis, seminal vesicles, and testes. Serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum androstenedione were severely diminished in TGFbeta1-deficient males. Testosterone deficiency was secondary to disrupted pituitary gonadotropin secretion because serum LH and to a lesser extent serum FSH were reduced, and exogenous LH replacement with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced serum testosterone to control levels. In the majority of TGFbeta1-deficient males, spermatogenesis was normal and sperm were developmentally competent as assessed by in vitro fertilization. Analysis of sexual behavior revealed that although TGFbeta1 null males showed avid interest in females and engaged in mounting activity, intromission was infrequent and brief, and ejaculation was not attained. Administration of testosterone to adult males, even after neonatal androgenization, was ineffective in restoring sexual function; however, erectile reflexes and ejaculation could be induced by electrical stimulation. These studies demonstrate the profound effect of genetic deficiency in TGFbeta1 on male fertility, implicating this cytokine in essential roles in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in testosterone-independent regulation of mating competence.

  11. Use of human chorionic gonadotropin in a male Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) to induce rut and achieve a pregnancy in a nulliparous female.

    PubMed

    Muraco, Holley S; Coombs, Leah D; Procter, Dianna G; Turek, Paul J; Muraco, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Walrus in US zoos have a very low reproductive rate of 11 births in 80 years, and little is known about Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) reproductive biology. To address this, we initiated a program in which detailed biological data were recorded on captive walrus. As part of a 7-year study, 1 male and 1 female 16-year-old captive Pacific walrus were carefully monitored with weekly serum hormone analysis, daily glans penis smears for spermatozoa, and abdominal ultrasound for pregnancy. The female ovulated once annually from late December through mid-January and then exhibited 9 months of sustained elevated progesterone. This nonconceptive estrous cycle profile is consistent with reports from wild walrus females. In contrast, the male's seasonal rut routinely occurred in late February through May with a serum testosterone peak in March. This profile differed from the reported adult male cycle in wild walrus of November through March. During the period of the female's ovulation, the male had nadir testosterone levels and was consistently azoospermic. Likewise, during the male's spermatogenic rut in the spring, the female was anovulatory with elevated progesterone. On this basis, the male was treated for 14 weeks with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in an attempt to increase testosterone levels in synchrony with the female's annual ovulation. The treatment successfully induced rut characterized by sustained elevated serum testosterone levels and production of spermatozoa. The male and female successfully bred, and the female became pregnant. Upon discontinuation of hCG treatment, the male resumed baseline testosterone levels. We theorize that the lack of synchronization of rut and ovulatory cycles is a primary reason for reproductive failure in these captive walrus. PMID:22207706

  12. Use of human chorionic gonadotropin in a male Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) to induce rut and achieve a pregnancy in a nulliparous female.

    PubMed

    Muraco, Holley S; Coombs, Leah D; Procter, Dianna G; Turek, Paul J; Muraco, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Walrus in US zoos have a very low reproductive rate of 11 births in 80 years, and little is known about Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) reproductive biology. To address this, we initiated a program in which detailed biological data were recorded on captive walrus. As part of a 7-year study, 1 male and 1 female 16-year-old captive Pacific walrus were carefully monitored with weekly serum hormone analysis, daily glans penis smears for spermatozoa, and abdominal ultrasound for pregnancy. The female ovulated once annually from late December through mid-January and then exhibited 9 months of sustained elevated progesterone. This nonconceptive estrous cycle profile is consistent with reports from wild walrus females. In contrast, the male's seasonal rut routinely occurred in late February through May with a serum testosterone peak in March. This profile differed from the reported adult male cycle in wild walrus of November through March. During the period of the female's ovulation, the male had nadir testosterone levels and was consistently azoospermic. Likewise, during the male's spermatogenic rut in the spring, the female was anovulatory with elevated progesterone. On this basis, the male was treated for 14 weeks with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in an attempt to increase testosterone levels in synchrony with the female's annual ovulation. The treatment successfully induced rut characterized by sustained elevated serum testosterone levels and production of spermatozoa. The male and female successfully bred, and the female became pregnant. Upon discontinuation of hCG treatment, the male resumed baseline testosterone levels. We theorize that the lack of synchronization of rut and ovulatory cycles is a primary reason for reproductive failure in these captive walrus.

  13. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the ‘vital principle’ as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  14. Testosterone and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Thomas R; Chughtai, Bilal; Kaplan, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The use of testosterone to treat the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadal men has increased recently due to patient and physician awareness. However, concerns regarding the effect of testosterone on the prostate, in particular any possible effect on the risk of prostate cancer have prompted further research in this regard. Surprisingly, numerous retrospective or small, randomized trials have pointed to a possible improvement in male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients treated with testosterone. The exact mechanism of this improvement is still debated but may have a close relationship to metabolic syndrome. For the clinician, the results of these studies are promising but do not constitute high levels of evidence. A thorough clinical examination (including history, examination and laboratory testing of testosterone) should be undertaken before considering the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism or instigating treatment for it. Warnings still remain on the testosterone supplement product labels regarding the risk of urinary retention and worsening LUTS, and these should be explained to patients. PMID:25337845

  15. TESTOSTERONE AND SPORT: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Stanton, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition. PMID:21983229

  16. Is testosterone influencing explosive performance?

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Marco; Stone, Michael H

    2006-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between testosterone levels and vertical jumping performance in elite men and women athletes. The secondary objective was to verify whether testosterone levels and vertical jumping performance were different in men and women athletes and if those measurements were different between different athletic groups. Seventy (22 women and 48 men) elite athletes in track and field (sprinters), handball, volleyball, and soccer competing at national and international levels participated in the study. After 10 hours of fasting and 1 day of rest, blood samples were drawn from the antecubital vein for determining testosterone levels. Vertical jumping tests consisted of countermovement jumps conducted on a resistive platform connected to a digital timer. Resting testosterone levels in women were 9.5% of those of the men (respectively 0.62 +/- 0.06 ng.ml(-1) and 6.49 +/- 0.37 ng.ml(-1); p < 0.001). Countermovement jump performance was significantly different between women and men athletes, with women's jumping ability 86.3% of that of men (p < 0.001). A significant positive relationship was identified between testosterone levels and vertical jump performance when all data where considered (r = 0.61, p < 0.001, n = 70).

  17. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  18. [Chorionic Villus Sampling in cytogenetic analysis--disadvantages and advantages].

    PubMed

    Gnyś-Wiercioch, Agnieszka; Bloch, Renata; Grolik, Barbara; Hadaś, Jolanta; Kania, Agnieszka; Szołtysik-Szot, Mariola; Sodowska, Henryka

    2012-05-01

    Chorionic villus sampling is used in prenatal diagnosis, enabling to detect fetal genetic abnormalities. Its advantages include the possibility of performing the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy relatively fast result, risk of miscarriage comparable to that in case of amniocentesis. The disadvantages of this method are: difficult cytogenetic analysis, the possibility of contamination with maternal cells and the risk of mosaicism. There should always be a valid indication to perform the CVS procedure.

  19. Possible role of prolactin in the inhibitory effect of testosterone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, J A; Perez Mendez, L F; Lopez-Calderon, A; Esquifino, A I

    1985-06-01

    To study the role of testosterone on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, young intact male Wistar rats were given acute (24 h) or chronic (5 days) subcutaneous treatments of 500 micrograms testosterone propionate (TP) or vehicle alone. Plasma LH, prolactin and testosterone levels were measured both basally and after administration of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) or human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) by means of specific radioimmunoassay systems using materials supplied by the NIADDK. After acute treatment with TP there was an increase in basal plasma testosterone concentrations and no modification in the hCG response when compared with vehicle-treated animals. No difference could be detected in basal plasma testosterone levels after the chronic treatment, but a significant reduction in the hCG response was observed. Both acute and chronic treatments with TP resulted in a significant decrease of basal plasma LH levels. A reduced LH response to LHRH in acutely treated rats and no response in the chronically treated rats was detected. Plasma prolactin levels showed an increase after both acute and chronic treatments. To evaluate the possible role of the increased plasma prolactin levels on the above modifications during TP treatment, another group of animals was treated with TP and bromocriptine (dopamine agonist) simultaneously to avoid the increase in plasma prolactin levels. In this situation, neither basal plasma LH levels nor the response to LHRH were altered when compared to vehicle-treated rats; a normal testosterone response to hCG stimulation was observed in spite of the high basal plasma testosterone levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. High serum testosterone levels are associated with excessive erythrocytosis of chronic mountain sickness in men.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gasco, Manuel; Tapia, Vilma; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia

    2009-06-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE) secondary to hypoventilation. Erythropoietin (Epo) and testosterone regulate erythrocyte production. Low thyroid hormone levels are also associated to hypoventilation. Hence, these hormones can play a role in etiopathogeny of EE. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of sexual and thyroid hormones and Epo in residents from Lima (150 m) and Cerro de Pasco (4,340 m), Peru, and the response to human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation (hCG). Three groups, one at low altitude and two at high altitude [1 with hemoglobin values >16-21 g/dl and the second with Hb >or=21 g/dl (EE)], were studied. hCG was administered intramuscularly in a single dose (1,000 IU), and blood samples were obtained at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection. High-altitude natives present similar levels of gonadotropins and thyroid hormones but lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels (P < 0.01) and greater Epo (P < 0.01), 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (P < 0.01), and testosterone levels (P < 0.01) than those at 150 m. Serum testosterone levels (524.13 +/- 55.91 microg/dl vs. 328.14 +/- 53.23 ng/dl, means +/- SE; P < 0.05) and testosterone/DHEAS ratios are higher (7.98 +/- 1.1 vs. 3.65 +/- 1.1; P < 0.01) and DHEAS levels lower in the EE group (83.85 +/- 14.60 microg/dl vs. 148.95 +/- 19.11 ug/dl; P < 0.05), whereas Epo was not further affected. Testosterone levels were highest and DHEAS levels lowest in the EE group at all times after hCG stimulation. In conclusion, high androgen activity could be involved in the etiopathogeny of CMS. This evidence provides an opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Review of health risks of low testosterone and testosterone administration

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Huanguang; Sullivan, Charles T; McCoy, Sean C; Yarrow, Joshua F; Morrow, Matthew; Borst, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism is prevalent in older men and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for older hypogonadal men is a promising therapy. However, a number of important clinical concerns over TRT safety remain unsolved due to a lack of large-scale randomized clinical trials directly comparing the health risks of untreated hypogonadism vs long-term use of TRT. Meta-analyses of clinical trials of TRT as of 2010 have identified three major adverse events resulting from TRT: polycythemia, an increase in prostate-related events, and a slight reduction in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are other purported health risks but their incidence can be neither confirmed nor denied based on the small number of subjects that have been studied to date. Furthermore, subsequent literature is equivocal with regard to the safety and utility of TRT and this topic has been subject to contentious debate. Since January 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration has released two official announcements regarding the safety of TRT and clinical monitoring the risks in TRT users. Additionally, the health risks related to the clinical presentation of low or declining testosterone levels not been resolved in the current literature. Because TRT is prescribed in the context of putative risks resulting from reduced testosterone levels, we reviewed the epidemiology and reported risks of low testosterone levels. We also highlight the current information about TRT utilization, the risks most often claimed to be associated with TRT, and current or emerging alternatives to TRT. PMID:25879005

  2. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate cancer. PMID:26770932

  3. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  4. Spectroscopic studies of Manduca sexta and Sesamia nonagrioides chorion protein structure.

    PubMed

    Orfanidou, C C; Hamodrakas, S J; Chryssikos, G D; Kamitsos, E I; Wellman, S E; Case, S T

    1995-04-01

    The secondary structure of Manduca sexta and Sesamia nonagrioides chorion proteins has been studied in intact chorions using laser-Raman and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and in a solution containing extracted and reassembled chorion proteins using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Laser-Raman and IR spectra suggest the predominance of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet structure in intact chorion proteins of both Lepidoptera species. The bands at 1673, 1674 cm-1 (amide I) and 1234-1238 cm-1 (amide III) in the laser-Raman spectra can best be interpreted as resulting from abundant antiparallel beta-pleated sheet structure. Analysis of the amide I band suggests that chorion proteins consist of 60-70% antiparallel beta-pleated sheet and 30-40% beta-turns. Supporting evidence for the prevalence of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet in chorion proteins was supplied using FTIR spectroscopy by the observation of a very intense absorption band at 1635 cm-1 (amide I) and of a weak band at 1530, 1525 cm-1 (amide II) from chorions of both species. Surprisingly, analysis of the CD spectra of extracted and reassembled chorion proteins suggests that, in solution, they retain a regular secondary structure most probably dominated by beta-pleated sheet. We therefore suggest that the prominent regular beta-sheet structure of chorion proteins may exist in solution and dictate the aggregation and polymerization process in vivo. PMID:7547721

  5. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  6. Leukemia inhibitory factor antagonizes gonadotropin induced-testosterone synthesis in cultured porcine leydig cells: sites of action.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, C; Goddard, I; Besset, V; Tabone, E; Rey, C; Gasnier, F; Dacheux, F; Benahmed, M

    2001-06-01

    In the present report, the action of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on testicular steroid hormone formation was studied. For this purpose, the direct effects of LIF were evaluated on basal and human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone synthesis by cultured, purified Leydig cells isolated from porcine testes. LIF reduced (more than 60%) hCG-stimulated testosterone synthesis. This inhibitory effect was exerted in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The maximal and half-maximal effects were obtained with, respectively, 10 ng/ml (0.5 nM ) and 2.5 ng/ml (0.125 nM ) of LIF after a 48-h treatment of the Leydig cells. Such an effect of the cytokine was not a cytotoxic effect, because it was reversible and Leydig cells recovered most of their steroidogenic activity after the removal of LIF. Considering the sites of action of LIF in inhibiting gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone formation, it was shown that LIF significantly (P < 0.002) reduced, in a comparable range (about 60% decrease), testosterone synthesis stimulated with LH/hCG or with pharmacological agents that enhance cAMP levels (cholera toxin, forskolin, and PG E2), and testosterone synthesis stimulated with 8-bromo-cAMP. Such an observation indicates that the antigonadotropic action of the cytokine is exerted in a predominant manner at a step (or steps) located beyond cAMP formation. Furthermore, incubation of Leydig cells with 22R-hydroxycholesterol (5 microg/ml, 2 h), a cholesterol substrate derivative that does not need an assisted process to be delivered to the inner mitochondrial membrane, reversed most of the inhibitory effect of LIF on the steroid hormone formation. Such results indicate that LIF acts by reducing cholesterol substrate availability in the mitochondria. Consequently, LIF action was tested on steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and PBR (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) shown to be potentially involved in such a cholesterol transfer. LIF reduced, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, LH

  7. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. PMID:26695486

  8. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable.

  9. Testosterone signaling and the regulation of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walker, William H

    2011-04-01

    Spermatogenesis and male fertility are dependent upon the presence of testosterone in the testis. In the absence of testosterone or the androgen receptor, spermatogenesis does not proceed beyond the meiosis stage. The major cellular target and translator of testosterone signals to developing germ cells is the Sertoli cell. In the Sertoli cell, testosterone signals can be translated directly to changes in gene expression (the classical pathway) or testosterone can activate kinases that may regulate processes required to maintain spermatogenesis (the non-classical pathway). Contributions of the classical and non-classical testosterone signaling pathways to the maintenance of spermatogenesis are discussed. Studies that may further elaborate the mechanisms by with the pathways support spermatogenesis are proposed. PMID:22319659

  10. Testosterone regulates bone response to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steffens, J P; Herrera, B S; Coimbra, L S; Stephens, D N; Rossa, C; Spolidorio, L C; Kantarci, A; Van Dyke, T E

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the alveolar bone response to testosterone and the impact of Resolvin D2 (RvD2) on testosterone-induced osteoblast function. For the in vivo characterization, 60 male adult rats were used. Treatments established sub-physiologic (L), normal (N), or supra-physiologic (H) concentrations of testosterone. Forty rats were subjected to orchiectomy; 20 rats received periodical testosterone injections while 20 rats received testicular sham-operation. Four weeks after the surgeries, 10 rats in each group received a subgingival ligature around the lower first molars to induce experimental periodontal inflammation and bone loss. In parallel, osteoblasts were differentiated from neonatal mice calvariae and treated with various doses of testosterone for 48 h. Cell lysates and conditioned media were used for the determination of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin. Micro-computed tomography linear analysis demonstrated that bone loss was significantly increased for both L and H groups compared to animals with normal levels of testosterone. Gingival IL-1β expression was increased in the L group (p<0.05). Ten nM testosterone significantly decreased osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG levels in osteoblasts; 100 nM significantly increased the RANKL:OPG ratio. RvD2 partially reversed the impact of 10 nM testosterone on osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG. These findings suggest that both L and H testosterone levels increase inflammatory bone loss in male rats. While low testosterone predominantly increases the inflammatory response, high testosterone promotes a higher osteoblast-derived RANKL:OPG ratio. The proresolving mediator RvD2 ameliorates testosterone-derived downregulation of osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG in primary murine osteoblasts suggesting a direct role of inflammation in osteoblast function.

  11. Fertility Rates of Ewes Treated with Medroxyprogesterone and Injected with Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin plus Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Anoestrous Season

    PubMed Central

    Santos, I. W.; Binsfeld, L. C.; Weiss, R. R.; Kozicki, L. E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to investigate the efficiency of the equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) plus human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) associated with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) to estrous ewes synchronization. Ninety Texel ewes were investigated during seasonal anoestrous. The ewes received intravaginal sponges containing MAP (60 mg) for nine days. At the time of sponges' withdrawal, the ewes were divided into three groups (G): (1) receiving 2 mL of saline i.m. (n = 30), (2) receiving eCG 400 IU i.m. (n = 30), and (3) receiving eCG 400 IU plus hCG 200 IU i.m. (n = 30). Twelve h after sponges' removal, teaser rams were used to estrus check and remained with the ewes for 96 h. The artificial insemination was made with fresh semen 10 h after estrus detection. The effect of the treatment was not significant for the estrous rates among the groups: 73%, 90%, and 86%, respectively. The main effect was observed in the pregnancy and lambing rates among the groups: 70%, 86%, 56%, and 80%, 120%, 56%, respectively. Based on these results from our study, the use of the MAP—eCG is the best choice to improve the fertility rate on ewes. PMID:20953333

  12. Testosterone and mood in aging men.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N; Weiser, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Age-associated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis hypofunction, or partial androgen deficiency of the aging male, is thought to be responsible for various age-associated conditions such as reduced muscle and bone mass, mobility limitations, frailty, obesity, sleep apnea, cognitive impairment, sexual dysfunction, and depression. It has been difficult to establish consistent correlations between these symptoms and plasma testosterone levels in middle-aged men, but testosterone replacement does lead to improved muscle strength, bone density, and sexual function. This article focuses on the relationship between testosterone and mood in older men, and the treatment of age-related depression with exogenous testosterone.

  13. The in vitro effects of steroids, human chorionic gonadotropin and cyanoketone on germinal vesicle breakdown of striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wanshu; Thomas, Peter

    1987-03-01

    The in vitro effects of steroids, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and cyanoketone on germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) oocytes were investigated. All concentrations of HCG (5,10,50 I.U./ml), progesterone and pregnenolone at the highest concentrations(lug/ml) were moderately effective in inducing GVBD, whereas 17β-estrodiol, cortisol, testosterone, 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione and 11-ketotestosterone did not stimulate GVBD. 17α, 20βdihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17α, 20βdiOHprog) and deoxycorticosterone (DOC) were the most potent steroids in stimulating final oocyte maturation. The results indicate that C21 hydroxylated steroids are potent inducers of final maturation in mullet. Further, co-incubations with 17β-estradiol, cortisol and testosterone did not alter the maturation-inducing effects of HCG or 17α,20βdiOHprog. Cyanoketone, a blocker of 3βHSD activity, was only partially effective in blocking GVBD induced by HCG. This suggests that Δ5 (pregnenolone derived) and Δ4 steroids may be involved in final oocyte maturation in this species.

  14. Glial cells missing homologue 1 is induced in differentiating equine chorionic girdle trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    de Mestre, Amanda M; Miller, Donald; Roberson, Mark S; Liford, Jenny; Chizmar, Lisay C; McLaughlin, Kristin E; Antczak, Douglas F

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify transcription factors associated with differentiation of the chorionic girdle, the invasive form of equine trophoblast. The expression patterns of five transcription factors were determined on a panel of conceptus tissues from early horse pregnancy. Tissues from Days 15 through 46 were tested. Eomesodermin (EOMES), glial cells missing homologue 1 (GCM1), heart and neural crest derivatives expressed transcript 1 (HAND1), caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), and distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) were detected in horse trophoblast, but the expression patterns for these genes varied. EOMES had the most restricted distribution, while DLX3 CDX2, and HAND1 were widely expressed. GCM1 seemed to increase in the developing chorionic girdle, and this was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR assays. GCM1 expression preceded a striking increase in expression of equine chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) in the chorionic girdle, and binding sites for GCM1 were discovered in the promoter region of the CGB gene. GCM1, CGB, and CGA mRNA were expressed preferentially in binucleate cells as opposed to uninucleate cells of the chorionic girdle. Based on these findings, it is likely that GCM1 has a role in differentiation and function of the invasive trophoblast of the equine chorionic girdle and endometrial cups. The equine binucleate chorionic girdle (CG) secreting trophoblast shares molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics with human syncytiotrophoblast and represents a model for studies of human placental function.

  15. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: origins of difference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are widely recognized for their roles in ovulation and the support of early pregnancy. Aside from the timing of expression, however, the differences between LH and hCG have largely been overlooked in the clinical realm because of their similar molecular structures and shared receptor. With technologic advancements, including the development of highly purified and recombinant gonadotropins, researchers now appreciate that these hormones are not as interchangeable as once believed. Although they bind to a common receptor, emerging evidence suggests that LH and hCG have disparate effects on downstream signaling cascades. Increased understanding of the inherent differences between LH and hCG will foster more effective diagnostic and prognostic assays for use in a variety of clinical contexts and support the individualization of treatment strategies for conditions such as infertility.

  16. Potential Therapy for Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Infections With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V

    2015-12-01

    The scientific evidence suggests that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infects human fallopian tubes by molecular mimicry in which pathogens act like a ligand to bind to epithelial cell surface human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)/luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors. The hCG-like molecule has been identified as ribosomal protein L12 in NG coat surface. Human fallopian tube epithelial cells have been shown to contain functional hCG/LH receptors. As previously shown in human fallopian tube organ and cell culture studies, cellular invasion and infection can be prevented by exposing the cells to excess hCG, which would outnumber and outcompete NG for receptor binding. Based on these data, we suggest testing hCG in clinical trials on infected women.

  17. Testosterone deficiency: myth, facts, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) afflicts approximately 30% of men ages 40-79 years, with an increase in prevalence strongly associated with aging and common medical conditions including obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. There appears to be a strong relationship between TD and metabolic syndrome, though the relationship is not certain to be causal. Several studies have suggested that repletion of testosterone in deficient men with these comorbidities may indeed reverse or delay their progression. While testosterone repletion has been largely thought of in a sexual realm, we discuss its potential role in general men's health concerns: metabolic, body composition, and its association with decreased all-cause mortality. Recent guidelines and studies have suggested variable prevalence statistics and expanded uses of testosterone repletion in certain populations with both biochemical and clinical signs of testosterone deficiency. Yet, this is not done without risk. A recent randomized placebo-controlled trial of testosterone repletion in elderly frail men with limited mobility has suggested potential negative cardiovascular risks in this older, sicker group of men. Two more recent retrospective studies of variable clinical design and interpretation suggest testosterone poses an increased cardiovascular risk in older men than 65 years and younger men with heart disease. This review examines these and other studies, with practical recommendations for the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency and repletion in middle aged and older men, including an analysis of treatment modalities and areas of concern and uncertainty. PMID:24978631

  18. Episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ritu; Venkatesh, K S; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Misra, Amit

    2012-06-01

    Film-forming lotions, precast films and adhesive patches containing testosterone (T) were prepared by compounding vinylic, acrylic and cellulosic polymers with a variety of excipients in order to achieve distribution of T in domains of heterogeneity within multicomponent matrices. The feasibility of this approach in achieving episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone (T) was investigated. Composition-dependent differences in extent of in vitro drug release and periodicity were observed. Representative formulations showing the most pronounced episodic T release in vitro were tested in female rats. Whereas intravenously administered T decayed exponentially, three maxima of T in serum were observed upon application of selected formulations. Thus, peak serum concentrations of 240, 36, and 29 ng/dL were observed at 0.2, 5, and 16.8 h after application of the preferred lotion formulation, and 89, 65, and 64 ng/dL at 1, 16.4, and 48.8 h after patches. Deconvolution, noncompartment pharmacokinetic analysis and multiple peak fitting also indicated episodicity. These results suggest the feasibility of using transdermal systems for pulsatile T delivery in a variety of clinical applications, including hormone supplementation and male contraception.

  19. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  20. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. PMID:26433309

  1. Testosterone and depression in aging men.

    PubMed

    Seidman, S N; Walsh, B T

    1999-01-01

    In men, testosterone secretion affects neurobehavioral functions such as sexual arousal, aggression, emotional tone, and cognition. Beginning at approximately age 50, men secrete progressively lower amounts of testosterone; about 20% of men over age 60 have lower-than-normal levels. The psychiatric sequelae are poorly understood, yet there is evidence of an association with depressive symptoms. The authors reviewed 1) the physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and its changes with age in men; and 2) the evidence linking testosterone level and major depression in men. Data on this relationship are derived from two types of studies: observational studies comparing testosterone levels and secretory patterns in depressed and non-depressed men, and treatment studies using exogenous androgens for male depression. The data suggest that some depressed older men may have state-dependent low testosterone levels and that some depressed men may improve with androgen treatment.

  2. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  3. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies.

  4. Reduced testosterone production in TM3 Leydig cells treated with Aspalathus linearis (Rooibos) or Camellia sinensis (tea).

    PubMed

    Opuwari, C S; Monsees, T K

    2015-02-01

    Flavonoids are major compounds of Aspalathus linearis and Camellia sinensis. They are classified as endocrine disruptors and some have been shown to inhibit testosterone production. TM3 Leydig cell cultures were treated with 250-5000 μg mL(-1) A. linearis (unfermented or fermented rooibos) or Camellia sinensis (green or black tea) for 24 h in the absence or presence of 6 mIU/200 μl human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Under nonstimulated conditions, all teas tend to decrease testosterone production (3.9-31.8%). However, under hCG-stimulation, a significant reduction in testosterone production was observed at all concentrations by both rooibos and tea (16.3-37.9%). MTT assay and phase contrast microscopy, revealed that at 250-1000 μg ml(-1) , both plants maintained the viability, proliferation and morphology of the cells, while 5000 μg ml(-1) was cytotoxic to the cells (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results here demonstrate the anti-androgenic property of A. linearis and C. sinensis.

  5. Testosterone supplementation: what and how to give.

    PubMed

    Jockenhövel, F

    2003-09-01

    Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a gradual decrease of serum testosterone with aging in men. A considerable number of men will experience hypogonadal androgen levels, defined by the normal range for young men. Thus, in addition to the long-standing use of androgen replacement therapy in the classical forms of primary and secondary hypogonadism, age-associated testosterone deficiency has led to considerable developments in application modes for testosterone. Since oral preparations of testosterone are ineffective, due to the first-pass effect of the liver, or, in case of 17 alpha-alkylation, cause hepatotoxicity, intramuscular injection of long-acting esters, such as testosterone enanthate, have been the mainstay of testosterone therapy. However, the large fluctuations of serum testosterone levels cause unsatisfactory shifts of mood and sexual function in some men; combined with the frequent injections, this delivery mode is thus far from being ideal. In contrast, the transdermal testosterone patches are characterized by favorable pharmacokinetic behavior and have proven to be an effective mode of delivery. Safety data over 10 years indicate no negative effect on the prostate. Nevertheless, the scrotal testosterone patch system is hampered by the application site, which is not easily accepted by many subjects; the non-scrotal patch has a high rate of skin irritations. In view of the drawbacks of the currently available preparations, the most recent developments in testosterone supplementation appear to be highly promising agents. Androgen, which has been available in the United States since mid-2000, will be introduced this year in most European markets as Testogel, a hydroalcoholic gel containing 1% testosterone. Doses of 50-100 mg gel applied once daily on the skin deliver sufficient amounts of testosterone to restore normal hormonal values and to correct the signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. The gel has shown to be very effective and successful

  6. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  7. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research.

  8. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. PMID:27103058

  9. Construction, complete sequence, and annotation of a BAC contig covering the silkworm chorion locus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    The silkmoth chorion was studied extensively by F.C. Kafatos’ group for almost 40 years. However, the complete structure of the chorion locus was not obtained in the genome sequence of Bombyx mori published in 2008 due to repetitive sequences, resulting in gaps and an incomplete view of the locus. To obtain the complete sequence of the chorion locus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from follicular epithelium cells were used as probes to screen a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Seven BACs were selected to construct a contig which covered the whole chorion locus. By Sanger sequencing, we successfully obtained complete sequences of the chorion locus spanning 871,711 base pairs on chromosome 2, where we annotated 127 chorion genes. The dataset reported here will recruit more researchers to revisit one of the oldest model systems which has been used to study developmentally regulated gene expression. It also provides insights into egg development and fertilization mechanisms and is relevant to applications related to improvements in breeding procedures and transgenesis. PMID:26594380

  10. Construction, complete sequence, and annotation of a BAC contig covering the silkworm chorion locus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    The silkmoth chorion was studied extensively by F.C. Kafatos' group for almost 40 years. However, the complete structure of the chorion locus was not obtained in the genome sequence of Bombyx mori published in 2008 due to repetitive sequences, resulting in gaps and an incomplete view of the locus. To obtain the complete sequence of the chorion locus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from follicular epithelium cells were used as probes to screen a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Seven BACs were selected to construct a contig which covered the whole chorion locus. By Sanger sequencing, we successfully obtained complete sequences of the chorion locus spanning 871,711 base pairs on chromosome 2, where we annotated 127 chorion genes. The dataset reported here will recruit more researchers to revisit one of the oldest model systems which has been used to study developmentally regulated gene expression. It also provides insights into egg development and fertilization mechanisms and is relevant to applications related to improvements in breeding procedures and transgenesis. PMID:26594380

  11. High serum testosterone levels are associated with excessive erythrocytosis of chronic mountain sickness in men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Gasco, Manuel; Tapia, Vilma; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE) secondary to hypoventilation. Erythropoietin (Epo) and testosterone regulate erythrocyte production. Low thyroid hormone levels are also associated to hypoventilation. Hence, these hormones can play a role in etiopathogeny of EE. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of sexual and thyroid hormones and Epo in residents from Lima (150 m) and Cerro de Pasco (4,340 m), Peru, and the response to human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation (hCG). Three groups, one at low altitude and two at high altitude [1 with hemoglobin values >16–21 g/dl and the second with Hb ≥21 g/dl (EE)], were studied. hCG was administered intramuscularly in a single dose (1,000 IU), and blood samples were obtained at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection. High-altitude natives present similar levels of gonadotropins and thyroid hormones but lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels (P < 0.01) and greater Epo (P < 0.01), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (P < 0.01), and testosterone levels (P < 0.01) than those at 150 m. Serum testosterone levels (524.13 ± 55.91 μg/dl vs. 328.14 ± 53.23 ng/dl, means ± SE; P < 0.05) and testosterone/DHEAS ratios are higher (7.98 ± 1.1 vs. 3.65 ± 1.1; P < 0.01) and DHEAS levels lower in the EE group (83.85 ± 14.60 μg/dl vs. 148.95 ± 19.11 ug/dl; P < 0.05), whereas Epo was not further affected. Testosterone levels were highest and DHEAS levels lowest in the EE group at all times after hCG stimulation. In conclusion, high androgen activity could be involved in the etiopathogeny of CMS. This evidence provides an opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19318512

  12. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  13. Priapism in teenage boys following depot testosterone.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, James F; Davis, Nikki; Davies, Justin H; Rees, Roland W; Steinbrecher, Henrik A

    2012-01-01

    Priapism is rare in children and may result in erectile dysfunction and sexual aversion behaviours. Testosterone therapy is commonly regarded as safe in children and is widely used in constitutional delay of growth and puberty, hypogonadism, hypospadias and micropenis. We report two cases of priapism in teenage boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty after a change in the formulation of depot testosterone. One case required surgical intervention and the other was preceded by stuttering priapism. These cases illustrate the importance of patient and/or parent counselling before testosterone administration and consideration of lower doses in at-risk patients.

  14. Comparative safety of testosterone dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Layton, J. Bradley; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increases in testosterone use and mixed reports of adverse events have raised concerns about the cardiovascular safety of testosterone. Testosterone is available in several delivery mechanisms with varying pharmacokinetics; injections cause spikes in testosterone levels, while transdermal patches and gels cause more subtle but sustained increases. The comparative cardiovascular safety of gels, injections and patches has not been studied. Objective To determine the comparative cardiovascular safety of testosterone injections, patches, and gels. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative claims from a commercially-insured and Medicare population in the United States, and general practitioner records from the United Kingdom, years 2000 – 2012 Participants Adult (18+), male initiators of testosterone patches, gels, or injections following 180 days free of any testosterone use Exposure New initiation of a testosterone dosage form, followed for up to one year Main Outcomes and Measures In- or outpatient medical records, diagnoses, or claims for: cardio- and cerebrovascular events, including myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina, stroke, composite acute event (MI, unstable angina, or stroke); venous thromboembolism (VTE); mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. Results We identified 431,687 testosterone initiators between the 3 datasets: 36% injection, 9% patch, 55% gel. Medicare had a majority of injection initiators (51%); the US commercially-insured population had majority gel initiators (56%); the United Kingdom had equal proportions of injections and gels (~41%). When compared to gels, injection initiators had higher hazards of CV events (MI, UA, and stroke) (HR=1.26, 95% CI: 1.18–1.35), hospitalization (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.13–1.18), and death (HR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.15–1.56), but not VTE (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.76–1.11). Patches did not confer increased hazards of CV events compared to gels (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.94–1

  15. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  16. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: distinguishing unique physiologic roles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which controls sexual maturation and functionality. In the absence of signaling through their shared receptor, fetal sexual differentiation and post-natal development cannot proceed normally. Although they share a high degree of homology, the physiologic roles of these hormones are unique, governed by differences in expression pattern, biopotency and regulation. Whereas LH is a key regulator of gonadal steroidogenesis and ovulation, hCG is predominantly active in pregnancy and fetal development. Emerging evidence has revealed endogenous functions not previously ascribed to hCG, including participation in ovulation and fertilization, implantation, placentation and other activities in support of successful pregnancy. Spontaneous and induced mutations in LH, hCG and their mutual receptor have contributed substantially to our understanding of reproductive development and function. The lack of naturally occurring, functionally significant mutations in the β-subunit of hCG reinforce its putative role in establishment of pregnancy. Rescue of reproductive abnormalities resulting from aberrant gonadotropin signaling is possible in certain clinical contexts, depending on the nature of the underlying defect. By understanding the physiologic roles of LH and hCG in normal and pathologic states, we may better harness their diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  17. Placental ischemia induces changes in gene expression in chorionic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Michael R.; Granger, Joey P.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious and common hypertensive complication of pregnancy, affecting ~5 to 8 % of pregnancies. The underlying cause of preeclampsia is believed to be placental ischemia, which causes secretion of pathogenic factors into the maternal circulation. While a number of these factors have been identified, it is likely that others remain to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized a relevant preclinical rodent model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension, the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, to determine the effect of chronic placental ischemia on the underlying chorionic tissue and placental villi. Tissue from control and RUPP rats were isolated on gestational day 19 and mRNA from these tissues was subjected to microarray analysis to determine differential gene expression. At a statistical cutoff of p <0.05, some 2,557 genes were differentially regulated between the two groups. Interestingly, only a small subset (22) of these genes exhibited changes of greater than 50 % versus control, a large proportion of which were subsequently confirmed using qRT-PCR analysis. Network analysis indicated a strong effect on inflammatory pathways, including those involving NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines. Of the most differentially expressed genes, the predominant gene classes were extracellular remodeling proteins, pro-inflammatory proteins, and a coordinated upregulation of the prolactin genes. The functional implications of these novel factors are discussed. PMID:24668059

  18. Direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) of salivary testosterone: correlation with free and total serium testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Vittek, J.; L'Hommedieu, D.G.; Gordon, G.G.; Rappaport, S.C.; Southren, A.L.

    1985-08-26

    Simple and sensitive direct RIA for determination of salivary testosterone was developed by using RSL NOSOLVEX TM (125 1) kit produced by Radioassay System Laboratories (Carcon, California). In addition, a relationship between salivary and serum free and total testosterone concentrations was studied in randomly selected 45 healthy subjects, 5 females on oral contraceptive pills and 28 hypertensive patients on various treatment regimens. The lowest weight of testosterone detectable by the modified method was equivalent to 1 pg/ml of saliva, taking into account analytical variability. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 5.09 +/- 2.7% and 8.2 +/- 5.9% respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary and serum free testosterone (r = 0.97) and salivary and serum total testosterone concentrations (r = 0.70 - 0.87). The exception to this was a group of hypertensive females in which no correlation (r = 0.14) between salivary and total serum testosterone was found. It is also of interest that, while salivary testosterone was significantly increased in subjects taking oral contraceptives and most of the hypertensive patients, the total serum testosterone concentration was in normal range. These findings suggest that the determination of salivary testosterone is a reliable method to detect changes in the concentration of available biologically active hormone in the circulation. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) supplement therapy improves the quality of life for men with testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, N C; Yan, B Q; Chung, J M; Lee, K M

    2003-06-01

    In a single-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of a 3-month oral administration of 160 mg/day testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) on the quality of life of men with testosterone deficiency were evaluated. The subjects included ten men with primary hypogonadism and 29 with andropause with sexual dysfunction as the most common problem. The changes in subjective symptoms were evaluated by the PNUH QoL scoring system and the St. Louis University Questionnaire for androgen deficiency in aging males (ADAM). Digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed and serum testosterone, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and liver profile were monitored. Testosterone undecanoate treatment (n = 33) significantly improved sexual dysfunction and symptom scores of metabolic, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal functions compared to baseline and to placebo (n = 6). ADAM score also significantly improved after 3 months of treatment. Serum testosterone was significantly increased compared to pretreatment levels only in the testosterone undecanoate group. In the placebo group, no significant changes compared to baseline were found for testosterone levels and QoL questionnaires. No abnormal findings were detected on DRE or laboratory findings in either group. Adverse events, such as gastrointestinal problems and fatigue, were mild and self-limiting. It is concluded that androgen supplement therapy with oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) restores the quality of life through improvement of general body functions in men with testosterone deficiency. PMID:12898792

  20. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van

    2016-10-01

    Neuro-evolutionary theories describe social anxiety as habitual subordinate tendencies acquired through a recursive cycle of social defeat and submissive reactions. If so, the steroid hormone testosterone might be of therapeutic value, as testosterone is a main force behind implicit dominance drive in many species including humans. We combined these two theories to investigate whether the tendency to submit to the dominance of others is an implicit mechanism in social anxiety (Study-1), and whether this can be relieved through testosterone administration (Study-2). Using interactive eye-tracking we demonstrate that socially anxious humans more rapidly avert gaze from subliminal angry eye contact (Study-1). We replicate this effect of implicit subordination in social anxiety in an independent sample, which is subsequently completely abolished after a single placebo-controlled sublingual testosterone administration (Study-2). These findings provide crucial evidence for hormonal and behavioral treatment strategies that specifically target mechanisms of dominance and subordination in social anxiety.

  1. Testosterone and disinhibited personality in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; García, Luis F; García, Óscar; Blanco, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    The relationship among testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), bioavailable testosterone (BT) and personality were studied in a sample of 105 healthy males (26.71±9.68years old). The possible effects of age and other hormones, such as luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and albumin (ALB) were controlled. Personality was assessed by the novelty seeking scale of Cloninger's Temperament-Character Inventory (TCI), and a reduced version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ). Main results show that there is a weak association among three measures of testosterone with novelty seeking, sociability and, to a lesser extent, with impulsive sensation seeking. Our data, as expected, confirmed previous results and also suggest that these relationships are strongly affected by the age variable. LH, FSH and SHBG hormones play no role in the reported relationships. PMID:27291990

  2. [Micropenis. Results of treatment with testosterone].

    PubMed

    Vanelli, M; Bernasconi, S; Terzi, C; Bolondi, O; Boselli, E; Virdis, R; Giovannelli, G

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of children presenting with micropenis (penis length less than or equal to 2.5 cm) were treated according to 2 different therapeutic schedules. The first consisted of the transcutaneous administration of testosterone propionate (4 mg twice a day) and the second of the intramuscular injection of sustained action testosterone enanthate (25 mg every 2 weeks). Only the intramuscular treatment was able to induce a normal and durable penis growth, owing to the hyperplastic action that the testosterone injection exerted on the level of the cellular tissues of the penis. Using testosterone enanthate dosages varying from 25 to 50 mg, the risks for an abnormal acceleration of growth and bone age seem to be minimized.

  3. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van

    2016-10-01

    Neuro-evolutionary theories describe social anxiety as habitual subordinate tendencies acquired through a recursive cycle of social defeat and submissive reactions. If so, the steroid hormone testosterone might be of therapeutic value, as testosterone is a main force behind implicit dominance drive in many species including humans. We combined these two theories to investigate whether the tendency to submit to the dominance of others is an implicit mechanism in social anxiety (Study-1), and whether this can be relieved through testosterone administration (Study-2). Using interactive eye-tracking we demonstrate that socially anxious humans more rapidly avert gaze from subliminal angry eye contact (Study-1). We replicate this effect of implicit subordination in social anxiety in an independent sample, which is subsequently completely abolished after a single placebo-controlled sublingual testosterone administration (Study-2). These findings provide crucial evidence for hormonal and behavioral treatment strategies that specifically target mechanisms of dominance and subordination in social anxiety. PMID:27448713

  4. FDA Warns of Dangers from Testosterone Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... hopes of boosting their physical health or libido. Anabolic steroids are synthetic variations of testosterone and are legally ... Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Anabolic Steroids Men's Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  5. Pattern of plasma testosterone and delta4-androstenedione in normal newborns: Evidence for testicular activity at birth.

    PubMed

    Forest, M G; Cathiard, A M

    1975-11-01

    Plasma testosterone (T) and delta4-androstenedione (delta) levels were measured by a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay method in 157 blood specimens from normal neonates. In both sexes at birth plasma T and delta were significantly higher in peripheral than in cord blood and drop within the first week of life. In males a secondary increase in both T and delta had occurred by the 2nd week of life while values continue to decrease in females. The present data demonstrate that testicular activity is still present at birth and suggest that the transient fall in T levels likely due to the removal of chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion is responsible for the secondary activation of the hypothalamic pituitary axis by a negative feed-back mechanism.

  6. A new oral testosterone undecanoate formulation.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Frank-Michael; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Testosterone undecanoate has been available on the market for more than 20 years. This testosterone ester is used worldwide for oral treatment of male hypogonadism. So far, testosterone undecanoate has been dissolved in oleic acid, leading to inconvenient storage conditions. It will now be available in a new formulation with castor oil and propylene glycol laurate instead of oleic acid, thus improving storage conditions markedly (stable at room temperature for approximately 3 years). Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated bioequivalence of the old and the new formulation of testosterone undecanoate. Therefore, the results of studies that were performed with the old formulation can be transferred to the clinical use of the new formulation. Controlled studies have shown its efficacy in the treatment of symptoms associated with reduced serum testosterone levels. In these cases testosterone undecanoate improves bone mineral density, quality of life, muscle mass, libido and mood. Further studies will help evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new formulation in the treatment of elderly men with late-onset hypogonadism. PMID:14579074

  7. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD. PMID:25532575

  8. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    PubMed Central

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T-treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T-deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk. PMID:25432501

  9. The role of chorion on toxicity of silver nanoparticles in the embryonic zebrafish assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate how the size- and surface coating-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is influenced by the presence and absence of the chorion in an embryonic zebrafish assay. Methods Normal and dechorinated embryos were exposed to four different AgNPs, 20 or 110 nm in size, with polypyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate surface coatings in a standard zebrafish embryo medium (EM). This was then compared to a 62.5 μM calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution where agglomeration was controlled. Results Embryonic toxicity in the absence of the chorion was greater than in its presence. The smaller 20 nm AgNPs were more toxic than the larger 110 nm AgNPs, regardless of the chorion and test media. However, surface coating affected toxicity, since PVPcoated AgNPs were more toxic than citrate-coated AgNPs; this was strongly affected by the presence of the chorion in both EM and CaCl2. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the permeability function of the chorion on the size- and surface coating-dependent toxicity of AgNPs. Thereafter, careful experiment should be conducted to assess nanoparticle toxicity in zebrafish embryos. PMID:25518841

  10. Male prolactinomas presenting with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Benbassat, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    In men harboring prolactinoma the most common symptoms are related to hypogonadism, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and gynecomastia. These men characteristically present with elevated serum prolactin (PRL) levels, suppressed gonadotropins, and low testosterone levels. We studied a group of 11 unique men with prolactinomas presenting with testosterone levels within the normal range (≥2.6 ng/ml; cohort A), and compared them to 11 prolactinoma men with borderline baseline testosterone (2.1-2.5 ng/ml; cohort B) and to a cohort of 34 prolactinoma patients with low testosterone levels (≤2 ng/ml; cohort C). Mean testosterone levels at presentation were 3.91 ± 0.9 ng/ml in cohort A (range, 2.6-5.2 ng/ml), 2.44 ± 0.16 ng/ml in cohort B and 0.96 ± 0.6 in cohort C (p < 0.001). Mean baseline PRL levels were >20 times above normal in cohort A compared to >100 times above normal in cohorts B and C. Symptoms of hypogonadism were present in 55, 64 and 76% of men in groups A, B and C, respectively. There was a trend towards a larger tumor size in the low testosterone group (p = 0.06). Visual fields defects at presentation were more prevalent in this cohort (C). With cabergoline, testosterone level increased from 3.91 to 6.42 ng/ml (Δ = 2.51 ng/ml) in cohort A, from 2.44 to 5.63 ng/ml (Δ = 3.19 ng/ml) in cohort B, and from 0.96 to 3.30 ng/ml (Δ = 2.34 ng/ml) in cohort C (p < 0.05 for each group). Symptoms of hypogonadism improved following treatment in 83% of symptomatic men in cohort A. Normal testosterone does not exclude the likelihood of prolactinoma in men. When treated with cabergoline, testosterone levels in these men can increase higher within the normal range together with clinical improvement. PMID:23756784

  11. Testosterone, territoriality, and the 'home advantage'.

    PubMed

    Neave, Nick; Wolfson, Sandy

    2003-02-01

    The consistently better performance seen by teams in various sporting contexts when playing at home is referred to as the 'home advantage'. Various explanations have been put forward to account for this robust phenomenon, though none has yet focussed on possible hormonal factors. In an initial study, we showed that salivary testosterone levels in soccer players were significantly higher before a home game than an away game.In a second study involving a different group of soccer players, this finding was replicated over two home games, two away games, and three training sessions. Perceived rivalry of the opposing team was important as testosterone levels were higher before playing an 'extreme' rival than a 'moderate' rival. Self-reported measures of mood in both studies were not linked to testosterone level. The present results corroborate and extend earlier findings on the relationships between testosterone, territoriality, and dominance in human competitive encounters and further suggest an important role for testosterone in the home advantage seen in various team sports.

  12. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  13. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  18. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring. PMID:26924592

  19. EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION BY HUMAN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLAST CULTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION BY HUMAN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLAST CULTURES

    Jiangang Chen1, Gordon C. Douglas1?,Twanda L. Thirkill1?, Peter N. Lohstroh1, Susan R. Bielmeier2, Michael G. Narotsky3, Deborah S. Best3, Randy A. Harrison3, Kala ...

  20. Egg morphology and chorionic ultrastructure of key stored product insect pests of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggs of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were imaged with scanning electron microscopy to explore how respiratory openings on the chorion surface may be related to the efficacy of fumigants. Each P. interpunctella eg...

  1. Postnatal Testosterone Concentrations and Male Social Development

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3–4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates. PMID:24600437

  2. Postnatal testosterone concentrations and male social development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3-4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates.

  3. Identification of the origin and localization of chorion (egg envelope) proteins in an ancient fish, the white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Conte, Fred S; McInnis, Elizabeth; Fong, Tak Hou; Cherr, Gary N

    2014-06-01

    In many modern teleost fish, chorion (egg envelope) glycoproteins are synthesized in the liver of females, and the expression of those genes is controlled by endogenous estrogen released from the ovary during maturation. However, among the classical teleosts, such as salmonid, carp, and zebrafish, the chorion glycoproteins are synthesized in the oocyte, as in higher vertebrates. Sturgeon, which are members of the subclass Chondrostei, represent an ancient lineage of ray-finned fishes that differ from other teleosts in that their sperm possess acrosomes, their eggs have numerous micropyles, and early embryo development is similar to that of amphibians. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of chorion formation and the phylogenetic relationship between sturgeon and other teleosts, we used specific antibodies directed against the primary components of sturgeon chorion glycoproteins, using immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry approaches. The origin of each chorion glycoprotein was determined through analyses of both liver and ovary, and their localization during ovarian development was investigated. Our data indicate that the origin of the major chorion glycoproteins of sturgeon, ChG1, ChG2, and ChG4, derive not only from the oocyte itself but also from follicle cells in the ovary, as well as from hepatocytes. In the follicle cell layer, granulosa cells were found to be the primary source of ChGs during oogenesis in white sturgeon. The unique origins of chorion glycoproteins in sturgeon suggest that sturgeons are an intermediate form in the evolution of the teleost lineage.

  4. Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J

    2016-05-01

    I describe an integrative social-evolutionary model for the adaptive significance of the human oxytocinergic system. The model is based on a role for this hormone in the generation and maintenance of social familiarity and affiliation across five homologous, functionally similar, and sequentially co-opted contexts: mothers with offspring, female and male mates, kin groups, individuals with reciprocity partners, and individuals within cooperating and competing social groups defined by culture. In each situation, oxytocin motivates, mediates and rewards the cognitive and behavioural processes that underlie the formation and dynamics of a more or less stable social group, and promotes a relationship between two or more individuals. Such relationships may be positive (eliciting neurological reward, reducing anxiety and thus indicating fitness-enhancing effects), or negative (increasing anxiety and distress, and thus motivating attempts to alleviate a problematic, fitness-reducing social situation). I also present evidence that testosterone exhibits opposite effects from oxytocin on diverse aspects of cognition and behaviour, most generally by favouring self-oriented, asocial and antisocial behaviours. I apply this model for effects of oxytocin and testosterone to understanding human psychological disorders centrally involving social behaviour. Reduced oxytocin and higher testosterone levels have been associated with under-developed social cognition, especially in autism. By contrast, some combination of oxytocin increased above normal levels, and lower testosterone, has been reported in a notable number of studies of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and, in some cases, higher oxytocin involves maladaptively 'hyper-developed' social cognition in these conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that human social cognition and behaviour are structured, in part, by joint and opposing effects of oxytocin and testosterone, and that extremes of such joint

  5. Pre-eclampsia (PE) and Chorionicity in Women with Twin Gestations

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anupama; Singh, Arati; Surapaneni, Tarakeswari; Nirmalan, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pre-Eclampsia (PE) affects 6-31% of pregnant women with multiple gestations. There are conflicting reports on the association of PE with Chorionicity and zygosity; however, there is a lack of information on this potential association in a population of pregnant Asian Indian women. Aim: To determine as to whether chorionicity and zygosity were associated with PE in a population of Asian Indian women with twin gestations. Settings and Design: A retrospective observational study was done at a single tertiary care centre in Southern India. Material and Methods: The study included pregnant women with twin gestations, who was delivered at the study institute in 2012. Hypertension in pregnancy was categorized, based on the criteria of the International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Chorionicity was determined by using ultrasonography and zygosity was determined, based on clinical criteria. Point estimates and the 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) around point estimates of PE and associations of chorionicity and zygosity with PE were determined by using bivariate analysis, logistic regression models and area under Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: This study included 208 women with twin gestations. The incidence of PE in dichorionic twin gestations was 13.17% (n=22, 95% CI: 8.66, 18.96), it was 4.87% (n=2, 95% CI: 0.83, 15.19) in monochorionic twin gestations, it was 16.36% (n=9, 95% CI: 8.29, 27.91) in dizygous twin gestations and it was 4.88% (n=2, 95% CI: 0.83, 15.19) in monozygous twin gestations. Neither chorionicity (adjusted OR: 2.59, 95% CI: 0.55, 12.19) nor zygosity (adjusted OR 2.72, 95% CI: 0.49, 15.13) were associated with PE In a multivariate logistic regression model. Conclusion: Although it was not statistically significant, the clinical incidence of PE was higher in dichorionic and dizygous twin gestations. PMID:24596736

  6. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides in chorion peroxidase of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Li, Junsuo S; Li, Jianyong

    2005-09-01

    A peroxidase is present in the chorion of Aedes aegypti eggs and catalyzes chorion protein cross-linking during chorion hardening, which is critical for egg survival in the environment. The unique chorion peroxidase (CPO) is a glycoprotein. This study deals with the N-glycosylation site, structures, and profile of CPO-associated oligosaccharides using mass spectrometric techniques and enzymatic digestion. CPO was isolated from chorion by solubilization and several chromatographic methods. Mono-saccharide composition was analyzed by HPLC with fluorescent detection. Our data revealed that carbohydrate (D-mannose, N-acetyl D-glucosamine, D-arabinose, N-acetyl D-galactosamine, and L-fucose) accounted for 2.24% of the CPO molecular weight. A single N-glycosylation site (Asn328-Cys- Thr) was identified by tryptic peptide mapping and de novo sequencing of native and PNGase A-deglycosylated CPO using matrix-assisted laser/desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF/MS) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The Asn328 was proven to be a major fully glycosylated site. Potential tryptic glycopeptides and profile were first assessed by MALDI/TOF/MS and then by precursor ion scanning during LC/MS/MS. The structures of N-linked oligosaccharides were elucidated from the MS/MS spectra of glycopeptides and exoglycosidase sequencing of PNGase A-released oligosaccharides. These CPO-associated oligosaccharides had dominant Man3GlcNAc2 and Man3 (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and high mannose-type structures (Man(4-8)GlcNAc2). The truncated structures, Man2GlcNAc2 and Man2 (Fuc) GlcNAc2, were also identified. Comparison of CPO activity and Stokes radius between native and deglycosylated CPO suggests that the N-linked oligosaccharides influence the enzyme activity by stabilizing its folded state.

  7. Licorice consumption and serum testosterone in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; Bonanni, G; Mattarello, M J; Fiore, C; Sartorato, P; Palermo, M

    2003-09-01

    We have previously found that licorice can reduce serum testosterone in healthy men. These results were not confirmed in another study, where the same amounts of licorice did not decrease salivary testosterone values. In the actual study we treated more cases with the same amount of licorice and reproduced our previous data. The mean testosterone values decreased by 26 % after one week of treatment (p < 0.01). There was also a significant increase in 17-OHP and LH concentrations and a slight, but not significant decrease in free testosterone. Licorice treatment, in addition, did not affect the response of testosterone and 17-OHP to stimulation with beta-HCG. PMID:14520600

  8. Time-dependent effects of alcohol on the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-testicular function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, A I; Mateos, A; Agrasal, C; Martin, I; Canovas, J M; Fermoso, J

    1989-04-01

    Adult male rats were followed throughout ethanol administration, in order to examine the time-dependent effects of ethanol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The results indicate that there is an increase in plasma prolactin levels together with a reduction in basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, which are evident from the beginning of the intoxication period. An exaggerated response of LH to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone was also evident from 2nd week on, in ethanol-treated rats. Basal and human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated plasma testosterone levels were decreased in alcohol-treated as compared to control rats, at all time points studied. In addition, plasma estradiol levels were increased in ethanol-fed rats. These data suggest a direct suppressive effect of ethanol on LH release in the beginning of the intoxication period. Subsequent elevations of plasma estradiol and prolactin levels may have contributed to the maintenance of hypogonadism at the end of the intoxication period.

  9. Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Morales-Martinez, Felipe Arturo; Rodríguez-Guajardo, René; González-Saldivar, Gloria; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo G.; Alvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; Lavalle-Gonzalez, Fernando Javier; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM). Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Free testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL) when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL) (P = 0.0001 and 0.001), respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r = 0.78; P ≤ 0.001, r = 0.74;  P ≤ 0.001, and r = 0.71;  P ≤ 0.001), respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P = 0.001) and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P = 0.0002 and 0.009). Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction. PMID:25505909

  10. Ovarian and adrenal androgens and their link to high human chorionic gonadotropin levels: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Morales-Martinez, Felipe Arturo; Rodríguez-Guajardo, René; González-Saldivar, Gloria; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo G; Alvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; Lavalle-Gonzalez, Fernando Javier; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM). Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Free testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL) when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL) (P = 0.0001 and 0.001), respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r = 0.78; P ≤ 0.001, r = 0.74;  P ≤ 0.001, and r = 0.71;  P ≤ 0.001), respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P = 0.001) and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P = 0.0002 and 0.009). Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction.

  11. Insulin has a biphasic effect on the ability of human chorionic gonadotropin to induce ovarian cysts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bogovich, K; Clemons, J; Poretsky, L

    1999-08-01

    Hyperinsulinemia enhances the ability of subovulatory doses of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to induce ovarian follicular cysts in the rat. To determine the relative contribution of these hormones to the development of ovarian cysts, adult female rats were treated with either (1) vehicle alone (controls), (2) a high-fat diet (HFD) to control for the effects of weight gain, (3) 1.5 to 6 IU hCG twice daily plus 6 U insulin (Ins)/d, or (4) 1.5 to 9 U Ins/d plus 3 IU hCG twice daily. On day 23 of the in vivo treatments, all groups that received at least 6 U Ins/d displayed increased body weight compared with control and HFD rats (P < or = .05). No control rats and only one HFD rat displayed ovarian cysts on this day. Plasma estrone (E1) and androstenedione (A4) were elevated in HFD rats with noncystic follicles compared with control rats (P < or = .05). Between 64% and 80% of rats on 6 U Ins/d plus twice-daily injections of 1.5 to 6 IU hCG displayed ovarian cysts on day 23. Plasma estradiol (E2) concentrations for these treatment groups were similar to those of control rats. Of the hormonally treated animals, only those that had ovarian cysts in response to twice-daily injections of 4.5 or 6 IU hCG plus 6 U Ins/d displayed elevated plasma A4 and/or testosterone compared with controls. In contrast, plasma E1 concentrations were elevated on day 23 for animals bearing ovarian cysts in response to increasing doses of hCG plus the fixed dose of 6 U Ins/d. Between 70% and 80% of rats treated twice daily with 3 IU hCG plus a daily dose of 1.5 to 6 U Ins displayed ovarian cysts on day 23. In marked contrast, only 25% of rats treated with this dose of hCG plus 9 U Ins/d developed cystic follicles. Of the plasma steroids tested, only E1 and A4 were elevated in these treatment groups compared with controls. However, these increases in plasma steroid concentrations did not correlate with the dose of insulin. We conclude from these data that, although the mechanisms remain to

  12. A link between high serum levels of human chorionic gonadotrophin and chorionic expression of its mature functional receptor (LHCGR) in Down's syndrome pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Smallwood, Alan; Chambers, Anne E; Papageorghiou, Aris; Loosfelt, Hugues; Spencer, Kevin; Campbell, Stuart; Nicolaides, Kypros

    2005-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) is released from placental trophoblasts and is involved in establishing pregnancy by maintaining progesterone secretion from the corpus luteum. Serum hCG is detected in the maternal circulation within the first 2–3 wks of gestation and peaks at the end of the first trimester before declining. In Down's syndrome (DS) pregnancies, serum hCG remains significantly high compared to gestation age-matched uncompromised pregnancies. It has been proposed that increased serum hCG levels could be due to transcriptional hyper-activation of the CGB (hCG beta) gene, or an increased half life of glycosylated hCG hormone, or both. Another possibility is that serum hCG levels remain high due to reduced availability of the hormone's cognate receptor, LHCGR, leading to lack of hormone utilization. We have tested this hypothesis by quantifying the expression of the hCG beta (CGB) RNA, LHCGR RNA and LHCGR proteins in chorionic villous samples. We demonstrate that chorionic expression of hCG beta (CGB) mRNA directly correlates with high serum hCG levels. The steady-state synthesis of LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–5) in DS pregnancies was significantly higher than that of controls, but the expression of full-length LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–11) in DS was comparable to that of uncompromised pregnancies. However, the synthesis of high molecular weight mature LHCGR proteins was significantly reduced in DS compared to uncompromised pregnancies, suggesting a lack of utilization of circulating hCG in DS pregnancies. PMID:15969756

  13. Suppression of male-specific cytochrome P450 2c and its mRNA by 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl in rat liver is not causally related to changes in serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, H N; Waxman, D J; LeBlanc, G A; Linko, P; Goldstein, J A

    1989-06-01

    Rat cytochrome P450 2c (P450 gene IIC11) is a constitutive, male-specific hepatic enzyme which is suppressed greater than 90% by treatment with 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCB) [H. N. Yeowell et al. (1987) Mol. Pharmacol. 32, 340-347]. HCB also decreases serum testosterone levels in adult male rats (greater than 98% loss). The present study assesses whether the suppression of P450 2c by HCB is a direct result of its effects on serum testosterone levels. Further, the site along the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis at which HCB acts to depress testosterone secretion was examined. Administration of the synthetic androgen methyltrienolone to HCB-treated rats failed to prevent the suppression of P450 2c mRNA and its associated microsomal steroid 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity under conditions where it effectively reversed the large decrease in P450 2c mRNA and steroid 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity produced by castration. Hepatic steroid 6 beta-hydroxylase activity, which is catalyzed primarily by P450 2a (P450 gene IIIA2), was also suppressed by HCB and was not protected by methyltrienolone. Administration of either human chorionic gonadotropin, an analog of pituitary-derived luteinizing hormone, or the hypothalamic luteinizing hormone releasing hormone elevated serum testosterone levels to a much smaller extent in HCB-treated rats than in control rats. These results indicate that the effects of HCB on serum testosterone levels reflect its effects on testicular function rather than the pituitary or hypothalamus. However, the present study demonstrates that the consequential reduction in serum testosterone levels in HCB-treated rats is not causally related to the reduction in hepatic P450 2c levels. Thus, HCB must also act on some other regulatory mechanism involved in the expression of this protein.

  14. Testosterone-induced increase of insulin-like growth factor I levels depends upon normal levels of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Saggese, G; Cesaretti, G; Franchi, G; Startari, L

    1996-08-01

    Pubertal development is associated with a rise in plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels that is related both to the increase in sex steroids and/or to the sex steroid-induced augmentation in endogenous growth hormone (GH) secretion. In order to investigate the relationship between IGF-I, GH and testosterone, we examined 42 male subjects with various clinical conditions (classical GH deficiency (CGHD, N = 5), non-classical GH deficiency (NCGHD, N = 7), short idiopathic stature (N = 6), nutritional obesity (N = 8), GH-treated CGHD (N = 4), GH-treated NCGHD (N = 5) and normal stature (N = 7)) in which , for evaluation of hypogonadism (i.e. the absence of one or both testes from the scrotal sac), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) tests were performed. We measured IGF-I, total and free testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) by radioimmunoassays before and 48 and 96 h after the start of the test. The values of IGF-I were lower (0.001 < p < 0.005) in CGHD and NCGHD than in the other groups. In comparison to basal levels, IGF-I values increased (0.005 < p < 0.05) both 48 and 96 h after the start of the hCG test in short idiopathic and normal stature children and in GH-treated subjects with NCGHD, but only 96 h in subjects with untreated NCGHD and GH-treated CGHD. No difference was demonstrated in basal values of total testosterone among any of the groups, while basal free testosterone levels were higher (0.001 < p < 0.05) in GH-treated subjects with NCGHD than in all the other groups except nutritional obesity; furthermore, free testosterone was higher (p < 0.05) in nutritional obesity than in CGHD. The values of total and free testosterone obtained both 48 and 96 h after the start of the hCG test were higher (0.001 < p < 0.05) than basal values in all groups. The DHEAS values did not show any significant change during the hCG test. Basal values were higher (0.01 < p < 0.05) in nutritional obesity than in the other groups. Considering all

  15. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  16. Testosterone supplementation in the aging male.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C

    1999-12-01

    World-wide life expectancy at birth for men and women will have increased by about 20 y during 50 y period between 1950 and 2000. As a result, the proportion of the elderly population is expected to increase significantly in the 21st century. Despite this increase in longevity for men and women, men still have significantly shorter life expectancy of approximately 5 y. To further reduce and prevent debilitating disease and disability in elderly men, a question is whether any type of interventions, such as hormone replacement therapy, may play a role in improving the quality of life as proven in post-menopausal women. Men experience age-related decline of capability physically and mentally. Various symptoms, such as nervousness, depression, impaired memory, inability to concentrate, easy fatigability, insomnia, hot flushes, periodic sweating, reduction of muscle mass and power, bone ache, and sexual dysfunction, are related to this change. The fact that a number of age-related changes resemble features of various hormonal deficiency has led to worldwide interest in the use of various hormonal preparations in an effort to prevent the aging process in elderly men. Even though there have been opinions against hormonal supplementation in the aging male, preliminary studies defining the risk/benefit ratio of androgen supplementation appear to be encouraging. To understand testosterone supplementation in the aging male, this review will discuss the following important topics: physiology of male hormonal balance, changes in reproductive organs in elderly men, endocrine evaluation of the male, pharmacological effects of testosterone on target organs, available preparations for testosterone, and testosterone supplementation. PMID:10637467

  17. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in men

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Bernie, Aaron M.; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is a widely used treatment for men with symptomatic hypogonadism. The benefits seen with TRT, such as increased libido and energy level, beneficial effects on bone density, strength and muscle as well as cardioprotective effects, have been well-documented. TRT is contraindicated in men with untreated prostate and breast cancer. Men on TRT should be monitored for side-effects such as polycythemia, peripheral edema, cardiac and hepatic dysfunction. PMID:24497673

  18. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  19. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  20. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology.

  1. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule. PMID:24470750

  2. Amnion and Chorion Allografts in Combination with Coronally Advanced Flap in the Treatment of Gingival Recession: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborthy, Sonali; Sambashivaiah, Savita; Bilchodmath, Shivaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Background Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) based root coverage using different allograft membranes has been utilized to correct gingival recession defects with promising results. Amnion and chorion allograft membranes of alternative origin derived from human placental tissue has been advocated in the treatment of gingival recession. However, chorion membrane has been used in combination with amnion membrane no study has compared these allograft membranes in the treatment of gingival recession. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate and compare the efficacy of amnion membrane and chorion membrane in combination with coronally advanced flap in the treatment of gingival recessions. Materials and Methods Twelve systemically healthy patients having at least 2 bilateral Miller’s Class I or Class II gingival recession were recruited and coronally advanced flap was performed with amnion membrane or chorion membrane. Clinical parameters such as gingival Index, plaque index, length of the recession, width of the recession, width of keratinized gingiva, relative attachment level were evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months post-surgery. Results The mean decrease in length of recession (LR) for Chorion site was 2.00±1.54mm and amnion site was 1.58±1.14mm. The gain in attachment level for amnion site was 2.17±1.53mm and for chorion site was 1.58±1.22mm. The total mean percentage of root coverage was 34% for chorion site and 22% for amnion site. Conclusion Both amnion membrane and chorion membrane has shown to be versatile allograft material to be used in the treatment of root coverage. PMID:26501023

  3. Laser-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic studies of peptide-analogues of silkmoth chorion protein segments.

    PubMed

    Benaki, D C; Aggeli, A; Chryssikos, G D; Yiannopoulos, Y D; Kamitsos, E I; Brumley, E; Case, S T; Boden, N; Hamodrakas, S J

    1998-07-01

    Silkmoth chorion, the proteinaceous major component of the eggshell, with extraordinary mechanical and physiological properties, consists of a complex set of proteins, which have a tripartite structure: a central, evolutionarily conserved, domain and two more variable 'arms'. Peptide-analogues of silkmoth chorion protein central domain segments have been synthesized. Laser-Raman and infrared spectroscopic studies suggest the preponderance of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet structure for these peptides, both in solution and in the solid state. PMID:9644596

  4. Effects of flucycloxuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, on reproductive events and thickness of chorion in mealworms.

    PubMed

    Hami, M; Taibi, F; Soltani-Mazouni, N

    2004-01-01

    Flucycloxuron (FCX), a benzoylphenylurea derivative, was evaluated on Tenebrio molitor. The compound was incorporated into the diet and administrated to newly emerged females at various doses (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg). FCX was found to affect several reproductive events such as the duration of preovipostion and oviposition period, the fecundity, the viability of eggs and the duration of embryonic development, respectively. Morphological study of ovaries showed that FCX reduced both oocytes number, the ovaries weight and the size and the volume of the basal oocyte during the sexual maturation. In addition, it reduced the thickness of chorion from freshly laid eggs. However, electron microscopic study revealed that this compound had no significant effect on the fine structure of chorion. Finally, measurements of ovarian ecdysteroids production by an enzyme immunoassay indicated a reduction in the hormonal amounts recorded.

  5. Comparison of angiogenic, cytoprotective, and immunosuppressive properties of human amnion- and chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamahara, Kenichi; Harada, Kazuhiko; Ohshima, Makiko; Ishikane, Shin; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Otani, Kentaro; Taguchi, Akihiko; Soma, Toshihiro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Katsuragi, Shinji; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Kangawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be obtained from the fetal membrane (FM), little information is available regarding biological differences in MSCs derived from different layers of the FM or their therapeutic potential. Isolated MSCs from both amnion and chorion layers of FM showed similar morphological appearance, multipotency, and cell-surface antigen expression. Conditioned media obtained from amnion- and chorion-derived MSCs inhibited cell death caused by serum starvation or hypoxia in endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Amnion and chorion MSCs secreted significant amounts of angiogenic factors including HGF, IGF-1, VEGF, and bFGF, although differences in the cellular expression profile of these soluble factors were observed. Transplantation of human amnion or chorion MSCs significantly increased blood flow and capillary density in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. In addition, compared to human chorion MSCs, human amnion MSCs markedly reduced T-lymphocyte proliferation with the enhanced secretion of PGE2, and improved the pathological situation of a mouse model of acute graft-versus-host disease. Our results highlight that human amnion- and chorion-derived MSCs, which showed differences in their soluble factor secretion and angiogenic/immuno-suppressive function, could be ideal cell sources for regenerative medicine.

  6. Reflexive Testosterone Release: A Model System for Studying the Nongenomic Effects of Testosterone Upon Male Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nyby, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Male mammals of many species exhibit reflexive testosterone release in mating situations. In house mice (Mus musculus), the dramatic robustness of such release, occurring primarily in response to a novel female, suggests some function. The resulting testosterone elevations typically peak during copulatory behavior and may serve to activate transitory motivational and physiological responses that facilitate reproduction. However, such a function requires that testosterone be working through either nongenomic, or very quick genomic, mechanisms. The first part of the review describes reflexive sex hormone release in house mice. The second part summarizes research implicating testosterone’s fast actions in affecting anxiety, reward, learning, analgesia, and penile reflexes in rodents, all of which could optimize male mating success. The review concludes with a speculative model of how spontaneous and reflexive hormone release might interact to regulate reproductive behavior and why mice appear to be an ideal species for examining testosterone’s quick effects. PMID:17976710

  7. The value of chorionic structure and size in the diagnosis of blowfly eggs.

    PubMed

    Erzinclioglu, Y Z

    1989-07-01

    Chorionic structure and size can be of great value in the identification of the eggs of British blowflies of forensic importance. The most useful features are the shape and structure of the plastronic area between the hatching pleats. Correct identification of the eggs of the species considered here would be of use in forensic investigations, not only in Britain, but also in the wide area of the Holarctic region.

  8. Stimulation of Spermiation by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Carp Pituitary Extract in Grass Puffer, Takifugu niphobles

    PubMed Central

    Goo, In Bon; Park, In-Seok; Gil, Hyun Woo; Im, Jae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Spermiation was stimulated in the mature grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, with an injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) or carp pituitary extract (CPE). Spermatocrit and sperm density were reduced, but milt production was increased in both the HCG and CPE treatment groups relative to those in the control group (P <0.05). These results should be useful for increasing the fertilization efficiency in grass puffer breeding programs. PMID:26973977

  9. Chorionic gonadotropin in weight control. A double-blind crossover study.

    PubMed

    Young, R L; Fuchs, R J; Woltjen, M J

    1976-11-29

    Two hundred two patients participated in a double-blind random cross-over study of the effectiveness of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) vs placebo in a wieght reduction program. Serial measurements were made of weight, skin-fold thickness, dropout rates, reasons for dropping out, and patient subjective response. There was no statistically significant difference between those receiving HCG vs placebo during any phase of this study (P greater than .1). PMID:792477

  10. An update on testosterone, HDL and cardiovascular risk in men

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Arthi; Rubinow, Katya B; Page, Stephanie T

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone prescriptions have risen steadily and sharply in the USA despite a lack of clear understanding of the relationship between androgens and cardiovascular disease. In men with increasing age, testosterone levels decline and cardiovascular disease risk goes up. Ties between hypogonadism and cardiovascular disease are suggested by observational data, yet therapy with testosterone replacement has not been shown to mitigate that risk. To the contrary, recent literature has raised concern for increased cardiovascular disease in certain groups of men receiving testosterone therapy. In this article, we review current literature in an attempt to better understand what it suggests is the true relationship between testosterone and cardiovascular disease. We also take a closer look at effects of testosterone on lipids and HDL in particular, to see if this explains the cardiovascular effects seen in clinical studies. PMID:26257830

  11. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman Cervical squamous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdağ, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B.; Ozcan, Huseyin C.

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient’s complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human placental chorion for perinatal tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guihua; Di Bernardo, Julie; DeLong, Cynthia J; Monteiro da Rocha, André; O'Shea, K Sue; Kunisaki, Shaun M

    2014-09-01

    The reliable derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a noninvasive autologous source at birth would facilitate the study of patient-specific in vitro modeling of congenital diseases and would enhance ongoing efforts aimed at developing novel cell-based treatments for a wide array of fetal and pediatric disorders. Accordingly, we have successfully generated iPSCs from human fetal chorionic somatic cells extracted from term pregnancies by ectopic expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. The isolated parental somatic cells exhibited an immunophenotypic profile consistent with that of chorionic mesenchymal stromal cells (CMSCs). CMSC-iPSCs maintained pluripotency in feeder-free systems for more than 15 passages based on morphology, immunocytochemistry, and gene expression studies and were capable of embryoid body formation with spontaneous trilineage differentiation. CMSC-iPSCs could be selectively differentiated in vitro into various germ layer derivatives, including neural stem cells, beating cardiomyocytes, and definitive endoderm. This study demonstrates the feasibility of term placental chorion as a novel noninvasive alternative to dermal fibroblasts and cord blood for human perinatal iPSC derivation and may provide additional insights regarding the reprogramming capabilities of extra-embryonic tissues as they relate to developmental ontogeny and perinatal tissue engineering applications.

  13. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman. Cervical squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdag, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B; Ozcan, Husiyen C

    2016-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in  non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient's complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  14. Testosterone induces "splitting" of circadian locomotor activity rhythms in birds.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, E

    1974-07-01

    Under the influence of testosterone, the free-running circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of the starling, Sturnus vulgaris, tends to "split" into two components which temporarily run with different circadian frequencies: "splitting" occurred in intact birds whose testes grew, and in castrated birds that were injected with testosterone. Since "splitting" most probably reflects the temporal separation of two (or two groups of) circadian oscillators, these results suggest that testosterone affects the mutual coupling of circadian oscillators controlling locomotor activity.

  15. The relationship between sleep disorders and testosterone in men

    PubMed Central

    Wittert, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Plasma testosterone levels display circadian variation, peaking during sleep, and reaching a nadir in the late afternoon, with a superimposed ultradian rhythm with pulses every 90 min reflecting the underlying rhythm of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. The increase in testosterone is sleep, rather than circadian rhythm, dependent and requires at least 3 h of sleep with a normal architecture. Various disorders of sleep including abnormalities of sleep quality, duration, circadian rhythm disruption, and sleep-disordered breathing may result in a reduction in testosterone levels. The evidence, to support a direct effect of sleep restriction or circadian rhythm disruption on testosterone independent of an effect on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), or the presence of comorbid conditions, is equivocal and on balance seems tenuous. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appears to have no direct effect on testosterone, after adjusting for age and obesity. However, a possible indirect causal process may exist mediated by the effect of OSA on obesity. Treatment of moderate to severe OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) does not reliably increase testosterone levels in most studies. In contrast, a reduction in weight does so predictably and linearly in proportion to the amount of weight lost. Apart from a very transient deleterious effect, testosterone treatment does not adversely affect OSA. The data on the effect of sleep quality on testosterone may depend on whether testosterone is given as replacement, in supratherapeutic doses, or in the context abuse. Experimental data suggest that testosterone may modulate individual vulnerability to subjective symptoms of sleep restriction. Low testosterone may affect overall sleep quality which is improved by replacement doses. Large doses of exogenous testosterone and anabolic/androgenic steroid abuse are associated with abnormalities of sleep duration and architecture. PMID:24435056

  16. Testosterone treatment comes of age: new options for hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2006-09-01

    Male hypogonadism is one of the most frequent, but also most underdiagnosed, endocrinopathies. However, the required testosterone treatment is simple and very effective if properly administered. Although testosterone has been available for clinical use for seven decades, until quite recently the treatment modalities were far from ideal. Subdermal testosterone pellets require minor surgery for insertion and often cause local problems. The injectable testosterone enanthate, for a long period the most frequently used mode of administration, lasts for two to four weeks, but produces supraphysiological levels initially and low levels before the next injection. The oral testosterone undecanoate has to be taken three times daily, has an uncertain absorption pattern and results in peaks and valleys of serum testosterone levels throughout the day. With the advent of transdermal testosterone preparations, the desired physiological serum levels could be achieved for the first time. Scrotal testosterone patches were the first to fulfil this requirement. These were followed by nonscrotal skin patches, which, however, cause considerable skin reactions including erythema and blisters. Recently introduced, invisible transdermal testosterone gels increased the intervals of application and are now slowly replacing other modalities. A mucoadhesive buccal testosterone tablet with sustained release is also a recent competing modality. Finally, injectable testosterone undecanoate in castor oil was made into a real depot preparation requiring only four injections per year for replacement therapy. These new preparations with a desired pharmacokinetic testosterone profile give the patient a real choice and make treatment easier. Based on pharmacogenetic considerations taking the androgen receptor polymorphism into account, treatment may be individualized for each patient in the future. PMID:16918944

  17. Testosterone in men with advanced liver disease: abnormalities and implications.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Marie; Grossmann, Mathis; Gow, Paul J; Angus, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    Serum testosterone is reduced in up to 90% of men with cirrhosis, with levels falling as liver disease advances. Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone, with effects on muscle, bone, and hematopoiesis. Many of the features of advanced liver disease are similar to those seen in hypogonadal men, including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, gynecomastia, and low libido. However, the relative contribution of testosterone deficiency to the symptomatology of advanced liver disease has not been well established. More recently, it has been demonstrated that low testosterone in men with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality, independent of the classically recognized prognostic factors, such as the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. Only several small clinical trials have examined the role of testosterone therapy in men with cirrhosis, none of which have resolved the issue of whether or not testosterone is beneficial. However, in men with organic hypogonadism due to structural hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis disease, testosterone therapy has been shown to improve muscle mass and bone mineral density, increase hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance. Despite initial concerns linking testosterone with hepatocellular carcinoma, more recent data suggest that this risk has been overstated. There is, therefore, now a strong rationale to assess the efficacy and safety of testosterone therapy in cirrhosis in well-designed randomized controlled trials. PMID:25087838

  18. Testosterone therapy--what, when and to whom?

    PubMed

    Jockenhövel, F

    2004-12-01

    Testosterone therapy has been used for more than 60 years in the treatment of male hypogonadism. The classical forms of hypogonadism are comprised of primary testicular failure or insufficient testicular stimulation due to the lack of pituitary gonadotropins. Typical causes of primary hypogonadism are Klinefelter's syndrome, anorchia or acquired disturbances of testicular function. Secondary hypogonadism is characterized by insufficient production of pituitary gonadotropins, due either to pituitary failure or defects at the hypothalamic level. It is unequivocally accepted in clinical practice that any male with inadequately low testosterone production for his age will require androgen therapy. In addition to the classical forms of hypogonadism, the past decade of research has clearly demonstrated that, with increasing age, many men will suffer from decreasing testosterone production. About 15-25% of men over the age of 50 years will experience serum testosterone levels well below the threshold considered normal for men between 20 and 40 years of age. Studies substituting testosterone in elderly men with low serum testosterone have shown that men with clinical symptoms identical to the symptomatology of classical hypogonadism will benefit most from such therapy. Therefore, it is the general consensus to treat men with age-related hypogonadism only when clinical symptoms are present that can be potentially corrected by testosterone administration. Until recently, intramuscular injections of esters, such as testosterone enanthate, have been the mainstay of testosterone therapy. The introduction of testosterone patches has not challenged this approach, since many users of patches suffer from moderate to severe skin reactions. Some oral testosterone formulations have proven to be problematic, as absorption can be variable, bioavailability is frequently poor, due to the first-pass effect of the liver, and frequent administration is often required. Oral testosterone

  19. Testosterone and the Prostate: Artifacts and Truths.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; Kohler, Tobias S

    2016-08-01

    Despite a lack of evidence, there have been stated concerns that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can pose a risk to men suffering with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). TRT may improve components of the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with worsening LUTS. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that TRT may decrease prostatic inflammation, which is also associated with worsening LUTS. The data on the relationship between TRT and LUTS have never shown worsening of LUTS, often show no change in LUTS, and occasionally show improvement. PMID:27476133

  20. The chorion layer of fetal membranes is prematurely destroyed in women with preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

    PubMed

    Canzoneri, Bernard J; Feng, Liping; Grotegut, Chad A; Bentley, Rex C; Heine, R Phillips; Murtha, Amy P

    2013-10-01

    Preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) is an important etiology of preterm birth and source of significant neonatal morbidity. We propose that PPROM occurs in the setting of long-standing altered tissue remodeling, which creates a vulnerable environment for the fetal membranes and pregnancy. We tested the hypothesis that PPROM is the result of tissue remodeling in the fetal membranes, specifically the chorion, and this weakening of the chorion compromises the protection provided to the amnion. The purpose of this study was to quantify thickness and apoptosis in the choriodecidua of fetal membranes in patients with PPROM, preterm labor (PTL), preterm no labor (PTNL), and women with term labor (TERM). We conducted a retrospective evaluation of fetal membrane samples from 86 placentas. Immunohistochemistry was performed using a cytokeratin antibody, and mean chorion cellular thickness was compared between each clinical group. To evaluate chorion apoptosis, fetal membranes from patients with PPROM, PTL, and TERM were stained with the M30 antibody, and the degree of cellular apoptosis was determined. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance with corrections for multiple comparisons. The chorion cellular layer was thinner in patients with PPROM compared to patients with PTNL and TERM (62, 140, and 169 µm, respectively, P < .0001), though not significantly different from PTL (95 µm, P > .05). The percentage of apoptotic cells within the chorion among the patients with PPROM was greater compared to PTL and TERM (24.2%, 13.1%, and 8.4%, respectively, P < .001). The chorion cellular layer is thinner and demonstrates increased apoptosis in PPROM compared to patients with PTL, PTNL, and TERM, suggesting differential remodeling between clinical phenotypes.

  1. Developmental programing: impact of testosterone on placental differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beckett, E M; Astapova, O; Steckler, T L; Veiga-Lopez, A; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-08-01

    Gestational testosterone treatment causes maternal hyperinsulinemia, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight, and adult reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions. Sheep models of IUGR demonstrate placental insufficiency as an underlying cause of IUGR. Placental compromise is probably the cause of fetal growth retardation in gestational testosterone-treated sheep. This study tested whether testosterone excess compromises placental differentiation by its androgenic action and/or via altered insulin sensitivity. A comparative approach of studying gestational testosterone (aromatizable androgen) against dihydrotestosterone (non-aromatizable androgen) or testosterone plus androgen antagonist, flutamide, was used to determine whether the effects of testosterone on placental differentiation were programed by its androgenic actions. Co-treatment of testosterone with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, was used to establish whether the effects of gestational testosterone on placentome differentiation involved compromised insulin sensitivity. Parallel cohorts of pregnant females were maintained for lambing and the birth weight of their offspring was recorded. Placental studies were conducted on days 65, 90, or 140 of gestation. Results indicated that i) gestational testosterone treatment advances placental differentiation, evident as early as day 65 of gestation, and culminates in low birth weight, ii) placental advancement is facilitated at least in part by androgenic actions of testosterone and is not a function of disrupted insulin homeostasis, and iii) placental advancement, while helping to increase placental efficiency, was insufficient to prevent IUGR and low-birth-weight female offspring. Findings from this study may be of relevance to women with polycystic ovary syndrome, whose reproductive and metabolic phenotype is captured by the gestational testosterone-treated offspring.

  2. Environmental and genetic contributors to salivary testosterone levels in infants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Yu, Yang; Ahn, Mihye; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Fei; Gilmore, John H; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins) between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ±5 kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF) analysis. We report an association between 5 min APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modeling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, an SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190). RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants.

  3. Testosterone negatively regulates right ventricular load stress responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hemnes, Anna R; Maynard, Karen B; Champion, Hunter C; Gleaves, Linda; Penner, Niki; West, James; Newman, John H

    2012-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is the major determinant of mortality in pulmonary arterial hypertension and male sex is a strong predictor of mortality in this disease. The effects of testosterone on RV structure and function in load stress are presently unknown. We tested whether testosterone levels affect RV hypertrophic responses, fibrosis, and function. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent castration or sham followed by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) or sham. After recovery, testosterone pellets were placed in a subset of the castrated mice and mice were maintained for at least two weeks, when they underwent hemodynamic measurements and tissues were harvested. Plasma levels of testosterone were reduced by castration and repleted by testosterone administration. In PAB, castration resulted in lower right ventricle/left ventricle + septum (RV/LV+S), and myocyte diameter (P < 0.05). Replacement of testosterone normalized these parameters and increased RV fibrosis (P < 0.05). Two weeks of PAB resulted in increased RV systolic pressure in all groups with decreased markers of RV systolic and diastolic function, specifically reduced ejection fraction and increased time constant, and dPdt minimum (P < 0.05), though there was minimal effect of testosterone on hemodynamic parameters. Survival was improved in mice that underwent castration with PAB compared with PAB alone (P < 0.05). Testosterone affects RV hypertrophic response to load stress through increased myocyte size and increased fibrosis in mice. Castration and testosterone replacement are not accompanied by significant alterations in RV in vivo hemodynamics, but testosterone deprivation appears to improve survival in PAB. Further study of the role of testosterone in RV dysfunction is warranted to better understand these findings in the context of human disease.

  4. Environmental and Genetic Contributors to Salivary Testosterone Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kai; Yu, Yang; Ahn, Mihye; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Fei; Gilmore, John H.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins) between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ±5 kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF) analysis. We report an association between 5 min APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modeling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, an SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190). RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants. PMID:25400620

  5. Reduced expression of 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase in chorion during labor is associated with decreased PRB and increased PRA and GR expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; He, Ping; Sun, Qianqian; Liu, Jie; Gao, Lu; You, Xingji; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2013-05-01

    The chorion laeve controls the levels of active prostaglandins within the uterus by NAD-dependent 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). The expression of PGDH in chorion is modulated by glucocorticoids and progesterone. In this study, we investigated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and progesterone receptor A and B (PRA and PRB) in the regulation of PGDH expression in chorion, and we determined whether reduced PGDH expression in chorion during labor is associated with the changes in GR and PR expression by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Dexamethasone (DEX) inhibited PGDH expression whereas progesterone stimulated PGDH expression in chorionic trophoblasts. DEX suppressed PGDH expression in GR overexpression and PR knockdown cells. The inhibitory effect of DEX did not occur in GR knockdown cells. Progesterone inhibited PGDH in GR overexpression and PR knockdown cells and it stimulated PGDH in PRB overexpression cells whereas it suppressed PGDH in PRA overexpression cells. Knockdown of c-Jun resulted in a loss of progesterone- and DEX-induced effects. PGDH was down-regulated in chorion tissues during labor. PRB was decreased whereas PRA and GR were increased in chorion during labor. Glucocorticoids inhibit PGDH expression via GR in chorionic trophoblasts. Progesterone enhances PGDH expression through PRB, whereas it inhibits PGDH expression via GR and PRA. Decreased PGDH expression is associated with increased GR and PRA, although decreased PRB, in chorion during labor.

  6. Expression of 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase in Human Chorion Is Associated with Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Isoform Expression in Term Labor.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Li, Yuan; Ding, Xiaoying; Sun, Qianqian; Huang, Ying; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Chorionic NAD-dependent 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) plays a pivotal role in controlling the amount of prostaglandins in the uterus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are implicated to be involved in parturition. In this study, we investigated whether PPARs are involved in control of PGDH expression in chorion. The chorionic tissues were collected from the following groups of the women with singleton pregnancy: term no labor (TNL), term labor (TL) and preterm labor (PTL). Chorionic trophoblasts were isolated and cultured in vitro. Immunocytochemistry analysis showed that PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PGDH, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were reduced in TL tissues compared to that of TNL group. PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TNL tissues, whereas only PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TL chorion tissues. PGDH expression was decreased in PTL tissues compared with TL group, whereas the expression of PPARs was not significantly different between TL and PTL groups. The agonists of three PPARs dose-dependently stimulated PGDH activity, mRNA, and protein expression in cultured chorionic cells. PPARs did not affect the stability of PGDH mRNA but stimulated the transcriptional activity of HPGD gene. Our results suggest that PPARs play pivotal roles in maintenance of PGDH expression in chorion during human pregnancy.

  7. Expression of 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase in Human Chorion Is Associated with Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Isoform Expression in Term Labor.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Li, Yuan; Ding, Xiaoying; Sun, Qianqian; Huang, Ying; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Chorionic NAD-dependent 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) plays a pivotal role in controlling the amount of prostaglandins in the uterus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are implicated to be involved in parturition. In this study, we investigated whether PPARs are involved in control of PGDH expression in chorion. The chorionic tissues were collected from the following groups of the women with singleton pregnancy: term no labor (TNL), term labor (TL) and preterm labor (PTL). Chorionic trophoblasts were isolated and cultured in vitro. Immunocytochemistry analysis showed that PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PGDH, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were reduced in TL tissues compared to that of TNL group. PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TNL tissues, whereas only PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TL chorion tissues. PGDH expression was decreased in PTL tissues compared with TL group, whereas the expression of PPARs was not significantly different between TL and PTL groups. The agonists of three PPARs dose-dependently stimulated PGDH activity, mRNA, and protein expression in cultured chorionic cells. PPARs did not affect the stability of PGDH mRNA but stimulated the transcriptional activity of HPGD gene. Our results suggest that PPARs play pivotal roles in maintenance of PGDH expression in chorion during human pregnancy. PMID:26093984

  8. Postnatal testosterone levels and temperament in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M; Saenz, Janet

    2011-12-01

    Recent research showing associations between behavior and postnatal testosterone levels in male infants has suggested that the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy may influence the expression of gender phenotypes in later development (i.e., the postnatal hormone hypothesis). As a further test of the relationship between postnatal hormones and behavior in infancy, we measured digit ratios and salivary testosterone in 76 male and female infants (3-4 months of age) and parents completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised, a well-established measure of temperament in the first year of life. Consistent with our earlier findings, there were no significant sex differences in salivary testosterone levels and testosterone levels were unrelated to measures of behavior in female infants. However, in male infants, higher androgen levels predicted greater Negative Affectivity. Further examination of the four scales contributing to the measure of Negative Affectivity showed testosterone levels were a significant predictor of scores on the Distress to Limitations scale, but not of scores on Fear, Sadness, or Reactivity scales. This sex-specific association between salivary testosterone and behavior in infants is consistent with animal research showing higher prenatal androgens associated with typical male development lower the threshold of sensitivity to endogenous testosterone in postnatal life. In sum, these data provide additional support for the postnatal hormone hypothesis and suggest postnatal testosterone levels may influence the development of emotional regulation in male infants.

  9. A Mendelian randomization study of testosterone and cognition in men

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie V.; Lam, Tai Hing; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Cherny, Stacey S.; Liu, Bin; Cheng, Kar Keung; Zhang, Weisen; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement for older men is increasingly common, with some observations suggesting a protective effect on cognitive function. We examined the association of endogenous testosterone with cognitive function among older men in a Mendelian randomization study using a separate-sample instrumental variable (SSIV) analysis estimator to minimize confounding and reverse causality. A genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). The association of genetically predicted testosterone with delayed 10-word recall score and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was assessed at baseline and follow-up using generalized estimating equation among 4,212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Predicted testosterone was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (−0.02 per nmol/L testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.06–0.02) or MMSE score (0.06, 95% CI −0.002–0.12). These estimates were similar after additional adjustment for age, education, smoking, use of alcohol, body mass index and the Framingham score. Our findings do not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cognitive function among older men. PMID:26864717

  10. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    PubMed Central

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen deficiency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:24407187

  11. Testosterone in men with hypogonadism and high cardiovascular risk, Pros.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Vitale, Cristiana; Fini, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Although numerous randomized studies have shown that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves intermediate outcomes in patients at risk and in those with proven cardiovascular disease (CVD), results derived mainly from registries and observational studies have suggested an increased cardiovascular risk in elderly men receiving often supra-therapeutic doses of testosterone. Recent meta-analyses have shown that when testosterone has been used in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions, the effect on the disease has been either beneficial or neutral. Similar results have been reported in hypo- and eugonadal men. Contrasting results have been reported by two trials of testosterone treatment in frail elderly men. Reports from poorly analyzed databases have reported an increased risk of cardiovascular events with testosterone use. More recently, a population-based study showed no increased cardiovascular risk of testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men. Available data from controlled clinical trials suggest that the use of testosterone in elderly men does not increase cardiovascular risk nor the risk of events. Studies in men with CVD, angina, or heart failure report a benefit from testosterone replacement in men with or without hypogonadism. Therefore, at present, the cardiovascular benefits of TRT in elderly men outweigh the risks. This is particularly evident in those men with pre-existing CVD.

  12. Fetal Testosterone, Socio-Emotional Engagement and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrant, Brad M.; Mattes, Eugen; Keelan, Jeff A.; Hickey, Martha; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations among fetal testosterone, child socio-emotional engagement and language development in a sample of 467 children (235 boys) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Bioavailable testosterone concentration measured in umbilical cord blood taken at birth was found to be significantly…

  13. Roles of Testosterone Replacement in Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is an anabolic steroid hormone, which is the major circulating androgen hormone in males. Testosterone levels decreasing below the normal physiological levels lead to a status known as androgen deficiency. Androgen deficiency has been shown to be a major risk factor in the development of several disorders, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. In the past decades, although several studies from animal models as well as clinical studies demonstrated that testosterone exerted cardioprotection, particularly during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, other preclinical and clinical studies have shown an inverse relationship between testosterone levels and cardioprotective effects. As a result, the effects of testosterone replacement on the heart remain controversial. In this review, reports regarding the roles of testosterone replacement in the heart following I/R injury are comprehensively summarized and discussed. At present, it may be concluded that chronic testosterone replacement at a physiological dose demonstrated cardioprotective effects, whereas acute testosterone replacement can cause adverse effects in the I/R heart.

  14. Testosterone and estradiol in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tissue.

    PubMed

    Kumagami, H

    1991-01-01

    Five cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) were studied in terms of the presence of testosterone and estradiol in the JNA tissues using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Testosterone was found to be negative and estradiol positive in all cases. JNA is considered to be a tumor associated with estradiol.

  15. Testosterone stimulates reproductive behavior during autumn in mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos).

    PubMed

    Logan, C A; Carlin, C A

    1991-06-01

    Mockingbirds normally secrete little or no testosterone during the period of autumnal territoriality. To determine the behavioral effects of exogenously administered testosterone, 20-mm lengths of Silastic tubing filled with crystalline testosterone were implanted into free-living resident mockingbirds during the autumn. Control residents were given sealed empty implants. Focal animal sampling showed that T-implanted males sang significantly more than controls. Perhaps as a consequence, a significantly greater percentage of the T-implanted males acquired mates. Though nest building does not naturally occur in autumn, T-implanted males also showed significantly more nest building than control males. However, T-implanted males only built if there was a female in the territory, suggesting a synergy between the presence of testosterone and social cues provided by the female. Examination of the effects of testosterone on territorial aggression showed that despite the high levels of territorial activity common in this species in autumn, territorial fights were unaffected by the presence of testosterone. One aggressive call, known to function in fall territorial defense, was significantly decreased in T-implanted versus control males. The presence of fall testosterone appears to stimulate a number of reproductive activities in mockingbirds, leaving autumnal aggressive interactions either unchanged or decreased. We discuss the application of these data to the effects of testosterone on the mockingbird's reproductive behavior during the breeding season.

  16. Testosterone deficiency in the aging male

    PubMed Central

    McBride, J. Abram; Carson, Culley C.; Coward, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hypogonadism is on the rise, particularly in the aging population. Yet treatment in this population represents a unique challenge to clinicians. The physiology of normal aging is complex and often shares the same, often vague, symptoms of hypogonadism. In older men, a highly prevalent burden of comorbid medical conditions and polypharmacy complicates the differentiation of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism from those of normal aging, yet this differentiation is essential to the diagnosis of hypogonadism. Even in older patients with unequivocally symptomatic hypogonadism, the clinician must navigate the potential benefits and risks of treatment that are not clearly defined in older men. More recently, a greater awareness of the potential risks associated with treatment in older men, particularly in regard to cardiovascular risk and mortality, have been appreciated with recent changes in the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for use of testosterone in aging men. The aim of this review is to provide a framework for the clinician evaluating testosterone deficiency in older men in order to identify correctly and treat clinically significant hypogonadism in this unique population while minimizing treatment-associated harm. PMID:26834840

  17. Understanding testosterone variation in a tropical lek-breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Thomas B; Horton, Brent M; Moore, Ignacio T

    2011-08-23

    Male reproductive coalitions, in which males cooperate to attract females, are a rare strategy among vertebrates. While some studies have investigated ultimate aspects of these relationships, little is known about the mechanistic role that hormones play in modulating cooperative behaviours. Here, we examined male testosterone variation in a tropical lekking bird, the wire-tailed manakin (Pipra filicauda), which exhibits cooperative male-male display coalitions. We found that testosterone levels in territorial males were comparable to those of temperate breeding birds, a surprising result given their environmental, social and reproductive dynamics. In addition, social status rather than plumage was a strong predictor of testosterone variation. Territorial males had significantly higher testosterone levels than did two other plumage classes of floater males, who do not hold territories. We hypothesize that testosterone variation plays an important role in the establishment of male dominance hierarchies (competition), while concurrently facilitating stable display partnerships (cooperation). PMID:21325306

  18. Single dose testosterone administration reduces loss chasing in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin; Liu, Jinting; Qu, Lujing; Eisenegger, Christoph; Clark, Luke; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    Testosterone has been linked to modulation of impulsivity and risky choice, potentially mediated by changes in reward or punishment sensitivity. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on risk-taking and the adjustment of risk-taking on trials following a gain or a loss. Loss chasing is operationalized herein as the propensity to recover losses by increasing risky choice. Healthy female participants (n=26) received a single-dose of 0.5mg sublingual testosterone in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. At 240min post-administration, participants performed a gambling task with a high and a low risk option. In the placebo condition, participants were more likely to choose the high risk option following losses compared to wins. This effect was abolished on the testosterone session. Ignoring prior outcomes, no overall changes in risk-taking were observed. Our data indicate that testosterone affects human decision-making via diminishing sensitivity to punishment. PMID:27236486

  19. Response of micropenis to topical testosterone and gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Klugo, R C; Cerny, J C

    1978-05-01

    Five patients were treated with gonadotropin and topical testosterone for micropenis associated with hypothalamic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. All patients received 1,000 units of gonadotropin weekly for 3 weeks, with a 6-week interval followed by 10% topical testosterone cream twice daily for 3 weeks. Serum testosterone levels were measured and remained equivalent for both modes of therapy. Average penile growth response with gonadotropin was 14.3% increase in length and 5.0% increase of girth. Topical testosterone produced an average increase of 60% in penile length and 52.9% in girth. The greatest growth response occurred in prepubertal male subjects with a minimal response in postpubertal male subjects. This study suggests that 10% topical testosterone cream twice daily will produce effective penile growth. The response appears to be greater in younger children, which is consistent with previously published studies of age-related 5 reductase activity.

  20. Testosterone, estradiol, ACTH and musical, spatial and verbal performance.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M; Gupta, D; Wollmann, H

    1992-01-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and ACTH were determined in blood serum of 26 healthy males aged 19.16 and of 25 healthy females aged 18.77 years on average, and results were correlated with test scores of three spatial tests, a verbal fluency measure, and a test measuring general musical ability. In addition, hemispheric lateralization for verbal material and handedness was assessed. While testosterone and estradiol alone were not significantly related to any of the cognitive or musical tests, testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly negatively correlated with spatial tests, and ACTH was significantly positively correlated with spatial and musical tests. Correlations were stronger in females than in males. The laterality index was significantly negatively correlated with testosterone in males indicating that right hemisphere involvement in verbal processing was associated with high testosterone levels.

  1. Increasing insulin resistance is associated with a decrease in Leydig cell testosterone secretion in men.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Hardin, Megan; Dwyer, Andrew A; Valassi, Elena; Yialamas, Maria; Elahi, Dariush; Hayes, Frances J

    2005-05-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with low testosterone (T) levels in men, the mechanism of which is unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men with a spectrum of insulin sensitivity. Twenty-one men (aged 25-65 yr) had a glucose tolerance test and assessment of insulin sensitivity using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity, expressed as the M value (milligrams per kilograms(-1) per minute(-1)), was calculated from the glucose disposal rate during the final 30 min of the clamp. Eighteen subjects had blood sampling every 10 min for 12 h to assess LH pulsatility. Hypogonadism was then induced with a GnRH antagonist, followed by sequential stimulation testing with GnRH (750 ng/kg, iv) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 1000 IU, im) to assess pituitary and testicular responsiveness, respectively. Nine subjects had normal glucose tolerance, nine had impaired glucose tolerance, and three had diabetes mellitus. There was a positive relationship between M and T levels (r = 0.46; P < 0.05). No relationship was seen between M and parameters of LH secretion, including mean LH levels, LH pulse amplitude, LH pulse frequency, and LH response to exogenous GnRH administration. In contrast, a strong correlation was observed between M and the T response to hCG (r = 0.73; P < 0.005). Baseline T levels correlated with the increase in T after hCG administration (r = 0.47; P < 0.05). During the clamp, T levels increased from a baseline level of 367 +/- 30 to 419 +/- 38 ng/dl during the last 30 min (P < 0.05). From these data we conclude that insulin resistance is associated with a decrease in Leydig cell T secretion in men. Additional studies are required to determine the mechanism of this effect.

  2. Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Older Men Receiving Testosterone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Urban, Randall J.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Raji, Mukaila A.; Du, Fei; Lin, Yu-li; Goodwin, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Testosterone therapy for older men has increased substantially over the past decade. Research on the effects of testosterone therapy on cardiovascular outcomes has yielded inconsistent results. Objective To examine the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based cohort of older men receiving intramuscular testosterone. Method Using a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries, we identified 6355 patients treated with at least 1 injection of testosterone between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2005. We matched this cohort to 19 065 testosterone nonusers at a 1:3 ratio based on a composite MI prognostic score. Patients were followed until December 31, 2005, or until they lost coverage from Medicare, enrolled in a health maintenance organization, experienced a MI, or died. Result In a Cox regression analysis adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, receipt of testosterone therapy was not associated with an increased risk of MI (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.69–1.02). In this analysis, there was an interaction between receipt of testosterone and quartile of risk of MI (P = 0.023). For men in the highest quartile of the MI prognostic score, testosterone therapy was associated with a reduced risk of MI (HR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53–0.92), whereas there was no difference in risk for the first (HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.88–1.67), second (HR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.69–1.30), and third quartiles (HR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.59–1.01). Conclusion Older men who were treated with intramuscular testosterone did not appear to have an increased risk of MI. For men with high MI risk, testosterone use was modestly protective against MI. PMID:24989174

  3. Structure, organization and evolution of developmentally regulated chorion genes in a silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Jones, C W; Kafatos, F C

    1980-12-01

    We describe in detail two cloned chromosomal DNA segments from Antheraea polyphemus, each bearing multiple chorion genes. Two types of genes are found per segment, each in two or three copies: they belong to both major chorion multigene families (A and B), but are expressed during the same developmental period (middle choriongenesis in one segment, late in the other). A and B genes alternate and are paired, lie in divergent transcriptional orientation and are in very close proximity to each other (mRNA cap sites are separated by a 5' flanking sequence 264 or 325 bp long). Each AB pair is embedded within a large, tandemly repeating unit. Within that unit, the homologous 3' flanking sequences that separate gene pairs evolve rapidly and are frequently interrupted by long segments representing inserts (or deletions). These segments would decrease unequal crossing-over, facilitating rapid evolution of the chorion multigene families. A total of 10.4 kb of DNA has been sequenced, permitting detailed comparisons of genes, their introns, 5' flanking and immediately 3' flanking regions. Genes range over two orders of sequence similarity, from highly releated to very disparate (gene copies; members of the same multigene family; members of different families). Among their universal features are a common cap-site sequence, a single intron invariably located at the same position within the signal peptide-encoding region, and a Hogness box 21 to 23 nucleotides upstream from the cap site. Features of possible paired promoters occupying the short 5' flanking region are discussed. Genes evolve both by base substitutions and by segmental mutations, which are almost invariably deletions/insertions related to small, direct repeats.

  4. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  5. Diffusive transfer of water and glucose across the chorionic plate of the isolated human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H J; Dehne, K; Andreas, T; Rägo, S; Rybakowski, C

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated systematically the diffusive transfer of water and glucose across the chorionic plate of the human placenta. Isolated sections of human term placentae were perfused at the fetal side (open loop) with modified Ringer's solution (n=31). An artificial amniotic compartment was created on top of the chorionic plate. 3H- and 14C-labelled tracer pairs were added (donor side) to the fetal perfusion fluid or to the 'amniotic' fluid. Transfer fractions (TF, ratio of acceptor side to donor side radioactivity) were calculated as percentages. TF of water and L-glucose from perfusion fluid into the 'amniotic' fluid were 3.9+/-0.5 per cent (mean+/-SEM) and 1.2+/-0.3 per cent after 60 min and significantly different (n=6). In each sample of the following experiments the transfer fraction of the D-hexose was larger than that of the L-isomer. At 60 min, the TF were 1.6+/-0.2 and 1.1+/-0.2 per cent (D-glucose/L-glucose; fetal to amniotic compartment, n=8), from amniotic compartment to fetal perfusate 0.6+/-0.1 and 0.4+/-0.1 per cent (D-glucose/L-glucose, n=11), and 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.6+/-0.1 per cent (3-O-methyl-D-glucose/L-glucose, n=6). The difference between the latter TF lost its significance after cytochalasin B (0.1-0.2 mmol/l) had been added to the amniotic compartment. It is concluded that a limited diffusive pathway across the chorionic plate of the human placenta exists and that the transfer of D-glucose depends in part on facilitated diffusion.

  6. Early patterning of the chorion leads to the trilaminar trophoblast cell structure in the placental labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David G; Natale, David R C; Begay, Valerie; Hughes, Martha; Leutz, Achim; Cross, James C

    2008-06-01

    The labyrinth of the rodent placenta contains villi that are the site of nutrient exchange between mother and fetus. They are covered by three trophoblast cell types that separate the maternal blood sinusoids from fetal capillaries--a single mononuclear cell that is a subtype of trophoblast giant cell (sinusoidal or S-TGC) with endocrine function and two multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast layers, each resulting from cell-cell fusion, that function in nutrient transport. The developmental origins of these cell types have not previously been elucidated. We report here the discovery of cell-layer-restricted genes in the mid-gestation labyrinth (E12.5-14.5) including Ctsq in S-TGCs (also Hand1-positive), Syna in syncytiotrophoblast layer I (SynT-I), and Gcm1, Cebpa and Synb in syncytiotrophoblast layer II (SynT-II). These genes were also expressed in distinct layers in the chorion as early as E8.5, prior to villous formation. Specifically, Hand1 was expressed in apical cells lining maternal blood spaces (Ctsq is not expressed until E12.5), Syna in a layer immediately below, and Gcm1, Cebpa and Synb in basal cells in contact with the allantois. Cebpa and Synb were co-expressed with Gcm1 and were reduced in Gcm1 mutants. By contrast, Hand1 and Syna expression was unaltered in Gcm1 mutants, suggesting that Gcm1-positive cells are not required for the induction of the other chorion layers. These data indicate that the three differentiated trophoblast cell types in the labyrinth arise from distinct and autonomous precursors in the chorion that are patterned before morphogenesis begins.

  7. Contemporary perspective and management of testosterone deficiency: Modifiable factors and variable management.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency can occur in males of all ages. In adult males, it is induced by endogenous testosterone decline through aging and other modifiable factors. Recent publications suggested the importance of the magnitude of longitudinal decline of testosterone from baseline. The baseline level and the longitudinal decline have individual variability influenced by individual factors including digit ratio, CAG repeat of the androgen receptor and sirtuin activity. Regarding treatment for testosterone deficiency, testosterone replacement therapy is the gold standard for the management of testosterone-deficient patients, and it improves three domains of testosterone deficiency symptoms, such as the physical, psychological and sexual domain. Recent reports suggested the importance of modifiable factors in the testosterone decline in addition to aging. Therefore, it might be responsible for the prevention of testosterone deficiency symptoms to maintain testosterone secretion taking account of the modifiable factors. The present article reviews the literature, and introduces contemporary perspectives and management of testosterone deficiency.

  8. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics. PMID:26770199

  9. The birds and the beans: a low-fidelity simulator for chorionic villus sampling skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wax, Joseph R; Cartin, Angelina; Pinette, Michael G

    2012-08-01

    Because no simulation models are described for chorionic villus sampling (CVS), we sought to design and construct a CVS training simulator. Using materials available from our labor floor and local supermarket, we built and demonstrated a practical model for learning transabdominal and transcervical CVS. The simulator can be used to teach single- or dual-operator transabdominal CVS and traditional transcervical CVS. Aspirated "villi" immediately inform the teacher and learner of successful procedures. No image degradation or sonographically visible tracks resulted from use, permitting more than one trainee to benefit from a model. This model for transabdominal and transcervical CVS provides realistic imaging, tactile sensations, and immediate feedback.

  10. [Mechanism of regulation of synthesis and secretion of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Barrera, David; Chirinos, Mayel; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2008-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an essential hormone for development and sustaining of gestation. Adequate hCG production is fundamental for pregnancy success since abnormal hCG serum concentrations have been correlated with pregnancy anomalies such as recurrent abortions and preeclampsia. Regulation of hCG production involves diverse molecules associated with different signaling pathways, which have complicated the establishment of the mechanisms involved in its production. The present study provides a critical review of the most relevant findings related to hCG production and functions during pregnancy, in order to help to understand some related pathologies and to treat them more adequately.

  11. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in the treatment of obesity: a critical assessment of the Simeons method.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A

    1977-12-01

    Injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) have been claimed to aid in weight reduction by reducing hunger, and affecting mood as well as aiding in localized (spot) reduction. We have tested these claims in a double-blind randomized trial using injections of HCG or placebo. Weight loss was identical between the two groups, and there was no evidence for differential effects on hunger, mood or localized body measurements. Placebo injections, therefore, appear to be as effective as HCG in the treatment of obesity. PMID:595585

  12. Early pregnancy factor is an immunosuppressive contaminant of commercial preparations of human chorionic gonadotrophin.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, B E; Morton, H; Clarke, F M

    1983-01-01

    Early pregnancy factor (EPF) is a pregnancy associated substance detected in human serum and urine throughout the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. It has also been detected in several commercial preparations of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). The various molecular weight forms of EPF which occur in human pregnancy serum, urine and commercial hCG preparations have been partially characterized and found to be similar to each other but distinct from hCG. Further evidence is presented which suggests that it is EPF rather than hCG which is responsible for the immunosuppressive activity of some crude hCG preparations. PMID:6831771

  13. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  14. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed.

  15. Testosterone suppression of CRH-stimulated cortisol in men.

    PubMed

    Rubinow, David R; Roca, Catherine A; Schmidt, Peter J; Danaceau, Merry A; Putnam, Karen; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Nieman, Lynnette

    2005-10-01

    Despite observations of age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, the role of androgens in the regulation of HPA axis activity in men has not been examined. We assessed this role by performing CRH stimulation tests in 10 men (ages 18-45 years) during gonadal suppression with leuprolide acetate and during testosterone addition to leuprolide. CRH-stimulated cortisol levels as well as peak cortisol and greatest cortisol excursion were significantly lower (p<0.05, 0.005, and 0.01, respectively) during testosterone replacement compared with the induced hypogonadal condition (leuprolide plus placebo); cortisol area under the curve was lower at a trend level (p<0.1). Paradoxically, CRH-stimulated corticotropin (ACTH) was increased significantly during testosterone replacement (p<0.05). The cortisol : ACTH ratio, a measure of adrenal sensitivity, was lower during testosterone replacement (p<0.1). A mixed effects regression model showed that testosterone but not estradiol or CBG significantly contributed to the variance of cortisol. These data demonstrate that testosterone regulates CRH-stimulated HPA axis activity in men, with the divergent effects on ACTH and cortisol suggesting a peripheral (adrenal) locus for the suppressive effects on cortisol. Our results further demonstrate that the enhanced stimulated HPA axis activity previously described in young men compared with young women cannot be ascribed to an activational upregulation of the axis by testosterone.

  16. Sex Differences in the Association Between Testosterone and Violent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research on the association between testosterone and violent behavior has provided conflicting findings. The majority of studies on the association between testosterone and antisocial-violent behaviors has used a clinical sample of severely violent individuals. These studies have mostly assessed males. Objectives: To study sex differences in the association between testosterone and violent behaviors in a community sample of young adults in the United States. Patients and Methods: A longitudinal study of an inner city population on subjects aged from adolescence to adulthood was undertaken. Testosterone and violent behaviors were measured among 257 young adults with an average age of 22 years (range 21 to 23 years). We used regression analysis to test the association between testosterone and violent behaviors in male and female samples. Results: There was a significant positive correlation between testosterone levels and violent behaviors among females, but not males. The association between testosterone levels and violent behaviors among females was significant, as it was above and beyond the effects of socio-economic status, age, education, and race. Conclusions: Our findings provide more information about the biological mechanisms for violent behaviors among young female adults. The study also helps us better understand sex differences in factors associated with violent behaviors in the community. PMID:25337519

  17. Testosterone and temperament traits in men: Longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Ilmari; Jokela, Markus; Hintsa, Taina; Firtser, Sonja; Kähönen, Mika; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2013-10-01

    Testosterone is the main male hormone that has been associated with various behavioral traits in humans and other animals. We investigated whether levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin were associated with temperament traits in a population-based sample of Finnish men at two measurement times taken 6 years apart (n=686 in year 2001, n=727 in year 2007). Temperament was assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory that consists of four temperament traits: novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, and persistence. Higher levels of total and free testosterone were associated with higher novelty seeking (standardized B=0.103, p<0.001). This association was also observed in a longitudinal within-person analysis (B=0.084, p=0.008), suggesting that the association is not confounded by stable between-individual differences in other characteristics. Within-individual variation in total testosterone was associated with higher reward dependence, and higher levels of free testosterone were marginally associated with higher reward dependence. Reward dependence reflects the importance of social rewards to an individual. These results provide additional evidence for the stable and time-varying associations between testosterone and temperament in humans.

  18. An exploration of testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wooderson, Sarah C.; Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone influences well-being, mood and cognition and may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Aim To examine testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. Method We examined baseline total testosterone levels and current depression scores in male and female patients with bipolar disorder and mild to moderate depression and healthy controls. Results A significant interaction between diagnosis and gender was observed (F(2,97)=9.791, P=0.002). Testosterone levels were significantly lower for male patients with bipolar disorder compared with male controls (P=0.001). Women with bipolar disorder had significantly higher testosterone levels than female controls (P=0.03). Conclusions Disturbances in testosterone levels may represent an important neurobiological abnormality in bipolar disorder and may differ by gender. If these findings are confirmed, the use of gender appropriate treatment strategies for the normalisation of testosterone levels in bipolar disorder depression should be further explored. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703738

  19. Testosterone for the aging male; current evidence and recommended practice

    PubMed Central

    Stanworth, Roger D; Jones, T Hugh

    2008-01-01

    An international consensus document was recently published and provides guidance on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in men. The diagnosis of LOH requires biochemical and clinical components. Controversy in defining the clinical syndrome continues due to the high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the aging male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Further controversy surrounds setting a lower limit of normal testosterone, the limitations of the commonly available total testosterone result in assessing some patients and the unavailability of reliable measures of bioavailable or free testosterone for general clinical use. As with any clinical intervention testosterone treatment should be judged on a balance of risk versus benefit. The traditional benefits of testosterone on sexual function, mood, strength and quality of life remain the primary goals of treatment but possible beneficial effects on other parameters such as bone density, obesity, insulin resistance and angina are emerging and will be reviewed. Potential concerns regarding the effects of testosterone on prostate disease, aggression and polycythaemia will also be addressed. The options available for treatment have increased in recent years with the availability of a number of testosterone preparations which can reliably produce physiological serum concentrations. PMID:18488876

  20. Recruitment and Screening for the Testosterone Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Laura; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Gill, Thomas M.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cifelli, Denise; Cunningham, Glenn R.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bhasin, Shalender; Pahor, Marco; Farrar, John T.; Cella, David; Rosen, Raymond C.; Resnick, Susan M.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Molitch, Mark E.; Crandall, Jill P.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Strorer, Thomas W.; Wang, Christina; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan; Tabatabaie, Vafa; Dougar, Darlene; Hou, Xiaoling; Snyder, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the recruitment of men for The Testosterone (T) Trials, which were designed to determine the efficacy of T treatment. Methods. Men were eligible if they were ≥65 years, had an average of two morning total T values <275ng/dL with neither value >300ng/mL, and had symptoms and objective evidence of mobility limitation, sexual dysfunction, and/or low vitality. Men had to be eligible for and enroll in at least one of these three main trials (physical function, sexual function, vitality). Results. Men were recruited primarily through mass mailings in 12 U.S. communities: 82% of men who contacted the sites did so in response to mailings. Men who responded were screened by telephone to ascertain eligibility. Of 51,085 telephone screens, 53.5% were eligible for further screening. Of 23,889 initial screening visits (SV1), 2,781 (11.6%) men were eligible for the second screening visit (SV2), which 2,261 (81.3%) completed. At SV2, 931 (41.2%) men met the criteria for one or more trials, the T level criterion and had no other exclusions. Of these, 790 (84.6%) were randomized; 99 (12.5%) in all three trials and 348 (44%) in two trials. Their mean age was 72 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 31.0kg/m2. Mean (standard deviation) total T (ng/dL) was 212.0 (40.0). Conclusion: Despite the telephone screening to enrollment ratio of 65 to 1, we met the recruitment goals for each trial. Recruitment of symptomatic older men with low testosterone levels is difficult but feasible. PMID:25878029

  1. Second to fourth digit ratio, testosterone and perceived male dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Neave, Nick; Laing, Sarah; Fink, Bernhard; Manning, John T

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that male faces with extreme features associated with testosterone are perceived as dominant and masculine. Women have been reported to prefer more masculinized male faces as they may consider testosterone markers to be an 'honest' indication of good health, and such considerations may underlie their aesthetic preferences. However, pronounced testosterone facial markers are also associated with dominance, and several negative personality traits. This suggests that female aesthetic preferences may be an adaptive compromise between positive attributes associated with higher than average testosterone, and negative attributes associated with more extreme masculinization. This current study attempts to clarify the role of hormone markers in female perceptions of dominance, masculinity and attractiveness, in male facial images. Recent evidence suggests that the relative length of the 2nd to 4th finger (2D : 4D ratio) is a pointer to prenatal testosterone levels and may thus serve as a window to the prenatal hormonal environment. We measured 2D : 4D in a sample of male college students and took salivary samples to analyse circulating levels of testosterone. Women rated facial images of these males for dominance, masculinity and attractiveness. Our results show that male 2D : 4D was significantly negatively related to perceived dominance and masculinity but not attractiveness. Circulating testosterone levels were not related to dominance, masculinity or attractiveness. These findings suggest that: (i) high prenatal levels of testosterone serve to 'organize' male facial features to subsequently reflect dominance and masculine characteristics presumably activated during puberty; and (ii) attractiveness is not directly related to testosterone levels. We conclude that facial dominance and masculinity reflect a male's perceived status rather than his physical attraction to women. PMID:14561281

  2. TESTOSTERONE AS A DISCRIMINATIVE STIMULUS IN MALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Vertelkina, Nina V.; Antzoulatos, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are reinforcing in animals, as determined by conditioned place preference or self-administration. Most drugs of abuse produce subjective effects on mood and perception that initiate and maintain drug taking. Whether AAS have similar effects is not known. Food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) were tested for their ability to discriminate an injection of testosterone from the β-cyclodextrin vehicle using a standard two-lever operant paradigm. In drug discrimination, animals use the subjective effects of drug or vehicle to select the appropriate lever to obtain food pellets under an FR10 schedule of reinforcement. All rats demonstrated vigorous responding for food (1415.1±76.1 responses/20 min) with 94.9% of responses on the active lever. For the first 30 days, rats received 1 mg/kg testosterone sc 30 min before testing. On Day 14, one rat achieved the discrimination criteria of 9/10 consecutive days with >90% responses on the active lever and ≤5 responses on the inactive lever before the first reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were tested with testosterone at different doses (2, 7.5, 15 mg/kg at 30 min before testing) and times (2 mg/kg at 30 or 60 min before testing), each for 20 days. One additional rat demonstrated successful discrimination at Day 54 with 2 mg/kg testosterone 60 min before testing. The remaining 7 rats failed to discriminate testosterone within 110 days. When analyzed according to less-stringent standards, 4 additional rats met criteria for testosterone discrimination. However, continued performance was not stable. Thus, testosterone was unable to consistently support drug discrimination. We conclude that testosterone does not produce rapid interoceptive effects. (NIH DA12843 to RIW) PMID:21893083

  3. Ultradian rhythmicity and induced changes in salivary testosterone.

    PubMed

    Beaven, C Martyn; Ingram, John R; Gill, Nicholas D; Hopkins, Will G

    2010-09-01

    Testosterone and cortisol respond to exercise stimuli and modulate adaptation. Episodic basal secretion of these hormones may modify the responsiveness of these hormones. We sought to identify episodic steroid secretion via frequent salivary sampling and investigate any interaction between ultradian rhythmicity and induced changes in testosterone. Salivary testosterone and cortisol concentrations of seven males (age 20-40 years) were measured every 10 min between 0800 and 1600 h on three consecutive days. On either the second or third day, three interventions designed to elicit a hormonal response were randomly assigned: sprint exercise (two 30-s maximal efforts on a cycle ergometer); boxing (two 30-s maximal punching efforts); and a violent video game (10 min of player vs. player combat). On the other days subjects were inactive. Testosterone data on non-intervention days suggested pulsatile secretion with a pulse interval of 47 +/- 9 min (mean +/- SD). The sprint intervention substantially affected hormones: it elicited a small transient elevation in testosterone (by a factor of 1.21; factor 90% confidence limits x/ divided by 1.21) 10 min after exercise, and a moderate elevation in cortisol peaking 50 min post-exercise (factor 2.3; x/ divided by 2.6). The testosterone response correlated with the change in testosterone concentration in the 10 min prior to the sprint (r = 0.78; 90% CL 0.22-0.95) and with a measure of randomness in testosterone fluctuations (r = 0.83; 0.35-0.96). Thus, the salivary testosterone response to exercise may be dependent on the underlying ultradian rhythm and aspects of its regulation. This interaction may have important implications for adaptation to exercise. PMID:20512500

  4. Clinical outcomes after assisted reproductive technology in twin pregnancies: chorionicity-based comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luming; Zou, Gang; Wei, Xing; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Okun, Nanette; Duan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The chorionicity–based evaluation of the perinatal risk in twin pregnancies after assisted reproductive technology (ART) is lacking. A retrospective review was performed of all twin pregnancies monitored prenatally and delivered at our hospital between 2010 and 2014. Chorionicity was diagnosed by ultrasound examination at first trimester and confirmed by postnatal pathology. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes were prospectively recorded. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated in a logistic regression model. A total of 1153 twin pregnancies were analyzed. The occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) was 3 times as frequent in monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies after ART as in those spontaneous counterparts (aOR 3.0; 95%CI 1.1–3.2). The prevalence of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancies (ICP) was significantly higher in dichorionic diamniotic (DCDA) twin pregnancies following ART compared to spontaneous DCDA pregnancies (aOR 3.3; 95%CI 1.3–5.6). Perinatal outcomes did not differ between two conception methods, either in MCDA or DCDA twin pregnancies. Based on differentiation of chorionicity, ART is associated with the increased risk of PPROM in MCDA twin pregnancies and with a higher rate of ICP in DCDA twin gestations. ART does not increase adversity of perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. PMID:27243373

  5. Effects of ECM Protein Mimetics on Adhesion and Proliferation of Chorion Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Myungshin; Oh, Eun-Jee; Kim, Yonggoo; Park, In Yang; Shin, Jong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the effects of fibronectin, collagen, cadherin, and laminin based extracellular matrix (ECM) protein mimetics coated with mussel derived adhesive protein (MAP) on adhesion and proliferation of chorionic mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs). Methods: Human placental chorionic tissues from term third-trimester pregnancies (n=3) were used. The cMSCs were cultured on rationally designed ECM protein mimetics coated with MAP on plastic surfaces with the addition of reduced fetal bovine serum (0.5%, 1% FBS). Adhesion capabilities were monitored by a real time cell analysis system (RTCA) utilizing an impedance method. Proliferation capabilities were monitored by RTCA and MTS assay. Results: Of the ECM protein mimetics tested, GRGDSP(FN) coated surfaces exhibited the highest adhesion and proliferation capabilities on RTCA at FBS concentration of 0.5% and 1%. When 0.5% FBS was added to ECM protein mimetics during the MTS assay, GRGDSP(FN), REDV(FN), and collagen mimetics, GPKGAAGEPGKP(ColI) showed higher cMSCs proliferation compared with the control. When 1% FBS was added, GRGDSP(FN) and TAIPSCPEGTVPLYS(ColIV) showed significant cMSCs proliferation capacity. Conclusions: Fibronectin mimetics, GRGDSP(FN) amino acid sequence showed the highest adhesion and proliferation capabilities. In addition, results from RTCA assessment of cell viability correlated well with the tetrazolium-based MTS assay. PMID:24516355

  6. Respiratory morphology of the Abedus herberti Hidalgo egg chorion (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Goforth, Christine L; Smith, Robert L

    2011-07-01

    Although giant water bugs (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) are large, aquatic insects known for their obligate paternal egg brooding behaviors, little research has focused on the structure of their eggs. The respiratory requirements of developing embryos likely created selection for brooding, so a thorough understanding of the respiratory morphology of belostomatid eggs could help explain how brooding behaviors facilitate embryonic gas exchange. This study used scanning electron microscopy to document the respiratory microstructure of the eggs of Abedus herberti, a back brooding giant water bug. The exochorion is similar to that of other belostomatids in texture and organization except that the respiratory region is confined to the uppermost quarter of the egg. This is the area exposed to the atmosphere by encumbered males. A plastron network made up of densely packed vertical projections demarcates the boundary between the respiratory and nonrespiratory regions of the chorion. The internal chorion is composed of alternate air-filled and denser layers that likely facilitate the movement of oxygen from the aeropyles at the top of the eggs to the developing embryonic tissues. J. Morphol., 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21472766

  7. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland. PMID:27149714

  8. Synthesis of deuterium labeled 17-methyl-testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S.; Kasuya, Y.

    1984-09-01

    The synthesis of two forms of selectively deuterated 17-methyl-testosterone is described. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone was prepared by the Grignard reaction of dehydroepiandrosterone with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium iodide followed by an Oppenauer oxidation. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone-19,19,19-d3 was prepared by treating 3,3-ethylenedioxy-5,10-epoxy-5 alpha, 10 alpha-estran-17-one with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium bromide followed by hydrolysis and dehydration of the 5 alpha-hydroxyandrostane derivative.

  9. The endocrine pharmacology of testosterone therapy in men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettel, Michael

    The review starts off by outlining the history of the discovery of the male sex hormone testosterone and the historical background to the various, often dubious, approaches to the treatment of age-related endocrine disorders in older men. A discussion of congenital androgen deficiency in young men is followed by methods of diagnosing hypogonadism in older men. Among therapeutic options, the alternatives to direct testosterone replacement are discussed, although none of them have proved to be particularly successful in clinical practice. For testosterone replacement itself, various routes of administration and pharmaceutical formulations are now available, facilitating good monitoring and individualized therapy.

  10. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland.

  11. Testosterone treatment in the aging male: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Nigro, Nicole; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2012-03-19

    The definition of late onset hypogonadism in the aging male is controversially debated, and according to the latest literature consists of at least three especially sexual symptoms such as loss of morning erection, low sexual desire and erectile dysfunction as well as a total testosterone <8-11 nmol/l. Testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male has been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle and fat mass as well as on bone mineral density, with more conflicting effects observed on muscle strength, sexual function, mood and quality of life. The prescriptions for testosterone products for the aging male increased by over 170% in the previous five years. Furthermore, there is a lot of epidemiological data showing an inverse relationship between testosterone levels and obesity, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, only few small randomised placebo-controlled studies have investigated the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on insulin resistance and HbA1c levels, with controversial results. Importantly, so far the long-term safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy has not been established. Although until now no clear evidence has been found that testosterone replacement therapy has a causative role in prostate cancer or indeed in changes of the biology of the prostate, in a recent meta-analysis a 4-fold increased risk of prostate-associated event rates in testosterone treated elderly men sounds a note of caution. Also the risk for cardiovascular events is still not clear and caution is warranted especially in elderly men with cardiovascular disease and limited mobility. In summary, the actual available evidence of long-term risks and outcome of testosterone replacement therapy is still very limited and carefully designed placebo-controlled trials of testosterone administration to assess the risks and benefits of such a therapy are required. Until then, testosterone treatment in elderly men

  12. Pubertal and adult Leydig cell function in Mullerian inhibiting substance-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Arumugam, Ramamani; Baker, Stephen P; Lee, Mary M

    2005-02-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) causes Mullerian duct regression during sexual differentiation and regulates postnatal Leydig cell development. MIS knockout (MIS-KO) mice with targeted deletions of MIS develop Leydig cell hyperplasia, but their circulating androgen concentrations are reportedly unaltered. We compared reproductive hormone profiles, androgen biosynthesis, and the expression of key steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in MIS-KO and wild-type (WT) mice at puberty (36 d) and sexual maturity (60 d). In pubertal animals, basal testosterone and LH concentrations in plasma were lower in MIS-KO than WT mice, whereas human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. In adults, basal LH, and both basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. Purified Leydig cells from pubertal MIS-KO mice had lower testosterone but higher androstanediol and androstenedione production rates. In contrast, testosterone, androstanediol, and androstenedione production rates were all lower in adult MIS-KO Leydig cells. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression was lower in pubertal MIS-KO mice compared with WT, whereas 17beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase and 5alpha-reductase were greater, and P450c17 and P450scc were similar. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was lower in adult MIS-KO mice, whereas that of 5alpha-reductase, P450c17, and P450scc was similar. Collectively, these results suggest that in the absence of MIS, Leydig cells remain less differentiated, causing an altered intratesticular androgen milieu that may contribute to the infertility of MIS-KO mice. In immature mice, this deficit in steroidogenic capacity appears to be mediated by a direct loss of MIS action in Leydig cells as well as by indirect effects via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  13. Perinatal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the lamb. II. In vitro testicular response to human chorionic gonadotropin and choleratoxin in the first 2 months of life.

    PubMed

    Savoie, S; Forest, M G; Bourel, B; Haour, F; Saez, J M; Collu, R; Bertrand, J; Ducharme, J R

    1980-01-01

    Testicular response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was studied in male lambs. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), testosterone (T), delta 4-androstenedione and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone content and cAMP and T production by dispersed interstitial cells were assessed in control and hCG-pretreated animals. Plasma T levels increased after hCG at 1, 4 and 8 weeks. Increments in the testicular content of cAMP, delta 4-androstenedione, and T were greater at 8 weeks and that of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and 125I-hCG binding to dispersed interstitial cells were identical at all ages. cAMP and T production by dispersed interstitial cells from nonstimulated animals and the response to hCG and choleratoxin were similar in all lambs. In contrast, cAMP and T production were higher at 1 week only in animals pretreated with hCG in vivo. These data are compatible with hCG-induced desensitization at 4 and 8 weeks.

  14. On the effects of testosterone on brain behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Celec, Peter; Ostatníková, Daniela; Hodosy, Július

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone influences the brain via organizational and activational effects. Numerous relevant studies on rodents and a few on humans focusing on specific behavioral and cognitive parameters have been published. The results are, unfortunately, controversial and puzzling. Dosing, timing, even the application route seem to considerably affect the outcomes. In addition, the methods used for the assessment of psychometric parameters are a bit less than ideal regarding their validity and reproducibility. Metabolism of testosterone contributes to the complexity of its actions. Reduction to dihydrotestosterone by 5-alpha reductase increases the androgen activity; conversion to estradiol by aromatase converts the androgen to estrogen activity. Recently, the non-genomic effects of testosterone on behavior bypassing the nuclear receptors have attracted the interest of researchers. This review tries to summarize the current understanding of the complexity of the effects of testosterone on brain with special focus on their role in the known sex differences. PMID:25741229

  15. Testosterone Therapy in Adult Men with Androgen Deficiency Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood levels of testosterone of 300–1,000 ng/dL are considered normal, but these levels may ... blood PSA (prostate specific antigen) level over 4 ng/ mL (which suggests prostate cancer or other prostate ...

  16. Prenatal stimulation and postnatal testosterone affects infanticide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M; Blustein, J; Kennedy, K

    1982-04-01

    Prenatal handling, prenatal stress, and early postnatal exogeneous testosterone were examined in female rats for their effects on rat pup-killing and pup retrieval. During each of the last 5 days of pregnancy. Long-Evans rats received either 3 minutes of handling, 45 minutes of restraint and intense illumination or remained untouched. Half of the offspring of each group received testosterone from Day 1 after birth to Day 30. In adulthood, animals that received handling prenatally and testosterone postnatally killed pups more rapidly than any other group and a larger proportion did so than in the control groups. Animals not manipulated at any time retrieved pups more rapidly and a larger proportion did so than the combined other groups. The study suggests that prenatal handling interacts with testosterone presented immediately postnatally to increase infanticide in female rats. A variety of perinatal manipulations seem to suppress pup retrieval. PMID:7200619

  17. Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159622.html Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives Gel hormone treatment led to improved libido ... experienced a moderate but significant improvement in their sex drive, sexual activity and erectile function compared to ...

  18. Testosterone replacement therapy: should it be performed in erectile dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Celik, Orcun; Yücel, Selcuk

    2013-09-01

    The classical etiology of erectile dysfunction (ED) comprises aging and vascular, neurogenic, psychological and hormonal components. Recent studies have shown that ED can be the forerunner of serious cardiovascular disturbances. It has also been reported that peripheral neuropathy and microvascular injuries caused by pathophysiological changes in patients with diabetes and obesity lead to ED in a significant number of such cases. These patients develop clinically significant ED and comprise a significant portion of the patient group which do not respond to PDE-5 inhibitors. Testosterone has been shown to increase the expression of PDE-5. This function of testosterone supports its effect on the regulation of erection and increasing the sexual libido. In view of the complexity of ED, as well as the effect of testosterone on erection, it is concluded that PDE-5 inhibitors in combination with testosterone replacement would be a better therapy alternative in the management of erectile dysfunction in hypogonadal patients. PMID:24350081

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms Related to Testosterone Metabolism in Intellectually Gifted Boys

    PubMed Central

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities. PMID:23382957

  20. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    PubMed

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  1. Testosterone precursors: use and abuse in pediatric athletes.

    PubMed

    Smurawa, Troy M; Congeni, Joseph A

    2007-08-01

    The dietary supplements androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenediol are precursors in the endogenous production of testosterone. The efficacy and safety of these prohormones are not well established but are promoted to have the same androgenic effects on building muscle mass and strength as anabolic-androgenic steroids. Studies have demonstrated repeatedly that acute and long-term administration of these oral testosterone precursors does not effectively increase serum testosterone levels and fails to produce any significant changes in lean body mass, muscle strength, or performance improvement compared with placebo. The Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004 lists androstenedione as a schedule III controlled substance, and it is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Testosterone precursors are banned by most major sports organizations.

  2. Seasonal testosterone pattern in Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi).

    PubMed

    Atkinson, S; Gilmartin, W G

    1992-09-01

    Blood samples from four captive male Hawaiian monk seals were collected at intervals of one month for one year for testosterone assay. Plasma testosterone concentrations, measured by radioimmunoassay, revealed a clear seasonal pattern. The lowest mean testosterone concentration (0.09 +/- 0.04 ng ml-1) occurred in January, and the highest (1.78 +/- 0.40 ng ml-1) in June. The seasonal occurrence of births and of injuries related to mating in wild populations of Hawaiian monk seals showed a distinct association with the period of high testosterone. This study supports other data that indicate that the Hawaiian monk seal is a seasonal breeder and is reproductively active for longer than monachine seals that live in higher latitudes. PMID:1432968

  3. Testosterone Supplementation Therapy in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical complex of risk factors including increased waist circumference, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and insulin resistance whose presence increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS has been referred to as the most significant public health threat of the 21st century. While lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, no specific pharmacological treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). As such, this review seeks to examine the role of testosterone and the use of TST as a treatment modality in men with MetS. PMID:25387223

  4. The Relationship between Testosterone Deficiency and Men's Health.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Akira

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone is important in the physiology of various organs and tissues. The serum testosterone concentration gradually declines as one of the processes of aging. Thus, the concept of late-onset hypogonadism has gained increasing attention in the last few years. Reported symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism are easily recognized and include diminished sexual desire and erectile quality, particularly in nocturnal erections, changes in mood with concomitant decreases in intellectual activity and spatial orientation, fatigue, depression and anger, a decrease in lean body mass with associated decreases in muscle volume and strength, a decrease in body hair and skin alterations, and decreased bone mineral density resulting in osteoporosis. Among these various symptoms, sexual dysfunction has been the most common and necessary to treat in the field of urology. It is well known that a low serum testosterone level is associated with erectile dysfunction and hypoactive sexual libido and that testosterone replacement treatment can improve these symptoms in patients with hypogonadism. Recently, in addition to sexual dysfunction, a close relationship between metabolic syndrome, characterized by central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and late-onset hypogonadism has been highlighted by several epidemiologic studies. Several randomized control trials have shown that testosterone replacement treatment significantly decreases insulin resistance in addition to its advantage for obesity. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and a low serum testosterone level is closely related to the development of atherosclerosis. Presently, it is speculated that a low serum testosterone level may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Thus, testosterone is a key molecule in men's health, especially that of elderly men. PMID:24044107

  5. Correlation Between Personality Traits and Testosterone Concentrations in Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Bayón, Camila; Díaz-Marsá, Marina; Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: High plasma testosterone levels have been associated with aggression, sexual behaviour and social status. The aim of this paper was to study the correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and personality variables in healthy participants. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four participants were randomly enrolled into this study. Basal plasma testosterone levels were measured between 8:30 am and 10 am. After 24 hours of blood drawing, each subject completed personality questionnaires. Results: Positive correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and anti-social personality traits in both genders was observed (r = 0.336 and P < 0.018). Also, a positive correlation was observed between basal plasmatestosterone levels and criminal thinking traits (r = 0. 376, P < 0.05) and Millon compulsive (r = 0.386, P < 0.010) in both genders. In female participants, a positive correlation between basal plasmatestosterone levels and psychoticism (r = 0. 25, P < 0.019) and Cloninger AUTO TCI (r = 0.507, P < 0.004) was observed. In males participants positive correlation between baseline plasmatic Testosterone levels and Millon Antisocial trait (r = 0. 544, P < 0.19) and Millon Hypomania trait (r = 0. 485, P < 0.41) and Millon Drug Abuse trait (r = 0.632, P < 0.05) was reported. Conclusion: Our results suggest gender differences in clinical and personality variables related with basal plasma testosterone level. In men, high plasma testosterone levels were associated with clinical traits, substance abuse and hypomania. Women with higher basal testosterone levels showed higher scores on personality self-direction traits. PMID:26664080

  6. Salivary testosterone measurements: collecting, storing, and mailing saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, J M

    1991-04-01

    Salivary testosterone measurements can be especially useful in field studies, but reliable ways of collecting and handling samples need to be established. Using cotton dental rolls to collect saliva leads to inflated testosterone scores. Sugarfree gum can be used satisfactorily to stimulate saliva among both male and female subjects. Leaving unpreserved saliva samples at room temperature for 2 weeks or mailing them unrefrigerated is satisfactory for male subjects but leads to inflated scores for female subjects.

  7. The Effect of Testosterone on Men With Andropause

    PubMed Central

    Sofimajidpour, Heshmatollah; Teimoori, Taher; Gharibi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Andropause is the gradual reduction of the male sex hormone (testosterone) with increasing age. Its symptoms are sexual dysfunction, weakness, fatigue, insomnia, loss of motivation, mood disorders and reduction of bone density. Treatment of andropause with testosterone has been recently considered. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone in the treatment of andropause in men. Patients and Methods: For men who met the inclusion criteria (50 years of age and older) laboratory tests and clinical examinations were conducted by an urologist in order to diagnose prostate cancer, prostate disease, urinary tract infection and active urinary retention. After obtaining consent, the patients were enrolled in the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage, mean, standard deviation) and the paired t-test were used to compare levels of testosterone. To determine the correlation between age and testosterone levels, the Pearson correlation was used. Finally, to compare the treatment processes during the treatment period the repeated measures ANOVA was used. Results: The mean age of patients was 56.57 ± 3.21 years. A total of 31 patients (39%) were smokers, among them 30% smoked daily, 2.5% weekly and 6% smoked for fun. The mean testosterone level before treatment was 240.6 ± 125.4 and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment the level was raised, so that at the end of the sixth months it was 578.7 ± 141.7. The level of increase was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Treatment with testosterone in men over 50 years with andropause will increase testosterone levels and also quality of life, sexual desire, erection, energy levels, ability to exercise and feel the joy of life more than before. Depression was decreased and they had sleepy feelings after dinner. PMID:26756004

  8. Seasonal aggression independent of seasonal testosterone in wood rats.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, G S; Glickman, S E; Smith, E R

    1984-01-01

    Levels of inter-male aggression, both in laboratory encounters and in the field, rise dramatically during the breeding season, closely paralleling the seasonal rise in testosterone. However, post-pubertally castrated males also show the dramatic seasonal rise in aggression in laboratory encounters with castrated opponents and show no decrement in fighting ability when paired with intact opponents, clearly demonstrating the independence of seasonal aggression from the proximate modulating effects of testosterone in wood rats. PMID:6591190

  9. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  10. Supra-physiological dose of testosterone induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pirompol, Prapawadee; Teekabut, Vassana; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone and androgenic anabolic steroids have been misused for enhancement of physical performance despite many reports on cardiac sudden death. Although physiological level of testosterone provided many regulatory benefits to human health, including the cardiovascular function, supra-physiological levels of the hormone induce hypertrophy of the heart with unclear contractile activation. In this study, dose- and time-dependent effects of high-testosterone treatment on cardiac structure and function were evaluated. Adult male rats were divided into four groups of testosterone treatment for 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW for 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Increases in both percentage heart:body weight ratio and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in representing hypertrophy of the heart were significantly shown in all testosterone-treated groups to the same degree. In 4-week-treated rats, physiological cardiac hypertrophy was apparent with an upregulation of α-MHC without any change in myofilament contractile activation. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy was observed in 8- and 12-week testosterone-treated groups, as indicated by suppression of myofilament activation and myocardial collagen deposition without transition of MHC isoforms. Only in 12-week testosterone-treated group, eccentric cardiac hypertrophy was demonstrated with unaltered myocardial stiffness, but significant reductions in the phosphorylation signals of ERK1/2 and mTOR. Results of our study suggest that the outcome of testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not dose dependent but is rather relied on the factor of exposure to duration in inducing maladaptive responses of the heart. PMID:26850730

  11. [Patient with testosterone deficit syndrome and dyslipemia].

    PubMed

    Sola Galarza, Ignacio; López López, Borja; Llorente Abarca, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    erectile dysfunction due to endothelial dysfunction, but also it generally appears years before the cardiovascular event. On the other hand, and in relation to the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of patients with MS, we urologists may contributein greatly to the detection of patients with MS whose only symptom is erectile dysfunction or diminished libido, but specially we may play a key role in the improvement of these patients, since it is known that testosterone replacement therapy has a major potential to diminish or stop the progression of MS or its cardiovascular effects. Testosterone treatment not only improves the lipid profile, hypertension, insulin resistance, or reduces the abdominal circumference, but also it may help to get a better adherence to diet and exercise, so contributing to change unhealthy lifestyle habits whch are the origin of the problem. PMID:24047636

  12. [Patient with testosterone deficit syndrome and dyslipemia].

    PubMed

    Sola Galarza, Ignacio; López López, Borja; Llorente Abarca, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    erectile dysfunction due to endothelial dysfunction, but also it generally appears years before the cardiovascular event. On the other hand, and in relation to the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of patients with MS, we urologists may contributein greatly to the detection of patients with MS whose only symptom is erectile dysfunction or diminished libido, but specially we may play a key role in the improvement of these patients, since it is known that testosterone replacement therapy has a major potential to diminish or stop the progression of MS or its cardiovascular effects. Testosterone treatment not only improves the lipid profile, hypertension, insulin resistance, or reduces the abdominal circumference, but also it may help to get a better adherence to diet and exercise, so contributing to change unhealthy lifestyle habits whch are the origin of the problem.

  13. A rare case of a false-negative finding in both direct and culture of a chorionic villus sample.

    PubMed

    Pindar, L; Whitehouse, M; Ocraft, K

    1992-06-01

    A discrepancy is reported between the karyotype of both direct and cultured chorionic villus cells (46,XX) and a fetal skin biopsy (47,XX, +18). The significance of this result is discussed and compared with similar discordant findings reported in the literature.

  14. What does testosterone do for red deer males?

    PubMed Central

    Malo, A.F.; Roldan, E.R.S.; Garde, J.J.; Soler, A.J.; Vicente, J.; Gortazar, C.; Gomendio, M.

    2008-01-01

    Testosterone has been proposed to have a dual effect, enhancing sexual traits while depressing parasite resistance in males. Here, we test this hypothesis in red deer, examining males from captive populations during the whole annual cycle and males from natural populations during the breeding season. We first explored the effects of body size, age and sampling date on testosterone to avoid confounding effects. Our results show that in captive populations seasonal changes in testosterone levels were mirrored by changes in testes size, and that during the rut there was a strong correlation between both. In natural populations, males with higher testosterone levels had larger testes, improved sperm quality, smaller burr diameter, stronger antlers, higher haematocrit levels, and increased nematode parasite load. By contrast, no significant relationship was found between testosterone and spleen size or tick parasite load. We conclude that testosterone (i) improves males' reproductive investment and physical stamina, (ii) improves antler strength but reduces burr diameter, and (iii) imposes a cost in terms of depressed parasite resistance. PMID:19129132

  15. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  16. Low Serum Testosterone Increases Mortality Risk among Male Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:19144759

  17. Low serum testosterone increases mortality risk among male dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease.

  18. ACTN3 GENOTYPE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TESTOSTERONE LEVELS OF ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Donnikov, A.E.; Trofimov, D.Y.

    2014-01-01

    α-Actinin-3 (ACTN3) has been proposed to regulate skeletal muscle differentiation and hypertrophy through its interaction with the signalling protein calcineurin. Since the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates the production of testosterone, we hypothesized that α-actinin-3 deficiency (predicted from the ACTN3 XX genotype) may influence serum levels of testosterone of athletes. Objective: To investigate the association of ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism with resting testosterone levels in athletes. Methods: A total of 209 elite Russian athletes from different sports (119 males, 90 females) were genotyped for ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism by real-time PCR. Resting testosterone was examined in serum of athletes using enzyme immunoassay. Results: The mean testosterone levels were significantly higher in both males and females with the ACTN3 R allele than in XX homozygotes (males: RR: 24.9 (5.7), RX: 21.8 (5.5), XX: 18.6 (4.9) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0071; females: RR: 1.43 (0.6), RX: 1.21 (0.71), XX: 0.79 (0.66) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0167). Conclusions: We found that the ACTN3 R allele was associated with high levels of testosterone in athletes, and this may explain, in part, the association between the ACTN3 RR genotype, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and power athlete status. PMID:24899773

  19. Optimization and Performance Assessment of the Chorion-Off [Dechorinated] Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Assay.

    PubMed

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Zhang, Cindy X; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    The Dechorinated Zebrafish Embryo Developmental toxicity assay was originally developed from a training set of 31 compounds and reported to be 87% concordant with in vivo teratogenicity data (Brannen, K. C., Panzica-Kelly, J. M., Danberry, T. L., and Augustine-Rauch, K. A. (2010). Development of a zebrafish embryo teratogenicity assay and quantitative prediction model. Birth Defects Res. 89, 66-77.). The assay includes scoring larva treated in a concentration range for malformations of specific morphological structures/organ systems. The model includes identifying a no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the concentration resulting in 25% lethality (LC25) at 5 days postfertilization. An LC25/NOAEL ratio ≥10 classifies a compound positive for teratogenic potential. A consortium effort evaluated a modified version of this assay which involved enzymatic chorion treatment instead of manual dissection and used experimental replicates for final classification. The modified assay achieved an 85% overall predictivity (Gustafson, A. L., Stedman, D. B., Ball, J., Hillegass, J. M., Flood, A., Zhang, C. X., Panzica-Kelly, J., Cao, J., Coburn, A., Enright, B. P., et al. (2012). Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I. Reprod. Toxicol. 33, 155-164.). The objective of this study was to perform a thorough performance evaluation of the dechorinated assay by repeating the original training set and testing additional compounds in experimental replicates. When the initial training set was repeated with inclusion of experimental replicates, the overall predictivity was 83%. Model performance was tested with an additional 34 compounds and achieved overall predictivity of 74%. When the training and test sets were combined (63 compounds) the assay's final sensitivity was 83% and the specificity was 71%. Total predictivity was 78% with relatively balanced predictivity for nonteratogens (77%) and teratogens (78%). The

  20. The Role of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin as Tumor Marker: Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Sisinni, Lorenza; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor markers are biological substances that are produced/released mainly by malignant tumor cells, enter the circulation in detectable amounts and are potential indicators of the presence of a tumor. The most useful biochemical markers are the tumor-specific molecules, i.e., receptors, enzymes, hormones, growth factors or biological response modifiers that are specifically produced by tumor cells and not, or minimally, by the normal counterpart (Richard et al. Principles and practice of gynecologic oncology. Wolters Kluwer Health, Philadelphia, 2009). Based on their specificity and sensitivity in each malignancy, biomarkers are used for screening, diagnosis, disease monitoring and therapeutic response assessment in clinical management of cancer patients.This chapter is focused on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone with a variety of functions and widely used as a tumor biomarker in selected tumors. Indeed, hCG is expressed by both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic human malignancies and plays a role in cell transformation, angiogenesis, metastatization, and immune escape, all process central to cancer progression. Of note, hCG testing is crucial for the clinical management of placental trophoblastic malignancies and germ cell tumors of the testis and the ovary. Furthermore, the production of hCG by tumor cells is accompanied by varying degrees of release of the free subunits into the circulation, and this is relevant for the management of cancer patients (Triozzi PL, Stevens VC, Oncol Rep 6(1):7-17, 1999).The name chorionic gonadotropin was conceived: chorion derives from the latin chordate meaning afterbirth, gonadotropin indicates that the hormone is a gonadotropic molecule, acting on the ovaries and promoting steroid production (Cole LA, Int J Endocrinol Metab 9(2):335-352, 2011). The function, the mechanism of action and the interaction between hCG and its receptor continue to be the subject of intensive investigation, even though many issues about

  1. The laboratory diagnosis of testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Darius A; Brannigan, Robert E; Fuchs, Eugene F; Kim, Edward D; Marmar, Joel L; Sandlow, Jay I

    2014-05-01

    The evaluation and treatment of hypogonadal men has become an important part of urologic practice. Fatigue, loss of libido, and erectile dysfunction are commonly reported, but nonspecific symptoms and laboratory verification of low testosterone (T) are an important part of evaluation in addition to a detailed history and physical examination. Significant intraindividual fluctuations in serum T levels, biologic variation of T action on end organs, the wide range of T levels in human serum samples, and technical limitations of currently available assays have led to poor reliability of T measurements in the clinical laboratory setting. There is no universally accepted threshold of T concentration that distinguishes eugonadal from hypogonadal men; thus, laboratory results have to be interpreted in the appropriate clinical setting. This review focuses on clinical, biological, and technological challenges that affect serum T measurements to educate clinicians regarding technological advances and limitations of the currently available laboratory methods to diagnose hypogonadism. A collaborative effort led by the American Urological Association between practicing clinicians, patient advocacy groups, government regulatory agencies, industry, and professional societies is underway to provide optimized assay platforms and evidence-based normal assay ranges to guide clinical decision making. Until such standardization is commonplace in clinical laboratories, the decision to treat should be based on the presence of signs and symptoms in addition to serum T measurements. Rigid interpretation of T ranges should not dictate clinical decision making or define coverage of treatment by third party payers.

  2. The laboratory diagnosis of testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Darius A; Brannigan, Robert E; Fuchs, Eugene F; Kim, Edward D; Marmar, Joel L; Sandlow, Jay I

    2014-05-01

    The evaluation and treatment of hypogonadal men has become an important part of urologic practice. Fatigue, loss of libido, and erectile dysfunction are commonly reported, but nonspecific symptoms and laboratory verification of low testosterone (T) are an important part of evaluation in addition to a detailed history and physical examination. Significant intraindividual fluctuations in serum T levels, biologic variation of T action on end organs, the wide range of T levels in human serum samples, and technical limitations of currently available assays have led to poor reliability of T measurements in the clinical laboratory setting. There is no universally accepted threshold of T concentration that distinguishes eugonadal from hypogonadal men; thus, laboratory results have to be interpreted in the appropriate clinical setting. This review focuses on clinical, biological, and technological challenges that affect serum T measurements to educate clinicians regarding technological advances and limitations of the currently available laboratory methods to diagnose hypogonadism. A collaborative effort led by the American Urological Association between practicing clinicians, patient advocacy groups, government regulatory agencies, industry, and professional societies is underway to provide optimized assay platforms and evidence-based normal assay ranges to guide clinical decision making. Until such standardization is commonplace in clinical laboratories, the decision to treat should be based on the presence of signs and symptoms in addition to serum T measurements. Rigid interpretation of T ranges should not dictate clinical decision making or define coverage of treatment by third party payers. PMID:24548716

  3. Chronic Testosterone Replacement Exerts Cardioprotection against Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Attenuating Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Testosterone-Deprived Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-01-01

    Background Although testosterone deficiency is associated with increased risks of heart disease, the benefits of testosterone therapy are controversial. Moreover, current understanding on the cardiac effect of testosterone during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) periods is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that testosterone replacement attenuates the impairment of left ventricular (LV) function and heart rate variability (HRV), and reduces the infarct size and arrhythmias caused by I/R injury in orchiectomized (ORX) rats. Methodology ORX or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n = 24) were randomly divided and received either testosterone (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously administered) or the vehicle for 8 weeks. The ejection fraction (EF) and HRV were determined at baseline and the 4th and 8th week. I/R was performed by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 30 minutes, followed by a 120-minute reperfusion. LV pressure, arrhythmia scores, infarct size and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. Results Prior to I/R, EF and HRV were impaired in the ORX group, but were restored in the testosterone-treated group. During I/R, arrhythmia scores and the infarct size were greater, and cardiac mitochondrial function was impaired, whereas the time to 1st VT/VF onset and the LV end-systolic pressure were decreased in the ORX group when compared to the sham group. Testosterone replacement attenuated the impairment of these parameters in ORX rats during I/R injury, but did not show any benefit or adverse effect in non-ORX rats. Conclusions Testosterone replacement restores cardiac function and autonomic regulation, and exerts cardioprotective effects during the I/R period via mitochondrial protection in ORX rats. PMID:25822979

  4. The progesterone antagonist onapristone retards the advanced endometrial transformation after gonadotropin stimulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krusche, C A; Herrler, A; Classen-Linke, I; Beier, H M

    2000-01-01

    Ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins (GN) during human in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET) therapy alters the ovarian steroid output, especially that of progesterone. As a consequence, endometrial transformation is advanced, and embryo implantation is hampered. This study used the rabbit model to determine if the application of the progesterone antagonist (PA) onapristone (ONA) could retard endometrial development after GN-stimulation. Rabbits were GN-stimulated twice daily with 5 IU FSH and 5 IU LH on 3 consecutive days with a) hMG (n = 10) or b) with a mixture of recombinant FSH and LH (n = 10). The animals were then mated, and hCG was injected i.v. to ensure ovulation. This day is designated as day 0 post coitum (d 0 p.c.). On day 2 p.c., five animals of each group were treated with 20 mg ONA/kg body weight and five with vehicle for control. On d 5 p.c. endometrial transformation was analyzed by morphology, uteroglobin (Ugl)-mRNA expression, and proliferation. Embryos were flushed from the uteri. Their number and morphology was evaluated. The endometrium of GN-stimulated control animals demonstrated very long endometrial glands and narrow stromal septa. Ugl-mRNA expression was restricted to the cells at the bottom of the gland. 17.0 +/- 4.6% (mean +/- SD) of glandular cells and 6.0 +/- 5.3% of luminal epithelial cells proliferated. In ONA-treated animals, endometrial glands were significantly shorter, and the pattern of arborization was less pronounced. Endometrial gland cells and luminal epithelial cells expressed Ugl-mRNA. Furthermore, glandular and luminal cells proliferated with high intensity (38.6 +/- 6.8% and 36.4 +/- 9.3%, respectively). These results indicate that the status of endometrial differentiation was retarded after ONA-treatment. Nevertheless, the embryos of these ONA-treated animals were well developed. In conclusion, after GN-stimulation, ONA treatment retarded the advanced endometrial transformation in rabbits. Therefore, postovulatory administration of a PA might be a possible strategy to modulate the advanced endometrial development in IVF-cycles. PMID:11108888

  5. Impact of Exogenous Gonadotropin Stimulation on Circulatory and Follicular Fluid Cytokine Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Baskind, N. Ellissa; Orsi, Nicolas M.; Sharma, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural cycle is the prototype to which we aspire to emulate in assisted reproduction techniques. Increasing evidence is emerging that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with exogenous gonadotropins may be detrimental to oogenesis, embryo quality, and endometrial receptivity. This research aimed at assessing the impact of COH on the intrafollicular milieu by comparing follicular fluid (FF) cytokine profiles during stimulated in vitro fertilization (IVF) and modified natural cycle (MNC) IVF. Methods. Ten women undergoing COH IVF and 10 matched women undergoing MNC IVF were recruited for this pilot study. 40 FF cytokine concentrations from individual follicles and plasma were measured by fluid-phase multiplex immunoassay. Demographic/cycle/cytokine data were compared and correlations between cytokines were computed. Results. No significant differences were found between COH and MNC groups for patient and cycle demographics, including outcome. Overall mean FF cytokine levels were higher in the MNC group for 29/40 cytokines, significantly so for leukaemia inhibitory factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1α. Furthermore, FF MNC cytokine correlations were significantly stronger than for COH data. Conclusions. These findings suggest that COH perturbs intrafollicular cytokine networks, in terms of both cytokine levels and their interrelationships. This may impact oocyte maturation/fertilization and embryo developmental competence. PMID:25763393

  6. Evolution of chorion structural genes and regulatory mechanisms in two wild silkmoths: a preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Moschonas, N K; Thireos, G; Kafatos, F C

    1988-01-01

    We report a preliminary analysis of structural and regulatory evolution of the A and B chorion gene families in two wild silkmoths, Antheraea pernyi and Antheraea polyphemus. Homospecific and heterospecific dot hybridizations were performed between previously characterized A. polyphemus complementary DNA clones and total or stage-specific follicular mRNAs from the two species. The hybridization patterns indicated substantial interspecies changes in the abundance of corresponding mRNA sequences (heteroposic evolution) without substantial changes in their developmental specificities (heterochronic evolution). In addition, the proteins encoded in the two species by corresponding mRNAs were determined by hybrid-selected translation followed by electrophoretic analysis. The results suggested that the proteins evolve in size, presumably through internal deletions and duplications.

  7. Potential Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sjögren Syndrome With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Sjögren syndrome (SS) ameliorate during pregnancy, through dampening (immunotolerance) of the maternal immune system which protects the fetus from rejection. A large number of studies have shown that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) contributes to this tolerance. Studies on animal models have reaffirmed that hCG treatment mimics the benefits of pregnancy. Based on the scientific evidence, randomized clinical trials comparing hCG with current therapies and/or placebo are recommended for RA, SS, and for other autoimmune diseases such as, type 1 diabetes and ankylosing spondylitis, which also get better during pregnancy and hCG treatment seems to help.

  8. A model for gas and nutrient exchange in the chorionic vasculature system of the mouse placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Sled, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an analytical model for the oxygen and nutrient transport from the umbilical cord to the small villous capillaries. The nutrient and carbon dioxide removal from the fetal cotyledons in the mouse placental system has also been considered. This model describes the mass transfer between the fetal and the maternal red blood cells in the chorionic arterial vasculature system. The model reveals the detail fetal vasculature system and its geometry and the precise mechanisms of mass transfer through the placenta. The dimensions of the villous capillaries, the total length of the villous trees, the total villi surface area, and the total resistance to mass transport in the fetal villous trees has also been defined. This is the first effort to explain the reason why there are at least 7 lobules in the mouse placenta from the fluid dynamics point of view.

  9. Evidence for, and Associated Risks with, the Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Supplemented Diet.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen A; Cole, Laurence A

    2016-11-01

    Trend diets can be commonplace amongst those who are trying to lose weight but in most cases there is some shred of evidence to suggest they might be of some benefit. Seldom is there a diet which is such a fad that it is not only completely unfounded but also potential harmful. The human chorionic gonadotropin or "hCG diet" is such a diet, which after half a century still has no evidence to support its efficacy; in fact all scientific publications subsequent to the original article counter these claims. In this short communication, we review the literature and present data on exactly what some of the hCG diet preparations actually contain and highlight that, based on current data, these may do more harm than good. It is worrying that more consideration is not given to the possible danger of administration of hCG preparations to individuals without an evidence-based rational. PMID:27010890

  10. Induction of follicular luteinization by equine chorionic gonadotropin in cyclic guinea pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-rong; Wang, Wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on follicular development and ovulation in cyclic guinea pigs were investigated by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Three groups of guinea pigs (n=12) were administrated subcutaneously with saline, 20 or 50 IU of eCG, respectively, on cyclic Day 12 (Day 1=vaginal openings). Ovaries were collected at 4 and 8 d after administration (6 animals per group each time). The eCG administration induced significant and distinct morphological changes in the ovaries, as it promoted the luteinization of granulosa cells, but not follicular development. In addition, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) were immunolocalized specifically in luteinized follicles. Our experiments together indicate that eCG administration can induce follicular luteinization but not superovulation in guinea pigs. The eCG in cyclic guinea pigs functions similar to that of luteinizing hormone (LH), but not follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). PMID:26642181

  11. Synthesis and processing of human chorionic gonadotropin subunits in cultured choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddon, R W; Hanson, C A; Addison, N J

    1979-01-01

    Pulse and pulse-chase experiments have identified the presence of partially glycosylated precursors of the alpha and beta subunits of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in cultured JAR choriocarcinoma cells. The alpha subunit precursor has an apparent molecular weight (by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 18,000 (compared to 22,000 for fully processed alpha subunit); the beta subunit precursor has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000 (fully processed, 34,000). Both of these precursors appear to have an intracellular half-life of at least 1 hr and to contain the mannose core but not the terminal carbohydrate sequences. Fully processed alpha and beta subunits do not accumulate intracellularly, indicating that further processing of the precursors is followed by rapid secretion. Images PMID:291927

  12. Potential Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sjögren Syndrome With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Sjögren syndrome (SS) ameliorate during pregnancy, through dampening (immunotolerance) of the maternal immune system which protects the fetus from rejection. A large number of studies have shown that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) contributes to this tolerance. Studies on animal models have reaffirmed that hCG treatment mimics the benefits of pregnancy. Based on the scientific evidence, randomized clinical trials comparing hCG with current therapies and/or placebo are recommended for RA, SS, and for other autoimmune diseases such as, type 1 diabetes and ankylosing spondylitis, which also get better during pregnancy and hCG treatment seems to help. PMID:26239386

  13. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum: lessons from the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddon, R. W.; Sherman, S. A.; Bedows, E.

    1996-01-01

    There have been few studies of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum of intact mammalian cells. In the one case where the in vivo and in vitro folding pathways of a mammalian secretory protein have been compared, the folding of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit (hCG-beta), the order of formation of the detected folding intermediates is the same. The rate and efficiency with which multidomain proteins such as hCG-beta fold to native structure in intact cells is higher than in vitro, although intracellular rates of folding of the beta subunit can be approached in vitro in the presence of an optimal redox potential and protein disulfide isomerase. Understanding how proteins fold in vivo may provide a new way to diagnose and treat human illnesses that occur due to folding defects. PMID:8844836

  14. Human chorionic gonadotropin promotes expression of protein absorption factors in the intestine of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Hao, G; Zhong, H; Wu, Q; Lu, S Q; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z

    2015-07-27

    Protein use is crucial for the ovulation and spawning of fish. Currently, limited information is available regarding the expression of protein absorption factors during the breeding seasons of teleosts and thus how various proteins involved in this process is not well-understood. The expression of CDX2, CREB, gluatamate dehydrogenase, LAT2, aminopeptidase N, PepT1, and SP1 were significantly elevated from the non-breeding season to the breeding season in female goldfish, and all proteins except PepT1 and SP1 were elevated in male goldfish. Injection of human chorionic gonadotropin upregulated the expression of all proteins except for aminopeptidase N in female goldfish and SP1 in male goldfish, suggesting a luteinizing hormone-inductive effect on protein absorption factors. Protein use in the intestine is increased during the breeding seasons as a result of increased luteinizing hormone.

  15. Evidence for, and Associated Risks with, the Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Supplemented Diet.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen A; Cole, Laurence A

    2016-11-01

    Trend diets can be commonplace amongst those who are trying to lose weight but in most cases there is some shred of evidence to suggest they might be of some benefit. Seldom is there a diet which is such a fad that it is not only completely unfounded but also potential harmful. The human chorionic gonadotropin or "hCG diet" is such a diet, which after half a century still has no evidence to support its efficacy; in fact all scientific publications subsequent to the original article counter these claims. In this short communication, we review the literature and present data on exactly what some of the hCG diet preparations actually contain and highlight that, based on current data, these may do more harm than good. It is worrying that more consideration is not given to the possible danger of administration of hCG preparations to individuals without an evidence-based rational.

  16. Human chorionic villus mesenchymal stromal cells reveal strong endothelial conversion properties.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Vecellio, Matteo; Grasselli, Annalisa; Baccarin, Marco; Farsetti, Antonella; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Pompilio, Giulio; Coviello, Domenico A; Gaetano, Carlo; Di Segni, Marina; Rossini, Alessandra

    2012-06-01

    Chorion, amnion and villi are reservoirs of mesenchymal stromal cells (StC) and the hypothesis that StC from fetal tissues retain higher plasticity compared to adult StC has been suggested. Aimed at investigating this aspect, a series of in vitro experiments were performed with StC isolated from first trimester human chorionic villi (CVStC). CVStC were cultured in: (i) standard mesenchymal medium (MM) and (ii) AmniomaxII® (AM), specifically designed to grow amnion-derived cells in prenatal diagnostic procedures. Cells were then exposed to distinct differentiation treatments and distinguished according to morphology, immunophenotype and molecular markers. Human StC obtained from adult bone marrow (BMStC) were used as control. CVStC cultured either in MM or AM presented stromal morphology and immunophenotype, were negative for pluripotency factors (Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox-2), lacked detectable telomerase activity and retained high genomic stability. In AM, however, CVStC exhibited a faster proliferation rate compared to BMStC or CVStC kept in MM. During differentiation, CVStC were less efficient than BMStC in acquiring adipocytes and osteocytes features; the cardiomyogenic conversion occurred at low efficiency in both cell types. Remarkably, in the presence of pro-angiogenic factors, CVStC reprogrammed toward an endothelial-like phenotype at significantly higher efficiency than BMStC. This effect was particularly evident in CVStC expanded in AM. Mechanistically, the reduced CVStC expression of anti-angiogenic microRNA could support this process. The present study demonstrates that, despite of fetal origin, CVStC exhibit restricted plasticity, distinct from that of BMStC and predominantly directed toward the endothelial lineage.

  17. Biological properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion composite graft: implications for chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Koob, Thomas J; Rennert, Robert; Zabek, Nicole; Massee, Michelle; Lim, Jeremy J; Temenoff, Johnna S; Li, William W; Gurtner, Geoffrey

    2013-10-01

    Human amnion/chorion tissue derived from the placenta is rich in cytokines and growth factors known to promote wound healing; however, preservation of the biological activities of therapeutic allografts during processing remains a challenge. In this study, PURION® (MiMedx, Marietta, GA) processed dehydrated human amnion/chorion tissue allografts (dHACM, EpiFix®, MiMedx) were evaluated for the presence of growth factors, interleukins (ILs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were performed on samples of dHACM and showed quantifiable levels of the following growth factors: platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), PDGF-BB, transforming growth factor α (TGFα), TGFβ1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), placental growth factor (PLGF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF). The ELISA assays also confirmed the presence of IL-4, 6, 8 and 10, and TIMP 1, 2 and 4. Moreover, the relative elution of growth factors into saline from the allograft ranged from 4% to 62%, indicating that there are bound and unbound fractions of these compounds within the allograft. dHACM retained biological activities that cause human dermal fibroblast proliferation and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro. An in vivo mouse model showed that dHACM when tested in a skin flap model caused mesenchymal progenitor cell recruitment to the site of implantation. The results from both the in vitro and in vivo experiments clearly established that dHACM contains one or more soluble factors capable of stimulating MSC migration and recruitment. In summary, PURION® processed dHACM retains its biological activities related to wound healing, including the potential to positively affect four distinct and pivotal physiological processes intimately involved in wound healing: cell proliferation, inflammation, metalloproteinase activity and recruitment of progenitor cells. This suggests

  18. Disorder of sex development as a diagnostic clue in the first Spanish known newborn with P450 oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garvín, Dunia; Albaladejo, Sonia; Ezquieta, Begoña; Corripio, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    We report the first known case of p450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) in a Spanish boy who presented ambiguous genitalia at birth as a unique feature. He had palpable gonads in the inguinal canal and a normal 46,XY karyotype. Blood tests showed increased lanosterol and androgen precursors (17-OH-pregnenolone and 17-OH-progesterone) and low adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate). Blood pressure and serum electrolytes were normal. As he had low-testosterone response to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation but responded to exogenous testosterone with phallic growth, male sex was assigned. Testosterone/dihydrotestosterone ratio and inhibin B were normal. Adrenal insufficiency was detected by corticotropin test. Hydrocortisone replacement treatment was administered. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia was ruled out and molecular analysis of POR gene showed the missense mutation p.Gly539Arg in compound heterozygosity located at splice acceptor site of intron 2 and the coding variant p.Gly80Arg. Surgery for cryptorchidism and hypospadias was performed.

  19. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures.

  20. Predicting low testosterone in aging men: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Adam C.; Lau, Adrian N.C.; Tomlinson, George; Kraguljac, Alan; Simel, David L.; Detsky, Allan S.; Lipscombe, Lorraine L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physicians diagnose and treat suspected hypogonadism in older men by extrapolating from the defined clinical entity of hypogonadism found in younger men. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the accuracy of clinical symptoms and signs for predicting low testosterone among aging men. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and Embase databases (January 1966 to July 2014) for studies that compared clinical features with a measurement of serum testosterone in men. Three of the authors independently reviewed articles for inclusion, assessed quality and extracted data. Results: Among 6053 articles identified, 40 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of low testosterone ranged between 2% and 77%. Threshold testosterone levels used for reference standards also varied substantially. The summary likelihood ratio associated with decreased libido was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.9), and the likelihood ratio for absence of this finding was 0.72 (95% CI 0.58–0.85). The likelihood ratio associated with the presence of erectile dysfunction was 1.5 (95% CI 1.3–1.8) and with absence of erectile dysfunction was 0.83 (95% CI 0.76–0.91). Of the multiple-item instruments, the ANDROTEST showed both the most favourable positive likelihood ratio (range 1.9–2.2) and the most favourable negative likelihood ratio (range 0.37–0.49). Interpretation: We found weak correlation between signs, symptoms and testosterone levels, uncertainty about what threshold testosterone levels should be considered low for aging men and wide variation in estimated prevalence of the condition. It is therefore difficult to extrapolate the method of diagnosing pathologic hypogonadism in younger men to clinical decisions regarding age-related testosterone decline in aging men. PMID:27325129

  1. A Novel Testosterone Catabolic Pathway in Bacteria ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Ismail, Wael; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Forty years ago, Coulter and Talalay (A. W. Coulter and P. Talalay, J. Biol. Chem. 243:3238–3247, 1968) established the oxygenase-dependent pathway for the degradation of testosterone by aerobes. The oxic testosterone catabolic pathway involves several oxygen-dependent reactions and is not available for anaerobes. Since then, a variety of anaerobic bacteria have been described for the ability to degrade testosterone in the absence of oxygen. Here, a novel, oxygenase-independent testosterone catabolic pathway in such organisms is described. Steroidobacter denitrificansDSMZ18526 was shown to be capable of degrading testosterone in the absence of oxygen and was selected as the model organism in this study. In a previous investigation, we identified the initial intermediates involved in an anoxic testosterone catabolic pathway, most of which are identical to those of the oxic pathway demonstrated in Comamonas testosteroni. In this study, five additional intermediates of the anoxic pathway were identified. We demonstrated that subsequent steps of the anoxic pathway greatly differ from those of the established oxic pathway, which suggests that a novel pathway for testosterone catabolism is present. In the proposed anoxic pathway, a reduction reaction occurs at C-4 and C-5 of androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, the last common intermediate of both the oxic and anoxic pathways. After that, a novel hydration reaction occurs and a hydroxyl group is thus introduced to the C-1α position of C19steroid substrates. To our knowledge, an enzymatic hydration reaction occurring at the A ring of steroid compounds has not been reported before. PMID:21725000

  2. Testosterone supports hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L; Petrovic, D M

    1989-08-01

    Female hooded rats were ovariectomized and implanted with a single testosterone-filled Silastic tube or an empty tube. The tube size was one which allowed a release of testosterone at the high end of the mean normal serum testosterone concentration for intact females. Following a 7-day recovery period, all rats were placed on a 23-hr food-deprivation schedule and adapted to a highly palatable liquid food over a 5-day period. Each animal with a testosterone implant was then housed with an animal of similar weight but an empty implant. The pairs were subjected to a series of 3 restricted-access competition tests (1/day) followed 4 days later by a series of 3 free-access competition tests. The animals were then separated, adapted to a bland liquid food, and paired with new partners. They were then subjected to the restricted- and free-access food-competition tests but with bland food as the incentive. During the first 6 competition tests there were no significant differences between groups in aggression or in time spent licking at the food spout. During the second series of tests, females with testosterone implants were more aggressive and more successful at maintaining access to the food than were their competitors with empty implants. The difference between groups occurred during the free- as well as the restricted-access tests. The effectiveness of physiological levels of testosterone in supporting aggression is attributed to the use of a test situation that activates as well as elicits hormone-dependent aggression. These results suggest that testosterone may be the hormonal substrate for hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

  3. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures. PMID:17292367

  4. Reproductive outcomes of Alpine goats primed with progesterone and treated with human chorionic gonadotropin during the anestrus-to-estrus transition season.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Espino, A S; Meza-Herrera, C A; Carrillo, E; González-Álvarez, V H; Guillen-Muñoz, J M; Ángel-García, O; Mellado, M; Véliz-Deras, F G

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the possible effects of a single injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as a means for estrus induction in acyclic French-Alpine goats during the reproductive transition period at 25°N, 103°W. The potential effects of hCG upon ovarian function and reproductive performance of goats were also assessed. Multiparous acyclic French-Alpine goats (n = 39; 37.4 ± 8 .5 kg) were primed with 20mg progesterone (P4) 1 day prior to hCG administration. Thereafter, does were treated either with saline (hCG-0; n = 10), 50 (hCG-50; n = 9), 100 (hCG-100; n = 10), or 300 IU of hCG (hCG-300; n = 10). Ovarian structures and pregnancy were monitored by transrectal ultrasonography. In addition, after hCG application, goats were monitored twice daily (0800 and 1800 h) to detect estrus signs, with the use of aproned, sexually active bucks treated with testosterone. Goats were bred 12h after the onset of estrus. Two days after hCG administration, the number of large follicles was higher (P < 0.05) in the hCG-50 and hCG-300 groups (1.7 ± 0.1 and 1.8 ± 0.2, respectively) compared with the hCG-100 and hCG-0 groups (1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.1 ± 0.1, respectively). Although none of the hCG-0-goats depicted estrus, the estrus response from the hCG-50, hCG-100, and hCG-300 groups over the 7-d breeding period was 67%, 100%, and 90%, respectively (P > 0.05), being always accompanied by ovulation. Pregnancy rate (67, 100, and 70%), kidding rate (55%, 80%, and 70%), and litter size (1.6 ± 0.5, 1.5 ± 0.5, and 1.5 ± 0.5) for hCG-50, hCG-100, and hCG-300, respectively, did not differ among the hCG-treated does. Therefore, the combined use of P4-priming plus a 100-IU hCG injection is an effective protocol for inducing estrus in non-cycling Alpine goats during the anestrus-to-estrus transition period, which is of key importance for both goat producers and industrializers. PMID:26944772

  5. Oral testosterone-triglyceride conjugate in rabbits: single-dose pharmacokinetics and comparison with oral testosterone undecanoate.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K; Scriba, G K E; Amory, D W; Bremner, W J

    2003-01-01

    Development of a safe and effective oral form of testosterone has been inhibited by the rapid hepatic metabolism of nonalkylated androgens. Since triglycerides are absorbed via lymphatics and bypass the liver, we hypothesized that a testosterone-triglyceride conjugate (TTC) might allow for safe and effective oral testosterone therapy. Therefore, we studied the single-dose pharmacokinetics of oral administration of TTC in rabbits. Female New Zealand rabbits were administered 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg of TTC in sesame oil by gastric lavage. Testosterone undecanoate (TU) by gastric lavage was used as a positive control. Blood was sampled from a catheter in the auricular artery at 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 360, 480, and 600 minutes after drug administration. Samples were assayed for testosterone by a fluoroimmunoassay. Mean serum testosterone, area under the curve (AUC), and terminal half-life were calculated. Oral TTC administration resulted in rapid and marked increases in serum testosterone. Oral TTC resulted in higher maximum serum testosterone concentrations than oral TU at 8 mg/kg (TTC: 28.6 +/- 7.9 nmol/L vs TU: 11.9 +/- 2.1 nmol/L; P <.001) and 4 mg/kg (TTC: 11.5 +/- 4.2 nmol/L vs TU: 3.6 +/- 1.0 nmol/L; P <.001). In addition, the AUC was 1.8 to 2.6 times greater for TTC than TU at both doses (P <.05). The terminal half-life for both TU and TTC was between 3 and 5 hours and was not significantly different. We conclude that oral TTC is rapidly absorbed from the rabbit intestine and results in elevated concentrations of serum testosterone. The absorption of TTC appears to be superior to that of TU; however, the in vivo persistence of the 2 compounds is similar. TTC may offer an alternative to the use of TU for oral testosterone therapy. Further testing of this compound is warranted. PMID:12954663

  6. Intratesticular delivery of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ceramide directly abrogates steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and Leydig cell steroidogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Victoria; Santana, Pino; Díaz, Raquel; Tabraue, Carlos; Gallardo, Germán; López Blanco, Félix; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fanjul, Luisa F; Ruiz de Galarreta, Carlos M

    2003-11-01

    Systemic or intratesticular release of TNF alpha and IL1 beta have been implicated in the reduced testosterone biosynthesis and impaired production of competent spermatozoa found in human patients suffering from sepsis or chronic inflammation. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TNF alpha and IL1 beta intercept the hypothalamic-pituitary testis axis at different levels, the site(s) of action and relative contribution of each cytokine to the overall testicular failure associated to systemic inflammatory processes remains poorly defined. In this study we show that intratesticular delivery of TNF alpha induced a rapid (4 h) and sustained (up to 24 h) reduction in steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression and testosterone biosynthesis in nonstimulated or human chorionic gonadotropin-treated intact or hypophysectomized rats. Bilateral treatment with cell-permeant short-chain ceramides (C2-cer or C6-cer) reproduced the early (4 h) inhibitory action of TNFalpha on testosterone biosynthesis and testicular StAR expression. The inhibitory action of C2-cer or C6-cer was not observed in animals treated with inactive analogs (dihydroceramide), phosphorylcholine, sphingosine, or sphingosine-1P. In sharp contrast to the previously described ability of IL1 beta to prevent human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, serum testosterone and testicular StAR protein expression remained unchanged in animals bilaterally injected with this cytokine. These data support the concept that TNF alpha triggers different effector mechanisms to directly inhibit Leydig cell StAR expression and steroidogenesis, which ultimately contribute to the global reproductive failure associated with chronic inflammation and sepsis.

  7. Testosterone Administration Decreases Generosity in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Paul J.; Kurzban, Robert; Ahmadi, Sheila; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Park, Jang; Efremidze, Levan; Redwine, Karen; Morgan, Karla; Matzner, William

    2009-01-01

    How do human beings decide when to be selfish or selfless? In this study, we gave testosterone to 25 men to establish its impact on prosocial behaviors in a double-blind within-subjects design. We also confirmed participants' testosterone levels before and after treatment through blood draws. Using the Ultimatum Game from behavioral economics, we find that men with artificially raised T, compared to themselves on placebo, were 27% less generous towards strangers with money they controlled (95% CI placebo: (1.70, 2.72); 95% CI T: (.98, 2.30)). This effect scales with a man's level of total-, free-, and dihydro-testosterone (DHT). Men in the lowest decile of DHT were 560% more generous than men in the highest decile of DHT. We also found that men with elevated testosterone were more likely to use their own money punish those who were ungenerous toward them. Our results continue to hold after controlling for altruism. We conclude that elevated testosterone causes men to behave antisocially. PMID:20016825

  8. Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion.

  9. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  10. Effect of testosterone therapy on the female voice

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, R.; York, A.; Dimitrakakis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This prospective study was designed to investigate the effect of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implants, on the female voice. Methods Ten women who had opted for testosterone therapy were recruited for voice analysis. Voices were recorded prior to treatment and at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months while on testosterone therapy. Acoustic samples were collected with subjects reading a sentence, reading a paragraph, and participating in a conversation. Significant changes in the voice over time were investigated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with the fundamental frequency (F 0) as a response variable. Demographic variables associated with characteristics of the voice were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in average F 0 related to smoking history, menopausal status, weight, or body mass index. There was no difference in average fundamental speaking frequency (sentence, paragraph, conversation) between the pre-treatment group and any post-treatment group at 3 and 12 months. There was an increase in sentence speech F 0 at 6 months. Two of three patients with lower than expected F 0 at baseline improved on testosterone therapy. Conclusion Therapeutic levels of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implant, had no adverse affect on the female voice including lowering or deepening of the voice. PMID:26857354

  11. Effects of Testosterone Administration on Strategic Gambling in Poker Play.

    PubMed

    van Honk, Jack; Will, Geert-Jan; Terburg, David; Raub, Werner; Eisenegger, Christoph; Buskens, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been associated with economically egoistic and materialistic behaviors, but -defensibly driven by reputable status seeking- also with economically fair, generous and cooperative behaviors. Problematically, social status and economic resources are inextricably intertwined in humans, thus testosterone's primal motives are concealed. We critically addressed this issue by performing a placebo-controlled single-dose testosterone administration in young women, who played a game of bluff poker wherein concerns for status and resources collide. The profit-maximizing strategy in this game is to mislead the other players by bluffing randomly (independent of strength of the hand), thus also when holding very poor cards (cold bluffing). The profit-maximizing strategy also dictates the players in this poker game to never call the other players' bluffs. For reputable-status seeking these materialistic strategies are disadvantageous; firstly, being caught cold bluffing damages one's reputation by revealing deceptive intent, and secondly, not calling the other players' bluffs signals submission in blindly tolerating deception. Here we show that testosterone administration in this game of bluff poker significantly reduces random bluffing, as well as cold bluffing, while significantly increasing calling. Our data suggest that testosterone in humans primarily motivates for reputable-status seeking, even when this elicits behaviors that are economically disadvantageous.

  12. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  13. Testosterone regulates metabolism of plasma chylomicrons in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Staprans, I.; Rapp, J.H.; Pan, X.M.; Ong, D.L.; Feingold, K.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Previously we demonstrated a marked sex difference in the metabolism of chylomicrons in adult rats. In males, radiolabeled chylomicrons displayed a longer dwell time on endothelial surfaces, which resulted in a decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. The increased rate of chylomicron metabolism in females was associated with increased postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of physiological doses of sex steroid hormones on the metabolism of chylomicrons and postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. No sex differences were found in prepubertal animals. We also found no difference in chylomicron metabolism in control female, castrated female, estrogen-treated female, castrated male, and estrogen-treated male rats. However, control male, testosterone-treated male, and testosterone-treated female rats showed increased endothelial binding of chylomicrons and decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity also was decreased by testosterone administration. In parallel with the alterations in chylomicron metabolism, serum high density lipoprotein levels in male rats decreased with testosterone administration. These results indicate that the differences in chylomicron metabolism, postheparin lipoprotein lipase activities, and serum high density lipoprotein levels observed between male and female rats are due to testosterone.

  14. Secondary structure of chorion proteins of the teleostean fish Dentex dentex by ATR FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, D G; Gionis, V; Pavlidis, M A; Paipetis, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2000-11-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy and ATR-IR spectroscopy were applied to study the secondary structure of the eggshell (chorion) proteins of the teleostean fish Dentex dentex. Raman and IR spectra clearly indicate an abundance of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet conformation in chorion proteins. This finding is further supported by analysis of the vibrational data by regression techniques and deconvolution procedures. Thus, the common morphological characteristics of D. dentex, Salmo gairdneri, and other teleostean fish chorions may be explained on the basis of common secondary structure features of their constituent proteins. A detailed understanding of the interactions that dictate the self-assembly of fish chorion proteins to form the fish eggshell awaits determination of amino acid sequences. PMID:11162733

  15. Secondary structure of chorion proteins of the Lepidoptera Pericallia ricini and Ariadne merione by ATR FT-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, G D; Gionis, V; Kumar, K; Hamodrakas, S J

    2011-10-01

    The gross morphological features of the eggs and eggshells (chorions) of two Lepidoptera species, Pericallia ricini and Ariadne merione were revealed for the first time by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These two insect pests are extremely serious threats for many crops, mainly in India, but also in several other regions of the world. Micro-Raman and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy were also applied to study in detail the secondary structure of the eggshell (chorion) proteins of these Lepidoptera species. Both techniques indicate that the two species have nearly identical conformations of their chorion proteins with abundant antiparallel β-pleated sheet. These results are in support of our previous findings that the helicoidal architecture of the proteinaceous chorion of Lepidoptera and fishes is dictated by a common molecular denominator, the antiparallel β-pleated sheet secondary structure. PMID:21620884

  16. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion proteins.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, G D; Gionis, V; Vriend, G; Hoenger, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-06-22

    Chorion is the major component of silkmoth eggshell. More than 95% of its dry mass consists of the A and B families of low molecular weight structural proteins, which have remarkable mechanical and chemical properties, and protect the oocyte and the developing embryo from the environment. We present data from negative staining, Congo red binding, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-Raman, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and modelling studies of a synthetic peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B family of silkmoth chorion proteins, indicating that this peptide folds and self-assembles, forming amyloid-like fibrils. These results support further our proposal, based on experimental data from a synthetic peptide analogue of the central domain of the A family of chorion proteins, that silkmoth chorion is a natural, protective amyloid [Iconomidou et al., FEBS Lett. 479 (2000) 141-145]. PMID:11423129

  17. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  18. Effects of dopamine blockade on gonadotropins and testosterone in men.

    PubMed

    Siris, S G; Siris, E S; van Kammen, D P; Docherty, J P; Alexander, P E; Bunney, W E

    1980-02-01

    The authors found that plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, and testosterone were initially normal in nine acutely psychotic males with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder; follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was normal in eight of the nine. When patients were treated with pimozide, a relatively specific dopamine receptor blocker, there were statistically significant declines in FSH and LH, although levels remained within normal limits. Prolactin rose significantly, but testosterone did not change. The observed reductions in FSH and LH concentrations are consistent with the hypotheses that dopamine and/or prolactin play a role in gonadotropin secretion. The maintenance of normal levels of gonadotropins and testosterone, however, suggests that these patients possessed relatively normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function before and during a course of neuroleptic treatment.

  19. Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men

    PubMed Central

    Amore, Mario; Innamorati, Marco; Costi, Sara; Sher, Leo; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testosterone failed to show sound evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Nevertheless, testosterone supplementation has proved to be effective on some domains significant for the quality of life of aged patients with PADAM (sexual function and cognitive functions, muscular strengths). PMID:22719760

  20. Sleep deprivation lowers reactive aggression and testosterone in men.

    PubMed

    Cote, Kimberly A; McCormick, Cheryl M; Geniole, Shawn N; Renn, Ryan P; MacAulay, Stacey D

    2013-02-01

    The role of sleep deprivation in aggressive behavior has not been systematically investigated, despite a great deal of evidence to suggest a relationship. We investigated the impact of 33 h of sleep loss on endocrine function and reactive aggression using the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP) task. PSAP performance was assessed in 24 young men and 25 women who were randomly assigned to a sleep deprivation or control condition. Sleep deprivation lowered reactive aggression and testosterone (but not cortisol) in men, and disrupted the positive relationship between a pre-post PSAP increase in testosterone and aggression that was evident in rested control men. While women increased aggression following provocation as expected, no influence of sleep deprivation was found. This is the first experimental study to demonstrate that sleep deprivation lowers reactive aggression in men. Testosterone, but not cortisol, played a role in the relationship between sleep and reactive aggression in men.

  1. Translational studies in older men using testosterone to treat sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Urban, Randall J; Dillon, E L; Choudhary, S; Zhao, Y; Horstman, A M; Tilton, R G; Sheffield-Moore, M

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with aging. Our research group has found an efficacious administration paradigm using testosterone to combat sarcopenia in humans. In addition, our research has uncovered an important regulatory enzyme of inflammation, nuclear factor-κB-inducing kinase that may regulate human skeletal muscle catabolism, and that appears to be counter-regulated by administration of standard doses of testosterone. This is important because a number of age-related clinical circumstances trigger acute and chronic muscle loss including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hospitalization, acute and chronic illness, and diseases in which systemic inflammation occurs. Moreover, it is often the treatment itself that can induce muscle loss. For example, glucocorticoids are tremendously effective at reducing inflammation and are a frontline therapy for many inflammatory-based diseases, yet paradoxically trigger muscle loss. We will discuss our research findings and the clinical significance of our human clinical translational research with testosterone.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi induces tissue disorganization and destruction of chorionic villi in an ex vivo infection model of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Duaso, J; Rojo, G; Cabrera, G; Galanti, N; Bosco, C; Maya, J D; Morello, A; Kemmerling, U

    2010-08-01

    Congenital Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America and also present with lower frequency in other countries, is associated with premature labor, miscarriage, and placentitis. The mechanism of tissue invasion and infection of human placenta by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) remains unclear. In order to explore some morphological aspects of this infection in the placenta, we incubated chorionic villous explants from normal human placentae ex vivo with the parasite and studied the resulting effects by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods. Infection of the chorionic villi with the parasite was confirmed by immunofluoresence and PCR. T. cruzi induces syncytiotrophoblast destruction and detachment, selective disorganization of basal lamina and disorganization of collagen I in the connective tissue of villous stroma. These effects are a function of the number of parasites used for the infection. Our results suggest a participation of the proteolytic activity of the parasite on the placental basal lamina and connective tissue in the mechanism of infection of the fetus by T. cruzi.

  3. Testosterone Stimulates Duox1 Activity through GPRC6A in Skin Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunbi; Choi, Hyun; Kim, Borim; Kim, Minsun; Park, Kkot-Nara; Bae, Il-Hong; Sung, Young Kwan; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook; Bae, Yun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone is an endocrine hormone with functions in reproductive organs, anabolic events, and skin homeostasis. We report here that GPRC6A serves as a sensor and mediator of the rapid action of testosterone in epidermal keratinocytes. The silencing of GPRC6A inhibited testosterone-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) mobilization and H2O2 generation. These results indicated that a testosterone-GPRC6A complex is required for activation of Gq protein, IP3 generation, and [Ca2+]i mobilization, leading to Duox1 activation. H2O2 generation by testosterone stimulated the apoptosis of keratinocytes through the activation of caspase-3. The application of testosterone into three-dimensional skin equivalents increased the apoptosis of keratinocytes between the granular and stratified corneum layers. These results support an understanding of the molecular mechanism of testosterone-dependent apoptosis in which testosterone stimulates H2O2 generation through the activation of Duox1. PMID:25164816

  4. Phthalate-Induced Pathology in the Foetal Testis Involves More Than Decreased Testosterone Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Foetal exposure to phthalates is known to adversely impact male reproductive development and function. Developmental anomalies of reproductive tract have been attributed to impaired testosterone synthesis. However, species differences in the ability to produce testosterone have...

  5. Effects of testosterone administration on fat distribution, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis progression.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender

    2003-01-01

    In spite of the widespread belief that testosterone supplementation increases the risk of atherosclerotic heart disease, evidence to support this premise is lacking. Although supraphysiological doses of testosterone, such as those used by athletes and recreational body builders, decrease plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations, replacement doses of testosterone have had only a modest or no effect on plasma HDL in placebo-controlled trials. In epidemiological studies, serum total and free testosterone concentrations have been inversely correlated with intra-abdominal fat mass, risk of coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Testosterone administration to middle-aged men is associated with decreased visceral fat and glucose concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity. Testosterone infusion increases coronary blood flow. Similarly, testosterone replacement retards atherogenesis in experimental models of atherosclerosis. However, the long-term risks and benefits of testosterone administration in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men with fat redistribution syndrome have not been studied in randomized clinical trials.

  6. The multiple actions of testosterone in men: nature knows best.

    PubMed

    Funder, John W

    2014-01-01

    In male hormone replacement therapy Finkelstein et al. show that testosterone rather than synthetic "pure" androgens should be prescribed. Testosterone is converted to the superactive androgen dihydrotestosterone and to estradiol, and thus has actions via androgen receptors and both estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ). Although muscle strength is androgen dependent, estradiol has major physiologic effects in men-on bone, cartilage, and together with androgens, on sexual functioning. Neither dihydrotestosterone nor 'pure' synthetic androgens can be converted to estradiol; those so treated thus risk missing out on the beneficial (and necessary) effects of estrogens in men. PMID:24385014

  7. Rising serum values of beta-subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) in patients with progressive vulvar carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    de Bruijn, H. W.; ten Hoor, K. A.; Krans, M.; van der Zee, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) were measured in 50% of patients with locoregional recurrences or progressive vulvar carcinoma (n = 14). At diagnosis of vulvar cancer, however, the incidence of elevated serum levels was low (5%) in 104 patients. The rising serum levels during progression of disease indicate that the synthesis of the beta-subunit hCG can be increased in vulvar carcinoma. PMID:9099973

  8. “Trophoblast islands of the chorionic connective tissue” (TICCT): A novel placental histologic feature

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J.-S.; Romero, R.; Kusanovic, J.P.; Kim, J.-S.; Lee, J.; Jin, M.; El Azzamy, H.; Lee, D.-C.; Topping, V.; Ahn, S.; Jacques, S.; Qureshi, F.; Chaiworapongsa, T.; Hassan, S.S.; Korzeniewski, S. J.; Than, N.G.; Kim, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We found isolated or clustered trophoblasts in the chorionic connective tissue of the extraplacental membranes, and defined this novel histologic feature as the “trophoblast islands of the chorionic connective tissue” (TICCT). This study was conducted to determine the clinical significance of TICCT. Methods Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin-7 was performed on the chorioamniotic membranes (N=2155) obtained from singleton pregnancies of 1199 uncomplicated term and 956 preterm deliveries. The study groups comprised 1236 African-American and 919 Hispanic women. Gestational age ranged from 24+0 weeks to 41+6 weeks. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the magnitude of association between patient characteristics and the presence of TICCT. Results The likelihood of TICCT was significantly associated with advancing gestational age both in term (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.16–1.45, p<0.001) and preterm deliveries (OR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.07–1.32, p=0.001). Hispanic women were less likely than African-American women to have TICCT across gestation in term (OR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.18–0.31, p<0.001) and preterm pregnancies (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29–0.58, p<0.001). Women with a female fetus were significantly more likely to have TICCT than women with a male fetus, in both term (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.28–2.11, p<0.001) and preterm gestations (OR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.46–2.85, p<0.001). TICCT was 40% less frequent in the presence of chronic placental inflammation [term (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.45–0.81, p=0.001) and preterm gestations (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.40–0.84, p=0.003)] and in parous women at term (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.44–0.81, p=0.001). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the duration of pregnancy, fetal sex, and parity may influence the behavior of extravillous trophoblast and placental mesenchymal cells. PMID:23453248

  9. Stimulation of calcitonin secretory capacity by increased serum levels of testosterone in men treated with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Schopman, W; Slager, E; Hackeng, W H; Mulder, H

    1987-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sex steroids, including both oestrogen and testosterone, influence calcitonin secretion. However, a negative effect of gonadotrophins on calcitonin has not been excluded. Twelve men with infertility and low-normal serum levels of testosterone were studied before and during tamoxifen therapy. Increases in the serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone and calcitonin were observed after treatment. Our findings suggest that testosterone has a direct influence on calcitonin secretion. PMID:3123401

  10. Targeted Downregulation of s36 Protein Unearths its Cardinal Role in Chorion Biogenesis and Architecture during Drosophila melanogaster Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Velentzas, Athanassios D.; Velentzas, Panagiotis D.; Sagioglou, Niki E.; Konstantakou, Eumorphia G.; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K.; Tsioka, Maria M.; Mpakou, Vassiliki E.; Kollia, Zoe; Consoulas, Christos; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Papassideri, Issidora S.; Tsangaris, George Th.; Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila chorion represents a model biological system for the in vivo study of gene activity, epithelial development, extracellular-matrix assembly and morphogenetic-patterning control. It is produced during the late stages of oogenesis by epithelial follicle cells and develops into a highly organized multi-layered structure that exhibits regional specialization and radial complexity. Among the six major proteins involved in chorion’s formation, the s36 and s38 ones are synthesized first and regulated in a cell type-specific and developmental stage-dependent manner. In our study, an RNAi-mediated silencing of s36 chorionic-gene expression specifically in the follicle-cell compartment of Drosophila ovary unearths the essential, and far from redundant, role of s36 protein in patterning establishment of chorion’s regional specialization and radial complexity. Without perturbing the developmental courses of follicle- and nurse-cell clusters, the absence of s36 not only promotes chorion’s fragility but also induces severe structural irregularities on chorion’s surface and entirely impairs fly’s fertility. Moreover, we herein unveil a novel function of s36 chorionic protein in the regulation of number and morphogenetic integrity of dorsal appendages in follicles sporadically undergoing aged fly-dependent stress. PMID:27752139

  11. The forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3: a critical role in male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Jasurda, Jake S; Jung, Deborah O; Froeter, Erin D; Schwartz, David B; Hopkins, Torin D; Farris, Corrie L; McGee, Stacey; Narayan, Prema; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2014-01-01

    Fertility is dependent on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Each component of this axis is essential for normal reproductive function. Mice with a mutation in the forkhead transcription factor gene, Foxp3, exhibit autoimmunity and infertility. We have previously shown that Foxp3 mutant mice have significantly reduced expression of pituitary gonadotropins. To address the role of Foxp3 in gonadal function, we examined the gonadal phenotype of these mice. Foxp3 mutant mice have significantly reduced seminal vesicle and testis weights compared with Foxp3(+/Y) littermates. Spermatogenesis in Foxp3 mutant males is arrested prior to spermatid elongation. Activation of luteinizing hormone signaling in Foxp3 mutant mice by treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin significantly increases seminal vesicle and testis weights as well as testicular testosterone content and seminiferous tubule diameter. Interestingly, human chorionic gonadotropin treatments rescue spermatogenesis in Foxp3 mutant males, suggesting that their gonadal phenotype is due primarily to a loss of pituitary gonadotropin stimulation rather than an intrinsic gonadal defect.

  12. Has testosterone passed the test in premenopausal women with low libido? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Beverly G; Bou Nemer, Laurice; Carr, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited evaluation and treatment options for low libido in premenopausal women. This review sought to evaluate the available evidence supporting the evaluation of testosterone serum levels and testosterone treatment of premenopausal women with low libido. Methods MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for articles that referenced the evaluation of testosterone serum level and/or testosterone treatment on premenopausal women with low libido from 1995 to 2015. Additional references were obtained from the reference sections of other papers and from peer review. Studies that included only postmenopausal women were excluded. A total of 13 studies were reviewed in detail. Nine studies examined the relationship between testosterone serum levels and sexuality, an additional three studies examined the effect of testosterone treatment on premenopausal women with low libido, and one study examined both the topics. Results Six of the ten testosterone serum evaluation studies failed to show a significant association between testosterone serum level and libido. Only one out of four studies examining testosterone treatment in premenopausal women was able to show any clear improvement in libido; however, the effect was limited to only the intermediate dose of testosterone, with the low and high doses of testosterone not producing any effect. Conclusion The currently available evidence does not support testosterone serum evaluation or treatment in premenopausal women with low libido. Hence, further studies are warranted. PMID:27785108

  13. Marriage and motherhood are associated with lower testosterone concentrations in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Emily S.; Tran, Van; Thurston, Sally; Jasienska, Grazyna; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Ellison, Peter T.; Thune, Inger

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone has been hypothesized to modulate the trade-off between mating and parenting effort in males. Indeed, evidence from humans and other pair-bonded species suggests that fathers and men in committed relationships have lower testosterone levels than single men and men with no children. To date, only one published study has examined testosterone in relation to motherhood, finding that mothers of young children have lower testosterone than non-mothers. Here, we examine this question in 195 reproductive-age Norwegian women. Testosterone was measured in morning serum samples taken during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, and marital and maternal status were assessed by questionnaire. Mothers of young children (age ≤3) had 14% lower testosterone than childless women and 19% lower testosterone than women who only had children over age 3. Among mothers, age of the youngest child strongly predicted testosterone levels. There was a trend towards lower testosterone among married women compared to unmarried women. All analyses controlled for body mass index (BMI), age, type of testosterone assay, and time of serum sample collection. This is the first study to look at testosterone concentrations in relation to marriage and motherhood in Western women, and it suggests that testosterone may differ with marital and maternal status in women, providing further corroboration of previous findings in both sexes. PMID:23123222

  14. Human chorionic somatomammotropin in normal adolescent primiparous pregnancy. I. Effect of smoking.

    PubMed

    Moser, R J; Hollingsworth, D R; Carlson, J W; Lamotte, L

    1974-12-15

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (HCS) levels were studied in normal smoking and nonsmoking primiparous adolescent pregnancies. 136 teenagers, aged 12-18 years, were divided into groups: nonsmokers, deep, and shallow inhalers, long, and short puffers, high, and low tar, and high, and low nicotin. Shallow inhaling and low nicotine exposure patients were found to have a later age of menarche than did nonsmokers (13.2 vs. 12.3 years, p=.03). The mean body weight of the mothers who smoked was slightly less (61 gm) than that of nonsmoking mothers. Except for long puffers, overall, smokers had significantly lower HCS values throughout pregnancy than noosmokers (p = .48 high tar-p = .002 low tar). However, in the third trimester those with the lowest smoking exposures had the lowest HCS values and the heavier smokers had slightly higher mean values than nonsmokers. These data suggest that HCS production may be more sensitive to low tar and nicotine exposure with possible tolerance or even stimulation occurring in larger doses. PMID:4432896

  15. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: reducing the human chorionic gonadotropin trigger dose.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonya; Parker, Kasey; Cedars, Marcelle I; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2010-11-01

    This article reviews the biological plausibility and evidence for the use of a low triggering dose of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). A systematic search of the literature revealed very little published data for or against the use of low-dose hCG in the prevention of OHSS after assisted reproductive technology. We have had success at avoiding OHSS as a result of gentle stimulation and low-dose sliding scale hCG trigger based on estradiol (E₂) levels. We therefore present the biological plausibility for such an approach by reviewing the relationship between OHSS, vascular endothelial growth factor, and hCG; the physiology of hCG; the relationship between risk of OHSS and E₂ at trigger; and the physiology of alternative methods of triggering such as recombinant luteinizing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. We also present the results of a quasi-experimental before and after study of the sliding scale protocol for hCG trigger dose in in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

  16. Chorionic enhancer is dispensable for regulated expression of the human renin gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiyou; Sigmund, Curt D

    2008-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a transcriptional chorionic enhancer (CE), previously identified to increase human renin expression in choriodecidual cells is required to mediate tissue-specific, cell-specific, and regulated expression of human renin in transgenic mice. Recombineering was used to delete the CE upstream of the renin gene alone or in combination with the kidney enhancer (KE) in a large artificial chromosome construct containing the entire human renin gene and extensive flanking sequences. Deletion of the CE had no qualitative or quantitative effect on the tissue-specific expression of human renin, nor on the cellular localization of human renin in the kidney or placenta. Combined deletion of both the CE and KE caused a decrease in the level of renal renin expression consistent with the established role of the KE. We also considered the possibility that the CE is a downstream enhancer of the KiSS1 gene, which lies directly upstream of renin and is also expressed in the placenta. Deletion of the CE alone, or the CE and KE together, had no effect on the level of KiSS1 expression in the placenta. These data provide convincing evidence that the CE is silent in vivo, at least in the mouse. The absence of a phenotype caused by deletion of the CE is consistent with the observation that the sequence is not evolutionarily conserved.

  17. Human chorionic gonadotrophin and weight loss. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bosch, B; Venter, I; Stewart, R I; Bertram, S R

    1990-02-17

    Low-dose human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) combined with a severe diet remains a popular treatment for obesity, despite equivocal evidence of its effectiveness. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of HCG on weight loss were compared with placebo injections. Forty obese women (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m2) were placed on the same diet supplying 5,000 kJ per day and received daily intramuscular injections of saline or HCG, 6 days a week for 6 weeks. A psychological profile, hunger level, body circumferences, a fasting blood sample and food records were obtained at the start and end of the study, while body weight was measured weekly. Subjects receiving HCG injections showed no advantages over those on placebo in respect of any of the variables recorded. Furthermore, weight loss on our diet was similar to that on severely restricted intake. We conclude that there is no rationale for the use of HCG injections in the treatment of obesity. PMID:2405506

  18. Ineffectiveness of human chorionic gonadotropin in weight reduction: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Stein, M R; Julis, R E; Peck, C C; Hinshaw, W; Sawicki, J E; Deller, J J

    1976-09-01

    Our investigation was designed to retest the hypothesis of the efficacy of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) on weight reduction in obese women in a clinic setting. We sought to duplicate the Asher-Harper study (1973) which had found that the combination of 500 cal diet and HCG had a statistically significant benefit over the diet and placebo combination as evidenced by greater weight loss and decrease in hunger. Fifty-one women between the ages of 18 and 60 participated in our 32-day prospective, randomized, double-blind comparison of HCG versus placebo. Each patient was given the same diet (the one prescribed in the Asher-Harper study), was weighed daily Monday through Saturday and was counselled by one of the investigators who administered the injections. Laboratory studies were performed at the time of initial physical examinations and at the end of the study. Twenty of 25 in the HCG and 21 of 26 patients in the placebo groups completed 28 injections. There was no statistically significant difference in the means of the two groups in number of injections received, weight loss, percent of weight loss, hip and waist circumference, weight loss per injections, or in hunger ratings. HCG does not appear to enhance the effectiveness of a rigidly imposed regimen for weight reduction. PMID:786001

  19. Silkmoth chorion proteins: sequence analysis of the products of a multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Regier, J C; Kafatos, F C; Goodfliesh, R; Hood, L

    1978-01-01

    Five polypeptide components have been isolated from the eggshell (chorions) of a silkmoth. Two are homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate and isoelectric focusing gels, and three contain predominantly two proteins each. Amino acid analyses show that all five components are similar to each other. These proteins have been sequenced from the amino terminus. Homogeneous components yielded single sequences; heterogeneous components yielded two residues at some positions, consistent with their containing two major electrophoretic components. Striking similarities are apparent among all these sequences. These similarities can be increased dramatically by separating each of the three protein mixtures into two sequences and introducing a small number of gaps or insertions. This is due in part to bringing into register a portion that contains short repeating subunits found in all sequences. All proteins are also characterized by a region of high cysteine content near the amino terminus followed by a longer low-cysteine region. The data suggest that these proteins share a common evolutionary origin and are encoded by a multigene family. Images PMID:272655

  20. Measurement of human chorionic gonadotropin by carboxyl terminal peptide assay in patients with cervical neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Chen, R J; Huang, S C; Chen, C K; Chang, D Y; Yen, M L; Chow, S N; Hsieh, C Y

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is produced by preinvasive cancer and the early stages of invasive cancer. One hundred and fifty-two patients with either various grades of preinvasive cervical carcinoma or microinvasive carcinoma, and 46 normal women used as controls, were enrolled in this study. A carboxyl terminal peptide beta-hCG (CTP-beta-hCG) assay with a sensitivity of 0.2 mIU/mL was used to measure serum levels. The results showed that the serum beta-hCG levels among normal control, preinvasive carcinoma and microinvasive carcinoma patients were not statistically different. Among the factors tested, including the interval since the last menstrual period, age, menopausal status, contraception method and diagnosis, serum hCG levels only correlated with the first factor. Preinvasive cervical carcinoma and microinvasive carcinoma did not result in significantly increased hCG secretion. At present, the CTP-beta-hCG assay is of limited value in the diagnosis of these diseases. PMID:7633194

  1. Uterine choriocarcinoma accompanied by an extremely high human chorionic gonadotropin level and thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Ying; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Huang, Soon-Cen

    2008-04-01

    The conventional treatments given to a 24-year-old woman with metastatic uterine choriocarcinoma and clinical and biochemical thyrotoxicosis did not appear to have any effect, probably due to an extremely high serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level which was up to 11,910,000 mIU/mL, and were initially underscored in light of the 'high-dose hook effect'. To our knowledge, no extremely high hCG level in a uterine choriocarcinoma patient has been reported in the literature. Her decapacitating symptoms subsided after the first course of chemotherapy by etoposide, methotrexate, and actinomycin D-cyclophosphamide and vincristine (EMA-CO) regimen. The serum hCG level, which reflects the quantification of host tumor burden, returned to the reference range after the fifth course of chemotherapy and the thyroid function reached euthyroid status before the third course of chemotherapy; two final courses were administered after the hCG level became undetectable. Two years after remission of disease, the patient experienced a normal pregnancy, and a term baby girl was delivered vaginally. No recurrence of uterine choriocarcinoma has been noted for 7 years. PMID:18412797

  2. Antibody-free detection of human chorionic gonadotropin by use of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2013-11-19

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important biomarker for the diagnosis of pregnancy and cancers. In this study, we report an antibody-free and label-free mechanism for detecting hCG. To replace enzyme-labeled antibodies, we use a short oligopeptide as an hCG receptor to bind hCG. The short oligopeptide sequence, (N-)PPLRINRHILTR(-C), is identified after 5 rounds of screening by use of a phage library. After binding, liquid crystal (LC) is used to transduce the binding event into optical signals. The captured hCG can disrupt a thin layer (~6 μm) of LC covered on the surface. Depending on the initial concentration of hCG, LC gives distinct optical signals visible to the naked eye. The limit of detection (LOD) for this method is approximately 1 IU/mL (2 nM) in both phosphate-buffered saline and urine samples, and only 0.6 μL of hCG solution is required. This means that as little as 45.5 pg of hCG can be detected by this method. Compared to other detection methods for hCG, this detection method does not require the use of antibody and is label-free. It has the potential to become a portable diagnostic kit for hCG. PMID:24147645

  3. Human chorionic gonadotropin β subunit affects the expression of apoptosis-regulating factors in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Szczerba, Anna; Śliwa, Aleksandra; Kubiczak, Marta; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Expression of human chorionic gonadotropin, especially its free β subunit (hCGβ) were shown to play an important role in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. It is postulated that hCGβ is one of the factors determining cancer cell survival. To test this hypothesis, we applied two models: an in vitro model of ovarian cancer using OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cell lines transfected with the CGB5 gene and an in vivo model of ovarian cancer tissues. The material was tested against changes in expression level of genes encoding factors involved in apoptosis: BCL2, BAX and BIRC5. Overexpression of hCGβ was found to cause a decrease in expression of the analyzed genes in the transfected cells compared with the control cells. In ovarian cancer tissues, high expression of CGB was related to significantly lower BCL2 but higher BAX and BIRC5 transcript levels. Moreover, a low BCL2/BAX ratio, characteristic of advanced stages of ovarian cancer, was revealed. Since tumors were discriminated by a significantly lower LHCGR level than the level noted in healthy fallopian tubes and ovaries, it may be stated that the effect of hCGβ on changes in the expression of apoptosis-regulating agents observed in ovarian cancer is LHCGR-independent. The results of the study suggest that the biological effects evoked by hCGβ are related to apoptosis suppression.

  4. Chorionic gonadotropin: a narrative of its identification and origin and the role of Georgeanna Seegar Jones.

    PubMed

    Jones, Howard W

    2007-01-01

    The following article on the history of human chorionic gonadotropin is interesting on several levels. I hope that you will enjoy the first-hand description of the events surrounding the discovery of site of origin of this important pregnancy-related hormone as told by Dr. Howard Jones Jr., husband of the late Georgeanna Seegar Jones. They were both editors of the SURVEY for more than 25 years. In today's world of microarray and PCR technology it is fun to hear about the progress of science using tissue culture and mouse assays. But this story is also about the progress we have made on the human level. At a time when well over 50% of the residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology are women, it is astounding to think that in 1938 Mom's name would have been listed as "G. Emory Seegar" on this important paper because it was felt that the paper would not be accepted for publication if one of the authors was a woman!

  5. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture of the hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but also other biologically active contaminants, such as growth factors, binding proteins and prion proteins. The actual amount of molecular LH in hMG preparations varies considerably due to the purification process, thus hCG, mimicking LH action, is added to standardise the product. However, unlike LH, hCG plays a different role during the natural human menstrual cycle. It is secreted by the embryo and placenta, and its main role is to support implantation and pregnancy. More recently, recombinant gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional differences between LH and hCG and assesses the clinical implications of hCG-supplemented urinary therapy compared with recombinant therapies used for ART. PMID:25280580

  6. Blood flow measurement system for fetoscopic laser photocoagulation of chorionic plate anastomosing vessels (FLPC).

    PubMed

    Seki, Takeshi; Oka, Kiyoshi; Naganawa, Akihiro; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Kim, Keri; Chiba, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Fetoscopic laser photocoagulation of chorionic plate anastomosing vessels (FLPC) applies to the treatment of previable fetuses with severe twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). The ultimate goal of FLPC is selective blood flow interruption of anastomotic communicating vessels on the placenta fetoscopically. However, there has not been an established method to confirm that the blood flow is blocked, thus, it depends on the operator's experience or intuition to evaluate whether the FLPC was performed successfully or not. For this issue, we have developed a composite-type optical fiberscope (2.2 mm in diameter), which has centrally-located cautery laser fiber and surrounding located fiberglasses for viewing. This fiberscope enables transmission of 50 W Yb fiber laser which can be focused to 10 mm focal length using two lenses on the fiberscope tip. In this study, we combined the fiberscope and a laser blood-flow meter, and irradiated cautery laser to porcine mesenteric vein with measuring blood flow at the same time. From the experimental results, we could quantitatively measure the blood flow before and after laser irradiation, and confirm the blood flow blocking with our system. PMID:19929297

  7. Concomitant abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids and human chorionic gonadotrophin impairs spermatogenesis in power athletes.

    PubMed

    Karila, T; Hovatta, O; Seppälä, T

    2004-05-01

    Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) may be an aetiological factor in male infertility among recreational power athletes. They try to avoid AAS-induced deterioration in spermatogenesis by combining doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and/or antiestrogens with their AAS abuse. Eighteen healthy male power athletes using massive doses of AASs were recruited for the study. Semen samples were collected during AAS abuse and 1.5 and 6 months after cessation of the abuse. They were also asked about their reproductive activity six years after the study. At the end of the AAS cycle, the sperm count was 33 +/- 49 x 10 (6) /ml (mean +/- SD), and only one subject had azoospermia. At 1.5 months after cessation of the AAS cycles, the mean sperm concentration was 30 +/- 42 x 10 (6) /ml, and after six months 77 +/- 70 x 10 (6) /ml. There were significant differences between the sample drawn six months after cessation of AAS abuse and both samples drawn during and 1.5 months after the abuse (p

  8. Evaluation of nicked human chorionic gonadotropin content in clinical specimens by a specific immunometric assay.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, G; Birken, S; Kakuma, T; Schlatterer, J; O'Connor, J F

    1999-01-01

    We report the development and characterization of an IRMA for the direct measurement of nicked human chorionic gonadotropin (hCGn) in blood and urine. hCGn derived from a reference preparation of hCG used as an immunogen elicits monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with enhanced recognition of human luteinizing hormone epitopes. The most specific assay for pregnancy hCGn is an IRMA composed of one mAb to choriocarcinoma-derived hCGn (C5) and a second mAb developed from immunization with normal-pregnancy hCGn. This assay was used to evaluate hCGn profiles in normal, in vitro fertilization, Down syndrome, and ectopic pregnancies. In all pregnancies, hCGn was usually present in much lower concentrations than the non-nicked hCG isoform. Our results suggest that some form of physical separation from the overwhelming quantities of non-nicked hCG present in clinical specimens will be required before accurate immunochemical estimations of hCGn can be made. PMID:9895340

  9. Second-to-Fourth Digit Length, Testosterone and Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempel, P.; Gohlke, B.; Klempau, J.; Zinsberger, P.; Reuter, M.; Hennig, J.

    2005-01-01

    Based on stimulating findings suggesting that prenatal levels of steroids may influence cognitive functions, a study with N=40 healthy volunteers of both sexes was conducted. Prenatal levels of testosterone (T) were estimated by use of the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) which is supposed to be controlled by the same genes involved in…

  10. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...; not for use in dairy or beef replacement heifers. Safety and effectiveness have not been...

  11. Aromatized testosterone attenuates contextual generalization of fear in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph F; Vanderhoof, Tyler; Winiecki, Patrick; Latsko, Maeson S; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-08-01

    Generalization is a common symptom of many anxiety disorders, and females are 60% more likely to suffer from an anxiety disorder than males. We have previously demonstrated that female rats display significantly accelerated rates of contextual fear generalization compared to male rats; a process driven, in part, by activation of ERβ. The current study was designed to determine the impact of estrogens on contextual fear generalization in male rats. For experiment 1, adult male rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and implanted with a capsule containing testosterone proprionate, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone proprionate (DHT), or an empty capsule. Treatment with testosterone or estradiol maintained memory precision when rats were tested in a different (neutral) context 1day after training. However, male rats treated with DHT or empty capsules displayed significant levels of fear generalization, exhibiting high levels of fear in the neutral context. In Experiment 2, we used acute injections of gonadal hormones at a time known to elicit fear generalization in female rats (e.g. 24h before testing). Injection treatment followed the same pattern of results seen in Experiment 1. Finally, animals given daily injections of the aromatase inhibitor, Fadrozole, displayed significant fear generalization. These data suggest that testosterone attenuates fear generalization likely through the aromatization testosterone into estradiol as animals treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, DHT, or animals treated with Fadrozole, displayed significant generalized fear. Overall, these results demonstrate a sex-dependent effect of estradiol on the generalization of contextual fear. PMID:27368147

  12. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  13. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  14. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  15. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin‐releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle‐stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real‐time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone‐induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a‐hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down‐regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1385–1391, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26626779

  16. Foetal Testosterone, Social Relationships, and Restricted Interests in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sex-differences exist in some areas of human social behaviour. In animals, foetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organising the brain and in later social behaviour. fT has also been implicated in language development, eye-contact, and spatial ability in humans. Methods: Fifty-eight children (35 male and 23 female), whose fT…

  17. Effects of Testosterone Administration on Strategic Gambling in Poker Play

    PubMed Central

    van Honk, Jack; Will, Geert-Jan; Terburg, David; Raub, Werner; Eisenegger, Christoph; Buskens, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been associated with economically egoistic and materialistic behaviors, but -defensibly driven by reputable status seeking- also with economically fair, generous and cooperative behaviors. Problematically, social status and economic resources are inextricably intertwined in humans, thus testosterone’s primal motives are concealed. We critically addressed this issue by performing a placebo-controlled single-dose testosterone administration in young women, who played a game of bluff poker wherein concerns for status and resources collide. The profit-maximizing strategy in this game is to mislead the other players by bluffing randomly (independent of strength of the hand), thus also when holding very poor cards (cold bluffing). The profit-maximizing strategy also dictates the players in this poker game to never call the other players’ bluffs. For reputable-status seeking these materialistic strategies are disadvantageous; firstly, being caught cold bluffing damages one’s reputation by revealing deceptive intent, and secondly, not calling the other players’ bluffs signals submission in blindly tolerating deception. Here we show that testosterone administration in this game of bluff poker significantly reduces random bluffing, as well as cold bluffing, while significantly increasing calling. Our data suggest that testosterone in humans primarily motivates for reputable-status seeking, even when this elicits behaviors that are economically disadvantageous. PMID:26727636

  18. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. PMID:26626779

  19. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects.

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve, but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level <200 ng/dl, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  1. The micropenis syndrome: clinical observations and expectations for growth.

    PubMed

    Kogan, S J; Williams, D I

    1977-08-01

    We reviewed 34 genotypic male subjects with a true micropenis to determine the clinical situations in which micropenis is encountered and the types of therapy resulting in growth. The relationship of clinically functioning testicular tissue to growth is noted. Diagnostic modalities, including human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation, are discussed, as well as a plan for individual assessment and therapy.

  2. Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on testicular blood flow measured by color doppler ultrasonography in male Shiba goats.

    PubMed

    Samir, Haney; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Ahmed, Eman; Karen, Aly; Nagaoka, Kentaro; El Sayed, Mohamed; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-05-01

    Although color Doppler ultrasonography has been used to evaluate testicular blood flow in many species, very little has been done in goat. Eight male Shiba goats were exposed to a single intramuscular injection of either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH group; 1 µg/kg BW) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG group; 25 IU/kg BW). Plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and inhibin (INH) were measured just before (0 hr) and at different intervals post injection by radioimmunoassay. Testis volume (TV) and Doppler indices, such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of the supratesticular artery, were measured by B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. The results indicated an increase in testicular blood flow in both groups, as RI and PI decreased significantly (P<0.05), but this increase was significant higher and earlier in hCG group (1 hr) than in the GnRH group (2 hr). A high correlation was found for RI and PI with both T (RI, r= -0.862; PI, r= -0.707) and INH in the GnRH group (RI, r=0.661; PI, r=0.701). However, a significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between E2 and both RI (r= -0.610) and PI (r= -0.763) in hCG group. In addition, TV significantly increased and was highly correlated with RI in both groups (GnRH, r= -0.718; hCG, r= -0.779). In conclusion, hCG and GnRH may improve testicular blood flow and TV in Shiba goats.

  3. Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on testicular blood flow measured by color doppler ultrasonography in male Shiba goats

    PubMed Central

    SAMIR, Haney; SASAKI, Kazuaki; AHMED, Eman; KAREN, Aly; NAGAOKA, Kentaro; EL SAYED, Mohamed; TAYA, Kazuyoshi; WATANABE, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Although color Doppler ultrasonography has been used to evaluate testicular blood flow in many species, very little has been done in goat. Eight male Shiba goats were exposed to a single intramuscular injection of either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH group; 1 µg/kg BW) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG group; 25 IU/kg BW). Plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and inhibin (INH) were measured just before (0 hr) and at different intervals post injection by radioimmunoassay. Testis volume (TV) and Doppler indices, such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of the supratesticular artery, were measured by B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. The results indicated an increase in testicular blood flow in both groups, as RI and PI decreased significantly (P<0.05), but this increase was significant higher and earlier in hCG group (1 hr) than in the GnRH group (2 hr). A high correlation was found for RI and PI with both T (RI, r= −0.862; PI, r= −0.707) and INH in the GnRH group (RI, r=0.661; PI, r=0.701). However, a significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between E2 and both RI (r= −0.610) and PI (r= −0.763) in hCG group. In addition, TV significantly increased and was highly correlated with RI in both groups (GnRH, r= −0.718; hCG, r= −0.779). In conclusion, hCG and GnRH may improve testicular blood flow and TV in Shiba goats. PMID:25715956

  4. Testosterone physiology in resistance exercise and training: the up-stream regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Vingren, Jakob L; Kraemer, William J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2010-12-01

    Testosterone is one of the most potent naturally secreted androgenic-anabolic hormones, and its biological effects include promotion of muscle growth. In muscle, testosterone stimulates protein synthesis (anabolic effect) and inhibits protein degradation (anti-catabolic effect); combined, these effects account for the promotion of muscle hypertrophy by testosterone. These physiological signals from testosterone are modulated through the interaction of testosterone with the intracellular androgen receptor (AR). Testosterone is important for the desired adaptations to resistance exercise and training; in fact, testosterone is considered the major promoter of muscle growth and subsequent increase in muscle strength in response to resistance training in men. The acute endocrine response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise generally includes increased secretion of various catabolic (breakdown-related) and anabolic (growth-related) hormones including testosterone. The response of testosterone and AR to resistance exercise is largely determined by upper regulatory elements including the acute exercise programme variable domains, sex and age. In general, testosterone concentration is elevated directly following heavy resistance exercise in men. Findings on the testosterone response in women are equivocal with both increases and no changes observed in response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise. Age also significantly affects circulating testosterone concentrations. Until puberty, children do not experience an acute increase in testosterone from a bout of resistance exercise; after puberty some acute increases in testosterone from resistance exercise can be found in boys but not in girls. Aging beyond 35-40 years is associated with a 1-3% decline per year in circulating testosterone concentration in men; this decline eventually results in the condition known as andropause. Similarly, aging results in a reduced acute testosterone response to resistance exercise in men

  5. Neural mechanisms of the testosterone-aggression relation: the role of orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pranjal H; Beer, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    Testosterone plays a role in aggressive behavior, but the mechanisms remain unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that testosterone influences aggression through the OFC, a region implicated in self-regulation and impulse control. In a decision-making paradigm in which people chose between aggression and monetary reward (the ultimatum game), testosterone was associated with increased aggression following social provocation (rejecting unfair offers). The effect of testosterone on aggression was explained by reduced activity in the medial OFC. The findings suggest that testosterone increases the propensity toward aggression because of reduced activation of the neural circuitry of impulse control and self-regulation. PMID:19925198

  6. Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, calculated free testosterone, and oestradiol in male vegans and omnivores.

    PubMed

    Key, T J; Roe, L; Thorogood, M; Moore, J W; Clark, G M; Wang, D Y

    1990-07-01

    Total testosterone (T), total oestradiol (E2) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations were measured in plasma samples from fifty-one male vegans and fifty-seven omnivores of similar age. Free T concentration was estimated by calculation. In comparison with the omnivores, the vegans had 7% higher total T (P = 0.250), 23% higher SHBG (P = 0.001), 3% lower free T (P = 0.580), and 11% higher E2 (P = 0.194). In a subset of eighteen vegans and twenty-two omnivores for whom 4 d diet records were available, there were statistically significant correlations between T and polyunsaturated fatty acids (r 0.37), SHBG and fat (r 0.43 for total fat, 0.46 for saturated fatty acids and 0.33 for polyunsaturated fatty acids), and SHBG and alcohol (r-0.39). It is concluded that a vegan diet causes a substantial increase in SHBG but has little effect on total or free T or on E2.

  7. [The importance of testosterone in the treatment of metabolic syndrome in men].

    PubMed

    Kempisty-Zdebik, Ewa; Zdebik, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome is being seen in increasing percentage of men with middle and old age. Besides the typical deterioration of sexual function there is predisposition to metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The similarity of the effects of testosterone substitution and the dietary treatment led the authors to a retrospective analysis of patient data treated for testosterone deficiency syndrome. Data on 341 patients aged over 45 years with metabolic syndrome and diabetes, meeting criteria for the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency syndrome were divided into 5 groups: T--testosterone substitution without additional diet, T-Low-Carb--testosterone and low carbohydrate diet, T-Fat-Low--testosterone and low fat diet, Carb-Low--only low carbohydrate diet, Fat-Low--only low fat diet. We analyzed change in body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HbAlc, HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels within 6 months from the start of observation. The best results of all investigated parameters were obtained in patients treated with testosterone and low-carbohydrate diet and in the group treated with testosterone and low-fat diet. Slightly worse results in the group received the same diets and the worst in the group treated only with testosterone. The improvement obtained in the total testosterone therapy and diet was much greater than the simple sum of the effects of both methods witch suggests the existence of synergies. PMID:22764516

  8. Salivary testosterone levels in men at a U.S. sex club.

    PubMed

    Escasa, Michelle J; Casey, Jacqueline F; Gray, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate males commonly experience elevations in testosterone levels in response to sexual stimuli, such as presentation of a novel mating partner. Some previous human studies have shown that watching erotic movies increases testosterone levels in males although studies measuring testosterone changes during actual sexual intercourse or masturbation have yielded mixed results. Small sample sizes, "unnatural" lab-based settings, and invasive techniques may help account for mixed human findings. Here, we investigated salivary testosterone levels in men watching (n = 26) versus participating (n = 18) in sexual activity at a large U.S. sex club. The present study entailed minimally invasive sample collection (measuring testosterone in saliva), a naturalistic setting, and a larger number of subjects than previous work to test three hypotheses related to men's testosterone responses to sexual stimuli. Subjects averaged 40 years of age and participated between 11:00 pm and 2:10 am. Consistent with expectations, results revealed that testosterone levels increased 36% among men during a visit to the sex club, with the magnitude of testosterone change significantly greater among participants (72%) compared with observers (11%). Contrary to expectation, men's testosterone changes were unrelated to their age. These findings were generally consistent with vertebrate studies indicating elevated male testosterone in response to sexual stimuli, but also point out the importance of study context since participation in sexual behavior had a stronger effect on testosterone increases in this study but unlike some previous human lab-based studies. PMID:21165688

  9. Testosterone, anastrozole, factor V Leiden heterozygosity and osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Ramesh S; Glueck, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Our specific aim is to describe the development of thrombotic osteonecrosis of the jaws after testosterone-anastrozole therapy in a 55-year-old white man subsequently found to have previously undiagnosed factor V Leiden heterozygosity. Before the diagnosis of V Leiden heterozygosity, he was given testosterone gel, 50 mg/day, and on testosterone, serum testosterone (963 ng/dl) and estradiol were high (50 pg/ml). Anastrozole was started, and testosterone was continued. Six months later, osteonecrosis of the jaws was diagnosed. Exogenous testosterone is aromatized to estradiol and estradiol-induced thrombophilia, when superimposed on underlying familial thrombophilia, as in this case, may lead to thrombosis and osteonecrosis. We recommend that before giving testosterone, at a minimum, screening for the factor V Leiden and G20210A mutations, and factor VIII and XI activity be carried out, to avoid unanticipated thrombosis.

  10. Forbidden fruit for athletes, but possible divine blessing for rehabilitation: testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is regarded as an attractive supplement for obtaining masculinity and sexuality; however, there have been pros and cons regarding its application as a treatment. In addition, there is also conventional repulsion on adoption of testosterone to any kind of exercise to anyone with concern with sports. However, we should keep in mind that in terms of rehabilitation, our main concern is not fairness but efficiency. And there are obvious advantages of testosterone in recovery and rejuvenation. We aim to introduce the possibility of testosterone in recovery and rejuvenation and are to bring up a topic the application of testosterone in exercise rehabilitation. Considering the light and darkness in testosterone, moderate use of testosterone under professional medication counseling might be an effective possibility to those with sickness and illness and should be considered as a possible option to assist the recovery from frailty and illness. PMID:25830137

  11. Ovarian reaction and estrus manifestation in delayed puberty gilts after treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prolonged pre-insemination anestrus (i.e. delayed puberty) is a major contributing factor for culling up to 30% of the replacement gilts at large breeding farm units in Vojvodina. It is imperative to determine if these gilts are acyclic (prepubertal) or cyclic, but just fail to exhibit behavioural estrus. Recent investigations demonstrate that treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) can increase the diestrous phase duration in sexually mature gilts. Based on these finding, the aim of the present studies was to determine the reproductive status of delayed puberty gilts following injection with eCG. Methods Two experiments were conducted on a swine breeding farm in Vojvodina. In Exp. 1, 20 prepubertal (acyclic) gilts, and 120 sexually mature (cyclic) gilts were injected with a single injection of 400 IU eCG + 200 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or with 1000 IU eCG (cyclic gilts), at d5, d11 or d17 after spontaneous estrus detection, to determine their ovarian reaction and induced estrus manifestation. In Exp. 2, sixty delayed puberty gilts (estrus not detected until 8 month of age, av. 258 days) were culled from breeding herd and slaughtered to determine their reproductive status based on ovarian anatomical features. The second group of gilts (n = 60) was treated with a single 1000 IU eCG injection to determine their reproductive status, based on the interval between eCG injection to estrus detection and duration. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance and Duncan’s test in the software package Statistics 10th. Results Ovulations were induced in 90% of acyclic (sexually immature) and, on average, 93.3% of cyclic (sexually mature) gilts after the eCG injection. On average, 4 days after the eCG injection, estrus was detected in 85% of the treated acyclic (sexually immature) gilts and in 95% (19/20) of the cyclic (sexually mature) gilts, treated with eCG on day 17 after

  12. Testosterone differentially alters cocaine-induced ambulatory and rearing behavioral responses in adult and adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Minerly, AnaChristina E.; Wu, Hui Bing K.; Weierstall, Karen M.; Niyomchai, Tipyamol; Kemen, Lynne; Jenab, Shirzad; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the physiological and behavioral effects of testosterone when co-administered with cocaine during adolescence. The present study aimed to determine whether exogenous testosterone administration differentially alters psychomotor responses to cocaine in adolescent and adult male rats. To this end, intact adolescent (30-days-old) and adult (60-day-old) male Fisher rats were pretreated with vehicle (sesame oil) or testosterone (5 or 10 mg/kg) 45 minutes prior to saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) administration. Behavioral responses were monitored 1 hour after drug treatment, and serum testosterone levels were determined. Serum testosterone levels were affected by age: saline- and cocaine-treated adults in the vehicle groups had higher serum testosterone levels than adolescents rats, but after co-administration of testosterone the adolescent rats had higher serum testosterone levels than the adults. Pretreatment with testosterone affected baseline activity in adolescent rats: 5 mg/kg of testosterone increased both rearing and ambulatory behaviors in saline-treated adolescent rats. After normalizing data to % saline, an interaction between hormone administration and cocaine-induced behavioral responses was observed; 5 mg/kg of testosterone decreased both ambulatory and rearing behaviors among adolescents whereas 10 mg/kg of testosterone decreased only rearing behaviors. Testosterone pretreatment did not alter cocaine-induced behavioral responses in adult rats. These findings suggest that adolescents are more sensitive than adults to an interaction between testosterone and cocaine, and, indirectly, suggest that androgen abuse may lessen cocaine-induced behavioral responses in younger cocaine users. PMID:19822170

  13. Testosterone and depressive symptoms among men in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Aroda, Vanita R.; Mather, Kieren J.; Christophi, Costas A.; Horton, Edward S.; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Bray, George A.; Labrie, Fernand; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective We examined associations between randomization to intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS) and changes in testosterone and associations with mood among middle-aged men. Design Secondary analysis of men (n=886) participating in the Diabetes Prevention Program which randomized glucose-intolerant, overweight men to ILS, metformin, or placebo. Main Outcome Measures Changes in testosterone between baseline and 1-year follow-up and associations of these changes with mood measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI], Beck Anxiety Inventory [BAI]) Results Median baseline testosterone was 10.98 nmol/l and 44% (n=385) had testosterone < 10.41 nmol/l or 300 ng/dl, a common threshold for biochemical hypogonadism. Testosterone increases were greater among men randomized to ILS vs. metformin vs. placebo (1.15 nmol/l vs. −0.12 nmol/l vs. −0.27 nmol/l, p<0.001). The association between changes in testosterone and mood differed by randomization arm (p<0.001 for interaction); there were no significant associations between changes in testosterone and mood changes among men randomized to ILS or placebo. Among men randomized to metformin, increases in testosterone were significantly associated with decreases in BDI (improved depressive symptoms) (β-coefficient −0.2336, p=0.0002) indicating a 0.23 decrease in BDI for every 1 nmol/l increase in testosterone and decreases in BAI (improved anxiety symptoms) (β-coefficient −0.2147, p=0.0014). Similar patterns were observed for bioavailable testosterone. Conclusions Among overweight middle-aged men with glucose-intolerance, ILS increased endogenous testosterone slightly but without significant improvements in mood. Metformin did not increase testosterone, but among participants randomized to metformin, testosterone increases were associated with improvements in mood. Thus, interventions that increase endogenous testosterone may not also improve mood. PMID:27371769

  14. Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane regulates stem cell activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lei, Jennifer; Lim, Jeremy J.; Young, Conan S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human‐derived placental tissues have been shown in randomized clinical trials to be effective for healing chronic wounds, and have also demonstrated the ability to recruit stem cells to the wound site in vitro and in vivo. In this study, PURION® Processed dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allografts (dHACM, EpiFix®, MiMedx Group, Marietta, GA) were evaluated for their ability to alter stem cell activity in vitro. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs), adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were treated with soluble extracts of dHACM tissue, and were evaluated for cellular proliferation, migration, and cytokine secretion. Stem cells were analyzed for cell number by DNA assay after 24 h, closure of an acellular zone using microscopy over 3 days, and soluble cytokine production in the medium of treated stem cells was analyzed after 3 days using a multiplex ELISA array. Treatment with soluble extracts of dHACM tissue stimulated BM‐MSCs, ADSCs, and HSCs to proliferate with a significant increase in cell number after 24 h. dHACM treatment accelerated closure of an acellular zone by ADSCs and BM‐MSCs after 3 days, compared to basal medium. BM‐MSCs, ADSCs, and HSCs also modulated endogenous production of a number of various soluble signals, including regulators of inflammation, mitogenesis, and wound healing. dHACM treatment promoted increased proliferation and migration of ADSCs, BM‐MSCs, and HSCs, along with modulation of secreted proteins from those cells. Therefore, dHACM may impact wound healing by amplifying host stem cell populations and modulating their responses in treated wound tissues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1495–1503, 2016. PMID:26175122

  15. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Pregnancy and Maternal Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toniolo, Paolo; Grankvist, Kjell; Wulff, Marianne; Chen, Tianhui; Johansson, Robert; Schock, Helena; Lenner, Per; Hallmans, Göran; Lehtinen, Matti; Kaaks, Rudolf; Wadell, Göran; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lundin, Eva; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2010-01-01

    Full-term pregnancies are associated with long-term reductions in maternal risk of breast cancer, but the biological determinants of the protection are unknown. Experimental observations suggest that human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), a major hormone of pregnancy, could play a role in this association. A case-control study (242 cases, 450 controls) nested within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort included women who had donated a blood sample during the first trimester of a first full-term pregnancy. Total hCG was determined on Immulite 2000 analyzer. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated through conditional logistic regression. Maternal breast cancer risk decreased with increasing hCG (upper tertile OR, 0.67; CI, 0.46-0.99) especially for pregnancies before age 25 (upper tertile OR, 0.41; CI, 0.21-0.80). The association diverged according to age at diagnosis: risk was reduced after age 40 (upper tertile OR: 0.60; CI, 0.39-0.91) and appeared to increase before age 40 (upper tertile OR: 1.78; CI, 0.72-4.38). Risk was reduced among those diagnosed 10 years or longer after blood draw (upper tertile OR, 0.60; CI, 0.40-0.90), but not so among those diagnosed within 10 years (upper tertile OR, 4.33; CI, 0.86-21.7). These observations suggest that the association between pregnancy hCG and subsequent maternal risk of breast cancer is modified by age at diagnosis. While the hormone appears to be a determinant of the reduced risk around or after age 50, it might not confer protection against, or it could even increase the risk of, cancers diagnosed in the years immediately following pregnancy. PMID:20713523

  16. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin receptors in various epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Venencie, P Y; Méduri, G; Pissard, S; Jolivet, A; Loosfelt, H; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1999-09-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes were used to study the localization of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptors in human skin. Immunolabelling was observed only in the epidermis and derived structures but not in the dermis. The basal, spinal and granular layers were stained, whereas no receptors were detected in the non-nucleated horny cells. In the growing (anagen) hair, immunostaining was found in the inner root sheath below the level of the sebaceous glands and in the outer root sheath above this level. In the resting (telogen) hair, only the latter staining was observed. In the sebaceous glands, only the thin cells close to the walls of the ducts were immunolabelled. In the eccrine sweat glands, the external clear cells were stained in the secretory portion of the gland, whereas only the cells close to the lumen were labelled in the ducts. The distribution of LH/hCG receptors was compared with that of steroidogenic enzymes (side chain cleavage cytochrome P450, adrenodoxin, 3-beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroid dehydrogenase Delta5-Delta4 isomerase, 17-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 aromatase). Only partial overlaps were observed. The presence of LH receptor mRNA in the skin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor failed to detect the latter in the epidermal structures and in the dermis. The role of LH and hCG in skin modifications occurring during pregnancy and after the menopause is unknown. These hormones may possibly act by regulating steroidogenic enzymes or by modulating cell growth and differentiation. PMID:10583046

  17. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Partially Mediates Phthalate Association With Male and Female Anogenital Distance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung Keun; Naimi, Ashley I.; Barrett, Emily; Nguyen, Ruby H.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Zhao, Yaqi; Thiet, Mari-Paule; Redmon, J. Bruce; Swan, Shanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Prenatal exposure to phthalates disrupts male sex development in rodents. In humans, the placental glycoprotein hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is required for male development, and may be a target of phthalate exposure. Objective: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that phthalates disrupt placental hCG differentially in males and females with consequences for sexually dimorphic genital development. Design: The Infant Development and Environment Study (TIDES) is a prospective birth cohort. Pregnant women were enrolled from 2010–2012 at four university hospitals. Participants: Participants were TIDES subjects (n = 541) for whom genital and phthalate measurements were available and who underwent prenatal serum screening in the first or second trimester. Main Outcome Measures: Outcomes included hCG levels in maternal serum in the first and second trimesters and anogenital distance (AGD), which is the distance from the anus to the genitals in male and female neonates. Results: Higher first-trimester urinary mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP; P = .01), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP; P = .03), and mono-carboxy-isooctyl phthalate (P < .01) were associated with higher first-trimester hCG in women carrying female fetuses, and lower hCG in women carrying males. First-trimester hCG was positively correlated with the AGD z score in female neonates, and inversely correlated in males (P = 0.01). We measured significant associations of MnBP (P < .01), MBzP (P = .02), and mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP; P < .01) with AGD, after adjusting for sex differences. Approximately 52% (MnBP) and 25% (MEHP) of this association in males, and 78% in females (MBzP), could be attributed to the phthalate association with hCG. Conclusions: First-trimester hCG levels, normalized by fetal sex, may reflect sexually dimorphic action of phthalates on placental function and on genital development. PMID:26200238

  18. Quantitative automated human chorionic gonadotropin measurement in urine using the Modular Analytics E170 module (Roche).

    PubMed

    Ajubi, Nasser E; Nijholt, Nine; Wolthuis, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing demands on laboratory performance require optimization of processes. An obvious way to achieve this is to reduce manual labor in favor of automated methods. We describe the validation of an automated quantitative urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) analysis on the Roche Modular E170 analyzer to replace the manual qualitative pregnancy test in urine. At urine hCG concentrations of 476, 45 and 11 U/L, we found inter-assay variation of 4.3%, 4.3% and 6.8% and average intra-assay variation of 3.0%, 2.6% and 3.0%, respectively. The analytical detection limit was 0.7 U/L. We did not detect any loss (due to degradation or adsorption) during a storage period of 5 days at 4 degrees C or at -20 degrees C. Recoveries of hCG in urine of a pregnant woman diluted with urine of a pre-menopausal non-pregnant woman (concentration range between 6 and 800 mU/L) were between 93% and 112% (y=0.997x-3.843, r 2 =0.999). Diluting a serum sample (hCG 42,000 U/L) with urine (negative for hCG) up to 8000-fold yielded a completely linear hCG response, indicating that the assay was not affected by the urine matrix. In a correlation study with 60 urine samples (of which 10 were of male origin), we did not find any discrepancies between results for the manual pregnancy test and the hCG test on the Roche Modular E170 (using a cutoff value of 50 U/L).

  19. Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane regulates stem cell activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lei, Jennifer; Lim, Jeremy J; Young, Conan S; Koob, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    Human-derived placental tissues have been shown in randomized clinical trials to be effective for healing chronic wounds, and have also demonstrated the ability to recruit stem cells to the wound site in vitro and in vivo. In this study, PURION(®) Processed dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allografts (dHACM, EpiFix(®) , MiMedx Group, Marietta, GA) were evaluated for their ability to alter stem cell activity in vitro. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were treated with soluble extracts of dHACM tissue, and were evaluated for cellular proliferation, migration, and cytokine secretion. Stem cells were analyzed for cell number by DNA assay after 24 h, closure of an acellular zone using microscopy over 3 days, and soluble cytokine production in the medium of treated stem cells was analyzed after 3 days using a multiplex ELISA array. Treatment with soluble extracts of dHACM tissue stimulated BM-MSCs, ADSCs, and HSCs to proliferate with a significant increase in cell number after 24 h. dHACM treatment accelerated closure of an acellular zone by ADSCs and BM-MSCs after 3 days, compared to basal medium. BM-MSCs, ADSCs, and HSCs also modulated endogenous production of a number of various soluble signals, including regulators of inflammation, mitogenesis, and wound healing. dHACM treatment promoted increased proliferation and migration of ADSCs, BM-MSCs, and HSCs, along with modulation of secreted proteins from those cells. Therefore, dHACM may impact wound healing by amplifying host stem cell populations and modulating their responses in treated wound tissues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1495-1503, 2016.

  20. [Preparation of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for human chorionic gonadotropin chimeric peptide 12 expressed in E. coli].

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Shui; Xu, Wan-Xiang; He, Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Da; Xue, Xiao-Lin

    2002-09-01

    In recent years, development of chimeric peptide (CP) immunogens is a trend in the vaccinological field. The CPs contain a B cell epitope(s) of target antigen and a promiscuous self - or foreign- T cell epitope(s). However, such constructed CPs were all expressed in prokaryotic or eukaryotic systems at lower levels. To purify the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) CP12 expressed in E. coli at the level of about 1% of the total cell proteins, an improved method of preparative gel polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was developed. The important improvement to routine preparative PAGE involves: (1) running reversed electrophoresis by rearranging the gel- carrying plate when the bromophenol blue band arrived at 1-1.5 centimeter from the bottom of the gel; (2) making a collecting trough between the gel and a dialytic membrane that was used to isolate the upper tank buffer. About 8 fractions were collected at regular intervals of 15 minutes after bromophenol blue running out of gel. And then 0.2 ml was taken from each fraction and the protein was precipitated by sequentially adding trichloroacetic acid and acetone. Each sample was dissolved in 20 microL sample buffer and analyzed and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As a result, the hCG CP12 expression product with 95% relative homogeneity was harvested at a 50-100 microgram level after a single-step purification of this preparative PAGE, with respect to the sample which contained 3-4 mg of cell proteins. PMID:12198575

  1. Hyperinsulinemia and human chorionic gonadotropin synergistically promote the growth of ovarian follicular cysts in rats.

    PubMed

    Poretsky, L; Clemons, J; Bogovich, K

    1992-08-01

    Tonically elevated serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and hyperinsulinemia are prominent features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO) in women, but the relative roles of LH and insulin in the pathogenesis of PCO is still unknown. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect(s) hyperinsulinemia might have on the induction of follicular cysts by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the rat. Beginning on day 85 of age, adult female rats were given one of the following in vivo treatments: (1) vehicle alone; (2) a high-fat diet to control for the effects of weight-gain; (3) up to 6 U insulin per day; (4) 50 micrograms gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist (GnRHant) per day; (5) 1.5 IU hCG twice daily; (6) insulin + hCG; (7) insulin + GnRHant; (8) hCG + GnRHant; or (9) hCG + insulin + GnRHant. After 22 days of treatment, animals were killed on day 23, trunk blood was collected, and ovaries were excised for histological study. Regular cycles, assessed by vaginal smears, ceased after 10 days for most animals in treatment groups receiving hCG, but continued in all other treatment groups. All the animals in each hCG-treated group developed either unilateral or bilateral cystic ovaries, while no animals in the groups not receiving hCG developed follicular cysts. More animals from each group treated with both hCG and insulin possessed bilateral ovarian cysts than did rats treated with hCG alone: 80% and 60%, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1640871

  2. Recognition of N-Glycoforms in Human Chorionic Gonadotropin by Monoclonal Antibodies and Their Interaction Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daoyuan; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fei; Chi, Lequan; Zhu, Deyu; Zhang, Qunye; Chi, Lianli

    2015-01-01

    The glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays an important role in reproductive tumors. Detecting hCG N-glycosylation alteration may significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of related cancers. However, developing an immunoassay directly against the N-linked oligosaccharides is unlikely because of the heterogeneity and low immunogenicity of carbohydrates. Here, we report a hydrogen/deuterium exchange and MS approach to investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the binding of antibodies against different hCG glycoforms. Hyperglycosylated hCG was purified from the urine of invasive mole patients, and the structure of its N-linked oligosaccharides was confirmed to be more branched by MS. The binding kinetics of the anti-hCG antibodies MCA329 and MCA1024 against hCG and hyperglycosylated hCG were compared using biolayer interferometry. The binding affinity of MCA1024 changed significantly in response to the alteration of hCG N-linked oligosaccharides. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange-MS reveals that the peptide β65–83 of the hCG β subunit is the epitope for MCA1024. Site-specific N-glycosylation analysis suggests that N-linked oligosaccharides at Asn-13 and Asn-30 on the β subunit affect the binding affinity of MCA1024. These results prove that some antibodies are sensitive to the structural change of N-linked oligosaccharides, whereas others are not affected by N-glycosylation. It is promising to improve glycoprotein biomarker-based cancer diagnostics by developing combined immunoassays that can determine the level of protein and measure the degree of N-glycosylation simultaneously. PMID:26240146

  3. Use of equine chorionic gonadotropin to control reproduction of the dairy cow: a review.

    PubMed

    De Rensis, F; López-Gatius, F

    2014-04-01

    Equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) is a member of the glycoprotein family of hormones along with LH, FSH and thyroid-stimulating hormone. In non-equid species, eCG shows high LH- and FSH-like activities and has a high affinity for both FSH and LH receptors in the ovaries. On the granulosa and thecal cells of the follicle, eCG has long-lasting LH- and FSH-like effects that stimulate oestradiol and progesterone secretion. Thus, eCG administration in dairy cattle results in fewer atretic follicles, the recruitment of more small follicles showing an elevated growth rate, the sustained growth of medium and large follicles and improved development of the dominant and pre-ovulatory follicle. In consequence, the quality of the ensuing CL is improved, and thereby progesterone secretion increased. Based on these characteristics, eCG treatment is utilized in veterinary medicine to control the reproductive activity of the cow by i) improving reproductive performance during early post-partum stages; ii) increasing ovulation and pregnancy rates in non-cyclic cows; iii) improving the conception rate in cows showing delayed ovulation; and finally, iv) eCG is currently included in protocols for fixed-time artificial insemination since after inducing the synchrony of ovulation using a progesterone-releasing device, eCG has beneficial effects on embryo development and survival. The above effects are not always observed in cyclic animals, but they are evident in animals in which LH secretion and ovarian activity are reduced or compromised, for instance, during the early post-partum period, under seasonal heat stress, in anoestrus animals or in animals with a low body condition score. PMID:24456154

  4. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome prenatal diagnosis by methylation analysis in chorionic villi.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Leda; Carlessi, Nicole; Fontana, Laura; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Motta, Silvia; Fiori, Stefano; Guerneri, Silvana; Lalatta, Faustina; Cereda, Anna; Sirchia, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Tabano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an imprinting disorder that can be prenatally suspected or diagnosed based on established clinical guidelines. Molecular confirmation is commonly performed on amniocytes. The possibility to use fresh (CVF) and cultured (CVC) chorionic villi has never been investigated. To verify whether CVF and CVC are reliable sources of DNA to study fetal methylation, we used pyrosequencing to test the methylation level of a number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) at several imprinted loci (ICR1, ICR2, H19, PWS/AS-ICR, GNASXL, GNAS1A, ZAC/PLAGL1, and MEST) and at non-imprinted MGMT and RASSF1A promoters. We analyzed these regions in 19 healthy pregnancies and highlighted stable methylation levels between CVF and CVC at ICR1, ICR2, GNASXL, PWS/AS-ICR, and MEST. Conversely, the methylation levels at H19 promoter, GNAS1A and ZAC/PLAGL1 were different in CVC compared to fresh CV. We also investigated ICR1 and ICR2 methylation level of CVF/CVC of 2 BWS-suspected fetuses (P1 and P2). P1 showed ICR2 hypomethylation, P2 showed normal methylation at both ICR1 and ICR2. Our findings, although limited to one case of BWS fetus with an imprinting defect, can suggest that ICR1 and ICR2, but not H19, could be reliable targets for prenatal BWS diagnosis by methylation test in CVF and CVC. In addition, PWS/AS-ICR, GNASXL, and MEST, but not GNAS1A and ZAC/PLAGL1, are steadily hemimethylated in CV from healthy pregnancies, independently from culture. Thus, prenatal investigation of genomic imprinting in CV needs to be validated in a locus-specific manner. PMID:26061650

  5. Choriocarcinoma-like human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and HCG bioactivity during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mock, P; Kovalevskaya, G; O'Connor, J F; Campana, A

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of choriocarcinoma-like human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) isoforms during first trimester pregnancy and their relationship with in-vitro HCG bioactivity. This was done by means of a retrospective analysis of patients' sera with first trimester normal intrauterine and abnormal (ectopic) pregnancies. Serum samples were obtained from 38 women with an amenorrhoea of <10 weeks. From these, 19 had a normal intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) and 19 an ectopic pregnancy (EP). Total immunoreactive HCG (HCGi), free beta-HCGi and oestradiol were measured by enzyme immunoassays and bioactive HCG by the mouse Leydig cell bioassay. The alterations in HCG isoform content were measured by the combination of two immunometric assays, B152 for choriocarcinoma-like HCG and B109 for intact HCG detection and expressed as the B152/B109 ratio. Choriocarcinoma-like HCG isoforms ratio measured by B152 and B109 assays was significantly higher in the low subgroups of free beta-HCGi and gestational age (P = 0.0111 and 0.0036 respectively). Whereas bioactive to immunoreactive HCG ratios (b/i ratio) were significantly higher when free beta-HCGi concentrations were low (P = 0.0010), no correlation was found between the variation of bioactivity (b/i ratio) and the proportion of choriocarcinoma-like HCG isoforms (B159/B108). It is concluded that in first trimester pregnancies (i) the modulation of HCG in-vitro bioactivity is not related to the variation of choriocarcinoma-like HCG isoforms secretion and (ii) the amount of choriocarcinoma-like HCG isoforms secreted by the early trophoblast is predominant and may be the result of an early developmental regulation of glycosylation enzyme. PMID:11006201

  6. Secretion of bioactive interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha proteins from primary cultured human fetal membrane chorion cells infected with influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Uchide, N; Suzuki, A; Ohyama, K; Bessho, T; Toyoda, H

    2006-01-01

    Influenza virus infection during pregnancy is implicated in one of the causes of premature delivery, abortion and stillbirth. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha produced by fetal membranes, are postulated to facilitate premature delivery. We investigated the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-alpha from primary cultured human fetal membrane chorion and amnion cells infected with influenza virus at protein and bioactivity levels in order to understand the pathology of premature delivery during influenza virus infection. Concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins were significantly increased in culture supernatants of chorion cells by influenza virus infection. Culture supernatants of the virus-infected chorion cells stimulated the proliferation of IL-6-sensitive 7-TD-1 cells and induced the cytolysis of TNF-alpha-sensitive L929 cells, both activities of which were inhibited by the addition of respective antibody, whereas no such phenomena were observed in amnion cells. The results demonstrated that only chorion cells secreted significant amounts of bioactive IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins responding to influenza virus infection. The present study suggests a possibility that the secretion of bioactive IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins from fetal membrane chorion cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of premature delivery during influenza virus infection. PMID:16122792

  7. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg.

  8. Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Accessory Cells and Chorion During Development of Ciona intestinalis Type B Embryos and the Impact of Their Removal on Cell Morphology.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2015-06-01

    Spawned ascidian oocytes are surrounded by a membrane called the chorion (or vitelline coat) and associated with two populations of maternally-supplied cells. Outside the chorion are follicle cells, which may affect the buoyancy of eggs. Inside the chorion are test cells, which during oogenesis provision the egg and which after fertilisation contribute to the larval tunic. The structure of maternal cells may vary between species. The model ascidian Ciona intestinalis has been recently split into two species, currently named type A and type B. The ultrastructure of extraembryonic cells and structures from type A embryos has been reported. Here we describe the ultrastructure of follicle and test cells from C. intestinalis type B embryos. Test cells are about 5 µm in diameter and line the inside of the chorion of developing embryos in a dense sheet. Follicle cells are large (> 100 µm long) and spike-shaped, with many large vesicles. Terminal electron dense granules are found towards the tips of spikes, adjacent to cytoplasm containing numerous small electron dense bodies connected by filaments. These are probably vesicles containing material for the terminal granules. Removal of maternal structures and cells just after fertilisation, as commonly used in many experiments manipulating C. intestinalis development, has been reported to affect embryonic patterning. We examined the impact of this on embryonic ectoderm cells by scanning electron microscopy. Cells of embryos that developed without maternal structures still developed cilia, but had indistinct cell boundaries and a more flattened appearance than those that developed within the chorion.

  9. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg. PMID:27648116

  10. Pregnancy close to the edge: an immunosuppressive infiltrate in the chorionic plate of placentas from uncomplicated egg cell donation.

    PubMed

    Schonkeren, Dorrith; Swings, Godelieve; Roberts, Drucilla; Claas, Frans; de Heer, Emile; Scherjon, Sicco

    2012-01-01

    In pregnancies achieved after egg donation (ED) tolerance towards a completely allogeneic fetus is mediated by several complex immunoregulatory mechanisms, of which numerous aspects are still unknown. A distinct lesion not described previously in the literature, was repeatedly found in the chorionic plate in a substantial portion of placentas from ED pregnancies, but never in placentas from normal term pregnancies. The aim of this study was to assess its origin and its cellular composition. The relation between the lesion, the clinical and histological parameters were assessed. In addition we investigated the relation with the number of HLA-mismatches and KIR genotype of mother and child.In ten out of twenty-six (38.5%) placentas from ED pregnancies an inflammatory lesion was present in the chorionic plate. A significantly lower incidence of pre-eclampsia was found in the group with the lesion; 0% versus 45.5%. A significant relation was found between this lesion and the presence of intervillositis, chronic deciduitis, presence of plasma cells and fibrin deposition in the decidua. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation with X/Y-chromosome probes showed that the majority of cells present in the lesion are of maternal origin. The expression of the macrophage marker CD14+ and of the type 2 macrophage (M2) marker CD163+ was significantly higher in the lesion. The incidence of a fetal HLA-C2 genotype was significantly higher in cases with a lesion compared to the group without the lesion. In conclusion, a striking relationship was observed between the presence of a not previously described inflammatory lesion in the chorionic plate and the absence of pre-eclampsia in ED pregnancies. The lesion consists of mainly maternal cells with a higher expression of the macrophage marker CD14+ and the M2 marker CD163+. These findings suggest a protective immune mechanism which might contribute to the prevention of severe clinical complications like pre-eclampsia. PMID:22479322

  11. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs

    PubMed Central

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance. Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials. PMID:22461251

  12. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs.

    PubMed

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance.Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials.

  13. Separation of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and immunoglobulin G by a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongmo; Chae, Junseok

    2009-04-01

    This report describes a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column that effectively preseparates raw samples for medical point-of-care testing (POCT) devices. The minicolumn is constructed of polydimethylsiloxane fabricated on a glass slide. The minicolumn separates 300 ng/ml of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) from an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-rich solution (100 μg/ml) in 7.7 min, with 2.23 resolution and 0.018 mm plate height. The complete analyte discrimination shows potential for the sample preparation stage of POCT devices for cancer screening, prognosis, and monitoring.

  14. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme showed no such correlation and was expressed in both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic hybrids. PMID:6959112

  15. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of <2.4 ng/mL. The tumor volume was calculated based on the pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement. PMID:26537232

  16. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains. PMID:25143719

  17. Imidazoles suppress rat testosterone secretion and testicular interstitial fluid formation In vivo.

    PubMed

    Adams, M L; Meyer, E R; Cicero, T J

    1998-08-01

    The aim of these studies was to examine the effects of imidazoles on testosterone secretion and testicular interstitial fluid (TIF) formation through measurement of serum LH, serum testosterone, TIF testosterone, and TIF volumes. Imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 4-methylimidazole (4-MI), and ketoconazole, an oral imidazole antifungal agent, caused dose-dependent decreases in testosterone secretion and TIF formation. Imidazole, 2-methylimidazole, and 4-MI decreased LH secretion. 4-MI decreased testosterone secretion 1-6 h after injection, increased testosterone at 8-16 h, decreased LH secretion at 4 h, decreased TIF volumes at 1-8 h, and slightly increased TIF volumes at 24 h. 4-MI blocked the stimulatory effects of hCG on testosterone secretion and prevented an expected increase in LH secretion after the 4-MI-induced decrease in testosterone secretion. 4-MI also reversed the effects of three other stimulants of testosterone secretion that presumably act through three different testicular regulatory systems: N-methyl-D,L-aspartate, an excitatory amino acid; NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor; and naltrexone, an opioid antagonist. These results support the hypothesis that imidazoles inhibit testicular function and male reproductive function through inhibition of testosterone secretion, TIF formation, and LH secretion regulatory systems. PMID:9687292

  18. Aggression by ovariectomized female rats with testosterone implants: competitive experience activates aggression toward unfamiliar females.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1990-04-01

    Female hooded rats (250 to 325 g) were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted with testosterone-filled or empty Silastic tubes. The testosterone-filled space in each tube was 10 mm long and this should produce a serum testosterone concentration 4 to 5 times that of an intact female, but well below that of a male. Three weeks following surgery, half of the animals with testosterone implants were housed with an animal with an empty implant and left for 6 weeks. The remaining animals were placed on a 23-hr food deprivation schedule, housed in testosterone implant/empty implant pairs, and then subjected to a series of food competition tests. Following the competition tests, all animals were individually tested in their living cage for aggression toward an unfamiliar female. In food competition, females with testosterone implants were more successful and more aggressive than their cagemates with empty implants. When tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar intruder, females with testosterone implants given competitive experience were more aggressive toward an intruder than were their cagemates with empty implants or females with testosterone implants not given the competitive experience. Females with testosterone implants but without competitive experience were not more aggressive toward an unfamiliar female than were their cagemates with empty implants. These results suggest that, in ovariectomized females with testosterone implants, hormone-dependent aggression fostered by a competitive situation is displayed toward unfamiliar females.

  19. Bill color, not badge size, indicates testosterone-related information in house sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Kempenaers, Bart; Dale, James

    2010-01-01

    The honesty of ornamental signals of quality is often argued to be enforced via costs associated with testosterone. It is still poorly understood, however, how seasonal variation of testosterone within individuals is related to the timing and extent of ornament development. Here, we studied inter- and intra-individual variability of plasma testosterone levels in a population of 150 captive male house sparrows (Passer domesticus) through the course of a full year. We further analyzed the relationship between plasma testosterone levels and two sexually dimorphic ornaments: badge size and bill coloration. Also, because of a known negative relation between molt and circulating testosterone levels, we analyzed the relationship between ornamentation and molt status during the fall. We found that testosterone levels increased towards the breeding season and decreased before the onset of annual molt. However, within individuals, relative testosterone titers demonstrated low repeatability between seasons. Plasma testosterone levels were not correlated with badge size in any season but were correlated strongly with bill coloration during all periods, except the breeding season when variation in bill color was low. Finally, we found that bill coloration strongly correlated with molt status during fall. Our results indicate that bill coloration, not badge size, is the best ornamental indicator of a “running average” of male testosterone in house sparrows and therefore the best potential indicator of qualities and/or behavioral strategies associated with testosterone. PMID:20730125

  20. Testosterone deprivation accelerates cardiac dysfunction in obese male rats.

    PubMed

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pintana, Hiranya; Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-06-01

    Low testosterone level is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular diseases. As obese-insulin-resistant condition could impair cardiac function and that the incidence of obesity is increased in aging men, a condition of testosterone deprivation could aggravate the cardiac dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant subjects. However, the mechanism underlying this adverse effect is unclear. This study investigated the effects of obesity on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), left ventricular (LV) function, and cardiac mitochondrial function in testosterone-deprived rats. Orchiectomized or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n=36per group) were randomly divided into groups and were given either a normal diet (ND, 19.77% of energy fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 57.60% of energy fat) for 12weeks. Metabolic parameters, HRV, LV function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined at 4, 8, and 12weeks after starting each feeding program. We found that insulin resistance was observed after 8weeks of the consumption of a HFD in both sham (HFS) and orchiectomized (HFO) rats. Neither the ND sham (NDS) group nor ND orchiectomized (NDO) rats developed insulin resistance. The development of depressed HRV, LV contractile dysfunction, and increased cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production was observed earlier in orchiectomized (NDO and HFO) rats at week 4, whereas HFS rats exhibited these impairments later at week 8. These findings suggest that testosterone deprivation accelerates the impairment of cardiac autonomic regulation and LV function via increased oxidative stress and impaired cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-orchiectomized male rats. PMID:27000685

  1. Testosterone Lab Testing and Initiation in the United Kingdom and the United States, 2000 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongmei; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Context: New formulations, increased marketing, and wider recognition of declining testosterone levels in older age may have contributed to wider testosterone testing and supplementation in many countries. Objective: Our objective was to describe testosterone testing and testosterone treatment in men in the United Kingdom and United States. Design: This was a retrospective incident user cohort. Setting: We evaluated commercial and Medicare insurance claims from the United States and general practitioner healthcare records from the United Kingdom for the years 2000 through 2011. Participants: We identified 410 019 US men and 6858 UK men who initiated a testosterone formulation as well as 1 114 329 US men and 66 140 UK men with a new testosterone laboratory measurement. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures included initiation of any injected testosterone, implanted testosterone pellets, or prescribed transdermal or oral testosterone formulation. Results: Testosterone testing and supplementation have increased pronouncedly in the United States. Increased testing in the United Kingdom has identified more men with low levels, yet US testing has increased among men with normal levels. Men in the United States tend to initiate at normal levels more often than in the United Kingdom, and many men initiate testosterone without recent testing. Gels have become the most common initial treatment in both countries. Conclusions: Testosterone testing and use has increased over the past decade, particularly in the United States, with dramatic shifts from injections to gels. Substantial use is seen in men without recent testing and in US men with normal levels. Given widening use despite safety and efficacy questions, prescribers must consider the medical necessity of testosterone before initiation. PMID:24423353

  2. Successful hunting increases testosterone and cortisol in a subsistence population

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Benjamin C.; Smith, Eric A.; O'Connor, Kathleen A.; Kaplan, Hillard S.; Gurven, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Controversy over the adaptive significance of male hunting in subsistence societies hinges on the relative importance of familial provisioning and mate-quality signalling. This paper examines the proximate and ultimate motivations of hunting behaviour from a neuroendocrine perspective, using salivary testosterone and cortisol data collected before, during and after hunting focal follows from 31 Tsimane hunters aged 18–82 years. Despite circadian declines in hormone levels, testosterone and cortisol of Tsimane hunters increased at the time of a kill, and remained high as successful hunters returned home. Previous studies of hormonal changes during competitions find that high-stakes and success in the presence of relevant audiences result in increased neuroendocrine arousal. If men hunt primarily to provision their families, then an additional audience would not be expected to impact testosterone or cortisol, nor would the size of the animal killed. However, if signalling male quality by ‘showing off’ was a larger relative driver of men's hunting behaviour, one would expect greater hormonal response in cases where men returned with large sharable kills, especially in the presence of community members. Consistent with provisioning models of male hunting motivation, neither kill size nor encountering an audience of villagers while returning from hunting was associated with hormonal changes for successful hunters. PMID:24335989

  3. Testosterone disrupts human collaboration by increasing egocentric choices

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nicholas D.; Bahrami, Bahador; Johnson, Emily; Di Malta, Gina; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Christopher D.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration can provide benefits to the individual and the group across a variety of contexts. Even in simple perceptual tasks, the aggregation of individuals' personal information can enable enhanced group decision-making. However, in certain circumstances such collaboration can worsen performance, or even expose an individual to exploitation in economic tasks, and therefore a balance needs to be struck between a collaborative and a more egocentric disposition. Neurohumoral agents such as oxytocin are known to promote collaborative behaviours in economic tasks, but whether there are opponent agents, and whether these might even affect information aggregation without an economic component, is unknown. Here, we show that an androgen hormone, testosterone, acts as such an agent. Testosterone causally disrupted collaborative decision-making in a perceptual decision task, markedly reducing performance benefit individuals accrued from collaboration while leaving individual decision-making ability unaffected. This effect emerged because testosterone engendered more egocentric choices, manifest in an overweighting of one's own relative to others' judgements during joint decision-making. Our findings show that the biological control of social behaviour is dynamically regulated not only by modulators promoting, but also by those diminishing a propensity to collaborate. PMID:22298852

  4. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Berger, P; Gruschwitz, M; Spoettl, G; Dirnhofer, S; Madersbacher, S; Gerth, R; Merz, W E; Plas, E; Sampson, N

    2007-01-01

    Normal hypothalamic-pituitary testicular and prostatic functions are essential for maintenance of male fertility, whereby glycoprotein hormones (GPH) as well as androgens are major endocrine and local regulators. We have investigated whether the GPH human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and the free alpha and beta subunits thereof are produced in the target organs themselves and potentially act as auto/paracrine modulators of fertility. Immunofluorometric assays (IFMAs) based on our panel of highly selective monoclonal antibodies, immunohistochemistry (IHC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and 1- and 2D gel electrophoreses with subsequent western blotting have been utilized for the detection of hCGalpha, hCGbeta and its metabolite hCGbeta core fragment (cf) in human testis, prostate and seminal plasma. Both organs synthesize hCGalpha and hCGbeta, which are subsequently detectable at high concentrations in seminal plasma of healthy probands (n=17): hCGalpha 2630+/-520 ng/mL (mean+/-S.E.M.), hCGbeta 2+/-0.28 ng/mL, hCGbetacf and hCG 0.19+/-0.039 ng/mL. These parameters significantly exceed physiological values, e.g. ten thousand-fold in the case of hCGalpha, in serum of young men (n=20): hCGalpha 0.142+/-0.054 ng/mL (mean+/-S.E.M.), hCGbeta 0.05 ng/mL and hCG 0.004+/-0.003 ng/mL. Levels of these markers were not correlated with sperm counts. Of all body fluids including those of pregnant women seminal plasma is the richest physiological source for genuine free i.e. non-dissociated GPHalpha (M(r,app) 23k) which may even appear as di- or tetramers. Its concentration is similar to that observed in maternal serum (weeks 10-12 of gestation) and in extra-embryonic coelomic fluid. In contrast to those fluids where ratios of free subunits to hCG are in the range of 1:100 highly inverse ratios in the range of 10.000:1.000:1 were observed for hCGalpha:hCGbeta:hCG in seminal plasma. hCGalpha is not derived from heterodimeric GPH suggesting hCG-independent functions of h

  5. Effect of human chorionic gonadotropin on mammary gland differentiation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Russo, I H; Koszalka, M; Russo, J

    1990-10-01

    The observation that mammary carcinogenesis is inhibited in rats which completed a pregnancy prior to exposure to the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) led us to determine whether the protective effect of pregnancy could be mimicked by treatment with the placental hormone chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We also studied the effect of this treatment on mammary gland structure and differentiation, and determined whether hCG exerts toxic or collateral effects on body weight and endocrine organs. The systemic effect of hCG on body wt and endocrine organs and mammary gland was studied in outbred virgin Sprague-Dawley rats which at the age of 50 days started receiving 100 IU hCG i.p. daily for 21 days. The animals were subdivided into nine groups of five animals each; one group was killed on the first day of and the others at 5, 10, 15 and 21 days of injection and 5, 10, 15 and 21 days post injection. The effect of the hormonal treatment on the estrous cycle was determined by studying the vaginal smears taken during and after the injection period. The following parameters were determined: body wt, weight and morphology of pituitary gland, adrenals, ovaries and uterine horns. Mammary glands were processed for histology, autoradiography for determination of DNA labeling index (DNA-LI) and whole mount preparation for morphometric studies. The effect of hCG on mammary carcinogenesis was studied in two groups of virgin rats; group I, which at the age of 50 days started receiving a daily i.p. injection of 100 IU hCG for 21 days; 21 days after the last injection they were given 8 mg DMBA/100 g body wt. Group II animals received DMBA only. hCG treated animals gained weight as a function of age at the same rate as controls. Treatment did not modify the weight of adrenal glands. The weight of ovaries, uterus and pituitary gland were transitorily increased by the 15th day of treatment, but had returned to the same values of controls by the time of DMBA

  6. New discoveries on the biology and detection of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Laurence A

    2009-01-26

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone comprising 2 subunits, alpha and beta joined non covalently. While similar in structure to luteinizing hormone (LH), hCG exists in multiple hormonal and non-endocrine agents, rather than as a single molecule like LH and the other glycoprotein hormones. These are regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and the free beta-subunit of hyperglycosylated hCG. For 88 years regular hCG has been known as a promoter of corpus luteal progesterone production, even though this function only explains 3 weeks of a full gestations production of regular hCG. Research in recent years has explained the full gestational production by demonstration of critical functions in trophoblast differentiation and in fetal nutrition through myometrial spiral artery angiogenesis. While regular hCG is made by fused villous syncytiotrophoblast cells, extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells make the variant hyperglycosylated hCG. This variant is an autocrine factor, acting on extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells to initiate and control invasion as occurs at implantation of pregnancy and the establishment of hemochorial placentation, and malignancy as occurs in invasive hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. Hyperglycosylated hCG inhibits apoptosis in extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells promoting cell invasion, growth and malignancy. Other non-trophoblastic malignancies retro-differentiate and produce a hyperglycosylated free beta-subunit of hCG (hCG free beta). This has been shown to be an autocrine factor antagonizing apoptosis furthering cancer cell growth and malignancy. New applications have been demonstrated for total hCG measurements and detection of the 3 hCG variants in pregnancy detection, monitoring pregnancy outcome, determining risk for Down syndrome fetus, predicting preeclampsia, detecting pituitary hCG, detecting and managing gestational trophoblastic diseases, diagnosing quiescent gestational trophoblastic

  7. Oxygen-Sensitive K+ Channels Modulate Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Secretion from Human Placental Trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Sibley, Colin P; Greenwood, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a key autocrine/paracrine regulator of placental syncytiotrophoblast, the transport epithelium of the human placenta. Syncytiotrophoblast hCG secretion is modulated by the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) channels. Here we test the hypothesis that K+ channels mediate the effects of pO2 and ROS on hCG secretion. Placental villous explants from normal term pregnancies were cultured for 6 days at 6% (normoxia), 21% (hyperoxia) or 1% (hypoxia) pO2. On days 3-5, explants were treated with 5mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or tetraethylammonium (TEA), blockers of pO2-sensitive voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, or ROS (10-1000μM H2O2). hCG secretion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a marker of necrosis, were determined daily. At day 6, hCG and LDH were measured in tissue lysate and 86Rb (K+) efflux assessed to estimate syncytiotrophoblast K+ permeability. hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux were significantly greater in explants maintained in 21% pO2 than normoxia. 4-AP/TEA inhibited hCG secretion to a greater extent at 21% than 6% and 1% pO2, and reduced 86Rb efflux at 21% but not 6% pO2. LDH release and tissue LDH/hCG were similar in 6%, 21% and 1% pO2 and unaffected by 4-AP/TEA. H2O2 stimulated 86Rb efflux and hCG secretion at normoxia but decreased 86Rb efflux, without affecting hCG secretion, at 21% pO2. 4-AP/TEA-sensitive K+ channels participate in pO2-sensitive hCG secretion from syncytiotrophoblast. ROS effects on both hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux are pO2-dependent but causal links between the two remain to be established. PMID:26863525

  8. Oxygen-Sensitive K+ Channels Modulate Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Secretion from Human Placental Trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Paula; Sibley, Colin P.; Greenwood, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a key autocrine/paracrine regulator of placental syncytiotrophoblast, the transport epithelium of the human placenta. Syncytiotrophoblast hCG secretion is modulated by the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) channels. Here we test the hypothesis that K+ channels mediate the effects of pO2 and ROS on hCG secretion. Placental villous explants from normal term pregnancies were cultured for 6 days at 6% (normoxia), 21% (hyperoxia) or 1% (hypoxia) pO2. On days 3–5, explants were treated with 5mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or tetraethylammonium (TEA), blockers of pO2-sensitive voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, or ROS (10–1000μM H2O2). hCG secretion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a marker of necrosis, were determined daily. At day 6, hCG and LDH were measured in tissue lysate and 86Rb (K+) efflux assessed to estimate syncytiotrophoblast K+ permeability. hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux were significantly greater in explants maintained in 21% pO2 than normoxia. 4-AP/TEA inhibited hCG secretion to a greater extent at 21% than 6% and 1% pO2, and reduced 86Rb efflux at 21% but not 6% pO2. LDH release and tissue LDH/hCG were similar in 6%, 21% and 1% pO2 and unaffected by 4-AP/TEA. H2O2 stimulated 86Rb efflux and hCG secretion at normoxia but decreased 86Rb efflux, without affecting hCG secretion, at 21% pO2. 4-AP/TEA-sensitive K+ channels participate in pO2-sensitive hCG secretion from syncytiotrophoblast. ROS effects on both hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux are pO2-dependent but causal links between the two remain to be established. PMID:26863525

  9. High divergence in primate-specific duplicated regions: Human and chimpanzee Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta genes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Low nucleotide divergence between human and chimpanzee does not sufficiently explain the species-specific morphological, physiological and behavioral traits. As gene duplication is a major prerequisite for the emergence of new genes and novel biological processes, comparative studies of human and chimpanzee duplicated genes may assist in understanding the mechanisms behind primate evolution. We addressed the divergence between human and chimpanzee duplicated genomic regions by using Luteinizing Hormone Beta (LHB)/Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta (CGB) gene cluster as a model. The placental CGB genes that are essential for implantation have evolved from an ancestral pituitary LHB gene by duplications in the primate lineage. Results We shotgun sequenced and compared the human (45,165 bp) and chimpanzee (39,876 bp) LHB/CGB regions and hereby present evidence for structural variation resulting in discordant number of CGB genes (6 in human, 5 in chimpanzee). The scenario of species-specific parallel duplications was supported (i) as the most parsimonious solution requiring the least rearrangement events to explain the interspecies structural differences; (ii) by the phylogenetic trees constructed with fragments of intergenic regions; (iii) by the sequence similarity calculations. Across the orthologous regions of LHB/CGB cluster, substitutions and indels contributed approximately equally to the interspecies divergence and the distribution of nucleotide identity was correlated with the regional repeat content. Intraspecies gene conversion may have shaped the LHB/CGB gene cluster. The substitution divergence (1.8–2.59%) exceeded two-three fold the estimates for single-copy loci and the fraction of transversional mutations was increased compared to the unique sequences (43% versus ~30%). Despite the high sequence identity among LHB/CGB genes, there are signs of functional differentiation among the gene copies. Estimates for dn/ds rate ratio suggested a purifying

  10. Value of human chorionic gonadotropin compared to CEA in discriminating benign from malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Lamerz, R; Stoetzer, O J; Mezger, J; Brandt, A; Darsow, M; Wilmanns, W

    1999-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is expressed in germ cell tumors and urothelial, breast, lung and colon cancers. The aim of the study was to investigate if the determination of HCG in comparison with CEA is able to discriminate between malignant and benign effusions. Effusion and partially serum samples of 61 patients with benign (g.i., heart/kidney isnuff.) and 116 patients with malignant diseases (g.i., gynec., lung, misc., CUP) were investigated. HCG was specifically determined by an IRMA using 2 monoclonal antibodies, CEA by a conventional double Ab RIA. Cytological staining was preformed using the Pappenheim-method on cytospin preparations. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were found for HCG between benign and malignant ascitic effusions with the best discrimination at 5 IU/l (ROC) and an overall sensitivity of 31.3% (spec. vs benign eff. 93.4%) increasing in subgroups from hematol. (5.8%) < misc. (31.3%) < gynec. (32.1%) < g.i. (36%) < lung (38.1%) to CUP (50%). CEA also showed significant differences between benign and malignant total and ascitic effusions, and weaker for the pleural subgroup (cutoff 9 ng/ml) with a total sensitivity of 44.6% (sp = 100%) increasing from misc. (30.8%) < lung (47.1%) < CUP (50%) < gynec. (60%) < g.i. (60.9%). Comparative cytology and TM determinations increased the positiverate of cytology (45.2%) to 58.3% for either cytology or HCG positive cases, or to 61.6% for either cytology or CEA positive cases. For the combined determination of cytologoy and HCG and CEA, the overall TM positive rate for 33 cytology-pos. cases was 78.8%, but in 40 cytology-negative cases 37.5% for TM positive cases. In conclusion HCG is useful in ascitic > pleural effusions with high specificity (90% at 5 IU/l) but low sensitivity of 31% increasing in g.i., lung and gynecologic cases, CEA a more general TM with higher sensitivity of 45% increasing in g.i., gynecologic and lung cases (sp. 100% at 9 ng/ml) both adding significantly to cytology

  11. New discoveries on the biology and detection of human chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Laurence A

    2009-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone comprising 2 subunits, alpha and beta joined non covalently. While similar in structure to luteinizing hormone (LH), hCG exists in multiple hormonal and non-endocrine agents, rather than as a single molecule like LH and the other glycoprotein hormones. These are regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and the free beta-subunit of hyperglycosylated hCG. For 88 years regular hCG has been known as a promoter of corpus luteal progesterone production, even though this function only explains 3 weeks of a full gestations production of regular hCG. Research in recent years has explained the full gestational production by demonstration of critical functions in trophoblast differentiation and in fetal nutrition through myometrial spiral artery angiogenesis. While regular hCG is made by fused villous syncytiotrophoblast cells, extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells make the variant hyperglycosylated hCG. This variant is an autocrine factor, acting on extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells to initiate and control invasion as occurs at implantation of pregnancy and the establishment of hemochorial placentation, and malignancy as occurs in invasive hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. Hyperglycosylated hCG inhibits apoptosis in extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells promoting cell invasion, growth and malignancy. Other non-trophoblastic malignancies retro-differentiate and produce a hyperglycosylated free beta-subunit of hCG (hCG free beta). This has been shown to be an autocrine factor antagonizing apoptosis furthering cancer cell growth and malignancy. New applications have been demonstrated for total hCG measurements and detection of the 3 hCG variants in pregnancy detection, monitoring pregnancy outcome, determining risk for Down syndrome fetus, predicting preeclampsia, detecting pituitary hCG, detecting and managing gestational trophoblastic diseases, diagnosing quiescent gestational trophoblastic

  12. Ethanol, growth hormone and testosterone in peripubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Tentler, J J; LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Williams, D; Castelli, M; Kelley, M R; Emanuele, N V; Emanuele, M A

    1997-03-01

    The deleterious effects of ethanol on the hypothalamic pituitary growth hormone axis in adult male humans and animals have been well documented. It is also well established that ethanol has toxic effects on testicular function in adult humans and animals. Much less is known, however, about the effects of ethanol on the growth hormone (GH) axis and testicular function in adolescence. Recent studies have established that adolescent problem drinking is a widespread and growing threat to the health of young people in the United States. In the present study, therefore, we investigated if acute ethanol exposure in peripubertal male Sprague-Dawley rats altered normal pituitary and testicular function. Serum levels of GH and testosterone were measured at 1.5, 3, 6, and 24 h after a single i.p. injection of either saline or 3 g/kg body weight ethanol. Histologic analysis as well as serum testosterone levels allowed us to assign animals to either early puberty (35-day-old animals), mid-puberty (41-day-old animals), or young adult (51- and 66-day-old animals) status. Ethanol produced significant decrements in serum testosterone in the 51- and 66-day-old animals, with a trend toward suppression in the 41-day-old group. Furthermore acute ethanol administration significantly decreased serum GH (P < 0.0001 by 3 way ANOVA) demonstrating a significant effect of ethanol on serum GH in all age groups and at all time points studied when compared with saline injected controls (P < 0.01 by Turkey's studentized range test). Despite this significant fall in peripheral GH levels, there was no decrease in either GH mRNA or growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) mRNA levels nor in hypothalamic concentration of GRF peptide. We conclude that, as in adult animals, acute exposure to ethanol causes a prolonged and severe decrement in serum GH which is possibly mediated at the level of secretion. In addition, there is attenuation in testosterone secretion. These data are all the more important

  13. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males.

  14. The effect of exogenous testosterone on ectoparasite loads in free-ranging western fence lizards.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Nicholas B; Vredevoe, Larisa K; Taylor, Emily N

    2012-08-01

    Numerous factors impact the dynamics of host-parasite relationships, such as host sex, hormonal state, reproductive condition, host health, and behavior. In particular, males from a variety of taxa frequently carry heavier parasite burdens than females, particularly during breeding season when testosterone concentrations are elevated. Using western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis), we tested the hypothesis that high circulating testosterone concentrations in male lizards induce high tick and mite loads. We implanted male lizards with either testosterone or control implants in the field during the spring, when tick and mite loads are highest. One month later, testosterone-implanted males had significantly higher tick loads, but lower mite loads, than control males. These results suggest that testosterone differentially impacts ectoparasitic acarine burdens. Testosterone may modulate aspects of lizard physiology and behavior that enhance or diminish parasitism by certain acarines during periods of peak reproductive effort. PMID:22689269

  15. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males. PMID:26626441

  16. Neither testosterone levels nor aggression decrease when the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) displays paternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Juana, Luis; Bárbara, Vázquez-Gaytán; Martín, Martínez-Torres; Agustín, Carmona; Guillermo, Ramos-Blancas; Guadalupe, Ortíz

    2010-03-01

    The first studies that correlated mammalian paternal behavior and testosterone levels indicated that the concentration of this steroid hormone decreases when males exhibit paternal care. However, recent studies have also shown that testosterone levels do not decrease when males display paternal behavior. In this study, we measured testosterone levels in plasma throughout the reproductive cycle of the Mongolian gerbil. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with paternal care as well as aggression. We also examined whether there is a trade-off between paternal behavior and aggression in this mammal. Our results show that Mongolian gerbil testosterone levels do not decrease when the males give paternal care. Likewise, male Mongolian gerbils exhibit high levels of aggression while displaying paternal behavior, indicating that there is no trade-off between aggression and paternal behavior. More studies are needed to determine whether testosterone is involved in the regulation of paternal behavior in this rodent.

  17. Salivary testosterone change following monetary wins and losses predicts future financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Coren L; Dreber, Anna; Mollerstrom, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    While baseline testosterone has recently been implicated in risk-taking in men, less is known about the effects of changing levels of testosterone on financial risk. Here we attempt to influence testosterone in men by having them win or lose money in a chance-based competition against another male opponent. We employ two treatments where we vary the amount of money at stake so that we can directly compare winners to losers who earn the same amount, thereby abstracting from income effects. We find that men who experience a greater increase in bioactive testosterone take on more risk, an association that remains when controlling for whether the participant won the competition. In fact, whether subjects won the competition did not predict future risk. These results suggest that testosterone change, and thus individual differences in testosterone reactivity, rather than the act of winning or losing, influence financial risk-taking. PMID:24275004

  18. A thicker chorion gives ova of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) the upper hand against Saprolegnia infections.

    PubMed

    Songe, M M; Willems, A; Sarowar, M N; Rajan, K; Evensen, Ø; Drynan, K; Skaar, I; van West, P

    2016-07-01

    Since the ban of malachite green in the fish farming industry, finding alternative ways of controlling Saprolegnia infections has become of utmost importance. Much effort has been made to elucidate the mechanisms by which Saprolegnia invades fish eggs. Little is known about the defence mechanisms of the hosts, making some eggs more prone to infection than others. One clue might lie in the composition of the eggs. As the immune system in the embryos is not developed yet, the difference in infection levels could be explained by factors influenced by the mother herself, by either transferring passive immunity, influencing the physical aspects of the eggs or both. One of the physical aspects that could be influenced by the female is the chorion, the extracellular coat surrounding the fish egg, which is in fact the first major barrier to be overcome by Saprolegnia spp. Our results suggest that a thicker chorion in eggs from Atlantic salmon gives a better protection against Saprolegnia spp. In addition to the identification of differences in sensitivity of eggs in a fish farm set-up, we were able to confirm these results in a laboratory-controlled challenge experiment. PMID:26644366

  19. Effect of additional human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) on follicular growth and ovulation in gonadotrophin-treated gilts

    PubMed Central

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Cassar, Glen; Friendship, Robert M.; Garcia, José C.; Dominguez, J. Carlos; Kirkwood, Roy N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of additional human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) on the ovarian response of gilts previously treated with 200 IU hCG combined with 400 IU equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) (eCG/hCG). Seventy-one prepuberal gilts (105 ± 7.5 kg) were assigned to groups: i) eCG/hCG (hCG-0; n = 25); ii) eCG/hCG followed by 100 IU of hCG at 24 h (hCG-100; n = 24); iii) eCG/hCG followed by 200 IU hCG at 24 h (hCG-200; n = 10); and iv) controls (CON; n = 12). Ovulation response was assessed by ovarian dissection or real-time ultrasonography. Additional hCG did not significantly improve numbers of gilts ovulating. Numbers of corpora lutea increased with hCG, and was higher in hCG-200 (P < 0.01). Compared to hCG-0, the frequency of cysts in gilts was higher in hCG-100 (P < 0.05) and further increased in hCG-200 (P < 0.01). The number of cysts per gilt was dose-dependently increased by additional hCG. We conclude that supplemental hCG will increase the number of corpora lutea but will be associated with follicular cyst development in a dose dependent manner. PMID:26130853

  20. Effect of Adiantum Capillus veneris Linn on an Animal Model of Testosterone-Induced Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Noubarani, Maryam; Rostamkhani, Hossein; Erfan, Mohammad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Babaeian, Mohammad; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common form of hair loss in men. The present study was designed to evaluate the hair growth-promoting activity of a preparation of the Adiantum capillus-veneris Linn. (A. capillus-veneris) on albino mice using a testosterone-induced alopecia model. Five groups of albino mice were studied: (A) Testosterone solution only (n=6); (B) Testosterone + Finasteride solution (2%) (n=6); (C) Testosterone + vehicle (n=6); (D) Testosterone + A. capillus-veneris solution (1%) (n=6); (E) intact control (n=2, without testosterone). Alopecia was induced in all intervention groups by testosterone 1.0 mg subcutaneous. A. capillus-veneris solution was applied topically to the back skin of animals in the respective group. Hair growth was evaluated by visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as follicle density (number of follicles/mm) and anagen/telogen ratio. After 21 days, a patch of diffuse hair loss was seen in animals received testosterone while animals treated with A. capillus-veneris showed less hair loss as compared to those treated with testosterone only. The follicular density observed in the A. capillus-veneris-treated group was 1.92 ± 0.47, compared to 1.05 ± 0.21 in testosterone-group and 2.05 ± 0.49 in finasteride-treated animals. Anagen/telogen ratio was significantly affected by A. capillus-veneris, which was 0.92 ± 0.06 as compared with 0.23 ± 0.03 and 1.12 ± 0.06 for testosterone and finasteride treated groups, respectively. According to visual observation and quantitative data (follicular density and anagen/telogen ratio), A. capillus-veneris was found to possess good activity against testosterone-induced alopecia. PMID:24711836

  1. Growing Up Or Growing Old? Cellular Aging Linked With Testosterone Reactivity To Stress In Youth

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Stacy S.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Shachet, Andrew; Phan, Jenny; Mabile, Emily; Brett, Zoë H.; Wren, Michael; Esteves, Kyle; Theall, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the established relation between testosterone and aging in older adults, we tested whether buccal telomere length (TL), an established cellular biomarker of aging, was associated with testosterone levels in youth. Methods Children, mean age 10.2 years, were recruited from the greater New Orleans area and salivary testosterone was measured during both an acute stressor and diurnally. Buccal TL was measured using monochrome multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (MMQ-PCR). Testosterone and telomere length data was available on 77 individuals. The association between buccal TL and testosterone was tested using multivariate Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) to account for clustering of children within families. Results Greater peak testosterone levels (β=-0.87, p < 0.01) and slower recovery (β=-0.56, p < 0.01) and reactivity (β = -1.22, p < 0.01) following a social stressor were significantly associated with shorter buccal TL after controlling for parental age at conception, child age, sex, sociodemographic factors and puberty. No association was initially present between diurnal measurements of testosterone or morning basal testosterone levels and buccal TL. Sex significantly moderated the relation between testosterone reactivity and buccal TL. Conclusions The association between testosterone and buccal TL supports gonadal maturation as a developmentally sensitive biomarker of aging within youth. As stress levels of testosterone were significantly associated with buccal TL, these findings are consistent with the growing literature linking stress exposure and accelerated maturation. The lack of association of diurnal testosterone or morning basal levels with buccal TL bolsters the notion of a shared stress-related maturational mechanism between cellular stress and the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis. These data provide novel evidence supporting the interaction of aging, physiologic stress and cellular processes as an underlying

  2. Status-appropriate singing behavior, testosterone and androgen receptor immunolabeling in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, M.A.; Stevenson, S.A.; Riters, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Vocalizations convey information about an individual’s motivational, internal, and social status. As circumstances change, individuals respond by adjusting vocal behavior accordingly. In European starlings, a male that acquires a nest site socially dominates other males and dramatically increases courtship song. Although circulating testosterone is associated with social status and vocal production it is possible that steroid receptors fine-tune status-appropriate changes in behavior. Here we explored a possible role for androgen receptors. Male starlings that acquired nest sites produced high rates of courtship song. For a subset of males this occurred even in the absence of elevated circulating testosterone. Immunolabeling for androgen receptors (ARir) was highest in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in males with both a nest site and elevated testosterone. For HVC, ARir was higher in dominant males with high testosterone (males that sang longer songs) than dominant males with low testosterone (males that sang shorter songs). ARir in the dorsal medial portion of the nucleus intercollicularis (DM) was elevated in males with high testosterone irrespective of dominance status. Song bout length related positively to ARir in POM, HVC and DM, and testosterone concentrations related positively to ARir in POM and DM. Results suggest the role of testosterone in vocal behavior differs across brain regions and support the hypothesis that testosterone in POM underlies motivation, testosterone in HVC relates to song quality, and testosterone in DM stimulates vocalizations. Our data also suggest that singing may influence AR independent of testosterone and that alternative androgen-independent pathways regulate status-appropriate singing behavior. PMID:24594286

  3. Status-appropriate singing behavior, testosterone and androgen receptor immunolabeling in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cordes, M A; Stevenson, S A; Riters, L V

    2014-04-01

    Vocalizations convey information about an individual's motivational, internal, and social status. As circumstances change, individuals respond by adjusting vocal behavior accordingly. In European starlings, a male that acquires a nest site socially dominates other males and dramatically increases courtship song. Although circulating testosterone is associated with social status and vocal production it is possible that steroid receptors fine-tune status-appropriate changes in behavior. Here we explored a possible role for androgen receptors. Male starlings that acquired nest sites produced high rates of courtship song. For a subset of males this occurred even in the absence of elevated circulating testosterone. Immunolabeling for androgen receptors (ARir) was highest in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in males with both a nest site and elevated testosterone. For HVC, ARir was higher in dominant males with high testosterone (males that sang longer songs) than dominant males with low testosterone (males that sang shorter songs). ARir in the dorsal medial portion of the nucleus intercollicularis (DM) was elevated in males with high testosterone irrespective of dominance status. Song bout length related positively to ARir in POM, HVC and DM, and testosterone concentrations related positively to ARir in POM and DM. Results suggest that the role of testosterone in vocal behavior differs across brain regions and support the hypothesis that testosterone in POM underlies motivation, testosterone in HVC relates to song quality, and testosterone in DM stimulates vocalizations. Our data also suggest that singing may influence AR independent of testosterone and that alternative androgen-independent pathways regulate status-appropriate singing behavior. PMID:24594286

  4. Testosterone, plumage colouration and extra-pair paternity in male North-American barn swallows.

    PubMed

    Eikenaar, Cas; Whitham, Megan; Komdeur, Jan; van der Velde, Marco; Moore, Ignacio T

    2011-01-01

    In most monogamous bird species, circulating testosterone concentration in males is elevated around the social female's fertile period. Variation in elevated testosterone concentrations among males may have a considerable impact on fitness. For example, testosterone implants enhance behaviours important for social and extra-pair mate choice. However, little is known about the relationship between natural male testosterone concentration and sexual selection. To investigate this relationship we measured testosterone concentration and sexual signals (ventral plumage colour and tail length), and determined within and extra-pair fertilization success in male North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Dark rusty coloured males had higher testosterone concentrations than drab males. Extra-pair paternity was common (42% and 31% of young in 2009 and 2010, respectively), but neither within- nor extra-pair fertilization success was related to male testosterone concentration. Dark rusty males were less often cuckolded, but did not have higher extra-pair or total fertilization success than drab males. Tail length did not affect within- or extra-pair fertilization success. Our findings suggest that, in North American barn swallows, male testosterone concentration does not play a significant direct role in female mate choice and sexual selection. Possibly plumage colour co-varies with a male behavioural trait, such as aggressiveness, that reduces the chance of cuckoldry. This could also explain why dark males have higher testosterone concentrations than drab males.

  5. Testosterone, Plumage Colouration and Extra-Pair Paternity in Male North-American Barn Swallows

    PubMed Central

    Eikenaar, Cas; Whitham, Megan; Komdeur, Jan; van der Velde, Marco; Moore, Ignacio T.

    2011-01-01

    In most monogamous bird species, circulating testosterone concentration in males is elevated around the social female's fertile period. Variation in elevated testosterone concentrations among males may have a considerable impact on fitness. For example, testosterone implants enhance behaviours important for social and extra-pair mate choice. However, little is known about the relationship between natural male testosterone concentration and sexual selection. To investigate this relationship we measured testosterone concentration and sexual signals (ventral plumage colour and tail length), and determined within and extra-pair fertilization success in male North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Dark rusty coloured males had higher testosterone concentrations than drab males. Extra-pair paternity was common (42% and 31% of young in 2009 and 2010, respectively), but neither within- nor extra-pair fertilization success was related to male testosterone concentration. Dark rusty males were less often cuckolded, but did not have higher extra-pair or total fertilization success than drab males. Tail length did not affect within- or extra-pair fertilization success. Our findings suggest that, in North American barn swallows, male testosterone concentration does not play a significant direct role in female mate choice and sexual selection. Possibly plumage colour co-varies with a male behavioural trait, such as aggressiveness, that reduces the chance of cuckoldry. This could also explain why dark males have higher testosterone concentrations than drab males. PMID:21853105

  6. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii)

    PubMed Central

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-01-01

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs. PMID:22700073

  7. Heterologous enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for measurement of testosterone in serum.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K; Prasad, Pramod K V; Kariya, Kiran P; Kumar, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    In steroid enzyme immunoassay (EIA), homologous and heterologous combinations of enzyme conjugate with immunogen influences labeled steroid recognition by antibodies that affect sensitivity of the assay. To develop testosterone enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), antibodies were generated against testosterone-3-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin (T-3-CMO-BSA), testosterone-11-hemisuccinate-bovine serum albumin (T-11-HS-BSA), testosterone-17-hemisuccinate-bovine serum albumin (T-17-HS-BSA), testosterone-17-glucuronide-bovine serum albumin (T-17-G-BSA), and testosterone-19-carboxymethylether-bovine serum albumin (T-19-CME-BSA). Testosterone horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme conjugate were prepared using carboxyl derivatives of 11-keto-testosterone (11-keto-T) and 1-dehydrotestosterone (1-Dehydro-T). Ten combinations of heterologous assays were evaluated. The data of the present study revealed that the use of the T-11-HS-BSA antibody in antigen plus site heterologous assay that employed 11-keto-testosterone-3-CMO-HRP as the label showed binding and displacement, and led to the development of sensitive and specific assay.

  8. Effects of Eurycoma longifolia on Testosterone Level and Bone Structure in an Aged Orchidectomised Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tajul Ariff, Abdul Shukor; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Pramanik, J.; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the choice of treatment in androgen-deficient osteoporosis. However, long-term use of testosterone is potentially carcinogenic. Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been reported to enhance testosterone level and prevent bone calcium loss but there is a paucity of research regarding its effect on the bone structural parameters. This study was conducted to explore the bone structural changes following EL treatment in normal and androgen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 12 months were divided into normal control, normal rat supplemented with EL, sham-operated, orchidectomised-control, orchidectomised with testosterone replacement, and orchidectomised with EL supplementation groups. Testosterone serum was measured both before and after the completion of the treatment. After 6 weeks of the treatment, the femora were processed for bone histomorphometry. Testosterone replacement was able to raise the testosterone level and restore the bone volume of orchidectomised rats. EL supplementation failed to emulate both these testosterone actions. The inability of EL to do so may be related to the absence of testes in the androgen deficient osteoporosis model for EL to stimulate testosterone production. PMID:22966245

  9. Testosterone is negatively associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in men.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guo, Chang-Yan; Jia, En-Zhi; Zhu, Tie-Bing; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Cao, Ke-Jiang; Ma, Wen-Zhu; Yang, Zhi-Jian

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to determine whether plasma testosterone is associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a group of 803 men who underwent elective coronary angiography. Testosterone levels were measured in 803 male patients who were categorized into three groups according to testosterone level tertiles. All patients underwent elective coronary angiography, and the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) was determined by the Gensini score. Moreover, patients were classified into two groups according to Gensini scores (score ≤26 and score >26) using the median values as cutoff points. The plasma testosterone levels were measured by an ELISA kit. The level of testosterone was negatively associated with the Gensini score (r=-0.188; P=0.000). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that testosterone was an independent risk factor for the Gensini score (β=-0.110; P=0.002) after adjusting for confounding covariates. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the severity of CAD was shown to be significantly lower in the third tertile (highest) of testosterone compared to the first tertile (lowest) of testosterone (odds ratio (OR)=0.465; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.327-0.662; P=0.000). In this study, patients with lower testosterone levels had higher Gensini scores in a group of 803 men who underwent elective coronary angiography. Additional studies are needed to clarify the direction of causality and possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:23042448

  10. The female menstrual cycle does not influence testosterone concentrations in male partners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The time of ovulation has since long been believed to be concealed to male heterosexual partners. Recent studies have, however, called for revision of this notion. For example, male testosterone concentrations have been shown to increase in response to olfactory ovulation cues, which could be biologically relevant by increasing sexual drive and aggressiveness. However, this phenomenon has not previously been investigated in real-life human settings. We therefore thought it of interest to test the hypothesis that males' salivary testosterone concentrations are influenced by phases of their female partners' menstrual cycle; expecting a testosterone peak at ovulation. Methods Thirty young, healthy, heterosexual couples were recruited. During the course of 30-40 days, the women registered menses and ovulation, while the men registered sexual activity, physical exercise, alcohol intake and illness (confounders), and obtained daily saliva samples for testosterone measurements. All data, including the registered confounders, were subjected to multiple regression analysis. Results In contrast to the hypothesis, the ovulation did not affect the testosterone levels, and the resulting testosterone profile during the menstrual cycle was on the average flat. The specific main hypothesis, that male testosterone levels on the day of ovulation would be higher than day 4 of the cycle, was clearly contradicted by a type II error(β)-analysis (< 14.3% difference in normalized testosterone concentration; β = 0.05). Conclusions Even though an ovulation-related salivary testosterone peak was observed in individual cases, no significant effect was found on a group level. PMID:22214343

  11. Testosterone deficiency and quality of life in Australasian testicular cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, B; Fournier, M; Olver, I N; Stockler, M R; Whitford, H; Toner, G C; Thomson, D B; Davis, I D; Hanning, F; Singhal, N; Underhill, C; Clingan, P; McDonald, A; Boland, A; Grimison, P

    2014-08-01

    This is the first prospective study in a contemporary Australian/New Zealand population to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in testicular cancer survivors at 12 months from treatment, and any association with poorer quality of life. Hormone assays from 54 evaluable patients in a prospective cohort study revealed biochemical hypogonadism in 18 patients (33%) and low-normal testosterone in 13 patients (24%). We found no association between testosterone levels and quality of life (all P > 0.05). Hypogonadal patients should be considered for testosterone replacement to prevent long-term morbidity. PMID:25081047

  12. Is rising obesity causing a secular (age-independent) decline in testosterone among American men?

    PubMed

    Mazur, Allan; Westerman, Ronny; Mueller, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The testosterone of men in industrial societies peaks in their twenties and tends to decline with increasing age. Apart from this individual-level decline, there have been reports of a secular (age-independent population-level) decline in testosterone among American and Scandinavian men during the past few decades, possibly an indication of declining male reproductive health. It has been suggested that both declines in testosterone (individual-level and population-level) are due to increasing male obesity because men in industrial society tend to add body fat as they age, and overall rates of obesity are increasing. Using an unusually large and lengthy longitudinal dataset (991 US Air Force veterans examined in six cycles over 20 years), we investigate the relationship of obesity to individual and population-level declines in testosterone. Over twenty years of study, longitudinal decline in mean testosterone was at least twice what would be expected from cross-sectional estimates of the aging decline. Men who put on weight intensified their testosterone decline, some greatly so, but even among those who held their weight constant or lost weight during the study, mean testosterone declined 117 ng/dl (19%) over 20 years. We have not identified the reason for secular decline in testosterone, but we exclude increasing obesity as a sufficient or primary explanation, and we deny the supposition that men who avoid excessive weight will maintain their youthful levels of testosterone.

  13. The Effects of Testosterone on Oxidative Stress Markers in Mice with Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Hamid; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Pasalar, Parvin; Jahanzad, Issa; Ghorbani, Rostam; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes infertility in male patients through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen and hormone abnormalities. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in poor semen quality and subsequent infertility in males with SCI. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of SCI on the level of testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous testosterone on the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation (PCO), as markers of OS, in 10 groups of SCI mice. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was determined using the 2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation assay. Results Exogenous testosterone administration in mice with SCI significantly reduced SOD and GPx enzyme activities and MDA level. There was no significant decrease in PCO content. In addition, TAC remarkably increased in the sham and SCI groups not treated with testosterone but remained unchanged in all other experimental groups. Exogenous testosterone also reduced serum testosterone levels in all groups except the positive control group. Conclusion Our cumulative data indicated that SCI could cause sterility by disturbing the plasmatic testosterone balance. The normal level of endogenous testosterone was not completely restored by exogenous testosterone administration. PMID:27123205

  14. Association of testosterone and BDNF serum levels with craving during alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Annemarie; Lenz, Bernd; Opfermann, Birgitt; Gröschl, Michael; Janke, Eva; Stange, Katrin; Groh, Adrian; Kornhuber, Johannes; Frieling, Helge; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show associations between testosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF) serum levels. BDNF and testosterone have been independently reported to influence alcohol consumption. Therefore, we aimed to investigate a possible interplay of testosterone and BDNF contributing to alcohol dependence. Regarding possible interplay of testosterone and BDNF and the activity of the hypothalamic pituitary axis (HPA), we included cortisol serum levels in our research. We investigated testosterone and BDNF serum levels in a sample of 99 male alcohol-dependent patients during alcohol withdrawal (day 1, 7, and 14) and compared them to a healthy male control group (n = 17). The testosterone serum levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the patients' group than in the control group and decreased significantly during alcohol withdrawal (p < 0.001). The decrease of testosterone serum levels during alcohol withdrawal (days 1-7) was significantly associated with the BDNF serum levels (day 1: p = 0.008). In a subgroup of patients showing high cortisol serum levels (putatively mirroring high HPA activity), we found a significant association of BDNF and testosterone as well as with alcohol craving measured by the Obsessive and Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). Our data suggest a possible association of BDNF and testosterone serum levels, which may be relevant for the symptomatology of alcohol dependence. Further studies are needed to clarify our results. PMID:27514572

  15. Single dose testosterone administration alleviates gaze avoidance in women with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Enter, Dorien; Terburg, David; Harrewijn, Anita; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Gaze avoidance is one of the most characteristic and persistent social features in people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). It signals social submissiveness and hampers adequate social interactions. Patients with SAD typically show reduced testosterone levels, a hormone that facilitates socially dominant gaze behavior. Therefore we tested as a proof of principle whether single dose testosterone administration can reduce gaze avoidance in SAD. In a double-blind, within-subject design, 18 medication-free female participants with SAD and 19 female healthy control participants received a single dose of 0.5mg testosterone and a matched placebo, at two separate days. On each day, their spontaneous gaze behavior was recorded using eye-tracking, while they looked at angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions. Testosterone enhanced the percentage of first fixations to the eye-region in participants with SAD compared to healthy controls. In addition, SAD patients' initial gaze avoidance in the placebo condition was associated with more severe social anxiety symptoms and this relation was no longer present after testosterone administration. These findings indicate that single dose testosterone administration can alleviate gaze avoidance in SAD. They support theories on the dominance enhancing effects of testosterone and extend those by showing that effects are particularly strong in individuals featured by socially submissive behavior. The finding that this core characteristic of SAD can be directly influenced by single dose testosterone administration calls for future inquiry into the clinical utility of testosterone in the treatment of SAD.

  16. Social dominance and serum testosterone concentration in dyads of male Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M R; Kaplan, J R; Bumsted, P T; Koritnik, D R

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between social dominance and serum testosterone concentration was evaluated in 24 male Macaca fascicularis in 14 dyads at 2-week intervals over an 8-month period. No associations between testosterone concentration and dominance ranks were found in dyads with "clear dominance" relationships. A significant positive association was found between testosterone concentration and dominance ranks in dyads that exhibited "contested dominance" or dominance reversals. Thus, higher testosterone concentration corresponded to social dominance in subjects dominant as the result of a contest, rather than a consequence of high relative rank.

  17. The effects of castration followed testosterone supplementation in prostatic complex of Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-06-01

    The prostatic complex (ventral and dorsal regions) of Artibeus planirostris exhibits seasonal variations throughout the year. Circulating testosterone was correlated with prostate weight, showing an increase from autumn to summer, with the highest peak in summer corresponding to the largest breeding season. This indicates that the level of serum testosterone influences variations in both testicular and prostatic weights. Serum testosterone levels seem to be closely related to the different responses of these glands throughout the year. The castration (consequent suppression of testosterone) and subsequent hormone supplementation may elucidate the relationship of these two glandular types with testosterone. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and the testosterone supplementation in the male prostatic complex of A. planirostris. The results indicated that both prostatic regions were affected by the ablation of testosterone, presenting a decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. Similarly, the prostate was responsive to hormonal supplementation, having a recovery of the active morphophysiological pattern with testosterone supplementation. However, data have shown that the ventral region was more sensitive to changes in testosterone than the dorsal, presenting greater cell renewal. PMID:27032910

  18. The effects of saliva collection, handling and storage on salivary testosterone measurement.

    PubMed

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Fábryová, Helena; Koborová, Ivana; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-12-20

    Several endocrine parameters commonly measured in plasma, such as steroid hormones, can be measured in the oral fluid. However, there are several technical aspects of saliva sampling and processing that can potentially bias the validity of salivary testosterone measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects caused by repeated sampling; 5 min centrifugation (at 2000, 6000 or 10,000g); the stimulation of saliva flow by a cotton swab soaked in 2% citric acid touching the tongue; different storage times and conditions as well as the impact of blood contamination on salivary testosterone concentration measured using a commercially available ELISA kit. Fresh, unprocessed, unstimulated saliva samples served as a control. Salivary testosterone concentrations were influenced neither by repeated sampling nor by stimulation of salivary flow. Testosterone levels determined in samples stored in various laboratory conditions for time periods up to 1 month did not differ in comparison with controls. For both genders, salivary testosterone levels were substantially reduced after centrifugation (men F=29.1; women F=56.17, p<0.0001). Blood contamination decreased salivary testosterone levels in a dose-dependent manner (men F=6.54, p<0.01, F=5.01, p<0.05). Salivary testosterone can be considered A robust and stable marker. However, saliva processing and blood leakage can introduce bias into measurements of salivary testosterone using ELISA. Our observations should be considered in studies focusing on salivary testosterone.

  19. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii).

    PubMed

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-03-25

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs.

  20. The hidden dimensions of the competition effect: basal cortisol and basal testosterone jointly predict changes in salivary testosterone after social victory in men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Watson, Neil V

    2012-11-01

    Dominance struggles appear to affect hormone concentrations in many mammalian species, such that higher concentrations of testosterone are seen in winners of competitions, compared to losers. This so-called, "competition effect" has received inconsistent empirical support, suggesting that additional psychological (e.g., mood), situational (i.e., nature of the competition) and physiological (e.g., cortisol) variables might intervene in modulating testosterone fluctuations after social contests. We investigated possible interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis in predicting transient changes in testosterone after social victory or defeat on a familiar competitive task. In particular, the present study examined the dual-hormone hypothesis - proposing that baseline cortisol potently modulates the competition effect (Mehta and Josephs, 2010) - in a sample of healthy young men engaged in head-to-head competition on a widely played commercial videogame, Tetris. We found a significant interaction between HPG and HPA axes status and the competition effect on testosterone in the randomly assigned videogame winners, such that winners with a pre-competition combination of high baseline testosterone and low baseline cortisol exhibited significantly greater post-competition testosterone concentrations. The randomly assigned videogame losers showed significantly decreased post-competition levels of testosterone. Possible biological and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed.

  1. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  2. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Mortality in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Hackett, G I

    2016-02-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Several authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations, whilst others have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous under-diagnosis and under-treatment in line with evidence based guidelines. It is unlikely that persuasive advertising or convenient formulations could grow a market over such a sustained period if the treatment was not effective. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT usually for ED. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with a possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing that therapy associated with clear increases in serum testosterone levels to the normal range is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively, they have compared non-treated patients with under-treated or non-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimes. Recent evidence suggests long-acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk, but the

  3. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Mortality in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Hackett, G I

    2016-02-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Several authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations, whilst others have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous under-diagnosis and under-treatment in line with evidence based guidelines. It is unlikely that persuasive advertising or convenient formulations could grow a market over such a sustained period if the treatment was not effective. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT usually for ED. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with a possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing that therapy associated with clear increases in serum testosterone levels to the normal range is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively, they have compared non-treated patients with under-treated or non-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimes. Recent evidence suggests long-acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk, but the

  4. Prenatal maternal programming determines testosterone response during social challenge.

    PubMed

    Kemme, Kristina; Kaiser, Sylvia; Sachser, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    The present study investigated in domestic guinea pigs whether the effects of prenatal social stress are pathological consequences of adverse social conditions; or whether mothers adjust their offspring to the environment they experience during pregnancy. As a prenatal stressor social instability was used: we studied male guinea pig offspring whose mothers lived in a stable social environment (SE-sons) or in an unstable social environment (UE-sons) during pregnancy. Eight experimental groups were established, consisting of one SE-son, one UE-son and five females, respectively. All experimental groups remained in a stable group composition for the whole investigation time. We hypothesized that if mothers prenatally adapt their offspring, in a stable social environment SE-sons will be dominant, display agonistic and courtship behavior more frequently, have higher body weights, be less stressed and have higher testosterone concentrations than UE-sons. Our results show no significant differences between SE- and UE-sons concerning behavior, body weight or plasma-cortisol concentrations. Hence no evidence exists that an unstable social environment during pregnancy has pathological consequences for the male offsprings' phenotype. However, SE-sons had significantly higher plasma testosterone concentrations than UE-sons in phases when females were receptive. A higher reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis might enable SE-males to adjust testosterone levels to the present social situation: they are significantly elevated in decisive phases of female receptivity, but remain on a lower level before and after reproductive challenge. Thus, mothers who experienced social stability during pregnancy provide their sons prenatally with a promising reproductive strategy in competitive situations later in life.

  5. Intensive exercise training suppresses testosterone during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Stanford, K. I.; Stein, T. P.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest (BR) alter plasma hormone levels inconsistently. This may be due, in part, to prescription of heavy exercise as a countermeasure for ameliorating the adverse effects of disuse. The initial project was to assess exercise programs to maintain aerobic performance and leg strength during BR. The present study evaluates the effect of BR and the performance of the prescribed exercise countermeasures on plasma steroid levels. In a 30-day BR study of male subjects, the efficacy of isotonic (ITE, n = 7) or isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training was evaluated in contrast to no exercise (n = 5). These exercise countermeasures protected aerobic performance and leg strength successfully. BR alone (no-exercise group) did not change steroidogenesis, as assessed by the plasma concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, aldosterone, and free (FT) and total testosterone (TT). In the exercise groups, both FT and TT were decreased (P < 0.05): FT during IKE from 24 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 2.0 pg/ml and during ITE from 21 +/- 1.5 to 18 +/- 1 pg/ml, and TT during IKE from 748 +/- 68 to 534 +/- 46 ng/dl and during ITE from 565 +/- 36 to 496 +/- 38 ng/dl. The effect of intensive exercise countermeasures on plasma testosterone was not associated with indexes of overtraining. The reduction in plasma testosterone associated with both the IKE and ITE countermeasures during BR supports our hypothesis that intensive exercise countermeasures may, in part, contribute to changes in plasma steroid concentrations during spaceflight.

  6. Gonadotrophin secretion patterns in testicular cancer patients with greatly increased human chorionic gonadotrophin serum concentrations.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, S; Gerth, R; Mann, K; Dirnhofer, S; Berger, P

    1998-12-01

    Despite the fact that a number of alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormone axis have been identified in patients with testicular cancer, little is known about the gonadotrophin secretion pattern in such patients who have greatly increased human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) serum concentrations. The aim of this study was to assess this issue in detail using a longitudinal study design and a panel of highly sensitive and specific immunoassays. Eleven patients with non-seminomatous (n=11), and one with seminomatous testicular cancer with pretreatment hCG serum concentrations exceeding 10(5) pg/ml (>1000 mIU/ml) were selected and followed for a mean of 166 days (mean of 14 serum samples/patient) after initial diagnosis. Serum concentrations of hCG, its free alpha- (hCGalpha) and beta- (hCGbeta) subunits, human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) and human luteinizing hormone (hLH) were determined by highly sensitive and specific enzymometric immunoassays based on a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MCA) established in our laboratory. A potential FSH-like activity (FSA) of hCG in the respective sera was determined by radioreceptor assays (RRA) for LH/CG and FSH. Specificity of FSA at the level of the receptor was assessed by MCA-based immunoabsorption studies. At diagnosis, hCG (9.8x10(7)+/-4.84x10(7) pg/ml; range 1.1x10(5)-5x10(8) pg/ml) was greatly increased and serum hFSH was undetectable (<9 pg/ml) in 11 patients, and one patient had very low, albeit detectable (approximately 30 pg/ml) hFSH concentrations. hLH was below the limit of detection (<2 pg/ml) in five individuals. During successful chemotherapy, hCG rapidly declined to physiological concentrations and hFSH/hLH returned to normal or even reached supraphysiological values. There was a highly significant negative correlation between hCG and hFSH (P=0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, hLH (P=0.0265). The ability of serum hCG to block the binding of [125I]rFSH (rat FSH) to its receptor was found to

  7. Teeth, Sex, and Testosterone: Aging in the World's Smallest Primate

    PubMed Central

    Zohdy, Sarah; Gerber, Brian D.; Tecot, Stacey; Blanco, Marina B.; Winchester, Julia M.; Wright, Patricia C.; Jernvall, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Mouse lemurs (Microcebus spp.) are an exciting new primate model for understanding human aging and disease. In captivity, Microcebus murinus develops human-like ailments of old age after five years (e.g., neurodegeneration analogous to Alzheimer's disease) but can live beyond 12 years. It is believed that wild Microcebus follow a similar pattern of senescence observed in captive animals, but that predation limits their lifespan to four years, thus preventing observance of these diseases in the wild. Testing whether this assumption is true is informative about both Microcebus natural history and environmental influences on senescence, leading to interpretation of findings for models of human aging. Additionally, the study of Microcebus longevity provides an opportunity to better understand mechanisms of sex-biased longevity. Longevity is often shorter in males of species with high male-male competition, such as Microcebus, but mouse lemurs are sexually monomorphic, suggesting similar lifespans. We collected individual-based observations of wild brown mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) from 2003–2010 to investigate sex-differences in survival and longevity. Fecal testosterone was measured as a potential mechanism of sex-based differences in survival. We used a combination of high-resolution tooth wear techniques, mark-recapture, and hormone enzyme immunoassays. We found no dental or physical signs of senescence in M. rufus as old as eight years (N = 189, ages 1–8, mean = 2.59±1.63 SE), three years older than captive, senescent congeners (M. murinus). Unlike other polygynandrous vertebrates, we found no sex difference in age-dependent survival, nor sex or age differences in testosterone levels. While elevated male testosterone levels have been implicated in shorter lifespans in several species, this is one of the first studies to show equivalent testosterone levels accompanying equivalent lifespans. Future research on captive aged individuals can determine

  8. The behavior of chickens following embryonic treatment with testosterone propionate.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, J M; Wolfe, J L; Glick, B

    1975-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate an initial response and the flocking behavior of chicks treated embryonically with testosterone propionate (TP). The high (1.28 gm. %) and low (0.32 gm. %) levels of TP interfered with the response of these chicks to a specific stimulus. However, only the high level TP depressed the flocking response. TP administered prior to day 13 of embryonic development will depress sexual behavior in the chicken. These data suggest that TP influences a variety of behavioral patterns in the chicken. PMID:1228736

  9. Correlates of low testosterone in men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Pacca, F; Cavallo, F; Costanzo, M; Felzani, G; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-09-01

    Although high rates of serum testosterone deficiency have been reported in men with spinal cord injury (SCI), its determinants and attributes are not yet established. The aim of this study was to recognize, among putative determinants and attributes of androgen deficiency, those significantly associated to low testosterone after adjustment for confounders recognizable in men with chronic SCI. A biochemical androgen deficiency (total testosterone <300 ng/dL) was exhibited by 18 of 51 patients (35.3%). Significant correlates of testosterone levels were as follows: weekly leisure time physical activity (LTPA) explored by the LTPA Questionnaire for people with SCI, body mass index (BMI), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides and sexual symptoms, explored by the aging males' symptom (AMS) questionnaire. At the multiple linear regression analysis, among putative determinants of low testosterone, only weekly LTPA and BMI exhibited a significant association with testosterone levels, explaining 54.2 and 9.0% of testosterone variability respectively. At the linear regression models, among various putative attributes of androgen deficiency, only lower sexual desire and, at a lesser extent, higher HOMA-IR, exhibited significant associations with lower testosterone levels, after adjustment for BMI, age, comorbidities and weekly LTPA. In conclusion, poor LTPA, high BMI and low sexual desire are independent predictors of low testosterone in men with chronic SCI. This is relevant to clinical practice, as all these features are routinely assessed in rehabilitation settings for SCI. As poor LTPA and high BMI are modifiable life-style related risk factors, prospective studies could clarify whether life-style modification could increase the level of testosterone and improve the low sexual desire, relevant clinical attribute of low testosterone in men with SCI. PMID:24925765

  10. Testosterone related to age and life-history stages in male baboons and geladas

    PubMed Central

    Beehner, Jacinta C.; Gesquiere, Laurence; Seyfarth, Robert M.; Cheney, Dorothy L.; Alberts, Susan C.; Altmann, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our knowledge of how testosterone mediates life-history trade-offs, this research has primarily focused on seasonal species. We know comparatively little about the relationship between testosterone and life-history stages for non-seasonally breeding species. Here we examine testosterone profiles across the lifespan of males from three non-seasonally breeding primates: yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus or P. hamadryas cynocephalus), chacma baboons (Papio ursinus or P. h. ursinus), and geladas (Theropithecus gelada). First, we predict that testosterone profiles will track the reproductive profiles of each taxon across their respective breeding years. Second, we evaluate age-related changes in testosterone to determine whether several life-history transitions are associated with these changes. Subjects include males (>2.5 years) from wild populations of each taxon from whom we had fecal samples for hormone determination. Although testosterone profiles across species were broadly similar, considerable variability was found in the timing of two major changes: (1) the attainment of adult levels of testosterone, and (2) the decline in testosterone after the period of maximum production. Attainment of adult testosterone levels was delayed by one year in chacmas compared with yellows and geladas. With respect to the decline in testosterone, geladas and chacmas exhibited a significant drop after three years of maximum production, while yellows declined so gradually that no significant annual drop was ever detected. For both yellows and chacmas, increases in testosterone production preceded elevations in social dominance rank. We discuss these differences in the context of ecological and behavioral differences exhibited by these taxa. PMID:19712676

  11. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles.

  12. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles. PMID:26699527

  13. Control of the misuse of testosterone in castrated horses based on an international threshold in plasma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Kwok, W H; Leung, David K K; Riggs, Christopher M; Sidlow, Gordon; Stewart, Brian D; Wong, April S Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2015-05-01

    Testosterone is an endogenous steroid produced primarily in the testes. Trace levels of testosterone are found in urine samples from geldings, as testosterone is also secreted by the adrenal. An international threshold of free and conjugated testosterone in urine (20 ng/mL) was adopted by the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) in 1996 for controlling testosterone misuse in geldings. In view of the recent popularity of using blood in doping control testing, it is necessary to establish a threshold for testosterone in gelding plasma. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method was developed for quantifying low levels of free testosterone in gelding plasma. Based on a population study of 152 post-race plasma samples, the mean ± SD concentration of plasma testosterone was determined to be 14.7 ± 6.8 pg/mL. Normal distribution could be obtained after square-root or cube-root transformation, resulting in respective tentative thresholds of 49 or 55 pg/mL (corresponding to a risk factor of less than 1 in 10 000). A rounded-up threshold of 100 pg/mL of free testosterone in plasma was proposed. Based on the administration of Testosterone Suspension 100 to six geldings, the same average detection time of 14 days was observed in either plasma or urine using the proposed plasma threshold and the existing international urine threshold. The maximum detection time was 18 days in plasma and 20 days in urine. The results demonstrated the proposed plasma threshold is effective in controlling the misuse of testosterone in geldings. Similar results were subsequently obtained in Europe, and this proposed threshold was adopted by IFHA in October 2013.

  14. One step enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for direct estimation of serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Basu, Anupam; Kariya, Kiran P

    2003-01-01

    One step competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for direct estimation of testosterone in human serum is described. Testosterone-3-O-carboxymethyl-oxime-bovine serum albumin (testosterone-3-O-CMO-BSA), was used as immunogen and testosterone-3-O-carboxymethyl-oxime-adipic-acid dihydrazide-horseradish peroxidase (testosterone-3-O-CMO-ADH-HRP) was used as tracer. To the testosterone antibody coated microtiter wells, standard or serum samples (100 microL), along with testosterone-3-O-CMO-ADH-HRP conjugate (100 microL) were incubated for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Bound enzyme activity was measured by using tetra methyl benzidine/hydrogen peroxide (TMB/H2O2) as a substrate. In this new strategy, charcoal stripped pooled human serum spiked with non-cross reactive C18, C19, C21, and C27 steroids, used for preparing the standards and blocking the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)/and other steroid binding globulins (SBG). The sensitivity of the assay was 0.015 ng/mL. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) were ranged from 7.8 to 11.8 and 4.8 to 10.4, respectively. The serum testosterone values, obtained by this method, were correlated well with those obtained by radioimmunoassay r = .98 (n = 100). PMID:12778972

  15. Aggressive behavior and change in salivary testosterone concentrations predict willingness to engage in a competitive task.

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-08-01

    The current study investigated relationships among aggressive behavior, change in salivary testosterone concentrations, and willingness to engage in a competitive task. Thirty-eight male participants provided saliva samples before and after performing the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (a laboratory measure that provides opportunity for aggressive and defensive behavior while working for reward; all three involve pressing specific response keys). Baseline testosterone concentrations were not associated with aggressive responding. However, aggressive responding (but not point reward or point protection responding) predicted the pre- to post-PSAP change in testosterone: Those with the highest aggressive responding had the largest percent increase in testosterone concentrations. Together, aggressive responding and change in testosterone predicted willingness to compete following the PSAP. Controlling for aggression, men who showed a rise in testosterone were more likely to choose to compete again (p=0.03) and controlling for testosterone change, men who showed the highest level of aggressive responding were more likely to choose the non-competitive task (p=0.02). These results indicate that situation-specific aggressive behavior and testosterone responsiveness are functionally relevant predictors of future social behavior.

  16. Responses of ram lambs to active immunization against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-03-01

    Active immunization of young ram lambs against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) was shown to block the growth attributes characteristic of intact ram lambs. Testosterone and LHRH-immunized lambs grew at a slower rate and converted feed to live weight gain less efficiently than albumin-immunized controls. Lambs immunized against testosterone and LHRH had high antibody titers for their respective antigens. Moreover, testosterone-immunized lambs had high serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, whereas LHRH-immunized lambs had low to nondetectable serum concentrations of these hormones. Release of LH and testosterone following the intravenous administration of LHRH (250 ng) was absent in LHRH-immunized lambs, but quantitatively similar for intact and albumin-immunized control lambs. Testosterone-immunized lambs responded as did conventional castrates with a large LH release, but testosterone concentrations were unchanged. These findings are discussed relative to the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular endocrine axis and the importance of gonadotropin support for normal testicular development. These data show that LHRH immunoneutralization effectively retards testicular development and produces a castration effect in young ram lambs.

  17. Effect of testosterone supplementation on sexual functioning in aging men: a 6-month randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Emmelot-Vonk, M H; Verhaar, H J J; Nakhai-Pour, H R; Grobbee, D E; van der Schouw, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Serum testosterone levels decline significantly with aging and this has been associated with reduced sexual function. We have conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the effect of testosterone supplementation on sexual function in 237 elderly men with a testosterone level <13.7 nmol l(-1). Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral testosterone undecanoate or a placebo for 6 months. A total of 207 men completed the study. After treatment, there were no differences in scores on sexual function between the groups. Subanalysis showed that although a baseline testosterone level in the lowest tertile was associated with significantly lower scores for sexual fantasies, desire of sexual contact and frequency of sexual contact, supplementation of testosterone did not result in improvement on any of these items in this group. In conclusion, the findings do not support the view that testosterone undecanoate supplementation for 6 months to elderly men with low-normal testosterone concentrations favorably affects sexual function. PMID:19225466

  18. Relations between Prenatal Testosterone Levels and Cognitive Abilities at 4 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegan, Jo-Anne K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared children's cognitive abilities at four years and their prenatal amniotic fluid testosterone levels. For girls, prenatal testosterone levels were related in a curvilinear manner to language comprehension and classification abilities, and inversely related to counting and knowledge of number facts. For boys, no relationships were found. (BC)

  19. Sex-Specific Associations between Umbilical Cord Blood Testosterone Levels and Language Delay in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Mattes, Eugen; Maybery, Murray T.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Jacoby, Peter; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Hickey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that prenatal testosterone exposure may be associated with language delay. However, no study has examined a large sample of children at multiple time-points. Methods: Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at 861 births and analysed for bioavailable testosterone (BioT) concentrations. When…

  20. Fulfilling desire: evidence for negative feedback between men's testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number.

    PubMed

    Puts, David A; Pope, Lauramarie E; Hill, Alexander K; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A; Welling, Lisa L M; Wheatley, John R; Marc Breedlove, S

    2015-04-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men's sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgens and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports.

  1. Stable carbon isotope ratio profiling of illicit testosterone preparations--domestic and international seizures.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Lance; Cawley, Adam; Drury, Jason; Edey, Claire; Hasick, Nicole; Goebel, Catrin

    2014-10-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is now established as a robust and mature analytical technique for the doping control of endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids in human sport. It relies on the assumption that the carbon isotope ratios of naturally produced steroids are significantly different to synthetically manufactured testosterone or testosterone prohormones used in commercial medical or dietary supplement products. Recent publications in this journal have highlighted the existence of black market testosterone preparations with carbon isotope ratios within the range reported for endogenous steroids (i.e. δ(13) C ≥ -25.8 ‰). In this study, we set out to profile domestic and international law enforcement seizures of illicit testosterone products to monitor the prevalence of 'enriched' substrates--which if administered to human subjects would be considered problematic for the use of current GC-C-IRMS methodologies for the doping control of testosterone in sport. The distribution of δ(13) C values for this illicit testosterone sample population (n = 283) ranged from -23.4 ‰ to -32.9 ‰ with mean and median of -28.6 ‰--comparable to previous work. However, only 13 out of 283 testosterone samples (4.6 %) were found to display δ(13) C values ≥ -25.8 ‰, confirming that in the vast majority of cases of illicit testosterone administration, current GC-C-IRMS doping control procedures would be capable of confirming misuse.

  2. Vehicle effects on the in vitro penetration of testosterone through equine skin.

    PubMed

    Mills, P C

    2007-02-01

    The effects of three vehicles, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), ethanol (50% in PBS w/w) and propylene glycol (50% in PBS w/w) on in vitro transdermal penetration of testosterone was investigated in the horse. Skin was harvested from the thorax of five Thoroughbred horses after euthanasia and stored at -20 degrees C until required. The skin was then defrosted and placed into Franz-type diffusion cells, which were maintained at approximately 32 degrees C by a water bath. Saturated solutions of testosterone, containing trace amounts of radiolabelled [14C]testosterone, in each vehicle were applied to the outer (stratum corneum) surface of each skin sample and aliquots of receptor fluid were collected at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 20, 22 and 24 h and analysed for testosterone by scintillation counting. The maximum flux (Jmax) of testosterone was significantly higher for all sites when testosterone was dissolved in a vehicle containing 50% ethanol or 50% propylene glycol, compared to PBS. In contrast, higher residues of testosterone were found remaining within the skin when PBS was used as a vehicle. This study shows that variability in clinical response to testosterone could be expected with formulation design. PMID:17191091

  3. Endogenous testosterone levels are associated with neural activity in men with schizophrenia during facial emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ellen; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Catts, Stanley V; Vercammen, Ans; White, Christopher; Gur, Raquel E; Weickert, Thomas W

    2015-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that testosterone may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia given that testosterone has been linked to cognition and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Here, we determine the extent to which serum testosterone levels are related to neural activity in affective processing circuitry in men with schizophrenia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal changes as 32 healthy controls and 26 people with schizophrenia performed a facial emotion identification task. Whole brain analyses were performed to determine regions of differential activity between groups during processing of angry versus non-threatening faces. A follow-up ROI analysis using a regression model in a subset of 16 healthy men and 16 men with schizophrenia was used to determine the extent to which serum testosterone levels were related to neural activity. Healthy controls displayed significantly greater activation than people with schizophrenia in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). There was no significant difference in circulating testosterone levels between healthy men and men with schizophrenia. Regression analyses between activation in the IFG and circulating testosterone levels revealed a significant positive correlation in men with schizophrenia (r=.63, p=.01) and no significant relationship in healthy men. This study provides the first evidence that circulating serum testosterone levels are related to IFG activation during emotion face processing in men with schizophrenia but not in healthy men, which suggests that testosterone levels modulate neural processes relevant to facial emotion processing that may interfere with social functioning in men with schizophrenia.

  4. Effects of Testosterone Therapy on Cognitive Function in Aging: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jeremy T; Hildreth, Kerry L; Pelak, Victoria S

    2016-09-01

    Endogenous testosterone in the aging man has been scrutinized extensively in regard to its effects on performance in many cognitive domains, especially verbal fluency, visuospatial and visuoperceptual abilities, memory, and executive function. Studies of testosterone supplementation have sought to identify potential cognitive improvements in men with and without baseline cognitive impairment, and have had a wide range of results. The variability in outcomes is likely related, in part, to the lack of consensus on methods for testosterone measurement and supplementation and, in part, to the disparate measures of cognitive function used in randomized controlled studies. Despite the limitations imposed by such inconsistent methods, promising associations have been found between cognition and testosterone supplementation in both eugonadal men and men with low testosterone levels, with and without baseline cognitive dysfunction. This systematic review highlights the cognitive measures used in and the outcomes of existing studies of testosterone and cognition in aging men. The review suggests that larger studies and a more standardized approach to assessment will be needed before we can fully understand and realize sustained benefits from testosterone supplementation in the elderly male population, particularly given the substantial increase in testosterone supplementation in clinical practice. PMID:27662450

  5. Testosterone during Pregnancy and Gender Role Behavior of Preschool Children: A Longitudinal, Population Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Melissa; Golombok, Susan; Rust, John; Johnston, Katie J.; Golding, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Related blood levels of testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in pregnant women to gender role behavior among 342 male and 337 female offspring at 3.5 years. Found that testosterone levels related linearly to girls' gender role behavior. Neither hormone related to boys' gender role behavior. Other factors, including older brothers or…

  6. The uptake of IgG by human placental chorionic villi: a correlated autoradiographic and wide aperture counting study.

    PubMed

    Ockleford, C D; Clint, J M

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of 3H-IgG into human placental chorionic villi in vitro takes place for at least 1 h at 37 degrees C and at 4 degrees C. The rate of uptake is lower at the latter temperature, but still about 20 per cent of the 37 degrees C total. Measurement of cell-associated redioactivity at 4 degrees C cannot therefore be used as a measure of binding: genuine uptake, probably as a result of endocytosis, appears to occur at this temperature. Some proportion of the uptake of IgG at 37 degrees C can be inhibited by colchicine and by cytochalasin B, but some is refractory to these treatments. A coated vesicle-enriched fraction isolated from placenta previously incubated with 3H-IgG was found to be associated with radioisotope.

  7. Experimental elevation of wildlife testosterone using silastic tube implants.

    PubMed

    Koresh, Efrat; Matas, Devorah; Koren, Lee

    2016-10-01

    Testosterone (T) is a key androgen that mediates vertebrate molecular, cellular, and behavioral processes. Its manipulation is therefore of interest to a vast number of researchers studying animal behavior and reproduction, among others. Here, the usage of silastic implants across wildlife species is reviewed, and a method to manipulate rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) testosterone levels using silastic implants is presented. Using a series of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, the secretion patterns of silastic tubes and silastic glue were tested and were surprisingly found to be similar. In addition, we studied endogenous T levels in wild-captured rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), and using T implants succeeded in elevating T to the maximal physiological concentrations recorded during the mating period. The number of implants that were inserted was the only predictor of T levels, and seven 20mm implants were found to be the optimal dose. Implants induced sexual behaviors in the non-reproductive period. The duration of time that the implants were in the hyrax was the only significant factor that influenced the amount of T left over in the implant once it was removed. All together we affirm that T implants may offer a versatile tool for wildlife behavioral research by elevating T levels in the non-breeding period to maximal breeding levels. PMID:27663363

  8. Baseline cortisol moderates testosterone reactivity to women's intercollegiate athletic competition.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David A; Casto, Kathleen V

    2015-04-01

    Recent research suggests that cortisol (C) level moderates testosterone (T) reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in men. The extent to which C moderates T reactivity in other circumstances and in women is not known. In this retrospective study, before- and after-competition salivary levels of C and T from 97 intercollegiate women athletes competing in one of four different sports (soccer, volleyball, softball, tennis) were used to evaluate the influence of before-competition C level on T reactivity in women's athletic competition. Athletic competition was associated with a substantial increase in salivary levels of C and T in the vast majority of athletes. Before-competition level of C significantly moderated testosterone reactivity to athletic competition - women with relatively low levels of C showed larger increases in T to competition than women with higher levels of C. Clearly, the moderating effect of C on T reactivity is not limited to laboratory settings intended to increase social stress, but is also seen in (as we show here) the context of athletic competition. PMID:25647361

  9. Baseline cortisol moderates testosterone reactivity to women's intercollegiate athletic competition.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David A; Casto, Kathleen V

    2015-04-01

    Recent research suggests that cortisol (C) level moderates testosterone (T) reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in men. The extent to which C moderates T reactivity in other circumstances and in women is not known. In this retrospective study, before- and after-competition salivary levels of C and T from 97 intercollegiate women athletes competing in one of four different sports (soccer, volleyball, softball, tennis) were used to evaluate the influence of before-competition C level on T reactivity in women's athletic competition. Athletic competition was associated with a substantial increase in salivary levels of C and T in the vast majority of athletes. Before-competition level of C significantly moderated testosterone reactivity to athletic competition - women with relatively low levels of C showed larger increases in T to competition than women with higher levels of C. Clearly, the moderating effect of C on T reactivity is not limited to laboratory settings intended to increase social stress, but is also seen in (as we show here) the context of athletic competition.

  10. Puberty and testosterone shape the corticospinal tract during male adolescence.

    PubMed

    Pangelinan, Melissa M; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, G Bruce; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    Some of the known sex differences in white matter emerge during adolescence. Here, we replicate and extend our previous findings of sex differences in the structure of the corticospinal tract (Perrin et al. 2009; Hervé et al. 2009). In a large normative sample of adolescents, we observed age × sex interactions in the signal intensity of T1-weighted (T1W) images (n = 941) and in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR; n = 761); both features were inversely associated with age in males but not in females. Moreover, we hypothesized that the age-related differences in CST structure exhibited by males would be mediated by differences in puberty stage and levels of bioavailable testosterone. We confirmed this prediction using mediation analysis with bootstrapping. These findings suggest that sex differences in the CST structure observed during male adolescence may be due to multiple processes associated with puberty, including (but not limited to) the rising levels of testosterone.

  11. Effect of naloxone on serum testosterone in adult male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pedrón, N; Pedroza, D; Calzada, L; Salazar, L; Fuentes, V

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that endogenous opioids may play an important role in the hypothalamic LH-releasing hormone. Administration of high doses of naloxone, an opiate antagonist, produces an increase in plasma concentration of LH. Naltrexone administration to healthy males produces an increase in both immunoactive and bioactive LH. The objective of the present work was to assess the effect of low doses of naloxone during 10 consecutive days on testosterone serum levels in rabbit. Three groups of five rabbits were injected with naloxone or saline. Naloxone was tested at 0.1 and 0.01 mg/kg day-1. Blood samples were taken at 90 min and 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days after starting naloxone administration. Plasma testosterone (T) levels were measured by RIA. T levels increased progressively through the study in the experimental groups. The differences were significant after days 4 and 7 for 0.01-mg/kg and 0.1-mg/kg doses, respectively. T levels in both groups peaked at day 10 and decreased at day 14 (4 days after treatment). PMID:8827343

  12. A concise review of testosterone and bone health

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nur-Vaizura; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana; Chin, Kok-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a condition causing significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population worldwide. Age-related testosterone deficiency is the most important factor of bone loss in elderly men. Androgen can influence bone health by binding to androgen receptors directly or to estrogen receptors (ERs) indirectly via aromatization to estrogen. This review summarized the direct and indirect effects of androgens on bone derived from in vitro, in vivo, and human studies. Cellular studies showed that androgen stimulated the proliferation of preosteoblasts and differentiation of osteoblasts. The converted estrogen suppressed osteoclast formation and resorption activity by blocking the receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligand pathway. In animal studies, activation of androgen and ERα, but not ERβ, was shown to be important in acquisition and maintenance of bone mass. Human epidemiological studies demonstrated a significant relationship between estrogen and testosterone in bone mineral density and fracture risk, but the relative significance between the two remained debatable. Human experimental studies showed that estrogen was needed in suppressing bone resorption, but both androgen and estrogen were indispensable for bone formation. As a conclusion, maintaining optimal level of androgen is essential in preventing osteoporosis and its complications in elderly men. PMID:27703340

  13. Histopathological Changes in the Chorionic Villi and Endometrial Decidual Tissues in the Product of Conception of Spontaneous Abortion Cases.

    PubMed

    Makaju, R; Shrestha, S; Sharma, S; Dhakal, R; Bhandari, S; Shrestha, A; Tamrakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous abortion refers to a pregnancy that ends spontaneously before the fetus has reached a viable gestational age or expulsion or extraction of an embryo or fetus weighing 500 g or less from its mother. The Maternal Mortality Morbidity Survey of Nepal 2008/09 reported that 7% of maternal deaths in Nepal were due to complications related to abortion. Objective The main objective of this study was to examine the histopathological changes in the chorionic villi and endometrial decidual tissue in products of conception obtained from women with spontaneous abortion. Method This is a retrospective study of 111 patients admitted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital (DH-KUH) with the diagnosis of spontaneous abortion during the period of January 2013 to January 2014. Result Among 111 cases of spontaneous abortions, products of conception was seen in 73 (65.77%) and with only one cases of choriocarcinoma. Majority of cases belongs to age group 21-30 years. The most common decidual changes were inflammation (41.4%) followed by fibrin deposition 29.7%. Majority of the cases shows hydropic changes as histopathological changes in chorionic villi. In the present study, minimum age of lady was 15 years and the maximum age was 45 years and the mean age was 25.09±5.58 years at the time of abortion. Among the cases, maximum 69 (62.2%) of them belonged to age group 21-30 years. Correlating the age group with number of abortions was found to be significantly different (Chi-square= 92.35, df= 3, p < 0.001) among four different age groups. Conclusion The histopathological diagnosis of spontaneous abortion will help in further management of the patient. Further study is required to know the cause of different histopathlogical changes in villi as well as in the decidua. PMID:27423288

  14. Histopathological Changes in the Chorionic Villi and Endometrial Decidual Tissues in the Product of Conception of Spontaneous Abortion Cases.

    PubMed

    Makaju, R; Shrestha, S; Sharma, S; Dhakal, R; Bhandari, S; Shrestha, A; Tamrakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous abortion refers to a pregnancy that ends spontaneously before the fetus has reached a viable gestational age or expulsion or extraction of an embryo or fetus weighing 500 g or less from its mother. The Maternal Mortality Morbidity Survey of Nepal 2008/09 reported that 7% of maternal deaths in Nepal were due to complications related to abortion. Objective The main objective of this study was to examine the histopathological changes in the chorionic villi and endometrial decidual tissue in products of conception obtained from women with spontaneous abortion. Method This is a retrospective study of 111 patients admitted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital (DH-KUH) with the diagnosis of spontaneous abortion during the period of January 2013 to January 2014. Result Among 111 cases of spontaneous abortions, products of conception was seen in 73 (65.77%) and with only one cases of choriocarcinoma. Majority of cases belongs to age group 21-30 years. The most common decidual changes were inflammation (41.4%) followed by fibrin deposition 29.7%. Majority of the cases shows hydropic changes as histopathological changes in chorionic villi. In the present study, minimum age of lady was 15 years and the maximum age was 45 years and the mean age was 25.09±5.58 years at the time of abortion. Among the cases, maximum 69 (62.2%) of them belonged to age group 21-30 years. Correlating the age group with number of abortions was found to be significantly different (Chi-square= 92.35, df= 3, p < 0.001) among four different age groups. Conclusion The histopathological diagnosis of spontaneous abortion will help in further management of the patient. Further study is required to know the cause of different histopathlogical changes in villi as well as in the decidua.

  15. Women's Preference for Attractive Makeup Tracks Changes in Their Salivary Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Claire I; Hahn, Amanda C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C

    2015-12-01

    Previous research suggests that women's motivation to appear attractive is increased around the time of ovulation. However, the specific hormonal correlates of within-woman changes in motivation to appear attractive have not been investigated. To address this issue, we used a longitudinal design and a data-driven visual preference task. We found that women's preference for attractive makeup increases when their salivary testosterone levels are high. The relationship between testosterone level and preference for attractive makeup was independent of estradiol level, progesterone level, and estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. These results suggest that testosterone may contribute to changes in women's motivation to wear attractive makeup and, potentially, their motivation to appear attractive in general. Our results are also consistent with recent models of the role of testosterone in social behavior, according to which testosterone increases the probability of behaviors that could function to support the acquisition of mates and competition for resources.

  16. The effect of testosterone on cardiovascular disease: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Su, Jeannie J; Park, Samuel K; Hsieh, T Mike

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Testosterone is the principal male sex hormone and plays an important role in men's health and well-being. Historically, testosterone was believed to adversely affect cardiovascular function. However, contemporary literature has refuted this traditional thinking; testosterone has been suggested to have a protective effect on cardiovascular function through its effects on the vascular system. Data from modern research indicate that hypogonadism is closely related to the development of various cardiovascular risk factors, including hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Several studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of testosterone supplementation therapy on reversing symptoms of hypogonadism and improving cardiovascular disease risk profiles. In this review, we perform a critical analysis on the association between testosterone and cardiovascular disease.

  17. Central and peripheral testosterone effects in men with heart failure: An approach for cardiovascular research

    PubMed Central

    Bušić, Željko; Čulić, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome recognized as a health problem worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, patients with HF still have increased morbidity and mortality. Testosterone is one of the most researched hormones in the course of HF. Growing interest regarding the effect of testosterone, on a variety of body systems, has increased the knowledge about its mechanisms of action. The terms central and peripheral effects are used to distinguish the effects of testosterone on cardiac and extracardiac structures. Central effects include influences on cardiomyocytes and electrophysiology. Peripheral effects include influences on blood vessels, baroreceptor reactivity, skeletal muscles and erythropoesis. Current knowledge about peripheral effects of testosterone may explain much about beneficiary effects in the pathophysiology of HF syndrome. However, central, i.e., cardiac effects of testosterone are to be further explored. PMID:26413227

  18. Parents’ Testosterone and Children’s Perception of Parent-Child Relationship Quality

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Alan; Hibel, Jacob; Granger, Douglas A.; Johnson, David

    2011-01-01

    We examine the link between parental testosterone and children’s perceptions of their relationship with their mother and father. Using data from 352 predominantly white working and middle class families, we find no direct link between mother’s and father’s testosterone and parent-child closeness. However, the association between mothers’ testosterone and mother-child closeness appears to be influenced by the quality of two other family relationships. When father’s marital satisfaction is low, mothers with high testosterone have a poorer relationship with their children. And, when fathers report low levels of intimacy with their children, high testosterone women have a poorer relationship with their children. No comparable associations were observed among fathers. PMID:21843525

  19. Alteration of the lipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes by dietary (n-3) fatty acids changes the responsiveness of Leydig cells and testosterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, E; Garg, M L; Wierzbicki, A; Thomson, A B; Clandinin, M T

    1990-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess whether changing dietary fat composition altered phospholipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes in a manner that altered receptor-mediated action of luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Weanling rats were fed diets that provided high or low cholesterol intakes and that were enriched with linseed oil, fish oil or beef tallow for 4 wk. Feeding diets high in (n-3) fatty acids decreased plasma and testicular plasma membrane 20:4(n-6) content. A marked reduction of the 22:5(n-6) content and an increase in the 22:6(n-3) content of testicular plasma membrane was found only in animals fed fish oil. A decrease in binding capacity of the gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor in the plasma membrane, with no change in receptor affinity, was observed for animals fed either linseed oil or fish oil diets. Dietary treatments that raised plasma membrane cholesterol content and the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio in the membrane were associated with increased binding capacity of the gonadotropin receptor. Feeding diets high in 18:3(n-3) vs. those high in fish oil altered receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase activity in a manner that depended on the level of dietary cholesterol. Feeding diets high in cholesterol or fish oil increased basal and LH-stimulated testosterone synthesis relative to that in animals fed the low cholesterol diet containing linseed oil. It is concluded that changing the fat composition of the diet alters the phospholipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes and that this change in composition influences membrane-mediated unmasking of gonadotropin receptor-mediated action in testicular tissue. PMID:2352035

  20. A review on the relationship between testosterone and life-course persistent antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Bariş O; Derksen, Jan J L

    2012-12-30

    Life-course persistent antisocial behavior is 10 to 14 times more prevalent in males and it has been suggested that testosterone levels could account for this gender bias. Preliminary studies with measures of fetal testosterone find inconsistent associations with antisocial behavior, especially studies that use the 2D:4D ratio as a proxy for fetal testosterone. However, circulating testosterone consistently shows positive associations with antisocial behaviors throughout childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, particularly in males. It is suggested that high fetal/circulating testosterone interactively influence the maturation and functionality of mesolimbic dopaminergic circuitry, right orbitofrontal cortex, and cortico-subcortical connectivity, resulting in a strong reward motivation, low social sensitivity, and dampened regulation of strong motivational/emotional processes. The link between these testosterone induced endophenotypes and actual display of antisocial behavior is strongly modulated by different social (e.g., social rejection, low SES) and genetic (e.g., MAOA, 5HTT) risk factors that can disturb socio-, psycho-, and biological development and interact with testosterone in shaping behavior. When these additional risk factors are present, the testosterone induced endophenotypes may increase the risk for a chronic antisocial lifestyle. However, behavioral endophenotypes induced by testosterone can also predispose towards socially adaptive traits such as a strong achievement motivation, leadership, fair bargaining behaviors, and social assertiveness. These adaptive traits are more likely to emerge when the high testosterone individual has positive social experiences that promote prosocial behaviors such as strong and secure attachments with his caregivers, affiliation with prosocial peers, and sufficient socioeconomic resources. A theoretical model is presented, various hypotheses are examined, and future venues for research are discussed.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of myotrophic actions by testosterone and trenbolone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fan; McCoy, Sean C; Ross, Heather H; Bernardo, Joseph A; Beharry, Adam W; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R; Beck, Darren T; Conover, Christine F; Cannady, Darryl F; Smith, Barbara K; Yarrow, Joshua F; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Androgens regulate body composition and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that trenbolone (a potent synthetic testosterone analogue that is not a substrate for 5-alpha reductase or for aromatase) induces myotrophic effects in skeletal muscle without causing prostate enlargement, which is in contrast to the known prostate enlarging effects of testosterone. These previous results suggest that the 5α-reduction of testosterone is not required for myotrophic action. We now report differential gene expression in response to testosterone versus trenbolone in the highly androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex of the adult rat after 6weeks of orchiectomy (ORX), using real time PCR. The ORX-induced expression of atrogenes (Muscle RING-finger protein-1 [MuRF1] and atrogin-1) was suppressed by both androgens, with trenbolone producing a greater suppression of atrogin-1 mRNA compared to testosterone. Both androgens elevated expression of anabolic genes (insulin-like growth factor-1 and mechano-growth factor) after ORX. ORX-induced increases in expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA were suppressed by trenbolone treatment, but not testosterone. In ORX animals, testosterone promoted WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP-2) gene expression while trenbolone did not. Testosterone and trenbolone equally enhanced muscle regeneration as shown by increases in LABC mass and in protein expression of embryonic myosin by western blotting. In addition, testosterone increased WISP-2 protein levels. Together, these findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone and trenbolone may regulate skeletal muscle maintenance and growth. PMID:24928725

  2. Testosterone is associated with cooperation during intergroup competition by enhancing parochial altruism

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Luise; Diekhof, Esther K.

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone is widely associated with negative behavioral effects, such as aggression or dominance. However, recent studies applying economic exchange tasks revealed conflicting results. While some point to a prosocial effect of testosterone by increasing altruistic behavior, others report that testosterone promotes antisocial tendencies. Taking into account additional factors such as parochial altruism (i.e., ingroup favoritism and outgroup hostility) might help to explain this contradiction. First evidence for a link between testosterone and parochial altruism comes from recently reported data of male soccer fans playing the ultimatum game. In this study high levels of endogenous testosterone predicted increased altruistic punishment during outgroup interactions and at the same time heightened ingroup generosity. Here, we report findings of another experimental task, the prisoner's dilemma, applied in the same context to examine the role of testosterone on parochial tendencies in terms of cooperation. In this task, 50 male soccer fans were asked to decide whether or not they wanted to cooperate with partners marked as either fans of the subject's own favorite team (ingroup) or fans of other teams (outgroups). Our results show that high testosterone levels were associated with increased ingroup cooperation during intergroup competition. In addition, subjects displaying a high degree of parochialism during intergroup competition had significantly higher levels of testosterone than subjects who did not differentiate much between the different groups. In sum, the present data demonstrate that the behavioral effects of testosterone are not limited to aggressive and selfish tendencies but may imply prosocial aspects depending on the context. By this means, our results support the previously reported findings on testosterone-dependent intergroup bias and indicate that this social hormone might be an important factor driving parochial altruism. PMID

  3. Testosterone induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; Oyarce, César; Silva, Patricio; Toyos, Marcela; Wilson, Carlos; Lavandero, Sergio; Uhlén, Per; Estrada, Manuel

    2009-08-01

    Elevated testosterone concentrations induce cardiac hypertrophy but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Anabolic properties of testosterone involve an increase in protein synthesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is a major regulator of cell growth, but the relationship between testosterone action and mTORC1 in cardiac cells remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether the hypertrophic effects of testosterone are mediated by mTORC1 signaling in cultured cardiomyocytes. Testosterone increases the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets 40S ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1; also known as RPS6KB1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). The S6K1 phosphorylation induced by testosterone was blocked by rapamycin and small interfering RNA to mTOR. Moreover, the hormone increased both extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 blocked the testosterone-induced S6K1 phosphorylation, whereas Akt inhibition (Akt-inhibitor-X) had no effect. Testosterone-induced ERK1/2 and S6K1 phosphorylation increases were blocked by either 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester or by inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) pathway: U-73122 and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborate. Finally, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was evaluated by, the expression of beta-myosin heavy chain, alpha-skeletal actin, cell size, and amino acid incorporation. Testosterone increased all four parameters and the increase being blocked by mTOR inhibition. Our findings suggest that testosterone activates the mTORC1/S6K1 axis through IP(3)/Ca(2+) and MEK/ERK1/2 to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:19474060

  4. Testosterone stimulates glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation through LKB1/AMPK signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kazuteru; Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukuda, Takuya; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kitawaki, Jo; Katsuyama, Masato; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Decreases in serum testosterone concentrations in aging men are associated with metabolic disorders. Testosterone has been reported to increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. However, studies on glucose uptake occurring in response to testosterone stimulation in adipocytes are currently not available. This study was designed to determine the effects of testosterone on glucose uptake in adipocytes. Glucose uptake was assessed with 2-[(3)H] deoxyglucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GLUT4 translocation was evaluated in plasma membrane (PM) sheets and PM fractions by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, respectively. Activation of GLUT4 translocation-related protein kinases, including Akt, AMPK, LKB1, CaMKI, CaMKII, and Cbl was followed by immunoblotting. Expression levels of androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and AR translocation to the PM were assessed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. The results showed that both high-dose (100 nM) testosterone and testosterone-BSA increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the PM, independently of the intracellular AR. Testosterone and testosterone-BSA stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK, LKB1, and CaMKII. The knockdown of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated testosterone- and testosterone-BSA-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. These results indicate that high-dose testosterone and testosterone-BSA increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inducing the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway.

  5. Amyloid fibril formation propensity is inherent into the hexapeptide tandemly repeating sequence of the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins of the A-family.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Chryssikos, Georgios D; Gionis, Vassilis; Galanis, Athanassios S; Cordopatis, Paul; Hoenger, Andreas; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2006-12-01

    Peptide-analogues of the A and B families of silkmoth chorion proteins form amyloid fibrils under a variety of conditions [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145; Iconomidou,V.A., Chryssikos, G.D.,Gionis, V., Vriend, G., Hoenger, A., Hamodrakas, S.J., 2001. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide-analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion protein. FEBS Lett. 499, 268-273; Hamodrakas, S.J. Hoenger, A., Iconomidou, V. A., 2004 . Amyloid fibrillogenesis of silkmoth chorion protein peptide-analogues via a liquid crystalline intermediate phase. J. Struct. Biol. 145, 226-235.], which led us to propose that silkmoth chorion is a natural protective amyloid. In this study, we designed and synthesized two mutant peptide-analogues of the central conservative domain of the A family: (a) one, cA_m1, with a length half of that of the central domain of the A family, which folds and self-assembles, in various conditions, into amyloid fibrils very similar in properties and structure to the fibrils formed by the cA peptide, which corresponds to the entire length of the A family central domain [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145.], in full support of our previous proposal, (b) the second, cA_m2, differing from cA_m1 at three positions, where three glutamates have replaced two valines and one alanine residues, does not form amyloid fibrils in any conditions. It appears that (a) the amyloidogenic properties of silkmoth chorion peptides are encoded into the tandemly repeating hexapeptides comprising the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins, and, that (b) suitable mutations, properly and carefully designed, greatly affect the strong amyloidogenic properties inherent in certain aminoacid sequences and may inhibit amyloid formation. PMID:17056273

  6. Neonatal testosterone suppresses a neuroendocrine pulse generator required for reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Le Masson, Gwendal; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    The pituitary gland releases hormones in a pulsatile fashion guaranteeing signalling efficiency. The determinants of pulsatility are poorly circumscribed. Here we show in magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal oxytocin (OT) neurons that the bursting activity underlying the neurohormonal pulses necessary for parturition and the milk-ejection reflex is entirely driven by a female-specific central pattern generator (CPG). Surprisingly, this CPG is active in both male and female neonates, but is inactivated in males after the first week of life. CPG activity can be restored in males by orchidectomy or silenced in females by exogenous testosterone. This steroid effect is aromatase and caspase dependent, and is mediated via oestrogen receptor-α. This indicates the apoptosis of the CPG network during hypothalamic sexual differentiation, explaining why OT neurons do not burst in adult males. This supports the view that stereotypic neuroendocrine pulsatility is governed by CPGs, some of which are subjected to gender-specific perinatal programming.

  7. Testosterone-Induced Effects on Lipids and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vodo, Stella; Bechi, Nicoletta; Petroni, Anna; Muscoli, Carolina; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain has to be considered in all respects a debilitating disease and 10–20% of the world's adult population is affected by this disease. In the most general terms, pain is symptomatic of some form of dysfunction and (often) the resulting inflammatory processes in the body. In the study of pain, great attention has been paid to the possible involvement of gonadal hormones, especially in recent years. In particular, testosterone, the main androgen, is thought to play a beneficial, protective role in the body. Other important elements to be related to pain, inflammation, and hormones are lipids, heterogenic molecules whose altered metabolism is often accompanied by the release of interleukins, and lipid-derived proinflammatory mediators. Here we report data on interactions often not considered in chronic pain mechanisms. PMID:23606790

  8. Effects of oral testosterone treatment on myocardial perfusion and vascular function in men with low plasma testosterone and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, Carolyn M; Elkington, Andrew G; Kraidly, Mustafa M; Keenan, Niall; Pennell, Dudley J; Collins, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Intracoronary testosterone infusions induce coronary vasodilatation and increase coronary blood flow. Longer term testosterone supplementation favorably affected signs of myocardial ischemia in men with low plasma testosterone and coronary heart disease. However, the effects on myocardial perfusion are unknown. Effects of longer term testosterone treatment on myocardial perfusion and vascular function were investigated in men with CHD and low plasma testosterone. Twenty-two men (mean age 57 +/- 9 [SD] years) were randomly assigned to oral testosterone undecanoate (TU; 80 mg twice daily) or placebo in a crossover study design. After each 8-week period, subjects underwent at rest and adenosine-stress first-pass myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance, pulse-wave analysis, and endothelial function measurements using radial artery tonometry, blood sampling, anthropomorphic measurements, and quality-of-life assessment. Although no difference was found in global myocardial perfusion after TU compared with placebo, myocardium supplied by unobstructed coronary arteries showed increased perfusion (1.83 +/- 0.9 vs 1.52 +/- 0.65; p = 0.037). TU decreased basal radial and aortic augmentation indexes (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively), indicating decreased arterial stiffness, but there was no effect on endothelial function. TU significantly decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased hip circumference, but had no effect on hemostatic factors, quality of life, and angina symptoms. In conclusion, oral TU had selective and modest enhancing effects on perfusion in myocardium supplied by unobstructed coronary arteries, in line with previous intracoronary findings. The TU-related decrease in basal arterial stiffness may partly explain previously shown effects of exogenous testosterone on signs of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. PMID:18308009

  9. Testosterone signaling through internalizable surface receptors in androgen receptor-free macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Lieberherr, M; Stamm, O; Wrehlke, C; Guo, Z; Wunderlich, F

    1999-10-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], which is due to release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. This Ca(2+) mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  10. Testosterone Signaling through Internalizable Surface Receptors in Androgen Receptor-free Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Benten, W. Peter M.; Lieberherr, Michèle; Stamm, Olaf; Wrehlke, Christian; Guo, Zhiyong; Wunderlich, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca2+], which is due to release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. This Ca2+ mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  11. Basal testosterone, leadership and dominance: A field study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Schaveling, Jaap; van Vugt, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the role of basal testosterone as a potential biological marker of leadership and hierarchy in the workplace. First, we report the result of a study with a sample of male employees from different corporate organizations in the Netherlands (n=125). Results showed that employees with higher basal testosterone levels reported a more authoritarian leadership style, but this relationship was absent among those who currently held a real management position (i.e., they had at least one subordinate). Furthermore, basal testosterone levels were not different between managers and non-managers, and testosterone was not associated with various indicators of status and hierarchy such as number of subordinates, income, and position in the organizational hierarchy. In our meta-analysis (second study), we showed that basal testosterone levels were not associated with leadership in men nor in women (9 studies, n=1103). Taken together, our findings show that basal testosterone is not associated with having a leadership position in the corporate world or related to leadership styles in leaders. We suggest that basal testosterone could play a role in acquiring leadership positions through dominant and authoritarian behavior. PMID:27372205

  12. Generation of Small Single Domain Nanobody Binders for Sensitive Detection of Testosterone by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Zhu, Min; Ma, Lu; Yan, Junrong; Lu, Xiaoling; Shen, Yanfei; Wan, Yakun

    2016-06-01

    A phage display library of variable domain of the heavy chain only antibody or nanobody (Nb) was constructed after immunizing a bactrian camel with testosterone. With the smaller molecular size (15 kDa), improved solubility, good stability, high affinity, specificity, and lower immunogenicity, Nbs are a promising tool in the next generation of diagnosis and medical applications. Testosterone is a reproductive hormone, playing an important role in normal cardiac function and being the highly predictive marker for many diseases. Herein, a simple and sensitive immunosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Nbs was successfully developed for the determination of testosterone. We successfully isolated the antitestosterone Nbs from an immune phage display library. Moreover, one of the Nbs was biotinylated according to in vivo BirA system, which showed the highest production yield and the most stable case. Further, the EIS immunosensor was set up for testosterone detection by applying the biotinylated antitestosterone Nb. As a result, the biosensor exhibited a linear working range from 0.05 to 5 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.045 ng mL(-1). In addition, the proposed immunosensor was successfully applied in determining testosterone in serum samples. In conclusion, the proposed immunosensor revealed high specificity of testosterone detection and showed as a potential approach for sensitive and accurate diagnosis of testosterone.

  13. Testosterone measured in infancy predicts subsequent sex-typed behavior in boys and in girls.

    PubMed

    Lamminmäki, Annamarja; Hines, Melissa; Kuiri-Hänninen, Tanja; Kilpeläinen, Leena; Dunkel, Leo; Sankilampi, Ulla

    2012-04-01

    The testes are active during gestation, as well as during early infancy. Testosterone elevation during fetal development has been shown to play a role in human neurobehavioral sexual differentiation. The role of early postnatal gonadal activation in human psychosexual development is largely unknown, however. We measured testosterone in 48 full term infants (22 boys, 26 girls) by monthly urinary sampling from day 7 postnatal to age 6 months, and related the area under the curve (AUC) for testosterone during the first 6 months postnatal to subsequent sex-typed behavior, at the age of 14 months, using the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI), and playroom observation of toy choices. In boys, testosterone AUC correlated significantly with PSAI scores (Spearman's rho = 0.54, p = 0.04). In addition, play with a train and with a baby doll showed the anticipated sex differences, and play with the train correlated significantly and positively with testosterone AUC in girls (Spearman's rho = 0.43, p = 0.05), while play with the doll correlated significantly and negatively with testosterone AUC in boys (Spearman's rho = -0.48, p < 0.03). These results may support a role for testosterone during early infancy in human neurobehavioral sexual differentiation.

  14. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved. PMID:26004317

  15. Testosterone reverses ethanol-induced deficit in spatial reference memory in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Rafaat; King, Michael A; Soliman, Magdi R I

    2005-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethanol, testosterone and combination of ethanol and testosterone, on spatial reference memory and beta-endorphin (beta-EN) levels in castrated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (120-150 g) were used in this study, Animals were castrated and ethanol, testosterone or combination of the drugs were administered to rats at 09:00 h. The drugs were administered after a training period of 5 days and spatial reference memory was evaluated for 7 days using the Morris water maze. One hour after the last injection, animals were sacrificed, their brains removed and dissected into cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus and midbrain. The beta-EN levels in these brain regions were determined by radioimmunoassay. The time to find the platform (latency period) was significantly increased in ethanol-treated rats, indicating that ethanol induces deficit in spatial reference memory. On the other hand, testosterone administration improved spatial reference memory by significantly decreasing the latency period. In addition, there was a significant decrease in latency period in the animals treated with combination of ethanol and testosterone. Results also indicate that administration of ethanol resulted in a significant increase in beta-EN levels in the hippocampus and in the cortex while concurrent administration with testosterone abolished this increase. These findings clearly indicate that administration of testosterone did not only improve memory but also abolished the spatial memory deficit induced by ethanol in castrated rats.

  16. Basal testosterone, leadership and dominance: A field study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Schaveling, Jaap; van Vugt, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the role of basal testosterone as a potential biological marker of leadership and hierarchy in the workplace. First, we report the result of a study with a sample of male employees from different corporate organizations in the Netherlands (n=125). Results showed that employees with higher basal testosterone levels reported a more authoritarian leadership style, but this relationship was absent among those who currently held a real management position (i.e., they had at least one subordinate). Furthermore, basal testosterone levels were not different between managers and non-managers, and testosterone was not associated with various indicators of status and hierarchy such as number of subordinates, income, and position in the organizational hierarchy. In our meta-analysis (second study), we showed that basal testosterone levels were not associated with leadership in men nor in women (9 studies, n=1103). Taken together, our findings show that basal testosterone is not associated with having a leadership position in the corporate world or related to leadership styles in leaders. We suggest that basal testosterone could play a role in acquiring leadership positions through dominant and authoritarian behavior.

  17. Evolution of testosterone treatment over 25 years: symptom responses, endocrine profiles and cardiovascular changes

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm; Cathcart, Paul; Feneley, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Testosterone treatment has evolved rapidly over the past 25 years as new, more effective and convenient methods have become available. This study reports experience with seven different methods, introduced on the market in the UK. Aim: To establish the symptom response when testosterone treatment was initiated on the basis of clinical features and symptoms of androgen deficiency, and the resulting endocrine, biochemical and physiological responses. Methods: Of 2693 patients attending the 3 Men’s Health Centers – The UK Androgen Study (UKAS), 2247 were treated. Treatments included pellet implants, oral testosterone undecanoate (Testocaps), mesterolone (Proviron), testosterone gel (Testogel), testosterone scrotal cream (Andromen) and scrotal gel (Tostran). Results: There was no correlation between initial testosterone level, initial symptom score or the success of treatment as defined by adequate resolution of symptoms. Despite the diverse endocrine patterns produced, the testosterone preparations appear equally safe over prolonged periods, with either no change or improvement of cardiovascular risk factors, especially in lowering cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: It is suggested that because of excessive reliance on laboratory measures of androgens and undue safety concerns, many men who could benefit from symptom relief, improvement in related clinical conditions and given preventive medical benefits remain untreated. PMID:26218766

  18. Environmental exposure to metals and male reproductive hormones: Circulating testosterone is inversely associated with blood molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Rossano, Mary G.; Protas, Bridget; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth; Daly, Douglas; Paneth, Nigel; Wirth, Julia J.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective To explore associations between exposure to metals and male reproductive hormone levels. Design Cross-sectional epidemiology study with adjustment for potential confounders. Setting Metal concentrations and reproductive hormone levels were measured in blood samples collected from 219 men. Patients: Men recruited through two Michigan, USA infertility clinics. Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Serum FSH, LH, inhibin B, testosterone, and SHBG. Results Cadmium, copper and lead were all significantly or suggestively positively associated with testosterone when modeled individually (p-values = 0.1, 0.03, and 0.07, respectively), findings that are consistent with limited previous human and animal studies. Conversely, molybdenum was associated with reduced testosterone (p-value for trend = 0.001). A significant inverse trend between molybdenum and testosterone remained when additionally considering other metals in the model, where a positive association between testosterone and zinc was also found. Finally, in exploratory analysis there was evidence for an interaction between molybdenum and zinc, where high molybdenum was associated with a 37% reduction in testosterone (relative to the population median level) among men with low zinc. Conclusions While reductions in testosterone and reproductive toxicity following molybdenum exposure have been previously demonstrated in animal studies, more research is needed to determine whether molybdenum poses a risk to human reproductive health. PMID:18990371

  19. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  20. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved.

  1. Contribution of Leydig and Sertoli cells to testosterone production in mouse fetal testes.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yuichi; Miyabayashi, Kanako; Haraguchi, Shogo; Arakawa, Tatsuhiko; Otake, Hiroyuki; Baba, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Sawako; Shishido, Yurina; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Taro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone is a final product of androgenic hormone biosynthesis, and Leydig cells are known to be the primary source of androgens. In the mammalian testis, two distinct populations of Leydig cells, the fetal and the adult Leydig cells, develop sequentially, and these two cell types differ both morphologically and functionally. It is well known that the adult Leydig cells maintain male reproductive function by producing testosterone. However, it has been controversial whether fetal Leydig cells can produce testosterone, and the synthetic pathway of testosterone in the fetal testis is not fully understood. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice in which enhanced green fluorescence protein was expressed under the control of a fetal Leydig cell-specific enhancer of the Ad4BP/SF-1 (Nr5a1) gene. The transgene construct was prepared by mutating the LIM homeodomain transcription factor (LHX9)-binding sequence in the promoter, which abolished promoter activity in the undifferentiated testicular cells. These transgenic mice were used to collect highly pure fetal Leydig cells. Gene expression and steroidogenic enzyme activities in the fetal Leydig cells as well as in the fetal Sertoli cells and adult Leydig cells were analyzed. Our results revealed that the fetal Leydig cells synthesize only androstenedione because they lack expression of Hsd17b3, and fetal Sertoli cells convert androstenedione to testosterone, whereas adult Leydig cells synthesize testosterone by themselves. The current study demonstrated that both Leydig and Sertoli cells are required for testosterone synthesis in the mouse fetal testis. PMID:23125070

  2. Drug insight: Testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2006-03-01

    Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with beta-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging.

  3. Testosterone and reward prediction-errors in healthy men and men with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morris, R W; Purves-Tyson, T D; Weickert, C Shannon; Rothmond, D; Lenroot, R; Weickert, T W

    2015-11-01

    Sex hormones impact reward processing, which is dysfunctional in schizophrenia; however, the degree to which testosterone levels relate to reward-related brain activity in healthy men and the extent to which this relationship may be altered in men with schizophrenia has not been determined. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural responses in the striatum during reward prediction-errors and hormone assays to measure testosterone and prolactin in serum. To determine if testosterone can have a direct effect on dopamine neurons, we also localized and measured androgen receptors in human midbrain with immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found correlations between testosterone and prediction-error related activity in the ventral striatum of healthy men, but not in men with schizophrenia, such that testosterone increased the size of positive and negative prediction-error related activity in a valence-specific manner. We also identified midbrain dopamine neurons that were androgen receptor immunoreactive, and found that androgen receptor (AR) mRNA was positively correlated with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA in human male substantia nigra. The results suggest that sex steroid receptors can potentially influence midbrain dopamine biosynthesis, and higher levels of serum testosterone are linked to better discrimination of motivationally-relevant signals in the ventral striatum, putatively by modulation of the dopamine biosynthesis pathway via AR ligand binding. However, the normal relationship between serum testosterone and ventral striatum activity during reward learning appears to be disrupted in schizophrenia. PMID:26232868

  4. Effect of Exogenous Testosterone, Finasteride, and Castration on Serum Level of Thyroxin

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Fatemeh; Yousofvand, Namdar; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The secretion of thyroxin (T4) as the main hormone of thyroid gland is regulated by androgens. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of T4 and to show the effect of this regulation on total body weight, weight of testis, and the weight of prostate. Methods: Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8): Group 1 (control), Group 2 (castration), Group 3 (finasteride: 20 mg/kg/day) and Group 4 (testosterone: 5 mg/kg/day). At the end of the study (35 days), serum level of thyroxin, body weight, weight of testis, and prostate were determined. Results: The data showed that the body weight increased in castrated (P = 0.04) and decreased in testosterone (P = 0.00) groups but did not differ in finasteride (P>0.05) group. There were not any differences in the weight of testis among control, finasteride, and testosterone groups but the weight of prostate increased in testosterone group (P = 0.00) and decreased in castrated (P = 0.03) and finasteride groups (P = 0.04). In addition, the serum level of T4 (nmo/ml) decreased in the three groups: finasteride (P = 0.03), testosterone (P = 0.04), and castrated (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Testosterone in both high and low levels decreased the amount of T4 with a time-dependent manner. PMID:23999719

  5. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls.

    PubMed

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age range of 10 to18 years and IQ scores higher than 130 were tested. Saliva samples were collected to obtain levels of salivary testosterone. 2D:4D digit ratio was measured on both hands as an indicator of prenatal testosterone. IQ parameters were assessed employing standardized set of tests. The CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of androgen receptor. Testing of between-subjects effects proved significant interactions between right and left 2D:4D ratio, genetic variability in androgen receptor, and also salivary testosterone level with non-verbal IQ in gifted girls. Our results point out that the variability in parameters of androgenicity contributes to the variability of nonverbal IQ in gifted girls. However, the exact molecular mechanism of how testosterone acts on the brain and affects this cognitive domain remains still unclear.

  6. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Brzezinska, Zofia; Klapcinska, Barbara; Galbo, Henrik; Gorski, Jan

    2010-09-01

    Fatty acids, which are the major cardiac fuel, are derived from lipid droplets stored in cardiomyocytes, among other sources. The heart expresses hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which regulates triglycerides (TG) breakdown, and the enzyme is under hormonal control. Evidence obtained from adipose tissue suggests that testosterone regulates HSL activity. To test whether this is also true in the heart, we measured HSL activity in the left ventricle of sedentary male rats that had been treated with testosterone supplementation or orchidectomy with or without testosterone substitution. Left ventricle HSL activity against TG was significantly elevated in intact rats supplemented with testosterone. HSL activity against both TG and diacylglyceride was reduced by orchidectomy, whereas testosterone replacement fully reversed this effect. Moreover, testosterone increased left ventricle free fatty acid levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  7. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-07-02

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways.

  8. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R. Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N.; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders’ financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  9. Latent trait testosterone among 18-24 year olds: Methodological considerations and risk associations.

    PubMed

    Dariotis, Jacinda K; Chen, Frances R; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-05-01

    The study investigated the relationship between latent trait testosterone (LTT) and risk-taking among 126 youth (M age=21.34years; 56% female; 52% African American). Latent state-trait (LST) modeling isolates observed variance of samples via their correlations into (1) a latent trait testosterone (LTT) factor capturing individual differences, and (2) a component of state testosterone factor (LST) capturing state-specific situational or environmental influences and random error variances. Participants provided four laboratory (20min apart) and four home (waking, 20-min post-waking, noon, evening) salivary samples (later assayed for testosterone). Participants reported risk-taking tendencies and behaviors via an Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview. Behavioral risk was measured using the Balloon Analog Risk Task. Results revealed: (1) LTT model invariance (operated similarly) for females and males; (2) LTT accounted for 18-89% (home samples) and 61-95% (lab samples) of the variance in testosterone levels, and (3) LTT was associated with risk-seeking behaviors and the strength of this association was similar across males and females. LST Modeling has potential to advance our understanding of testosterone-behavior associations to new limits by estimating stable trait-like components of the variance in testosterone levels. PMID:26852415

  10. Elevated testosterone during meiotic segregation stimulates laying hens to produce more sons than daughters.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Sara E; Wilson, Jeanna L; Navara, Kristen J

    2011-11-01

    Biases in avian sex ratios have been documented in relation to a variety of social and environmental conditions. Previous studies suggest that treatment with hormones can stimulate females to manipulate offspring sex, and that this effect occurs before ovulation. For example, acute and chronic treatments with testosterone stimulated significant skews towards male offspring. Hormones may act by influencing which sex chromosome is donated by the heterogametic female bird into the oocyte. However, it is difficult to pinpoint when effects of testosterone on offspring sex occurred in previous experiments because testosterone treatments were given either chronically over the entire period of follicular development or many hours before the critical period of chromosome segregation. We injected laying hens with testosterone