Science.gov

Sample records for chorismate synthase revealed

  1. Functional Contribution of Chorismate Synthase, Anthranilate Synthase, and Chorismate Mutase to Penetration Resistance in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2) and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch-points downstream of the s...

  2. Purification and Characterization of Chorismate Synthase from Euglena gracilis 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andreas; van Afferden, Manfred; Windhofer, Volker; Bülow, Sven; Abel, Gernot; Schmid, Jürg; Amrhein, Nikolaus

    1991-01-01

    Chorismate synthase was purified 1200-fold from Euglena gracilis. The molecular mass of the native enzyme is in the range of 110 to 138 kilodaltons as judged by gel filtration. The molecular mass of the subunit was determined to be 41.7 kilodaltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified chorismate synthase is associated with an NADPH-dependent flavin mononucleotide reductase that provides in vivo the reduced flavin necessary for catalytic activity. In vitro, flavin reduction can be mediated by either dithionite or light. The enzyme obtained from E. gracilis was compared with chorismate synthases purified from a higher plant (Corydalis sempervirens), a bacterium (Escherichia coli), and a fungus (Neurospora crassa). These four chorismate synthases were found to be very similar in terms of cofactor specificity, kinetic properties, isoelectric points, and pH optima. All four enzymes react with polyclonal antisera directed against chorismate synthases from C. sempervirens and E. coli. The closely associated flavin mononucleotide reductase that is present in chorismate synthase preparations from E. gracilis and N. crassa is the main difference between those synthases and the monofunctional enzymes from C. sempervirens and E. coli. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668543

  3. Studies on 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid 8-phosphate synthase using chorismate mutase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Birck, M R; Husain, A; Sheflyan, G Y; Ganem, B; Woodard, R W

    2001-11-05

    The proposed cyclic mechanism of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid 8-phosphate synthase and the mechanism of chorismate mutase share certain structural and electronic similarities. In this report, we examine several inhibitors of chorismate mutase for their efficacy against KDO 8-P synthase.

  4. Functional contribution of chorismate synthase, anthranilate synthase, and chorismate mutase to penetration resistance in barley-powdery mildew interactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingsha; Meng, Yan; Wise, Roger P

    2009-03-01

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2), and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch points downstream of the shikimate pathway leading to the synthesis of aromatic amino acids. Here, we provide functional evidence that these genes contribute to penetration resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, the causal agent of powdery mildew disease. Single-cell transient-induced gene silencing of HvCS and HvCM1 in mildew resistance locus a (Mla) compromised cells resulted in increased susceptibility. Correspondingly, overexpression of HvCS, HvASa2, and HvCM1 in lines carrying mildew resistance locus o (Mlo), a negative regulator of penetration resistance, significantly decreased susceptibility. Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing of HvCS, HvASa2, and HvCM1 significantly increased B. graminis f. sp. hordei penetration into epidermal cells, followed by formation of haustoria and secondary hyphae. However, sporulation of B. graminis f. sp. hordei was not detected on the silenced host plants up to 3 weeks after inoculation. Taken together, these results establish a previously unrecognized role for the influence of HvCS, HvASa2, and HvCM1 on penetration resistance and on the rate of B. graminis f. sp. hordei development in Mla-mediated, barley-powdery mildew interactions.

  5. Interaction between DAHP synthase and chorismate mutase endows new regulation on DAHP synthase activity in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan-Pan; Li, De-Feng; Liu, Di; Liu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chang; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Previous research on Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed that 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DSCg, formerly DS2098) interacts with chorismate mutase (CMCg, formerly CM0819). In this study, we investigated the interaction by means of structure-guided mutation and enzymatic assays. Our results show that the interaction imparted a new mechanism for regulation of DAHP activity: In the absence of CMCg, DSCg activity was not regulated by prephenate, whereas in the presence of CMCg, prephenate markedly inhibited DSCg activity. Prephenate competed with the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate, and the inhibition constant (K i) was determined to be 0.945 mM. Modeling based on the structure of the complex formed between DAHP synthase and chorismate mutase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis predicted the interaction surfaces of the putative DSCg-CMCg complex. The amino acid residues and structural domains that contributed to the interaction surfaces were experimentally identified to be the (212)SPAGARYE(219) sequence of DSCg and the (60)SGGTR(64) loop and C-terminus ((97)RGKLG(101)) of CMCg.

  6. Structural analysis of a 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase with an N-terminal chorismate mutase-like regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Halavaty, Andrei S; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F

    2012-06-01

    3-Deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. Likely because this reaction is situated at a pivotal biosynthetic gateway, several DAHPS classes distinguished by distinct mechanisms of allosteric regulation have independently evolved. One class of DAHPSs contains a regulatory domain with sequence homology to chorismate mutase-an enzyme further downstream of DAHPS that catalyzes the first committed step in tyrosine/phenylalanine biosynthesis-and is inhibited by chorismate mutase substrate (chorismate) and product (prephenate). Described in this work, structures of the Listeria monocytogenes chorismate/prephenate regulated DAHPS in complex with Mn(2+) and Mn(2+) + phosphoenolpyruvate reveal an unusual quaternary architecture: DAHPS domains assemble as a tetramer, from either side of which chorismate mutase-like (CML) regulatory domains asymmetrically emerge to form a pair of dimers. This domain organization suggests that chorismate/prephenate binding promotes a stable interaction between the discrete regulatory and catalytic domains and supports a mechanism of allosteric inhibition similar to tyrosine/phenylalanine control of a related DAHPS class. We argue that the structural similarity of chorismate mutase enzyme and CML regulatory domain provides a unique opportunity for the design of a multitarget antibacterial.

  7. Structural analysis of a 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase with an N-terminal chorismate mutase-like regulatory domain

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-06-27

    3-Deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. Likely because this reaction is situated at a pivotal biosynthetic gateway, several DAHPS classes distinguished by distinct mechanisms of allosteric regulation have independently evolved. One class of DAHPSs contains a regulatory domain with sequence homology to chorismate mutase - an enzyme further downstream of DAHPS that catalyzes the first committed step in tyrosine/phenylalanine biosynthesis - and is inhibited by chorismate mutase substrate (chorismate) and product (prephenate). Described in this work, structures of the Listeria monocytogenes chorismate/prephenate regulated DAHPS in complex with Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} + phosphoenolpyruvate reveal an unusual quaternary architecture: DAHPS domains assemble as a tetramer, from either side of which chorismate mutase-like (CML) regulatory domains asymmetrically emerge to form a pair of dimers. This domain organization suggests that chorismate/prephenate binding promotes a stable interaction between the discrete regulatory and catalytic domains and supports a mechanism of allosteric inhibition similar to tyrosine/phenylalanine control of a related DAHPS class. We argue that the structural similarity of chorismate mutase enzyme and CML regulatory domain provides a unique opportunity for the design of a multitarget antibacterial.

  8. Conversion of anthranilate synthase into isochorismate synthase: implications for the evolution of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Plach, Maximilian G; Löffler, Patrick; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-09-14

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes play a vital role in the biosynthesis of metabolites in plants as well as free-living and infectious microorganisms. Among these enzymes are the homologous primary metabolic anthranilate synthase (AS) and secondary metabolic isochorismate synthase (ICS). Both catalyze mechanistically related reactions by using ammonia and water as nucleophiles, respectively. We report that the nucleophile specificity of AS can be extended from ammonia to water by just two amino acid exchanges in a channel leading to the active site. The observed ICS/AS bifunctionality demonstrates that a secondary metabolic enzyme can readily evolve from a primary metabolic enzyme without requiring an initial gene duplication event. In a general sense, these findings add to our understanding how nature has used the structurally predetermined features of enzyme superfamilies to evolve new reactions.

  9. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of salicylate synthase, a chorismate-utilizing enyme involved in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, James F. Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Ladner, Jane E.

    2006-03-01

    Salicylate synthase, which catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of the siderophore yersiniabactin, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å. Bacteria have evolved elaborate schemes that help them thrive in environments where free iron is severely limited. Siderophores such as yersiniabactin are small iron-scavenging molecules that are deployed by bacteria during iron starvation. Several studies have linked siderophore production and virulence. Yersiniabactin, produced by several Enterobacteriaceae, is derived from the key metabolic intermediate chorismic acid via its conversion to salicylate by salicylate synthase. Crystals of salicylate synthase from the uropathogen Escherichia coli CFT073 have been grown by vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as the precipitant. The monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals diffract to 2.5 Å. The unit-cell parameters are a = 57.27, b = 164.07, c = 59.04 Å, β = 108.8°. The solvent content of the crystals is 54% and there are two molecules of the 434-amino-acid protein in the asymmetric unit. It is anticipated that the structure will reveal key details about the reaction mechanism and the evolution of salicylate synthase.

  10. Structure and function of a complex between chorismate mutase and DAHP synthase: efficiency boost for the junior partner.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Severin; Okvist, Mats; Roderer, Kathrin; Gamper, Marianne; Codoni, Giosiana; Krengel, Ute; Kast, Peter

    2009-07-22

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes a key step in the shikimate biosynthetic pathway towards phenylalanine and tyrosine. Curiously, the intracellular chorismate mutase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtCM; Rv0948c) has poor activity and lacks prominent active-site residues. However, its catalytic efficiency increases >100-fold on addition of DAHP synthase (MtDS; Rv2178c), another shikimate-pathway enzyme. The 2.35 A crystal structure of the MtCM-MtDS complex bound to a transition-state analogue shows a central core formed by four MtDS subunits sandwiched between two MtCM dimers. Structural comparisons imply catalytic activation to be a consequence of the repositioning of MtCM active-site residues on binding to MtDS. The mutagenesis of the C-terminal extrusion of MtCM establishes conserved residues as part of the activation machinery. The chorismate-mutase activity of the complex, but not of MtCM alone, is inhibited synergistically by phenylalanine and tyrosine. The complex formation thus endows the shikimate pathway of M. tuberculosis with an important regulatory feature. Experimental evidence suggests that such non-covalent enzyme complexes comprising an AroQ(delta) subclass chorismate mutase like MtCM are abundant in the bacterial order Actinomycetales.

  11. Investigation of potential inhibitors of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Švarcová, Markéta; Krátký, Martin; Vinšova, Jarmila

    2015-01-01

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes (CUE) such as chorismate mutase, anthranilate synthase, chorismate pyruvate-lyase, 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase, isochorismate synthase and salicylate synthase are responsible for converting chorismate into various products necessary for the survival of bacteria. The absence of these enzymes in humans and their importance in the virulence and survival of bacteria make them suitable targets for potential antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, the CUE have significant structural homology and similar catalytic mechanisms, enabling the strategy of affecting multiple enzymes with one single inhibitor. This review follows up the investigation of mechanisms of CUE-catalysed reactions and the concurrent development of CUE inhibitors. Many active compounds were found amongst the structures mimicking the transition state of chorismate during the reaction. Most recently, high nanomolar and low micromolar inhibitors against isochorismate-pyruvate lyase were identified, which were also effective against chorismate mutase and salicylate synthase and belong to the most active inhibitors reported up to date.

  12. A novel noncovalent complex of chorismate mutase and DAHP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: protein purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Okvist, Mats; Sasso, Severin; Roderer, Kathrin; Kast, Peter; Krengel, Ute

    2009-10-01

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes a key step in the shikimate-biosynthetic pathway and hence is an essential enzyme in bacteria, plants and fungi. Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two chorismate mutases, a secreted and an intracellular one, the latter of which (MtCM; Rv0948c; 90 amino-acid residues; 10 kDa) is the subject of this work. Here are reported the gene expression, purification and crystallization of MtCM alone and of its complex with another shikimate-pathway enzyme, DAHP synthase (MtDS; Rv2178c; 472 amino-acid residues; 52 kDa), which has been shown to enhance the catalytic efficiency of MtCM. The MtCM-MtDS complex represents the first noncovalent enzyme complex from the common shikimate pathway to be structurally characterized. Soaking experiments with a transition-state analogue are also reported. The crystals of MtCM and the MtCM-MtDS complex diffracted to 1.6 and 2.1 A resolution, respectively.

  13. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli enterobactin-specific isochorismate synthase (EntC) bound to its reaction product isochorismate: implications for the enzyme mechanism and differential activity of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Howard, Nigel; Kerbarh, Olivier; Błaszczyk, Michał; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L

    2010-03-19

    EntC, one of two isochorismate synthases in Escherichia coli, is specific to the biosynthesis of the siderophore enterobactin. Here, we report the crystal structure of EntC in complex with isochorismate and Mg(2+)at 2.3 A resolution, the first structure of a chorismate-utilizing enzyme with a non-aromatic reaction product. EntC exhibits a complex alpha+beta fold like the other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as salicylate synthase and anthranilate synthase. Comparison of active site structures allowed the identification of several residues, not discussed previously, that might be important for the isochorismate activity of the EntC. Although EntC, MenF and Irp9 all convert chorismate to isochorismate, only Irp9 subsequently exhibits isochorismate pyruvate lyase activity resulting in the formation of salicylate and pyruvate as the reaction products. With a view to understanding the roles of these amino acid residues in the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate and to obtaining clues about the pyruvate lyase activity of Irp9, several mutants of EntC were generated in which the selected residues in EntC were substituted for those of Irp9: these included A303T, L304A, F327Y, I346L and F359Q mutations. Biochemical analysis of these mutants indicated that the side chain of A303 in EntC may be crucial in the orientation of the carbonyl to allow formation of a hydrogen bond with isochorismate. Some mutations, such as L304A and F359Q, give rise to a loss of catalytic activity, whereas others, such as F327Y and I346L, show that subtle changes in the otherwise closely similar active sites influence activity. We did not find a combination of these residues that conferred pyruvate lyase activity.

  14. The 2.15 A crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase reveals an unexpected gene duplication and suggests a role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Qamra, Rohini; Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Hasnain, Seyed E; Mande, Shekhar C

    2006-06-13

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes the first committed step toward the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine. While this biosynthetic pathway exists exclusively in the cell cytoplasm, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme has been shown to be secreted into the extracellular medium. The secretory nature of the enzyme and its existence in M. tuberculosis as a duplicated gene are suggestive of its role in host-pathogen interactions. We report here the crystal structure of homodimeric chorismate mutase (Rv1885c) from M. tuberculosis determined at 2.15 A resolution. The structure suggests possible gene duplication within each subunit of the dimer (residues 35-119 and 130-199) and reveals an interesting proline-rich region on the protein surface (residues 119-130), which might act as a recognition site for protein-protein interactions. The structure also offers an explanation for its regulation by small ligands, such as tryptophan, a feature previously unknown in the prototypical Escherichia coli chorismate mutase. The tryptophan ligand is found to be sandwiched between the two monomers in a dimer contacting residues 66-68. The active site in the "gene-duplicated" monomer is occupied by a sulfate ion and is located in the first half of the polypeptide, unlike in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) enzyme, where it is located in the later half. We hypothesize that the M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase might have a role to play in host-pathogen interactions, making it an important target for designing inhibitor molecules against the deadly pathogen.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of 2,5-dihydrochorismate analogues as inhibitors of the chorismate-utilising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard J; Bulloch, Esther M M; Toscano, Miguel M; Jones, Michelle A; Kerbarh, Olivier; Abell, Chris

    2009-06-07

    A library of 2,5-dihydrochorismate analogues were designed as inhibitors of the chorismate-utilising enzymes including anthranilate synthase, isochorismate synthase, salicylate synthase and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase. The inhibitors were synthesised in seven or eight steps from shikimic acid, sourced from star anise. The compounds exhibited moderate but differential inhibition against the four chorismate-utilising enzymes.

  16. 1.6 A crystal structure of the secreted chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: novel fold topology revealed.

    PubMed

    Okvist, Mats; Dey, Raja; Sasso, Severin; Grahn, Elin; Kast, Peter; Krengel, Ute

    2006-04-14

    The presence of exported chorismate mutases produced by certain organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been shown to correlate with their pathogenicity. As such, these proteins comprise a new group of promising selective drug targets. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the secreted dimeric chorismate mutase from M. tuberculosis (*MtCM; encoded by Rv1885c), which represents the first 3D-structure of a member of this chorismate mutase family, termed the AroQ(gamma) subclass. Structures are presented both for the unliganded enzyme and for a complex with a transition state analog. The protomer fold resembles the structurally characterized (dimeric) Escherichia coli chorismate mutase domain, but exhibits a new topology, with helix H4 of *MtCM carrying the catalytic site residue missing in the shortened helix H1. Furthermore, the structure of each *MtCM protomer is significantly more compact and only harbors one active site pocket, which is formed entirely by one polypeptide chain. Apart from the structural model, we present evidence as to how the substrate may enter the active site.

  17. A metabolic node in action: chorismate-utilizing enzymes in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dosselaere, F; Vanderleyden, J

    2001-01-01

    The shikimate pathway has been described as a metabolic tree with many branches that led to the synthesis of an extensive range of products. This pathway is present only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. While there is only little difference in the sequence of the chemical reactions of the pathway, significant differences exist in terms of organization and regulation. In the main trunk of the shikimate pathway, D-erythrose 4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate are converted via shikimate to chorismate. Chorismate is the common precursor for the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, but also for other products as diverse as folate cofactors, benzoid and naphthoid coenzymes, phenazines, and siderophores. Five chorismate-utilizing enzymes have been characterized in microorganisms: chorismate mutase, anthranilate synthase, aminodeoxychorismate synthase, isochorismate synthase, and chorismate pyruvate-lyase. In this review these enzymes are discussed in terms of the corresponding gene structures and regulation, nucleotide and protein sequences, protein structures, and reaction mechanisms. The main emphasis is on transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, in view of how a microbial cell exploits its chorismate pool in diverse anabolic pathways. Comparison of the chorismate-utilizing enzymes has shown that some of them share sequence similarity, suggesting divergent evolution and commonality in reaction mechanisms. However, other chorismate-utilizing enzymes are examples of convergent evolution toward similar reaction capabilities.

  18. Crystal structure of a hypothetical protein, TTHA0829 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, composed of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and aspartate-kinase chorismate-mutase tyrA (ACT) domains.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Shibata, Naoki; Ishido-Nakai, Emi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Iio, Yota; Komori, Hirofumi; Ueda, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    TTHA0829 from Thermus thermophilus HB8 has a molecular mass of 22,754 Da and is composed of 210 amino acid residues. The expression of TTHA0829 is remarkably elevated in the latter half of logarithmic growth phase. TTHA0829 can form either a tetrameric or dimeric structure, and main-chain folding provides an N-terminal cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domain and a C-terminal aspartate-kinase chorismate-mutase tyrA (ACT) domain. Both CBS and ACT are regulatory domains to which a small ligand molecule can bind. The CBS domain is found in proteins from organisms belonging to all kingdoms and is observed frequently as two or four tandem copies. This domain is considered as a small intracellular module with a regulatory function and is typically found adjacent to the active (or functional) site of several enzymes and integral membrane proteins. The ACT domain comprises four β-strands and two α-helices in a βαββαβ motif typical of intracellular small molecule binding domains that help control metabolism, solute transport and signal transduction. We discuss the possible role of TTHA0829 based on its structure and expression pattern. The results imply that TTHA0829 acts as a cell-stress sensor or a metabolite acceptor.

  19. Microbial Origin of Plant-Type 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-d-arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthases, Exemplified by the Chorismate- and Tryptophan-Regulated Enzyme from Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Guillermo; Bonner, Carol A.; Jensen, Roy A.

    2001-01-01

    Enzymes performing the initial reaction of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthases, exist as two distinct homology classes. The three classic Escherichia coli paralogs are AroAI proteins, but many members of the Bacteria possess the AroAII class of enzyme, sometimes in combination with AroAI proteins. AroAII DAHP synthases until now have been shown to be specifically dedicated to secondary metabolism (e.g., formation of ansamycin antibiotics or phenazine pigment). In contrast, here we show that the Xanthomonas campestris AroAII protein functions as the sole DAHP synthase supporting aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. X. campestris AroAII was cloned in E. coli by functional complementation, and genes corresponding to two possible translation starts were expressed. We developed a 1-day partial purification method (>99%) for the unstable protein. The recombinant AroAII protein was found to be subject to an allosteric pattern of sequential feedback inhibition in which chorismate is the prime allosteric effector. l-Tryptophan was found to be a minor feedback inhibitor. An N-terminal region of 111 amino acids may be located in the periplasm since a probable inner membrane-spanning region is predicted. Unlike chloroplast-localized AroAII of higher plants, X. campestris AroAII was not hysteretically activated by dithiols. Compared to plant AroAII proteins, differences in divalent metal activation were also observed. Phylogenetic tree analysis shows that AroAII originated within the Bacteria domain, and it seems probable that higher-plant plastids acquired AroAII from a gram-negative bacterium via endosymbiosis. The X. campestris AroAII protein is suggested to exemplify a case of analog displacement whereby an ancestral aroAI species was discarded, with the aroAII replacement providing an alternative pattern of allosteric control. Three subgroups of AroAII proteins can be recognized: a large, central group

  20. Conservation of mechanism in three chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    He, Ze; Stigers Lavoie, Kimberly D; Bartlett, Paul A; Toney, Michael D

    2004-03-03

    Chorismate is the end-product of the shikimate pathway for biosynthesis of carbocyclic aromatic compounds in plants, bacteria, fungi, and some parasites. Anthranilate synthase (AS), 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS), and isochorismate synthase (IS) are homologous enzymes that carry out the initial transformations on chorismate in the biosynthesis of tryptophan, p-aminobenzoate, and enterobactin, respectively, and are expected to share a common mechanism. Poor binding to ADCS of two potential transition state analogues for addition of a nucleophile to C6 of chorismate implies that it, like AS and IS, initiates reaction by addition of a nucleophile to C2. Molecular modeling based on the X-ray structures of AS and ADCS suggests that the active site residue K274 is the nucleophile employed by ADCS to initiate the reaction, forming a covalent intermediate. The K274A and K274R mutants were shown to have 265- and 640-fold reduced k(cat) values when PabA (the cognate amidotransferase) + glutamine are used as the nitrogen source. Under conditions of saturating chorismate and NH(4)(+), ADCS and the K274A mutant have identical k(cat) values, suggesting the participation of NH(4)(+) as a rescue agent. Such participation was confirmed by the buildup of 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate in the reactions of the K274A mutant but not ADCS, when either NH(4)(+) or PabA + glutamine is used as the nitrogen source. Additionally, the inclusion of ethylamine in the reactions of K274A yields the N-ethyl derivative of 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate. A unifying mechanism for AS, ADCS, and IS entailing nucleophile addition to C2 of chorismate in an S(N)2' ' process is proposed.

  1. Inhibition of chorismate-utilising enzymes by 2-amino-4-carboxypyridine and 4-carboxypyridone and 5-carboxypyridone analogues.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard J; Bulloch, Esther M M; Kerbarh, Olivier; Abell, Chris

    2010-08-07

    Several 2-amino-4-carboxypyridine, 4- and 5-carboxypyridone-based compounds were prepared and tested against three members of the chorismate-utilising enzyme family, anthranilate synthase, isochorismate synthase and salicylate synthase. Most compounds exhibited low micromolar inhibition of these three enzymes. The most potent inhibitor was a 4-carboxypyridone analogue bearing a lactate side chain on the pyridyl nitrogen which exhibited inhibition constants of 5, 91 and 54 muM against anthranilate synthase, isochorismate synthase and salicylate synthase respectively.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Qamra, Rohini; Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2005-05-01

    Chorismate mutase from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies reveal the occurrence of a dimeric molecule in the crystal asymmetric unit. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine in bacteria, fungi and higher plants. The recent re-annotation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome has revealed the presence of a duplicate set of genes coding for chorismate mutase. The mycobacterial gene Rv1885c bears <20% sequence homology to other bacterial chorismate mutases, thus serving as a potential target for the development of inhibitors specific to the pathogen. The M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase was crystallized in space group C2 and the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations revealed the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  3. The Structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the First Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Siderophore Mycobactin, Reveals It To Be a Salicylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2006-01-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 Å, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis. PMID:16923875

  4. The structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin, reveals it to be a salicylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2006-09-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 A, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis.

  5. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc Andre; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis.

  6. Pericyclic reactions catalyzed by chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Audrey L

    2011-09-06

    One of the fundamental questions of enzymology is how catalytic power is derived. This review focuses on recent developments in the structure--function relationships of chorismate-utilizing enzymes involved in siderophore biosynthesis to provide insight into the biocatalysis of pericyclic reactions. Specifically, salicylate synthesis by the two-enzyme pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is examined. The isochorismate-pyruvate lyase is discussed in the context of its homologues, the chorismate mutases, and the isochorismate synthase is compared to its homologues in the MST family (menaquinone, siderophore, or tryptophan biosynthesis) of enzymes. The tentative conclusion is that the activities observed cannot be reconciled by inspection of the active site participants alone. Instead, individual activities must arise from unique dynamic properties of each enzyme that are tuned to promote specific chemistries.

  7. Pericyclic reactions catalyzed by chorismate-utilizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Audrey L.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental questions of enzymology is how catalytic power is derived. This review focuses on recent developments in the structure-function relationships of chorismate-utilizing enzymes involved in siderophore biosynthesis to provide insight into the biocatalysis of pericyclic reactions. Specifically, salicylate synthesis by the two-enzyme pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is examined. The isochorismate-pyruvate lyase is discussed in the context of its homologues, the chorismate mutases, and the isochorismate synthase is compared to its homologues in the MST-family (menaquinone, siderophore or tryptophan biosynthesis) of enzymes. The tentative conclusion is that the activities observed cannot be reconciled by inspection of the active site participants alone. Instead, individual activities must arise from unique dynamic properties of each enzyme that are tuned to promote specific chemistries. PMID:21823653

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Qamra, Rohini; Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Hasnain, Seyed E; Mande, Shekhar C

    2005-05-01

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine in bacteria, fungi and higher plants. The recent re-annotation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome has revealed the presence of a duplicate set of genes coding for chorismate mutase. The mycobacterial gene Rv1885c bears <20% sequence homology to other bacterial chorismate mutases, thus serving as a potential target for the development of inhibitors specific to the pathogen. The M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase was crystallized in space group C2 and the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 A. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations revealed the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Mechanistic and inhibition studies of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kerbarh, O; Bulloch, E M M; Payne, R J; Sahr, T; Rébeillé, F; Abell, C

    2005-08-01

    The shikimate biosynthetic pathway is utilized in algae, higher plants, bacteria, fungi and apicomplexan parasites; it involves seven enzymatic steps in which phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate are converted into chorismate. In Escherichia coli, five chorismate-utilizing enzymes catalyse the synthesis of aromatic compounds such as L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, folate, ubiquinone and siderophores such as yersiniabactin and enterobactin. As mammals do not possess such a biosynthetic system, the enzymes involved in the pathway have aroused considerable interest as potential targets for the development of antimicrobial drugs and herbicides. As an initiative to investigate the mechanism of some of these enzymes, we showed that the antimicrobial effect of (6S)-6-fluoroshikimate is the result of irreversible inhibition of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase by 2-fluorochorismate. Based on this study, a catalytic mechanism for this enzyme was proposed, in which the residue Lys-274 is involved in the formation of a covalent intermediate. In another study, Yersinia enterocolitica Irp9, which is involved in the biosynthesis of the siderophore yersiniabactin, was for the first time biochemically characterized and shown to catalyse the formation of salicylate from chorismate via isochorismate as a reaction intermediate. A three-dimensional model for this enzyme was constructed that will guide the search for potent inhibitors of salicylate formation, and hence of bacterial iron uptake.

  10. Structural evolution of differential amino acid effector regulation in plant chorismate mutases.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Corey S; Xu, Ang; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-10-10

    Chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. To understand the molecular basis of allosteric regulation in the plant chorismate mutases, we analyzed the three Arabidopsis thaliana chorismate mutase isoforms (AtCM1-3) and determined the x-ray crystal structures of AtCM1 in complex with phenylalanine and tyrosine. Functional analyses show a wider range of effector control in the Arabidopsis chorismate mutases than previously reported. AtCM1 is activated by tryptophan with phenylalanine and tyrosine acting as negative effectors; however, tryptophan, cysteine, and histidine activate AtCM3. AtCM2 is a nonallosteric form. The crystal structure of AtCM1 in complex with tyrosine and phenylalanine identifies differences in the effector sites of the allosterically regulated yeast enzyme and the other two Arabidopsis isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the effector site reveals key features leading to differential effector regulation in these enzymes. In AtCM1, mutations of Gly-213 abolish allosteric regulation, as observed in AtCM2. A second effector site position, Gly-149 in AtCM1 and Asp-132 in AtCM3, controls amino acid effector specificity in AtCM1 and AtCM3. Comparisons of chorismate mutases from multiple plants suggest that subtle differences in the effector site are conserved in different lineages and may lead to specialized regulation of this branch point enzyme.

  11. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis. PMID:20944209

  12. [Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of chorismate mutase gene from Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jiang, Chao; Shen, Ye

    2013-06-01

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate that is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine. A chorismate mutase gene, designated SmCM1, was isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza by using RT-PCR. The full length of SmCM1 cDNA consists of 948 nucleotides and has an open reading frame of 765 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmCM1 has 255 amino acid residues which forms a 36.0 kD polypeptide with calculated pI of 6.41 as expected. The putative polypeptide contains a CM_2 super family function domain. Blast W results showed that SmCM1 had 70% of the similarity with Petunia x hybrid CM, 72% of the similarity with Arabidopsis thaliana CM, and 64% of similarity with Populus trichocarpa CM. The transcription level of SmCM1 in root, stem and leaf was analysed by realtime quantitative PCR. The results showed the expression level of the SmCM1 in leaf was highest, and lowest in root. Yeast extract and silver ion joint induction could markedly stimulate the increase of mRNA expression of SmCM1 and its upstream 3-deoxy-7- phosphoheptulonate synthase (DAHPS) and chorismate synthase (CS). It was 7.9, 5.5 and 9.8 times of control on 8 h after induction, respectively.

  13. Allosteric regulation of catalytic activity: Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase versus yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, K; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    2001-09-01

    Allosteric regulation of key metabolic enzymes is a fascinating field to study the structure-function relationship of induced conformational changes of proteins. In this review we compare the principles of allosteric transitions of the complex classical model aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli, consisting of 12 polypeptides, and the less complicated chorismate mutase derived from baker's yeast, which functions as a homodimer. Chorismate mutase presumably represents the minimal oligomerization state of a cooperative enzyme which still can be either activated or inhibited by different heterotropic effectors. Detailed knowledge of the number of possible quaternary states and a description of molecular triggers for conformational changes of model enzymes such as ATCase and chorismate mutase shed more and more light on allostery as an important regulatory mechanism of any living cell. The comparison of wild-type and engineered mutant enzymes reveals that current textbook models for regulation do not cover the entire picture needed to describe the function of these enzymes in detail.

  14. Ligand binding induces an ammonia channel in 2-amino-2-desoxyisochorismate (ADIC) synthase PhzE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PhzE utilizes chorismate and glutamine to synthesize 2-amino-2-desoxyisochorismate (ADIC) in the first step of phenazine biosynthesis. At variance with the related anthranilate synthase, the monomer of PhzE consists of a single chain that contains both a chorismate-converting domain of the menaquino...

  15. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of aza inhibitors of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Hediger, Mark E

    2004-09-15

    A series of aza inhibitors (4-9) of chorismate mutase (E.C. 5.4.99.5) was designed, prepared, and evaluated against the enzyme by monitoring the direct inhibition of the chorismate, 1, to prephenate, 2, conversion. None of these aza inhibitors displayed tighter binding to the enzyme than the native substrate chorismate or greater inhibitory action than the previously reported ether analogue, 3. Furthermore, no time-dependent loss of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of the two potentially reactive aza inhibitors (7 and 9). These results in conjunction with inhibition data from a broader series of chorismate mutase inhibitors allowed a novel proposal for the mechanistic role of chorismate mutase to be developed. This proposed mechanism was computationally verified and correlated with crystallographic studies of various chorismate mutases.

  16. An engineered chorismate mutase with allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-07-17

    Besides playing a central role in phenylalanine biosynthesis, the bifunctional P-protein in Eschericia coli provides a unique model system for investigating whether allosteric effects can be engineered into protein catalysts using modular regulatory elements. Previous studies have established that the P-protein contains three distinct domains whose functions are preserved, even when separated: chorismate mutase (residues 1-109), prephenate dehydratase (residues 101-285), and an allosteric domain (residues 286-386) for feedback inhibition by phenylalanine. By deleting the prephenate dehydrase domain, a functional chorismate mutase linked directly to the phenylalanine binding domain has been engineered and overexpressed. This manuscript reports the catalytic properties of the mutase in the absence and presence of phenylalanine.

  17. Crystallization of the c14-rotor of the chloroplast ATP synthase reveals that it contains pigments

    PubMed Central

    Varco-Merth, Benjamin; Fromme, Raimund; Wang, Meitian; Fromme, Petra

    2012-01-01

    The ATP synthase is one of the most important enzymes on earth as it couples the transmembrane electrochemical potential of protons to the synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate, providing the main ATP source of almost all higher life on earth. During ATP synthesis, stepwise protonation of a conserved carboxylate on each protein subunit of an oligomeric ring of 10–15 c-subunits is commonly thought to drive rotation of the rotor moiety (c10–14γε) relative to stator moiety (α3β3δab2). Here we report the isolation and crystallization of the c14-ring of subunit c from the spinach chloroplast enzyme diffracting as far as 2.8 Å. Though ATP synthase was not previously known to contain any pigments, the crystals of the c-subunit possessed a strong yellow color. The pigment analysis revealed that they contain 1 chlorophyll and 2 carotenoids, thereby showing for the first time that the chloroplast ATP synthase contains cofactors, leading to the question of the possible roles of the functions of the pigments in the chloroplast ATP synthase. PMID:18515064

  18. Genetic and biochemical identification of the chorismate mutase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan-Pan; Liu, Ya-Jun; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2009-10-01

    Chorismate mutase (CM) catalyses the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate and is also the first and the key enzyme that diverges the shikimate pathway to either tryptophan (Trp) or phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr). Corynebacterium glutamicum is one of the most important amino acid producers for the fermentation industry and has been widely investigated. However, the gene(s) encoding CM has not been experimentally identified in C. glutamicum. In this study, the ncgl0819 gene, which was annotated as 'conserved hypothetical protein' in the C. glutamicum genome, was genetically characterized to be essential for growth in minimal medium, and a mutant deleted of ncgl0819 was a Phe and Tyr auxotroph. Genetic cloning and expression of ncgl0819 in Escherichia coli resulted in the formation of a new protein (NCgl0819) having CM activity. It was concluded that ncgl0819 encoded the CM of C. glutamicum (CM0819). CM0819 was demonstrated to be a homodimer and is a new member of the monofunctional CMs of the AroQ structural class. The CM0819 activity was not affected by Phe, Tyr or Trp. Two 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthases (DS0950 and DS2098, formerly NCgl0950 and NCgl2098) had been previously identified from C. glutamicum. CM0819 significantly stimulated DAHP synthase (DS2098) activity. Physical interaction between CM0819 and DS2098 was observed. When CM0819 was present, DS2098 activity was subject to allosteric inhibition by chorismate and prephenate. Conserved hypothetical proteins homologous to CM0819 were identified in all known Corynebacterium genomes, suggesting a universal occurrence of CM0819-like CMs in the genus Corynebacterium.

  19. In situ structure of trypanosomal ATP synthase dimer reveals a unique arrangement of catalytic subunits

    PubMed Central

    Mühleip, Alexander W.; Dewar, Caroline E.; Schnaufer, Achim; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M.

    2017-01-01

    We used electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the in situ structures of mitochondrial ATP synthase dimers from two organisms belonging to the phylum euglenozoa: Trypanosoma brucei, a lethal human parasite, and Euglena gracilis, a photosynthetic protist. At a resolution of 32.5 Å and 27.5 Å, respectively, the two structures clearly exhibit a noncanonical F1 head, in which the catalytic (αβ)3 assembly forms a triangular pyramid rather than the pseudo-sixfold ring arrangement typical of all other ATP synthases investigated so far. Fitting of known X-ray structures reveals that this unusual geometry results from a phylum-specific cleavage of the α subunit, in which the C-terminal αC fragments are displaced by ∼20 Å and rotated by ∼30° from their expected positions. In this location, the αC fragment is unable to form the conserved catalytic interface that was thought to be essential for ATP synthesis, and cannot convert γ-subunit rotation into the conformational changes implicit in rotary catalysis. The new arrangement of catalytic subunits suggests that the mechanism of ATP generation by rotary ATPases is less strictly conserved than has been generally assumed. The ATP synthases of these organisms present a unique model system for discerning the individual contributions of the α and β subunits to the fundamental process of ATP synthesis. PMID:28096380

  20. In situ structure of trypanosomal ATP synthase dimer reveals a unique arrangement of catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Mühleip, Alexander W; Dewar, Caroline E; Schnaufer, Achim; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M

    2017-01-31

    We used electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the in situ structures of mitochondrial ATP synthase dimers from two organisms belonging to the phylum euglenozoa: Trypanosoma brucei, a lethal human parasite, and Euglena gracilis, a photosynthetic protist. At a resolution of 32.5 Å and 27.5 Å, respectively, the two structures clearly exhibit a noncanonical F1 head, in which the catalytic (αβ)3 assembly forms a triangular pyramid rather than the pseudo-sixfold ring arrangement typical of all other ATP synthases investigated so far. Fitting of known X-ray structures reveals that this unusual geometry results from a phylum-specific cleavage of the α subunit, in which the C-terminal αC fragments are displaced by ∼20 Å and rotated by ∼30° from their expected positions. In this location, the αC fragment is unable to form the conserved catalytic interface that was thought to be essential for ATP synthesis, and cannot convert γ-subunit rotation into the conformational changes implicit in rotary catalysis. The new arrangement of catalytic subunits suggests that the mechanism of ATP generation by rotary ATPases is less strictly conserved than has been generally assumed. The ATP synthases of these organisms present a unique model system for discerning the individual contributions of the α and β subunits to the fundamental process of ATP synthesis.

  1. A definitive mechanism for chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Bruice, Thomas C

    2005-08-09

    In previous research presentations, we have described the important features of the chorismate --> prephenate reaction using molecular dynamics (MD) and thermodynamic integration studies. This investigation of the reaction in Escherichia coli and water involves QM/MM procedures (SCCDFTB/MM two-dimensional reaction coordinates to identify transition state structures in the water, enzyme, and gas phase followed by B3LYP/6-31+G* single-point computations which allow the determination of activation energies in water and in the E. coli enzyme). Computed activation energies of 11.3 kcal/mol in enzyme and 20.3 kcal/mol in water may be compared to the experimental values of 12.7 and 20.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The transition state structures in the gas phase, water, and enzyme are much the same. The transition states are characteristic of a concerted pericyclic rearrangement. The very small differences in the partial charges of O13 in NAC and TS support only a small preferential (10%) electrostatic stabilization of TS. The free energy of NAC formation in water exceeds that in enzyme by 8.5 kcal/mol, and it is this favored formation of NAC that provides the major kinetic advantage to the enzymatic reaction. These findings compare most favorably with those previous observations of this laboratory employing molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integrations. A definitive mechanism for the chorismate mutase enzymes is provided.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of noncovalent chorismate mutase-inhibitor binding by ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Silke; McCombie, Gregor; Daniel, Jürg; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Hilvert, Donald; Zenobi, Renato

    2003-12-01

    Electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively determine the dissociation constant of chorismate mutase and a transition state analogue inhibitor. This system presents a fairly complex stoichiometry because the native protein is a homotrimer with three equal and independent substrate binding sites. We can detect the chorismate mutase trimer as well as chorismate mutase-inhibitor complexes by choosing appropriate conditions in the ESI source. To verify that the protein-inhibitor complexes are specific, titration experiments with different enzyme variants and different inhibitors were performed. A plot of the number of bound inhibitors versus added inhibitor concentration revealed saturation behavior with 3:1 (inhibitor:functional trimer) stoichiometry for the TSA. The soft ESI conditions, the relatively high protein mass of 43.5 kDa, and the low charge state (high m/z) result in broad peaks, a typical problem in analyzing noncovalent protein complexes. Due to the low molecular weight of the TSA (226 Da) the peaks of the free protein and the protein with one, two or three inhibitors bound cannot be clearly resolved. For data analysis, relative peak areas of the deconvoluted spectra of chorismate mutase-inhibitor complexes were obtained by fitting appropriate peak shapes to the signals corresponding to the free enzyme and its complexes with one, two, or three inhibitor molecules. From the relative peak areas we were able to calculate a dissociation constant that agreed well with known solution-phase data. This method may be generally useful for interpreting mass spectra of noncovalent complexes that exhibit broad peaks in the high m/z range.

  3. Preorganization and reorganization as related factors in enzyme catalysis: the chorismate mutase case.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2003-02-17

    In this paper a deeper insight into the chorismate-to prephenate-rearrangement, catalyzed by Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase, is provided by means of a combination of statistical quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation methods and hybrid potential energy surface exploration techniques. The main aim of this work is to present an estimation of the preorganization and reorganization terms of the enzyme catalytic rate enhancement. To analyze the first of these, we have studied different conformational equilibria of chorismate in aqueous solution and in the enzyme active site. Our conclusion is that chorismate mutase preferentially binds the reactive conformer of the substrate--that presenting a structure similar to the transition state of the reaction to be catalyzed--with shorter distances between the carbon atoms to be bonded and more diaxial character. With respect to the reorganization effect, an energy decomposition analysis of the potential energies of the reactive reactant and of the reaction transition state in aqueous solution and in the enzyme shows that the enzyme structure is better adapted to the transition structure. This means not only a more negative electrostatic interaction energy with the transition state but also a low enzyme deformation contribution to the energy barrier. Our calculations reveal that the structure of the enzyme is responsible for stabilizing the transition state structure of the reaction, with concomitant selection of the reactive form of the reactants. This is, the same enzymatic pattern that stabilizes the transition structure also promotes those reactant structures closer to the transition structure (i.e., the reactive reactants). In fact, both reorganization and preorganization effects have to be considered as the two faces of the same coin, having a common origin in the effect of the enzyme structure on the energy surface of the substrate.

  4. Chorismate mutase of Thermus thermophilus is a monofunctional AroH class enzyme inhibited by tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Merkl, Rainer; Braus, Gerhard H

    2004-03-01

    aroG, encoding the monofunctional chorismate mutase (TtCM) of the thermophilic gram-negative bacterium Thermus thermophilus, was cloned and its gene product characterized. TtCM was purified to homogeneity on an SDS polyacrylamide gel as a His-fusion protein with a deduced molecular mass of 15.8 kDa. The enzyme belongs to the rare group of AroH-type chorismate mutases which are mainly found in gram-positive bacteria of the Bacillus/ Clostridia group and have recently also been described for gram-negative organisms. The native molecular mass is consistent with a pseudo-alpha/beta barrel enzyme that is organized as a trimer. Comparison of the enzyme's structure with that of its mesophilic counterpart from Bacillus revealed an increase in hydrophilicity on the protein's surface, greater hydrophobicity in cavities within the protein, and greater restriction of conformational freedom, features that contribute to the thermal stability of this chorismate mutase. The kinetic data show Michaelis-Menten substrate saturation with a Km of 290 microM, and a kcat/ Km value of 180 s(-1) mM(-1). TtCM was inhibited by tyrosine with a Ki =34 microM, possibly in a competitive manner.

  5. The mechanism of catalysis of the chorismate to prephenate reaction by the Escherichia coli mutase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun; Bruice, Thomas C

    2002-02-05

    Molecular dynamics studies of the Escherichia coli chorismate mutase (EcCM), containing at the active site chorismate and in turn the transition state (TS), have been performed. The simulations show that TS is not bound any tighter than chorismate. Comparison of average polar interactions show they are virtually identical for interactions of EcCM with chorismate and the TS, whereas hydrophobic interactions with TS are much weaker than with chorismate. Interactions and the mechanism of catalysis of chorismate --> prephenate by the EcCM enzyme are discussed.

  6. Analysis of the cercosporin polyketide synthase CTB1 reveals a new fungal thioesterase function

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Vagstad, Anna L.; Belecki, Katherine; Scheerer, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    The polyketide synthase CTB1 is demonstrated to catalyze pyrone formation thereby expanding the known biosynthetic repertoire of thioesterase domains in iterative, non-reducing polyketide synthases. PMID:23108075

  7. Structure and Mechanism of MbtI, the Salicylate Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen,J.; Kolappan, S.; Zhou, R.; Kisker, C.; Tonge, P.

    2007-01-01

    MbtI (rv2386c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the initial transformation in mycobactin biosynthesis by converting chorismate to salicylate. We report here the structure of MbtI at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and demonstrate that isochorismate is a kinetically competent intermediate in the synthesis of salicylate from chorismate. At pH values below 7.5 isochorismate is the dominant product while above this pH value the enzyme converts chorismate to salicylate without the accumulation of isochorismate in solution. The salicylate and isochorismate synthase activities of MbtI are Mg{sup 2+}-dependent, and in the absence of Mg{sup 2+} MbtI has a promiscuous chorismate mutase activity similar to that of the isochorismate pyruvate lyase, PchB, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MbtI is part of a larger family of chorismate-binding enzymes descended from a common ancestor (the MST family), that includes the isochorismate synthases and anthranilate synthases. The lack of active site residues unique to pyruvate eliminating members of this family, combined with the observed chorismate mutase activity, suggests that MbtI may exploit a sigmatropic pyruvate elimination mechanism similar to that proposed for PchB. Using a combination of structural, kinetic, and sequence based studies we propose a mechanism for MbtI applicable to all members of the MST enzyme family.

  8. Structure and mechanism of MbtI, the salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Jacque; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Zhou, Rong; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2007-01-30

    MbtI (rv2386c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the initial transformation in mycobactin biosynthesis by converting chorismate to salicylate. We report here the structure of MbtI at 2.5 A resolution and demonstrate that isochorismate is a kinetically competent intermediate in the synthesis of salicylate from chorismate. At pH values below 7.5 isochorismate is the dominant product while above this pH value the enzyme converts chorismate to salicylate without the accumulation of isochorismate in solution. The salicylate and isochorismate synthase activities of MbtI are Mg2+-dependent, and in the absence of Mg2+ MbtI has a promiscuous chorismate mutase activity similar to that of the isochorismate pyruvate lyase, PchB, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MbtI is part of a larger family of chorismate-binding enzymes descended from a common ancestor (the MST family), that includes the isochorismate synthases and anthranilate synthases. The lack of active site residues unique to pyruvate eliminating members of this family, combined with the observed chorismate mutase activity, suggests that MbtI may exploit a sigmatropic pyruvate elimination mechanism similar to that proposed for PchB. Using a combination of structural, kinetic, and sequence based studies we propose a mechanism for MbtI applicable to all members of the MST enzyme family.

  9. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  10. Functional analysis of environmental DNA-derived type II polyketide synthases reveals structurally diverse secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhiyang; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Brady, Sean F.

    2011-01-01

    A single gram of soil is predicted to contain thousands of unique bacterial species. The majority of these species remain recalcitrant to standard culture methods, prohibiting their use as sources of unique bioactive small molecules. The cloning and analysis of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (environmental DNA, eDNA) provides a means of exploring the biosynthetic capacity of natural bacterial populations. Environmental DNA libraries contain large reservoirs of bacterial genetic diversity from which new secondary metabolite gene clusters can be systematically recovered and studied. The identification and heterologous expression of type II polyketide synthase-containing eDNA clones is reported here. Functional analysis of three soil DNA-derived polyketide synthase systems in Streptomyces albus revealed diverse metabolites belonging to well-known, rare, and previously uncharacterized structural families. The first of these systems is predicted to encode the production of the known antibiotic landomycin E. The second was found to encode the production of a metabolite with a previously uncharacterized pentacyclic ring system. The third was found to encode the production of unique KB-3346-5 derivatives, which show activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. These results, together with those of other small-molecule-directed metagenomic studies, suggest that culture-independent approaches are capable of accessing biosynthetic diversity that has not yet been extensively explored using culture-based methods. The large-scale functional screening of eDNA clones should be a productive strategy for generating structurally previously uncharacterized chemical entities for use in future drug development efforts. PMID:21768346

  11. The allosteric mechanism of yeast chorismate mutase: a dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yifei; Ma, Jianpeng; Karplus, Martin; Lipscomb, William N

    2006-02-10

    The effector-regulated allosteric mechanism of yeast chorismate mutase (YCM) was studied by normal mode analysis and targeted molecular dynamics. The normal mode analysis shows that the conformational change between YCM in the R state and in the T state can be represented by a relatively small number of low-frequency modes. This suggests that the transition is coded in the structure and is likely to have a low energetic barrier. Quantitative comparisons (i.e. frequencies) between the low-frequency modes of YCM with and without effectors (modeled structures) reveal that the binding of Trp increases the global flexibility, whereas Tyr decreases global flexibility. The targeted molecular dynamics simulation of substrate analog release from the YCM active site suggests that a series of residues are critical for orienting and "recruiting" the substrate. The simulation led to the switching of a series of substrate-release-coupled salt-bridge partners in the ligand-binding domain; similar changes occur in the transition between YCM R-state and T-state crystal structures. Thus, the normal mode analysis and targeted molecular dynamics results provide evidence that the effectors regulate YCM activity by influencing the global flexibility. The change in flexibility is coupled to the binding of substrate to the T state and release of the product from the R state, respectively.

  12. Functional analysis of (4S)-limonene synthase mutants reveals determinants of catalytic outcome in a model monoterpene synthase.

    PubMed

    Srividya, Narayanan; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney B; Lange, B Markus

    2015-03-17

    Crystal structural data for (4S)-limonene synthase [(4S)-LS] of spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) were used to infer which amino acid residues are in close proximity to the substrate and carbocation intermediates of the enzymatic reaction. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of 48 amino acids combined with enzyme fidelity analysis [percentage of (-)-limonene produced] indicated which residues are most likely to constitute the active site. Mutation of residues W324 and H579 caused a significant drop in enzyme activity and formation of products (myrcene, linalool, and terpineol) characteristic of a premature termination of the reaction. A double mutant (W324A/H579A) had no detectable enzyme activity, indicating that either substrate binding or the terminating reaction was impaired. Exchanges to other aromatic residues (W324H, W324F, W324Y, H579F, H579Y, and H579W) resulted in enzyme catalysts with significantly reduced activity. Sequence comparisons across the angiosperm lineage provided evidence that W324 is a conserved residue, whereas the position equivalent to H579 is occupied by aromatic residues (H, F, or Y). These results are consistent with a critical role of W324 and H579 in the stabilization of carbocation intermediates. The potential of these residues to serve as the catalytic base facilitating the terminal deprotonation reaction is discussed.

  13. RNA Sequencing Revealed Numerous Polyketide Synthase Genes in the Harmful Dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kei; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakayama, Kei; Shikata, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Fumio; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Skamoto, Setsuko; Yamaguchi, Mineo; Tomaru, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi forms blooms in the coastal waters of temperate regions and occasionally causes massive fish and invertebrate mortality. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effect of K. mikimotoi on marine organisms by using the genomics approach; RNA-sequence libraries were constructed, and data were analyzed to identify toxin-related genes. Next-generation sequencing produced 153,406 transcript contigs from the axenic culture of K. mikimotoi. BLASTX analysis against all assembled contigs revealed that 208 contigs were polyketide synthase (PKS) sequences. Thus, K. mikimotoi was thought to have several genes encoding PKS metabolites and to likely produce toxin-like polyketide molecules. Of all the sequences, approximately 30 encoded eight PKS genes, which were remarkably similar to those of Karenia brevis. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that these genes belonged to a new group of PKS type-I genes. Phylogenetic and active domain analyses showed that the amino acid sequence of four among eight Karenia PKS genes was not similar to any of the reported PKS genes. These PKS genes might possibly be associated with the synthesis of polyketide toxins produced by Karenia species. Further, a homology search revealed 10 contigs that were similar to a toxin gene responsible for the synthesis of saxitoxin (sxtA) in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. These contigs encoded A1–A3 domains of sxtA genes. Thus, this study identified some transcripts in K. mikimotoi that might be associated with several putative toxin-related genes. The findings of this study might help understand the mechanism of toxicity of K. mikimotoi and other dinoflagellates. PMID:26561394

  14. Structures of mesophilic and extremophilic citrate synthases reveal rigidity and flexibility for function.

    PubMed

    Wells, Stephen A; Crennell, Susan J; Danson, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) catalyses the entry of carbon into the citric acid cycle and is highly-conserved structurally across the tree of life. Crystal structures of dimeric CSs are known in both "open" and "closed" forms, which differ by a substantial domain motion that closes the substrate-binding clefts. We explore both the static rigidity and the dynamic flexibility of CS structures from mesophilic and extremophilic organisms from all three evolutionary domains. The computational expense of this wide-ranging exploration is kept to a minimum by the use of rigidity analysis and rapid all-atom simulations of flexible motion, combining geometric simulation and elastic network modeling. CS structures from thermophiles display increased structural rigidity compared with the mesophilic enzyme. A CS structure from a psychrophile, stabilized by strong ionic interactions, appears to display likewise increased rigidity in conventional rigidity analysis; however, a novel modified analysis, taking into account the weakening of the hydrophobic effect at low temperatures, shows a more appropriate decreased rigidity. These rigidity variations do not, however, affect the character of the flexible dynamics, which are well conserved across all the structures studied. Simulation trajectories not only duplicate the crystallographically observed symmetric open-to-closed transitions, but also identify motions describing a previously unidentified antisymmetric functional motion. This antisymmetric motion would not be directly observed in crystallography but is revealed as an intrinsic property of the CS structure by modeling of flexible motion. This suggests that the functional motion closing the binding clefts in CS may be independent rather than symmetric and cooperative.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase: A potential target for TB.

    PubMed

    Khanapur, Manjulatha; Alvala, Mallika; Prabhakar, Maddela; Shiva Kumar, K; Edwin, R K; Sri Saranya, P S V K; Patel, Raj Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Misra, P; Pal, Manojit

    2017-03-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase (MtbCM) catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in the shikimate biosynthetic pathway to form the essential amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Two genes encoding chorismate mutase have been identified in Mtb. The secretory form,∗MtbCM (encoded by Rv1885c) is assumed to play a key role in pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Also, the inhibition of MtbCM may hinder the supply of nutrients to the organism. Indeed, the existence of chorismate mutase (CM) in bacteria, fungi and higher plants but not in human and low sequence homology among known CM makes it an interesting target for the discovery of anti-tubercular agents. The present article mainly focuses on the recent developments in the structure, function and inhibition of MtbCM. The understanding of various aspects of MtbCM as presented in the current article may facilitate the design and subsequent chemical synthesis of new inhibitors against ∗MtbCM, that could lead to the discovery and development of novel and potent anti-tubercular agents in future.

  16. Meloidogyne javanica chorismate mutase 1 alters plant cell development.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Kris N

    2003-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes are obligate plant parasites that alter plant cell growth and development by inducing the formation of giant cells for feeding. Nematodes inject secretions from their esophageal glands through their stylet and into plant cells to induce giant cell formation. Meloidogyne javanica chorismate mutase 1 (MjCM-1) is one such esophageal gland protein likely to be secreted from the nematode as giant cells form. MjCM-1 has two domains, an N-terminal chorismate mutase (CM) domain and a C-terminal region of unknown function. It is the N-terminal CM domain of the protein that is the predominant form produced in root-knot nematodes. Transgenic expression of MjCM-1 in soybean hairy roots results in a phenotype of reduced and aborted lateral roots. Histological studies demonstrate the absence of vascular tissue in hairy roots expressing MjCM-1. The phenotype of MjCM-1 expressed at low levels can be rescued by the addition of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indicating MjCM-1 overexpression reduces IAA biosynthesis. We propose MjCM-1 lowers IAA by causing a competition for chorismate, resulting in an alteration of chorismate-derived metabolites and, ultimately, in plant cell development. Therefore, we hypothesize that MjCM-1 is involved in allowing nematodes to establish a parasitic relationship with the host plant.

  17. A new salicylate synthase AmS is identified for siderophores biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T).

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Dai, Shengwang; Shen, Jinzhao; Ren, Biao; Huang, Pei; Wang, Qiushui; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Buchang; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-07-01

    Siderophores are important for the growth of bacteria or the applications in treatment of iron overload-associated diseases due to the iron-chelating property. Salicylate synthase played a key role in the biosynthesis of some NRPS-derived siderophores by the providing of an iron coordination moiety as the initial building block. A new salicylate synthase, namely AmS, was identified in the biosynthesis pathway of siderophore amychelin in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T), since it shunt chorismate, an integrant precursor, from primary to secondary metabolite flow. The amino acid sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that AmS grouped into a new cluster. In vitro assays of AmS revealed its wide temperature tolerance ranged from 0 to 40 °C and narrow pH tolerant ranged from 7.0 to 9.0. AmS was resistant to organic solvents and non-ionic detergents. Moreover, AmS converted chorismate to salicylate with K m of 129.05 μM, k cat of 2.20 min(-1) at optimal conditions, indicating its low substrate specificity and comparable velocity to reported counterparts (Irp9 and MbtI). These properties of AmS may improve the iron-seizing ability of A. methanolica to compete with its neighbors growing in natural environments. Most importantly, serine and cysteine residues were found to be important for the catalytic activity of AmS. This study presented AmS as a new cluster of salicylate synthase and the reaction mechanism and potential applications of salicylate synthase were highlighted as well.

  18. Tyrosine and tryptophan act through the same binding site at the dimer interface of yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Schnappauf, G; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    1998-07-03

    Tyrosine and tryptophan are the regulators of the dimeric yeast chorismate mutase. Biochemical studies reveal two binding sites per molecule for both effectors, tyrosine or tryptophan. A single binding site is built up by helix 8 and helices 4 and 5 of two different subunits. The binding sites have been analyzed in the active enzyme by site directed mutagenesis of critical codons of the coding gene, ARO7. Gly-141 and Ser-142, which both reside on helix 8, are involved in the binding of tyrosine or tryptophan presumably by interacting specifically with the amino- and carboxylate-groups of these amino acid effectors. Interaction with Thr-145 of helix 8 is required for a strong tyrosine binding to the allosteric site. Replacement of Arg-75, which connects helices 4 and 5 or of Arg-76, which is part of helix 5 by alanine residues, resulted in unregulated enzymes. These two residues are bonded to the carboxylate group and phenolic hydroxyl group of tyrosine, respectively, but do not interact with tryptophan by hydrogen bonding in the crystal structures. Phenylalanine, which has low binding affinity slightly activated the chorismate mutase. A T145V mutant chorismate mutase, however, showed increased activation by phenylalanine. Our results support a mechanism by which tyrosine contracts the allosteric site by interacting with its phenolic hydroxyl group. Tryptophan works in an inverse way by opening the allosteric site through the steric size of its side chain.

  19. Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate

    PubMed Central

    Andexer, Jennifer N.; Kendrew, Steven G.; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Lazos, Orestis; Foster, Teresa A.; Zimmermann, Anna-Sophie; Warneck, Tony D.; Suthar, Dipen; Coates, Nigel J.; Koehn, Frank E.; Skotnicki, Jerauld S.; Carter, Guy T.; Gregory, Matthew A.; Martin, Christine J.; Moss, Steven J.; Leadlay, Peter F.; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-01-01

    The macrocyclic polyketides FK506, FK520, and rapamycin are potent immunosuppressants that prevent T-cell proliferation through initial binding to the immunophilin FKBP12. Analogs of these molecules are of considerable interest as therapeutics in both metastatic and inflammatory disease. For these polyketides the starter unit for chain assembly is (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid derived from the shikimate pathway. We show here that the first committed step in its formation is hydrolysis of chorismate to form (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. This chorismatase activity is encoded by fkbO in the FK506 and FK520 biosynthetic gene clusters, and by rapK in the rapamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Purified recombinant FkbO (from FK520) efficiently catalyzed the chorismatase reaction in vitro, as judged by HPLC-MS and NMR analysis. Complementation using fkbO from either the FK506 or the FK520 gene cluster of a strain of S. hygroscopicus specifically deleted in rapK (BIOT-4010) restored rapamycin production, as did supplementation with (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. Although BIOT-4010 produced no rapamycin, it did produce low levels of BC325, a rapamycin analog containing a 3-hydroxybenzoate starter unit. This led us to identify the rapK homolog hyg5 as encoding a chorismatase/3-hydroxybenzoate synthase. Similar enzymes in other bacteria include the product of the bra8 gene from the pathway to the terpenoid natural product brasilicardin. Expression of either hyg5 or bra8 in BIOT-4010 led to increased levels of BC325. Also, purified Hyg5 catalyzed the predicted conversion of chorismate into 3-hydroxybenzoate. FkbO, RapK, Hyg5, and Bra8 are thus founder members of a previously unrecognized family of enzymes acting on chorismate. PMID:21383123

  20. Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate.

    PubMed

    Andexer, Jennifer N; Kendrew, Steven G; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Lazos, Orestis; Foster, Teresa A; Zimmermann, Anna-Sophie; Warneck, Tony D; Suthar, Dipen; Coates, Nigel J; Koehn, Frank E; Skotnicki, Jerauld S; Carter, Guy T; Gregory, Matthew A; Martin, Christine J; Moss, Steven J; Leadlay, Peter F; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-03-22

    The macrocyclic polyketides FK506, FK520, and rapamycin are potent immunosuppressants that prevent T-cell proliferation through initial binding to the immunophilin FKBP12. Analogs of these molecules are of considerable interest as therapeutics in both metastatic and inflammatory disease. For these polyketides the starter unit for chain assembly is (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid derived from the shikimate pathway. We show here that the first committed step in its formation is hydrolysis of chorismate to form (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. This chorismatase activity is encoded by fkbO in the FK506 and FK520 biosynthetic gene clusters, and by rapK in the rapamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Purified recombinant FkbO (from FK520) efficiently catalyzed the chorismatase reaction in vitro, as judged by HPLC-MS and NMR analysis. Complementation using fkbO from either the FK506 or the FK520 gene cluster of a strain of S. hygroscopicus specifically deleted in rapK (BIOT-4010) restored rapamycin production, as did supplementation with (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. Although BIOT-4010 produced no rapamycin, it did produce low levels of BC325, a rapamycin analog containing a 3-hydroxybenzoate starter unit. This led us to identify the rapK homolog hyg5 as encoding a chorismatase/3-hydroxybenzoate synthase. Similar enzymes in other bacteria include the product of the bra8 gene from the pathway to the terpenoid natural product brasilicardin. Expression of either hyg5 or bra8 in BIOT-4010 led to increased levels of BC325. Also, purified Hyg5 catalyzed the predicted conversion of chorismate into 3-hydroxybenzoate. FkbO, RapK, Hyg5, and Bra8 are thus founder members of a previously unrecognized family of enzymes acting on chorismate.

  1. Structures of lipoyl synthase reveal a compact active site for controlling sequential sulfur insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jenny E; Hiscox, Martyn J; Dinis, Pedro C; Fox, Stephen J; Iliopoulos, Andreas; Hussey, James E; Sandy, James; Van Beek, Florian T; Essex, Jonathan W; Roach, Peter L

    2014-11-15

    Lipoyl cofactors are essential for living organisms and are produced by the insertion of two sulfur atoms into the relatively unreactive C-H bonds of an octanoyl substrate. This reaction requires lipoyl synthase, a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme superfamily. In the present study, we solved crystal structures of lipoyl synthase with two [4Fe-4S] clusters bound at opposite ends of the TIM barrel, the usual fold of the radical SAM superfamily. The cluster required for reductive SAM cleavage conserves the features of the radical SAM superfamily, but the auxiliary cluster is bound by a CX4CX5C motif unique to lipoyl synthase. The fourth ligand to the auxiliary cluster is an extremely unusual serine residue. Site-directed mutants show this conserved serine ligand is essential for the sulfur insertion steps. One crystallized lipoyl synthase (LipA) complex contains 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a breakdown product of SAM, bound in the likely SAM-binding site. Modelling has identified an 18 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) deep channel, well-proportioned to accommodate an octanoyl substrate. These results suggest that the auxiliary cluster is the likely sulfur donor, but access to a sulfide ion for the second sulfur insertion reaction requires the loss of an iron atom from the auxiliary cluster, which the serine ligand may enable.

  2. Anthranilate synthase subunit organization in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Carminatti, C A; Oliveira, I L; Recouvreux, D O S; Antônio, R V; Porto, L M

    2008-09-16

    Tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid used for protein synthesis and cellular growth. Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 uses two tryptophan molecules to synthesize violacein, a secondary metabolite of pharmacological interest. The genome analysis of this bacterium revealed that the genes trpA-F and pabA-B encode the enzymes of the tryptophan pathway in which the first reaction is the conversion of chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase (AS), an enzyme complex. In the present study, the organization and structure of AS protein subunits from C. violaceum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools available on the Web. We showed by calculating molecular masses that AS in C. violaceum is composed of alpha (TrpE) and beta (PabA) subunits. This is in agreement with values determined experimentally. Catalytic and regulatory sites of the AS subunits were identified. The TrpE and PabA subunits contribute to the catalytic site while the TrpE subunit is involved in the allosteric site. Protein models for the TrpE and PabA subunits were built by restraint-based homology modeling using AS enzyme, chains A and B, from Salmonella typhimurium (PDB ID 1I1Q).

  3. Irp9, Encoded by the High-Pathogenicity Island of Yersinia enterocolitica, Is Able To Convert Chorismate into Salicylate, the Precursor of the Siderophore Yersiniabactin

    PubMed Central

    Pelludat, Cosima; Brem, Daniela; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    The Irp9 protein of Yersinia enterocolitica participates in the synthesis of salicylate, the precursor of the siderophore yersiniabactin. In Pseudomonas species, salicylate synthesis is mediated by two enzymes: isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate-lyase. Both enzymes are required for complementation of a Yersinia irp9 mutant. However, irp9 is not able to complement Escherichia coli entC for the production of enterobactin, which requires isochorismate as a precursor. These results suggest that Irp9 directly converts chorismate into salicylate. PMID:12949119

  4. Lysine 190 is the catalytic base in MenF, the menaquinone-specific isochorismate synthase from Escherichia coli: implications for an enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Zwahlen, Jacque; Zhou, Rong; Truglio, James J; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2007-01-30

    Menaquinone biosynthesis is initiated by the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, a reaction that is catalyzed by the menaquinone-specific isochorismate synthase, MenF. The catalytic mechanism of MenF has been probed using a combination of structural and biochemical studies, including the 2.5 A structure of the enzyme, and Lys190 has been identified as the base that activates water for nucleophilic attack at the chorismate C2 carbon. MenF is a member of a larger family of Mg2+ dependent chorismate binding enzymes catalyzing distinct chorismate transformations. The studies reported here extend the mechanism recently proposed for this enzyme family by He et al.: He, Z., Stigers Lavoie, K. D., Bartlett, P. A., and Toney, M. D. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 2378-85.

  5. Multiple-steering QM-MM calculation of the free energy profile in chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Alejandro; Martí, Marcelo A; Estrin, Darío A; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2005-05-18

    A novel technique for computing free energy profiles in enzymatic reactions using the multiple steering molecular dynamics approach in the context of an efficient QM-MM density functional scheme is presented. The conversion reaction of chorismate to prephenate catalyzed by the Bacillus subtilis enzyme chorismate mutase has been chosen as an illustrative example.

  6. Analysis of 51 cyclodipeptide synthases reveals the basis for substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Isabelle B; Moutiez, Mireille; Witwinowski, Jerzy; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Martel, Cécile; Seguin, Jérôme; Favry, Emmanuel; Thai, Robert; Lecoq, Alain; Dubois, Steven; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Gondry, Muriel; Belin, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs) constitute a family of peptide bond-forming enzymes that use aminoacyl-tRNAs for the synthesis of cyclodipeptides. Here, we describe the activity of 41 new CDPSs. We also show that CDPSs can be classified into two main phylogenetically distinct subfamilies characterized by specific functional subsequence signatures, named NYH and XYP. All 11 previously characterized CDPSs belong to the NYH subfamily, suggesting that further special features may be yet to be discovered in the other subfamily. CDPSs synthesize a large diversity of cyclodipeptides made up of 17 proteinogenic amino acids. The identification of several CDPSs having the same specificity led us to determine specificity sequence motifs that, in combination with the phylogenetic distribution of CDPSs, provide a first step toward being able to predict the cyclodipeptides synthesized by newly discovered CDPSs. The determination of the activity of ten more CDPSs with predicted functions constitutes a first experimental validation of this predictive approach.

  7. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  8. The Plasmodiophora brassicae genome reveals insights in its life cycle and ancestry of chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Schwelm, Arne; Fogelqvist, Johan; Knaust, Andrea; Jülke, Sabine; Lilja, Tua; Bonilla-Rosso, German; Karlsson, Magnus; Shevchenko, Andrej; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Kim, Hong Gi; Park, Ju Young; Lim, Yong Pyo; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Dixelius, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodiophora brassicae causes clubroot, a major disease of Brassica oil and vegetable crops worldwide. P. brassicae is a Plasmodiophorid, obligate biotrophic protist in the eukaryotic kingdom of Rhizaria. Here we present the 25.5 Mb genome draft of P. brassicae, developmental stage-specific transcriptomes and a transcriptome of Spongospora subterranea, the Plasmodiophorid causing powdery scab on potato. Like other biotrophic pathogens both Plasmodiophorids are reduced in metabolic pathways. Phytohormones contribute to the gall phenotypes of infected roots. We report a protein (PbGH3) that can modify auxin and jasmonic acid. Plasmodiophorids contain chitin in cell walls of the resilient resting spores. If recognized, chitin can trigger defense responses in plants. Interestingly, chitin-related enzymes of Plasmodiophorids built specific families and the carbohydrate/chitin binding (CBM18) domain is enriched in the Plasmodiophorid secretome. Plasmodiophorids chitin synthases belong to two families, which were present before the split of the eukaryotic Stramenopiles/Alveolates/Rhizaria/Plantae and Metazoa/Fungi/Amoebozoa megagroups, suggesting chitin synthesis to be an ancient feature of eukaryotes. This exemplifies the importance of genomic data from unexplored eukaryotic groups, such as the Plasmodiophorids, to decipher evolutionary relationships and gene diversification of early eukaryotes. PMID:26084520

  9. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides. PMID:26754912

  10. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase Structures with Fragments Reveal a Portal for Substrate/Product Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Krieger, Inna V.; Parai, Maloy K.; Gawandi, Vijay B.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Fragment screening and high throughput screening are complementary approaches that combine with structural biology to explore the binding capabilities of an active site. We have used a fragment-based approach on malate synthase (GlcB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and discovered several novel binding chemotypes. In addition, the crystal structures of GlcB in complex with these fragments indicated conformational changes in the active site that represent the enzyme conformations during catalysis. Additional structures of the complex with malate and of the apo form of GlcB supported that hypothesis. Comparative analysis of GlcB structures in complex with 18 fragments allowed us to characterize the preferred chemotypes and their binding modes. The fragment structures showed a hydrogen bond to the backbone carbonyl of Met-631. We successfully incorporated an indole group from a fragment into an existing phenyl-diketo acid series. The resulting indole-containing inhibitor was 100-fold more potent than the parent phenyl-diketo acid with an IC50 value of 20 nm. PMID:27738104

  12. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-12

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides.

  13. Targeting multiple chorismate-utilizing enzymes with a single inhibitor: validation of a three-stage design.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, Kristin T; Dixon, Seth M; Avila, Belem; El-Badri, Mohamed H; Guggenheim, Kathryn G; Kurth, Mark J; Toney, Michael D

    2010-05-13

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes are attractive antimicrobial drug targets due to their absence in humans and their central role in bacterial survival and virulence. The structural and mechanistic homology of a group of these inspired the goal of discovering inhibitors that target multiple enzymes. Previously, we discovered seven inhibitors of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) in an on-bead, fluorescent-based screen of a 2304-member one-bead-one-compound combinatorial library. The inhibitors comprise PAYLOAD and COMBI stages, which interact with active site and surface residues, respectively, and are linked by a SPACER stage. These seven compounds, and six derivatives thereof, also inhibit two other enzymes in this family, isochorismate synthase (IS) and anthranilate synthase (AS). The best binding compound inhibits ADCS, IS, and AS with K(i) values of 720, 56, and 80 microM, respectively. Inhibitors with varying SPACER lengths show the original choice of lysine to be optimal. Lastly, inhibition data confirm the PAYLOAD stage directs the inhibitors to the ADCS active site.

  14. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Camilla C.; Dallabona, Cristina; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Dusi, Sabrina; Tosi, Elena; Tiranti, Valeria; Goffrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases. PMID:28357284

  15. Selective knockdown of ceramide synthases reveals complex interregulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas D; Spassieva, Stefka; Jenkins, Russell W; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ceramide synthases 1 to 6 (CerS1-6) generate Cer in an acyl-CoA-dependent manner, and expression of individual CerS has been shown to enhance the synthesis of ceramides with particular acyl chain lengths. However, the contribution of each CerS to steady-state levels of specific Cer species has not been evaluated. We investigated the knockdown of individual CerS in the MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell line by using small-interfering RNA (siRNA). We found that siRNA-induced downregulation of each CerS resulted in counter-regulation of nontargeted CerS. Additionally, each CerS knockdown produced unique effects on the levels of multiple sphingolipid species. For example, downregulation of CerS2 decreased very long-chain Cer but increased levels of CerS4, CerS5, and CerS6 expression and upregulated long-chain and medium-long-chain sphingolipids. Conversely, CerS6 knockdown decreased C16:0-Cer but increased CerS5 expression and caused non-C16:0 sphingolipids to be upregulated. Knockdown of individual CerS failed to decrease total sphingolipids or upregulate sphingoid bases. Treatment with siRNAs targeting combined CerS, CerS2, CerS5, and CerS6, did not change overall Cer or sphingomyelin mass but caused upregulation of dihydroceramide and hexosyl-ceramide and promoted endoplasmic reticulum stress. These data suggest that sphingolipid metabolism is robustly regulated by both redundancy in CerS-mediated Cer synthesis and counter-regulation of CerS expression.

  16. Purified recombinant hypothetical protein coded by open reading frame Rv1885c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibits a monofunctional AroQ class of periplasmic chorismate mutase activity.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Sardesai, Abhijit A; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2005-05-20

    Naturally occurring variants of the enzyme chorismate mutase are known to exist that exhibit diversity in enzyme structure, regulatory properties, and association with other proteins. Chorismate mutase was not annotated in the initial genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) because of low sequence similarity between known chorismate mutases. Recombinant protein coded by open reading frame Rv1885c of Mtb exhibited chorismate mutase activity in vitro. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the recombinant protein suggests its resemblance to the AroQ class of chorismate mutases, prototype examples of which include the Escherichia coli and yeast chorismate mutases. We also demonstrate that unlike the corresponding proteins of E. coli, Mtb chorismate mutase does not have any associated prephenate dehydratase or dehydrogenase activity, indicating its monofunctional nature. The Rv1885c-encoded chorismate mutase showed allosteric regulation by pathway-specific as well as cross-pathway-specific ligands, as evident from proteolytic cleavage protection and enzyme assays. The predicted N-terminal signal sequence of Mtb chorismate mutase was capable of functioning as one in E. coli, suggesting that Mtb chorismate mutase belongs to the AroQ class of chorismate mutases. It was evident that Rv1885c may not be the only enzyme with chorismate mutase enzyme function within Mtb, based on our observation of the presence of chorismate mutase activity displayed by another hypothetical protein coded by open reading frame Rv0948c, a novel instance of the existence of two monofunctional chorismate mutases ever reported in any pathogenic bacterium.

  17. The structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis trehalose synthase reveals an unusual active site configuration and acarbose-binding mode†

    PubMed Central

    Caner, Sami; Nguyen, Nham; Aguda, Adeleke; Zhang, Ran; Pan, Yuan T; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) catalyzes the reversible conversion of maltose into trehalose in mycobacteria as one of three biosynthetic pathways to this nonreducing disaccharide. Given the importance of trehalose to survival of mycobacteria, there has been considerable interest in understanding the enzymes involved in its production; indeed the structures of the key enzymes in the other two pathways have already been determined. Herein, we present the first structure of TreS from Mycobacterium smegmatis, thereby providing insights into the catalytic machinery involved in this intriguing intramolecular reaction. This structure, which is of interest both mechanistically and as a potential pharmaceutical target, reveals a narrow and enclosed active site pocket within which intramolecular substrate rearrangements can occur. We also present the structure of a complex of TreS with acarbose, revealing a hitherto unsuspected oligosaccharide-binding site within the C-terminal domain. This may well provide an anchor point for the association of TreS with glycogen, thereby enhancing its role in glycogen biosynthesis and degradation. PMID:23735230

  18. The structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis trehalose synthase reveals an unusual active site configuration and acarbose-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Caner, Sami; Nguyen, Nham; Aguda, Adeleke; Zhang, Ran; Pan, Yuan T; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-09-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) catalyzes the reversible conversion of maltose into trehalose in mycobacteria as one of three biosynthetic pathways to this nonreducing disaccharide. Given the importance of trehalose to survival of mycobacteria, there has been considerable interest in understanding the enzymes involved in its production; indeed the structures of the key enzymes in the other two pathways have already been determined. Herein, we present the first structure of TreS from Mycobacterium smegmatis, thereby providing insights into the catalytic machinery involved in this intriguing intramolecular reaction. This structure, which is of interest both mechanistically and as a potential pharmaceutical target, reveals a narrow and enclosed active site pocket within which intramolecular substrate rearrangements can occur. We also present the structure of a complex of TreS with acarbose, revealing a hitherto unsuspected oligosaccharide-binding site within the C-terminal domain. This may well provide an anchor point for the association of TreS with glycogen, thereby enhancing its role in glycogen biosynthesis and degradation.

  19. Mutational analysis of white spruce (Picea glauca) ent-kaurene synthase (PgKS) reveals common and distinct mechanisms of conifer diterpene synthases of general and specialized metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zerbe, Philipp; Chiang, Angela; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Conifer diterpene synthases (diTPSs) catalyze the multi-step cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate, or copalyl diphosphate, to a variety of diterpenes in general (i.e., primary) and specialized (i.e., secondary) metabolism. Despite their functional diversity, the known conifer diTPSs are structurally closely related, with variations in three conserved domains, α, β and γ. The catalytic specificity of conifer class I and class I/II diTPSs is predominantly determined by the protein environment of the C-terminal class I active site through stabilization of common and unique carbocation intermediates. Using the crystal structure of Taxus brevifolia taxadiene synthase as template, comparative modeling and mutagenesis of the class I diTPS ent-kaurene synthase from Picea glauca (PgKS) was performed to elucidate the catalytic specificity of PgKS relative to spruce diTPSs of specialized metabolism. N-terminal truncations demonstrated a role for the βγ domain in class I enzyme activity for PgKS, facilitating the closure of the class I active site upon substrate binding. Based on position, Arg476 and Asp736 in the C-terminal α domain of PgKS may contribute to this conformational transition and appear critical for catalysis. Consistent with the mechanism of other diTPSs, the subsequent ionization of a copalyl diphosphate substrate and coordination of the diphosphate group is controlled by strictly conserved residues in the DDxxD and NDIQGCKRE motif of PgKS, such as Asn656 and Arg653. Furthermore, Lys478, Trp502, Met588, Ala615 and Ile619 control the enzymatic activity and specificity of PgKS via carbocation stabilization en route to ent-kaurene. These positions show a high level of amino acid variation, consistent with functional plasticity among conifer diTPSs of different functions in general or specialized metabolism.

  20. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of a Potential Transition-State Inhibitor of the Salicylate Synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-07-02

    Mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators (siderophores) produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) for iron mobilization. The bifunctional salicylate synthase MbtI catalyzes the first step of mycobactin biosynthesis through the conversion of the primary metabolite chorismate into salicylic acid via isochorismate. We report the design, synthesis, and biochemical evaluation of an inhibitor based on the putative transition state (TS) for the isochorismatase partial reaction of MbtI. The inhibitor mimics the hypothesized charge buildup at C-4 of chorismate in the TS as well as C-O bond formation at C-6. Another important design element of the inhibitor is replacement of the labile pyruvate side chain in chorismate with a stable C-linked propionate isostere. We developed a stereocontrolled synthesis of the highly functionalized cyclohexene inhibitor that features an asymmetric aldol reaction using a titanium enolate, diastereoselective Grignard addition to a tert-butanesulfinyl aldimine, and ring closing olefin metathesis as key steps.

  1. The structure of dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase reveals a common architecture of aromatic prenyltransferases in fungi and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Ute; Schall, Christoph; Zocher, Georg; Unsöld, Inge; Stec, Edyta; Li, Shu-Ming; Heide, Lutz; Stehle, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are toxins and important pharmaceuticals that are produced biotechnologically on an industrial scale. The first committed step of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis is catalyzed by dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase (DMATS; EC 2.5.1.34). Orthologs of DMATS are found in many fungal genomes. We report here the x-ray structure of DMATS, determined at a resolution of 1.76 Å. A complex of DMATS from Aspergillus fumigatus with its aromatic substrate L-tryptophan and with an analogue of its isoprenoid substrate dimethylallyl diphosphate reveals the structural basis of this enzyme-catalyzed Friedel-Crafts reaction, which shows strict regiospecificity for position 4 of the indole nucleus of tryptophan as well as unusual independence of the presence of Mg2+ ions. The 3D structure of DMATS belongs to a rare β/α barrel fold, called prenyltransferase barrel, that was recently discovered in a small group of bacterial enzymes with no sequence similarity to DMATS. These bacterial enzymes catalyze the prenylation of aromatic substrates in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (i.e., a reaction similar to that of DMATS). PMID:19706516

  2. Enzymes do what is expected (chalcone isomerase versus chorismate mutase).

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun; Bruice, Thomas C

    2003-02-12

    Madicago sativa chalcone isomerase (CI) catalyzes the isomerization of chalcone to flavanone, whereas E. coli chorismate mutase (CM) catalyzes the pericyclic rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate. Covalent intermediates are not formed in either of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions, K(M) and k(cat) are virtually the same for both enzymes, and the rate constants (k(o)) for the noncatalyzed reactions in water are also the same. This kinetic identity of both the enzymatic and the nonenzymatic reactions is not shared by a similarity in driving forces. The efficiency (DeltaG(o)() - DeltaG(cat)()) for the CI mechanism involves transition-state stabilization through general-acid catalysis and freeing of three water molecules trapped in the E.S species. The contribution to lowering DeltaG(cat)() by an increase in near attack conformer (NAC) formation in E.S as compared to S in water is not so important. In the CM reaction, the standard free energy for NAC formation in water is 8.4 kcal/mol as compared to 0.6 kcal/mol in E.S. Because the value of (DeltaG(o)() - DeltaG(cat)()) is 9 kcal/mol, the greater percentage of NACs accounts for approximately 90% of the kinetic advantage of the CM reaction. There is no discernible transition-state stabilization in the CM reaction. These results are discussed. In anthropomorphic terms, each enzyme has had to do what it must to have a biologically relevant rate of reaction.

  3. Silencing of hydroperoxide lyase and allene oxide synthase reveals substrate and defense signaling crosstalk in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, Rayko; Ziegler, Jörg; Keinänen, Markku; Baldwin, Ian T

    2004-10-01

    The fatty acid hydroperoxide (HP) substrates required for the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) and green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are supplied by separate lipoxygenases (LOX). We silenced the expression of two genes downstream of the LOX: allene oxide synthase (AOS) and HP lyase (HPL) by antisense expression of endogenous genes (NaAOS, NaHPL) in Nicotiana attenuata, in which the biosynthesis of JA is amplified by herbivore-specific elicitors. We report that these elicitors also amplify wound-induced GLV releases, but suppress the wound-induced increase of NaHPL transcripts, suggesting that substrate flux controls GLV biosynthesis. As expected, silencing of NaHPL and NaAOS reduced GLV release and JA accumulation, respectively. Surprisingly, HPL- and AOS-silenced plants had enhanced JA and GLV responses, suggesting substrate 'crosstalk' between these two oxylipin cascades. Plants with depleted GLVs (as-hpl) were less attractive than wild type (WT) or empty vector control plants in choice-tests with native lepidopteran herbivores. In feeding trials, Manduca sexta larvae developed slower on as-hpl plants. The reduced larval consumption and performance, which was not caused by increases in defense responses in as-hpl plants, could be restored to WT levels by the addition of synthetic GLVs, demonstrating that GLVs function as feeding stimulants. Gene expression profiling by cDNA microarray analysis and characterization of several induced defenses in herbivore-elicited as-hpl and as-aos plants revealed differential involvement of JA and GLVs in defense signaling. Elicitation of volatile terpenoids (an indirect defense) requires JA signaling, where as trypsin protease inhibitor elicitation (a direct defense) requires both functional JA and GLV cascades.

  4. RNAi and Homologous Over-Expression Based Functional Approaches Reveal Triterpenoid Synthase Gene-Cycloartenol Synthase Is Involved in Downstream Withanolide Biosynthesis in Withania somnifera

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bhawana; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam S.

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera Dunal, is one of the most commonly used medicinal plant in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine traditionally owing to its therapeutic potential, because of major chemical constituents, withanolides. Withanolide biosynthesis requires the activities of several enzymes in vivo. Cycloartenol synthase (CAS) is an important enzyme in the withanolide biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing cyclization of 2, 3 oxidosqualene into cycloartenol. In the present study, we have cloned full-length WsCAS from Withania somnifera by homology-based PCR method. For gene function investigation, we constructed three RNAi gene-silencing constructs in backbone of RNAi vector pGSA and a full-length over-expression construct. These constructs were transformed in Agrobacterium strain GV3101 for plant transformation in W. somnifera. Molecular and metabolite analysis was performed in putative Withania transformants. The PCR and Southern blot results showed the genomic integration of these RNAi and overexpression construct(s) in Withania genome. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of WsCAS gene was considerably downregulated in stable transgenic silenced Withania lines compared with the non-transformed control and HPLC analysis showed that withanolide content was greatly reduced in silenced lines. Transgenic plants over expressing CAS gene displayed enhanced level of CAS transcript and withanolide content compared to non-transformed controls. This work is the first full proof report of functional validation of any metabolic pathway gene in W. somnifera at whole plant level as per our knowledge and it will be further useful to understand the regulatory role of different genes involved in the biosynthesis of withanolides. PMID:26919744

  5. Chorismate mutase: an alternatively spliced parasitism gene and a diagnostic marker for three important Globodera nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chorismate mutase gene is widely distributed in both cyst and root-knot nematode species and believed to play a critical role in nematode parasitism. In this study, we cloned a new chorismate mutase gene (Gt-cm-1) from Globodera tabacum and further characterized the gene structure in both G. tab...

  6. Crystallization of the c[subscript 14]-rotor of the chloroplast ATP synthase reveals that it contains pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Varco-Merth, Benjamin; Fromme, Raimund; Wang, Meitian; Fromme, Petra

    2008-08-27

    The ATP synthase is one of the most important enzymes on earth as it couples the transmembrane electrochemical potential of protons to the synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphage, providing the main ATP source of almost all higher life on earth. During ATP synthesis, stepwise protonation of a conserved carboxylate on each protein subunit of an oligomeric ring of 10--15 c-subunits is commonly thought to drive rotation of the rotor moiety (c{sub 10-14}{gamma}{sup {epsilon}}) relative to stator moiety ({alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3}{delta}ab{sub 2}). Here we report the isolation and crystallization of the c{sub 14}-ring of subunit c from the spinach chloroplast enzyme diffracting as far as 2.8 {angstrom}. Though ATP synthase was not previously know to contain any pigments, the crystals of the c-subunit possessed a strong yellow color. The pigment analysis revaled that they contain 1 chlorophyll and 2 carotenoids, thereby showing for the first time that the chloroplast ATP synthase contains cofactors, leading to the question of the possible roles of the functions of the pigments in the chloroplast ATP synthase.

  7. Inhibition studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI).

    PubMed

    Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Bulloch, Esther M M; Rutledge, Peter J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Payne, Richard J

    2010-07-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI), a member of the chorismate-utilizing enzyme family, catalyses the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin T. This complex secondary metabolite is essential for both virulence and survival of M. tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is therefore anticipated that inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as TB therapies with a novel mode of action. Herein we describe the first inhibition study of M. tuberculosis MbtI using a library of functionalized benzoate-based inhibitors designed to mimic the substrate (chorismate) and intermediate (isochorismate) of the MbtI-catalyzed reaction. The most potent inhibitors prepared were those designed to mimic the enzyme intermediate, isochorismate. These compounds, based on a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate scaffold, proved to be low-micromolar inhibitors of MbtI. The most potent inhibitors in this series possessed hydrophobic enol ether side chains at C3 in place of the enol-pyruvyl side chain found in chorismate and isochorismate.

  8. Design, selection, and characterization of a split chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Müller, Manuel M; Kries, Hajo; Csuhai, Eva; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald

    2010-05-01

    Split proteins are versatile tools for detecting protein-protein interactions and studying protein folding. Here, we report a new, particularly small split enzyme, engineered from a thermostable chorismate mutase (CM). Upon dissecting the helical-bundle CM from Methanococcus jannaschii into a short N-terminal helix and a 3-helix segment and attaching an antiparallel leucine zipper dimerization domain to the individual fragments, we obtained a weakly active heterodimeric mutase. Using combinatorial mutagenesis and in vivo selection, we optimized the short linker sequences connecting the leucine zipper to the enzyme domain. One of the selected CMs was characterized in detail. It spontaneously assembles from the separately inactive fragments and exhibits wild-type like CM activity. Owing to the availability of a well characterized selection system, the simple 4-helix bundle topology, and the small size of the N-terminal helix, the heterodimeric CM could be a valuable scaffold for enzyme engineering efforts and as a split sensor for specifically oriented protein-protein interactions.

  9. Transition state determination of enzyme reaction on free energy surface: Application to chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-04-01

    The transition state on the free energy surface for Claisen rearrangement of chorismate in Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase is calculated with a method based on a linear response theory. The calculated activation free energy is 16.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimental one. The catalytic ability of the enzyme is examined by comparing the activation barrier with that in aqueous solution and found to be mainly attributed to the conformational restriction of the substrate. We also calculate the kinetic isotope effects, which are in accord with the experimental estimates.

  10. The role of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa anthranilate synthases in tryptophan and quorum signal production

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory C.; Jorth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in the lungs of individuals with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Density-dependent production of toxic factors regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) have been proposed to be involved in P. aeruginosa virulence. PQS biosynthesis requires conversion of the central metabolite chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase. This reaction is also the first step in tryptophan biosynthesis. P. aeruginosa possesses two functional anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, and these enzymes are not functionally redundant, as trpEG mutants are tryptophan auxotrophs but produce PQS while mutants in phnAB are tryptophan prototrophs but do not produce PQS in minimal media. The goal of the work described in this paper was to determine the mechanism for this lack of functional complementation of TrpEG and PhnAB. Our results reveal that overexpression of either enzyme compensates for tryptophan auxotrophy and PQS production in the trpEG and phnAB mutants respectively, leading to the hypothesis that differential regulation of these genes is responsible for the lack of functional complementation. In support of this hypothesis, trpEG was shown to be expressed primarily during low-density growth while phnAB was expressed primarily at high density. Furthermore, dysregulation of phnAB expression eliminated tryptophan auxotrophy in the P. aeruginosa trpEG mutant. Based on these data, we propose a model for anthranilate sequestration by differential transcriptional regulation of the two P. aeruginosa anthranilate synthase enzymes. PMID:23449919

  11. Structural changes during ATP hydrolysis activity of the ATP synthase from Escherichia coli as revealed by fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Turina, P

    2000-08-01

    F1F0-ATPase complexes undergo several changes in their tertiary and quaternary structure during their functioning. As a possible way to detect some of these different conformations during their activity, an environment-sensitive fluorescence probe was bound to cysteine residues, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis, in the gamma subunit of the Escherichia coli enzyme. Fluorescence changes and ATP hydrolysis rates were compared under various conditions in F1 and in reconstituted F1F0. The results are discussed in terms of possible modes of operation of the ATP synthases.

  12. Selective stabilization of the chorismate mutase transition state by a positively charged hydrogen bond donor.

    PubMed

    Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald

    2003-03-19

    Citrulline was incorporated via chemical semisynthesis at position 90 in the active site of the AroH chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis. The wild-type arginine at this position makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with the ether oxygen of chorismate. Replacement of the positively charged guanidinium group with the isosteric but neutral urea has a dramatic effect on the ability of the enzyme to convert chorismate into prephenate. The Arg90Cit variant exhibits a >104-fold decrease in the catalytic rate constant kcat with a 2.7-fold increase in the Michaelis constant Km. In contrast, its affinity for a conformationally constrained inhibitor molecule that effectively mimics the geometry but not the dissociative character of the transition state is only reduced by a factor of approximately 6. These results show that an active site merely complementary to the reactive conformation of chorismate is insufficient for catalysis of the mutase reaction. Instead, electrostatic stabilization of the polarized transition state by provision of a cationic hydrogen bond donor proximal to the oxygen in the breaking C-O bond is essential for high catalytic efficiency.

  13. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer.

  14. Computationally designed variants of Escherichia coli chorismate mutase show altered catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Keeffe, Jennifer R; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Mayo, Stephen L

    2005-04-01

    Computational protein design methods were used to predict five variants of monofunctional Escherichia coli chorismate mutase expected to maintain catalytic activity. The variants were tested experimentally and three active site mutants exhibited catalytic activity similar to or greater than the wild-type enzyme. One mutant, Ala32Ser, showed increased catalytic efficiency.

  15. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christina A.; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. PMID:26002894

  16. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications.

  17. A monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase found in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum reveals important roles for galactolipids in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shinji; Harada, Jiro; Yokono, Makio; Yuzawa, Yuichi; Shimojima, Mie; Murofushi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Masuda, Hanako; Murakawa, Masato; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Yuasa, Hideya; Noguchi, Masato; Oh-Oka, Hirozo; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which is conserved in almost all photosynthetic organisms, is the most abundant natural polar lipid on Earth. In plants, MGDG is highly accumulated in the chloroplast membranes and is an important bulk constituent of thylakoid membranes. However, precise functions of MGDG in photosynthesis have not been well understood. Here, we report a novel MGDG synthase from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. This enzyme, MgdA, catalyzes MGDG synthesis using UDP-Gal as a substrate. The gene encoding MgdA was essential for this bacterium; only heterozygous mgdA mutants could be isolated. An mgdA knockdown mutation affected in vivo assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, suggesting the involvement of MGDG in the construction of the light-harvesting complex called chlorosome. These results indicate that MGDG biosynthesis has been independently established in each photosynthetic organism to perform photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. We complemented an Arabidopsis thaliana MGDG synthase mutant by heterologous expression of MgdA. The complemented plants showed almost normal levels of MGDG, although they also had abnormal morphological phenotypes, including reduced chlorophyll content, no apical dominance in shoot growth, atypical flower development, and infertility. These observations provide new insights regarding the importance of regulated MGDG synthesis in the physiology of higher plants.

  18. Selection of Heterodera glycines chorismate mutase-1 alleles on nematode-resistant soybean.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kris N; Bekal, Sadia; Domier, Leslie L; Niblack, Terry L; Noel, Gregory R; Smyth, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines is the most destructive pathogen of soybean in the Unites States. Diversity in the parasitic ability of the nematode allows it to reproduce on nematode-resistant soybean. H. glycines chorismate mutase-1 (Hg-CM-1) is a nematode enzyme with the potential to suppress host plant defense compounds; therefore, it has the potential to enhance the parasitic ability of nematodes expressing the gene. Hg-cm-1 is a member of a gene family where two alleles, Hg-cm-1A and Hg-cm-1B, have been identified. Analysis of the Hg-cm-1 gene copy number revealed that there are multiple copies of Hg-cm-1 alleles in the H. glycines genome. H. glycines inbred lines were crossed to ultimately generate three F2 populations of second-stage juveniles (J2s) segregating for Hg-cm-1A and Hg-cm-1B. Segregation of Hg-cm-1A and 1B approximated a 1:2:1 ratio, which suggested that Hg-cm-1 is organized in a cluster of genes that segregate roughly as a single locus. The F2 H. glycines J2 populations were used to infect nematode-resistant (Hartwig, PI88788, and PI90763) and susceptible (Lee 74) soybean plants. H. glycines grown on Hartwig, Lee 74, and PI90763 showed allelic frequencies similar to Hg-cm-1A/B, but nematodes grown on PI88788 contained predominately Hg-cm-1A allele as a result of a statistically significant drop of Hg-cm-1B in the population. This result suggests that specific Hg-cm-1 alleles, or a closely linked gene, may aid H. glycines in adapting to particular soybean hosts.

  19. The fused anthranilate synthase from Streptomyces venezuelae functions as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, Meseret; Reddy, Prasad T; Parsons, James F; Byrnes, W Malcolm

    2015-02-01

    Recently, we showed that the fused chorismate-utilizing enzyme from the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae is an anthranilate synthase (designated SvAS), not a 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate (ADIC) synthase, as was predicted based on its amino acid sequence similarity to the phenazine biosynthetic enzyme PhzE (an ADIC synthase). Here, we report the characterization of SvAS using steady-state kinetics, gel filtration chromatography, and laser light scattering. The recombinant His-tagged enzyme has Michaelis constants Km with respect to substrates chorismate and glutamine of 8.2 ± 0.2 μM and 0.84 ± 0.05 mM, respectively, and a catalytic rate constant k cat of 0.57 ± 0.02 s(-1) at 30 °C. Unlike most other anthranilate synthases, SvAS does not utilize ammonia as a substrate. The enzyme is competitively but non-cooperatively inhibited by tryptophan (K i = 11.1 ± 0.1 μM) and is active as a monomer. The finding that SvAS is a monomer jibes with the variety of association modes that have been observed for anthranilate synthases from different microorganisms, and it identifies the enzyme's minimal functional unit as a single TrpE-TrpG pair.

  20. The Fused Anthranilate Synthase from Streptomyces venezuelae Functions as a Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Ashenafi, Meseret; Reddy, Prasad T.; Parsons, James F.; Byrnes, W. Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Recently we showed that the fused chorismate-utilizing enzyme from the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae is an anthranilate synthase (designated SvAS), not a 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate (ADIC) synthase, as was predicted based on its amino acid sequence similarity to the phenazine biosynthetic enzyme PhzE (an ADIC synthase). Here we report the characterization of SvAS using steady-state kinetics, gel filtration chromatography and laser light scattering. The recombinant His-tagged enzyme has Michaelis constants Km with respect to substrates chorismate and glutamine of 8.2 ± 0.2 μM and 0.84 ± 0.05 mM, respectively, and a catalytic rate constant kcat of 0.57 ± 0.02 s−1 at 30°C. Unlike most other anthranilate synthases, SvAS does not utilize ammonia as a substrate. The enzyme is competitively but noncooperatively inhibited by tryptophan (Ki = 11.1 ± 0.1 μM) and is active as a monomer. The finding that SvAS is a monomer jibes with the variety of association modes that have been observed for anthranilate synthases from different microorganisms, and it identifies the enzyme’s minimal functional unit as a single TrpE-TrpG pair. PMID:25355158

  1. Functional genomics reveals that a compact terpene synthase gene family can account for terpene volatile production in apple.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Green, Sol A; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J D; Matich, Adam J; Wang, Mindy Y; Atkinson, Ross G

    2013-02-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple 'Royal Gala' expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies.

  2. A Novel N-Acetylglutamate Synthase Architecture Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Bifunctional Enzyme from Maricaulis maris

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Li, Yongdong; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2011-01-01

    Novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinases (NAGS/K) that catalyze the first two steps of arginine biosynthesis and are homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), an essential cofactor-producing enzyme in the urea cycle, were identified in Maricaulis maris and several other bacteria. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of NAGS but not NAGK activity. The crystal structure of M. maris NAGS/K (mmNAGS/K) at 2.7 Å resolution indicates that it is a tetramer, in contrast to the hexameric structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS. The quaternary structure of crystalline NAGS/K from Xanthomonas campestris (xcNAGS/K) is similar, and cross-linking experiments indicate that both mmNAGS/K and xcNAGS are tetramers in solution. Each subunit has an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, which is likely responsible for N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) activity and has a putative arginine binding site, and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain that contains the putative NAGS active site. These structures and sequence comparisons suggest that the linker residue 291 may determine whether arginine acts as an allosteric inhibitor or activator in homologous enzymes in microorganisms and vertebrates. In addition, the angle of rotation between AAK and NAT domains varies among crystal forms and subunits within the tetramer. A rotation of 26° is sufficient to close the predicted AcCoA binding site, thus reducing enzymatic activity. Since mmNAGS/K has the highest degree of sequence homology to vertebrate NAGS of NAGS and NAGK enzymes whose structures have been determined, the mmNAGS/K structure was used to develop a structural model of human NAGS that is fully consistent with the functional effects of the 14 missense mutations that were identified in NAGS-deficient patients. PMID:22174908

  3. Functional Genomics Reveals That a Compact Terpene Synthase Gene Family Can Account for Terpene Volatile Production in Apple1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J.D.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple ‘Royal Gala’ expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies. PMID:23256150

  4. A Novel N-Acetylglutamate Synthase Architecture Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Bifunctional Enzyme from Maricaulis maris

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang; Li, Yongdong; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2012-05-24

    Novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinases (NAGS/K) that catalyze the first two steps of arginine biosynthesis and are homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), an essential cofactor-producing enzyme in the urea cycle, were identified in Maricaulis maris and several other bacteria. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of NAGS but not NAGK activity. The crystal structure of M. maris NAGS/K (mmNAGS/K) at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution indicates that it is a tetramer, in contrast to the hexameric structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS. The quaternary structure of crystalline NAGS/K from Xanthomonas campestris (xcNAGS/K) is similar, and cross-linking experiments indicate that both mmNAGS/K and xcNAGS are tetramers in solution. Each subunit has an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, which is likely responsible for N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) activity and has a putative arginine binding site, and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain that contains the putative NAGS active site. These structures and sequence comparisons suggest that the linker residue 291 may determine whether arginine acts as an allosteric inhibitor or activator in homologous enzymes in microorganisms and vertebrates. In addition, the angle of rotation between AAK and NAT domains varies among crystal forms and subunits within the tetramer. A rotation of 26{sup o} is sufficient to close the predicted AcCoA binding site, thus reducing enzymatic activity. Since mmNAGS/K has the highest degree of sequence homology to vertebrate NAGS of NAGS and NAGK enzymes whose structures have been determined, the mmNAGS/K structure was used to develop a structural model of human NAGS that is fully consistent with the functional effects of the 14 missense mutations that were identified in NAGS-deficient patients.

  5. Aminodeoxychorismate synthase inhibitors from one-bead one-compound combinatorial libraries: "staged" inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Seth; Ziebart, Kristin T; He, Ze; Jeddeloh, Melissa; Yoo, Choong Leol; Wang, Xiaobing; Lehman, Alan; Lam, Kit S; Toney, Michael D; Kurth, Mark J

    2006-12-14

    4-Amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) catalyzes the first step in the conversion of chorismate into p-aminobenzoate, which is incorporated into folic acid. We aim to discover compounds that inhibit ADCS and serve as leads for a new class of antimicrobial compounds. This report presents (1) synthesis of a mass-tag encoded library based on a "staged" design, (2) massively parallel fluorescence-based on-bead screening, (3) rapid structural identification of hits, and (4) full kinetic analysis of ADCS. All inhibitors are competitive against chorismate and Mg(2+). The most potent ADCS inhibitor identified has a K(i) of 360 microM. We show that the combinatorial diversity elements add substantial binding affinity by interacting with residues outside of but proximal to the active site. The methods presented here constitute a paradigm for inhibitor discovery through active site targeting, enabled by rapid library synthesis, facile massively parallel screening, and straightforward hit identification.

  6. A comprehensive analysis of the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase enzyme family identifies novel members and reveals mechanisms of substrate specificity and quaternary structure organization.

    PubMed

    Peterhoff, David; Beer, Barbara; Rajendran, Chitra; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kapetaniou, Evangelia; Guldan, Harald; Wierenga, Rik K; Sterner, Reinhard; Babinger, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase (GGGPS) family enzymes catalyse the formation of an ether bond between glycerol-1-phosphate and polyprenyl diphosphates. They are essential for the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, but also occur in bacterial species, albeit with unknown physiological function. It has been known that there exist two phylogenetic groups (I and II) of GGGPS family enzymes, but a comprehensive study has been missing. We therefore visualized the variability within the family by applying a sequence similarity network, and biochemically characterized 17 representative GGGPS family enzymes regarding their catalytic activities and substrate specificities. Moreover, we present the first crystal structures of group II archaeal and bacterial enzymes. Our analysis revealed that the previously uncharacterized bacterial enzymes from group II have GGGPS activity like the archaeal enzymes and differ from the bacterial group I enzymes that are heptaprenylglyceryl phosphate synthases. The length of the isoprenoid substrate is determined in group II GGGPS enzymes by 'limiter residues' that are different from those in group I enzymes, as shown by site-directed mutagenesis. Most of the group II enzymes form hexamers. We could disrupt these hexamers to stable and catalytically active dimers by mutating a single amino acid that acts as an 'aromatic anchor'.

  7. Crystal structures of yeast beta-alanine synthase complexes reveal the mode of substrate binding and large scale domain closure movements.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piskur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-12-07

    Beta-alanine synthase is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of uracil and thymine in higher organisms. The fold of the homodimeric enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri identifies it as a member of the AcyI/M20 family of metallopeptidases. Its subunit consists of a catalytic domain harboring a di-zinc center and a smaller dimerization domain. The present site-directed mutagenesis studies identify Glu(159) and Arg(322) as crucial for catalysis and His(262) and His(397) as functionally important but not essential. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type beta-alanine synthase in complex with the reaction product beta-alanine, and of the mutant E159A with the substrate N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, revealing the closed state of a dimeric AcyI/M20 metallopeptidase-like enzyme. Subunit closure is achieved by a approximately 30 degrees rigid body domain rotation, which completes the active site by integration of substrate binding residues that belong to the dimerization domain of the same or the partner subunit. Substrate binding is achieved via a salt bridge, a number of hydrogen bonds, and coordination to one of the zinc ions of the di-metal center.

  8. A disulfide-stabilized conformer of methionine synthase reveals an unexpected role for the histidine ligand of the cobalamin cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Supratim; Koutmos, Markos; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Ludwig, Martha L.; Matthews, Rowena G.

    2008-07-08

    B{sub 12}-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) from Escherichia coli is a large modular protein that is alternately methylated by methyltetrahydrofolate to form methylcobalamin and demethylated by homocysteine to form cob(I)alamin. Major domain rearrangements are required to allow cobalamin to react with three different substrates: homocysteine, methyltetrahydrofolate, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). These same rearrangements appear to preclude crystallization of the wild-type enzyme. Disulfide cross-linking was used to lock a C-terminal fragment of the enzyme into a unique conformation. Cysteine point mutations were introduced at Ile-690 and Gly-743. These cysteine residues span the cap and the cobalamin-binding module and form a cross-link that reduces the conformational space accessed by the enzyme, facilitating protein crystallization. Here, we describe an x-ray structure of the mutant fragment in the reactivation conformation; this conformation enables the transfer of a methyl group from AdoMet to the cobalamin cofactor. In the structure, the axial ligand to the cobalamin, His-759, dissociates from the cobalamin and forms intermodular contacts with residues in the AdoMet-binding module. This unanticipated intermodular interaction is expected to play a major role in controlling the distribution of conformers required for the catalytic and the reactivation cycles of the enzyme.

  9. Revealing the Effects of Missense Mutations Causing Snyder-Robinson Syndrome on the Stability and Dimerization of Spermine Synthase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunhui; Norris, Joy; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-08

    Missense mutations in spermine synthase (SpmSyn) protein have been shown to cause the Snyder-Robinson syndrome (SRS). Depending on the location within the structure of SpmSyn and type of amino acid substitution, different mechanisms resulting in SRS were proposed. Here we focus on naturally occurring amino acid substitutions causing SRS, which are situated away from the active center of SpmSyn and thus are not directly involved in the catalysis. Two of the mutations, M35R and P112L, are reported for the first time in this study. It is demonstrated, both experimentally and computationally, that for such mutations the major effect resulting in dysfunctional SpmSyn is the destabilization of the protein. In vitro experiments indicated either no presence or very little amount of the mutant SpmSyn in patient cells. In silico modeling predicted that all studied mutations in this work destabilize SpmSyn and some of them abolish homo-dimer formation. Since dimerization and structural stability are equally important for the wild type function of SpmSyn, it is proposed that the SRS caused by mutations occurring in the N-domain of SpmSyn is a result of dysfunctional mutant proteins being partially unfolded and degraded by the proteomic machinery of the cell or being unable to form a homo-dimer.

  10. The Crystal Structure of (S)-3-O-geranylgeranylglycerol phosphate synthase Reveals an Ancient Fold for an Ancient Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Payandeh, Jian; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Gillon, Wanda; Pai, Emil F.

    2010-12-03

    We report crystal structures of the citrate and sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P) complexes of (S)-3-O-geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfGGGPS) at 1.55 and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. AfGGGPS is an enzyme that performs the committed step in archaeal lipid biosynthesis, and it presents the first triose phosphate isomerase (TIM)-barrel structure with a prenyltransferase function. Our studies provide insight into the catalytic mechanism of AfGGGPS and demonstrate how it selects for the sn-G1P isomer. The replacement of 'Helix 3' by a 'strand' in AfGGGPS, a novel modification to the canonical TIM-barrel fold, suggests a model of enzyme adaptation that involves a 'greasy slide' and a 'swinging door.' We propose functions for the homologous PcrB proteins, which are conserved in a subset of pathogenic bacteria, as either prenyltransferases or being involved in lipoteichoic acid biosynthesis. Sequence and structural comparisons lead us to postulate an early evolutionary history for AfGGGPS, which may highlight its role in the emergence of Archaea.

  11. Pronounced Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Sucrose Synthase May Reveal a Novel Sugar Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Luan, Sheng; Wi, Seung G.; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Dae-Seok; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Soluble sugars not only serve as nutrients, but also act as signals for plant growth and development, but how sugar signals are perceived and translated into physiological responses in plants remains unclear. We manipulated sugar levels in transgenic plants by overexpressing sucrose synthase (SuSy), which is a key enzyme believed to have reversible sucrose synthesis and sucrose degradation functions. The ectopically expressed SuSy protein exhibited sucrose-degrading activity, which may change the flux of sucrose demand from photosynthetic to non-photosynthetic cells, and trigger an unknown sucrose signaling pathway that lead to increased sucrose content in the transgenic plants. An experiment on the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth demonstrated the existence of a novel sucrose signaling pathway, which stimulated photosynthesis, and enhanced photosynthetic synthesis of sucrose, which was the direct cause or the sucrose increase. In addition, a light/dark time treatment experiment, using different day length ranges for photosynthesis/respiration showed the carbohydrate pattern within a 24-h day and consolidated the role of sucrose signaling pathway as a way to maintain sucrose demand, and indicated the relationships between increased sucrose and upregulation of genes controlling development of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). As a result, transgenic plants featured a higher biomass and a shorter time required to switch to reproduction compared to those of control plants, indicating altered phylotaxis and more rapid advancement of developmental stages in the transgenic plants. PMID:26793204

  12. The Structure of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase from Halothermothrix orenii Reveals Its Mechanism of Action and Binding Mode[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Teck Khiang; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Tan, Tien-Chye; Huynh, Frederick; Patel, Bharat K.; Sivaraman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the transfer of a glycosyl group from an activated donor sugar, such as uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-Glc), to a saccharide acceptor d-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), resulting in the formation of UDP and d-sucrose-6′-phosphate (S6P). This is a central regulatory process in the production of sucrose in plants, cyanobacteria, and proteobacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of SPS from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii and its complexes with the substrate F6P and the product S6P. SPS has two distinct Rossmann-fold domains with a large substrate binding cleft at the interdomain interface. Structures of two complexes show that both the substrate F6P and the product S6P bind to the A-domain of SPS. Based on comparative analysis of the SPS structure with other related enzymes, the donor substrate, nucleotide diphosphate glucose, binds to the B-domain of SPS. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism of catalysis by H. orenii SPS. Our findings indicate that SPS from H. orenii may represent a valid model for the catalytic domain of plant SPSs and thus may provide useful insight into the reaction mechanism of the plant enzyme. PMID:18424616

  13. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Polyketide Synthase 11 (PKS11) Reveals Intermediates in the Synthesis of Methyl-branched Alkylpyrones*

    PubMed Central

    Gokulan, Kuppan; O'Leary, Seán E.; Russell, William K.; Russell, David H.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2013-01-01

    PKS11 is one of three type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although many PKSs in M. tuberculosis have been implicated in producing complex cell wall glycolipids, the biological function of PKS11 is unknown. PKS11 has previously been proposed to synthesize alkylpyrones from fatty acid substrates. We solved the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis PKS11 and found the overall fold to be similar to other type III PKSs. PKS11 has a deep hydrophobic tunnel proximal to the active site Cys-138 to accommodate substrates. We observed electron density in this tunnel from a co-purified molecule that was identified by mass spectrometry to be palmitate. Co-crystallization with malonyl-CoA (MCoA) or methylmalonyl-CoA (MMCoA) led to partial turnover of the substrate, resulting in trapped intermediates. Reconstitution of the reaction in solution confirmed that both co-factors are required for optimal activity, and kinetic analysis shows that MMCoA is incorporated first, then MCoA, followed by lactonization to produce methyl-branched alkylpyrones. PMID:23615910

  14. Investigation of a 6-MSA Synthase Gene Cluster in Aspergillus aculeatus Reveals 6-MSA-derived Aculinic Acid, Aculins A-B and Epi-Aculin A.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lene M; Holm, Dorte K; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Mortensen, Uffe H; Larsen, Thomas O

    2015-10-12

    Aspergillus aculeatus, a filamentous fungus belonging to the Aspergillus clade Nigri, is an industrial workhorse in enzyme production. Recently we reported a number of secondary metabolites from this fungus; however, its genetic potential for the production of secondary metabolites is vast. In this study we identified a 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA) synthase from A. aculeatus, and verified its functionality by episomal expression in A. aculeatus and heterologous expression in A. nidulans. Feeding studies with fully (13) C-labeled 6-MSA revealed that 6-MSA is incorporated into aculinic acid, which further incorporates into three compounds that we name aculins A and B, and epi-aculin A, described here for the first time. Based on NMR data and bioinformatic studies we propose the structures of the compounds as well as a biosynthetic pathway leading to formation of aculins from 6-MSA.

  15. Structure of isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Domagalski, M J; Tkaczuk, K L; Chruszcz, M; Skarina, T; Onopriyenko, O; Cymborowski, M; Grabowski, M; Savchenko, A; Minor, W

    2013-09-01

    The isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis is essential for the biosynthesis of the siderophore bacillibactin by this pathogenic bacterium. The structure of the selenomethionine-substituted protein was determined to 2.4 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. B. anthracis DhbC bears the strongest resemblance to the Escherichia coli isochorismate synthase EntC, which is involved in the biosynthesis of another siderophore, namely enterobactin. Both proteins adopt the characteristic fold of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of various products, including siderophores, menaquinone and tryptophan. The conservation of the active-site residues, as well as their spatial arrangement, suggests that these enzymes share a common Mg(2+)-dependent catalytic mechanism.

  16. Structure of isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, M. J.; Tkaczuk, K. L.; Chruszcz, M.; Skarina, T.; Onopriyenko, O.; Cymborowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Savchenko, A.; Minor, W.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis is essential for the biosynthesis of the siderophore bacillibactin by this pathogenic bacterium. The structure of the selenomethionine-substituted protein was determined to 2.4 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. B. anthracis DhbC bears the strongest resemblance to the Escherichia coli isochorismate synthase EntC, which is involved in the biosynthesis of another siderophore, namely enterobactin. Both proteins adopt the characteristic fold of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of various products, including siderophores, menaquinone and tryptophan. The conservation of the active-site residues, as well as their spatial arrangement, suggests that these enzymes share a common Mg2+-dependent catalytic mechanism. PMID:23989140

  17. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal protein–ligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Amy C.

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 Å resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  18. Mapping of chorismate mutase and prephenate dehydrogenase domains in the Escherichia coli T-protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuqing; Vincent, Sarah; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-02-01

    The Escherichia coli bifunctional T-protein transforms chorismic acid to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid in the l-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway. The 373 amino acid T-protein is a homodimer that exhibits chorismate mutase (CM) and prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, both of which are feedback-inhibited by tyrosine. Fifteen genes coding for the T-protein and various fragments thereof were constructed and successfully expressed in order to characterize the CM, PDH and regulatory domains. Residues 1-88 constituted a functional CM domain, which was also dimeric. Both the PDH and the feedback-inhibition activities were localized in residues 94-373, but could not be separated into discrete domains. The activities of cloned CM and PDH domains were comparatively low, suggesting some cooperative interactions in the native state. Activity data further indicate that the PDH domain, in which NAD, prephenate and tyrosine binding sites were present, was more unstable than the CM domain.

  19. Yeast allosteric chorismate mutase is locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidheini, T.; Moesch, H.U.; Braus, G. ); Evans, J.N.S. )

    1990-04-17

    Chorismate mutase, a branch-point enzyme in the aromatic amino acid pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and also a mutant chorismate mutase with a single amino acid substitution in the C-terminal part of the protein have been purified approximately 20-fold and 64-fold from overproducing strains, respectively. The wild-type enzyme is activated by tryptophan and subject to feedback inhibition by tyrosine, whereas the mutant enzyme does not respond to activation by tryptophan nor inhibition by tyrosine. Both enzymes are dimers consisting of two identical subunits of M{sub r} 30,000, each one capable of binding one substrate and one activator molecule. Each subunit of the wild-type enzyme also binds one inhibitor molecule, whereas the mutant enzyme lost this ability. The enzyme reaction was observed by {sup 1}H NMR and shows a direct and irreversible conversion of chorismate to prephenate without the accumulation of any enzyme-free intermediates. The kinetic data of the wild-type chorismate mutase show positive cooperativity toward the substrate with a Hill coefficient of 1.71 and a (S){sub 0.5} value of 4.0 mM. In the presence of the activator tryptophan, the cooperativity is lost. The enzyme has an (S){sub 0.5} value of 1.2 mM in the presence of 10 {mu}M tryptophan and an increased (S){sub 0.5} value of 8.6 mM in the presence of 300 {mu}M tyrosine. In the mutant enzyme, a loss of the cooperativity was observed, and (S){sub 0.5} was reduced to 1.0 mM. This enzyme is therefore locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution.

  20. Quantum chemical analysis of reaction paths in chorismate mutase: Conformational effects and electrostatic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefczyk, Borys; Claeyssens, Frederik; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Sokalski, W. Andrzej

    We have performed a detailed, quantum chemical, decomposition analysis of the physical nature of key interactions in the model enzyme chorismate mutase (CM), for several active conformations produced by high level combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling. In opposition to our previous study, interactions between selected residues in the active site of CM were analysed along the whole reaction path, for several paths. The interaction energy is calculated up to Møller-Plesset second order level of theory and decomposed into physically meaningful components (electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and electron correlation). This analysis shows, that the dominant interaction is differential stabilization by Arg90: this residue significantly stabilizes the transition state (TS) relative to the substrate in all the paths studied. Interactions in the active site of CM are dominated by the electrostatic component, whereas other components, for example electron correlation, are constant during reaction. Electrostatic effects alone are found to be responsible for lowering the barrier for reaction at the active site. Analysis of four reaction paths derived from QM/MM modeling shows that differences in the height of the barrier are due to differences in the electrostatic interactions of several weakly interacting residues. The influence of conformational effects, such as hydroxyl group rotation in the chorismate/TS, and the distance between Arg90 and the reacting chorismate, have also been analysed. The results show that specific conformations provide better activation barrier lowering. Even small changes in the conformation, like rotation of the hydroxyl group in chorismate (substrate), can significantly alter the activation barrier.0

  1. A petunia chorismate mutase specialized for the production of floral volatiles.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Thomas A; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Kim, Joo Young; Reinhardt, Didier; Cline, Kenneth; Clark, David G

    2010-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida cv. 'Mitchell Diploid' floral fragrance is comprised of 13 volatile benzenoids/phenylpropanoids derived from the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine. Several genes involved in the direct synthesis of individual floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) compounds, i.e. at the end of the pathway, have been isolated and characterized in petunia through reverse genetic and biochemical approaches. In an effort to understand the regulation of 'upstream' components in the FVBP system, we have cloned and characterized two CHORISMATE MUTASE (PhCM1 and PhCM2) cDNAs from petunia. PhCM1 has a transcript accumulation profile consistent with known FVBP genes, while PhCM2 showed a constitutive transcript accumulation profile. The plastid-localized PhCM1 is allosterically regulated by tryptophan but not phenylalanine or tyrosine. The total FVBP emission in PhCM1 RNAi knockdown petunias is reduced by approximately 60-70%, and total chorismate mutase activity in corolla tissue is reduced by 80-85% compared to control plants. These results show that PhCM1 is the principal CHORISMATE MUTASE responsible for the coupling of metabolites from the shikimate pathway to the synthesis of FVBPs in the corolla of Petunia x hybrida cv. 'Mitchell Diploid'.

  2. Contributions of conformational compression and preferential transition state stabilization to the rate enhancement by chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cristiano Ruch Werneck; Repasky, Matthew P; Chandrasekhar, Jayaraman; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2003-06-11

    The rate enhancement provided by the chorismate mutase (CM) enzyme for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate has been investigated by application of the concept of near attack conformations (NACs). Using a combined QM/MM Monte Carlo/free-energy perturbation (MC/FEP) method, 82% and 100% of chorismate conformers were found to be NAC structures in water and in the CM active site, respectively. Consequently, the conversion of non-NACs to NACs does not contribute to the free energy of activation from preorganization of the substrate into NACs. The FEP calculations yielded differences in free energies of activation that well reproduce the experimental data. Additional calculations indicate that the rate enhancement by CM over the aqueous phase results primarily from conformational compression of NACs by the enzyme and that this process is enthalpically controlled. This suggests that preferential stabilization of the transition state in the enzyme environment relative to water plays a secondary role in the catalysis by CM.

  3. QM/MM calculations of kinetic isotope effects in the chorismate mutase active site.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vincent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Williams, Ian H

    2003-02-07

    Kinetic isotope effects have been computed for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in aqueous solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase from B. subtilus. These included primary 13C and 18O and secondary 3H effects for substitutions at the bond-making and bond-breaking positions. The initial structures of the putative stationary points on the potential energy surface, required for the calculations of isotope effects using the CAMVIB/CAMISO programs, have been selected from hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamical simulations using the DYNAMO program. Refinement of the reactant complex and transition-state structures has been carried out by means of AM1/CHARMM24/TIP3P calculations using the GRACE program, with full gradient relaxation of the position of > 5200 atoms for the enzymic simulations, and with a box containing 711 water molecules for the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution. Comparison of these results, and of gas phase calculations, with experimental data has shown that the chemical rearrangement is largely rate-determining for the enzyme mechanism. Inclusion of the chorismate conformational pre-equilibrium step in the modelled kinetic scheme leads to better agreement between recent experimental data and theoretical predictions. These results provide new information on an important enzymatic transformation, and the key factors responsible for the kinetics of its molecular mechanism are clarified. Treatment of the enzyme and/or solvent environment by means of a large and flexible model is absolutely essential for prediction of kinetic isotope effects.

  4. Charge optimization increases the potency and selectivity of a chorismate mutase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Ajay; Hilvert, Donald

    2003-05-14

    The highest affinity inhibitor for chorismate mutases, a conformationally constrained oxabicyclic dicarboxylate transition state analogue, was modified as suggested by computational charge optimization methods. As predicted, replacement of the C10 carboxylate in this molecule with a nitro group yields an even more potent inhibitor of a chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis (BsCM), but the magnitude of the improvement (roughly 3-fold, corresponding to a DeltaDeltaG of -0.7 kcal/mol) is substantially lower than the gain of 2-3 kcal/mol binding free energy anticipated for the reduced desolvation penalty upon binding. Experiments with a truncated version of the enzyme show that the flexible C terminus, which was only partially resolved in the crystal structure and hence omitted from the calculations, provides favorable interactions with the C10 group that partially compensate for its desolvation. Although truncation diminishes the affinity of the enzyme for both inhibitors, the nitro derivative binds 1.7 kcal/mol more tightly than the dicarboxylate, in reasonable agreement with the calculations. Significantly, substitution of the C10 carboxylate with a nitro group also enhances the selectivity of inhibition of BsCM relative to a chorismate mutase from Escherichia coli (EcCM), which has a completely different fold and binding pocket, by 10-fold. These results experimentally verify the utility of charge optimization methods for improving interactions between proteins and low-molecular weight ligands.

  5. Exploration of swapping enzymatic function between two proteins: a simulation study of chorismate mutase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase.

    PubMed

    Choutko, Alexandra; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2013-06-01

    The enzyme chorismate mutase EcCM from Escherichia coli catalyzes one of the few pericyclic reactions in biology, the transformation of chorismate to prephenate. The isochorismate pyruvate lyase PchB from Pseudomonas aeroginosa catalyzes another pericyclic reaction, the isochorismate to salicylate transformation. Interestingly, PchB possesses weak chorismate mutase activity as well thus being able to catalyze two distinct pericyclic reactions in a single active site. EcCM and PchB possess very similar folds, despite their low sequence identity. Using molecular dynamics simulations of four combinations of the two enzymes (EcCM and PchB) with the two substrates (chorismate and isochorismate) we show that the electrostatic field due to EcCM at atoms of chorismate favors the chorismate to prephenate transition and that, analogously, the electrostatic field due to PchB at atoms of isochorismate favors the isochorismate to salicylate transition. The largest differences between EcCM and PchB in electrostatic field strengths at atoms of the substrates are found to be due to residue side chains at distances between 0.6 and 0.8 nm from particular substrate atoms. Both enzymes tend to bring their non-native substrate in the same conformation as their native substrate. EcCM and to a lower extent PchB fail in influencing the forces on and conformations of the substrate such as to favor the other chemical reaction (isochorismate pyruvate lyase activity for EcCM and chorismate mutase activity for PchB). These observations might explain the difficulty of engineering isochorismate pyruvate lyase activity in EcCM by solely mutating active site residues.

  6. When inhibitors do not inhibit: critical evaluation of rational drug design targeting chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Munack, Steffi; Leroux, Vincent; Roderer, Kathrin; Ökvist, Mats; van Eerde, André; Gundersen, Lise-Lotte; Krengel, Ute; Kast, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating disease that claims millions of lives every year. Hindered access or non-compliance to medication, especially in developing countries, led to drug resistance, further aggravating the situation. With current standard therapies in use for over 50 years and only few new candidates in clinical trials, there is an urgent call for new TB drugs. A powerful tool for the development of new medication is structure-guided design, combined with virtual screening or docking studies. Here, we report the results of a drug-design project, which we based on a publication that claimed the structure-guided discovery of several promising and highly active inhibitors targeting the secreted chorismate mutase (*MtCM) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We set out to further improve on these compounds and synthesized a series of new derivatives. Thorough evaluation of these molecules in enzymatic assays revealed, to our dismay, that neither the claimed lead compounds, nor any of the synthesized derivatives, show any inhibitory effects against *MtCM.

  7. Isolation and characterization of another cDNA encoding a chorismate mutase from the phytoparasitic nematode Meloidogyne arenaria.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Wang, Xuan; Xu, Jian Hua; Hu, Yong Jian

    2006-06-01

    A new cDNA, named Ma-cm-2, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), has been isolated from Meloidogyne arenaria. The full-length cDNA, carrying the trans-spliced SL1 leader sequence, was 753-bp long with an open reading frame of 576 bp. The deduced protein MA-CM-2 including amino-terminal signal peptide shows significant similarity to CMs of Meloidogyne incognita, Meloidogyne javanica, and also bacteria. Secondary structure prediction of MA-CM-2 indicates the presence of the three conserved alpha-helix domains present in the Escherichia coli CMs. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that its transcript abundance is high in the early developmental stages and low in later ones. In situ mRNA hybridization revealed that the transcripts of Ma-cm-2 accumulated specifically in the two subventral oesophageal gland cells of M. arenaria. The widespread existence of CMs in the sedentary endoparasitic nematodes implicates that this enzyme plays an important role in the host-parasite interaction.

  8. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival.

    PubMed

    García-Alcázar, Manuel; Giménez, Estela; Pineda, Benito; Capel, Carmen; García-Sogo, Begoña; Sánchez, Sibilla; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-03-28

    Photosynthetic activity is indispensable for plant growth and survival and it depends on the synthesis of plastidial isoprenoids as chlorophylls and carotenoids. In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids. In tomato, the function of DXS1 has only been studied in fruits, and hence its functional relevance during plant development remains unknown. Here we report the characterization of the wls-2297 tomato mutant, whose severe deficiency in chlorophylls and carotenoids promotes an albino phenotype. Additionally, growth of mutant seedlings was arrested without developing vegetative organs, which resulted in premature lethality. Gene cloning and silencing experiments revealed that the phenotype of wls-2297 mutant was caused by 38.6 kb-deletion promoted by a single T-DNA insertion affecting the DXS1 gene. This was corroborated by in vivo and molecular complementation assays, which allowed the rescue of mutant phenotype. Further characterization of tomato plants overexpressing DXS1 and comparative expression analysis indicate that DXS1 may play other important roles besides to that proposed during fruit carotenoid biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DXS1 is essentially required for the development and survival of tomato plants.

  9. Architecture of the Nitric-oxide Synthase Holoenzyme Reveals Large Conformational Changes and a Calmodulin-driven Release of the FMN Domain*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yokom, Adam L.; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Lau, Miranda; Su, Min; Glukhova, Alisa; Osawa, Yoichi; Southworth, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) is required in mammals to generate NO for regulating blood pressure, synaptic response, and immune defense. NOS is a large homodimer with well characterized reductase and oxygenase domains that coordinate a multistep, interdomain electron transfer mechanism to oxidize l-arginine and generate NO. Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) binds between the reductase and oxygenase domains to activate NO synthesis. Although NOS has long been proposed to adopt distinct conformations that alternate between interflavin and FMN-heme electron transfer steps, structures of the holoenzyme have remained elusive and the CaM-bound arrangement is unknown. Here we have applied single particle electron microscopy (EM) methods to characterize the full-length of the neuronal isoform (nNOS) complex and determine the structural mechanism of CaM activation. We have identified that nNOS adopts an ensemble of open and closed conformational states and that CaM binding induces a dramatic rearrangement of the reductase domain. Our three-dimensional reconstruction of the intact nNOS-CaM complex reveals a closed conformation and a cross-monomer arrangement with the FMN domain rotated away from the NADPH-FAD center, toward the oxygenase dimer. This work captures, for the first time, the reductase-oxygenase structural arrangement and the CaM-dependent release of the FMN domain that coordinates to drive electron transfer across the domains during catalysis. PMID:24737326

  10. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcázar, Manuel; Giménez, Estela; Pineda, Benito; Capel, Carmen; García-Sogo, Begoña; Sánchez, Sibilla; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity is indispensable for plant growth and survival and it depends on the synthesis of plastidial isoprenoids as chlorophylls and carotenoids. In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids. In tomato, the function of DXS1 has only been studied in fruits, and hence its functional relevance during plant development remains unknown. Here we report the characterization of the wls-2297 tomato mutant, whose severe deficiency in chlorophylls and carotenoids promotes an albino phenotype. Additionally, growth of mutant seedlings was arrested without developing vegetative organs, which resulted in premature lethality. Gene cloning and silencing experiments revealed that the phenotype of wls-2297 mutant was caused by 38.6 kb-deletion promoted by a single T-DNA insertion affecting the DXS1 gene. This was corroborated by in vivo and molecular complementation assays, which allowed the rescue of mutant phenotype. Further characterization of tomato plants overexpressing DXS1 and comparative expression analysis indicate that DXS1 may play other important roles besides to that proposed during fruit carotenoid biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DXS1 is essentially required for the development and survival of tomato plants. PMID:28350010

  11. Functional analyses of a flavonol synthase-like gene from Camellia nitidissima reveal its roles in flavonoid metabolism during floral pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing-Wen; Fan, Zheng-Qi; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yu-Lin; Li, Ji-Yuan; Yin, Heng-Fu

    2013-09-01

    The flavonoids metabolic pathway plays central roles in floral coloration, in which anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from common precursors, dihydroflavonols. Flavonol synthase (FLS) catalyses dihydroflavonols into flavonols, which presents a key branch of anthocyanins biosynthesis. The yellow flower of Camellia nitidissima Chi. is a unique feature within the genus Camellia, which makes it a precious resource for breeding yellow camellia varieties. In this work, we characterized the secondary metabolites of pigments during floral development of C. nitidissima and revealed that accumulation of flavonols correlates with floral coloration. We first isolated CnFLS1 and showed that it is a FLS of C. nitidissima by gene family analysis. Second, expression analysis during floral development and different floral organs indicated that the expression level of CnFLS1 was regulated by developmental cues, which was in agreement with the accumulating pattern of flavonols. Furthermore, over-expression of CnFLS1 in Nicotiana tabacum altered floral colour into white or light yellow, and metabolic analysis showed significant increasing of flavonols and reducing of anthocyanins in transgenic plants. Our work suggested CnFLS1 plays critical roles in yellow colour pigmentation and is potentially a key point of genetic engineering toward colour modification in Camellia.

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  13. Nitric oxide synthase histochemistry in insect nervous systems: Methanol/formalin fixation reveals the neuroarchitecture of formaldehyde-sensitive NADPH diaphorase in the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Ott, Swidbert R; Elphick, Maurice R

    2002-06-24

    Formaldehyde-insensitive NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd) activity is used widely as a histochemical marker for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, in several insects including the cockroach Periplaneta americana, NOS is apparently formaldehyde-sensitive; NADPHd fails to reveal neuron morphology and results in faint generalized staining. Here we have used a novel fixative, methanol/ formalin (MF), to reveal for the first time the neuroarchitecture of NADPHd in the cockroach, with intense selective staining occurring in neurons throughout the brain and thoracic ganglia. Immunocytochemical and histochemical analysis of cockroach and locust nervous systems indicated that neuronal NADPHd after MF fixation can be attributed to NOS. However, NADPHd in locust glial and perineurial cells was histochemically different from that in neurons and may thus be due to enzymes other than NOS. Histochemical implications of species-specific enzyme properties and of the transcriptional complexity of the NOS gene are discussed. The present findings suggest that MF fixation is a valuable new tool for the comparative analysis of the neuroarchitecture of NO signaling in insects. The Golgi-like definition of the staining enabled analysis of the NADPHd architecture in the cockroach and comparison with that in the locust. NADPHd in the tactile neuropils of the thoracic ganglia showed a similar organization in the two species. The olfactory glomeruli of the antennal lobes were in both species densely innervated by NADPHd-positive local interneurons that correlated in number with the number of glomeruli. Thus, the NADPHd architectures appear highly conserved in primary sensory neuropils. In the cockroach mushroom bodies, particularly dense staining in the gamma-layer of the lobes was apparently derived from Kenyon cells, whereas extrinsic arborizations were organized in domains across the lobes, an architecture that contrasts with the previously described tubular compartmentalization of

  14. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18-C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18-C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys.

  15. Identification and structure-activity relationship study of carvacrol derivatives as Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alokam, Reshma; Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Matikonda, Siddharth Sai; Peddi, Santosh; Alvala, Mallika; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we identified carvacrol, a major phenolic component of oregano oil as a novel small molecule inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) chorismate mutase (CM) enzyme with IC50 of 1.06 ± 0.4 µM. Virtual screening of the BITS-Pilani in-house database using the crystal structure of the MTB CM bound transition state intermediate (PDB: 2FP2) as framework identified carvacrol as a potential lead. Further various carvacrol derivatives were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit MTB CM enzyme, whole cell MTB and cytotoxicity as steps toward the derivation of structure-activity relationships (SAR) and lead optimization.

  16. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for L-tyrosine production by expression of genes coding for the chorismate mutase domain of the native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase and a cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Béjar, María I; Lara, Alvaro R; López, Hezraí; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Martinez, Alfredo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2008-05-01

    The expression of the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzyme cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase (TyrC) from Zymomonas mobilis and the chorismate mutase domain from native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase (PheA(CM)) from Escherichia coli was compared to the expression of native feedback inhibition-sensitive chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydrogenase (CM-TyrA(p)) with regard to the capacity to produce l-tyrosine in E. coli strains modified to increase the carbon flow to chorismate. Shake flask experiments showed that TyrC increased the yield of l-tyrosine from glucose (Y(l-Tyr/Glc)) by 6.8-fold compared to the yield obtained with CM-TyrA(p). In bioreactor experiments, a strain expressing both TyrC and PheA(CM) produced 3 g/liter of l-tyrosine with a Y(l-Tyr/Glc) of 66 mg/g. These values are 46 and 48% higher than the values for a strain expressing only TyrC. The results show that the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzymes can be employed for strain development as part of a metabolic engineering strategy for l-tyrosine production.

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for l-Tyrosine Production by Expression of Genes Coding for the Chorismate Mutase Domain of the Native Chorismate Mutase-Prephenate Dehydratase and a Cyclohexadienyl Dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Béjar, María I.; Lara, Alvaro R.; López, Hezraí; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Martinez, Alfredo; Ramírez, Octavio T.; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzyme cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase (TyrC) from Zymomonas mobilis and the chorismate mutase domain from native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase (PheACM) from Escherichia coli was compared to the expression of native feedback inhibition-sensitive chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydrogenase (CM-TyrAp) with regard to the capacity to produce l-tyrosine in E. coli strains modified to increase the carbon flow to chorismate. Shake flask experiments showed that TyrC increased the yield of l-tyrosine from glucose (Yl-Tyr/Glc) by 6.8-fold compared to the yield obtained with CM-TyrAp. In bioreactor experiments, a strain expressing both TyrC and PheACM produced 3 g/liter of l-tyrosine with a Yl-Tyr/Glc of 66 mg/g. These values are 46 and 48% higher than the values for a strain expressing only TyrC. The results show that the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzymes can be employed for strain development as part of a metabolic engineering strategy for l-tyrosine production. PMID:18344329

  18. HARO7 Encodes Chorismate Mutase of the Methylotrophic Yeast Hansenula polymorpha and Is Derepressed upon Methanol Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Sven; Pries, Ralph; Gellissen, Gerd; Hiller, Mark; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2000-01-01

    The HARO7 gene of the methylotrophic, thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha was cloned by functional complementation. HARO7 encodes a monofunctional 280-amino-acid protein with chorismate mutase (EC 5.4.99.5) activity that catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate, a key step in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. The HARO7 gene product shows strong similarities to primary sequences of known eukaryotic chorismate mutase enzymes. After homologous overexpression and purification of the 32-kDa protein, its kinetic parameters (kcat = 319.1 s−1, nH = 1.56, [S]0.5 = 16.7 mM) as well as its allosteric regulatory properties were determined. Tryptophan acts as heterotropic positive effector; tyrosine is a negative-acting, heterotropic feedback inhibitor of enzyme activity. The influence of temperature on catalytic turnover and the thermal stability of the enzyme were determined and compared to features of the chorismate mutase enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we constructed mutant strains carrying a disrupted HARO7 gene that showed tyrosine auxotrophy and severe growth defects. The amount of the 0.9-kb HARO7 mRNA is independent of amino acid starvation conditions but increases twofold in the presence of methanol as the sole carbon source, implying a catabolite repression system acting on HARO7 expression. PMID:10894726

  19. Conformational effects in enzyme catalysis: QM/MM free energy calculation of the 'NAC' contribution in chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Ranaghan, Kara E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2004-05-21

    The controversial 'near attack conformation'(NAC) effect in the important model enzyme chorismate mutase is calculated to be 3.8-4.6 kcal mol(-1) by QM/MM free energy perturbation molecular dynamics methods, showing that the NAC effect by itself does not account for catalysis in this enzyme.

  20. HARO7 encodes chorismate mutase of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha and is derepressed upon methanol utilization.

    PubMed

    Krappmann, S; Pries, R; Gellissen, G; Hiller, M; Braus, G H

    2000-08-01

    The HARO7 gene of the methylotrophic, thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha was cloned by functional complementation. HARO7 encodes a monofunctional 280-amino-acid protein with chorismate mutase (EC 5.4. 99.5) activity that catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate, a key step in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. The HARO7 gene product shows strong similarities to primary sequences of known eukaryotic chorismate mutase enzymes. After homologous overexpression and purification of the 32-kDa protein, its kinetic parameters (k(cat) = 319.1 s(-1), n(H) = 1.56, [S](0.5) = 16.7 mM) as well as its allosteric regulatory properties were determined. Tryptophan acts as heterotropic positive effector; tyrosine is a negative-acting, heterotropic feedback inhibitor of enzyme activity. The influence of temperature on catalytic turnover and the thermal stability of the enzyme were determined and compared to features of the chorismate mutase enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we constructed mutant strains carrying a disrupted HARO7 gene that showed tyrosine auxotrophy and severe growth defects. The amount of the 0.9-kb HARO7 mRNA is independent of amino acid starvation conditions but increases twofold in the presence of methanol as the sole carbon source, implying a catabolite repression system acting on HARO7 expression.

  1. Mapping Interaction Energies in Chorismate Mutase with the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Steinmann, Casper

    2017-03-02

    The Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate is mapped across the entire reaction pathway using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. Three basis sets (6-31G(d), cc-pVDZ, and pcseg-1) are studied to provide guidance toward obtaining high accuracy with the FMO method on such systems. Using a fragmentation scheme of one residue per fragment, the FMO method using the 6-31G(d) basis set and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the hybrid orbital projection fragmentation scheme provides the most reliable results across the entire reaction pathway. Calculations using the multilayer FMO method are performed and shown to be in agreement with single-layer calculations in all cases with differences of less than one kilocalorie per mole for all tested basis set combinations along the entire reaction path. The use of restricted Hartree-Fock for the lower-level layer and MP2 for the higher-level layer gives the most consistent results when using the same basis set for both layers. Pair interaction energy decomposition analysis calculations confirm that electrostatic interactions are the predominant force between three key arginine residues and chorismate and that dispersion and charge transfer interactions in the binding pocket also play a role in the local chemistry of the reaction.

  2. Insights into enzyme catalysis from QM/MM modelling: transition state stabilization in chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaghan, Kara E.; Ridder, Lars; Szefczyk, Borys; Sokalski, W. Andrzej; Hermann, Johannes C.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    Chorismate mutase provides an important test of theories of enzyme catalysis, and of modelling methods. The Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in the enzyme has been modelled here by a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method. Several pathways have been calculated. The sensitivity of the results to details of model preparation and pathway calculation is tested, and the results are compared in detail to previous similar studies and experiments. The potential energy barrier for the enzyme reaction is estimated at 24.5-31.6 kcal mol-1 (AM1/CHARMM), and 2.7-11.9 kcal mol-1 with corrections (e.g. B3LYP/6-31+G(d)). In agreement with previous studies, the present analysis of the calculated paths provides unequivocal evidence of significant transition state stabilization by the enzyme, indicating that this is central to catalysis by the enzyme. The active site is exquisitely complementary to the transition state, stabilizing it more than the substrate, so reducing the barrier to reaction. A number of similar pathways for reaction exist in the protein, as expected. Small structural differences give rise to differences in energetic contributions. Major electrostatic contributions to transition state stabilization come in all cases from Arg90, Arg7, one or two water molecules, and Glu78 (Glu78 destabilizes the transition state less than the substrate), while Arg63 contributes significantly in one model.

  3. A transition path sampling study of the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Crehuet, Ramon; Field, Martin J

    2007-05-24

    The study of the chemical steps in enzyme-catalyzed reactions represents a challenge for molecular simulation techniques. One concern is how to calculate paths for the reaction. Common techniques include the definition of a reaction coordinate in terms of a small set of (normally) geometrical variables or the determination of minimum energy paths on the potential energy surface of the reacting system. Both have disadvantages, the former because it presupposes knowledge of which variables are likely to be important for reaction and the latter because it provides a static picture and dynamical effects are ignored. In this paper, we employ the transition path sampling method developed by Chandler and co-workers, which overcomes some of these limitations. The reaction that we have chosen is the chorismate-mutase-catalyzed conversion of chorismate into prephenate, which has become something of a test case for simulation studies of enzyme mechanisms. We generated an ensemble of approximately 1000 independent transition paths for the reaction in the enzyme and another approximately 500 for the corresponding reaction in solution. A large variety of analyses of these paths was performed, but we have concentrated on characterizing the transition state ensemble, particularly the flexibility of its structures with respect to other ligands of the enzyme and the time evolution of various geometrical and energetic properties as the reaction proceeds. We have also devised an approximate technique for locating transition state structures along the paths.

  4. Computing kinetic isotope effects for chorismate mutase with high accuracy. A new DFT/MM strategy.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Williams, Ian H

    2005-03-10

    A novel procedure has been applied to compute experimentally unobserved intrinsic kinetic isotope effects upon the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate catalyzed by B. subtilis chorismate mutase. In this modified QM/MM approach, the "low-level" QM description of the quantum region is corrected during the optimization procedure by means of a "high-level" calculation in vacuo, keeping the QM-MM interaction contribution at a quantum "low-level". This allows computation of energies, gradients, and Hessians including the polarization of the QM subsystem and its interaction with the MM environment, both terms calculated using the low-level method at a reasonable computational cost. New information on an important enzymatic transformation is provided with greater reliability than has previously been possible. The predicted kinetic isotope effects on Vmax/Km are 1.33 and 0.86 (at 30 degrees C) for 5-3H and 9-3H2 substitutions, respectively, and 1.011 and 1.055 (at 22 degrees C) for 1-13C and 7-18O substitutions, respectively.

  5. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of a Potential Transition-State Inhibitor of the Salicylate Synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators (siderophores) produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) for iron mobilization. The bifunctional salicylate synthase MbtI catalyzes the first step of mycobactin biosynthesis through the conversion of the primary metabolite chorismate into salicylic acid via isochorismate. We report the design, synthesis and biochemical evaluation of an inhibitor based on the putative transition-state (TS) for the isochorismatase partial reaction of MbtI. The inhibitor mimics the hypothesized charge build-up at C-4 of chorismate in the TS as well as C-O bond-formation at C-6. Another important design element of the inhibitor is replacement of the labile pyruvate side-chain in chorismate with a stable C-linked propionate isostere. We developed a stereocontrolled synthesis of the highly functionalized cyclohexene inhibitor that features an asymmetric aldol reaction using a titanium enolate, diastereoselective Grignard addition to a tert-butanesulfinyl aldimine, and ring closing olefin metathesis as key steps. PMID:26035083

  6. Identification and functional characterization of monofunctional ent-copalyl diphosphate and ent-kaurene synthases in white spruce reveal different patterns for diterpene synthase evolution for primary and secondary metabolism in gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Dullat, Harpreet K; Yuen, Mack; Ralph, Steven G; Jancsik, Sharon; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    The biosynthesis of the tetracyclic diterpene ent-kaurene is a critical step in the general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin hormones. ent-Kaurene is formed by a two-step cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate via the intermediate ent-copalyl diphosphate. In a lower land plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens, a single bifunctional diterpene synthase (diTPS) catalyzes both steps. In contrast, in angiosperms, the two consecutive cyclizations are catalyzed by two distinct monofunctional enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS). The enzyme, or enzymes, responsible for ent-kaurene biosynthesis in gymnosperms has been elusive. However, several bifunctional diTPS of specialized (secondary) metabolism have previously been characterized in gymnosperms, and all known diTPSs for resin acid biosynthesis in conifers are bifunctional. To further understand the evolution of ent-kaurene biosynthesis as well as the evolution of general and specialized diterpenoid metabolisms in gymnosperms, we set out to determine whether conifers use a single bifunctional diTPS or two monofunctional diTPSs in the ent-kaurene pathway. Using a combination of expressed sequence tag, full-length cDNA, genomic DNA, and targeted bacterial artificial chromosome sequencing, we identified two candidate CPS and KS genes from white spruce (Picea glauca) and their orthologs in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis). Functional characterization of the recombinant enzymes established that ent-kaurene biosynthesis in white spruce is catalyzed by two monofunctional diTPSs, PgCPS and PgKS. Comparative analysis of gene structures and enzyme functions highlights the molecular evolution of these diTPSs as conserved between gymnosperms and angiosperms. In contrast, diTPSs for specialized metabolism have evolved differently in angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  7. Alternative splicing and gene duplication differentially shaped the regulation of isochorismate synthase in Populus and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinan; Chung, Jeng-Der; Fu, Xueyan; Johnson, Virgil E.; Ranjan, Priya; Booth, Sarah L.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2009-01-01

    Isochorismate synthase (ICS) converts chorismate to isochorismate for the biosynthesis of phylloquinone, an essential cofactor for photosynthetic electron transport. ICS is also required for salicylic acid (SA) synthesis during Arabidopsis defense. In several other species, including Populus, SA is derived primarily from the phenylpropanoid pathway. We therefore sought to investigate ICS regulation in Populus to learn the extent of ICS involvement in SA synthesis and defense. Arabidopsis harbors duplicated AtICS genes that differ in their exon-intron structure, basal expression, and stress inducibility. In contrast, we found a single ICS gene in Populus and six other sequenced plant genomes, pointing to the AtICS duplication as a lineage-specific event. The Populus ICS encodes a functional plastidic enzyme, and was not responsive to stresses that stimulated phenylpropanoid accumulation. Populus ICS underwent extensive alternative splicing that was rare for the duplicated AtICSs. Sequencing of 184 RT-PCR Populus clones revealed 37 alternative splice variants, with normal transcripts representing ≈50% of the population. When expressed in Arabidopsis, Populus ICS again underwent alternative splicing, but did not produce normal transcripts to complement AtICS1 function. The splice-site sequences of Populus ICS are unusual, suggesting a causal link between junction sequence, alternative splicing, and ICS function. We propose that gene duplication and alternative splicing of ICS evolved independently in Arabidopsis and Populus in accordance with their distinct defense strategies. AtICS1 represents a divergent isoform for inducible SA synthesis during defense. Populus ICS primarily functions in phylloquinone biosynthesis, a process that can be sustained at low ICS transcript levels. PMID:19996170

  8. Modes of Heme-Binding and Substrate Access for Cytochrome P450 CYP74A Revealed by Crystal Structures of Allene Oxide Synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytochrome P450s exist ubiquitously in all organisms and are involved in many biological processes. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a P450 enzyme that plays a key role in the biosynthesis of oxylipin jasmonates which are involved in signal and defense reactions in higher plants. The crystal structure...

  9. Ligand based virtual screening and biological evaluation of inhibitors of chorismate mutase (Rv1885c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Himanshu; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bal, Naresh Chandra; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Arora, Ashish

    2007-06-01

    We have identified new lead candidates that possess inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv chorismate mutase by a ligand-based virtual screening optimized for lead evaluation in combination with in vitro enzymatic assay. The initial virtual screening using a ligand-based pharmacophore model identified 95 compounds from an in-house small molecule database of 15,452 compounds. The obtained hits were further evaluated by molecular docking and 15 compounds were short listed based on docking scores and the other scoring functions and subjected to biological assay. Chorismate mutase activity assays identified four compounds as inhibitors of M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase (MtCM) with low K(i) values. The structural models for these ligands in the chorismate mutase binding site will facilitate medicinal chemistry efforts for lead optimization against this protein.

  10. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  11. Multiple high-level QM/MM reaction paths demonstrate transition-state stabilization in chorismate mutase: correlation of barrier height with transition-state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Claeyssens, Frederik; Ranaghan, Kara E; Manby, Frederick R; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-28

    Multiple profiles for the reaction from chorismate to prephenate in the enzyme chorismate mutase calculated with hybrid density functional combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d)-CHARMM27) agree well with experiment, and provide direct evidence of transition-state stabilization by this important enzyme, which is at the centre of current debates about the nature of enzyme catalysis.

  12. Discovery and structure optimization of a series of isatin derivatives as Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jeankumar, Variam U; Alokam, Reshma; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda P; Suryadevara, Priyanka; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Peddi, Santosh; Sahithi, Seedarala; Alvala, Mallika; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the crystal structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) enzyme chorismate mutase (CM) bound to transition state analogue (PDB: 2FP2) was used as a framework for virtual screening of the BITS-Pilani in-house database (2500 compounds) to identify new scaffold. We identified isatin as novel small molecule MTB CM inhibitors; further twenty-four isatin derivatives were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit MTB CM, and activity against M. tuberculosis as steps towards the derivation of structure-activity relationships (SAR) and lead optimization. Compound 3-(4-nitrobenzylidene)indolin-2-one, 24 emerged as the most promising lead with an IC50 of 1.01 ± 0.22 μm for purified CM and MIC of 23.5 μm for M. tuberculosis, with little or no cytotoxicity.

  13. Targeted proteomics using selected reaction monitoring reveals the induction of specific terpene synthases in a multi-level study of methyl jasmonate-treated Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Lippert, Dustin N; Kuzyk, Michael A; Domanski, Dominik; Chou, Tina; Borchers, Christoph H; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Induction of terpene synthase (TPS) gene expression and enzyme activity is known to occur in response to various chemical and biological stimuli in several species of spruce (genus Picea). However, high sequence identity between TPS family members has made it difficult to determine the induction patterns of individual TPS at the protein and transcript levels and whether specific TPS enzymes respond differentially to treatment. In the present study we used a multi-level approach to measure the induction and activity of TPS enzymes in protein extracts of Norway spruce (Picea abies) bark tissue following treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Measurements were made on the transcript, protein, enzyme activity and metabolite levels. Using a relatively new proteomics application, selective reaction monitoring (SRM), it was possible to differentiate and quantitatively measure the abundance of several known TPS proteins and three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) isoforms in Norway spruce. Protein levels of individual TPS and DXS enzymes were differentially induced upon MeJA treatment and good correlation was generally observed between induction of transcripts, proteins, and enzyme activities. Most of the mono- and diterpenoid metabolites accumulated with similar temporal patterns of induction as part of the coordinated multi-compound chemical defense response. Protein and enzyme activity levels of the monoTPS (+)-3-carene synthase and the corresponding accumulation of (+)-3-carene was induced to a higher fold change than any other TPS or metabolite measured, indicating an important role in the induced terpenoid defense response in Norway spruce.

  14. A chorismate mutase from the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines shows polymorphisms that correlate with virulence.

    PubMed

    Bekal, Sadia; Niblack, Terry L; Lambert, Kris N

    2003-05-01

    Parasitism genes from phytoparasitic nematodes are thought to be essential for nematode invasion of the host plant, to help the nematode establish feeding sites, and to aid nematodes in the suppression of host plant defenses. One gene that may play several roles in nematode parasitism is chorismate mutase (CM). This secreted enzyme is produced in the nematode's esophageal glands and appears to function within the plant cell to manipulate the plant's shikimate pathway, which controls plant cell growth, development, structure, and pathogen defense. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers, we amplified and cloned a chorismate mutase (Hg-cm-1) from Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), and showed it had CM activity. RNA in situ hybridization of Hg-cm-1 cDNA to SCN sections confirms that it is specifically expressed in the nematodes' esophageal glands. DNA gel blots of genomic DNA isolated from SCN inbred lines that have differing virulence on SCN resistant soybean show Hg-cm-1 is a member of a polymorphic gene family. Some Hg-cm family members predominate in SCN inbred lines that are virulent on certain SCN resistant soybean cultivars. The same polymorphisms and correlation with virulence are seen in the Hg-cm-1 expressed in the SCN second-stage juveniles. Based on the enzymatic activity of Hg-cm-1 and the observation that different forms of the mutase are expressed in virulent nematodes, we hypothesize that the Hg-cm-1 is a virulence gene, some forms of which allow SCN to parasitize certain resistant soybean plants.

  15. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the secreted chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a tricky crystallization problem solved

    SciTech Connect

    Krengel, Ute; Dey, Raja; Sasso, Severin; Ökvist, Mats; Ramakrishnan, Chandra; Kast, Peter

    2006-05-01

    A method is presented that allowed the diffraction limit of crystals of the secreted chorismate mutase from M. tuberculosis to be improved from approximately 3.5 to 1.3 Å. To obtain large well diffracting crystals, it was critical to initiate crystallization at higher precipitant concentration and then transfer the drops to lower precipitant concentrations within 5–15 min. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine in bacteria, fungi and plants. Here, the crystallization of the unusual secreted chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (encoded by Rv1885c), a 37.2 kDa dimeric protein belonging to the AroQ{sub γ} subclass of mutases, is reported. Crystal optimization was non-trivial and is discussed in detail. To obtain crystals of sufficient quality, it was critical to initiate crystallization at higher precipitant concentration and then transfer the drops to lower precipitant concentrations within 5–15 min, in an adaptation of a previously described technique [Saridakis & Chayen (2000 ▶), Protein Sci.9, 755–757]. As a result of the optimization, diffraction improved from 3.5 to 1.3 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.6, b = 72.6, c = 62.0 Å, β = 104.5°. The asymmetric unit contains one biological dimer, with 167 amino acids per protomer. A soak with a transition-state analogue is also described.

  16. Alternative splicing: a novel mechanism of regulation identified in the chorismate mutase gene of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun-Wen; Tian, Duanhua; Borchardt-Wier, Harmony B; Wang, Xiaohong

    2008-11-01

    Chorismate mutase (CM) secreted from the stylet of plant-parasitic nematodes plays an important role in plant parasitism. We isolated and characterized a new nematode CM gene (Gr-cm-1) from the potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis. The Gr-cm-1 gene was found to exist in the nematode genome as a single-copy gene that has two different alleles, Gr-cm-1A and Gr-cm-1B, both of which could give rise to two different mRNA transcripts of Gr-cm-1 and Gr-cm-1-IRII. In situ mRNA hybridization showed that the Gr-cm-1 gene was exclusively expressed within the subventral oesophageal gland cells of the nematode. Gr-cm-1 was demonstrated to encode a functional CM (GR-CM-1) potentially having a dimeric structure as the secreted bacterial *AroQ CMs. Gr-cm-1-IRII, generated by retention of intron 2 of the Gr-cm-1 pre-mRNA through alternative splicing (AS), would encode a truncated protein (GR-CM-1t) lacking the CM domain with no CM activity. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed that splicing of the Gr-cm-1 gene was developmentally regulated; Gr-cm-1 was up-regulated whereas Gr-cm-1-IRII was down-regulated in early nematode parasitic stages compared to the preparasitic juvenile stage. Low-temperature SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that GR-CM-1 could form homodimers when expressed in Escherichia coli and the dimerization domain was retained in the truncated GR-CM-1t protein. The specific interaction between the two proteins was demonstrated in yeast. Our data suggested that the novel splice variant might function as a dominant negative isoform through heterodimerization with the full-length GR-CM-1 protein and that AS may represent an important mechanism for regulating CM activity during nematode parasitism.

  17. Analysis of an Arabidopsis heat-sensitive mutant reveals that chlorophyll synthase is involved in reutilization of chlorophyllide during chlorophyll turnover.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao-Pin; Lee, Tsung-yuan; Tanaka, Ayumi; Charng, Yee-yung

    2014-10-01

    Chlorophylls, the most abundant pigments in the photosynthetic apparatus, are constantly turned over as a result of the degradation and replacement of the damage-prone reaction center D1 protein of photosystem II. Results from isotope labeling experiments suggest that chlorophylls are recycled by reutilization of chlorophyllide and phytol, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, by characterization of a heat-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant we provide evidence of a salvage pathway for chlorophyllide a. A missense mutation in CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG) was identified and confirmed to be responsible for a light-dependent, heat-induced cotyledon bleaching phenotype. Following heat treatment, mutant (chlg-1) but not wild-type seedlings accumulated a substantial level of chlorophyllide a, which resulted in a surge of phototoxic singlet oxygen. Immunoblot analysis suggested that the mutation destabilized the chlorophyll synthase proteins and caused a conditional blockage of esterification of chlorophyllide a after heat stress. Accumulation of chlorophyllide a after heat treatment occurred during recovery in the dark in the light-grown but not the etiolated seedlings, suggesting that the accumulated chlorophyllides were not derived from de novo biosynthesis but from de-esterification of the existing chlorophylls. Further analysis of the triple mutant harboring the CHLG mutant allele and null mutations of CHLOROPHYLLASE1 (CLH1) and CLH2 indicated that the known chlorophyllases are not responsible for the accumulation of chlorophyllide a in chlg-1. Taken together, our results show that chlorophyll synthase acts in a salvage pathway for chlorophyll biosynthesis by re-esterifying the chlorophyllide a produced during chlorophyll turnover.

  18. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  19. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the secreted chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a tricky crystallization problem solved.

    PubMed

    Krengel, Ute; Dey, Raja; Sasso, Severin; Okvist, Mats; Ramakrishnan, Chandra; Kast, Peter

    2006-05-01

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine in bacteria, fungi and plants. Here, the crystallization of the unusual secreted chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (encoded by Rv1885c), a 37.2 kDa dimeric protein belonging to the AroQ(gamma) subclass of mutases, is reported. Crystal optimization was non-trivial and is discussed in detail. To obtain crystals of sufficient quality, it was critical to initiate crystallization at higher precipitant concentration and then transfer the drops to lower precipitant concentrations within 5-15 min, in an adaptation of a previously described technique [Saridakis & Chayen (2000), Protein Sci. 9, 755-757]. As a result of the optimization, diffraction improved from 3.5 to 1.3 A resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 42.6, b = 72.6, c = 62.0 angstroms, beta = 104.5 degrees. The asymmetric unit contains one biological dimer, with 167 amino acids per protomer. A soak with a transition-state analogue is also described.

  20. Electrostatic transition state stabilization rather than reactant destabilization provides the chemical basis for efficient chorismate mutase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Burschowsky, Daniel; van Eerde, André; Ökvist, Mats; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald; Krengel, Ute

    2014-12-09

    For more than half a century, transition state theory has provided a useful framework for understanding the origins of enzyme catalysis. As proposed by Pauling, enzymes accelerate chemical reactions by binding transition states tighter than substrates, thereby lowering the activation energy compared with that of the corresponding uncatalyzed process. This paradigm has been challenged for chorismate mutase (CM), a well-characterized metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate. Calculations have predicted the decisive factor in CM catalysis to be ground state destabilization rather than transition state stabilization. Using X-ray crystallography, we show, in contrast, that a sluggish variant of Bacillus subtilis CM, in which a cationic active-site arginine was replaced by a neutral citrulline, is a poor catalyst even though it effectively preorganizes chorismate for the reaction. A series of high-resolution molecular snapshots of the reaction coordinate, including the apo enzyme, and complexes with substrate, transition state analog and product, demonstrate that an active site, which is only complementary in shape to a reactive substrate conformer, is insufficient for effective catalysis. Instead, as with other enzymes, electrostatic stabilization of the CM transition state appears to be crucial for achieving high reaction rates.

  1. Electrostatic transition state stabilization rather than reactant destabilization provides the chemical basis for efficient chorismate mutase catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Burschowsky, Daniel; van Eerde, André; Ökvist, Mats; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald; Krengel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    For more than half a century, transition state theory has provided a useful framework for understanding the origins of enzyme catalysis. As proposed by Pauling, enzymes accelerate chemical reactions by binding transition states tighter than substrates, thereby lowering the activation energy compared with that of the corresponding uncatalyzed process. This paradigm has been challenged for chorismate mutase (CM), a well-characterized metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate. Calculations have predicted the decisive factor in CM catalysis to be ground state destabilization rather than transition state stabilization. Using X-ray crystallography, we show, in contrast, that a sluggish variant of Bacillus subtilis CM, in which a cationic active-site arginine was replaced by a neutral citrulline, is a poor catalyst even though it effectively preorganizes chorismate for the reaction. A series of high-resolution molecular snapshots of the reaction coordinate, including the apo enzyme, and complexes with substrate, transition state analog and product, demonstrate that an active site, which is only complementary in shape to a reactive substrate conformer, is insufficient for effective catalysis. Instead, as with other enzymes, electrostatic stabilization of the CM transition state appears to be crucial for achieving high reaction rates. PMID:25422475

  2. Monofunctional chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis: Kinetic and sup 13 C NMR studies on the interactions of the enzyme with its ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.V.; Eren, D.; Knowles, J.R. )

    1990-09-18

    The interaction of the monofuctional chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis with chorismate and prephenate has been studied kinetically and by NMR spectroscopy with {sup 13}C specifically labeled substrates. Prephenate dominates the population of enzyme-bound species, and the off rate constant obtained from line-broadening experiments is close to the value of k{sub cat} for chorismate determined kinetically. The calculated on rate constant for prephenate is similar to the value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for chorismate. The kinetic parameters of the Bacillus mutase are remarkably insensitive to pH over a wide range and display no solvent isotope effect. These results suggest that the enzyme-catalyzed reaction may be encounter controlled (slowed from the diffusion limit by some feature of the enzyme's active site) and the k{sub cat} for chorismate is determined by the product off rate. There is now no evidence to suggest that the skeletal rearrangement on the enzyme surface occurs by a pathway other than a pericyclic process.

  3. Feedback inhibition of chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydrogenase (TyrA) of Escherichia coli: generation and characterization of tyrosine-insensitive mutants.

    PubMed

    Lütke-Eversloh, Tina; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2005-11-01

    In order to get insights into the feedback regulation by tyrosine of the Escherichia coli chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydrogenase (CM/PDH), which is encoded by the tyrA gene, feedback-inhibition-resistant (fbr) mutants were generated by error-prone PCR. The tyrA(fbr) mutants were selected by virtue of their resistance toward m-fluoro-D,L-tyrosine, and seven representatives were characterized on the biochemical as well as on the molecular level. The PDH activities of the purified His6-tagged TyrA proteins exhibited up to 35% of the enzyme activity of TyrA(WT), but tyrosine did not inhibit the mutant PDH activities. On the other hand, CM activities of the TyrA(fbr) mutants were similar to those of the TyrA(WT) protein. Analyses of the DNA sequences of the tyrA genes revealed that tyrA(fbr) contained amino acid substitutions either at Tyr263 or at residues 354 to 357, indicating that these two sites are involved in the feedback inhibition by tyrosine.

  4. Structural and functional investigation of a secreted chorismate mutase from the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii in the context of related enzymes from diverse origins.

    PubMed

    Vanholme, Bartel; Kast, Peter; Haegeman, Annelies; Jacob, Joachim; Grunewald, Wim; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-03-01

    In this article, we present the cloning of Hscm1, a gene for chorismate mutase (CM) from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. CM is a key branch-point enzyme of the shikimate pathway, and secondary metabolites that arise from this pathway control developmental programmes and defence responses of the plant. By manipulating the plant's endogenous shikimate pathway, the nematode can influence the plant physiology for its own benefit. Hscm1 is a member of the CM gene family and is expressed during the pre-parasitic and parasitic stages of the nematode's life cycle. In situ mRNA hybridization reveals an expression pattern specific to the subventral and dorsal pharyngeal glands. The predicted protein has a signal peptide for secretion in addition to two domains. The N-terminal domain of the mature protein, which is only found in cyst nematodes, contains six conserved cysteine residues, which may reflect the importance of disulphide bond formation for protein stabilization. The C-terminal domain holds a single catalytic site and has similarity to secreted CMs of pathogenic bacteria, classifying HsCM1 as an AroQ(gamma) enzyme. The presumed catalytic residues are discussed in detail, and genetic complementation experiments indicate that the C-terminal domain is essential for enzyme activity. Finally, we show how the modular design of the protein is mirrored in the genomic sequence by the intron/exon organization, suggesting exon shuffling as a mechanism for the evolutionary assembly of this protein.

  5. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from E. coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid – general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid – general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step. PMID:23942051

  6. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L

    2013-10-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from Escherichia coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid-general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid-general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step.

  7. Characterization of the secreted chorismate mutase from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Severin; Ramakrishnan, Chandra; Gamper, Marianne; Hilvert, Donald; Kast, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The gene encompassing ORF Rv1885c with weak sequence similarity to AroQ chorismate mutases (CMs) was cloned from the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene product (*MtCM) complements a CM-deficient E. coli strain, but only if produced without the predicted N-terminal signal sequence typical of M. tuberculosis. The mature *MtCM, which was purified by exploiting its resistance to irreversible thermal denaturation, possesses high CM activity in vitro. The enzyme follows simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, having a k(cat) of 50 s(-1) and a K(m) of 180 microM (at 30 degrees C and pH 7.5). *MtCM was shown to be a dimer by analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. Secondary-structure prediction and CD spectroscopy confirmed that *MtCM is a member of the all-alpha-helical AroQ class of CMs, but it seems to have a topologically rearranged AroQ fold. Because CMs are normally intracellular metabolic enzymes required for the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine, the existence of an exported CM in Gram-positive M. tuberculosis is puzzling. The observation that homologs of *MtCM with a predicted export sequence are generally only present in parasitic or pathogenic organisms suggests that secreted CMs may have evolved to participate in some aspect of parasitism or pathogenesis yet to be unraveled.

  8. Apparent NAC effect in chorismate mutase reflects electrostatic transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Strajbl, Marek; Shurki, Avital; Kato, Mitsunori; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-08-27

    The catalytic reaction of chorismate mutase (CM) has been the subject of major current attention. Nevertheless, the origin of the catalytic power of CM remains an open question. In particular, it has not been clear whether the enzyme works by providing electrostatic transition state stabilization (TSS), by applying steric strain, or by populating near attack conformation (NAC). The present work explores this issue by a systematic quantitative analysis. The overall catalytic effect is reproduced by the empirical valence bond (EVB) method. In addition, the binding free energy of the ground state and the transition state is evaluated, demonstrating that the enzyme works by TSS. Furthermore, the evaluation of the electrostatic contribution to the reduction of the activation energy establishes that the TSS results from electrostatic effects. It is also found that the apparent NAC effect is not the reason for the catalytic effect but the result of the TSS. It is concluded that in CM as in other enzymes the key catalytic effect is electrostatic TSS. However, since the charge distribution of the transition state and the reactant state is similar, the stabilization of the transition state leads to reduction in the distance between the reacting atoms in the reactant state.

  9. Transcriptome sequencing of three Pseudo-nitzschia species reveals comparable gene sets and the presence of Nitric Oxide Synthase genes in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Di Dato, Valeria; Musacchia, Francesco; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Patil, Shrikant; Montresor, Marina; Sanges, Remo; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are among the most diverse eukaryotic microorganisms on Earth, they are responsible for a large fraction of primary production in the oceans and can be found in different habitats. Pseudo-nitzschia are marine planktonic diatoms responsible for blooms in coastal and oceanic waters. We analyzed the transcriptome of three species, Pseudo-nitzschia arenysensis, Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima and Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata, with different levels of genetic relatedness. These species have a worldwide distribution and the last one produces the neurotoxin domoic acid. We were able to annotate about 80% of the sequences in each transcriptome and the analysis of the relative functional annotations allowed comparison of the main metabolic pathways, pathways involved in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids (MAV and MEP pathways), and pathways putatively involved in domoic acid synthesis. The search for homologous transcripts among the target species and other congeneric species resulted in the discovery of a sequence annotated as Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), found uniquely in Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. The predicted protein product contained all the domains of the canonical metazoan sequence. Putative NOS sequences were found in other available diatom datasets, supporting a role for nitric oxide as signaling molecule in this group of microalgae. PMID:26189990

  10. Tissue-specific transcriptome analysis within the maturing sugarcane stalk reveals spatial regulation in the expression of cellulose synthase and sucrose transporter gene families.

    PubMed

    Casu, Rosanne E; Rae, Anne L; Nielsen, Janine M; Perroux, Jai M; Bonnett, Graham D; Manners, John M

    2015-12-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) accumulates high concentrations of sucrose in its mature stalk and a considerable portion of carbohydrate metabolism is also devoted to cell wall synthesis and fibre production. We examined tissue-specific expression patterns to explore the spatial deployment of pathways responsible for sucrose accumulation and fibre synthesis within the stalk. We performed expression profiling of storage parenchyma, vascular bundles and rind dissected from a maturing stalk internode of sugarcane, identifying ten cellulose synthase subunit genes and examining significant differences in the expression of their corresponding transcripts and those of several sugar transporters. These were correlated with differential expression patterns for transcripts of genes encoding COBRA-like proteins and other cell wall metabolism-related proteins. The sugar transporters genes ShPST2a, ShPST2b and ShSUT4 were significantly up-regulated in storage parenchyma while ShSUT1 was up-regulated in vascular bundles. Two co-ordinately expressed groups of cell wall related transcripts were also identified. One group, associated with primary cell wall synthesis (ShCesA1, ShCesA7, ShCesA9 and Shbk2l3), was up-regulated in parenchyma. The other group, associated with secondary cell wall synthesis (ShCesA10, ShCesA11, ShCesA12 and Shbk-2), was up-regulated in rind. In transformed sugarcane plants, the ShCesA7 promoter conferred stable expression of green fluorescent protein preferentially in the storage parenchyma of the maturing stalk internode. Our results indicate that there is spatial separation for elevated expression of these important targets in both sucrose accumulation and cell wall synthesis, allowing for increased clarity in our understanding of sucrose transport and fibre synthesis in sugarcane.

  11. Analysis of chorismate mutase catalysis by QM/MM modelling of enzyme-catalysed and uncatalysed reactions.

    PubMed

    Claeyssens, Frederik; Ranaghan, Kara E; Lawan, Narin; Macrae, Stephen J; Manby, Frederick R; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2011-03-07

    Chorismate mutase is at the centre of current controversy about fundamental features of biological catalysts. Some recent studies have proposed that catalysis in this enzyme does not involve transition state (TS) stabilization but instead is due largely to the formation of a reactive conformation of the substrate. To understand the origins of catalysis, it is necessary to compare equivalent reactions in different environments. The pericyclic conversion of chorismate to prephenate catalysed by chorismate mutase also occurs (much more slowly) in aqueous solution. In this study we analyse the origins of catalysis by comparison of multiple quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) reaction pathways at a reliable, well tested level of theory (B3LYP/6-31G(d)/CHARMM27) for the reaction (i) in Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM) and (ii) in aqueous solvent. The average calculated reaction (potential energy) barriers are 11.3 kcal mol(-1) in the enzyme and 17.4 kcal mol(-1) in water, both of which are in good agreement with experiment. Comparison of the two sets of reaction pathways shows that the reaction follows a slightly different reaction pathway in the enzyme than in it does in solution, because of a destabilization, or strain, of the substrate in the enzyme. The substrate strain energy within the enzyme remains constant throughout the reaction. There is no unique reactive conformation of the substrate common to both environments, and the transition state structures are also different in the enzyme and in water. Analysis of the barrier heights in each environment shows a clear correlation between TS stabilization and the barrier height. The average differential TS stabilization is 7.3 kcal mol(-1) in the enzyme. This is significantly higher than the small amount of TS stabilization in water (on average only 1.0 kcal mol(-1) relative to the substrate). The TS is stabilized mainly by electrostatic interactions with active site residues in the enzyme, with Arg

  12. Novel alkynyl substituted 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one derivatives as potential inhibitors of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjuna Rao, V; Mahesh Kumar, P; Rambabu, D; Kapavarapu, Ravikumar; Shobha Rani, S; Misra, Parimal; Pal, Manojit

    2013-12-01

    A series of novel alkynyl substituted 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (DHPM) derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated in vitro as potential inhibitors of chorismate mutase (CM). All these compounds were prepared via a multi-component reaction (MCR) involving sequential I2-mediated Biginelli reaction followed by Cu-free Sonogashira coupling. Some of them showed promising inhibitory activities when tested at 30μM. One compound showed dose dependent inhibition of CM with IC50 value of 14.76±0.54μM indicating o-alkynylphenyl substituted DHPM as a new scaffold for the discovery of promising inhibitors of CM.

  13. Toward Accurate Modelling of Enzymatic Reactions: All Electron Quantum Chemical Analysis combined with QM/MM Calculation of Chorismate Mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-01

    To further understand the catalytic role of the protein environment in the enzymatic process, the author has analyzed the reaction mechanism of the Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM). By introducing a new computational strategy that combines all-electron QM calculations with ab initio QM/MM modelings, it was possible to simulate the molecular interactions between the substrate and the protein environment. The electrostatic nature of the transition state stabilization was characterized by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital technique for the entire enzyme.

  14. Toward Accurate Modelling of Enzymatic Reactions: All Electron Quantum Chemical Analysis combined with QM/MM Calculation of Chorismate Mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-17

    To further understand the catalytic role of the protein environment in the enzymatic process, the author has analyzed the reaction mechanism of the Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM). By introducing a new computational strategy that combines all-electron QM calculations with ab initio QM/MM modelings, it was possible to simulate the molecular interactions between the substrate and the protein environment. The electrostatic nature of the transition state stabilization was characterized by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital technique for the entire enzyme.

  15. The importance of chorismate mutase in the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma parareesei.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Esclaudys; Rubio, M Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Bettiol, Wagner; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma exert direct biocontrol activity against soil-borne plant pathogens due to their ability to compete for nutrients and to inhibit or kill their targets through the production of antibiotics and/or hydrolytic enzymes. In addition to these abilities, Trichoderma spp. have beneficial effects for plants, including the stimulation of defenses and the promotion of growth. Here we study the role in biocontrol of the T. parareesei Tparo7 gene, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), a shikimate pathway branch point leading to the production of aromatic amino acids, which are not only essential components of protein synthesis but also the precursors of a wide range of secondary metabolites. We isolated T. parareesei transformants with the Tparo7 gene silenced. Compared with the wild-type, decreased levels of Tparo7 expression in the silenced transformants were accompanied by reduced CM activity, lower growth rates on different culture media, and reduced mycoparasitic behavior against the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea in dual cultures. By contrast, higher amounts of the aromatic metabolites tyrosol, 2-phenylethanol and salicylic acid were detected in supernatants from the silenced transformants, which were able to inhibit the growth of F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. In in vitro plant assays, Tparo7-silenced transformants also showed a reduced capacity to colonize tomato roots. The effect of Tparo7-silencing on tomato plant responses was examined in greenhouse assays. The growth of plants colonized by the silenced transformants was reduced and the plants exhibited an increased susceptibility to B. cinerea in comparison with the responses observed for control plants. In addition, the plants turned yellowish and were defective in jasmonic acid- and ethylene-regulated signaling pathways which was seen by expression analysis of lipoxygenase 1 (LOX1), ethylene-insensitive protein 2 (EIN2) and pathogenesis

  16. The importance of chorismate mutase in the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma parareesei

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Esclaudys; Rubio, M. Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E.; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Bettiol, Wagner; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma exert direct biocontrol activity against soil-borne plant pathogens due to their ability to compete for nutrients and to inhibit or kill their targets through the production of antibiotics and/or hydrolytic enzymes. In addition to these abilities, Trichoderma spp. have beneficial effects for plants, including the stimulation of defenses and the promotion of growth. Here we study the role in biocontrol of the T. parareesei Tparo7 gene, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), a shikimate pathway branch point leading to the production of aromatic amino acids, which are not only essential components of protein synthesis but also the precursors of a wide range of secondary metabolites. We isolated T. parareesei transformants with the Tparo7 gene silenced. Compared with the wild-type, decreased levels of Tparo7 expression in the silenced transformants were accompanied by reduced CM activity, lower growth rates on different culture media, and reduced mycoparasitic behavior against the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea in dual cultures. By contrast, higher amounts of the aromatic metabolites tyrosol, 2-phenylethanol and salicylic acid were detected in supernatants from the silenced transformants, which were able to inhibit the growth of F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. In in vitro plant assays, Tparo7-silenced transformants also showed a reduced capacity to colonize tomato roots. The effect of Tparo7-silencing on tomato plant responses was examined in greenhouse assays. The growth of plants colonized by the silenced transformants was reduced and the plants exhibited an increased susceptibility to B. cinerea in comparison with the responses observed for control plants. In addition, the plants turned yellowish and were defective in jasmonic acid- and ethylene-regulated signaling pathways which was seen by expression analysis of lipoxygenase 1 (LOX1), ethylene-insensitive protein 2 (EIN2) and pathogenesis

  17. Characterization of multiple SPS knockout mutants reveals redundant functions of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase isoforms in plant viability, and strongly indicates that enhanced respiration and accelerated starch turnover can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bahaji, Abdellatif; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Muñoz, Francisco José; Romero, Jose M; Ruiz, María Teresa; Baslam, Marouane; Almagro, Goizeder; Sesma, María Teresa; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-09-01

    We characterized multiple knock-out mutants of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB and SPSC) isoforms. Despite their reduced SPS activity, spsa1/spsa2, spsa1/spsb, spsa2/spsb, spsa2/spsc, spsb/spsc, spsa1/spsa2/spsb and spsa2/spsb/spsc mutants displayed wild type (WT) vegetative and reproductive morphology, and showed WT photosynthetic capacity and respiration. In contrast, growth of rosettes, flowers and siliques of the spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc mutants was reduced compared with WT plants. Furthermore, these plants displayed a high dark respiration phenotype. spsa1/spsb/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsb/spsc seeds poorly germinated and produced aberrant and sterile plants. Leaves of all viable sps mutants, except spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc, accumulated WT levels of nonstructural carbohydrates. spsa1/spsc leaves possessed high levels of metabolic intermediates and activities of enzymes of the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways, and accumulated high levels of metabolic intermediates of the nocturnal starch-to-sucrose conversion process, even under continuous light conditions. Results presented in this work show that SPS is essential for plant viability, reveal redundant functions of the four SPS isoforms in processes that are important for plant growth and nonstructural carbohydrate metabolism, and strongly indicate that accelerated starch turnover and enhanced respiration can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis in spsa1/spsc leaves.

  18. BetaQ114N and betaT110V Mutations Reveal a Critically Important Role of the Substrate alpha-Carboxylte Site in the Reaction Specificity of Tryptophan Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenstein,L.; Domratcheva, T.; Niks, D.; Ngo, H.; Seidel, R.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2007-01-01

    constraints that prevent this reaction in the wild-type enzyme. This study reveals a new layer of structure-function interactions essential for reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase.

  19. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae XKK.12 contains an AroQgamma chorismate mutase that is involved in rice virulence.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Giuliano; Devescovi, Giulia; Bigirimana, Joseph; Venturi, Vittorio

    2010-03-01

    Chorismate mutase (CM) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids. There are two classes of CMs, AroQ and AroH, and several pathogenic bacteria have been reported to possess a subgroup of CMs designated AroQ(gamma). These CMs are usually exported to the periplasm or outside the cell; in a few cases, they have been reported to be involved in virulence and their precise role is currently unknown. Here, we report that the important rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae XKK.12 produces an AroQ(gamma) CM which we have purified and characterized from spent supernatants. This enzyme is synthesized in planta and X. oryzae pv. oryzae knock-out mutants are hypervirulent to rice. The role of this enzyme in X. oryzae pv. oryzae rice virulence is discussed.

  20. Expression of a bacterial bi-functional chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase modulates primary and secondary metabolism associated with aromatic amino acids in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tzin, Vered; Malitsky, Sergey; Aharoni, Asaph; Galili, Gad

    2009-10-01

    Plants can synthesize the aromatic amino acid Phe via arogenate, but it is still not known whether they also use an alternative route for Phe biosynthesis via phenylpyruvate, like many micro-organisms. To examine this possibility, we expressed a bacterial bi-functional PheA (chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana that converts chorismate via prephenate into phenylpyruvate. The PheA-expressing plants showed a large increase in the level of Phe, implying that they can convert phenylpyruvate into Phe. In addition, PheA expression rendered the plants more sensitive than wild-type plants to the Trp biosynthesis inhibitor 5-methyl-Trp, implying that Phe biosynthesis competes with Trp biosynthesis from their common precursor chorismate. Surprisingly, GC-MS, LC-MS and microarray analyses showed that this increase in Phe accumulation only had a very minor effect on the levels of other primary metabolites as well as on the transcriptome profile, implying little regulatory cross-interaction between the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis network and the bulk of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and primary metabolism. However, the levels of a number of secondary metabolites derived from all three aromatic amino acids (Phe, Trp and Tyr) were altered in the PheA plants, implying regulatory cross-interactions between the flux of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis from chorismate and their further metabolism into various secondary metabolites. Taken together, our results provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and their interaction with central primary metabolism, as well as the regulatory interface between primary and secondary metabolism.

  1. Temperature dependence of the structure of the substrate and active site of the Thermus thermophilus chorismate mutase E x S complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Bruice, Thomas C

    2006-07-18

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Thermus thermophilus chorismate mutase substrate complex (TtCM x S) have been carried out at 298 K, 333 K, and the temperature of optimum activity: 343 K. The enzyme exists as trimeric subunits with active sites shared between two neighboring subunits. Two features distinguish intersubunit linkages of the thermophilic and mesophilic enzyme Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase substrate complex (BsCM x S): (i) electrostatic interactions by intersubunit ion pairs (Arg3-Glu40*/41, Arg76-Glu51* and Arg69*-Asp101, residues labeled with an asterisk are from the neighboring subunit) in the TtCM x S are not present in the structure of the BsCM x S; and (ii) replacement of polar residues with short and nonpolar residues in the interstices of the TtCM x S tighten the intersubunit hydrophobic interactions compared to BsCM x S. Concerning the active site, electrostatic interactions of the critically placed Arg6 and Arg63* with the two carboxylates of chorismate place the latter in a reactive conformation to spontaneously undergo a Claisen rearrangement. The optimum geometry at the active site has the CZ atoms of the two arginines 11 A apart. With a decrease in temperature, Arg63* moves toward Arg6 and the average conformation structure of chorismate moves further away from the reactive ground state conformation. This movement is due to the decrease in distance separating the electrostatic (in the main) and hydrophobic interacting pairs holding the two subunits together.

  2. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  3. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the last step of a catalytic cycle: product release from the active site of the enzyme chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choutko, Alexandra; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-11-01

    The protein chorismate mutase MtCM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes one of the few pericyclic reactions known in biology: the transformation of chorismate to prephenate. Chorismate mutases have been widely studied experimentally and computationally to elucidate the transition state of the enzyme catalyzed reaction and the origin of the high catalytic rate. However, studies about substrate entry and product exit to and from the highly occluded active site of the enzyme have to our knowledge not been performed on this enzyme. Crystallographic data suggest a possible substrate entry gate, that involves a slight opening of the enzyme for the substrate to access the active site. Using multiple molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the natural dynamic process of the product exiting from the binding pocket of MtCM. We identify a dominant exit pathway, which is in agreement with the gate proposed from the available crystallographic data. Helices H2 and H4 move apart from each other which enables the product to exit from the active site. Interestingly, in almost all exit trajectories, two residues arginine 72 and arginine 134, which participate in the burying of the active site, are accompanying the product on its exit journey from the catalytic site.

  5. SIRT3 Deacetylates Ceramide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Novgorodov, Sergei A.; Riley, Christopher L.; Keffler, Jarryd A.; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Lombard, David B.; Gudz, Tatyana I.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports the role of mitochondrial ceramide accumulation as a cause of mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after stroke. Herein, we report that SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis via deacetylation of ceramide synthase (CerS) 1, 2, and 6. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CerS1, CerS2, and CerS6, but not CerS4, are associated with SIRT3 in cerebral mitochondria. Furthermore, CerS1, -2, and -6 are hyperacetylated in the mitochondria of SIRT3-null mice, and SIRT3 directly deacetylates the ceramide synthases in a NAD+-dependent manner that increases enzyme activity. Investigation of the SIRT3 role in mitochondrial response to brain ischemia/reperfusion (IR) showed that SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ceramide synthases increased enzyme activity and ceramide accumulation after IR. Functional studies demonstrated that absence of SIRT3 rescued the IR-induced blockade of the electron transport chain at the level of complex III, attenuated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, and decreased reactive oxygen species generation and protein carbonyls in mitochondria. Importantly, Sirt3 gene ablation reduced the brain injury after IR. These data support the hypothesis that IR triggers SIRT3-dependent deacetylation of ceramide synthases and the elevation of ceramide, which could inhibit complex III, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and brain injury. The results of these studies highlight a novel mechanism of SIRT3 involvement in modulating mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis and suggest an important role of SIRT3 in mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after experimental stroke. PMID:26620563

  6. Transition state stabilization and substrate strain in enzyme catalysis: ab initio QM/MM modelling of the chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ranaghan, Kara E; Ridder, Lars; Szefczyk, Borys; Sokalski, W Andrzej; Hermann, Johannes C; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2004-04-07

    To investigate fundamental features of enzyme catalysis, there is a need for high-level calculations capable of modelling crucial, unstable species such as transition states as they are formed within enzymes. We have modelled an important model enzyme reaction, the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in chorismate mutase, by combined ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. The best estimates of the potential energy barrier in the enzyme are 7.4-11.0 kcal mol(-1)(MP2/6-31+G(d)//6-31G(d)/CHARMM22) and 12.7-16.1 kcal mol(-1)(B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)//6-31G(d)/CHARMM22), comparable to the experimental estimate of Delta H(++)= 12.7 +/- 0.4 kcal mol(-1). The results provide unequivocal evidence of transition state (TS) stabilization by the enzyme, with contributions from residues Arg90, Arg7, and Arg63. Glu78 stabilizes the prephenate product (relative to substrate), and can also stabilize the TS. Examination of the same pathway in solution (with a variety of continuum models), at the same ab initio levels, allows comparison of the catalyzed and uncatalyzed reactions. Calculated barriers in solution are 28.0 kcal mol(-1)(MP2/6-31+G(d)/PCM) and 24.6 kcal mol(-1)(B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)/PCM), comparable to the experimental finding of Delta G(++)= 25.4 kcal mol(-1) and consistent with the experimentally-deduced 10(6)-fold rate acceleration by the enzyme. The substrate is found to be significantly distorted in the enzyme, adopting a structure closer to the transition state, although the degree of compression is less than predicted by lower-level calculations. This apparent substrate strain, or compression, is potentially also catalytically relevant. Solution calculations, however, suggest that the catalytic contribution of this compression may be relatively small. Consideration of the same reaction pathway in solution and in the enzyme, involving reaction from a 'near-attack conformer' of the substrate, indicates that adoption of this

  7. All electron quantum chemical calculation of the entire enzyme system confirms a collective catalytic device in the chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2006-01-26

    To elucidate the catalytic power of enzymes, we analyzed the reaction profile of Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM) by all electron quantum chemical calculations using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ab initio-based quantum chemical calculations of the entire enzyme system, where we provide a detailed analysis of the catalytic factors that accomplish transition-state stabilization (TSS). FMO calculations deliver an ab initio-level estimate of the intermolecular interaction between the substrate and the amino acid residues of the enzyme. To clarify the catalytic role of Arg90, we calculated the reaction profile of the wild-type BsCM as well as Lys90 and Cit90 mutant BsCMs. Structural refinement and the reaction path determination were performed at the ab initio QM/MM level, and FMO calculations were applied to the QM/MM refined structures. Comparison between three types of reactions established two collective catalytic factors in the BsCM reaction: (1) the hydrogen bonds connecting the Glu78-Arg90-substrate cooperatively control the stability of TS relative to the ES complex and (2) the positive charge on Arg90 polarizes the substrate in the TS region to gain more electrostatic stabilization.

  8. The β1 domain of protein G can replace the chorismate mutase domain of the T-protein.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Joel; Flores, Humberto; Saab-Rincón, Gloria

    2012-02-17

    T-protein is composed of chorismate mutase (AroQ(T)) fused to the N-terminus of prephenate dehydrogenase (TyrA). Here, we report the replacement of AroQ(T) with the β1-domain of protein G (Gβ1). The TyrA domain shows a strong dehydrogenase activity within the context of this fusion, and our data indicate that Gβ1-TyrA folds into a dimeric conformation. Amino acid substitutions in the Gβ1 domain of Gβ1-TyrA identified residues involved in stabilizing the TyrA dimeric conformation. Gβ1 substitutions in the N-terminal β-hairpin eliminated Gβ1-TyrA expression, whereas Gβ1-TyrA tolerated Gβ1 substitutions in the C-terminal β-hairpin and in the α-helix. All of the characterized variants folded into a dimeric conformation. The importance of the β2-strand in forming a Gβ1 homo-dimerization interface explains the relevance of the first-β-hairpin in stabilizing the dimeric TyrA protein.

  9. The proficiency of a thermophilic chorismate mutase enzyme is solely through an entropic advantage in the enzyme reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Bruice, Thomas C

    2005-12-20

    A study of the Thermus thermophilus chorismate mutase (TtCM) is described by using quantum mechanics (self-consistent-charge density-functional tight binding)/molecular mechanics, umbrella sampling, and the weighted histogram analysis method. The computed free energies of activation for the reactions in water and TtCM are comparable to the experimental values. The free energies for formation of near attack conformer have been determined to be 8.06 and 0.05 kcal/mol in water and TtCM, respectively. The near attack conformer stabilization contributes approximately 90% to the proficiency of the enzymatic reaction compared with the reaction in water. The transition state (TS) structures and partial atom charges are much the same in the enzymatic and water reactions. The difference in the electrostatic interactions of Arg-89 with O13 in the enzyme-substrate complex and enzyme-TS complex provides the latter with but 0.55 kcal/mol of 1.92 kcal/mol total TS stabilization. Differences in electrostatic interactions between components at the active site in the enzyme-substrate complex and enzyme-TS complex are barely significant, such that TS stabilization is of minor importance and the enzymatic catalysis is through an entropic advantage.

  10. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  11. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  12. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  13. Differential transition-state stabilization in enzyme catalysis: quantum chemical analysis of interactions in the chorismate mutase reaction and prediction of the optimal catalytic field.

    PubMed

    Szefczyk, Borys; Mulholland, Adrian J; Ranaghan, Kara E; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2004-12-15

    Chorismate mutase is a key model system in the development of theories of enzyme catalysis. To analyze the physical nature of catalytic interactions within the enzyme active site and to estimate the stabilization of the transition state (TS) relative to the substrate (differential transition state stabilization, DTSS), we have carried out nonempirical variation-perturbation analysis of the electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and correlation interactions of the enzyme-bound substrate and transition-state structures derived from ab initio QM/MM modeling of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase. Significant TS stabilization by approximately -23 kcal/mol [MP2/6-31G(d)] relative to the bound substrate is in agreement with that of previous QM/MM modeling and contrasts with suggestions that catalysis by this enzyme arises purely from conformational selection effects. The most important contributions to DTSS come from the residues, Arg90, Arg7, Glu78, a crystallographic water molecule, Arg116, and Arg63, and are dominated by electrostatic effects. Analysis of the differential electrostatic potential of the TS and substrate allows calculation of the catalytic field, predicting the optimal location of charged groups to achieve maximal DTSS. Comparison with the active site of the enzyme from those of several species shows that the positions of charged active site residues correspond closely to the optimal catalytic field, showing that the enzyme has evolved specifically to stabilize the TS relative to the substrate.

  14. A comparative study of claisen and cope rearrangements catalyzed by chorismate mutase. An insight into enzymatic efficiency: transition state stabilization or substrate preorganization?

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicente; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2004-01-14

    In this work we present a detailed analysis of the activation free energies and averaged interactions for the Claisen and Cope rearrangements of chorismate and carbachorismate catalyzed by Bacillus subtilischorismate mutase (BsCM) using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation methods. In gas phase, both reactions are described as concerted processes, with the activation free energy for carbachorismate being about 10-15 kcal mol(-)(1) larger than for chorismate, at the AM1 and B3LYP/6-31G levels. Aqueous solution and BsCM active site environments reduce the free energy barriers for both reactions, due to the fact that in these media the two carboxylate groups can be approached more easily than in the gas phase. The enzyme specifically reduces the activation free energy of the Claisen rearrangement about 3 kcal mol(-)(1) more than that for the Cope reaction. This result is due to a larger transition state stabilization associated to the formation of a hydrogen bond between Arg90 and the ether oxygen. When this oxygen atom is changed by a methylene group, the interaction is lost and Arg90 moves inside the active site establishing stronger interactions with one of the carboxylate groups. This fact yields a more intense rearrangement of the substrate structure. Comparing two reactions in the same enzyme, we have been able to obtain conclusions about the relative magnitude of the substrate preorganization and transition state stabilization effects. Transition state stabilization seems to be the dominant effect in this case.

  15. Cloning, expression, and characterization of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) synthase from Agaricus bisporus 02, a thermotolerant mushroom strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li-Xin; Shen, Yue-Mao; Song, Si-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The pabS gene of Agaricus bisporus 02 encoding a putative PABA synthase was cloned, and then the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 under the control of the T7 promoter. The enzyme with an N-terminal GST tag or His tag, designated GST-AbADCS or His-AbADCS, was purified with glutathione Sepharose 4B or Ni Sepharose 6 Fast Flow. The enzyme was an aminodeoxychorismate synthase, and it was necessary to add with an aminodeoxychorismate lyase for synthesizing PABA. AbADCS has maximum activity at a temperature of approximately 25°C and pH 8.0. Magnesium or manganese ions were necessary for the enzymatic activity. The Michaelis-Menten constant for chorismate was 0.12 mM, and 2.55 mM for glutamine. H2O2 did distinct damage on the activity of the enzyme, which could be slightly recovered by Hsp20. Sulfydryl reagents could remarkably promote its activity, suggesting that cysteine residues are essential for catalytic function.

  16. A comparative biochemical and structural analysis of the intracellular chorismate mutase (Rv0948c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(v) and the secreted chorismate mutase (y2828) from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Sathyavelu K; Nelson, Bryant C; Robinson, Howard; Reddy, Prasad T; Ladner, Jane E

    2008-10-01

    The Rv0948c gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(v) encodes a 90 amino acid protein as the natural gene product with chorismate mutase (CM) activity. The protein, 90-MtCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k(cat) of 5.5+/-0.2s(-1) and a K(m) of 1500+/-100microm at 37 degrees C and pH7.5. The 2.0A X-ray structure shows that 90-MtCM is an all alpha-helical homodimer (Protein Data Bank ID: 2QBV) with the topology of Escherichia coli CM (EcCM), and that both protomers contribute to each catalytic site. Superimposition onto the structure of EcCM and the sequence alignment shows that the C-terminus helix3 is shortened. The absence of two residues in the active site of 90-MtCM corresponding to Ser84 and Gln88 of EcCM appears to be one reason for the low k(cat). Hence, 90-MtCM belongs to a subfamily of alpha-helical AroQ CMs termed AroQ(delta.) The CM gene (y2828) from Yersinia pestis encodes a 186 amino acid protein with an N-terminal signal peptide that directs the protein to the periplasm. The mature protein, *YpCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k(cat) of 70+/-5s(-1) and K(m) of 500+/-50microm at 37 degrees C and pH7.5. The 2.1A X-ray structure shows that *YpCM is an all alpha-helical protein, and functions as a homodimer, and that each protomer has an independent catalytic unit (Protein Data Bank ID: 2GBB). *YpCM belongs to the AroQ(gamma) class of CMs, and is similar to the secreted CM (Rv1885c, *MtCM) from M.tuberculosis.

  17. A comparative biochemical and structural analysis of the intracellular chorismate mutase (Rv0948c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and the secreted chorismate mutase (y2828) from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Robinson, H.; Reddy, S. K.; Nelson, B. C.; Reddy, P. T.; Ladner, J. E.

    2008-10-01

    The Rv0948c gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H{sub 37}R{sub v} encodes a 90 amino acid protein as the natural gene product with chorismate mutase (CM) activity. The protein, 90-MtCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 5.5 {+-} 0.2 s{sup -1} and a K{sub m} of 1500 {+-} 100 {mu}m at 37 C and pH 7.5. The 2.0 {angstrom} X-ray structure shows that 90-MtCM is an all {alpha}-helical homodimer (Protein Data Bank ID: 2QBV) with the topology of Escherichia coli CM (EcCM), and that both protomers contribute to each catalytic site. Superimposition onto the structure of EcCM and the sequence alignment shows that the C-terminus helix 3 is shortened. The absence of two residues in the active site of 90-MtCM corresponding to Ser84 and Gln88 of EcCM appears to be one reason for the low k{sub cat}. Hence, 90-MtCM belongs to a subfamily of {alpha}-helical AroQ CMs termed AroQ{sub {delta}}. The CM gene (y2828) from Yersinia pestis encodes a 186 amino acid protein with an N-terminal signal peptide that directs the protein to the periplasm. The mature protein, *YpCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 70 {+-} 5 s{sup -1} and K{sub m} of 500 {+-} 50 {mu}m at 37 C and pH 7.5. The 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray structure shows that *YpCM is an all {alpha}-helical protein, and functions as a homodimer, and that each protomer has an independent catalytic unit (Protein Data Bank ID: 2GBB). *YpCM belongs to the AroQ{sub {gamma}} class of CMs, and is similar to the secreted CM (Rv1885c, *MtCM) from M. tuberculosis.

  18. A Comparative Biochemical and Structural Analysis of the Intracellular chorismate mutase (Rv0948c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(v) and the Secreted chorismate mutase (y2828) from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    S Kim; S Reddy; B Nelson; H Robinson; P Reddy; J Ladner

    2011-12-31

    The Rv0948c gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H{sub 37}R{sub v} encodes a 90 amino acid protein as the natural gene product with chorismate mutase (CM) activity. The protein, 90-MtCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 5.5 {+-} 0.2 s{sup -1} and a K{sub m} of 1500 {+-} 100 {micro}m at 37 C and pH 7.5. The 2.0 {angstrom} X-ray structure shows that 90-MtCM is an all {alpha}-helical homodimer (Protein Data Bank ID: 2QBV) with the topology of Escherichia coli CM (EcCM), and that both protomers contribute to each catalytic site. Superimposition onto the structure of EcCM and the sequence alignment shows that the C-terminus helix 3 is shortened. The absence of two residues in the active site of 90-MtCM corresponding to Ser84 and Gln88 of EcCM appears to be one reason for the low k{sub cat}. Hence, 90-MtCM belongs to a subfamily of {alpha}-helical AroQ CMs termed AroQ{delta}. The CM gene (y2828) from Yersinia pestis encodes a 186 amino acid protein with an N-terminal signal peptide that directs the protein to the periplasm. The mature protein, *YpCM, exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 70 {+-} 5 s{sup -1} and Km of 500 {+-} 50 {micro}m at 37 C and pH 7.5. The 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray structure shows that *YpCM is an all {alpha}-helical protein, and functions as a homodimer, and that each protomer has an independent catalytic unit (Protein Data Bank ID: 2GBB). *YpCM belongs to the AroQ{gamma} class of CMs, and is similar to the secreted CM (Rv1885c, *MtCM) from M. tuberculosis.

  19. Effects of point mutation on enzymatic activity: correlation between protein electronic structure and motion in chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2010-05-26

    Assignment of particular roles to catalytic residues is an important requirement in clearly understanding enzyme functions. Therefore, predicting the catalytic activities of mutant variants is a fundamental challenge in computational biochemistry. Although site-directed mutagenesis is widely used for studying enzymatic activities and other important classes of protein function, interpreting mutation experiments is usually difficult mainly due to side effects induced by point mutations. Because steric and, in many cases, electrostatic effects may affect the local, fine geometries conserved in wild-type proteins that are usually believed to be thermodynamically stable, simply reducing a loss in catalytic activity into clear elements is difficult. To address these important but difficult issues, we performed a systematic ab initio QM/MM computational analysis combined with MD-FEP simulations and all-electron QM calculations for the entire protein matrix. We selected chorismate mutase, one of the simplest and well-known enzymes, to discuss the details of mutational effects on the enzymatic reaction process. On the basis of the reliable free energy profiles of the wild-type enzyme and several mutant variants, we analyzed the effects of point mutations relative to electronic structure and protein dynamics. In general, changes in geometrical parameters introduced by a mutation were usually limited to the local mutational site. However, this local structural modification could affect the global protein dynamics through correlated motions of particular amino acid residues even far from the mutation site. Even for mutant reactions with low catalytic activity, transition state stabilization was observed as a result of conformational modifications and reorganization around the active site. As for the electrostatic effect created by the polar protein environment, the wild-type enzyme was most effectively designed to stabilize the transition state of the reactive substrate, and

  20. Mammalian ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michal; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-05-01

    In mammals, ceramide, a key intermediate in sphingolipid metabolism and an important signaling molecule, is synthesized by a family of six ceramide synthases (CerS), each of which synthesizes ceramides with distinct acyl chain lengths. There are a number of common biochemical features between the CerS, such as their catalytic mechanism, and their structure and intracellular localization. Different CerS also display remarkable differences in their biological properties, with each of them playing distinct roles in processes as diverse as cancer and tumor suppression, in the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, in apoptosis, and in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  2. Subcellular localization of the homocitrate synthase in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, O; Casqueiro, J; Steidl, S; Gutiérrez, S; Brakhage, A; Martín, J F

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports regarding the cellular localization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and filamentous fungi of homocitrate synthase, the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway. The homocitrate synthase (HS) gene (lys1) of Penicillium chrysogenum was disrupted in three transformants (HS(-)) of the Wis 54-1255 pyrG strain. The three mutants named HS1(-), HS2(-) and HS3(-) all lacked homocitrate synthase activity and showed lysine auxotrophy, indicating that there is a single gene for homocitrate synthase in P. chrysogenum. The lys1 ORF was fused in frame to the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Homocitrate synthase-deficient mutants transformed with a plasmid containing the lys1-GFP fusion recovered prototrophy and showed similar levels of homocitrate synthase activity to the parental strain Wis 54-1255, indicating that the hybrid protein retains the biological function of wild-type homocitrate synthase. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the HS-GFP fusion protein is maintained intact and does not release the GFP moiety. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of the transformants showed that homocitrate synthase was mainly located in the cytoplasm in P. chrysogenum; in S. cerevisiae the enzyme is targeted to the nucleus. The control nuclear protein StuA was properly targeted to the nucleus when the StuA (targeting domain)-GFP hybrid protein was expressed in P. chrysogenum. The difference in localization of homocitrate synthase between P. chrysogenum and S. cerevisiae suggests that this protein may play a regulatory function, in addition to its catalytic function, in S. cerevisiae but not in P. chrysogenum.

  3. Structure of a modular polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Whicher, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Douglas A.; Hale, Wendi A.; Chemler, Joseph A.; Congdon, Grady R.; Narayan, Alison R.; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyketide natural products constitute a broad class of compounds with diverse structural features and biological activities. Their biosynthetic machinery, represented by type I polyketide synthases, has an architecture in which successive modules catalyze two-carbon linear extensions and keto group processing reactions on intermediates covalently tethered to carrier domains. We employed electron cryo-microscopy to visualize a full-length module and determine sub-nanometer resolution 3D reconstructions that revealed an unexpectedly different architecture compared to the homologous dimeric mammalian fatty acid synthase. A single reaction chamber provides access to all catalytic sites for the intra-module carrier domain. In contrast, the carrier from the preceding module uses a separate entrance outside the reaction chamber to deliver the upstream polyketide intermediate for subsequent extension and modification. This study reveals for the first time the structural basis for both intra-module and inter-module substrate transfer in polyketide synthases, and establishes a new model for molecular dissection of these multifunctional enzyme systems. PMID:24965652

  4. Cu-mediated N-arylation of 1,2,3-triazin-4-ones: synthesis of fused triazinone derivatives as potential inhibitors of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Shiva Kumar, K; Adepu, Raju; Sandra, Sandhya; Rambabu, D; Rama Krishna, G; Malla Reddy, C; Misra, Parimal; Pal, Manojit

    2012-01-15

    A rapid and direct access to N-aryl substituted fused triazinone derivatives has been accomplished via N-arylation of 1,2,3-triazin-4-one ring involving a Cu-mediated coupling between triazinone derivatives and aryl boronic acids. A combination of Cu(OAc)(2)-Et(3)N in 1,2-dichloroethane was found to be effective and various fused triazinone derivatives have been prepared by using this methodology. Molecular structure of a representative compound was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The scope and limitations of this reaction is discussed. Some of the compounds synthesized were tested for chorismate mutase inhibitory properties in vitro. The in vitro dose response study of an active compound is presented.

  5. Investigation of ligand binding and protein dynamics in Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase by transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Hilvert, Donald; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2005-05-10

    The structural and dynamical consequences of ligand binding to a monofunctional chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis have been investigated by solution NMR spectroscopy. TROSY methods were employed to assign 98% of the backbone (1)H(N), (1)H(alpha), (15)N, (13)C', and (13)C(alpha) resonances as well as 86% of the side chain (13)C resonances of the 44 kDa trimeric enzyme at 20 degrees C. This information was used to map chemical shift perturbations and changes in intramolecular mobility caused by binding of prephenate or a transition state analogue to the X-ray structure. Model-free interpretation of backbone dynamics for the free enzyme and its complexes based on (15)N relaxation data measured at 600 and 900 MHz showed significant structural consolidation of the protein in the presence of a bound ligand. In agreement with earlier structural and biochemical studies, substantial ordering of 10 otherwise highly flexible residues at the C-terminus is particularly notable. The observed changes suggest direct contact between this protein segment and the bound ligand, providing support for the proposal that the C-terminus can serve as a lid for the active site, limiting diffusion into and out of the pocket and possibly imposing conformational control over substrate once bound. Other regions of the protein that experience substantial ligand-induced changes also border the active site or lie along the subunit interfaces, indicating that the enzyme adapts dynamically to ligands by a sort of induced fit mechanism. It is believed that the mutase-catalyzed chorismate-to-prephenate rearrangement is partially encounter controlled, and backbone motions on the millisecond time scale, as seen here, may contribute to the reaction barrier.

  6. Mechanisms of acetohydroxyacid synthases.

    PubMed

    Chipman, David M; Duggleby, Ronald G; Tittmann, Kai

    2005-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthases are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent biosynthetic enzymes found in all autotrophic organisms. Over the past 4-5 years, their mechanisms have been clarified and illuminated by protein crystallography, engineered mutagenesis and detailed single-step kinetic analysis. Pairs of catalytic subunits form an intimate dimer containing two active sites, each of which lies across a dimer interface and involves both monomers. The ThDP adducts of pyruvate, acetaldehyde and the product acetohydroxyacids can be detected quantitatively after rapid quenching. Determination of the distribution of intermediates by NMR then makes it possible to calculate individual forward unimolecular rate constants. The enzyme is the target of several herbicides and structures of inhibitor-enzyme complexes explain the herbicide-enzyme interaction.

  7. Molecular aspects of beta-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) catalysis.

    PubMed

    von Wettstein-Knowles, P; Olsen, J; Arnvig Mcguire, K; Larsen, S

    2000-12-01

    Crystal structure data for Escherichia coli beta-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) I with C(10) and C(12) fatty acid substrates bound in conjunction with results from mutagenizing residues in the active site leads to a model for catalysis. Differences from and similarities to the other Claisen enzymes carrying out decarboxylations reveal two catalytic mechanisms, one for KAS I and KAS II, the other for KAS III and chalcone synthase. A comparison of the structures of KAS I and KAS II does not reveal the basis of chain-length specificity. The structures of the Arabidopsis thaliana KAS family are compared.

  8. Genome-wide identification of Drosophila Hb9 targets reveals a pivotal role in directing the transcriptome within eight neuronal lineages, including activation of Nitric Oxide Synthase and Fd59a/Fox-D

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Rusch, Jannette; Yeh, Raymond T.; Fujioka, Miki; Wilson, Beth A.; Zhu, Yi; Robie, Alice A.; Mistry, Hemlata; Wang, Ting; Jaynes, James B.; Skeath, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Hb9 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that acts in combination with Nkx6, Lim3, and Tail-up (Islet) to guide the stereotyped differentiation, connectivity, and function of a subset of neurons in Drosophila. The role of Hb9 in directing neuronal differentiation is well documented, but the lineage of Hb9+ neurons is only partly characterized, its regulation is poorly understood, and most of the downstream genes through which it acts remain at large. Here, we complete the lineage tracing of all embryonic Hb9+ neurons (to eight neuronal lineages) and provide evidence that hb9, lim3, and tail-up are coordinately regulated by a common set of upstream factors. Through the parallel use of micro-array gene expression profiling and the Dam-ID method, we searched for Hb9-regulated genes, uncovering transcription factors as the most over-represented class of genes regulated by Hb9 (and Nkx6) in the CNS. By a nearly ten-to-one ratio, Hb9 represses rather than activates transcription factors, highlighting transcriptional repression of other transcription factors as a core mechanism by which Hb9 governs neuronal determination. From the small set of genes activated by Hb9, we characterized the expression and function of two – fd59a/foxd, which encodes a transcription factor, and Nitric oxide synthase. Under standard lab conditions, both genes are dispensable for Drosophila development, but Nos appears to inhibit hyper-active behavior and fd59a appears to act in octopaminergic neurons to control egg-laying behavior. Together our data clarify the mechanisms through which Hb9 governs neuronal specification and differentiation and provide an initial characterization of the expression and function of Nos and fd59a in the Drosophila CNS. PMID:24512689

  9. Terpene synthases from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Judith K.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis (Cannabis sativa) plants produce and accumulate a terpene-rich resin in glandular trichomes, which are abundant on the surface of the female inflorescence. Bouquets of different monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes are important components of cannabis resin as they define some of the unique organoleptic properties and may also influence medicinal qualities of different cannabis strains and varieties. Transcriptome analysis of trichomes of the cannabis hemp variety ‘Finola’ revealed sequences of all stages of terpene biosynthesis. Nine cannabis terpene synthases (CsTPS) were identified in subfamilies TPS-a and TPS-b. Functional characterization identified mono- and sesqui-TPS, whose products collectively comprise most of the terpenes of ‘Finola’ resin, including major compounds such as β-myrcene, (E)-β-ocimene, (-)-limonene, (+)-α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, and α-humulene. Transcripts associated with terpene biosynthesis are highly expressed in trichomes compared to non-resin producing tissues. Knowledge of the CsTPS gene family may offer opportunities for selection and improvement of terpene profiles of interest in different cannabis strains and varieties. PMID:28355238

  10. Inhibitors of specific ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Hartmann, Daniela; Fuchs, Sina; Birod, Kerstin; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Schreiber, Yannick; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine; Stark, Holger

    2012-02-01

    Ceramide synthases (CerSs) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and display a group of at least six different isoenzymes (CerS1-6). Ceramides itself are bioactive molecules. Ceramides with different N-acyl side chains (C(14:0)-Cer - C(26:0)-Cer) possess distinct roles in cell signaling. Therefore, the selective inhibition of specific CerSs which are responsible for the formation of a specific ceramide holds promise for a number of new clinical treatment strategies, e.g., cancer. Here, we identified four of hitherto unknown functional inhibitors of CerSs derived from the FTY720 (Fingolimod) lead structure and showed their inhibitory effectiveness by two in vitro CerS activity assays. Additionally, we tested the substances in two cell lines (HCT-116 and HeLa) with different ceramide patterns. In summary, the in vitro activity assays revealed out that ST1058 and ST1074 preferentially inhibit CerS2 and CerS4, while ST1072 inhibits most potently CerS4 and CerS6. Importantly, ST1060 inhibits predominately CerS2. First structure-activity relationships and the potential biological impact of these compounds are discussed.

  11. Starter unit specificity directs genome mining of polyketide synthase pathways in fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Search of the protein database with the aflatoxin pathway polyketide synthase (PKS) revealed putative PKSs in the pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii that could require partnerships with a pair of fatty acid synthase (FAS) subunits for the biosynthesis of fatty acid-poly...

  12. C-N bond formation under Cu-catalysis: synthesis and in vitro evaluation of N-aryl substituted thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones against chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Adepu, Raju; Shiva Kumar, K; Sandra, Sandhya; Rambabu, D; Rama Krishna, G; Malla Reddy, C; Kandale, Ajit; Misra, Parimal; Pal, Manojit

    2012-09-01

    A series of novel N-aryl substituted thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones were designed and synthesized as potential inhibitors of chorismate mutase. Synthesis of this class of compounds was carried out by using Cu-mediated C-N bond forming reaction between thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones and aryl boronic acids. The reaction can be performed in an open flask as the conversion was found to be not sensitive to the presence of air or atmospheric moisture. A range of compounds were prepared by using this method and single crystal X-ray diffraction study was performed using a representative compound. In vitro pharmacological data of some of the compounds synthesized along with dose response studies using active molecules are presented. In silico interactions of these molecules with chorismate mutase are also presented.

  13. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  14. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  15. Phosphanilic Acid Inhibits Dihydropteroate Synthase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    dihydropteroate synthases of P. aeruginosa and E . coli were about equally susceptible to inhibition by PA. These results suggest that cells of P. aeruginosa...are more permeable to PA than cells of E . coli . Although a weak inhibitor, PA acted on dihydropteroate synthase in the same manner as the sulfonamides...with which PA is structurally related. Inhibition of E . coli by PA in a basal salts-glucose medium was prevented by p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). However

  16. Exhaustive mutagenesis of six secondary active-site residues in Escherichia coli chorismate mutase shows the importance of hydrophobic side chains and a helix N-capping position for stability and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Keeffe, Jennifer R; Kast, Peter; Mayo, Stephen L

    2007-06-12

    Secondary active-site residues in enzymes, including hydrophobic amino acids, may contribute to catalysis through critical interactions that position the reacting molecule, organize hydrogen-bonding residues, and define the electrostatic environment of the active site. To ascertain the tolerance of an important model enzyme to mutation of active-site residues that do not directly hydrogen bond with the reacting molecule, all 19 possible amino acid substitutions were investigated in six positions of the engineered chorismate mutase domain of the Escherichia coli chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase. The six secondary active-site residues were selected to clarify results of a previous test of computational enzyme design procedures. Five of the positions encode hydrophobic side chains in the wild-type enzyme, and one forms a helix N-capping interaction as well as a salt bridge with a catalytically essential residue. Each mutant was evaluated for its ability to complement an auxotrophic chorismate mutase deletion strain. Kinetic parameters and thermal stabilities were measured for variants with in vivo activity. Altogether, we find that the enzyme tolerated 34% of the 114 possible substitutions, with a few mutations leading to increases in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The results show the importance of secondary amino acid residues in determining enzymatic activity, and they point to strengths and weaknesses in current computational enzyme design procedures.

  17. Implications of binding mode and active site flexibility for inhibitor potency against the salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Gamma; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; O'Connor, Patrick D; Johnston, Jodie M; Evans, Genevieve L; Baker, Edward N; Payne, Richard J; Lott, J Shaun; Bulloch, Esther M M

    2012-06-19

    MbtI is the salicylate synthase that catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of the iron chelating compound mycobactin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We previously developed a series of aromatic inhibitors against MbtI based on the reaction intermediate for this enzyme, isochorismate. The most potent of these inhibitors had hydrophobic substituents, ranging in size from a methyl to a phenyl group, appended to the terminal alkene of the enolpyruvyl group. These compounds exhibited low micromolar inhibition constants against MbtI and were at least an order of magnitude more potent than the parental compound for the series, which carries a native enolpyruvyl group. In this study, we sought to understand how the substituted enolpyruvyl group confers greater potency, by determining cocrystal structures of MbtI with six inhibitors from the series. A switch in binding mode at the MbtI active site is observed for inhibitors carrying a substituted enolpyruvyl group, relative to the parental compound. Computational studies suggest that the change in binding mode, and higher potency, is due to the effect of the substituents on the conformational landscape of the core inhibitor structure. The crystal structures and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays indicate that substituents larger than a methyl group are accommodated in the MbtI active site through significant but localized flexibility in the peptide backbone. These findings have implications for the design of improved inhibitors of MbtI, as well as other chorismate-utilizing enzymes from this family.

  18. SbnG, a Citrate Synthase in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.; Heinrichs, David E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2014-01-01

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production. PMID:25336653

  19. Mechanistic studies on class I polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Ralstonia eutropha: class I and III synthases share a similar catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y; Yuan, W; Wodzinska, J; Park, C; Sinskey, A J; Stubbe, J

    2001-01-30

    The Class I and III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases from Ralstonia eutropha and Chromatium vinosum, respectively, catalyze the polymerization of beta-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (HBCoA) to generate PHB. These synthases have different molecular weights, subunit composition, and kinetic properties. Recent studies with the C. vinosum synthase suggested that it is structurally homologous to bacterial lipases and allowed identification of active site residues important for catalysis [Jia, Y., Kappock, T. J., Frick, T., Sinskey, A. J., and Stubbe, J. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 3927-3936]. Sequence alignments between the Class I and III synthases revealed similar residues in the R. eutropha synthase. Site-directed mutants of these residues were prepared and examined using HBCoA and a terminally saturated trimer of HBCoA (sT-CoA) as probes. These studies reveal that the R. eutropha synthase possesses an essential catalytic dyad (C319-H508) in which the C319 is involved in covalent catalysis. A conserved Asp, D480, was shown not to be required for acylation of C319 by sT-CoA and is proposed to function as a general base catalyst to activate the hydroxyl of HBCoA for ester formation. Studies of the [(3)H]sT-CoA with wild-type and mutant synthases reveal that 0.5 equiv of radiolabel is covalently bound per monomer of synthase, suggesting that a dimeric form of the enzyme is involved in elongation. These studies, in conjunction with search algorithms for secondary structure, suggest that the Class I and III synthases are mechanistically similar and structurally homologous, despite their physical and kinetic differences.

  20. ATP synthases: cellular nanomotors characterized by LILBID mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jan; Sokolova, Lucie; Preiss, Laura; Hicks, David B.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Morgner, Nina; Wittig, Ilka; Schägger, Hermann; Meier, Thomas; Brutschy, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes is still a methodological challenge due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the species and the fact that all subunits are bound non-covalently together. The present study with the novel laser induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) reports on the determination of the subunit composition of the F1Fo-ATP synthase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, that of both bovine heart and, for the first time, of human heart mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthases. Under selected buffer conditions the mass of the intact F1Fo-ATP synthase of B. pseudofirmus OF4 could be measured, allowing the analysis of complex subunit stoichiometry. The agreement with theoretical masses derived from sequence databases is very good. A comparison of the ATP synthase subunit composition of 5 different ATPases reveals differences in the complexity of eukaryotic and bacterial ATP synthases. However, whereas the overall construction of eukaryotic enzymes is more complex than the bacterial ones, functionally important subunits are conserved among all ATPases. PMID:20820587

  1. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Belkheir, Asma K; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents.

  2. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Belkheir, Asma K.; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  3. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  4. Comparison of formation of reactive conformers (NACs) for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in water and in the E. coli mutase: the efficiency of the enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun; Bruice, Thomas C

    2003-05-14

    The Claisen rearrangements of chorismate (CHOR) in water and at the active site of E. coli chorismate mutase (EcCM) have been compared. From a total of 33 ns molecular dynamics simulation of chorismate in water solvent, seven diaxial conformers I-VII were identified. Most of the time (approximately 99%), the side chain carboxylate of the chorismate is positioned away from the ring due to the electrostatic repulsion from the carboxylate in the ring. Proximity of the two carboxylates, as seen in conformer I, is a requirement for the formation of a near attack conformer (NAC) that can proceed to the transition state (TS). In the EcCM.CHOR complex, the two carboxylates of CHOR are tightly held by Arg28 of one subunit and Arg11* of the other subunit, resulting in the side chain C16 being positioned adjacent to C5 with their motions restricted by van der Waals contacts with methyl groups of Val35 and Ile81. With the definition of NAC as the C5...C16 distance < or =3.7 A and the attack angle < or =30 degrees, it was estimated from our MD trajectories that the free energy of NAC formation is approximately 8.4 kcal/mol above the total ground state in water, whereas in the enzyme it is only 0.6 kcal/mol above the average of the Michaelis complex EcCM.CHOR. The experimentally measured difference in the activation free energies of the water and enzymatic reactions (Delta Delta G(++)) is 9 kcal/mol. It follows that the efficiency of formation of NAC (7.8 kcal/mol) at the active site provides approximately 90% of the kinetic advantage of the enzymatic reaction as compared to the water reaction. Comparison of the EcCM.TSA (transition state analogue) and EcCM.NAC simulations suggests that the experimentally measured 100 fold tighter binding of TSA compared to CHOR does not originate from the difference between NAC and the TS binding affinities, but might be due to the free energy cost to bring the two carboxylates of CHOR together to interact with Arg28 and Arg11* at the active

  5. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  6. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-28

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  7. Altered expression of the caffeine synthase gene in a naturally caffeine-free mutant of Coffea arabica

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we studied the biosynthesis of caffeine by examining the expression of genes involved in this biosynthetic pathway in coffee fruits containing normal or low levels of this substance. The amplification of gene-specific transcripts during fruit development revealed that low-caffeine fruits had a lower expression of the theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase genes and also contained an extra transcript of the caffeine synthase gene. This extra transcript contained only part of exon 1 and all of exon 3. The sequence of the mutant caffeine synthase gene revealed the substitution of isoleucine for valine in the enzyme active site that probably interfered with enzymatic activity. These findings indicate that the absence of caffeine in these mutants probably resulted from a combination of transcriptional regulation and the presence of mutations in the caffeine synthase amino acid sequence. PMID:21637458

  8. Direct interaction with ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of GLU1-encoded ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Niwata, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Because it plays an essential role in nitrogen (N) assimilation and photorespiration, the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) system is widely accepted as occupying a central position in leaf N metabolism. However, the regulation of GOGAT at the post-transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we show that ACR11, an ACT (acronym for aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA) domain-containing family protein, interacts with Glu1-encoded ferredoxin (Fd)-GOGAT in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In addition, Arabidopsis acr11 mutants have lost the capability to control Fd-GOGAT levels in response to light/dark diurnal cycles, nitrogen inputs, and changes in photorespiratory activity. Considering that ACR11 has putative glutamine-binding domains, our results indicate that ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of leaf Glu1-encoded Fd-GOGAT. This regulation takes place through direct interaction of ACR11 and Fd-GOGAT, possibly in an allosteric manner. PMID:27411448

  9. Acetohydroxyacid synthases: evolution, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadi; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase, a thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme, can condense either two pyruvate molecules to form acetolactate for synthesizing L-valine and L-leucine or pyruvate with 2-ketobutyrate to form acetohydroxybutyrate for synthesizing L-isoleucine. Because the key reaction catalyzed by acetohydroxyacid synthase in the biosynthetic pathways of branched-chain amino acids exists in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria, but not in animals, acetohydroxyacid synthase becomes a potential target for developing novel herbicides and antimicrobial compounds. In this article, the evolution, structure, and catalytic mechanism of acetohydroxyacid synthase are summarized.

  10. Binding modes of zaragozic acid A to human squalene synthase and staphylococcal dehydrosqualene synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-05-25

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr(248) in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors.

  11. The rice ent-KAURENE SYNTHASE LIKE 2 encodes a functional ent-beyerene synthase.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Daisuke; Ito, Akira; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Imai, Ryozo

    2015-05-08

    The rice genome contains a family of kaurene synthase-like (OsKSL) genes that are responsible for the biosynthesis of various diterpenoids, including gibberellins and phytoalexins. While many OsKSL genes have been functionally characterized, the functionality of OsKSL2 is still unclear and it has been proposed to be a pseudogene. Here, we found that OsKSL2 is drastically induced in roots by methyl jasmonate treatment and we successfully isolated a full-length cDNA for OsKSL2. Sequence analysis of the OsKSL2 cDNA revealed that the open reading frame of OsKSL2 is mispredicted in the two major rice genome databases, IRGSP-RAP and MSU-RGAP. In vitro conversion assay indicated that recombinant OsKSL2 catalyzes the cyclization of ent-CDP into ent-beyerene as a major and ent-kaurene as a minor product. ent-Beyerene is an antimicrobial compound and OsKSL2 is induced by methyl jasmonate; these data suggest that OsKSL2 is a functional ent-beyerene synthase that is involved in defense mechanisms in rice roots.

  12. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  13. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  14. A close look at a ketosynthase from a trans-acyltransferase modular polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Darren C.; Gay, Glen; Axelrod, Abram J.; Jenner, Matthew; Kohlhaas, Christoph; Kampa, Annette; Oldham, Neil J.; Piel, Jörn; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The recently discovered trans-acyltransferase modular polyketide synthases catalyze the biosynthesis of a wide range of bioactive natural products in bacteria. Here we report the structure of the second ketosynthase from the bacillaene trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase. This 1.95 Å-resolution structure provides the highest resolution view available of a modular polyketide synthase ketosynthase and reveals a flanking subdomain that is homologous to an ordered linker in cis-acyltransferase modular polyketide synthases. The structure of the cysteine-to-serine mutant of the ketosynthase acylated by its natural substrate provides high-resolution details of how a native polyketide intermediate is bound and helps explain the basis of ketosynthase substrate specificity. The substrate range of the ketosynthase was further investigated by mass spectrometry. PMID:24508341

  15. Architecture of the polyketide synthase module: surprises from electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Janet L; Skiniotis, Georgios; Sherman, David H

    2015-01-01

    Modular polyketide synthases produce a vast array of bioactive molecules that are the basis of many highly valued pharmaceuticals. The biosynthesis of these compounds is based on ordered assembly lines of multi-domain modules, each extending and modifying a specific chain-elongation intermediate before transfer to the next module for further processing. The first 3D structures of a full polyketide synthase module in different functional states were obtained recently by electron cryo-microscopy. The unexpected module architecture revealed a striking evolutionary divergence of the polyketide synthase compared to its metazoan fatty acid synthase homolog, as well as remarkable conformational rearrangements dependent on its biochemical state during the full catalytic cycle. The design and dynamics of the module are highly optimized for both catalysis and fidelity in the construction of complex, biologically active natural products. PMID:25791608

  16. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time.

  17. Studies on tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase that produces the acidic precursor of tetrahydrocannabinol, the pharmacologically active cannabinoid in marijuana.

    PubMed

    Taura, F

    2009-06-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is now regarded as a promising medicine because this cannabinoid has been shown to exert a variety of therapeutic activities. It has been demonstrated that THC is generated from the acidic precursor, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) by nonenzymatic decarboxylation, and that THCA is biosynthesized by THCA synthase, which catalyzes a unique biosynthetic reaction, the stereospecific oxidative cyclization of the geranyl group of the substrate cannabigerolic acid. Molecular characterization of THCA synthase has revealed its structural characteristics and reaction mechanism. THCA synthase is the first cannabinoid synthase to be studied and is potentially attractive target for various biotechnological applications as it produces the direct precursor of THC. This review describes the research history of this enzyme, i.e., purification, molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and possible biotechnological application of THCA synthase.

  18. Biochemical-Pathway Diversity in Archabacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-28

    KCl was present in the buffer. Chorismate mutase . The enzyme is very active but possesses a rather low affinity for chorismate . Each of the three...the enzymological similarities include the curious properties of chorismate mutase and the lack of detectable DAHP synthase. These results support

  19. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D80DQFD and N218DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H218O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-2H2]FDP and (R)-[1-2H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues were

  20. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  1. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion.

  2. The structural basis of Erwinia rhapontici isomaltulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Li, Jie; Li, Yan; Feng, Xiaohai; Wang, Renxiao; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Jiahai

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose isomerase NX-5 from Erwiniarhapontici efficiently catalyzes the isomerization of sucrose to isomaltulose (main product) and trehalulose (by-product). To investigate the molecular mechanism controlling sucrose isomer formation, we determined the crystal structures of native NX-5 and its mutant complexes E295Q/sucrose and D241A/glucose at 1.70 Å, 1.70 Å and 2.00 Å, respectively. The overall structure and active site architecture of NX-5 resemble those of other reported sucrose isomerases. Strikingly, the substrate binding mode of NX-5 is also similar to that of trehalulose synthase from Pseudomonasmesoacidophila MX-45 (MutB). Detailed structural analysis revealed the catalytic RXDRX motif and the adjacent 10-residue loop of NX-5 and isomaltulose synthase PalI from Klebsiella sp. LX3 adopt a distinct orientation from those of trehalulose synthases. Mutations of the loop region of NX-5 resulted in significant changes of the product ratio between isomaltulose and trehalulose. The molecular dynamics simulation data supported the product specificity of NX-5 towards isomaltulose and the role of the loop(330-339) in NX-5 catalysis. This work should prove useful for the engineering of sucrose isomerase for industrial carbohydrate biotransformations.

  3. The Structural Basis of Erwinia rhapontici Isomaltulose Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Li, Jie; Li, Yan; Feng, Xiaohai; Wang, Renxiao; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Jiahai

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose isomerase NX-5 from Erwiniarhapontici efficiently catalyzes the isomerization of sucrose to isomaltulose (main product) and trehalulose (by-product). To investigate the molecular mechanism controlling sucrose isomer formation, we determined the crystal structures of native NX-5 and its mutant complexes E295Q/sucrose and D241A/glucose at 1.70 Å, 1.70 Å and 2.00 Å, respectively. The overall structure and active site architecture of NX-5 resemble those of other reported sucrose isomerases. Strikingly, the substrate binding mode of NX-5 is also similar to that of trehalulose synthase from Pseudomonasmesoacidophila MX-45 (MutB). Detailed structural analysis revealed the catalytic RXDRX motif and the adjacent 10-residue loop of NX-5 and isomaltulose synthase PalI from Klebsiella sp. LX3 adopt a distinct orientation from those of trehalulose synthases. Mutations of the loop region of NX-5 resulted in significant changes of the product ratio between isomaltulose and trehalulose. The molecular dynamics simulation data supported the product specificity of NX-5 towards isomaltulose and the role of the loop330-339 in NX-5 catalysis. This work should prove useful for the engineering of sucrose isomerase for industrial carbohydrate biotransformations. PMID:24069347

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  5. Structures of human constitutive nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Plaza, Carla; Pineda, Stephanie Hai; Chreifi, Georges; Jing, Qing; Cinelli, Maris A.; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals produce three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS): neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The overproduction of NO by nNOS is associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, a desirable therapeutic goal is the design of drugs that target nNOS but not the other isoforms. Crystallography, coupled with computational approaches and medicinal chemistry, has played a critical role in developing highly selective nNOS inhibitors that exhibit exceptional neuroprotective properties. For historic reasons, crystallography has focused on rat nNOS and bovine eNOS because these were available in high quality; thus, their structures have been used in structure–activity–relationship studies. Although these constitutive NOSs share more than 90% sequence identity across mammalian species for each NOS isoform, inhibitor-binding studies revealed that subtle differences near the heme active site in the same NOS isoform across species still impact enzyme–inhibitor interactions. Therefore, structures of the human constitutive NOSs are indispensible. Here, the first structure of human neuronal NOS at 2.03 Å resolution is reported and a different crystal form of human endothelial NOS is reported at 1.73 Å resolution. PMID:25286850

  6. Structure of Leishmania major cysteine synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Ramos, Tania; Müller, Sylke; Coombs, Graham H.; Hunter, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine biosynthesis is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Leishmania species; these protozoa are responsible for a range of serious diseases. To improve understanding of this aspect of Leishmania biology, a crystallographic and biochemical study of L. major cysteine synthase has been undertaken, seeking to understand its structure, enzyme activity and modes of inhibition. Active enzyme was purified, assayed and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data extending to 1.8 Å resolution were measured and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. A fragment of γ-poly-d-glutamic acid, a constituent of the crystallization mixture, was bound in the enzyme active site. Although a d-­glutamate tetrapeptide had insignificant inhibitory activity, the enzyme was competitively inhibited (K i = 4 µM) by DYVI, a peptide based on the C-­terminus of the partner serine acetyltransferase with which the enzyme forms a complex. The structure surprisingly revealed that the cofactor pyridoxal phosphate had been lost during crystallization. PMID:22750854

  7. Biochemical and structural characterization of the secreted chorismate mutase (Rv1885c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv: an *AroQ enzyme not regulated by the aromatic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Sathyavelu K; Nelson, Bryant C; Vasquez, Gregory B; Davis, Andrew; Howard, Andrew J; Patterson, Sean; Gilliland, Gary L; Ladner, Jane E; Reddy, Prasad T

    2006-12-01

    The gene Rv1885c from the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv encodes a monofunctional and secreted chorismate mutase (*MtCM) with a 33-amino-acid cleavable signal sequence; hence, it belongs to the *AroQ class of chorismate mutases. Consistent with the heterologously expressed *MtCM having periplasmic destination in Escherichia coli and the absence of a discrete periplasmic compartment in M. tuberculosis, we show here that *MtCM secretes into the culture filtrate of M. tuberculosis. *MtCM functions as a homodimer and exhibits a dimeric state of the protein at a concentration as low as 5 nM. *MtCM exhibits simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 0.5 +/- 0.05 mM and a k(cat) of 60 s(-1) per active site (at 37 degrees C and pH 7.5). The crystal structure of *MtCM has been determined at 1.7 A resolution (Protein Data Bank identifier 2F6L). The protein has an all alpha-helical structure, and the active site is formed within a single chain without any contribution from the second chain in the dimer. Analysis of the structure shows a novel fold topology for the protein with a topologically rearranged helix containing Arg134. We provide evidence by site-directed mutagenesis that the residues Arg49, Lys60, Arg72, Thr105, Glu109, and Arg134 constitute the catalytic site; the numbering of the residues includes the signal sequence. Our investigation on the effect of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan on *MtCM shows that *MtCM is not regulated by the aromatic amino acids. Consistent with this observation, the X-ray structure of *MtCM does not have an allosteric regulatory site.

  8. The fused TrpEG from Streptomyces venezuelae is an anthranilate synthase, not a 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate [corrected] (ADIC) synthase.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, Meseret; Carrington, Renee; Collins, Alvin C; Byrnes, W Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    The chloramphenicol producer Streptomyces venezuelae contains an enzyme, SvTrpEG, that has a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the phenazine biosynthetic enzyme PhzE of certain species of Pseudomonas. PhzE has the sequence signature of an anthranilate synthase, but recent evidence indicates that it catalyzes the production of 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate [corrected] (ADIC), an intermediate in the two-step anthranilate synthase reaction, not anthranilate. In order to determine if SvTrpEG is likewise an ADIC synthase, we have cloned the gene for SvTrpEG, expressed the recombinant enzyme in Escherichia coli, and purified the enzyme. Analysis of the SvTrpEG-catalyzed reaction mixture using UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography shows that the product of the reaction is anthranilate, not ADIC. Our results therefore reveal that, despite its sequence similarity to PhzE, SvTrpEG is an anthranilate synthase, not an ADIC synthase.

  9. Novel terpenes generated by heterologous expression of bacterial terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuuki; Arima, Shiho; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Johmoto, Kohei; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Eguchi, Tadashi; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-06-01

    Mining of bacterial genome data has revealed numerous presumptive terpene synthases. Heterologous expression of several putative terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host has revealed 13 newly discovered terpenes whose GC-MS and NMR data did not match with any known compounds in spectroscopic databases. Each of the genes encoding the corresponding terpene synthases were silent in their parent microorganisms. Heterologous expression and detailed NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed assignment of the structures of 13 new cyclic terpenes. Among these newly identified compounds, two were found to be linear triquinane sesquiterpenes that have never previously been isolated from bacteria or any other source. The remaining 11 new compounds were shown to be diterpene hydrocarbons and alcohol, including hydropyrene (1), hydropyrenol (2), tsukubadiene (11) and odyverdienes A (12) and B (13) each displaying a novel diterpene skeleton that had not previously been reported.

  10. Studies on identifying the binding sites of folate and its derivatives in Lactobacillus casei thymidylate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Maley, F.; Maley, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    It was shown that folate and its derivatives have a profound effect on stabilizing thymidylate synthase in vitro and in vivo, as a consequence of ternary formation between the folate, dUMP, or FdUMP, and the synthase. The degree to which complex formation is affected can be revealed qualitatively by circular dichroism and quantitatively by equilibrium dialysis using the Lactobacillus casei synthase. In contrast to the pteroylmonoglutamates, the pteroylpolyglutamates bind to thymidylate synthase in the absence of dUMP, but even their binding affinity is increased greatly by this nucleotide or its analogues. Similarly, treatment of the synthase with carboxypeptidase A prevents the binding of the pteroylmonoglutamates and reduces the binding of the polyglutamates without affecting dUMP binding. The latter does not protect against carboxypeptidase inactivation but does potentiate the protective effect of the pteroylpolyglutamates. To determine the region of the synthase involved in the binding of the glutamate residues, Pte(/sup 14/C)GluGlu6 was activated by a water soluble carbodiimide in the presence and absence of dUMP. This folate derivative behaved as a competitive inhibitor of 5,10-CH/sub 2/H/sub 4/PteGlu, in contrast to methotrexate which was non-competitive. Separation of the five cyanogen bromide peptides from the L. casei synthase revealed 80% of the radioactivity to be associated with CNBr-2 and about 15% with CNBr-4. Chymotrypsin treatment of CNBr-2 yielded two /sup 14/C-labeled peaks on high performance liquid chromatography, with the slower migrating one being separated further into two peaks by Bio-gel P2 chromatography. All three peptides came from the same region of CNBr-2, encompassing residues 47-61 of the enzyme. From these studies it would appear that the residues most probably involved in the fixation of PteGlu7 are lysines 50 and 58. In contrast, methotrexate appeared to bind to another region of CNBr-2.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Amish infantile epilepsy syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) ...

  12. Chitin synthase inhibitors as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Preeti M; Tupe, Santosh G; Deshpande, Mukund V

    2013-02-01

    Increased risk of fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, emerging fungal pathogens, limited repertoire of antifungal drugs and resistance development against the drugs demands for development of new and effective antifungal agents. With greater knowledge of fungal metabolism efforts are being made to inhibit specific enzymes involved in different biochemical pathways for the development of antifungal drugs. Chitin synthase is one such promising target as it is absent in plants and mammals. Nikkomycin Z, a chitin synthase inhibitor is under clinical development. Chitin synthesis in fungi, chitin synthase as a target for antifungal agent development, different chitin synthase inhibitors isolated from natural sources, randomly synthesized and modified from nikkomycin and polyoxin are discussed in this review.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of Staphylococcus aureus dihydrodipicolinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Girish, Tavarekere S; Sharma, Eshita; Gopal, B

    2008-08-20

    Lysine biosynthesis is crucial for cell-wall formation in bacteria. Enzymes involved in lysine biosynthesis are thus potential targets for anti-microbial therapeutics. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first step of this pathway. Unlike its homologues, Staphylococcus aureus DHDPS is a dimer both in solution and in the crystal and is not feedback inhibited by lysine. The crystal structure of S. aureus DHDPS in the free and substrate bound forms provides a structural rationale for its catalytic mechanism. The structure also reveals unique conformational features of the S. aureus enzyme that could be crucial for the design of specific non-competitive inhibitors.

  14. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  15. Identification of a Fungal 1,8-Cineole Synthase from Hypoxylon sp. with Specificity Determinants in Common with the Plant Synthases*

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jeffrey J.; Berbasova, Tetyana; Sasaki, Tomoaki; Jefferson-George, Kyra; Spakowicz, Daniel J.; Dunican, Brian F.; Portero, Carolina E.; Narváez-Trujillo, Alexandra; Strobel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Terpenes are an important and diverse class of secondary metabolites widely produced by fungi. Volatile compound screening of a fungal endophyte collection revealed a number of isolates in the family Xylariaceae, producing a series of terpene molecules, including 1,8-cineole. This compound is a commercially important component of eucalyptus oil used in pharmaceutical applications and has been explored as a potential biofuel additive. The genes that produce terpene molecules, such as 1,8-cineole, have been little explored in fungi, providing an opportunity to explore the biosynthetic origin of these compounds. Through genome sequencing of cineole-producing isolate E7406B, we were able to identify 11 new terpene synthase genes. Expressing a subset of these genes in Escherichia coli allowed identification of the hyp3 gene, responsible for 1,8-cineole biosynthesis, the first monoterpene synthase discovered in fungi. In a striking example of convergent evolution, mutational analysis of this terpene synthase revealed an active site asparagine critical for water capture and specificity during cineole synthesis, the same mechanism used in an unrelated plant homologue. These studies have provided insight into the evolutionary relationship of fungal terpene synthases to those in plants and bacteria and further established fungi as a relatively untapped source of this important and diverse class of compounds. PMID:25648891

  16. Characterization of α-humulene synthases responsible for the production of sesquiterpenes induced by methyl jasmonate in Aquilaria cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kumeta, Yukie; Ito, Michiho

    2016-07-01

    The resinous portions of Aquilaria and Gyrinops plants are known as 'agarwood' and have a distinctive fragrance. To examine the biosynthesis of these fragrant compounds, we previously established cell cultures of Aquilaria crassna in which the production of three sesquiterpenes (α-guaiene, α-humulene, and δ-guaiene) could be induced by methyl jasmonate (MJ), and showed that cloned δ-guaiene synthase from MJ-treated cells is involved in the synthesis of these three compounds, although only very small amounts of α-humulene are produced. In the present study, cDNAs encoding α-humulene synthases were also isolated. Three putative sesquiterpene synthase clones (AcHS1-3) isolated from the MJ-treated cells had very similar amino acid sequences and shared 52 % identity with δ-guaiene synthases. The recombinant enzymes catalyzed the formation of α-humulene as a major product. Expression of transcripts of the α-humulene synthase and δ-guaiene synthase genes in cultured cells increased after treatment with MJ. These results revealed that these α-humulene and δ-guaiene synthases are involved in the synthesis of three sesquiterpenes induced by MJ treatment.

  17. Tertiary model of a plant cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Haigler, Candace H.; Kubicki, James D.; Zimmer, Jochen; Bonetta, Dario; DeBolt, Seth; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D atomistic model of a plant cellulose synthase (CESA) has remained elusive despite over forty years of experimental effort. Here, we report a computationally predicted 3D structure of 506 amino acids of cotton CESA within the cytosolic region. Comparison of the predicted plant CESA structure with the solved structure of a bacterial cellulose-synthesizing protein validates the overall fold of the modeled glycosyltransferase (GT) domain. The coaligned plant and bacterial GT domains share a six-stranded β-sheet, five α-helices, and conserved motifs similar to those required for catalysis in other GT-2 glycosyltransferases. Extending beyond the cross-kingdom similarities related to cellulose polymerization, the predicted structure of cotton CESA reveals that plant-specific modules (plant-conserved region and class-specific region) fold into distinct subdomains on the periphery of the catalytic region. Computational results support the importance of the plant-conserved region and/or class-specific region in CESA oligomerization to form the multimeric cellulose–synthesis complexes that are characteristic of plants. Relatively high sequence conservation between plant CESAs allowed mapping of known mutations and two previously undescribed mutations that perturb cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana to their analogous positions in the modeled structure. Most of these mutation sites are near the predicted catalytic region, and the confluence of other mutation sites supports the existence of previously undefined functional nodes within the catalytic core of CESA. Overall, the predicted tertiary structure provides a platform for the biochemical engineering of plant CESAs. PMID:23592721

  18. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active.

    PubMed

    Schönitzer, Veronika; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2011-12-02

    Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA(-) cell lines are shown.

  19. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: a new fold on an old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2014-12-05

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production.

  20. UVB-irradiated keratinocytes induce melanoma-associated ganglioside GD3 synthase gene in melanocytes via secretion of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Maiko; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Tajima, Orie; Sobue, Sayaka; Kambe, Mariko; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko

    2014-03-07

    Although expression of gangliosides and their synthetic enzyme genes in malignant melanomas has been well studied, that in normal melanocytes has been scarcely analyzed. In particular, changes in expression levels of glycosyltransferase genes responsible for ganglioside synthesis during evolution of melanomas from melanocytes are very important to understand roles of gangliosides in melanomas. Here, expression of glycosyltransferase genes related to the ganglioside synthesis was analyzed using RNAs from cultured melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that melanomas expressed high levels of mRNA of GD3 synthase and GM2/GD2 synthase genes and low levels of GM1/GD1b synthase genes compared with melanocytes. As a representative exogenous stimulation, effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) on the expression levels of 3 major ganglioside synthase genes in melanocytes were analyzed. Although direct UVB irradiation of melanocytes caused no marked changes, culture supernatants of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) induced definite up-regulation of GD3 synthase and GM2/GD2 synthase genes. Detailed examination of the supernatants revealed that inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6 enhanced GD3 synthase gene expression. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokines secreted from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes induced melanoma-associated ganglioside synthase genes, proposing roles of skin microenvironment in the promotion of melanoma-like ganglioside profiles in melanocytes.

  1. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenitzer, Veronika; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.

  2. Molecular Evolution and Functional Divergence of Soluble Starch Synthase Genes in Cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Yifan; Xu, Shuhui; Xu, Chenwu; Yan, Changjie

    2013-01-01

    Soluble starch synthases (SSs) are major enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis in plants. Cassava starch has many remarkable characteristics, which should be influenced by the evolution of SS genes in this starchy root crop. In this work, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of the soluble starch synthases in cassava. Genome-wide identification showed that there are 9 genes encoding soluble starch synthases in cassava. All of the soluble starch synthases encoded by these genes contain both Glyco_transf_5 and Glycos_transf_1 domains, and a correlation analysis showed evidence of coevolution between these 2 domains in cassava SS genes. The SS genes in land plants can be divided into 6 subfamilies that were formed before the origin of seed plants, and species-specific expansion has contributed to the evolution of this family in cassava. A functional divergence analysis for this family provided statistical evidence for shifted evolutionary rates between the subfamilies of land plant soluble starch synthases. Although the main selective pressure acting on land plant SS genes was purifying selection, our results also revealed that point mutation with positive selection contributed to the evolution of 2 SS genes in cassava. The remarkable cassava starch characteristics might be the result of both the duplication and adaptive selection of SS genes. PMID:23888108

  3. Critical roles of CTP synthase N-terminal in cytoophidium assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Jin-Jun; Ghosh, Sanjay; Liu, Ji-Long

    2017-03-22

    Several metabolic enzymes assemble into distinct intracellular structures in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggesting an important functional role in cell physiology. The CTP-generating enzyme CTP synthase forms long filamentous structures termed cytoophidia in bacteria, yeast, fruit flies and human cells independent of its catalytic activity. However, the amino acid determinants for protein-protein interaction necessary for polymerisation remained unknown. In this study, we systematically analysed the role of the conserved N-terminal of Drosophila CTP synthase in cytoophidium assembly. Our mutational analyses identified three key amino acid residues within this region that play an instructive role in organisation of CTP synthase into a filamentous structure. Co-transfection assays demonstrated formation of heteromeric CTP synthase filaments which is disrupted by protein carrying a mutated N-terminal alanine residue thus revealing a dominant-negative activity. Interestingly, the dominant-negative activity is supressed by the CTP synthase inhibitor DON. Furthermore, we found that the amino acids at the corresponding position in the human protein exhibit similar properties suggesting conservation of their function through evolution. Our data suggest that cytoophidium assembly is a multi-step process involving N-terminal-dependent sequential interactions between correctly folded structural units and provide insights into the assembly of these enigmatic structures.

  4. Functional characterization of terpene synthases and chemotypic variation in three lavender species of section Stoechas.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkader, Tarek; Guitton, Yann; Pasquier, Bernard; Magnard, Jean Louis; Jullien, Frédéric; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Legendre, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Lavandula pedunculata (Mill.) Cav. subsp. lusitanica, Lavandula stoechas L. subsp. stoechas and Lavandula viridis l'Hér. are three lavender taxa that belong to the botanical section Stoechas and are widely used as aromatherapy, culinary herb or folk medicine in many Mediterranean regions. The analysis of their bioactive volatile constituents revealed the presence of 124 substances, the most abundant being the bicyclic monoterpenes fenchone, camphor and 1,8-cineole that give these three species their respective chemotypes. Most noteworthy was fenchone which, with its reduced form fenchol, made 48% of the total volatile constituents of L. pedunculata while present at 2.9% in L. stoechas and undetectable in L. viridis. In order to provide a molecular explanation to the differences in volatile compounds of these three species, two monoterpene synthases (monoTPS) and one sesquiterpene synthase (sesquiTPS) were cloned in L. pedunculata and functionally characterized as fenchol synthase (LpFENS), α-pinene synthase (LpPINS) and germacrene A synthase (LpGEAS). The two other lavender species contained a single orthologous gene for each of these three classes of TPS with similar enzyme product specificities. Expression profiles of FENS and PINS genes matched the accumulation profile of the enzyme products unlike GEAS. This study provides one of the rare documented cases of chemotype modification during plant speciation via changes in the level of plant TPS gene expression, and not functionality.

  5. Structure and conformational states of the bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase by cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Anna; Rohou, Alexis; Schep, Daniel G; Bason, John V; Montgomery, Martin G; Walker, John E; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Rubinstein, John L

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical energy currency of biology, is synthesized in eukaryotic cells primarily by the mitochondrial ATP synthase. ATP synthases operate by a rotary catalytic mechanism where proton translocation through the membrane-inserted FO region is coupled to ATP synthesis in the catalytic F1 region via rotation of a central rotor subcomplex. We report here single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) analysis of the bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase. Combining cryo-EM data with bioinformatic analysis allowed us to determine the fold of the a subunit, suggesting a proton translocation path through the FO region that involves both the a and b subunits. 3D classification of images revealed seven distinct states of the enzyme that show different modes of bending and twisting in the intact ATP synthase. Rotational fluctuations of the c8-ring within the FO region support a Brownian ratchet mechanism for proton-translocation-driven rotation in ATP synthases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10180.001 PMID:26439008

  6. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding beta-amyrin synthase from petroleum plant Euphorbia tirucalli L.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Uchida, Hidenobu; Ohyama, Kanji

    2005-08-01

    Euphorbia tirucalli L., known as the petroleum plant, produces a large amount of triterpenes, such as beta-amyrin. Degenerate RT-PCR based on the sequences conserved among known beta-amyrin synthases led to cloning of a putative triterpene synthase cDNA, EtAS, from leaves of E. tirucalli. The deduced amino acid sequence of the EtAS cDNA showed the highest identity of 82% to the Panax ginseng beta-amyrin synthase. Heterologous expression of the EtAS ORF in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, resulted in production of beta-amyrin, revealing that the EtAS cDNA codes for a beta-amyrin synthase. This is the first report of a gene involved in the triterpene synthetic pathway from Euphorbiaceae plants.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase in plants: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Santolini, Jérôme; André, François; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Wendehenne, David

    2017-02-28

    Over the past twenty years, nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important player in various plant physiological processes. Although many advances in the understanding of NO functions have been made, the question of how NO is produced in plants is still challenging. It is now generally accepted that the endogenous production of NO is mainly accomplished through the reduction of nitrite via both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms which remain to be fully characterized. Furthermore, experimental arguments in favour of the existence of plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like enzymes have been reported. However, recent investigations revealed that land plants do not possess animal NOS-like enzymes while few algal species do. Phylogenetic and structural analyses reveals interesting features specific to algal NOS-like proteins.

  8. Phytochelatin synthase genes from Arabidopsis and the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, S B; Smith, A P; Howden, R; Dietrich, W M; Bugg, S; O'Connell, M J; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1999-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs), a family of heavy metal-inducible peptides important in the detoxification of heavy metals, have been identified in plants and some microorganisms, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but not in animals. PCs are synthesized enzymatically from glutathione (GSH) by PC synthase in the presence of heavy metal ions. In Arabidopsis, the CAD1 gene, identified by using Cd-sensitive, PC-deficient cad1 mutants, has been proposed to encode PC synthase. Using a positional cloning strategy, we have isolated the CAD1 gene. Database searches identified a homologous gene in S. pombe, and a mutant with a targeted deletion of this gene was also Cd sensitive and PC deficient. Extracts of Escherichia coli cells expressing a CAD1 cDNA or the S. pombe gene catalyzing GSH-dependent, heavy metal-activated synthesis of PCs in vitro demonstrated that both genes encode PC synthase activity. Both enzymes were activated by a range of metal ions. In contrast, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction experiments showed that expression of the CAD1 mRNA is not influenced by the presence of Cd. A comparison of the two predicted amino acid sequences revealed a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is presumed to be the catalytic domain, and a variable C-terminal region containing multiple Cys residues, which is proposed to be involved in activation of the enzyme by metal ions. Interestingly, a similar gene was identified in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting that PCs may also be expressed in some animal species. PMID:10368185

  9. The polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, methionine synthase, methionine synthase reductase, and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results.

  10. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  11. Deficiency of sphingomyelin synthase-1 but not sphingomyelin synthase-2 causes hearing impairments in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei-Hong; Takemoto, Makoto; Watanabe, Ken; Luo, Huan; Nishimura, Masataka; Yano, Masato; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi; Song, Wen-Jie

    2012-08-15

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a sphingolipid reported to function as a structural component of plasma membranes and to participate in signal transduction. The role of SM metabolism in the process of hearing remains controversial. Here, we examined the role of SM synthase (SMS), which is subcategorized into the family members SMS1 and SMS2, in auditory function. Measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) revealed hearing impairment in SMS1−/− mice in a low frequency range (4–16 kHz). As a possible mechanism of this impairment, we found that the stria vascularis (SV) in these mice exhibited atrophy and disorganized marginal cells. Consequently, SMS1−/− mice exhibited significantly smaller endocochlear potentials (EPs). As a possible mechanism for EP reduction, we found altered expression patterns and a reduced level of KCNQ1 channel protein in the SV of SMS1−/− mice. These mice also exhibited reduced levels of distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Quantitative comparison of the SV atrophy, KCNQ1 expression, and outer hair cell density at the cochlear apical and basal turns revealed no location dependence, but more macrophage invasion into the SV was observed in the apical region than the basal region, suggesting a role of cochlear location-dependent oxidative stress in producing the frequency dependence of hearing loss in SMS1−/− mice. Elevated ABR thresholds, decreased EPs, and abnormal KCNQ1 expression patterns in SMS1−/− mice were all found to be progressive with age. Mice lacking SMS2, however, exhibited neither detectable hearing loss nor changes in their EPs. Taken together, our results suggest that hearing impairments occur in SMS1−/− but not SMS2−/− mice. Defects in the SV with subsequent reductions in EPs together with hair cell dysfunction may account, at least partially, for hearing impairments in SMS1−/− mice.

  12. Identification of novel sesterterpene/triterpene synthase from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Kashima, Shoji; Murata, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2013-05-10

    Basic enzyme: The tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue from the alkalophilic Bacillus clausii catalyses conversions of a geranylfarnesyl diphosphate and a hexaprenyl diphosphate into novel head-to-tail acyclic sesterterpene and triterpene. Tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologues represent a new family of terpene synthases that form not only sesquarterpene but also sesterterpene and triterpene.

  13. Tryptophan synthase: a multienzyme complex with an intramolecular tunnel.

    PubMed

    Miles, E W

    2001-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase is a classic enzyme that channels a metabolic intermediate, indole. The crystal structure of the tryptophan synthase alpha2beta2 complex from Salmonella typhimurium revealed for the first time the architecture of a multienzyme complex and the presence of an intramolecular tunnel. This remarkable hydrophobic tunnel provides a likely passageway for indole from the active site of the alpha subunit, where it is produced, to the active site of the beta subunit, where it reacts with L-serine to form L-tryptophan in a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent reaction. Rapid kinetic studies of the wild type enzyme and of channel-impaired mutant enzymes provide strong evidence for the proposed channeling mechanism. Structures of a series of enzyme-substrate intermediates at the alpha and beta active sites are elucidating enzyme mechanisms and dynamics. These structural results are providing a fascinating picture of loops opening and closing, of domain movements, and of conformational changes in the indole tunnel. Solution studies provide further evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes that send signals between the alpha and beta subunits. The combined results show that the switching of the enzyme between open and closed conformations couples the catalytic reactions at the alpha and beta active sites and prevents the escape of indole.

  14. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-05-26

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  15. Lessons from 455 Fusarium polyketide synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, polyketide synthases (PKSs) synthesize a structurally diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a range of biological activities. The most studied SMs are toxic to animals and/or plants, alter plant growth, have beneficial pharmaceutical activities, and/or are brightly colored pigm...

  16. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  17. Cell wall protection by the Candida albicans class I chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Preechasuth, Kanya; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Brown, Alistair J.P.; Gow, Neil A.R.; Lenardon, Megan D.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans has four chitin synthases from three different enzyme classes which deposit chitin in the cell wall, including at the polarized tips of growing buds and hyphae, and sites of septation. The two class I enzymes, Chs2 and Chs8, are responsible for most of the measurable chitin synthase activity in vitro, but their precise biological functions in vivo remain obscure. In this work, detailed phenotypic analyses of a chs2Δchs8Δ mutant have shown that C. albicans class I chitin synthases promote cell integrity during early polarized growth in yeast and hyphal cells. This was supported by live cell imaging of YFP-tagged versions of the class I chitin synthases which revealed that Chs2-YFP was localized at sites of polarized growth. Furthermore, a unique and dynamic pattern of localization of the class I enzymes at septa of yeast and hyphae was revealed. Phosphorylation of Chs2 on the serine at position 222 was shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that is localized to sites of polarized growth and septation. Independently from this post-translational modification, specific cell wall stresses were also shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that localizes to specific sites in cells, and this was linked to the ability of the class I enzymes to reinforce cell wall integrity during early polarized growth in the presence of these stresses. PMID:26257018

  18. Structural organization of the human neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS1).

    PubMed

    Hall, A V; Antoniou, H; Wang, Y; Cheung, A H; Arbus, A M; Olson, S L; Lu, W C; Kau, C L; Marsden, P A

    1994-12-30

    Neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase, localized to human chromosome 12, uniquely participates in diverse biologic processes; neurotransmission, the regulation of body fluid homeostasis, neuroendocrine physiology, control of smooth muscle motility, sexual function, and myocyte/myoblast biology, among others. Restriction enzyme mapping, subcloning, and DNA sequence analysis of bacteriophage- and yeast artificial chromosome-derived human genomic DNA indicated that the mRNA for neuronal NO synthase is dispersed over a minimum of 160 kilobases of human genomic DNA. Analysis of intron-exon splice junctions predicted that the open reading frame is encoded by 28 exons, with translation initiation and termination in exon 2 and exon 29, respectively. Determination of transcription initiation sites in brain poly(A) RNA with primer extension analysis and RNase protection revealed a major start site 28 nucleotides downstream from a TATA box. Sequence inspection of 5'-flanking regions revealed potential cis-acting DNA elements: AP-2, TEF-1/MCBF, CREB/ATF/c-Fos, NRF-1, Ets, NF-1, and NF-kappa B-like sequences. Diversity appears to represent a major theme apparent upon analysis of human neuronal NO synthase mRNA transcripts. A microsatellite of the dinucleotide variety was detected within the 3'-untranslated region of exon 29. Multiple alleles were evident in normal individuals indicating the existence of allelic mRNA sequence variation. Characterization of variant human neuronal NO synthase cDNAs indicated the existence of casette exon 9/10 and exon 10 deletions as examples of structural mRNA diversity due to alternative splicing. The latter deletion of a 175-nucleotide exon introduces a frame-shift and premature stop codon indicating the potential existence of a novel NH2 terminus protein. In summary, analysis of the human neuronal NO synthase locus reveals a complex genomic organization and mRNA diversity that is both allelic and structural.

  19. Identification and expression of mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene causing acute intermittent porphyria (AIP).

    PubMed Central

    Solis, C.; Lopez-Echaniz, I.; Sefarty-Graneda, D.; Astrin, K. H.; Desnick, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (EC 4.3.1.8; HMB-synthase). This disease is characterized by acute, life-threatening neurologic attacks that are precipitated by various drugs, hormones, and other factors. The enzymatic and/or biochemical diagnosis of AIP heterozygotes is problematic; therefore, efforts have focused on the identification of HMB-synthase mutations so that heterozygotes can be identified and educated to avoid the precipitating factors. In Spain, the occurrence of AIP has been reported, but the nature of the HMB-synthase mutations causing AIP in Spanish families has not been investigated. Molecular analysis was therefore undertaken in nine unrelated Spanish AIP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected probands and family members of nine unrelated Spanish families with AIP. The HMB-synthase gene was amplified by long-range PCR and the nucleotide sequence of each exon was determined by cycle sequencing. RESULTS: Three new mutations, a missense, M212V; a single base insertion, g4715insT; and a deletion/insertion, g7902ACT-->G, as well as five previously reported mutations (G111R, R116W, R149X R167W, and R173W) were detected in the Spanish probands. Expression of the novel missense mutation M212V in E. coli revealed that the mutation was causative, having <2% residual activity. CONCLUSIONS: These studies identified the first mutations in the HMB-synthase gene causing AIP in Spanish patients. Three of the mutations were novel, while five previously reported lesions were found in six Spanish families. These findings enable accurate identification and counseling of presymptomatic carriers in these nine unrelated Spanish AIP families and further demonstrate the genetic heterogeneity of mutations causing AIP. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10602775

  20. Identification and characterization of a second isogene encoding γ-terpinene synthase in Thymus caespititius.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marta D; Barroso, José G; Oliveira, M Margarida; Trindade, Helena

    2014-07-15

    Thymus caespititius Brot. is an Iberian endemic species, whose essential oils possess high polymorphism. They consist mostly of mono- and sesquiterpene, some of them with interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. The search for terpene synthase genes was performed in three in vitro T. caespititius genotypes. For these plants, the expression of a previously described γ-terpinene synthase gene, Tctps2, was confirmed, occurring concomitantly with a new gene encoding an enzyme with similar activity, named Thymus caespititius terpene synthase 4 (Tctps4). The two isogenes were isolated and functionally characterized in the three plant genotypes. Alignment of the two Tctps revealed a transit peptide much shorter in Tctps4 than in Tctps2 (3-4 amino acids instead of 47). The Tctps4 open reading frame is shorter than Tctps2 (1665 bp versus 1794 bp). The amino acid sequence of both γ-terpinene synthases shared an 88% pairwise identity. The fact that T. caespititius carries two isogenes for γ-terpinene synthases, suggests gene duplication along the evolutionary process, followed by mutations leading to the differentiation of both genes. These mutations didn't compromise protein activity. A high accumulation of transcripts from both genes was found in shoots of in vitro plantlets, while in roots they could not be detected. Still, γ-terpinene levels in aerial parts were reduced, probably due to fast conversion into carvacrol and thymol, the main components from T. caespititius essential oils. This study is a contribution to the identification of terpene synthase genes in Lamiaceae.

  1. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  2. Structure of Salmonella typhimurium OMP synthase in a complete substrates complex

    PubMed Central

    Grubmeyer, Charles; Hansen, Michael Riis; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Almo, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Dimeric Salmonella typhimurium orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OMP synthase, E.C. 2.4.2.10), a key enzyme in de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, has been co-crystallized in a complete substrate complex of E•MgPRPP•orotate, and the structure solved to 2.2 Å resolution. This structure resembles that for Saccharomyces cerevisiae OMP synthase in showing a dramatic and asymmetric reorganization around the active site-bound ligands, but shares the same basic topology previously observed in complexes of OMP synthase from S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli. The catalytic loop (residues 99–109) contributed by subunit A is reorganized to close the active site situated in subunit B and to sequester it from solvent. Furthermore, the overall structure of subunit B is more compact, due to movements of the amino-terminal hood and elements of the core domain. The catalytic loop of subunit B remains open and disordered, and subunit A retains the more relaxed conformation observed in loop-open S. typhimurium OMP synthase structures. A non-proline cis-peptide formed between Ala71 and Tyr72 is seen in both subunits. The loop-closed catalytic site of subunit B reveals that both the loop and the hood interact directly with the bound pyrophosphate group of PRPP. In contrast to dimagnesium hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferases, OMP synthase contains a single catalytic Mg2+ in the closed active site. The remaining pyrophosphate charges of PRPP are neutralized by interactions with Arg99A, Lys100B, Lys103A, and His105A. The new structure confirms the importance of loop movement in catalysis by OMP synthase, and identifies several additional movements that must be accomplished in each catalytic cycle. A catalytic mechanism based on enzymic and substratea-ssisted stabilization of the previously documented oxocarbenium transition state structure is proposed. PMID:22531064

  3. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  4. Genomic organization of δ-guaiene synthase genes in Aquilaria crassna and its possible use for the identification of Aquilaria species.

    PubMed

    Kumeta, Yukie; Ito, Michiho

    2011-07-01

    The resinous portions of Aquilaria plants, called agarwood, have been used as medicines and incenses. Agarwood contains a great variety of sesquiterpenes, and a study using cultured cells of Aquilaria crassna showed that the production of sesquiterpenes (α-guaiene, α-humulene, and δ-guaiene) was induced by treatment with methyl jasmonate, which led to the cloning of δ-guaiene synthases. In the present study, analyses of genomic organization and Southern blotting of δ-guaiene synthase in A. crassna were performed in order to examine the genomic background of δ-guaiene synthases in Aquilaria plants. Genomic cloning and sequencing revealed five types of sequence in putative δ-guaiene synthases sharing more than 96% identity in exon regions, and that these enzymes belonged to the class III TPS subfamily with seven exons and six introns. Furthermore, Southern blotting revealed that at least five copies of δ-guaiene synthase existed in A. crassna. The hybridization of digested DNA of A. crassna and A. sinensis with probes made with a δ-guaiene synthase cDNA fragment resulted in different banding patterns for these two species. It may be possible to identify Aquilaria species by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses with δ-guaiene synthase cDNA probes.

  5. Catalysis and Sulfa Drug Resistance in Dihydropteroate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M. Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Lee, Richard E.; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.

    2013-04-08

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S{sub N}1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  6. Catalysis and sulfa drug resistance in dihydropteroate synthase.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M; Lee, Richard E; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W

    2012-03-02

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S(N)1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  7. Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Is Essential for Male Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scherthan, Harry; Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Ford, Steven J.; Burton, Neal C.; Razansky, Daniel; Trümbach, Dietrich; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Tobias; Floss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids and the derived gangliosides have critical functions in spermatogenesis, thus mutations in genes involved in sphingolipid biogenesis are often associated with male infertility. We have generated a transgenic mouse line carrying an insertion in the sphingomyelin synthase gene Sms1, the enzyme which generates sphingomyelin species in the Golgi apparatus. We describe the spermatogenesis defect of Sms1-/- mice, which is characterized by sloughing of spermatocytes and spermatids, causing progressive infertility of male homozygotes. Lipid profiling revealed a reduction in several long chain unsaturated phosphatidylcholins, lysophosphatidylcholins and sphingolipids in the testes of mutants. Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography indicated blood-testis barrier dysfunction. A supplementary diet of the essential omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid diminished germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous epithelium and restored spermatogenesis and fertility in 50% of previously infertile mutants. Our findings indicate that SMS1 has a wider than anticipated role in testis polyunsaturated fatty acid homeostasis and for male fertility. PMID:27788151

  8. Polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in multiple myeloma risk.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carmen S P; Ortega, Manoela M; Ozelo, Margareth C; Araujo, Renato C; De Souza, Cármino A; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Costa, Fernando F

    2008-03-01

    We tested whether the polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, the methionine synthase gene, MTR A2756G, the methionine synthase reductase gene, MTRR A66G, and the thymidylate synthase gene, TYMS 2R-->3R, involved in folate and methionine metabolism, altered the risk for multiple myeloma (MM). Genomic DNA from 123MM patients and 188 controls was analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion for the polymorphism analyses. The frequency of the MTR 2756 AG plus GG genotype was higher in patients than in controls (39.8% versus 23.4%, P=0.001). Individual carriers of the variant allele G had a 2.31 (95% CI: 1.38-3.87)-fold increased risk for MM compared with others. In contrast, similar frequencies of the MTHFR, the MTRR and the TYMS genotypes were seen in patients and controls. These results suggest, for the first time, a role for the MTR A2756G polymorphism in MM risk in our country, but should be confirmed by large-scale epidemiological studies with patients and controls age matched.

  9. Molecular Docking Analysis of Selected Clinacanthus nutans Constituents as Xanthine Oxidase, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Human Neutrophil Elastase, Matrix Metalloproteinase 2, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 and Squalene Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Radhakrishnan; Isha, Azizul; Wai, Lam Kok; Ismail, Intan Safinar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f.) Lindau has gained popularity among Malaysians as a traditional plant for anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: This prompted us to carry out the present study on a selected 11 constituents of C. nutans which are clinacoside A–C, cycloclinacoside A1, shaftoside, vitexin, orientin, isovitexin, isoorientin, lupeol and β-sitosterol. Materials and Methods: Selected 11 constituents of C. nutans were evaluated on the docking behavior of xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), human neutrophil elastase (HNE), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 2 and 9), and squalene synthase (SQS) using Discovery Studio Version 3.1. Also, molecular physicochemical, bioactivity, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET), and toxicity prediction by computer assisted technology analyzes were also carried out. Results: The molecular physicochemical analysis revealed that four ligands, namely clinacoside A–C and cycloclinacoside A1 showed nil violations and complied with Lipinski's rule of five. As for the analysis of bioactivity, all the 11 selected constituents of C. nutans exhibited active score (>0) toward enzyme inhibitors descriptor. ADMET analysis showed that the ligands except orientin and isoorientin were predicted to have Cytochrome P4502D6 inhibition effect. Docking studies and binding free energy calculations revealed that clinacoside B exhibited the least binding energy for the target enzymes except for XO and SQS. Isovitexin and isoorientin showed the potentials in the docking and binding with all of the six targeted enzymes, whereas vitexin and orientin docked and bound with only NOS and HNE. Conclusion: This present study has paved a new insight in understanding these 11 C. nutans ligands as potential inhibitors against XO, NOS, HNE, MMP 2, MMP 9, and SQS. SUMMARY Isovitexin and isoorientin (Clinacanthus nutans constituent) showed potentials in the docking and binding with all of the six targeted

  10. Discovery of a novel superfamily of type III polyketide synthases in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Seshime, Yasuyo; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Fujii, Isao; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2005-05-27

    Identification of genes encoding type III polyketide synthase (PKS) superfamily members in the industrially useful filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, revealed that their distribution is not specific to plants or bacteria. Among other Aspergilli (Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus), A. oryzae was unique in possessing four chalcone synthase (CHS)-like genes (csyA, csyB, csyC, and csyD). Expression of csyA, csyB, and csyD genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Comparative genome analyses revealed single putative type III PKS in Neurospora crassa and Fusarium graminearum, two each in Magnaporthe grisea and Podospora anserina, and three in Phenarocheate chrysosporium, with a phylogenic distinction from bacteria and plants. Conservation of catalytic residues in the CHSs across species implicated enzymatically active nature of these newly discovered homologs.

  11. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    PubMed

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region.

  12. Domain analysis of 3 Keto Acyl-CoA synthase for structural variations in Vitis vinifera and Oryza brachyantha using comparative modelling.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Mamta; Pandey, Neetesh; Qamar, Naseha; Singh, Brijendra; Shukla, Akanksha

    2015-03-01

    The long chain fatty acids incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units which is provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA after interactions with 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), found in several plants. This study provides functional characterization of three 3 ketoacyl CoA synthase like proteins in Vitis vinifera (one) and Oryza brachyantha (two proteins). Sequence analysis reveals that protein of Oryza brachyantha shows 96% similarity to a hypothetical protein in Sorghum bicolor; total 11 homologs were predicted in Sorghum bicolor. Conserved domain prediction confirm the presence of FAE1/Type III polyketide synthase-like protein, Thiolase-like, subgroup; Thiolase-like and 3-Oxoacyl-ACP synthase III, C-terminal and chalcone synthase like domain but very long chain 3-keto acyl CoA domain is absent. All three proteins were found to have Chalcone and stilbene synthases C terminal domain which is similar to domain of thiolase and β keto acyl synthase. Its N terminal domain is absent in J3M9Z7 protein of Oryza brachyantha and F6HH63 protein of Vitis vinifera. Differences in N-terminal domain is responsible for distinguish activity. The J3MF16 protein of Oryza brachyantha contains N terminal domain and C terminal domain and characterized using annotation of these domains. Domains Gcs (streptomyces coelicolor) and Chalcone-stilbene synthases (KAS) in 2-pyrone synthase (Gerbera hybrid) and chalcone synthase 2 (Medicago sativa) were found to be present in three proteins. This similarity points toward anthocyanin biosynthetic process. Similarity to chalcone synthase 2 reveals its possible role in Naringenine and Chalcone synthase like activity. In 3 keto acyl CoA synthase of Oryza brachyantha. Active site residues C-240, H-407, N-447 are present in J3MF16 protein that are common in these three protein at different positions. Structural variations among dimer interface, product binding site, malonyl-CoA binding sites, were predicted in

  13. Chrysanthemyl Diphosphate Synthase Operates in Planta as a Bifunctional Enzyme with Chrysanthemol Synthase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12–0.16 μg h−1 g−1 fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  14. chsZ, a gene for a novel class of chitin synthase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Chigira, Yuko; Abe, Keietsu; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakajima, Tasuku

    2002-07-01

    We cloned and characterized a novel Aspergillus oryzae chitin synthase gene, chsZ, encoding a polypeptide containing a new myosin motor-like domain in its N-terminal half. Alignment analysis revealed that ChsZ was less homologous to known class V enzymes, except for its probable chitin synthase conserved region in the C-terminal half. We also found a chsY gene and found that ChsY showed higher similarity to the class V enzymes than did ChsZ. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that the A. oryzae ChsZ, together with Chs4 of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Chs6 of Ustilago maydis, formed a new subclass distinct from A. oryzae ChsY and known class V chitin synthases, including A. nidulans CsmA (ChsD) and A. fumigatus ChsE. In conclusion, we propose a new class, class VI chitin synthases, represented by A. oryzae ChsZ, P. brasiliensis Chs4 and U. maydis Chs6. Expression analysis suggested that the regulation of chsZ expression is distinct from that of chsY expression.

  15. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  16. Characterisation of a Recombinant Patchoulol Synthase Variant for Biocatalytic Production of Terpenes.

    PubMed

    Frister, Thore; Hartwig, Steffen; Alemdar, Semra; Schnatz, Katharina; Thöns, Laura; Scheper, Thomas; Beutel, Sascha

    2015-08-01

    The patchoulol synthase (PTS) is a multi-product sesquiterpene synthases which is the central enzyme for biosynthesis of patchouli essential oil in the patchouli plant. Sesquiterpene synthases catalyse the formation of various complex carbon backbones difficult to approach by organic synthesis. Here, we report the characterisation of a recombinant patchoulol synthase complementary DNA (cDNA) variant (PTS var. 1), exhibiting significant amino acid exchanges compared to the native PTS. The product spectrum using the natural substrate E,E-farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) as well as terpenoid products resulting from conversions employing alternative substrates was analysed by GC-MS. In respect to a potential use as a biocatalyst, important enzymatic parameters such as the optimal reaction conditions, kinetic behaviour and the product selectivity were studied as well. Adjusting the reaction conditions, an increased patchoulol ratio in the recombinant essential oil was achieved. Nevertheless, the ratio remained lower than in plant-derived patchouli oil. As alternative substrates, several prenyl diposphates were accepted and converted in numerous compounds by the PTS var. 1, revealing its great biocatalytic potential.

  17. Bovine F1Fo ATP synthase monomers bend the lipid bilayer in 2D membrane crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jiko, Chimari; Davies, Karen M; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Mills, Deryck J; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Gerle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of electron cryo-tomography, subtomogram averaging, and electron crystallographic image processing to analyse the structure of intact bovine F1Fo ATP synthase in 2D membrane crystals. ATPase assays and mass spectrometry analysis of the 2D crystals confirmed that the enzyme complex was complete and active. The structure of the matrix-exposed region was determined at 24 Å resolution by subtomogram averaging and repositioned into the tomographic volume to reveal the crystal packing. F1Fo ATP synthase complexes are inclined by 16° relative to the crystal plane, resulting in a zigzag topology of the membrane and indicating that monomeric bovine heart F1Fo ATP synthase by itself is sufficient to deform lipid bilayers. This local membrane curvature is likely to be instrumental in the formation of ATP synthase dimers and dimer rows, and thus for the shaping of mitochondrial cristae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06119.001 PMID:25815585

  18. Mechanistic insight with HBCH2CoA as a probe to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shrestha, Ruben; Buckley, Rachael M; Jewell, Jamie; Bossmann, Stefan H; Stubbe, JoAnne; Li, Ping

    2014-08-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1-2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [(3)H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [(3)H]-sTCoA ([(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([(3)H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([(3)H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [(3)H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation.

  19. Threonine Synthase of Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746

    PubMed Central

    Giovanelli, John; Veluthambi, K.; Thompson, Gregory A.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Datko, Anne H.

    1984-01-01

    Threonine synthase (TS) was purified approximately 40-fold from Lemna paucicostata, and some of its properties determined by use of a sensitive and specific assay. During the course of its purification, TS was separated from cystathionine γ-synthase, establishing the separate identity of these enzymes. Compared to cystathionine γ-synthase, TS is relatively insensitive to irreversible inhibition by propargylglycine (both in vitro and in vivo) and to gabaculine, vinylglycine, or cysteine in vitro. TS is highly specific for O-phospho-l-homoserine (OPH) and water (hydroxyl ion). Nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ion is restricted to carbon-3 of OPH and proceeds sterospecifically to form threonine rather than allo-threonine. The Km for OPH, determined at saturating S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), is 2.2 to 6.9 micromolar, two orders of magnitude less than values reported for TS from other plant tissues. AdoMet markedly stimulates the enzyme in a reversible and cooperative manner, consistent with its proposed role in regulation of methionine biosynthesis. Cysteine (1 millimolar) caused a slight (26%) reversible inhibition of the enzyme. Activities of TS isolated from Lemna were inversely related to the methionine nutrition of the plants. Down-regulation of TS by methionine may help to limit the overproduction of threonine that could result from allosteric stimulation of the enzyme by AdoMet. No evidence was obtained for feedback inhibition, repression, or covalent modification of TS by threonine and/or isoleucine. PMID:16663833

  20. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  1. Progress towards clinically useful aldosterone synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the high degree of similarity between aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) and cortisol synthase (CYP11B1), the design of selective inhibitors of one or the other of these two enzymes was, at one time, thought to be impossible. Through development of novel enzyme screening assays and significant medicinal chemistry efforts, highly potent inhibitors of CYP11B2 have been identified with selectivities approaching 1000-fold between the two enzymes. Many of these molecules also possess selectivity against other steroidogenic cytochromes P450 (e.g. CYP17A1 and CYP19A1) as well as hepatic drug metabolizing P450s. Though not as well developed or explored, inhibitors of CYP11B1, with selectivities approaching 50-fold, have also been identified. The therapeutic benefits of affecting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been well established with the therapeutically useful angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Data regarding the additional benefits of an aldosterone synthase inhibitor (ASi) are beginning to emerge from animal models and human clinical trials. Despite great promise and much progress, additional challenges still exist in the path towards development of a therapeutically useful ASi.

  2. UVB-irradiated keratinocytes induce melanoma-associated ganglioside GD3 synthase gene in melanocytes via secretion of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Maiko; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Tajima, Orie; Sobue, Sayaka; Kambe, Mariko; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Melanocytes showed low ST8SIA1 and high B3GALT4 levels in contrast with melanomas. • Direct UVB irradiation of melanocytes did not induce ganglioside synthase genes. • Culture supernatants of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes induced ST8SIA1 in melanocytes. • TNFα and IL-6 secreted from keratinocytes enhanced ST8SIA1 expression in melanocytes. • Inflammatory cytokines induced melanoma-related ST8SIA1 in melanocytes. - Abstract: Although expression of gangliosides and their synthetic enzyme genes in malignant melanomas has been well studied, that in normal melanocytes has been scarcely analyzed. In particular, changes in expression levels of glycosyltransferase genes responsible for ganglioside synthesis during evolution of melanomas from melanocytes are very important to understand roles of gangliosides in melanomas. Here, expression of glycosyltransferase genes related to the ganglioside synthesis was analyzed using RNAs from cultured melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that melanomas expressed high levels of mRNA of GD3 synthase and GM2/GD2 synthase genes and low levels of GM1/GD1b synthase genes compared with melanocytes. As a representative exogenous stimulation, effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) on the expression levels of 3 major ganglioside synthase genes in melanocytes were analyzed. Although direct UVB irradiation of melanocytes caused no marked changes, culture supernatants of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) induced definite up-regulation of GD3 synthase and GM2/GD2 synthase genes. Detailed examination of the supernatants revealed that inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6 enhanced GD3 synthase gene expression. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokines secreted from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes induced melanoma-associated ganglioside synthase genes, proposing roles of skin microenvironment in the promotion of melanoma-like ganglioside profiles in melanocytes.

  3. Mutational analysis of a monoterpene synthase reaction: altered catalysis through directed mutagenesis of (-)-pinene synthase from Abies grandis.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-07-15

    Two monoterpene synthases, (-)-pinene synthase and (-)-camphene synthase, from grand fir (Abies grandis) produce different product mixtures despite having highly homologous amino acid sequences and, presumably, very similar three-dimensional structures. The major product of (-)-camphene synthase, (-)-camphene, and the major products of (-)-pinene synthase, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, arise through distinct mechanistic variations of the electrophilic reaction cascade that is common to terpenoid synthases. Structural modeling followed by directed mutagenesis in (-)-pinene synthase was used to replace selected amino acid residues with the corresponding residues from (-)-camphene synthase in an effort to identify the amino acids responsible for the catalytic differences. This approach produced an enzyme in which more than half of the product was channeled through an alternative pathway. It was also shown that several (-)-pinene synthase to (-)-camphene synthase amino acid substitutions were necessary before catalysis was significantly altered. The data support a model in which the collective action of many key amino acids, located both in and distant from the active site pocket, regulate the course of the electrophilic reaction cascade.

  4. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  5. Differences in substrate specificities of five bacterial wax ester synthases.

    PubMed

    Barney, Brett M; Wahlen, Bradley D; Garner, EmmaLee; Wei, Jiashi; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2012-08-01

    Wax esters are produced in certain bacteria as a potential carbon and energy storage compound. The final enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway responsible for wax ester production is the bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT), which utilizes a range of fatty alcohols and fatty acyl-CoAs to synthesize the corresponding wax ester. We report here the isolation and substrate range characterization for five WS/DGAT enzymes from four different bacteria: Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8, Acinetobacter baylyi, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5. The results from kinetic studies of isolated enzymes reveal a differential activity based on the order of substrate addition and reveal subtle differences between the substrate selectivity of the different enzymes. These in vitro results are compared to the wax ester and triacylglyceride product profiles obtained from each organism grown under neutral lipid accumulating conditions, providing potential insights into the role that the WS/DGAT enzyme plays in determining the final wax ester products that are produced under conditions of nutrient stress in each of these bacteria. Further, the analysis revealed that one enzyme in particular from M. aquaeolei VT8 showed the greatest potential for future study based on rapid purification and significantly higher activity than was found for the other isolated WS/DGAT enzymes. The results provide a framework to test prospective differences between these enzymes for potential biotechnological applications such as high-value petrochemicals and biofuel production.

  6. Protons, the thylakoid membrane, and the chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, W

    1989-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic theory, proton pumps and ATP synthases are coupled by lateral proton flow through aqueous phases. Three long-standing challenges to this concept, all of which have been loosely subsumed under 'localized coupling' in the literature, were examined in the light of experiments carried out with thylakoids: (1) Nearest neighbor interaction between pumps and ATP synthases. Considering the large distances between photosystem II and CFoCF1, in stacked thylakoids this is a priori absent. (2) Enhanced proton diffusion along the surface of the membrane. This could not be substantiated for the outer side of the thylakoid membrane. Even for the interface between pure lipid and water, two laboratories have reported the absence of enhanced diffusion. (3) Localized proton ducts in the membrane. Intramembrane domains that can transiently trap protons do exist in thylakoid membranes, but because of their limited storage capacity for protons, they probably do not matter for photophosphorylation under continuous light. Seemingly in favor of localized proton ducts is the failure of a supposedly permeant buffer to enhance the onset lag of photophosphorylation. However, it was found that failure of some buffers and the ability of others in this respect were correlated with their failure/ability to quench pH transients in the thylakoid lumen, as predicted by the chemiosmotic theory. It was shown that the chemiosmotic concept is a fair approximation, even for narrow aqueous phases, as in stacked thylakoids. These are approximately isopotential, and protons are taken in by the ATP synthase straight from the lumen. The molecular mechanism by which F0F1 ATPases couple proton flow to ATP synthesis is still unknown. The threefold structural symmetry of the headpiece that, probably, finds a corollary in the channel portion of these enzymes appeals to the common wisdom that structural symmetry causes functional symmetry. "Rotation catalysis" has been proposed. It is

  7. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  8. Ent-kaurene synthase from the fungus Phaeosphaeria sp. L487. cDNA isolation, characterization, and bacterial expression of a bifunctional diterpene cyclase in fungal gibberellin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kawaide, H; Imai, R; Sassa, T; Kamiya, Y

    1997-08-29

    ent-Kaurene is the first cyclic diterpene intermediate of gibberellin biosynthesis in both plants and fungi. In plants, ent-kaurene is synthesized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate via copalyl diphosphate in a two-step cyclization catalyzed by copalyl diphosphate synthase and ent-kaurene synthase. A cell-free system of the fungus Phaeosphaeria sp. L487 converted labeled geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurene. A cDNA fragment, which possibly encodes copalyl diphosphate synthase, was isolated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers based on the consensus motifs of plant enzymes. Translation of a full-length cDNA sequence isolated from the fungal cDNA library revealed an open reading frame for a 106-kDa polypeptide. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 24 and 21% identity with maize copalyl diphosphate synthase and pumpkin ent-kaurene synthase, respectively. A fusion protein produced by expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli catalyzed the two-step cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurene. Amo-1618 completely inhibited the copalyl diphosphate synthase activity of the enzyme at 10(-6) M, whereas it did not inhibit the ent-kaurene synthase activity even at 10(-4) M. These results indicate that the fungus has a bifunctional diterpene cyclase that can convert geranylgeranyl diphosphate into ent-kaurene. They may be separate catalytic sites for the two cyclization reactions.

  9. Calpain 1 cleaves and inactivates prostacyclin synthase in mesenteric arteries from diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Kyselova, Anastasia; Elgheznawy, Amro; Zukunft, Sven; Wittig, Ilka; Fleming, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of co-morbidities including an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The activation of Ca(2+)-activated proteases of the calpain family has been implicated in platelet activation associated with diabetes and this study aimed to determine the role of calpain activation in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Diabetes induction in mice attenuated acetylcholine-induced relaxation of mesenteric artery rings, an effect prevented in mice receiving a calpain inhibitor. A nitric oxide-independent but diclofenac-sensitive component of the relaxation-response was altered and correlated with a loss of prostacyclin (PGI2) generation and reduced vascular levels of PGI2 synthase. Calpain inhibition was also able to restore PGI2 synthase levels and PGI2 generation in arteries from diabetic animals. The effects of diabetes were reproduced in vitro by a combination of high glucose and palmitate, which elicited calpain activation, PGI2 synthase cleavage and inactivation as well as endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice. PGI2 cleavage was not observed in arteries from calpain 1(-/-) mice or mice overexpressing the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Finally, proteomic analyses revealed that calpain 1 cleaved the C-terminal domain of PGI2 synthase close to the catalytic site of the enzyme. These data demonstrate that diabetes leads to the activation of calpain 1 in mesenteric arteries and can initiate endothelial dysfunction by cleaving and inactivating the PGI2 synthase. Given that calpain inhibition prevented diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries, calpains represent an interesting therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular complication of diabetes.

  10. Deletion of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 increases sensitivity to salt loading and angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanjun; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Zheng; Yang, Tianxin

    2006-11-24

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), a membrane-associated protein, is critically involved in the inflammatory response and may be involved in physiological processes as well. The present study examined the role of mPGES-1 in regulation of sodium balance and blood pressure in the settings of salt loading and angiotensin II infusion. mPGES-1 -/- mice developed severe and progressive hypertension associated with an inappropriate increase in sodium balance when fed a high-salt diet. These mice exhibited a significantly impaired ability to excrete an acute enteral load of NaCl. Under these 2 settings of salt loading, urinary excretion of prostaglandin E(2) and nitrate/nitrite were remarkably increased in wild-type animals but not in mPGES-1 -/- mice. The changes of urinary cGMP paralleled that of urinary nitrate/nitrite. mPGES-1 -/- mice exhibited a remarkable inhibition of high salt-induced increase in gene expression of all 3 NO synthase isoforms, whereas these mice had upregulated expression of NO synthase III but not NO synthase I and NO synthase II at basal state. Chronic salt loading remarkably induced mPGES-1 protein expression exclusively in the distal nephron. In primary cultures of CD cells, mPGES-1 expression was significantly increased following exposure to hypertonic NaCl, in parallel with increased prostaglandin E(2) release. These findings have revealed a mPGES-1/prostaglandin E(2)/NO/cGMP pathway that appears to be critically important for salt adaptation. In addition, we provide evidence that mPGES-1 deficiency sensitized the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II. Overall, this study has characterized the natriuretic and antihypertensive role of mPGES-1 that likely contributes to blood pressure homeostasis.

  11. Rat mitochondrial and cytosolic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ayté, J; Gil-Gómez, G; Haro, D; Marrero, P F; Hegardt, F G

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a 1994-base-pair cDNA that encompasses the entire transcription unit of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase (EC 4.1.3.5.) gene from rat. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 508 residues and 56,918-Da molecular mass. Identify of the cDNA clone isolated as mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase was confirmed by the following criteria: (i) Amino acid residues are 65% homologous with hamster cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. (ii) A 19-amino acid sequence probably corresponding to the catalytic site is highly homologous (90%) to that reported for chicken liver mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. (iii) The expression product of the cDNA in Escherichia coli has HMG-CoA synthase activity. (iv) The protein includes a sequence of 37 amino acid residues at the N terminus that is not present in the cytosolic enzyme. The predominantly basic, hydrophobic, and hydroxylated nature of the residues of this sequence suggests that it is a leader peptide to target HMG-CoA synthase inside mitochondria. These data plus the hybridization pattern in genomic Southern blot analysis, the different transcript size (2.0 kilobases versus 3.4 kilobases for the cytosolic enzyme), and the different expression pattern shown in RNA blot experiments suggest the presence of two HMG-CoA synthase genes, one for the cytosolic and another for the mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:1971108

  12. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  13. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  14. Cellulose synthase interacting protein: a new factor in cellulose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Somerville, Chris

    2010-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities.

  15. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  16. Differentially expressed galactinol synthase(s) in chickpea are implicated in seed vigor and longevity by limiting the age induced ROS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Prafull; Saxena, Saurabh Chandra; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Kamble, Nitin Uttam; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Rao, Venkateswara; Ghosh, Shraboni; Majee, Manoj

    2016-10-11

    Galactinol synthase (GolS) catalyzes the first and rate limiting step of Raffinose Family Oligosaccharide (RFO) biosynthetic pathway, which is a highly specialized metabolic event in plants. Increased accumulation of galactinol and RFOs in seeds have been reported in few plant species, however their precise role in seed vigor and longevity remain elusive. In present study, we have shown that galactinol synthase activity as well as galactinol and raffinose content progressively increase as seed development proceeds and become highly abundant in pod and mature dry seeds, which gradually decline as seed germination progresses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum). Furthermore, artificial aging also stimulates galactinol synthase activity and consequent galactinol and raffinose accumulation in seed. Molecular analysis revealed that GolS in chickpea are encoded by two divergent genes (CaGolS1 and CaGolS2) which potentially encode five CaGolS isoforms through alternative splicing. Biochemical analysis showed that only two isoforms (CaGolS1 and CaGolS2) are biochemically active with similar yet distinct biochemical properties. CaGolS1 and CaGolS2 are differentially regulated in different organs, during seed development and germination however exhibit similar subcellular localization. Furthermore, seed-specific overexpression of CaGolS1 and CaGolS2 in Arabidopsis results improved seed vigor and longevity through limiting the age induced excess ROS and consequent lipid peroxidation.

  17. Differentially expressed galactinol synthase(s) in chickpea are implicated in seed vigor and longevity by limiting the age induced ROS accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Prafull; Saxena, Saurabh Chandra; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Kamble, Nitin Uttam; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Rao, Venkateswara; Ghosh, Shraboni; Majee, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Galactinol synthase (GolS) catalyzes the first and rate limiting step of Raffinose Family Oligosaccharide (RFO) biosynthetic pathway, which is a highly specialized metabolic event in plants. Increased accumulation of galactinol and RFOs in seeds have been reported in few plant species, however their precise role in seed vigor and longevity remain elusive. In present study, we have shown that galactinol synthase activity as well as galactinol and raffinose content progressively increase as seed development proceeds and become highly abundant in pod and mature dry seeds, which gradually decline as seed germination progresses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum). Furthermore, artificial aging also stimulates galactinol synthase activity and consequent galactinol and raffinose accumulation in seed. Molecular analysis revealed that GolS in chickpea are encoded by two divergent genes (CaGolS1 and CaGolS2) which potentially encode five CaGolS isoforms through alternative splicing. Biochemical analysis showed that only two isoforms (CaGolS1 and CaGolS2) are biochemically active with similar yet distinct biochemical properties. CaGolS1 and CaGolS2 are differentially regulated in different organs, during seed development and germination however exhibit similar subcellular localization. Furthermore, seed-specific overexpression of CaGolS1 and CaGolS2 in Arabidopsis results improved seed vigor and longevity through limiting the age induced excess ROS and consequent lipid peroxidation. PMID:27725707

  18. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  19. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  20. Cloning and characterization of the citA gene encoding the mitochondrial citrate synthase of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Park, B W; Han, K H; Lee, C Y; Lee, C H; Maeng, P J

    1997-04-30

    We isolated a citrate synthase gene (citA) from Aspergillus nidulans. By analysis of the protein coding region, citA was shown to encode a citrate synthase (CitA) of 52.2 kDa consisting of 474 amino acid residues that were interrupted by seven introns. Also, the precursor CitA protein was revealed to have an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal of 35 amino acid residues containing an R-3 cleavage motif, R(32)-C-Y decreases S(35), which supports the fact that citA encodes the mitochondrial form of citrate synthase of A. nidulans. Southern blot analysis showed that citA is present as a single copy in the genome.

  1. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E G; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring's ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens.

  2. Transcriptomic insight into terpenoid and carbazole alkaloid biosynthesis, and functional characterization of two terpene synthases in curry tree (Murraya koenigii)

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Seema; Rajeev Kumar, Sarma; Dwivedi, Varun; Kumar Singh, Anup; Chanotiya, Chandan S.; Akhtar, Md. Qussen; Kumar, Krishna; Kumar Shasany, Ajit; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.

    2017-01-01

    Curry tree (Murraya koenigii L.) is a rich source of aromatic terpenes and pharmacologically important carbazole alkaloids. Here, M. koenigii leaf transcriptome was generated to gain insight into terpenoid and alkaloid biosynthesis. Analysis of de novo assembled contigs yielded genes for terpene backbone biosynthesis and terpene synthases. Also, gene families possibly involved in carbazole alkaloid formation were identified that included polyketide synthases, prenyltransferases, methyltransferases and cytochrome P450s. Further, two genes encoding terpene synthases (MkTPS1 and MkTPS2) with highest in silico transcript abundance were cloned and functionally characterized to determine their involvement in leaf volatile formation. Subcellular localization using GFP fusions revealed the plastidial and cytosolic localization of MkTPS1 and MkTPS2, respectively. Enzymatic characterization demonstrated the monoterpene synthase activity of recombinant MkTPS1, which produced primarily (−)-sabinene from geranyl diphosphate (GPP). Recombinant MkTPS2 exhibited sesquiterpene synthase activity and formed (E,E)-α-farnesene as the major product from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Moreover, mRNA expression and leaf volatile analyses indicated that MkTPS1 accounts for (−)-sabinene emitted by M. koenigii leaves. Overall, the transcriptome data generated in this study will be a great resource and the start point for characterizing genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of medicinally important carbazole alkaloids. PMID:28272514

  3. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D.; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E. G.; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring’s ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26601184

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the isomerase domain of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase from Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Olchowy, Jaroslaw; Milewski, Slawomir

    2005-11-01

    The isomerase domain of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase from C. albicans has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected. Preliminary analysis of the data reveals the oligomeric structure of the eukaryotic synthase to be a ‘dimer’ of prokaryotic-like dimers. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (EC 2.6.1.16) catalyses the first and practically irreversible step in the hexosamine metabolism pathway, the end product of which, uridine 5′-diphospho-N-acetyl d-glucosamine, is an essential substrate for assembly of the cell wall. The isomerase domain, consisting of residues 346–712 (42 kDa), of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase from Candida albicans has been crystallized. X-ray analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149, c = 103 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 3.8 Å. Preliminary results from molecular replacement using the homologous bacterial monomer reveal that the asymmetric unit contains two monomers that resemble a bacterial dimer. The crystal lattice consists of pairs of such symmetry-related dimers forming elongated tetramers.

  5. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G.; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene–producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon–intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  6. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G; Köllner, Tobias G

    2016-03-15

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene-producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon-intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors.

  7. Molecular cloning, expression pattern and comparative analysis of chitin synthase gene B in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Senthil; Tang, Bin; Chen, Xiaofei; Tian, Honggang; Zhang, Wenqing

    2008-03-01

    The chitin synthase (CHS) gene B (4781 bp) of Spodoptera exigua (SeCHSB) was cloned by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and 3'/5' RACE from the midgut. SeCHSB contains an open reading frame of 4572 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 1523 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 174.6 kDa. Alignment of SeCHSB with class B CHSs of other insects showed a high degree of conservation in the putative catalytic domain region. The structure of the SeCHSB gene was analyzed and was found to be the same as that of Manduca sexta CHSB (MsCHSB), including 23 exons and 22 introns but without alternative exons. Southern blot analysis revealed that SeCHSB was a single copy gene and the presence of only two chitin synthase genes in S. exigua. Further investigation indicated that SeCHSB was specifically expressed in the midgut, and its transcript existed constitutively in the midgut from the 3rd instar larval stage to prepupae and reached highest expression on the 1st day of the fifth instar larval stage. These data suggest that SeCHSB is very important in midgut formation and development. Chitin synthase gene comparisons between different classes of insects using software tools revealed some interesting aspects of the similarity and divergence of the gene in the Class Insecta.

  8. Investigating sesquiterpene biosynthesis in Ginkgo biloba: molecular cloning and functional characterization of (E,E)-farnesol and α-bisabolene synthases.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Iffat; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jianping; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Ali, Abbas; Baerson, Scott R; Techen, Natascha; Chappell, Joe; Khan, Ikhlas A; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest living tree species and has been extensively investigated as a source of bioactive natural compounds, including bioactive flavonoids, diterpene lactones, terpenoids and polysaccharides which accumulate in foliar tissues. Despite this chemical diversity, relatively few enzymes associated with any biosynthetic pathway from ginkgo have been characterized to date. In the present work, predicted transcripts potentially encoding enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of diterpenoid and terpenoid compounds, including putative terpene synthases, were first identified by mining publicly-available G. biloba RNA-seq data sets. Recombinant enzyme studies with two of the TPS-like sequences led to the identification of GbTPS1 and GbTPS2, encoding farnesol and bisabolene synthases, respectively. Additionally, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the two terpene synthase genes as primitive genes that might have evolved from an ancestral diterpene synthase.

  9. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  10. Construction of gene expression system in hop (Humulus lupulus) lupulin gland using valerophenone synthase promoter.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukio; Saeki, Kazuo; Inaba, Akira; Suda, Narushi; Kaneko, Takafumi; Ito, Kazutoshi

    2003-09-01

    The promoter region of the valerophenone synthase (VPS) gene was isolated from hop (Humulus lupulus). VPS, a member of the chalcone synthase (CHS) super-family, catalyzes the biosynthesis reaction of the hop resin that significantly accumulates in the cone's secretory gland called the "lupulin gland". The typical H-box and G-box sequences, which exist in many plants' CHS promoters and act as cis-elements for tissue specificity, UV-light induction, etc., were not found in the isolated VPS promoter, although the H-box-like sequence (CCTTACC, CCTAACC) and the core sequence (ACGT) of the G-box were observed. The transformation experiment using the VPS promoter-UIDA gene fusion revealed that the promoter acts not only in the lupulin gland but also in the glands of leaf and stem. On the other hand, the VPS promoter activity was not induced by UV-irradiation.

  11. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme.

  12. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    SciTech Connect

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  13. Truncating mutation in the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene is associated with infantile achalasia.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Edvardson, Simon; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Zangen, Tzili; Hashavya, Saar; Begin, Michal; Yaacov, Barak; Cinamon, Yuval; Koplewitz, Benjamin Z; Vromen, Amos; Elpeleg, Orly; Smith, Brian C

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide is thought to have a role in the pathogenesis of achalasia. We performed a genetic analysis of 2 siblings with infant-onset achalasia. Exome analysis revealed that they were homozygous for a premature stop codon in the gene encoding nitric oxide synthase 1. Kinetic analyses and molecular modeling showed that the truncated protein product has defects in folding, nitric oxide production, and binding of cofactors. Heller myotomy had no effect in these patients, but sildenafil therapy increased their ability to drink. The finding recapitulates the previously reported phenotype of nitric oxide synthase 1-deficient mice, which have achalasia. Nitric oxide signaling appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of achalasia in humans.

  14. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B.; Minto, Robert E.; Melton, Rachel E.; O’Maille, Paul E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  15. Dedicated ent-kaurene and ent-atiserene synthases for platensimycin and platencin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Smanski, Michael J; Yu, Zhiguo; Casper, Jeffrey; Lin, Shuangjun; Peterson, Ryan M; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Rajski, Scott R; Shen, Ben

    2011-08-16

    Platensimycin (PTM) and platencin (PTN) are potent and selective inhibitors of bacterial and mammalian fatty acid synthases and have emerged as promising drug leads for both antibacterial and antidiabetic therapies. Comparative analysis of the PTM and PTN biosynthetic machineries in Streptomyces platensis MA7327 and MA7339 revealed that the divergence of PTM and PTN biosynthesis is controlled by dedicated ent-kaurene and ent-atiserene synthases, the latter of which represents a new pathway for diterpenoid biosynthesis. The PTM and PTN biosynthetic machineries provide a rare glimpse at how secondary metabolic pathway evolution increases natural product structural diversity and support the wisdom of applying combinatorial biosynthesis methods for the generation of novel PTM and/or PTN analogues, thereby facilitating drug development efforts based on these privileged natural product scaffolds.

  16. The effect of a spinal cord hemisection on changes in nitric oxide synthase pools in the site of injury and in regions located far away from the injured site.

    PubMed

    Lukácová, Nadezda; Kolesárová, Mária; Kuchárová, Karolína; Pavel, Jaroslav; Kolesár, Dalibor; Radonák, Jozef; Marsala, Martin; Chalimoniuk, Malgorzata; Langfort, Jozef; Marsala, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to examine the nitric oxide synthase activities (constitutive and inducible) in the site of injury in response to Th10-Th11 spinal cord hemisection and, to determine whether unilateral disconnection of the spinal cord influences the NOS pools on the contra- and ipsilateral sides in segments located far away from the epicentre of injury. 2. A radioassay detection was used to determine Ca(2+)-dependent and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities. Somal, axonal and neuropil neuronal nitric oxide synthase was assessed by immunocytochemical study. A quantitative assessment of neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity was made by an image analyser. The level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein was measured by the Western blot analysis. 3. Our data show the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase activity and a decrease of Ca(2+)-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the injured site analysed 1 and 7 days after surgery. In segments remote from the epicentre of injury the inducible nitric oxide synthase activity was increased at both time points. Ca(2+)-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity had decreased in L5-S1 segments in a group of animals surviving for 7 days. A hemisection performed at thoracic level did not cause significant difference in the nitric oxide synthase activities and in the level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein between the contra- and ipsilateral sides in C6-Th1 and L5-S1 segments taken as a whole. Significant differences were observed, but only when the spinal cord was analysed segment by segment, and/or was divided into dorsal and ventral parts. The cell counts in the cervicothoracic (C7-Th1) and lumbosacral (L5-S1) enlargements revealed changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity on the ipsilateral side of the injury. The densitometric area measurements confirmed the reduction of somal, neuropil and axonal neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive staining in

  17. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  18. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases.

    PubMed

    Egan, Alexander J F; Biboy, Jacob; van't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-10-05

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied for 70 years, useful in vitro assays for measuring their activities were established only recently, and these provided the first insights into the regulation of these enzymes. Here, we review the current knowledge on the glycosyltransferase and transpeptidase activities of PG synthases. We provide new data showing that the bifunctional PBP1A and PBP1B from Escherichia coli are active upon reconstitution into the membrane environment of proteoliposomes, and that these enzymes also exhibit DD-carboxypeptidase activity in certain conditions. Both novel features are relevant for their functioning within the cell. We also review recent data on the impact of protein-protein interactions and other factors on the activities of PBPs. As an example, we demonstrate a synergistic effect of multiple protein-protein interactions on the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1B, by its cognate lipoprotein activator LpoB and the essential cell division protein FtsN.

  19. Subcellular localization and regulation of coenzyme A synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Panasyuk, Ganna; Valovka, Taras; Fenton, Tim; Rebholz, Heike; Wang, Mong-Lien; Foxon, Richard; Lyzogubov, Valeriy; Usenko, Vasylij; Kyyamova, Ramziya; Gorbenko, Olena; Matsuka, Genadiy; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T

    2003-12-12

    CoA synthase mediates the last two steps in the sequence of enzymatic reactions, leading to CoA biosynthesis. We have recently identified cDNA for CoA synthase and demonstrated that it encodes a bifunctional enzyme possessing 4'-phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase and dephospho-CoA kinase activities. Molecular cloning of CoA synthase provided us with necessary tools to study subcellular localization and the regulation of this bifunctional enzyme. Transient expression studies and confocal microscopy allowed us to demonstrate that full-length CoA synthase is associated with the mitochondria, whereas the removal of the N-terminal region relocates the enzyme to the cytosol. In addition, we showed that the N-terminal sequence of CoA synthase (amino acids 1-29) exhibits a hydrophobic profile and targets green fluorescent protein exclusively to mitochondria. Further analysis, involving subcellular fractionation and limited proteolysis, indicated that CoA synthase is localized on the mitochondrial outer membrane. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which are the main components of the mitochondrial outer membrane, are potent activators of both enzymatic activities of CoA synthase in vitro. Taken together, these data provide the evidence that the final stages of CoA biosynthesis take place on mitochondria and the activity of CoA synthase is regulated by phospholipids.

  20. Argininosuccinate synthase: at the center of arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ricci J; Pendleton, Laura C; Eichler, Duane C

    2011-01-01

    The levels of L-arginine, a cationic, semi-essential amino acid, are often controlled within a cell at the level of local availability through biosynthesis. The importance of this temporal and spatial control of cellular L-arginine is highlighted by the tissue specific roles of argininosuccinate synthase (argininosuccinate synthetase) (EC 6.3.4.5), as the rate-limiting step in the conversion of L-citrulline to L-arginine. Since its discovery, the function of argininosuccinate synthase has been linked almost exclusively to hepatic urea production despite the fact that alternative pathways involving argininosuccinate synthase were defined, such as its role in providing arginine for creatine and for polyamine biosynthesis. However, it was the discovery of nitric oxide that meaningfully extended our understanding of the metabolic importance of non-hepatic argininosuccinate synthase. Indeed, our knowledge of the number of tissues that manage distinct pools of arginine under the control of argininosuccinate synthase has expanded significantly.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds.

  2. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5′-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  3. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    PubMed

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  4. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  5. Revelation of the ability of Burkholderia sp. USM (JCM 15050) PHA synthase to polymerize 4-hydroxybutyrate monomer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The nutrition-versatility of Burkholderia sp. strain USM (JCM 15050) has initiated the studies on the use of this bacterium for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production. To date, the Burkholderia sp. has been reported to synthesize 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxyvalerate and 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate monomers. In this study, the PHA biosynthetic genes of this strain were successfully cloned and characterized. The PHA biosynthetic cluster of this strain consisted of a PHA synthase (phaC), β-ketothiolase (phaA), acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (phaB) and PHA synthesis regulator (phaR). The translated products of these genes revealed identities to corresponding proteins of Burkholderia vietnamiensis (99–100 %) and Cupriavidus necator H16 (63–89%). Heterologous expression of phaCBs conferred PHA synthesis to the PHA-negative Cupriavidus necator PHB¯4, confirming that phaCBs encoded functionally active protein. PHA synthase activity measurements revealed that the crude extracts of C. necator PHB¯4 transformant showed higher synthase activity (243 U/g) compared to that of wild-types Burkholderia sp. (151 U/g) and C. necator H16 (180 U/g). Interestingly, the transformant C. necator PHB¯4 harbouring Burkholderia sp. PHA synthase gene accumulated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) with 4-hydroxybutyrate monomer as high as up to 87 mol% from sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate. The wild type Burkholderia sp. did not have the ability to produce this copolymer. PMID:22877240

  6. ATP Synthase Deficiency due to TMEM70 Mutation Leads to Ultrastructural Mitochondrial Degeneration and Is Amenable to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Braczynski, Anne K.; Vlaho, Stefan; Müller, Klaus; Wittig, Ilka; Blank, Anna-Eva; Tews, Dominique S.; Drott, Ulrich; Kleinle, Stephanie; Abicht, Angela; Horvath, Rita; Plate, Karl H.; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H.; Schulze, Andreas; Harter, Patrick N.; Kieslich, Matthias; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    TMEM70 is involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ATP synthase and mutations in the TMEM70 gene impair oxidative phosphorylation. Herein, we report on pathology and treatment of ATP synthase deficiency in four siblings. A consanguineous family of Roma (Gipsy) ethnic origin gave birth to 6 children of which 4 were affected presenting with dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, cardiomyopathy, metabolic crises, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as clinical symptoms. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.317-2A>G) in the TMEM70 gene. While light microscopy was unremarkable, ultrastructural investigation of muscle tissue revealed accumulation of swollen degenerated mitochondria with lipid crystalloid inclusions, cristae aggregation, and exocytosis of mitochondrial material. Biochemical analysis of mitochondrial complexes showed an almost complete ATP synthase deficiency. Despite harbouring the same mutation, the clinical outcome in the four siblings was different. Two children died within 60 h after birth; the other two had recurrent life-threatening metabolic crises but were successfully managed with supplementation of anaplerotic amino acids, lipids, and symptomatic treatment during metabolic crisis. In summary, TMEM70 mutations can cause distinct ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration and almost complete deficiency of ATP synthase but are still amenable to treatment. PMID:26550569

  7. Identification of cystathionine γ-synthase and threonine synthase from Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris.

    PubMed

    Morneau, Dominique J K; Jaworski, Allison F; Aitken, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    In plants, cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) and threonine synthase (TS) compete for the branch-point metabolite O-phospho-L-homoserine. These enzymes are potential targets for metabolic engineering studies, aiming to alter the flux through the competing methionine and threonine biosynthetic pathways, with the goal of increasing methionine production. Although CGS and TS have been characterized in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, little information is available on these enzymes in other, particularly plant, species. The functional CGS and TS coding sequences from the grain legumes Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Lens culinaris (lentil) identified in this study share approximately 80% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding sequences from Glycine max. At least 7 active-site residues of grain legume CGS and TS are conserved in the model bacterial enzymes, including the catalytic base. Putative processing sites that remove the targeting sequence and result in functional TS were identified in the target species.

  8. Heterologous expression in Saccharopolyspora erythraea of a pentaketide synthase derived from the spinosyn polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christine J; Timoney, Máire C; Sheridan, Rose M; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Staunton, James C; Leadlay, Peter F

    2003-12-07

    A truncated version of the spinosyn polyketide synthase comprising the loading module and the first four extension modules fused to the erythromycin thioesterase domain was expressed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A novel pentaketide lactone product was isolated, identifying cryptic steps of spinosyn biosynthesis and indicating the potential of this approach for the biosynthetic engineering of spinosyn analogues. A pathway for the formation of the tetracyclic spinosyn aglycone is proposed.

  9. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  10. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T.; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S.; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO) - a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  12. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  13. A Single Amino Acid Substitution Converts Benzophenone Synthase into Phenylpyrone Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Klundt, Tim; Bocola, Marco; Lütge, Maren; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Benzophenone metabolism provides a number of plant natural products with fascinating chemical structures and intriguing pharmacological activities. Formation of the carbon skeleton of benzophenone derivatives from benzoyl-CoA and three molecules of malonyl-CoA is catalyzed by benzophenone synthase (BPS), a member of the superfamily of type III polyketide synthases. A point mutation in the active site cavity (T135L) transformed BPS into a functional phenylpyrone synthase (PPS). The dramatic change in both substrate and product specificities of BPS was rationalized by homology modeling. The mutation may open a new pocket that accommodates the phenyl moiety of the triketide intermediate but limits polyketide elongation to two reactions, resulting in phenylpyrone formation. 3-Hydroxybenzoyl-CoA is the second best starter molecule for BPS but a poor substrate for PPS. The aryl moiety of the triketide intermediate may be trapped in the new pocket by hydrogen bond formation with the backbone, thereby acting as an inhibitor. PPS is a promising biotechnological tool for manipulating benzoate-primed biosynthetic pathways to produce novel compounds. PMID:19710020

  14. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  15. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F.; Haskins, Mark E.; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with ∼35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461–GQ850464. PMID:19934113

  16. Molecular cloning of AtRS4, a seed specific multifunctional RFO synthase/galactosylhydrolase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Roman; Behmüller, Robert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Stachyose is among the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) one of the major water-soluble carbohydrates next to sucrose in seeds of a number of plant species. Especially in leguminous seeds, e.g. chickpea, stachyose is reported as the major component. In contrast to their ambiguous potential as essential source of carbon for germination, RFOs are indigestible for humans and can contribute to diverse abdominal disorders. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, six putative raffinose synthase genes are reported, whereas little is known about these putative raffinose synthases and their biochemical characteristics or their contribution to the RFO physiology in A. thaliana. In this paper, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli and purification of recombinant AtRS4 from A. thaliana and the biochemical characterisation of the putative stachyose synthase (AtSTS, At4g01970) as a raffinose and high affinity stachyose synthase (Km for raffinose 259.2 ± 21.15 μM) as well as stachyose and galactinol specific galactosylhydrolase. A T-DNA insertional mutant in the AtRS4 gene was isolated. Only semi-quantitative PCR from WT siliques showed a specific transcriptional AtRS4 PCR product. Metabolite measurements in seeds of ΔAtRS4 mutant plants revealed a total loss of stachyose in ΔAtRS4 mutant seeds. We conclude that AtRS4 is the only stachyose synthase in the genome of A. thaliana that AtRS4 represents a key regulation mechanism in the RFO physiology of A. thaliana due to its multifunctional enzyme activity and that AtRS4 is possibly the second seed specific raffinose synthase beside AtRS5, which is responsible for Raf accumulation under abiotic stress. PMID:26483807

  17. [An intron-free methyl jasmonate inducible geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase gene from Taxus media and its functional identification in yeast].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhihua; Gong, Yifu; Kai, Guoyin; Zuo, Kaijing; Chen, Min; Tan, Qiumin; Wei, Yamin; Guo, Liang; Tan, Feng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2005-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS, EC: 2.5.1.29) catalyzes the biosynthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), which is a key precursor for diterpenes including Taxol, one of the most potent antitumor drugs. In order to investigate the role of GGPP synthase in taxol biosynthesis, we cloned, characterized and functionally expressed the GGPP synthase gene from Taxus media. A 3743-bp genomic sequence of T. media was isolated by genome walking strategy which contained an 1182-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 393-amino acid polypeptide that showed high similarity to other plant GGPPSs. Subsequently the full-length cDNA of the GGPPS gene of T. media (designated TmGGPPS) was amplified by RACE. Bioinformatic analysis showed that TmGGPPS was an intron-free gene and its deduced polypeptide contained all the five conserved domains and functional aspartate-rich motifs of the prenyltransferases. By constructing the phylogenetic tree of plant GGPPSs, it was found that plant-derived GGPPSs could be divided into two classes, angiosperm and gymnosperm classes, which might have evolved in parallel from the same ancestor. To our knowledge this was the first report that the geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase genes were free of intron and evolved in parallel between angiosperms and gymnosperms. The coding sequence of TmGGPPS was expressed in yeast mutant (SFNY368) lacking of GGPP synthase activity through functional complementation, and the transgenic yeast showed to have activity of GGPP synthase. This was also the first time to use SFNY368 to identify the function of plant-derived GGPPSs. Furthermore, investigation of the impact of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on the expression of TmGGPPS revealed that MeJA-treated T. media cultured cells had much higher expression of TmGGPPS than untreated cells.

  18. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Haskins, Mark E; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-02-15

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with approximately 35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461-GQ850464.

  19. Enhanced gastric nitric oxide synthase activity in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Eliakim, R; Stalnikowicz, R; Ackerman, Z; Amir, G; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide, the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may have a role in tissue injury through its oxidative metabolism. Nitric oxide may have a role in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the association between gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and peptic disease. In this study, calcium independent nitric oxide synthase activity was detected in human gastric mucosa suggesting expression of the inducible isoform. In 17 duodenal ulcer patients gastric antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity was found to be two and 1.5-fold respectively higher than its activity in the antrum and fundus of 14 normal subjects (p < 0.05). H pylori was detected in the antrum of 15 of 17 duodenal ulcer patients and only in 7 of 14 of the control subjects. Antral nitric oxide synthase activity in H pylori positive duodenal ulcer patients was twofold higher than in H pylori positive normal subjects (p < 0.05). In duodenal ulcer patients antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity resumed normal values after induction of ulcer healing with ranitidine. Eradication of H pylori did not further affect gastric nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings suggest that in duodenal ulcer patients stimulated gastric mucosal nitric oxide synthase activity, though independent of the H pylori state, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:7525417

  20. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  1. Inhibitor-bound complexes of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Darren W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Raymond, Amy C.; Smith, Eric R.; Hartley, Robert C.; Abendroth, Jan; Sankaran, Banumathi; Lorimer, Donald D.; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2011-01-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by eukaryotic Babesia parasites which are morphologically similar to Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria in humans. Like Plasmodium, different species of Babesia are tuned to infect different mammalian hosts, including rats, dogs, horses and cattle. Most species of Plasmodium and Babesia possess an essential bifunctional enzyme for nucleotide synthesis and folate metabolism: dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase. Although thymidylate synthase is highly conserved across organisms, the bifunctional form of this enzyme is relatively uncommon in nature. The structural characterization of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase in Babesia bovis, the causative agent of babesiosis in livestock cattle, is reported here. The apo state is compared with structures that contain dUMP, NADP and two different antifolate inhibitors: pemetrexed and raltitrexed. The complexes reveal modes of binding similar to that seen in drug-resistant malaria strains and point to the utility of applying structural studies with proven cancer chemotherapies towards infectious disease research. PMID:21904052

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of a linalool synthase from lemon myrtle.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Mizue; Ito, Sohei; Saito, Yosuke; Niwa, Yasuo; Koltunow, Anna M; Sugimoto, Osamu; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Using a homology-based PCR strategy, we identified a cDNA with sequence similarity to linalool synthase from lemon myrtle. Functional expression of the cDNA (designated BcLS) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an active enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of geranyl diphosphate to (-)-linalool, i.e., an acyclic monoterpene alcohol, and to lesser amounts of cyclic monoterpenes. The kinetic parameters of BcLS were similar to those of synthases producing cyclic monoterpenes. PCR analysis revealed that the BcLS gene transcript was ubiquitously expressed in lemon myrtle and was upregulated in response to jasmonic acid treatment. Although the physiological role of neryl diphosphate (NPP) dependency of BcLS remains unclear, the cyclization activity of BcLS was enhanced when NPP was used as substrate, resulting in predominant production of cyclic monoterpenes. These findings indicate that BcLS has novel specificity and kinetic parameters, but its physiological responses to stresses such as insect damage appear to be similar to known linalool synthases.

  3. Identification and evaluation of novel acetolactate synthase inhibitors as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Richie, Daryl L; Thompson, Katherine V; Studer, Christian; Prindle, Vivian C; Aust, Thomas; Riedl, Ralph; Estoppey, David; Tao, Jianshi; Sexton, Jessica A; Zabawa, Thomas; Drumm, Joseph; Cotesta, Simona; Eichenberger, Jürg; Schuierer, Sven; Hartmann, Nicole; Movva, N Rao; Tallarico, John A; Ryder, Neil S; Hoepfner, Dominic

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput phenotypic screening against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed a series of triazolopyrimidine-sulfonamide compounds with broad-spectrum antifungal activity, no significant cytotoxicity, and low protein binding. To elucidate the target of this series, we have applied a chemogenomic profiling approach using the S. cerevisiae deletion collection. All compounds of the series yielded highly similar profiles that suggested acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p, which catalyzes the first common step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis) as a possible target. The high correlation with profiles of known Ilv2p inhibitors like chlorimuron-ethyl provided further evidence for a similar mechanism of action. Genome-wide mutagenesis in S. cerevisiae identified 13 resistant clones with 3 different mutations in the catalytic subunit of acetolactate synthase that also conferred cross-resistance to established Ilv2p inhibitors. Mapping of the mutations into the published Ilv2p crystal structure outlined the chlorimuron-ethyl binding cavity, and it was possible to dock the triazolopyrimidine-sulfonamide compound into this pocket in silico. However, fungal growth inhibition could be bypassed through supplementation with exogenous branched-chain amino acids or by the addition of serum to the medium in all of the fungal organisms tested except for Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these data support the identification of the triazolopyrimidine-sulfonamide compounds as inhibitors of acetolactate synthase but suggest that targeting may be compromised due to the possibility of nutrient bypass in vivo.

  4. Mitochondrial β-Cyanoalanine Synthase Is Essential for Root Hair Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Castellano, José María; Vioque, Blanca; Solano, Roberto; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanide is stoichiometrically produced as a coproduct of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway and is detoxified by β-cyanoalanine synthase enzymes. The molecular and phenotypical analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants of the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1 suggests that discrete accumulation of cyanide is not toxic for the plant and does not alter mitochondrial respiration rates but does act as a strong inhibitor of root hair development. The cys-c1 null allele is defective in root hair formation and accumulates cyanide in root tissues. The root hair defect is phenocopied in wild-type plants by the exogenous addition of cyanide to the growth medium and is reversed by the addition of hydroxocobalamin or by genetic complementation with the CYS-C1 gene. Hydroxocobalamin not only recovers the root phenotype of the mutant but also the formation of reactive oxygen species at the initial step of root hair tip growth. Transcriptional profiling of the cys-c1 mutant reveals that cyanide accumulation acts as a repressive signal for several genes encoding enzymes involved in cell wall rebuilding and the formation of the root hair tip as well as genes involved in ethylene signaling and metabolism. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase activity is essential to maintain a low level of cyanide for proper root hair development. PMID:20935247

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Sá-Moura, Bebiana; Albuquerque, Luciana; Empadinhas, Nuno; Costa, Milton S. da; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    The enzyme mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from R. xylanophilus has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only Gram-positive bacterium known to synthesize the compatible solute mannosylglycerate (MG), which is commonly found in hyperthermophilic archaea and some thermophilic bacteria. Unlike the salt-dependent pattern of accumulation observed in (hyper)thermophiles, in R. xylanophilus MG accumulates constitutively. The synthesis of MG in R. xylanophilus was tracked from GDP-mannose and 3-phosphoglycerate, but the genome sequence of the organism failed to reveal any of the genes known to be involved in this pathway. The native enzyme was purified and its N-terminal sequence was used to identify the corresponding gene (mpgS) in the genome of R. xylanophilus. The gene encodes a highly divergent mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) without relevant sequence homology to known mannosylphosphoglycerate synthases. In order to understand the specificity and enzymatic mechanism of this novel enzyme, it was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals thus obtained belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and contained two protein molecules per asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by SIRAS using a mercury derivative.

  6. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Clay, Kasi; Thompson, Stephanie S.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Andrews, Bethany J.; Zechmann, Bernd; Gibbon, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2) called “Quality Protein Maize” (QPM) have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms. PMID:26115014

  7. Heterodimeric geranyl(geranyl)diphosphate synthase from hop (Humulus lupulus) and the evolution of monoterpene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-06-16

    Myrcene, which accounts for 30-50% of the essential oil in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) trichomes, derives from geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the common precursor of monoterpenes. Full-length sequences of heterodimeric GPP synthase small subunit (GPPS.SSU, belonging to the SSU I subfamily) and large subunit (LSU) cDNAs were mined from a hop trichome cDNA library. The SSU was inactive, whereas the LSU produced GPP, farnesyl diphosphate, and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) from dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate in vitro. Coexpression of both subunits in Escherichia coli yielded a heterodimeric enzyme exhibiting altered ratios of GPP and GGPP synthase activities and greatly enhanced catalytic efficiency. Transcript analysis suggested that the heterodimeric geranyl(geranyl)diphosphate synthase [G(G)PPS] is involved in myrcene biosynthesis in hop trichomes. The critical role of the conserved CxxxC motif (where "x" can be any hydrophobic amino acid residue) in physical interactions between the 2 subunits was demonstrated by using site-directed mutagenesis, and this motif was used in informatic searches to reveal a previously undescribed SSU subfamily (SSU II) present in both angiosperms and gymnosperms. The evolution and physiological roles of SSUs are discussed.

  8. Crystal structure of Ralstonia eutropha polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase C-terminal domain and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Kim, Yeo-Jin; Choi, So Young; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are natural polyesters synthesized by numerous microorganisms as energy and reducing power storage materials, and have attracted much attention as substitutes for petroleum-based plastics. Here, we report the first crystal structure of Ralstonia eutropha PHA synthase at 1.8 Å resolution and structure-based mechanisms for PHA polymerization. RePhaC1 contains two distinct domains, the N-terminal (RePhaC1ND ) and C-terminal domains (RePhaC1CD ), and exists as a dimer. RePhaC1CD catalyzes polymerization via non-processive ping-pong mechanism using a Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Molecular docking simulation of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to the active site of RePhaC1CD reveals residues involved in the formation of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA binding pocket and substrate binding tunnel. Comparative analysis with other polymerases elucidates how different classes of PHA synthases show different substrate specificities. Furthermore, we attempted structure-based protein engineering and developed a RePhaC1 mutant with enhanced PHA synthase activity.

  9. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: A new fold on an old enzyme

    DOE PAGES

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.; ...

    2014-10-21

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. In this paper, we present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic genemore » clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. Finally, a structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production.« less

  10. Structural study and thermodynamic characterization of inhibitor binding to lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Illarionov, Boris; Saller, Sabine; Popov, Aleksander; Sambaiah, Thota; Bacher, Adelbert; Cushman, Mark; Fischer, Markus; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2010-09-01

    Crystallographic studies of lumazine synthase, the penultimate enzyme of the riboflavin-biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotic inhibitors, together with calorimetric and kinetic investigations of inhibitor binding. The crystal structure of lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis was solved by molecular replacement and refined to R{sub cryst} = 23.7% (R{sub free} = 28.4%) at a resolution of 3.5 Å. The structure reveals the icosahedral symmetry of the enzyme and specific features of the active site that are unique in comparison with previously determined orthologues. The application of isothermal titration calorimetry in combination with enzyme kinetics showed that three designed pyrimidine derivatives bind to lumazine synthase with micromolar dissociation constants and competitively inhibit the catalytic reaction. Structure-based modelling suggested the binding modes of the inhibitors in the active site and allowed an estimation of the possible contacts formed upon binding. The results provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotics active against B. anthracis.

  11. Human uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: genomic organization, alternative promoters, and erythroid-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Aizencang, G; Solis, C; Bishop, D F; Warner, C; Desnick, R J

    2000-12-01

    Uroporphyrinogen-III (URO) synthase is the heme biosynthetic enzyme defective in congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The approximately 34-kb human URO-synthase gene (UROS) was isolated, and its organization and tissue-specific expression were determined. The gene had two promoters that generated housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts with unique 5'-untranslated sequences (exons 1 and 2A) followed by nine common coding exons (2B to 10). Expression arrays revealed that the housekeeping transcript was present in all tissues, while the erythroid transcript was only in erythropoietic tissues. The housekeeping promoter lacked TATA and SP1 sites, consistent with the observed low level expression in most cells, whereas the erythroid promoter contained GATA1 and NF-E2 sites for erythroid specificity. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the housekeeping promoter was active in both erythroid K562 and HeLa cells, while the erythroid promoter was active only in erythroid cells and its activity was increased during hemin-induced erythroid differentiation. Thus, human URO-synthase expression is regulated during erythropoiesis by an erythroid-specific alternative promoter.

  12. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is the molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    van Beek, E; Pieterman, E; Cohen, L; Löwik, C; Papapoulos, S

    1999-10-14

    Bisphosphonates (Bps), inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption, are used in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Recent evidence indicated that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase and/or isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) isomerase is the intracellular target(s) of bisphosphonate action. To examine which enzyme is specifically affected, we determined the effect of different Bps on incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate (MVA), [(14)C]IPP, and [(14)C]dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) into polyisoprenyl pyrophosphates in a homogenate of bovine brain. HPLC analysis revealed that the three intermediates were incorporated into FPP and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). In contrast to clodronate, the nitrogen-containing Bps (NBps), alendronate, risedronate, olpadronate, and ibandronate, completely blocked FPP and GGPP formation and induced in incubations with [(14)C]MVA a 3- to 5-fold increase in incorporation of label into IPP and/or DMAPP. Using a method that could distinguish DMAPP from IPP on basis of their difference in stability in acid, we found that none of the NBps affected the conversion of [(14)C]IPP into DMAPP, catalyzed by IPP isomerase, excluding this enzyme as target of NBp action. On the basis of these and our previous findings, we conclude that none of the enzymes up- or downstream of FPP synthase are affected by NBps, and FPP synthase is, therefore, the exclusive molecular target of NBp action.

  13. Gibberellin Overproduction Promotes Sucrose Synthase Expression and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition in Cotton Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Song, Shui-Qing; Hu, Lin; Zeng, Jian-Yan; Li, Xian-Bi; Hou, Lei; Luo, Ming; Li, De-Mou; Pei, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) comprise an important class of natural plant growth regulators and play essential roles in cotton fiber development. To date, the molecular base of GAs' functions in fiber development is largely unclear. To address this question, the endogenous bioactive GA levels in cotton developing fibers were elevated by specifically up-regulating GA 20-oxidase and suppressing GA 2-oxidase via transgenic methods. Higher GA levels in transgenic cotton fibers significantly increased micronaire values, 1000-fiber weight, cell wall thickness and cellulose contents of mature fibers. Quantitative RT-PCR and biochemical analysis revealed that the transcription of sucrose synthase gene GhSusA1 and sucrose synthase activities were significantly enhanced in GA overproducing transgenic fibers, compared to the wild-type cotton. In addition, exogenous application of bioactive GA could promote GhSusA1 expression in cultured fibers, as well as in cotton hypocotyls. Our results suggested that bioactive GAs promoted secondary cell wall deposition in cotton fibers by enhancing sucrose synthase expression. PMID:24816840

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of recombinant Persicaria minor β-sesquiphellandrene synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ker, De-Sheng; Pang, Sze Lei; Othman, Noor Farhan; Kumaran, Sekar; Tan, Ee Fun; Krishnan, Thiba; Chan, Kok Gan; Othman, Roohaida

    2017-01-01

    Background Sesquiterpenes are 15-carbon terpenes synthesized by sesquiterpene synthases using farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) as a substrate. Recently, a sesquiterpene synthase gene that encodes a 65 kDa protein was isolated from the aromatic plant Persicaria minor. Here, we report the expression, purification and characterization of recombinant P. minor sesquiterpene synthase protein (PmSTS). Insights into the catalytic active site were further provided by structural analysis guided by multiple sequence alignment. Methods The enzyme was purified in two steps using affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Enzyme assays were performed using the malachite green assay and enzymatic product was identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Sequence analysis of PmSTS was performed using multiple sequence alignment (MSA) against plant sesquiterpene synthase sequences. The homology model of PmSTS was generated using I-TASSER server. Results Our findings suggest that the recombinant PmSTS is mainly expressed as inclusion bodies and soluble aggregate in the E. coli protein expression system. However, the addition of 15% (v/v) glycerol to the protein purification buffer and the removal of N-terminal 24 amino acids of PmSTS helped to produce homogenous recombinant protein. Enzyme assay showed that recombinant PmSTS is active and specific to the C15 substrate FPP. The optimal temperature and pH for the recombinant PmSTS are 30 °C and pH 8.0, respectively. The GC-MS analysis further showed that PmSTS produces β-sesquiphellandrene as a major product and β-farnesene as a minor product. MSA analysis revealed that PmSTS adopts a modified conserved metal binding motif (NSE/DTE motif). Structural analysis suggests that PmSTS may binds to its substrate similarly to other plant sesquiterpene synthases. Discussion The study has revealed that homogenous PmSTS protein can be obtained with the addition of glycerol in the protein buffer. The N-terminal truncation

  15. Cloning and Characterization of an Armillaria gallica cDNA Encoding Protoilludene Synthase, Which Catalyzes the First Committed Step in the Synthesis of Antimicrobial Melleolides*

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Benedikt; Heinig, Uwe; Grothe, Torsten; Stadler, Marc; Jennewein, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Melleolides and related fungal sesquiterpenoid aryl esters are antimicrobial and cytotoxic natural products derived from cultures of the Homobasidiomycetes genus Armillaria. The initial step in the biosynthesis of all melleolides involves cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor farnesyl diphosphate to produce protoilludene, a reaction catalyzed by protoilludene synthase. We achieved the partial purification of protoilludene synthase from a mycelial culture of Armillaria gallica and found that 6-protoilludene was its exclusive reaction product. Therefore, a further isomerization reaction is necessary to convert the 6–7 double bond into the 7–8 double bond found in melleolides. We expressed an A. gallica protoilludene synthase cDNA in Escherichia coli, and this also led to the exclusive production of 6-protoilludene. Sequence comparison of the isolated sesquiterpene synthase revealed a distant relationship to other fungal terpene synthases. The isolation of the genomic sequence identified the 6-protoilludene synthase to be present as a single copy gene in the genome of A. gallica, possessing an open reading frame interrupted with eight introns. PMID:21148562

  16. Structural basis for recognition of polyglutamyl folates by thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Kamb, A; Finer-Moore, J; Calvert, A H; Stroud, R M

    1992-10-20

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of thymidine. In vivo TS binds a polyglutamyl cofactor, polyglutamyl methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2-H4folate), which serves as a carbon donor. Glutamate residues on the cofactor contribute as much as 3.7 kcal to the interaction between the cofactor, substrate, and enzyme. Because many ligand/receptor interactions appear to be driven largely by hydrophobic forces, it is surprising that the addition of hydrophilic, soluble groups such as glutamates increases the affinity of the cofactor for TS. The structure of a polyglutamyl cofactor analog bound in ternary complex with deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) and Escherichia coli TS reveals how the polyglutamyl moiety is positioned in TS and accounts in a qualitative way for the binding contributions of the different individual glutamate residues. The polyglutamyl moiety is not rigidly fixed by its interaction with the protein except for the first glutamate residue nearest the p-aminobenzoic acid ring of folate. Each additional glutamate is progressively more disordered than the previous one in the chain. The position of the second and third glutamate residues on the protein surface suggests that the polyglutamyl binding site could be utilized by a new family of inhibitors that might fill the binding area more effectively than polyglutamate.

  17. Structure and function of eukaryotic fatty acid synthases.

    PubMed

    Maier, Timm; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2010-08-01

    In all organisms, fatty acid synthesis is achieved in variations of a common cyclic reaction pathway by stepwise, iterative elongation of precursors with two-carbon extender units. In bacteria, all individual reaction steps are carried out by monofunctional dissociated enzymes, whereas in eukaryotes the fatty acid synthases (FASs) have evolved into large multifunctional enzymes that integrate the whole process of fatty acid synthesis. During the last few years, important advances in understanding the structural and functional organization of eukaryotic FASs have been made through a combination of biochemical, electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic approaches. They have revealed the strikingly different architectures of the two distinct types of eukaryotic FASs, the fungal and the animal enzyme system. Fungal FAS is a 2·6 MDa α₆β₆ heterododecamer with a barrel shape enclosing two large chambers, each containing three sets of active sites separated by a central wheel-like structure. It represents a highly specialized micro-compartment strictly optimized for the production of saturated fatty acids. In contrast, the animal FAS is a 540 kDa X-shaped homodimer with two lateral reaction clefts characterized by a modular domain architecture and large extent of conformational flexibility that appears to contribute to catalytic efficiency.

  18. Uncoupled Cardiac Nitric Oxide Synthase Mediates Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Gad A.; Fan, Tai-Hwang M.; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Zhe; Xiao, Hong D.; Lovelock, Joshua D.; Boulden, Beth M.; Widder, Julian; Fredd, Scott; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Wolska, Beata M.; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is one consequence of hypertension and caused by impaired cardiac diastolic relaxation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a known modulator of cardiac relaxation. Hypertension can lead to a reduction in vascular NO, in part because nitric oxide synthase (NOS) becomes uncoupled when oxidative depletion of its co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) occurs.Similar events may occur in the heart leading to uncoupled NOS and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results In a hypertensive mouse model, diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac oxidation, a reduction in cardiac BH4, and uncoupled NOS. Compared to sham-operated animals, male mice with unilateral nephrectomy, with subcutaneous implantation of a controlled release deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) pellet, and given 1% saline to drink were mildly hypertensive and had diastolic dysfunction in the absence of systolic dysfunction or cardiac hypertrophy. The hypertensive mouse hearts showed increased oxidized biopterins, NOS-dependent superoxide production, reduced NO production, and phosphorylated phospholamban. Feeding hypertensive mice BH4 (5 mg/day), but not treating with hydralazine or tetrahydroneopterin, improved cardiac BH4 stores, phosphorylated phospholamban levels, and diastolic dysfunction. Isolated cardiomyocyte experiments revealed impaired relaxation that was normalized with acute BH4 treatment. Targeted cardiac overexpression of angiotensin converting enzyme also resulted in cardiac oxidation, NOS uncoupling, and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension. Conclusions Cardiac oxidation, independent of vascular changes, can lead to uncoupled cardiac NOS and diastolic dysfunction. BH4 may represent a possible treatment for diastolic dysfunction. PMID:20083682

  19. Mechanics of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Living Plant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehfroosh, Nina; Liu, Derui; Ramos, Kieran P.; Yang, Xiaoli; Goldner, Lori S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    The polymer cellulose is one of the major components of the world's biomass with unique and fascinating characteristics such as its high tensile strength, renewability, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. Because of these distinctive aspects, cellulose has been the subject of enormous scientific and industrial interest, yet there are still fundamental open questions about cellulose biosynthesis. Cellulose is synthesized by a complex of transmembrane proteins called ``Cellulose Synthase A'' (CESA) in the plasma membrane. Studying the dynamics and kinematics of the CESA complex will help reveal the mechanism of cellulose synthesis and permit the development and validation of models of CESA motility. To understand what drives these complexes through the cell membrane, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and variable angle epi-fluorescence microscopy to track individual, fluorescently-labeled CESA complexes as they move in the hypocotyl and root of living plants. A mean square displacement analysis will be applied to distinguish ballistic, diffusional, and other forms of motion. We report on the results of these tracking experiments. This work was funded by NSF/PHY-1205989.

  20. Structure-based inhibitor discovery of Helicobacter pylori dehydroquinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jai-Shin; Cheng, Wen-Chi; Wang, Hung-Jung; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2008-08-15

    Dehydroquinate synthase (DHQS) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent enzyme that converts 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) into 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ). Since it catalyzes the second key step in the shikimate pathway, which is crucial for the aromatic amino acid metabolism in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but not in mammals, DHQS is a potential target for new antimicrobial agents, anti-parasitic agents and herbicides. The crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori DHQS (HpDHQS) complexed with NAD has been determined at 2.4-A resolution and was found to possess an N-terminal Rossmann-fold domain and a C-terminal alpha-helical domain. Structural comparison reveals that the binary complex adopts an open-state conformation and shares conserved residues in the binding pocket. Virtual docking of compounds into the active site of the HpDHQS structure using the GOLD docking program led to the identification of several inhibitors. The most active compound had an IC(50) value of 61 microM, which may serve as a lead for potent inhibitors.

  1. Allostery and the dynamic oligomerization of porphobilinogen synthase

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eileen K.; Lawrence, Sarah H.

    2011-01-01

    The structural basis for allosteric regulation of porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) is modulation of a quaternary structure equilibrium between octamer and hexamer (via dimers), which is represented schematically as 8mer ⇔ 2mer ⇔ 2mer* ⇔ 6mer*. The “*” represents a reorientation between two domains of each subunit that occurs in the dissociated state because it is sterically forbidden in the larger multimers. Allosteric effectors of PBGS are both intrinsic and extrinsic and are phylogenetically variable. In some species this equilibrium is modulated intrinsically by magnesium which binds at a site specific to the 8mer. In other species this equilibrium is modulated intrinsically by pH; the guanidinium group of an arginine being spatially equivalent to the allosteric magnesium ion. In humans, disease associated variants all shift the equilibrium toward the 6mer* relative to wild type. The 6mer* has a surface cavity that is not present in the 8mer and is proposed as a small molecule allosteric binding site. In silico and in vitro approaches have revealed species-specific allosteric PBGS inhibitors that stabilize the 6mer*. Some of these inhibitors are drugs in clinical use leading to the hypothesis that extrinsic allosteric inhibition of human PBGS could be a mechanism for drug side effects. PMID:22037356

  2. SIRT3 Deacetylates Ceramide Synthases: IMPLICATIONS FOR MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND BRAIN INJURY.

    PubMed

    Novgorodov, Sergei A; Riley, Christopher L; Keffler, Jarryd A; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S; Macklin, Wendy B; Lombard, David B; Gudz, Tatyana I

    2016-01-22

    Experimental evidence supports the role of mitochondrial ceramide accumulation as a cause of mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after stroke. Herein, we report that SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis via deacetylation of ceramide synthase (CerS) 1, 2, and 6. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CerS1, CerS2, and CerS6, but not CerS4, are associated with SIRT3 in cerebral mitochondria. Furthermore, CerS1, -2, and -6 are hyperacetylated in the mitochondria of SIRT3-null mice, and SIRT3 directly deacetylates the ceramide synthases in a NAD(+)-dependent manner that increases enzyme activity. Investigation of the SIRT3 role in mitochondrial response to brain ischemia/reperfusion (IR) showed that SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ceramide synthases increased enzyme activity and ceramide accumulation after IR. Functional studies demonstrated that absence of SIRT3 rescued the IR-induced blockade of the electron transport chain at the level of complex III, attenuated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, and decreased reactive oxygen species generation and protein carbonyls in mitochondria. Importantly, Sirt3 gene ablation reduced the brain injury after IR. These data support the hypothesis that IR triggers SIRT3-dependent deacetylation of ceramide synthases and the elevation of ceramide, which could inhibit complex III, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and brain injury. The results of these studies highlight a novel mechanism of SIRT3 involvement in modulating mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis and suggest an important role of SIRT3 in mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after experimental stroke.

  3. Hydroxymethylbilane synthase: Complete genomic sequence and amplifiable polymorphisms in the human gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hanwook; Warner, C.A.; Chen, Chiahsiang; Desnick, R.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Heterozygous individuals are prone to life-threatening acute neurologic attacks, which are precipitated by certain drugs and other metabolic, hormonal, and nutritional factors. Since the biochemical diagnosis of heterozygous individuals has been problematic, recent efforts have focused on the identification of mutations and diagnostically useful restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPS) in the HMB-synthase gene. To facilitate these endeavors, the human HMB-synthase gene, including 1.1 kb of the 5[prime] flanking region, was isolated and completely sequenced in both orientations. The 10,024-bp gene contained 15 exons ranging in size from 39 to 438 bp and 14 introns ranging from 87 to 2913 bp. All intron/exon boundaries conformed to the GT/AG consensus rule. There were six Alu repetitive elements, one of the J and five of the Sa subfamilies. Analysis of the 1. I -kb 5[prime]flanking region revealed putative regulatory elements for the housekeeping promoter including AP1, AP4, SP1, TRE, ENH, and CAC. This region contained 10 HpaII sites and had an overall GC content of 54%. Three new polymorphic sites were identified by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, a common BsmAI site in intron 3 (3581 A/G), a common HinfI RFLP in intron 10 (7064 C/A), and a rare MnlI site in intron 14 (7998G/A). The allele frequencies of five previously known and the new polymorphic sites in a normal Caucasian population indicated that the intron 1 and intron 3 RFLPs were in linkage disequilibrium; however, the Hint I site segregated independently. 54 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. A trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene from Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunyan; Wang, Xiuliang; Guo, Hui; Duan, Delin

    2014-01-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence of a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene from Saccharina japonica (designated as SjaTPS) (Accession: KC578568) was isolated based on homologous cloning and RACE-PCR. It was 4,127 bp, with 320 bp 5'-UTR, 21 bp 3'-UTR, and open reading frame (ORF) of 3,786 bp. The deduced 1,261 amino acids characterized with predicted molecular weight of 137.84 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 7.12. The SjaTPS had one N-terminal CBM20 (family 20 carbohydrate-binding module) domain, one TPS domain (trehalose-6-phosphate synthase) in the middle region and a single TPP (trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase) domain near the C-terminus. Structural analysis suggested that the SjaTPS putatively functioned as trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, and might be related to laminaran metabolism in S. japonica. Homology analysis indicated that the SjaTPS shared 49-70 % similarities with the 13 known TPS sequences of other algae; only 55 % amino acid similarities were detected between SjaTPS and the previously reported TPS sequence of S. japonica (Accession: DQ666325). Phylogenetic analysis revealed close affinity between SjaTPS and TPS of brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus (Accession: CBJ29609). Transcriptional analysis showed that desiccation greatly enhanced SjaTPS expression and the maximum appeared at 3 h, which was about 300-fold compared to that of the start, implied that SjaTPS was involved with drought adaption in kelp. In vitro expression of SjaTPS showed that one distinct band existed at ~115 kDa, and western blot detection proved that it was positive to the anti-His antibody with high specificity. Our results increased the knowledge of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase properties in S. japonica and also important for better understanding the role trehalose plays in kelp abiotic tolerance for adaption to the sublittoral habitats.

  5. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  6. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  7. Geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from Methanosarcina mazei: Different role, different evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2010-02-26

    The gene of (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase that is responsible for the biosynthesis of methanophenazine, an electron carrier utilized for methanogenesis, was cloned from a methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Goe1. The properties of the recombinant enzyme and the results of phylogenetic analysis suggest that the enzyme is closely related to (all-E) prenyl diphosphate synthases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, rather than to the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, including (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from a thermophilic archaeon.

  8. O-Nucleoside, S-Nucleoside, and N-Nucleoside Probes of Lumazine Synthase and Riboflavin Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Arindam; Zhao, Yujie; Lv, Wei; Bacher, Adelbert; Illarionov, Boris; Fischer, Markus; Cushman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Lumazine synthase catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin, while riboflavin synthase catalyzes the last step. O-Nucleoside, S-nucleoside and N-nucleoside analogues of hypothetical lumazine biosynthetic intermediates have been synthesized in order to obtain structure and mechanism probes of these two enzymes, as well as inhibitors of potential value as antibiotics. Methods were devised for the selective cleavage of benzyl protecting groups in the presence of other easily reduced functionality by controlled hydrogenolysis over Lindlar catalyst. The deprotection reaction was performed in the presence of other reactive functionality including nitro groups, alkenes, and halogens. The target compounds were tested as inhibitors of lumazine synthase and riboflavin synthase obtained from a variety of microorganisms. In general, the S-nucleosides and N-nucleosides were more potent than the corresponding O-nucleosides as lumazine synthase and riboflavin synthase inhibitors, while the C-nucleosides were the least potent. A series of molecular dynamics simulations followed by free energy calculations using the Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (MM-PBSA) method were carried out in order to rationalize the results of ligand binding to lumazine synthase, and the results provide insight into the dynamics of ligand binding as well as the molecular forces stabilizing the intermediates in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:22780198

  9. Biosynthesis of the psychotropic plant diterpene salvinorin A: Discovery and characterization of the Salvia divinorum clerodienyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Pelot, Kyle A; Mitchell, Rod; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Hagelthorn, David M; Wardman, Jacob F; Chiang, Angela; Bohlmann, Jörg; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Zerbe, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    Salvia divinorum commonly known as diviner's sage, is an ethnomedicinal plant of the mint family (Lamiaceae). Salvia divinorum is rich in clerodane-type diterpenoids, which accumulate predominantly in leaf glandular trichomes. The main bioactive metabolite, salvinorin A, is the first non-nitrogenous natural compound known to function as an opioid-receptor agonist, and is undergoing clinical trials for potential use in treating neuropsychiatric diseases and drug addictions. We report here the discovery and functional characterization of two S. divinorum diterpene synthases (diTPSs), the ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CPP) synthase SdCPS1, and the clerodienyl diphosphate (CLPP) synthase SdCPS2. Mining of leaf- and trichome-specific transcriptomes revealed five diTPSs, two of which are class II diTPSs (SdCPS1-2) and three are class I enzymes (SdKSL1-3). Of the class II diTPSs, transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana identified SdCPS1 as an ent-CPP synthase, which is prevalent in roots and, together with SdKSL1, exhibits a possible dual role in general and specialized metabolism. In vivo co-expression and in vitro assays combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis identified SdCPS2 as a CLPP synthase. A role of SdCPS2 in catalyzing the committed step in salvinorin A biosynthesis is supported by its biochemical function, trichome-specific expression and absence of additional class II diTPSs in S. divinorum. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed four catalytic residues that enabled the re-programming of SdCPS2 activity to afford four distinct products, thus advancing our understanding of how neo-functionalization events have shaped the array of different class II diTPS functions in plants, and may promote synthetic biology platforms for a broader spectrum of diterpenoid bioproducts.

  10. Evolution of metamorphism in thymidylate synthases within the primate lineages.

    PubMed

    Luo, BeiBei; Johnson, Saphronia R; Lebioda, Lukasz; Berger, Sondra H

    2011-03-01

    Crystal structures of human thymidylate synthase (hTS) revealed that the protein exists in active and inactive conformations, defined by the position of a loop containing the active site nucleophile. TS is highly homologous among diverse species; however, the residue at position 163 (hTS) differs among species. Arginine at this position is predicted by structural modeling to enable conformational switching. Arginine or lysine is reported at this position in all mammals in the GenBank and Ensembl databases, with arginine reported in only primates. Sequence analysis of the TS gene of representative primates revealed that arginine occurs at this relative position in all primates except a representative of prosimians. Mutant human proteins were created with residues at position 163 that occur in TSs from prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Catalytic constants (k(cat)) of mutant enzymes were 45-149% of hTS, with the lysine mutant (R163K) exhibiting the highest k(cat). The effect of lysine substitution on solution structure and on ligand binding was investigated. R163K exhibited higher intrinsic fluorescence, a more negative molar ellipticity, and higher dissociation constants (K(d)) for ligands that modulate protein conformation than hTS. Temperature effects on intrinsic fluorescence and catalytic activity of hTS and R163K are consistent with proteins populating different conformational states. The data indicate that the enzyme with arginine at the position corresponding to 163 (hTS) evolved after the divergence of prosimians and simians and that substitution of lysine by arginine confers unique structural and functional properties to the enzyme expressed in simian primates.

  11. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  12. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  13. Rare structural variants of human and murine uroporphyrinogen I synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.; Carter, M.L.C.

    1980-05-01

    An isoelectric focusing method for detection of structural variants of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthase (porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8) in mammalian tissues has been developed. Mouse and human erythrocytes contain one or two major isozymes of uroporphyrinogen I synthase, respectively. Other tissues contain a set of more acidic isozymes that are encoded by the same structural gene as the erythrocyte isozymes. Mouse populations studied with this method were monomorphic for uroporphyrinogen I synthase, with the exception of one feral mouse population. The pedigree of a human family with a rare structural variant is consistent with autosomal linkage of the structural gene. This system provides a convenient isozyme marker for genetic studies and will facilitate determination of the chromosomal location of the uroporphyrinogen I synthase locus.

  14. Identification and characterization of the niddamycin polyketide synthase genes from Streptomyces caelestis.

    PubMed Central

    Kakavas, S J; Katz, L; Stassi, D

    1997-01-01

    The genes encoding the polyketide synthase (PKS) portion of the niddamycin biosynthetic pathway were isolated from a library of Streptomyces caelestis NRRL-2821 chromosomal DNA. Analysis of 40 kb of DNA revealed the presence of five large open reading frames (ORFs) encoding the seven modular sets of enzymatic activities required for the synthesis of a 16-membered lactone ring. The enzymatic motifs identified within each module were consistent with those predicted from the structure of niddamycin. Disruption of the second ORF of the PKS coding region eliminated niddamycin production, demonstrating that the cloned genes are involved in the biosynthesis of this compound. PMID:9393718

  15. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: an unusual riboflavin synthase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, S; Korn, S; Lottspeich, F; Bacher, A

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase was purified by a factor of about 1,500 from cell extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. The enzyme had a specific activity of about 2,700 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, which is relatively low compared to those of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Amino acid sequences obtained after proteolytic cleavage had no similarity with known riboflavin synthases. The gene coding for riboflavin synthase (designated ribC) was subsequently cloned by marker rescue with a ribC mutant of Escherichia coli. The ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum specifies a protein of 153 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees with the information gleaned from Edman degradation of the isolated protein and shows 67% identity with the sequence predicted for the unannotated reading frame MJ1184 of Methanococcus jannaschii. The ribC gene is adjacent to a cluster of four genes with similarity to the genes cbiMNQO of Salmonella typhimurium, which form part of the cob operon (this operon contains most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12). The amino acid sequence predicted by the ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum shows no similarity whatsoever to the sequences of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Most notably, the M. thermoautotrophicum protein does not show the internal sequence homology characteristic of eubacterial and yeast riboflavin synthases. The protein of M. thermoautotrophicum can be expressed efficiently in a recombinant E. coli strain. The specific activity of the purified, recombinant protein is 1,900 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C. In contrast to riboflavin synthases from eubacteria and fungi, the methanobacterial enzyme has an absolute requirement for magnesium ions. The 5' phosphate of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine does not act as a substrate. The findings suggest that riboflavin synthase has evolved independently in eubacteria and methanobacteria. PMID:9139911

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the isomerase domain of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, Jaroslaw; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Milewski, Slawomir; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (EC 2.6.1.16) catalyses the first and practically irreversible step in the hexosamine metabolism pathway, the end product of which, uridine 5′-diphospho-N-acetyl d-glucosamine, is an essential substrate for assembly of the cell wall. The isomerase domain, consisting of residues 346–712 (42 kDa), of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase from Candida albicans has been crystallized. X-ray analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149, c = 103 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 3.8 Å. Preliminary results from molecular replacement using the homologous bacterial monomer reveal that the asymmetric unit contains two monomers that resemble a bacterial dimer. The crystal lattice consists of pairs of such symmetry-related dimers forming elongated tetramers. PMID:16511216

  17. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia due to a mutation in exon 10 of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Edgar, A J; Wickramasinghe, S N

    1998-02-01

    DNA sequencing of the coding region of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS2) cDNA from a male with pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia revealed a missense mutation C1622G and a closely linked polymorphism C1612A in exon 10 of the gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic DNA from other family members revealed that the proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous carriers of the mutation, consistent with the X-linked inheritance. The C1622G mutation results in a histidine to aspartic acid substitution at amino acid residue 524. The histidine residue is conserved in both the erythroid and housekeeping ALAS proteins in vertebrates, all other known ALAS proteins and other oxamine synthases that have pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a co-factor. This histidine is located in a predicted loop, preceding a long alpha-helix region near the carboxy-terminus.

  18. Sbg1 Is a Novel Regulator for the Localization of the β-Glucan Synthase Bgs1 in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Reshma; Pontasch, Josef A.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Glucan synthases synthesize glucans, complex polysaccharides that are the major components in fungal cell walls and division septa. Studying regulation of glucan synthases is important as they are essential for fungal cell survival and thus popular targets for anti-fungal drugs. Linear 1,3-β-glucan is the main component of primary septum and is synthesized by the conserved β-glucan synthase Bgs1 in fission yeast cytokinesis. It is known that Rho1 GTPase regulates Bgs1 catalytic activity and the F-BAR protein Cdc15 plays a role in Bgs1 delivery to the plasma membrane. Here we characterize a novel protein Sbg1 that is present in a complex with Bgs1 and regulates its protein levels and localization. Sbg1 is essential for contractile-ring constriction and septum formation during cytokinesis. Sbg1 and Bgs1 physically interact and are interdependent for localization to the plasma membrane. Bgs1 is less stable and/or mis-targeted to vacuoles in sbg1 mutants. Moreover, Sbg1 plays an earlier and more important role in Bgs1 trafficking and localization than Cdc15. Together, our data reveal a new mode of regulation for the essential β-glucan synthase Bgs1 by the novel protein Sbg1. PMID:27898700

  19. Production and characterization of polyclonal antibodies in rabbits to 4S-limonene synthase from spearmint (Mentha spicata).

    PubMed

    Alonso, W R; Crock, J E; Croteau, R

    1993-02-15

    Limonene synthase, a monoterpene cyclase from the oil glands of spearmint (Mentha spicata) leaves that catalyzes the conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate to (-)-4S-limonene, was purified, and polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits against the sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured protein. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the antibodies were very specific for denatured limonene synthase from all Mentha species tested. However, no immunological cross-reactivity was observed with denatured limonene synthases from Valencia oranges (Citrus sinensis, Rutaceae) or wormseed (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae). Furthermore, the antibody preparation did not detectably cross-react with other monoterpene cyclases from related angiosperm species of the Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, and Umbellifereae, or from conifer species, and no cross-reactivity was demonstrated toward several sesquiterpene cyclases of higher plant and fungal origin. Although the antibody preparation was highly selective for denatured limonene cyclase from Mentha, the antibodies did not recognize the native protein in several different types of experiments. Nevertheless, specificity for the target enzyme was unambiguously demonstrated when the antibody preparation was shown to cross-react with the cyclase protein expressed in Escherichia coli that harbored the corresponding limonene synthase cDNA gene from M. spicata.

  20. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6} recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

  1. In vitro isolation, elicitation of psoralen in callus cultures of Psoralea corylifolia and cloning of psoralen synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Parast, Behrooz M; Chetri, Siva K; Sharma, Kuldeep; Agrawal, Veena

    2011-10-01

    Psoralen, an important furanocoumarin occurring abundantly in seeds of Psoralea corylifolia is used as an anticancerous compound against leukemia and other cancer cell lines. Evaluation and isolation of psoralen from the calluses derived from different plant parts, viz. cotyledons, nodes, leaves and roots have been done in the present case for the first time. Amongst all, a maximum of 1934.75 μg/g f.w. of psoralen was recorded in callus derived from cotyledons, followed by 1875.50 and 1465.75 μg/g f.w. of psoralen in node and leaf derived calluses, respectively. Amount of psoralen enhanced further when cotyledonary calluses were exposed to different concentrations of organic elicitors (yeast extract, proline, inositol, casein hydrolyzate (CH), glycine, glutamine and sucrose) and precursors of psoralen (umbelliferone, cinnamic acid and NADPH). Isolation of psoralen was done using methanol as solvent through column chromatography and TLC. FT-IR and NMR further characterized and confirmed the structure of psoralen. In addition, the putative gene, psoralen synthase involved in psoralen synthesis pathway has been isolated, cloned and sequenced which comprised 1237 bp length. BLAST analysis of the gene sequence of psoralen synthase revealed that its nucleotide sequence showed 93% homology with psoralen synthase isolated from Ammi majus. This is the first report of isolation, cloning and characterization of psoralen synthase from Psoralea corylifolia.

  2. Alendronate is a specific, nanomolar inhibitor of farnesyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, J D; Bostedor, R G; Masarachia, P J; Reszka, A A; Rodan, G

    2000-01-01

    Alendronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption used for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. Recent findings suggest that alendronate and other N-containing bisphosphonates inhibit the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway and interfere with protein prenylation, as a result of reduced geranylgeranyl diphosphate levels. This study identified farnesyl disphosphate synthase as the mevalonate pathway enzyme inhibited by bisphosphonates. HPLC analysis of products from a liver cytosolic extract narrowed the potential targets for alendronate inhibition (IC(50) = 1700 nM) to isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Recombinant human farnesyl diphosphate synthase was inhibited by alendronate with an IC(50) of 460 nM (following 15 min preincubation). Alendronate did not inhibit isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase or GGPP synthase, partially purified from liver cytosol. Recombinant farnesyl diphosphate synthase was also inhibited by pamidronate (IC(50) = 500 nM) and risedronate (IC(50) = 3.9 nM), negligibly by etidronate (IC50 = 80 microM), and not at all by clodronate. In osteoclasts, alendronate inhibited the incorporation of [(3)H]mevalonolactone into proteins of 18-25 kDa and into nonsaponifiable lipids, including sterols. These findings (i) identify farnesyl diphosphate synthase as the selective target of alendronate in the mevalonate pathway, (ii) show that this enzyme is inhibited by other N-containing bisphosphonates, such as risendronate, but not by clodronate, supporting a different mechanism of action for different bisphosphonates, and (iii) document in purified osteoclasts alendronate inhibition of prenylation and sterol biosynthesis.

  3. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  4. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  5. Concerted versus Stepwise Mechanism in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalyzes the intracellular de novo formation of thymidylate (a DNA building block) in most living organisms, making it a common target for chemotherapeutic and antibiotic drugs. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the rate-limiting hydride transfer step in TSase catalysis: a stepwise mechanism in which the hydride transfer precedes the cleavage of the covalent bond between the enzymatic cysteine and the product and a mechanism where both happen concertedly. Striking similarities between the enzyme-bound enolate intermediates formed in the initial and final step of the reaction supported the first mechanism, while QM/MM calculations favored the concerted mechanism. Here, we experimentally test these two possibilities using secondary kinetic isotope effect (KIE), mutagenesis study, and primary KIEs. The findings support the concerted mechanism and demonstrate the critical role of an active site arginine in substrate binding, activation of enzymatic nucleophile, and the hydride transfer studied here. The elucidation of this reduction/substitution sheds light on the critical catalytic step in TSase and may aid future drug or biomimetic catalyst design. PMID:24949852

  6. Nitric oxide synthase in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    López-Figueroa, M O; Møller, M

    1996-10-01

    The recent discovery of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger molecule with unique characteristics has opened a new field in pineal research. This free radical gas is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from L-arginine. The activation of adrenoreceptors in the membrane of the pinealocytes mediates the increase in NO through a mechanism that involves G proteins. In the pinealocyte, NO stimulates guanylyl cyclase resulting in an increased intracellular content of cGMP. The role of cGMP in pineal metabolism, however, is still enigmatic. Using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, the presence of NOS has been confirmed in the pineal gland of some species. In the rat and especially in the sheep, NOS is located in nerve fibres innervating the gland. These nerve fibres also contain the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and are probably of parasympathetic origin. In cell cultures and tissue sections NOS immunoreactivity has been shown to be present in pinealocytes of the rat and bovine but not in the sheep. Finally, NOS is also present in the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the pineal gland. Accordingly, in the mammalian pineal gland, NO is synthesized in both presynaptic nerve fibers and pinealocytes, as well as in blood vessels. However, the anatomical location of NO synthesis varies considerably among species. NO released in the pineal gland, might influence both the pineal metabolism and the blood flow of the gland.

  7. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in the myocard.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, I B; Schulze, W; Karczewski, P; Kostic, M M; Wallukat, G; Morwinski, R; Krause, E G; Müller, J; Paul, M; Slezak, J; Luft, F C; Haller, H

    2001-01-01

    Recognition of significance of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in cardiovascular regulations has led to intensive research and development of therapies focused on NOS as potential therapeutic targets. However, the NOS isoform profile of cardiac tissue and subcellular localization of NOS isoforms remain a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of an inducible NOS isoform (NOS2) in cardiomyocytes. Employing a novel immunocytochemical technique of a catalyzed reporter deposition system with tyramide and electron microscopical immunocytochemistry complemented with Western blotting and RT-PCR, we detected NOS2 both in rat neonatal and adult cultured cardiomyocytes and in the normal myocard of adult rats as well as in the human myocard of patients with dilative cardiomyopathy. NOS2 was targeted predominantly to a particulate component of the cardiomyocyte--along contractile fibers, in the plasma membrane including T-tubules, as well as in the nuclear envelope, mitochondria and Golgi complex. Our results point to an involvement of NOS2 in maintaining cardiac homeostasis and contradict to the notion that NOS2 is expressed in cardiac tissue only in response to various physiological and pathogenic factors. NOS2 targeting to mitochondria and contractile fibers suggests a relationship of NO with contractile function and energy production in the cardiac muscle.

  9. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism.

  10. Effect of chronologic age on induction of cystathionine synthase, uroporphyrinogen I synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gartler, S M; Hornung, S K; Motulsky, A G

    1981-01-01

    The activities of cystathionine synthase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding homocysteine), EC 4.2.1.22], uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8], and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) have been measured in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes of young and old human subjects. A significant decrease in activity with age was observed for cystathionine synthase and uroporphyrinogen I synthase but not for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These changes could not be related to declining phytohemagglutinin response with aging. Age-related decreases in activity of some enzymes may be relevant for an understanding of the biology of aging. False assignment of heterozygosity, and even homozygosity, for certain genetic disorders, such as homocystinuria, may result when low enzyme levels are detected in the lymphocytes of older people. PMID:6940198

  11. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  12. Functional analysis of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SS) in sugarcane (Saccharum) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Verma, A K; Upadhyay, S K; Verma, P C; Solomon, S; Singh, S B

    2011-03-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13) are key enzymes in the synthesis and breakdown of sucrose in sugarcane. The activities of internodal SPS and SS, as well as transcript expression were determined using semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different developmental stages of high and low sucrose accumulating sugarcane cultivars. SPS activity and transcript expression was higher in mature internodes compared with immature internodes in all the studied cultivars. However, high sugar cultivars showed increased transcript expression and enzyme activity of SPS compared to low sugar cultivars at all developmental stages. SS activity was higher in immature internodes than in mature internodes in all cultivars; SS transcript expression showed a similar pattern. Our studies demonstrate that SPS activity was positively correlated with sucrose and negatively correlated with hexose sugars. However, SS activity was negatively correlated with sucrose and positively correlated with hexose sugars. The present study opens the possibility for improvement of sugarcane cultivars by increasing expression of the respective enzymes using transgene technology.

  13. Cloning and characterization of squalene synthase and cycloartenol synthase from Siraitia grosvenorii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; Tang, Qi; Mo, Changming; Bai, Longhua; Tu, Dongping; Ma, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    Mogrosides and steroid saponins are tetracyclic triterpenoids found in Siraitia grosvenorii. Squalene synthase (SQS) and cycloartenol synthase (CAS) are key enzymes in triterpenoid and steroid biosynthesis. In this study, full-length cDNAs of SgSQS and SgCAS were cloned by a rapid amplification of cDNA-ends with polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) approach. The SgSQS cDNA has a 1254 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 417 amino acids, and the SgCAS cDNA contains a 2298 bp ORF encoding 765 amino acids. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the deduced SgSQS protein has two transmembrane regions in the C-terminal. Both SgSQS and SgCAS have significantly higher levels in fruits than in other tissues, suggesting that steroids and mogrosides are competitors for the same precursors in fruits. Combined in silico prediction and subcellular localization, experiments in tobacco indicated that SgSQS was probably in the cytoplasm or on the cytoskeleton, and SgCAS was likely located in the nucleus or cytosol. These results will provide a foundation for further study of SgSQS and SgCAS gene functions in S. grosvenorii, and may facilitate improvements in mogroside content in fruit by regulating gene expression.

  14. Identification of a Dolabellane Type Diterpene Synthase and other Root-Expressed Diterpene Synthases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Jia, Meirong; Huh, Jung-Hyun; Muchlinski, Andrew; Peters, Reuben J.; Tholl, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana maintains a complex metabolism for the production of secondary or specialized metabolites. Such metabolites include volatile and semivolatile terpenes, which have been associated with direct and indirect defensive activities in flowers and leaves. In comparison, the structural diversity and function of terpenes in Arabidopsis roots has remained largely unexplored despite a substantial number of root-expressed genes in the Arabidopsis terpene synthase (TPS) gene family. We show that five root-expressed TPSs of an expanded subfamily-a type clade in the Arabidopsis TPS family function as class I diterpene synthases that predominantly convert geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to different semi-volatile diterpene products, which are in part detectable at low levels in the ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Cape Verde Island (Cvi). The enzyme TPS20 produces a macrocyclic dolabellane diterpene alcohol and a dolabellane-related diterpene olefin named dolathaliatriene with a so far unknown C6-C11 bicyclic scaffold besides several minor olefin products. The TPS20 compounds occur in all tissues of Cvi but are absent in the Col ecotype because of deletion and substitution mutations in the Col TPS20 sequence. The primary TPS20 diterpene products retard the growth of the root rot pathogen Pythium irregulare but only at concentrations exceeding those in planta. Together, our results demonstrate that divergence and pseudogenization in the Arabidopsis TPS gene family allow for structural plasticity in diterpene profiles of above- and belowground tissues. PMID:27933080

  15. Expression patterns, activities and carbohydrate-metabolizing regulation of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and neutral invertase in pineapple fruit during development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion.

  16. Identification and characterization of (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase and α/β-pinene synthase potentially involved in constitutive and herbivore-induced terpene formation in cotton.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinzheng; Xiao, Yutao; Köllner, Tobias G; Zhang, Wanna; Wu, Junxiang; Wu, Juan; Guo, Yuyuan; Zhang, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) plants damaged by insects emit a blend of volatiles, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, which can directly repel herbivores and/or indirectly protect the plant by attracting natural enemies of the herbivores. To understand the molecular basis of terpene biosynthesis and regulation in cotton, two terpene synthase genes, GhTPS1 and GhTPS2, were heterologously expressed and characterized. Recombinant GhTPS1 accepted farnesyl pyrophosphate as substrate and produced (E)-β-caryophyllene and α-humulene. GhTPS2 was characterized as a monoterpene synthase which formed α-pinene and β-pinene using geranyl pyrophosphate as substrate. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that GhTPS1 and GhTPS2 gene expression was elevated after methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment in cotton leaves. Moreover, feeding of the green plant bug Apolygus lucorum, a major cotton pest in northern China, resulted in increased GhTPS2 expression in young leaves, suggesting that GhTPS2 might be involved in plant defense in cotton.

  17. Expression Patterns, Activities and Carbohydrate-Metabolizing Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase and Neutral Invertase in Pineapple Fruit during Development and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion. PMID:22949808

  18. Modulation of ceramide synthase activity via dimerization.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Elad L; Kelly, Samuel; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H

    2012-06-15

    Ceramide, the backbone of all sphingolipids, is synthesized by a family of ceramide synthases (CerS) that each use acyl-CoAs of defined chain length for N-acylation of the sphingoid long chain base. CerS mRNA expression and enzymatic activity do not always correlate with the sphingolipid acyl chain composition of a particular tissue, suggesting post-translational mechanism(s) of regulation of CerS activity. We now demonstrate that CerS activity can be modulated by dimer formation. Under suitable conditions, high M(r) CerS complexes can be detected by Western blotting, and various CerS co-immunoprecipitate. CerS5 activity is inhibited in a dominant-negative fashion by co-expression with catalytically inactive CerS5, and CerS2 activity is enhanced by co-expression with a catalytically active form of CerS5 or CerS6. In a constitutive heterodimer comprising CerS5 and CerS2, the activity of CerS2 depends on the catalytic activity of CerS5. Finally, CerS dimers are formed upon rapid stimulation of ceramide synthesis by curcumin. Together, these data demonstrate that ceramide synthesis can be regulated by the formation of CerS dimers and suggest a novel way to generate the acyl chain composition of ceramide (and downstream sphingolipids), which may depend on the interaction of CerS with each other.

  19. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  20. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, K Y; Huso, D L; Dawson, T M; Bredt, D S; Becker, L C

    1999-01-19

    NO. is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO. produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO. was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOS mu antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO. produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart.

  1. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai Y.; Huso, David L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Bredt, David S.; Becker, Lewis C.

    1999-01-01

    NO⋅ is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO⋅ produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO⋅ was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOSμ antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO⋅ produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart. PMID:9892689

  2. In vivo enzyme immobilization by use of engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2006-03-01

    This study demonstrated that engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases can be employed as molecular tools to covalently immobilize enzymes at the PHA granule surface. The beta-galactosidase was fused to the N terminus of the class II PHA synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The open reading frame was confirmed to encode the complete fusion protein by T7 promoter-dependent overexpression. Restoration of PHA biosynthesis in the PHA-negative mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed a PHA synthase function of the fusion protein. PHA granules were isolated and showed beta-galactosidase activity. PHA granule attached proteins were analyzed and confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, the beta-galactosidase-PHA synthase fusion protein was detectable at a high copy number at the PHA granule, compared with PHA synthase alone, which was barely detectable at PHA granules. Localization of the beta-galactosidase at the PHA granule surface was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies. Treatment of these beta-galactosidase-PHA granules with urea suggested a covalent binding of the beta-galactosidase-PHA synthase to the PHA granule. The immobilized beta-galactosidase was enzymologically characterized, suggesting a Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. A Km of 630 microM and a Vmax of 17.6 nmol/min for orthonitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside as a substrate was obtained. The immobilized beta-galactosidase was stable for at least several months under various storage conditions. This study demonstrated that protein engineering of PHA synthase enables the manufacture of PHA granules with covalently attached enzymes, suggesting an application in recycling of biocatalysts, such as in fine-chemical production.

  3. Cloning and Structure-Function Analyses of Quinolone- and Acridone-producing Novel Type III Polyketide Synthases from Citrus microcarpa*

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Takashi; Kinjo, Keishi; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Two novel type III polyketide synthases, quinolone synthase (QNS) and acridone synthase (ACS), were cloned from Citrus microcarpa (Rutaceae). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. microcarpa QNS is unique, and it shared only 56–60% identities with C. microcarpa ACS, Medicago sativa chalcone synthase (CHS), and the previously reported Aegle marmelos QNS. In contrast to the quinolone- and acridone-producing A. marmelos QNS, C. microcarpa QNS produces 4-hydroxy-N-methylquinolone as the “single product” by the one-step condensation of N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. However, C. microcarpa ACS shows broad substrate specificities and produces not only acridone and quinolone but also chalcone, benzophenone, and phloroglucinol from 4-coumaroyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, and hexanoyl-CoA, respectively. Furthermore, the x-ray crystal structures of C. microcarpa QNS and ACS, solved at 2.47- and 2.35-Å resolutions, respectively, revealed wide active site entrances in both enzymes. The wide active site entrances thus provide sufficient space to facilitate the binding of the bulky N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA within the catalytic centers. However, the active site cavity volume of C. microcarpa ACS (760 Å3) is almost as large as that of M. sativa CHS (750 Å3), and ACS produces acridone by employing an active site cavity and catalytic machinery similar to those of CHS. In contrast, the cavity of C. microcarpa QNS (290 Å3) is significantly smaller, which makes this enzyme produce the diketide quinolone. These results as well as mutagenesis analyses provided the first structural bases for the anthranilate-derived production of the quinolone and acridone alkaloid by type III polyketide synthases. PMID:23963450

  4. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, M; Mizuno, H; Kawai, Y; Tsuboi, T; Sumi, S; Okajima, K; Hodgson, M E; Ogawa, H; Wada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a lambdaEMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning approximately 15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5' flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A-to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A (v = .26) and 440Gpoly (v = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9042911

  5. Insights into the reactivation of cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Smith, Janet L.; Matthews, Rowena G.

    2009-12-10

    Cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) is a modular protein that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to produce methionine and tetrahydrofolate. The cobalamin cofactor, which serves as both acceptor and donor of the methyl group, is oxidized once every {approx}2,000 catalytic cycles and must be reactivated by the uptake of an electron from reduced flavodoxin and a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Previous structures of a C-terminal fragment of MetH (MetH{sup CT}) revealed a reactivation conformation that juxtaposes the cobalamin- and AdoMet-binding domains. Here we describe 2 structures of a disulfide stabilized MetH{sup CT} ({sub s-s}MetH{sup CT}) that offer further insight into the reactivation of MetH. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sup CT} with cob(II)alamin and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine represents the enzyme in the reactivation step preceding electron transfer from flavodoxin. The structure supports earlier suggestions that the enzyme acts to lower the reduction potential of the Co(II)/Co(I) couple by elongating the bond between the cobalt and its upper axial water ligand, effectively making the cobalt 4-coordinate, and illuminates the role of Tyr-1139 in the stabilization of this 4-coordinate state. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sub CT} with aquocobalamin may represent a transient state at the end of reactivation as the newly remethylated 5-coordinate methylcobalamin returns to the 6-coordinate state, triggering the rearrangement to a catalytic conformation.

  6. Development of pheochromocytoma in ceramide synthase 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Brenner, Ori; Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Merrill, Alfred H; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2015-08-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the adrenal medulla and sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia, for which mutations in ∼15 disease-associated genes have been identified. We now document the role of an additional gene in mice, the ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) gene. CerS2, one of six mammalian CerS, synthesizes ceramides with very-long (C22-C24) chains. The CerS2 null mouse has been well characterized and displays lesions in several organs including the liver, lung and the brain. We now demonstrate that changes in the sphingolipid acyl chain profile of the adrenal gland lead to the generation of adrenal medullary tumors. Histological analyses revealed that about half of the CerS2 null mice developed PCC by ∼13 months, and the rest showed signs of medullary hyperplasia. Norepinephrine and normetanephrine levels in the urine were elevated at 7 months of age consistent with the morphological abnormalities found at later ages. Accumulation of ceroid in the X-zone was observed as early as 2 months of age and as a consequence, older mice displayed elevated levels of lysosomal cathepsins, reduced proteasome activity and reduced activity of mitochondrial complex IV by 6 months of age. Together, these findings implicate an additional pathway that can lead to PCC formation, which involves alterations in the sphingolipid acyl chain length. Analysis of the role of sphingolipids in PCC may lead to further understanding of the mechanism by which PCC develops, and might implicate the sphingolipid pathway as a possible novel therapeutic target for this rare tumor.

  7. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may

  8. Evolution and Expression of Tandem Duplicated Maize Flavonol Synthase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; Casas, María Isabel; Questa, Julia Irene; Herrera, Andrea Lorena; DeBlasio, Stacy; Wang, Jing; Jackson, David; Grotewold, Erich; Casati, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids are specialized compounds widely distributed and with diverse functions throughout the plant kingdom and with several benefits for human health. In particular, flavonols, synthesized by flavonol synthase (FLS), protect plants against UV-B radiation and are essential for male fertility in maize and other plants. We have recently characterized a UV-B inducible ZmFLS1, corresponding to the first to be described in monocot plants. Interestingly, the new assembly of the B73 maize genome revealed the presence of a second putative FLS gene (ZmFLS2), with very high identity with ZmFLS1. ZmFLSs expression was analyzed in different maize tissues, and by combining electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transient expression experiments, we show that both genes are direct targets of anthocyanin (C1/PL1 + R/B) and 3-deoxy flavonoid (P1) transcriptional regulators. ZmFLS expression analyses show higher levels of both transcripts in high altitude landraces than inbred lines, and both genes are regulated by UV-B radiation in all lines analyzed. Moreover, the high sequence conservation of the ZmFLS promoters between maize lines suggests that the differences observed in ZmFLS expression are due to allelic variations in the transcription factors that regulate their activities. Finally, we generated pFLS1::FLS1-RFP transgenic plants and analyzed ZmFLS1 expression in different maize tissues; we found that this enzyme is localized in the ER and the perinuclear region. PMID:22654889

  9. Isolation and characterization of galactinol synthases from hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Unda, Faride; Canam, Thomas; Preston, Lindsay; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2012-01-01

    The raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) serve as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, storage compounds in sink tissues, and putative biological agents to combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. To investigate further the functional roles of this class of compounds in trees, two cDNAs encoding galactinol synthase (GolS, EC 2.4.1.123), which catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of RFOs, were identified and cloned from hybrid poplar (Populus alba×grandidentata). Phylogenetic analyses of the Populus GolS isoforms with other known GolS proteins suggested a putative role for these enzymes during biotic or abiotic stress in hybrid poplar. The predicted protein sequences of both isoforms (Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII) showed characteristics of GolS proteins from other species, including a serine phosphorylation site and the ASAAP pentapeptide hydrophobic domain. Kinetic analyses of recombinant Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII resulted in Km values for UPD-galactose of 0.80 and 0.65 mM and Vmax values of 657.5 and 1245 nM min−1, respectively. Pa×gGolSI inherently possessed a broader pH and temperature range when compared with Pa×gGolSII. Interestingly, spatial and temporal expression analyses revealed that Pa×gGolSII transcript levels varied seasonally, while Pa×gGolSI did not, implying temperature-regulated transcriptional control of this gene in addition to the observed thermosensitivity of the respective enzyme. This evidence suggested that Pa×gGolSI may be involved in basic metabolic activities such as storage, while Pa×gGolSII is probably involved in seasonal mobilization of carbohydrates. PMID:22197892

  10. Structural, functional, and evolutionary analysis of the unusually large stilbene synthase gene family in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A B; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed.

  11. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-10-29

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges.

  12. Bifunctional effects of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin Won; Yoon, Se Young; Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-07-21

    Algal fucoidan is a marine sulfated polysaccharide with a wide variety of biological activities including anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. This study evaluated the effect of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Low concentration range of fucoidan (10 {mu}g/ml) increased the basal expression level of iNOS in quiescent macrophages. However, we found for the first time that fucoidan inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot analysis revealed that fucoidan suppressed the LPS-induced expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene. Moreover, the activation of both nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) are key steps in the transcriptional activation of the iNOS gene. Here, it was revealed that fucoidan selectively suppressed AP-1 activation, and that the activation of AP-1 appears to be essential for the induction of iNOS in activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect on AP-1 activation by fucoidan might be associated with its NO blocking and anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  14. Insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase in cultured human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, H; Howard, B V; Kosmakos, F C; Fields, R M; Craig, J W; Bennett, P H; Larner, J

    1980-10-01

    The effect of insulin on glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts has been studied. As little as 2 X 10(-10) M insulin increased the glycogen synthase / activity without changing the total activity. Stimulation occurred within 5 min and became maximal in 30 min. A half-maximal increase of / activity was achieved at 3 X 10(-9) M insulin. Glucose starvation increased the magnitude of response of glycogen synthase to insulin but did not change the insulin concentration necessary to give a half-maximal stimulation. Glucose increased the basal level of / activity in human diploid fibroblasts; the effect of insulin was additive. During in vitro senescence the total glycogen synthase activity declined, but the concentration of insulin that produced a half-maximal stimulation remained unchanged. These data indicate that regulation of glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts is responsive to physiologic insulin levels and that the system provides a useful model for the in vitro study of insulin sensitivity.

  15. Heterologous expression of an active chitin synthase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Lugo, Holjes; Sánchez-Arreguín, Alejandro; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-12-01

    Chitin synthases are highly important enzymes in nature, where they synthesize structural components in species belonging to different eukaryotic kingdoms, including kingdom Fungi. Unfortunately, their structure and the molecular mechanism of synthesis of their microfibrilar product remain largely unknown, probably because no fungal active chitin synthases have been isolated, possibly due to their extreme hydrophobicity. In this study we have turned to the heterologous expression of the transcript from a small chitin synthase of Rhizopus oryzae (RO3G_00942, Chs1) in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was active, but accumulated mostly in inclusion bodies. High concentrations of arginine or urea solubilized the enzyme, but their dilution led to its denaturation and precipitation. Nevertheless, use of urea permitted the purification of small amounts of the enzyme. The properties of Chs1 (Km, optimum temperature and pH, effect of GlcNAc) were abnormal, probably because it lacks the hydrophobic transmembrane regions characteristic of chitin synthases. The product of the enzyme showed that, contrasting with chitin made by membrane-bound Chs's and chitosomes, was only partially in the form of short microfibrils of low crystallinity. This approach may lead to future developments to obtain active chitin synthases that permit understanding their molecular mechanism of activity, and microfibril assembly.

  16. Identification of two distinct Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-08-01

    Two distinct Bacillus subtilis genes (citA and citZ) were found to encode citrate synthase isozymes that catalyze the first step of the Krebs cycle. The citA gene was cloned by genetic complementation of an Escherichia coli citrate synthase mutant strain (W620) and was in a monocistronic transcriptional unit. A divergently transcribed gene, citR, could encode a protein with strong similarity to the bacterial LysR family of regulatory proteins. A null mutation in citA had little effect on citrate synthase enzyme activity or sporulation. The residual citrate synthase activity was purified from a citA null mutant strain, and the partial amino acid sequence for the purified protein (CitZ) was determined. The citZ gene was cloned from B. subtilis chromosomal DNA by using a PCR-generated probe synthesized with oligonucleotide primers derived from the partial amino acid sequence of purified CitZ. The citZ gene proved to be the first gene in a tricistronic cluster that also included citC (coding for isocitrate dehydrogenase) and citH (coding for malate dehydrogenase). A mutation in citZ caused a substantial loss of citrate synthase enzyme activity, glutamate auxotrophy, and a defect in sporulation.

  17. Diversity of sesquiterpene synthases in the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Sean; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Fungi are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites and mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) are especially known for the synthesis of numerous bioactive and often cytotoxic sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites. Compared to the large number of sesquiterpene synthases identified in plants, less than a handful of unique sesquiterpene synthases have been described from fungi. Here we describe the functional characterization of six sesquiterpene synthases (Cop1 to Cop6) and two terpene oxidizing cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cox1 and Cox2) from Coprinus cinereus. The genes were cloned and, except for cop5, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cop1 and Cop2 each synthesize germacrene A as the major product. Cop3 was identified as a α-muurolene synthase, an enzyme that has not been described previously, while Cop4 synthesizes δ-cadinene as its major product. Cop6 was originally annotated as a trichodiene synthase homolog, but instead was found to catalyze highly specific the synthesis of α-cuprenene. Co-expression of cop6 and the two monooxygenase genes next to it yields oxygenated α-cuprenene derivatives, including cuparophenol, suggesting that these genes encode the enzymes for the biosynthesis of antimicrobial quinone sesquiterpenoids (known as lagopodins) that were previously isolated from C. cinereus and other Coprinus species. PMID:19400802

  18. Diversity of sesquiterpene synthases in the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Agger, Sean; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2009-06-01

    Fungi are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites, and mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) are especially known for the synthesis of numerous bioactive and often cytotoxic sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites. Compared with the large number of sesquiterpene synthases identified in plants, less than a handful of unique sesquiterpene synthases have been described from fungi. Here we describe the functional characterization of six sesquiterpene synthases (Cop1 to Cop6) and two terpene-oxidizing cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cox1 and Cox2) from Coprinus cinereus. The genes were cloned and, except for cop5, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cop1 and Cop2 each synthesize germacrene A as the major product. Cop3 was identified as an alpha-muurolene synthase, an enzyme that has not been described previously, while Cop4 synthesizes delta-cadinene as its major product. Cop6 was originally annotated as a trichodiene synthase homologue but instead was found to catalyse the highly specific synthesis of alpha-cuprenene. Coexpression of cop6 and the two monooxygenase genes next to it yields oxygenated alpha-cuprenene derivatives, including cuparophenol, suggesting that these genes encode the enzymes for the biosynthesis of antimicrobial quinone sesquiterpenoids (known as lagopodins) that were previously isolated from C. cinereus and other Coprinus species.

  19. Possible Involvement of F1F0-ATP synthase and Intracellular ATP in Keratinocyte Differentiation in normal skin and skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoyun, Xie; Chaofei, Han; Weiqi, Zeng; Chen, Chen; Lixia, Lu; Queping, Liu; Cong, Peng; Shuang, Zhao; Juan, Su; Xiang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The F1F0-ATP synthase, an enzyme complex, is mainly located on the mitochondrial inner membrane or sometimes cytomembrane to generate or hydrolyze ATP, play a role in cell proliferation. This study focused on the role of F1F0-ATP synthase in keratinocyte differentiation, and its relationship with intracellular and extracellular ATP (InATP and ExATP). The F1F0-ATP synthase β subunit (ATP5B) expression in various skin tissues and confluence-dependent HaCaT differentiation models was detected. ATP5B expression increased with keratinocyte and HaCaT cell differentiation in normal skin, some epidermis hyper-proliferative diseases, squamous cell carcinoma, and the HaCaT cell differentiation model. The impact of InATP and ExATP content on HaCaT differentiation was reflected by the expression of the differentiation marker involucrin. Inhibition of F1F0-ATP synthase blocked HaCaT cell differentiation, which was associated with a decrease of InATP content, but not with changes of ExATP. Our results revealed that F1F0-ATP synthase expression is associated with the process of keratinocyte differentiation which may possibly be related to InATP synthesis. PMID:28209970

  20. Methionine synthase and thymidylate synthase gene polymorphisms and colorectal adenoma risk: the self defense forces study.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Shinichiro; Morita, Makiko; Hamachi, Tadamichi; Tabata, Shinji; Abe, Hiroshi; Tajima, Osamu; Uezono, Kousaku; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kono, Suminori

    2012-10-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated associations of functional genetic polymorphisms of methionine synthase (MTR), MTR reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TS) with colorectal adenomas. The study subjects were 455 cases of colorectal adenomas and 1052 controls with no polyp at colonoscopy. Genotypes were determined for MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G and two polymorphisms in the TS gene, 28-bp tandem repeat polymorphism in the promoter enhancer region (TSER) and 6-bp deletion polymorphism at position 1494 in the 3' untranslated region (TS 1494del6). We also examined the alcohol-genotype and gene-gene interactions on adenoma risk. The GG genotype of MTR A2756G was associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas; odds ratios for AG and GG versus AA genotype were 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.26) and 1.72 (1.04-2.82), respectively. The increase in the risk associated with MTR 2756GG genotype was evident in men with high alcohol consumption (≥30 mL/d), but not in those with low alcohol consumption (interaction P = 0.03). Men who were homozygous for the TSER double-repeat allele had a slightly decreased risk of colorectal adenomas as compared with those homozygous for the TSER triple-repeat allele. Neither MTRR A66G nor TS 1494del6 was associated with colorectal adenomas. There was no measurable interaction either between MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G or between TSER and TS 1494del6. MTR A2756G appears to be associated with colorectal adenoma risk differently according to alcohol consumption. The MTR-catalyzed reaction may play an important role in the development of colorectal adenomas.

  1. Bornyl-diphosphate synthase from Lavandula angustifolia: A major monoterpene synthase involved in essential oil quality.

    PubMed

    Despinasse, Yolande; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Antonczak, Serge; Moja, Sandrine; Bony, Aurélie; Nicolè, Florence; Baudino, Sylvie; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Jullien, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Lavender essential oils (EOs) of higher quality are produced by a few Lavandula angustifolia cultivars and mainly used in the perfume industry. Undesirable compounds such as camphor and borneol are also synthesized by lavender leading to a depreciated EO. Here, we report the cloning of bornyl diphosphate synthase of lavender (LaBPPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the production of bornyl diphosphate (BPP) and then by-products such as borneol or camphor, from an EST library. Compared to the BPPS of Salvia officinalis, the functional characterization of LaBPPS showed several differences in amino acid sequence, and the distribution of catalyzed products. Molecular modeling of the enzyme's active site suggests that the carbocation intermediates are more stable in LaBPPS than in SoBPPS leading probably to a lower efficiency of LaBPPS to convert GPP into BPP. Quantitative RT-PCR performed from leaves and flowers at different development stages of L. angustifolia samples show a clear correlation between transcript level of LaBPPS and accumulation of borneol/camphor, suggesting that LaBPPS is mainly responsible of in vivo biosynthesis of borneol/camphor in fine lavender. A phylogenetic analysis of terpene synthases (TPS) pointed out the basal position of LaBPPS in the TPSb clade, suggesting that LaBPPS could be an ancestor of others lavender TPSb. Finally, borneol could be one of the first monoterpenes to be synthesized in the Lavandula subgenus. Knowledge gained from these experiments will facilitate future studies to improve the lavender oils through metabolic engineering or plant breeding. Accession numbers: LaBPPS: KM015221.

  2. The Structure of the L-myo-inositol-1-phosphate Synthase-NAD[superscript +]-2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-(E)-Vinylhomophosphonate Complex Demands a Revision of the Enzyme Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiangshu; Foley, Kathleen M.; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-16

    1l-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (MIP) synthase catalyzes the conversion of D-glucose 6-phosphate to 1l-myo-inositol 1-phosphate, the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of all inositol-containing compounds. It involves an oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction. Here we present the structure of MIP synthase in complex with NAD{sup +} and a high-affinity inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-(E)-vinylhomophosphonate. This structure reveals interactions between the enzyme active site residues and the inhibitor that are significantly different from that proposed for 2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-phosphate in the previously published structure of MIP synthase-NAD{sup +}-2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-phosphate. There are several other conformational changes in NAD{sup +} and the enzyme active site as well. Based on the new structural data, we propose a new and completely different mechanism for MIP synthase.

  3. X-ray Crystal Structure of Aristolochene Synthase from Aspergillus terreus and Evolution of Templates for the Cyclization of Farnesyl Diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova,E.; Di Costanzo, L.; Cane, D.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus catalyzes the cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor, farnesyl diphosphate, to form the bicyclic hydrocarbon aristolochene. The 2.2 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of aristolochene synthase reveals a tetrameric quaternary structure in which each subunit adopts the {alpha}-helical class I terpene synthase fold with the active site in the 'open', solvent-exposed conformation. Intriguingly, the 2.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complex with Mg{sup 2+}{sub 3}-pyrophosphate reveals ligand binding only to tetramer subunit D, which is stabilized in the 'closed' conformation required for catalysis. Tetramer assembly may hinder conformational changes required for the transition from the inactive open conformation to the active closed conformation, thereby accounting for the attenuation of catalytic activity with an increase in enzyme concentration. In both conformations, but especially in the closed conformation, the active site contour is highly complementary in shape to that of aristolochene, and a catalytic function is proposed for the pyrophosphate anion based on its orientation with regard to the presumed binding mode of aristolochene. A similar active site contour is conserved in aristolochene synthase from Penicillium roqueforti despite the substantial divergent evolution of these two enzymes, while strikingly different active site contours are found in the sesquiterpene cyclases 5-epi-aristolochene synthase and trichodiene synthase. Thus, the terpenoid cyclase active site plays a critical role as a template in binding the flexible polyisoprenoid substrate in the proper conformation for catalysis. Across the greater family of terpenoid cyclases, this template is highly evolvable within a conserved {alpha}-helical fold for the synthesis of terpene natural products of diverse structure and stereochemistry.

  4. Kinetic characteristics of nitric oxide synthase from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R G; Palacios, M; Palmer, R M; Moncada, S

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rate of synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and guanylate cyclase stimulation was used to characterize the kinetics of the NO synthase from rat forebrain and of some inhibitors of this enzyme. The NO synthase had an absolute requirement for L-arginine and NADPH and did not require any other cofactors. The enzyme had a Vmax. of 42 pmol of NO formed.min-1.mg of protein-1 and a Km for L-arginine of 8.4 microM. Three analogues of L-arginine, namely NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, NG-nitro-L-arginine and NG-iminoethyl-L-ornithine inhibited the brain NO synthase. All three compounds were competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with Ki values of 0.7, 0.4 and 1.2 microM respectively. PMID:1695842

  5. Properties of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Segovia, J L; Zafra, M F; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1982-09-01

    Adenine nucleotides were tested as effectors of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana leaves in the presence of different concentrations of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate substrates. ATP inhibited both enzyme activities but with a different inhibition profile. 1.0-7.5 mM ADP did not inhibit the peroxisomal citrate synthase in the presence of high substrate concentrations, while the mitochondrial enzyme was strongly inhibited by 1.0 mM ADP in the same conditions. Likewise, a different pattern was obtained with AMP on both peroxisomal and mitochondrial activities. The rate of citrate formation as function of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate concentration was also studied in both fractions. Maximal velocity was highest in the peroxisomal fraction, whether acetyl-CoA or oxalacetate were the variable substrates. These differences indicate that peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthases seem to be two different isoenzymes.

  6. Synthase-dependent exopolysaccharide secretion in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, J.C.; Howell, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis and export of bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides is known to occur through several distinct mechanisms. Recent advances in the biochemistry and structural biology of several proteins in synthase-dependent polysaccharide secretion systems have identified key conserved components of this pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. These components include an inner-membrane-embedded polysaccharide synthase, a periplasmic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing scaffold protein, and an outer-membrane β-barrel porin. There is also increasing evidence that many synthase-dependent systems are post-translationally regulated by the bacterial second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Here, we compare these core proteins in the context of the alginate, cellulose, and poly-β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) secretion systems. PMID:23117123

  7. The hyaluronate synthase from a eukaryotic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Klewes, L; Turley, E A; Prehm, P

    1993-01-01

    The hyaluronate synthase complex was identified in plasma membranes from B6 cells. It contained two subunits of molecular masses 52 kDa and 60 kDa which bound the precursor UDP-GlcA in digitonin solution and partitioned into the aqueous phase, together with nascent hyaluronate upon Triton X-114 phase separation. The 52 kDa protein cross-reacted with poly- and monoclonal antibodies raised against the streptococcal hyaluronate synthase and the 60 kDa protein was recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against a hyaluronate receptor. The 52 kDa protein was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography with monoclonal anti-hyaluronate synthase. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8457208

  8. Utility of Aspergillus niger citrate synthase promoter for heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kashyap; Punekar, Narayan S

    2011-09-10

    Citrate synthase is a central player in the acidogenic metabolism of Aspergillus niger. The 5' upstream sequence (0.9kb DNA) of citrate synthase gene (citA) from A. niger NCIM 565 was analyzed and its promoter function demonstrated through the heterologous expression of two proteins. The cloned citrate synthase promoter (PcitA) sequence was able to express bar coding sequence thereby conferring phosphinothricin resistance. This sequence was further analyzed by systematic deletions to define an effective but compact functional promoter. The PcitA driven egfp expression showed that PcitA was active in all differentiation cell-stages of A. niger. EGFP expression was highest on non-repressible carbon sources like acetate and glycerol. Mycelial EGFP levels increased during acidogenic growth suggesting that PcitA is functional throughout this cultivation. A. niger PcitA is the first Krebs cycle gene promoter used to express heterologous proteins in filamentous fungi.

  9. Structure Conservation and Differential Expression of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Genes in Euphorbiaceous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Li, Hui-Liang; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) is a key enzyme of isoprenoids biosynthesis. However, knowledge of the FPSs of euphorbiaceous species is limited. In this study, ten FPSs were identified in four euphorbiaceous plants. These FPSs exhibited similar exon/intron structure. The deduced FPS proteins showed close identities and exhibited the typical structure of plant FPS. The members of the FPS family exhibit tissue expression patterns that vary among several euphorbiaceous plant species under normal growth conditions. The expression profiles reveal spatial and temporal variations in the expression of FPSs of different tissues from Euphorbiaceous plants. Our results revealed wide conservation of FPSs and diverse expression in euphorbiaceous plants during growth and development. PMID:26389894

  10. Cloning and characterization of squalene synthase gene from Poria cocos and its up-regulation by methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Lin, Jun-Fang; Guo, Li-Qiong; You, Lin-Feng; Zeng, Xian-Lu; Wen, Jia-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Squalene synthase (SQS) catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of farnesyl diphosphate to give presqualene diphosphate and the subsequent rearrangement to form squalene. The gene encoding squalene synthase was cloned from Poria cocos by degenerate PCR and inverse PCR. The open reading frame of the gene is 1,497 bp, which encodes 499 amino acid residues. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that P. cocos SQS belonged to the fungus group, and was more closely related to the SQS of Ganoderma lucidum than other fungi. The treatment of P. cocos with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) significantly enhanced the transcriptional level of P. cocos sqs gene and the content of squalene in P. cocos. The transcriptional level of sqs gene was approximately fourfold higher than the control sample and the squalene content reached 128.62 μg/g, when the concentration of MeJA was 300 μM after 72 h induction.

  11. Allosteric regulation of glycogen synthase in liver. A physiological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, F Q; Gannon, M C

    1993-06-25

    Glycogen synthase catalyzes the transfer of the glucosyl moiety from UDP-glucose to the terminal branch of the glycogen molecule and is considered to be the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis. However, under ideal assay conditions, i.e. 37 degrees C with saturating concentrations of UDP-glucose and the activator, glucose-6-P, the maximal catalytic activity of glycogen synthase was only 78% of the in vivo glycogen synthetic rate. Using concentrations of UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P likely to be present in vivo, the rate was only approximately 30%. This prompted us to reassess a possible role of allosteric effectors on synthase activity. Glycogen synthase was assayed at 37 degrees C using dilute, pH 7.0, buffered extracts, initial rate conditions, and UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P concentrations, which approximate those calculated to be present in total liver cell water. Several allosteric effectors were tested. Magnesium and AMP had little effect on activity. Pi, ADP, ATP, and UTP inhibited activity. When a combination of effectors were added at concentrations approximating those present in cell water, synthase activity could account for only 2% of the glycogen synthetic rate. Thus, although allosteric effectors are likely to be playing a major role in regulating synthase enzymic activity in liver cells, to date, a metabolite that can stimulate activity and/or overcome nucleotide inhibition has yet to be identified. If such a metabolite cannot be identified, an additional or alternative pathway for glycogen synthesis must be considered.

  12. Transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of CSLA9 encoding mannan synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Chan; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kim, Yongsig; Park, Sunchung; Thomashow, Michael F; Keegstra, Kenneth; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have a structural role and serve as storage reserves during plant growth and development. Previous studies led to the conclusion that mannan synthase enzymes in several plant species are encoded by members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) gene family. Arabidopsis has nine members of the CSLA gene family. Earlier work has shown that CSLA9 is responsible for the majority of glucomannan synthesis in both primary and secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. Little is known about how expression of the CLSA9 gene is regulated. Sequence analysis of the CSLA9 promoter region revealed the presence of multiple copies of a cis-regulatory motif (M46RE) recognized by transcription factor MYB46, leading to the hypothesis that MYB46 (At5g12870) is a direct regulator of the mannan synthase CLSA9. We obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. First, the expression of CSLA9 was substantially upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. Second, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to demonstrate the direct binding of MYB46 to the promoter of CSLA9 in vitro. This interaction was further confirmed in vivo by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, over-expression of MYB46 resulted in a significant increase in mannan content. Considering the multifaceted nature of MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, we reasoned that additional transcription factors are involved in the CSLA9 regulation. This hypothesis was tested by carrying out yeast-one hybrid screening, which identified ANAC041 and bZIP1 as direct regulators of CSLA9. Transcriptional activation assays and EMSA were used to confirm the yeast-one hybrid results. Taken together, we report that transcription factors ANAC041, bZIP1 and MYB46 directly regulate the expression of CSLA9.

  13. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Brucella spp. lumazine synthase: a novel antigen delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Toledo, Andrea; Cruz, Carmen; Rosas, Gabriela; Meneses, Gabriela; Laplagne, Diego; Ainciart, Natalia; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Fragoso, Gladis; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2005-04-15

    Lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) was evaluated as a protein carrier to improve antigen delivery of KETc1, one of the peptides of the anti-cysticercosis vaccine. KETc1 becomes antigenic, preserved its immunogenicity and its protective capacity when expressed as a recombinant chimeric protein using Brucella spp. lumazine synthase. KETc1 and BLS-KETc1 were not MHC H-2(d), H-2(k) nor H-2(b) haplotype-restricted albeit KETc1 is preferentially presented in the H-2(b) haplotype. These findings support that BLS is a potent new delivery system for the improvement of subunit vaccines.

  15. Engineered biosynthesis of plant polyketides: manipulation of chalcone synthase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2006-02-02

    [reaction: see text]. Chalcone synthase (CHS) is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase catalyzing condensation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA with three molecules of malonyl-CoA. Surprisingly, it was demonstrated that S338V mutant of Scutellaria baicalensis CHS produced octaketides SEK4/SEK4b from eight molecules of malonyl-CoA. Further, the octaketides-forming activity was dramatically increased in a CHS triple mutant (T197G/G256L/S338T). The functional conversion is based on the simple steric modulation of a chemically inert residue lining the active-site cavity.

  16. Enzymatic proof for the identity of the S-sulfocysteine synthase and cysteine synthase B of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T; Iwahashi, H; Eguchi, Y

    1984-01-01

    S-Sulfocysteine synthase was isolated from Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 to homogeneous form with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of this enzyme was determined to be ca. 55,000. The enzyme consisted of two identically sized subunits, and it contained one pyridoxal phosphate per subunit. The enzyme catalyzed the biosynthesis of cysteine or S-methylcysteine from sulfide or methanethiol and O-acetylserine, respectively, in addition to the formation of S-sulfocysteine from thiosulfate and O-acetylserine. The enzyme is identical to cysteine synthase B. The intracellular level of this enzyme was regulated by lesser extents of the same factors as those effective for cysteine synthase A. Images PMID:6373737

  17. The Remarkable Character of Porphobilinogen Synthase.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-11-15

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS), also known as 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase, is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of all tetrapyrroles, which function in respiration, photosynthesis, and methanogenesis. Throughout evolution, PBGS adapted to a diversity of cellular niches and evolved to use an unusual variety of metal ions both for catalytic function and to control protein multimerization. With regard to the active site, some PBGSs require Zn(2+); a subset of those, including human PBGS, contain a constellation of cysteine residues that acts as a sink for the environmental toxin Pb(2+). PBGSs that do not require the soft metal ion Zn(2+) at the active site instead are suspected of using the hard metal Mg(2+). The most unexpected property of the PBGS family of enzymes is a dissociative allosteric mechanism that utilizes an equilibrium of architecturally and functionally distinct protein assemblies. The high-activity assembly is an octamer in which intersubunit interactions modulate active-site lid motion. This octamer can dissociate to dimer, the dimer can undergo a hinge twist, and the twisted dimer can assemble to a low-activity hexamer. The hexamer does not have the intersubunit interactions required to stabilize a closed conformation of the active site lid. PBGS active site chemistry benefits from a closed lid because porphobilinogen biosynthesis includes Schiff base formation, which requires deprotonated lysine amino groups. N-terminal and C-terminal sequence extensions dictate whether a specific species of PBGS can sample the hexameric assembly. The bulk of species (nearly all except animals and yeasts) use Mg(2+) as an allosteric activator. Mg(2+) functions allosterically by binding to an intersubunit interface that is present in the octamer but absent in the hexamer. This conformational selection allosteric mechanism is purported to be essential to avoid the untimely accumulation of phototoxic chlorophyll precursors in plants. For those PBGSs that do

  18. Characterization of spermidine synthase and spermine synthase--The polyamine-synthetic enzymes that induce early flowering in Gentiana triflora.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tomohiro; Fujita, Kohei; Tasaki, Keisuke; Higuchi, Atsumi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2015-08-07

    Polyamines are essential for several living processes in plants. However, regulatory mechanisms of polyamines in herbaceous perennial are almost unknown. Here, we identified homologs of two Arabidopsis polyamine-synthetic enzymes, spermidine synthase (SPDS) and spermine synthase (SPMS) denoted as GtSPDS and GtSPMS, from the gentian plant, Gentiana triflora. Our results showed that recombinant proteins of GtSPDS and GtSPMS possessed SPDS and SPMS activities, respectively. The expression levels of GtSPDS and GtSPMS increased transiently during vegetative to reproductive growth phase and overexpression of the genes hastened flowering, suggesting that these genes are involved in flowering induction in gentian plants.

  19. Benzophenone synthase and chalcone synthase from Hypericum androsaemum cell cultures: cDNA cloning, functional expression, and site-directed mutagenesis of two polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benye; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Schmidt, Werner; Beerhues, Ludger

    2003-06-01

    Benzophenone derivatives, such as polyprenylated benzoylphloroglucinols and xanthones, are biologically active secondary metabolites. The formation of their C13 skeleton is catalyzed by benzophenone synthase (BPS; EC 2.3.1.151) that has been cloned from cell cultures of Hypericum androsaemum. BPS is a novel member of the superfamily of plant polyketide synthases (PKSs), also termed type III PKSs, with 53-63% amino acid sequence identity. Heterologously expressed BPS was a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 42.8 kDa. Its preferred starter substrate was benzoyl-CoA that was stepwise condensed with three malonyl-CoAs to give 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone. BPS did not accept activated cinnamic acids as starter molecules. In contrast, recombinant chalcone synthase (CHS; EC 2.3.1.74) from the same cell cultures preferentially used 4-coumaroyl-CoA and also converted CoA esters of benzoic acids. The enzyme shared 60.1% amino acid sequence identity with BPS. In a phylogenetic tree, the two PKSs occurred in different clusters. One cluster was formed by CHSs including the one from H. androsaemum. BPS grouped together with the PKSs that functionally differ from CHS. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids shaping the initiation/elongation cavity of CHS yielded a triple mutant (L263M/F265Y/S338G) that preferred benzoyl-CoA over 4-coumaroyl-CoA.

  20. Leveraging structure determination with fragment screening for infectious disease drug targets: MECP synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, Darren W.; Hartley, Robert C.; Davies, Douglas R.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Leonard, Jess T.; Abendroth, Jan; Burris, Courtney A.; Bhandari, Janhavi; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2011-09-28

    As part of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, we seek to enhance structural genomics with ligand-bound structure data which can serve as a blueprint for structure-based drug design. We have adapted fragment-based screening methods to our structural genomics pipeline to generate multiple ligand-bound structures of high priority drug targets from pathogenic organisms. In this study, we report fragment screening methods and structure determination results for 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MECP) synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the gram-negative bacterium which causes melioidosis. Screening by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as crystal soaking followed by X-ray diffraction led to the identification of several small molecules which bind this enzyme in a critical metabolic pathway. A series of complex structures obtained with screening hits reveal distinct binding pockets and a range of small molecules which form complexes with the target. Additional soaks with these compounds further demonstrate a subset of fragments to only bind the protein when present in specific combinations. This ensemble of fragment-bound complexes illuminates several characteristics of MECP synthase, including a previously unknown binding surface external to the catalytic active site. These ligand-bound structures now serve to guide medicinal chemists and structural biologists in rational design of novel inhibitors for this enzyme.

  1. Identification and molecular characterization of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kang, Hye-Min; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Heum Gi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-02-10

    In copepods, no information has been reported on the structure or molecular characterization of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus, we identified a NOS gene that is involved in immune responses of vertebrates and invertebrates. In silico analyses revealed that nitric oxide (NO) synthase domains, such as the oxygenase and reductase domains, are highly conserved in the T. japonicus NOS gene. The T. japonicus NOS gene was highly transcribed in the nauplii stages, implying that it plays a role in protecting the host during the early developmental stages. To examine the involvement of the T. japonicus NOS gene in the innate immune response, the copepods were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and two Vibrio sp. After exposure to different concentrations of LPS and Vibrio sp., T. japonicus NOS transcription was significantly increased over time in a dose-dependent manner, and the NO/nitrite concentration increased as well. Taken together, our findings suggest that T. japonicus NOS transcription is induced in response to an immune challenge as part of the conserved innate immunity.

  2. The human ATP synthase beta subunit gene: sequence analysis, chromosome assignment, and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Neckelmann, N; Warner, C K; Chung, A; Kudoh, J; Minoshima, S; Fukuyama, R; Maekawa, M; Shimizu, Y; Shimizu, N; Liu, J D

    1989-11-01

    In humans, the functional F0F1-ATP synthase beta subunit gene is located on chromosome 12 in the p13----qter region. Other partially homologous sequences have been detected on chromosomes 2 and 17. The bona fide beta subunit gene has 10 exons encoding a leader peptide of 49 amino acids and a mature protein of 480 amino acids. Thirteen Alu family DNA repeats are found upstream from the gene and in four introns. The gene has four "CCAAT" sequences upstream and in close proximity to the transcriptional initiation site. A 13-bp motif is found in the 5' nontranscribed region of both the beta subunit gene and an ADP/ATP translocator gene that is expressed in high levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Analysis of the beta subunit mRNA levels reveals marked differences among tissues. The highest levels are found in heart, lower levels in skeletal muscle, and the lowest levels in liver and kidney. These findings suggest that the tissue-specific levels of ATP synthase beta subunit mRNA may be generated through transcriptional control.

  3. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  4. Primary structure of the Escherichia coli thyA gene and its thymidylate synthase product.

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, M; Maley, G; Pedersen-Lane, J; Maley, F

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1,163-base-pair fragment that encodes the entire thyA gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was determined. The strategy involved sequence determination of both DNA strands by using overlapping deletions that had been generated in vitro from the two ends of the fragment with BAL-31 nuclease. The amino-terminal sequence of thymidylate synthase (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate:dUMP C-methyltransferase, EC 2.1.1.45), the product of the thyA gene, located the 792-base-pair open reading frame, which codes for the 264 amino acid residues of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide data was confirmed to the extent of 40% by partial sequence analysis of the enzyme purified from extracts of the amplified cloned gene. Transcriptional and translational control areas were apparent in the regions flanking the structural gene. The 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate-binding residue of the active site was identified as cysteine-146. Comparison of the E. coli and Lactobacillus casei synthase sequences reveals consistent homology (62%) over extensive regions. This homology is particularly striking in a very hydrophobic region bordering cysteine-146. In the two enzymes, this region, which probably defines the active site, is 82% homologous. However, a dramatic difference between the two sequences is reflected by the surprising finding that a 51-amino-acid stretch, present midway through the L. casei sequence, is completely absent from the E. coli enzyme. PMID:6308660

  5. The Crystal Structures of the Open and Catalytically Competent Closed Conformation of Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Jia, Xiaofei; Yep, Alejandra; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2009-07-06

    Escherichia coli glycogen synthase (EcGS, EC 2.4.1.21) is a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) that transfers glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose to a glucan chain acceptor with retention of configuration at the anomeric carbon. EcGS belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Here we report several EcGS x-ray structures that together shed considerable light on the structure and function of these enzymes. The structure of the wild-type enzyme bound to ADP and glucose revealed a 15.2 degrees overall domain-domain closure and provided for the first time the structure of the catalytically active, closed conformation of a glycogen synthase. The main chain carbonyl group of His-161, Arg-300, and Lys-305 are suggested by the structure to act as critical catalytic residues in the transglycosylation. Glu-377, previously thought to be catalytic is found on the alpha-face of the glucose and plays an electrostatic role in the active site and as a glucose ring locator. This is also consistent with the structure of the EcGS(E377A)-ADP-HEPPSO complex where the glucose moiety is either absent or disordered in the active site

  6. Zinc affects differently growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities and phytochelatin synthase expression of four marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Deroche, Thi Le Nhung; Caruso, Aurore; Le, Thi Trung; Bui, Trang Viet; Schoefs, Benoît; Tremblin, Gérard; Morant-Manceau, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-supplementation (20 μM) effects on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase), and the expression of phytochelatin synthase gene were investigated in four marine diatoms (Amphora acutiuscula, Nitzschia palea, Amphora coffeaeformis and Entomoneis paludosa). Zn-supplementation reduced the maximum cell density. A linear relationship was found between the evolution of gross photosynthesis and total chlorophyll content. The Zn treatment decreased the electron transport rate except in A. coffeaeformis and in E. paludosa at high irradiance. A linear relationship was found between the efficiency of light to evolve oxygen and the size of the light-harvesting antenna. The external carbonic anhydrase activity was stimulated in Zn-supplemented E. paludosa but was not correlated with an increase of photosynthesis. The total activity of the antioxidant enzymes did not display any clear increase except in ascorbate peroxidase activity in N. palea. The phytochelatin synthase gene was identified in the four diatoms, but its expression was only revealed in N. palea, without a clear difference between control and Zn-supplemented cells. Among the four species, A. paludosa was the most sensitive and A. coffeaeformis, the most tolerant. A. acutiuscula seemed to be under metal starvation, whereas, to survive, only N. palea developed several stress responses.

  7. Cloning and Characterization of a Squalene Synthase Gene from the Chaga Medicinal Mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Agaricomycetes).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panpan; Cao, Xiaoying; Li, Changgen; Zheng, Zhujun; Yong, Sun; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the condensation of 2 molecules of farnesyl diphosphate to produce squalene, the first committed precursor for sterol, brassinosteroid, and triterpene biosynthesis. A squalene synthase gene, designated IoSQS, was isolated from Inonotus obliquus, a medicinal mushroom that produces a plethora of bioactive triterpenes. IoSQS complementary DNA was found to contain an open reading frame of 1476 bp, encoding a protein of 491 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 55.85 kDa. The IoSQS genomic DNA sequence consisted of 1813 bp and contained 4 exons and 3 introns. The restriction fragment polymorphisms revealed by Southern blot analysis suggested that IoSQS was a single-copy gene. Promoter analysis indicated that the 5' upstream region of IoSQS possessed various potential elements associated with physiological and environmental factors. The expression pattern of IoSQS in different stages and under methyl jasmonate treatment correlated with the accumulation of total triterpenoids and was consistent with the predicted results of the IoSQS promoter region. The N-terminal 466 residues of the hydrophilic sequence were expressed as a His-tagged protein in Escherichia coli, and the resultant bacterial crude extract was incubated with farnesyl diphosphate and NADPH. Squalene was detected in vitro in reaction mixture by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. These results suggest that the IoSQS enzyme is involved in squalene production in I. obliquus.

  8. Crystal Structures of Two Isozymes of Citrate Synthase from Sulfolobus tokodaii Strain 7

    PubMed Central

    Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 has two citrate synthase genes (ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS) in the genome with 45% sequence identity. Because they exhibit similar optimal temperatures of catalytic activity and thermal inactivation profiles, we performed structural comparisons between these isozymes to elucidate adaptation mechanisms to high temperatures in thermophilic CSs. The crystal structures of ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS were determined at 2.0 Å and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Structural comparison reveals that both of them are dimeric enzymes composed of two identical subunits, and these dimeric structures are quite similar to those of citrate synthases from archaea and eubacteria. ST0587-CS has, however, 55 ion pairs within whole dimer structure, while having only 36 in ST1805-CS. Although the number and distributions of ion pairs are distinct from each other, intersubunit ion pairs between two domains of each isozyme are identical especially in interterminal region. Because the location and number of ion pairs are in a trend with other CSs from thermophilic microorganisms, the factors responsible for thermal adaptation of ST-CS isozymes are characterized by ion pairs in interterminal region. PMID:27656296

  9. Early growth and development impairments in patients with ganglioside GM3 synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, A; Wang, D; Bright, A; Sency, V; Zhou, A; Xin, B

    2016-05-01

    Ganglioside GM3 synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gangliosides. GM3 synthase deficiency (GSD) causes a complete absence of GM3 and all downstream biosynthetic derivatives. The individuals affected by this disorder manifest severe irritability, intractable seizures and profound intellectual disability. However, we have found that most newborns seem symptom-free for a period of time after birth. In order to further understand the onset of the disease, we investigated the early growth and development of patients with this condition through this study. We compared 37 affected individuals with their normal siblings and revealed that all children with GSD had relatively normal intrauterine growth and development, as their weight, length and head circumference were similar to their normal siblings at birth. However, the disease progresses quickly after birth and causes significant constitutional impairments of growth and development by 6 months of age. Neither breastfeeding nor gastrostomy tube placement made significant difference on growth and development as all groups of patients showed the similar pattern. We conclude that GSD causes significant postnatal growth and developmental impairments and the amount of gangliosides in breast milk and general nutritional intervention do not seem to alter these outcomes.

  10. Inactivation of Ceramide Synthase 6 in Mice Results in an Altered Sphingolipid Metabolism and Behavioral Abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, Philipp; vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain. PMID:23760501

  11. Inactivation of ceramide synthase 6 in mice results in an altered sphingolipid metabolism and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Philipp; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-07-19

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain.

  12. Detection of proteins related to starch synthase activity in the developing mungbean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Ya-Ting; Chang, Jin-Yi

    2005-06-15

    Proteins associated with starch synthase (SS) activities were identified in immature mungbeans (Vigna radiata L. cv KPS1). Seed soluble extract was separated by native-PAGE and subjected to in situ activity staining. The gel zymogram located starch-enzyme complex bands. The soluble extract was also partitioned by preparative-IEF and screened for SS activity using radioactive assay. IEF fractions eluted within pH 4-6 revealed enriched SS activity of 145-fold. Parallel comparison of the protein profiles among the activity stained enzyme complex and the active isoelectric focused fractions on SDS-PAGE depicted three SS-activity-related proteins with molecular size of 32, 53, and 85 kDa. The 85 kDa protein, however, was identified to be methionine synthase by MALDI-TOF analysis and should be a protein physically associated with the active SS. Polyclonal antibodies raised from eluted native enzyme complex neutralized up to 90% activity and antigenically recognize the other 53 and 32 kDa proteins on Western blot. Antibodies raised from the two individual denatured proteins were able to neutralize SS activities near 60% separately, indicating that the 53 kDa and 32 proteins associated with SS activity are potentially involved in starch biosynthesis during mungbean seed development.

  13. Enzymatic properties and mutational studies of chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2012-01-01

    PpCHS is a member of the type III polyketide synthase family and catalyses the synthesis of the flavonoid precursor naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Recent research reports the production of pyrone derivatives using either hexanoyl-CoA or butyryl-CoA as starter molecule. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad found in other plant chalcone synthase predicted polypeptides is conserved in PpCHS. Site directed mutagenesis involving these amino acids residing in the active-site cavity revealed that the cavity volume of the active-site plays a significant role in the selection of starter molecules as well as product formation. Substitutions of Cys 170 with Arg and Ser amino acids decreased the ability of the PpCHS to utilize hexanoyl-CoA as a starter molecule, which directly effected the production of pyrone derivatives (products). These substitutions are believed to have a restricted number of elongations of the growing polypeptide chain due to the smaller cavity volume of the mutant's active site.

  14. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine Synthase: A Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with Polar Tendencies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes are widely distributed and catalyze diverse reactions. SAM binds to the unique iron atom of a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster and is reductively cleaved to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurine containing natural products. 6-Carboxypterin (6-CP), an oxidized analogue of the natural substrate 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4), is shown to be an alternate substrate for CDG synthase. Under reducing conditions that would promote the reductive cleavage of SAM, 6-CP is turned over to 6-deoxyadenosylpterin (6-dAP), presumably by radical addition of the 5′-deoxyadenosine followed by oxidative decarboxylation to the product. By contrast, in the absence of the strong reductant, dithionite, the carboxylate of 6-CP is esterified to generate 6-carboxypterin-5′-deoxyadenosyl ester (6-CP-dAdo ester). Structural studies with 6-CP and SAM also reveal electron density consistent with the ester product being formed in crystallo. The differential reactivity of 6-CP under reducing and nonreducing conditions highlights the ability of radical SAM enzymes to carry out both polar and radical transformations in the same active site. PMID:28045519

  15. Enzymatic Properties and Mutational Studies of Chalcone Synthase from Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2012-01-01

    PpCHS is a member of the type III polyketide synthase family and catalyses the synthesis of the flavonoid precursor naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Recent research reports the production of pyrone derivatives using either hexanoyl-CoA or butyryl-CoA as starter molecule. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad found in other plant chalcone synthase predicted polypeptides is conserved in PpCHS. Site directed mutagenesis involving these amino acids residing in the active-site cavity revealed that the cavity volume of the active-site plays a significant role in the selection of starter molecules as well as product formation. Substitutions of Cys 170 with Arg and Ser amino acids decreased the ability of the PpCHS to utilize hexanoyl-CoA as a starter molecule, which directly effected the production of pyrone derivatives (products). These substitutions are believed to have a restricted number of elongations of the growing polypeptide chain due to the smaller cavity volume of the mutant’s active site. PMID:22949824

  16. Glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation causes a novel skeletal muscle glycogenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Miller, Michael B; Wade, Claire; DiMauro, Salvatore; Akman, Hasan O; Mickelson, James R

    2008-01-01

    Summary We describe a gain of function mutation in the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase gene that is responsible for a novel myopathy, and is highly prevalent in multiple breeds of horses because it arose before the founding of many modern breeds. Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM) is a novel glycogenosis in horses characterized by abnormal glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle and muscle damage with exertion. It is unlike glycogen storage diseases resulting from known defects in glycogenolysis, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis that have been described in humans and domestic animals. A genome wide association identified GYS1, encoding skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS), as a candidate gene for PSSM. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation resulting in an arginine to histidine substitution in a highly conserved region of GS. Functional analysis demonstrated an elevated GS activity in PSSM horses and haplotype analysis and allele age estimation demonstrated that this mutation is identical by descent among horse breeds. This is the first report of a gain of function mutation in GYS1 resulting in a glycogenosis. PMID:18358695

  17. Structure of soybean [beta]-cyanoalanine synthase and the molecular basis for cyanide detoxification in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hankuil; Juergens, Matthew; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-09-07

    Plants produce cyanide (CN{sup -}) during ethylene biosynthesis in the mitochondria and require {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) for CN{sup -} detoxification. Recent studies show that CAS is a member of the {beta}-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) family, which also includes the Cys biosynthesis enzyme O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), but how the BSAS evolved distinct metabolic functions is not understood. Here we show that soybean (Glycine max) CAS and OASS form {alpha}-aminoacrylate reaction intermediates from Cys and O-acetylserine, respectively. To understand the molecular evolution of CAS and OASS in the BSAS enzyme family, the crystal structures of Gm-CAS and the Gm-CAS K95A mutant with a linked pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-Cys molecule in the active site were determined. These structures establish a common fold for the plant BSAS family and reveal a substrate-induced conformational change that encloses the active site for catalysis. Comparison of CAS and OASS identified residues that covary in the PLP binding site. The Gm-OASS T81M, S181M, and T185S mutants altered the ratio of OASS:CAS activity but did not convert substrate preference to that of a CAS. Generation of a triple mutant Gm-OASS successfully switched reaction chemistry to that of a CAS. This study provides new molecular insight into the evolution of diverse enzyme functions across the BSAS family in plants.

  18. Novel protein–protein interaction between spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Agnihotri, Pragati; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • L. donovani spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase have been cloned and purified. • S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has autocatalytic property. • GST pull down assay shows the two proteins to form a metabolon. • Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that binding was exothermic having K{sub d} value of 0.4 μM. • Interaction confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. - Abstract: Polyamine biosynthesis pathway has long been considered an essential drug target for trypanosomatids including Leishmania. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDc) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn) are enzymes of this pathway that catalyze successive steps, with the product of the former, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM), acting as an aminopropyl donor for the latter enzyme. Here we have explored the possibility of and identified the protein–protein interaction between SpdSyn and AdoMetDc. The protein–protein interaction has been identified using GST pull down assay. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that the interaction is thermodynamically favorable. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies also confirms the interaction, with SpdSyn exhibiting a change in tertiary structure with increasing concentrations of AdoMetDc. Size exclusion chromatography suggests the presence of the complex as a hetero-oligomer. Taken together, these results suggest that the enzymes indeed form a heteromer. Computational analyses suggest that this complex differs significantly from the corresponding human complex, implying that this complex could be a better therapeutic target than the individual enzymes.

  19. Substrate geometry controls the cyclization cascade in multiproduct terpene synthases from Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Vattekkatte, Abith; Gatto, Nathalie; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2015-06-07

    Multiproduct terpene synthases TPS4-B73 and TPS5-Delprim from maize (Zea mays) catalyze the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and geranyl diphosphate (GDP) into a complex mixture of sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes, respectively. Various isotopic and geometric isomers of natural substrates like (2Z)-[2-(2)H]- and [2,4,4,9,9,9-(2)H6]-(GDP) and (2Z,6E)-[2-(2)H]- and [2,4,4,13,13,13-(2)H6]-(FDP) were synthesized analogous to presumptive reaction intermediates. On incubation with labeled (2Z) substrates, TPS4 and TPS5 showed much lower kinetic isotope effects than the labeled (2E) substrates. Interestingly, the products arising from the deuterated (2Z)-precursors revealed a distinct preference for cyclic products and exhibited an enhanced turnover on comparison with natural (2E)-substrates. This increase in the efficiency due to (2Z) configuration emphasizes the rate limiting effect of the initial (2E) → (2Z) isomerization step in the reaction cascade of the multiproduct terpene synthases. Apart from turnover advantages, these results suggest that substrate geometry can be used as a tool to optimize the biosynthetic reaction cascade towards valuable cyclic terpenoids.

  20. Acetylation and phosphorylation control both local and global stability of the chloroplast F1 ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Carla; Beilsten-Edmands, Victoria; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    ATP synthases (ATPases) are enzymes that produce ATP and control the pH in the cell or cellular compartments. While highly conserved over different species, ATPases are structurally well-characterised but the existence and functional significance of many post-translational modifications (PTMs) is not well understood. We combined a range of mass spectrometric techniques to unravel the location and extent of PTMs in the chloroplast ATP synthase (cATPase) purified from spinach leaves. We identified multiple phosphorylation and acetylation sites and found that both modifications stabilise binding of ε and δ subunits. Comparing cross-linking of naturally modified cATPase with the in vitro deacetylated enzyme revealed a major conformational change in the ε subunit in accord with extended and folded forms of the subunit. Locating modified residues within the catalytic head we found that phosphorylated and acetylated residues are primarily on α/β and β/α interfaces respectively. By aligning along different interfaces the higher abundance acetylated residues are proximal to the regulatory sites while the lower abundance phosphorylation sites are more densely populated at the catalytic sites. We propose that modifications in the catalytic head, together with the conformational change in subunit ε, work in synergy to fine-tune the enzyme during adverse conditions. PMID:28276484

  1. Structure of a functional ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine synthase bound to a substrate RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Bo; Zhou, Jing; Kahen, Elliot; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2009-09-29

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoprotein particles comprise the most complex pseudouridine synthases and are essential for ribosome and spliceosome maturation. The multistep and multicomponent-mediated enzyme mechanism remains only partially understood. Here we report a crystal structure at 2.35 {angstrom} of a substrate-bound functional archaeal enzyme containing three of the four proteins, Cbf5, Nop10 and L7Ae, and a box H/ACA RNA that reveals detailed information about the protein-only active site. The substrate RNA, containing 5-fluorouridine at the modification position, is fully docked and catalytically rearranged by the enzyme in a manner similar to that seen in two stand-alone pseudouridine synthases. Structural analysis provides a mechanism for plasticity in the diversity of guide RNA sequences used and identifies a substrate-anchoring loop of Cbf5 that also interacts with Gar1 in unliganded structures. Activity analyses of mutated proteins and RNAs support the structural findings and further suggest a role of the Cbf5 loop in regulation of enzyme activity.

  2. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase-an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J

    2016-01-18

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states.

  3. Isoelectric focusing of wound-induced tomato ACC synthase

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.A.; Kende, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Several techniques of electrofocusing have been used to determine whether 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase isolated from wounded tomato pericarp tissue exists in different isoforms, each with its characteristic isoelectric point (pI). The pI of the native enzyme was found to be 6.0 {plus minus} 0.2. When radiolabeled, denatured ACC synthase was electrofocused by non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis (NEpHGE), the enzyme separated into four discernible spots which, upon reaching equilibrium, ranged in pI from 6.6 to 6.9. Immunopurified ACC synthase from four tomato cultivars (Duke, Cornell, Mountain Pride and Pik Red) migrated in each case as a 50-kDa protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). We propose that native ACC synthase in extracts of tomato pericarp tissue exists in one single form and that the charge heterogeneities observed upon electrofocusing of denatured enzyme result from modifications of preexisting protein.

  4. Substituted 2-aminopyridines as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, W K; Caldwell, C G; Chen, P; Durette, P L; Esser, C K; Lanza, T J; Kopka, I E; Guthikonda, R; Shah, S K; MacCoss, M; Chabin, R M; Fletcher, D; Grant, S K; Green, B G; Humes, J L; Kelly, T M; Luell, S; Meurer, R; Moore, V; Pacholok, S G; Pavia, T; Williams, H R; Wong, K K

    2000-09-04

    A series of substituted 2-aminopyridines was prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of human nitric oxide synthases (NOS). 4,6-Disubstitution enhanced both potency and specificity for the inducible NOS with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 28 nM.

  5. Mammalian fatty acid synthase: closure on a textbook mechanism?

    PubMed

    Leadlay, Peter; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2003-02-01

    Mammalian fatty acid synthase is a classic example of a chain-building multienzyme. A cornerstone of its mechanism has been the obligatory collaboration of two identical subunits, with fatty acyl intermediates transferring between them. Now, fresh evidence has upset this view.

  6. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that represents one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. The article includes 609 references and covers the literature from 2009 through June 2015.

  7. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn

    2010-07-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that have recently been recognized as one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. 436 references are cited.

  8. Insight into Biochemical Characterization of Plant Sesquiterpene Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Manczak, Tom; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    A fast and reproducible protocol was established for enzymatic characterization of plant sesquiterpene synthases that can incorporate radioactivity in their products. The method utilizes the 96-well format in conjunction with cluster tubes and enables processing of >200 samples a day. Along with reduced reagent usage, it allows further reduction in the use of radioactive isotopes and flammable organic solvents. The sesquiterpene synthases previously characterized were expressed in yeast, and the plant-derived Thapsia garganica kunzeaol synthase TgTPS2 was tested in this method. KM for TgTPS2 was found to be 0.55 μM; the turnover number, kcat, was found to be 0.29 s−1, kcat for TgTPS2 is in agreement with that of terpene synthases of other plants, and kcat/KM was found to be 0.53 s−1 μM−1 for TgTPS2. The kinetic parameters were in agreement with previously published data. PMID:27721652

  9. Genetics Home Reference: N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reactions that occurs in liver cells. This cycle processes excess nitrogen, generated when protein is used by the body, to make a compound called urea that is excreted by the kidneys. The ... cycle. In people with N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency , N- ...

  10. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    DOE PAGES

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; ...

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ringmore » motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics

  11. C-S bond cleavage by a polyketide synthase domain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Liu, Tao; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Leinamycin (LNM) is a sulfur-containing antitumor antibiotic featuring an unusual 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety that is spiro-fused to a thiazole-containing 18-membered lactam ring. The 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety is essential for LNM’s antitumor activity, by virtue of its ability to generate an episulfonium ion intermediate capable of alkylating DNA. We have previously cloned and sequenced the lnm gene cluster from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. In vivo and in vitro characterizations of the LNM biosynthetic machinery have since established that: (i) the 18-membered macrolactam backbone is synthesized by LnmP, LnmQ, LnmJ, LnmI, and LnmG, (ii) the alkyl branch at C-3 of LNM is installed by LnmK, LnmL, LnmM, and LnmF, and (iii) leinamycin E1 (LNM E1), bearing a thiol moiety at C-3, is the nascent product of the LNM hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS). Sulfur incorporation at C-3 of LNM E1, however, has not been addressed. Here we report that: (i) the bioinformatics analysis reveals a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent domain, we termed cysteine lyase (SH) domain (LnmJ-SH), within PKS module-8 of LnmJ; (ii) the LnmJ-SH domain catalyzes C-S bond cleavage by using l-cysteine and l-cysteine S-modified analogs as substrates through a PLP-dependent β-elimination reaction, establishing l-cysteine as the origin of sulfur at C-3 of LNM; and (iii) the LnmJ-SH domain, sharing no sequence homology with any other enzymes catalyzing C-S bond cleavage, represents a new family of PKS domains that expands the chemistry and enzymology of PKSs and might be exploited to incorporate sulfur into polyketide natural products by PKS engineering. PMID:26240335

  12. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings

  13. Mechanism-oriented redesign of an isomaltulose synthase to an isomelezitose synthase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Görl, Julian; Timm, Malte; Seibel, Jürgen

    2012-01-02

    An isomelezitose synthase was redesigned out of the sucrose isomerase from Protaminobacter rubrum for the synthesis of isomelezitose (6-O(F)-glucosylsucrose), a potential nutraceutical. The variants F297A, F297P, R333K, F321A_F319A and E428D catalyze the formation of isomelezitose in up to 70 % yield.

  14. Identifying the catalytic components of cellulose synthase and the maize mixed-linkage beta-glucan synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas C Carpita

    2009-04-20

    Five specific objectives of this project are to develop strategies to identify the genes that encode the catalytic components of "mixed-linkage" (1→3),(1→4)-beta-D-glucans in grasses, to determine the protein components of the synthase complex, and determine the biochemical mechanism of synthesis. We have used proteomic approaches to define intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of Golgi membranes that are associated with polysaccharide synthesis and trafficking. We were successful in producing recombinant catalytic domains of cellulose synthase genes and discovered that they dimerize upon concentration, indicating that two CesA proteins form the catalytic unit. We characterized a brittle stalk2 mutant as a defect in a COBRA-like protein that results in compromised lignin-cellulose interactions that decrease tissue flexibility. We used virus-induced gene silencing of barley cell wall polysaccharide synthesis by BSMV in an attempt to silence specific members of the cellulose synthase-like gene family. However, we unexpectedly found that regardless of the specificity of the target gene, whole gene interaction networks were silenced. We discovered the cause to be an antisense transcript of the cellulose synthase gene initiated small interfering RNAs that spread silencing to related genes.

  15. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  16. Isolation and functional characterization of a τ-cadinol synthase, a new sesquiterpene synthase from Lavandula angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Frédéric; Moja, Sandrine; Bony, Aurélie; Legrand, Sylvain; Petit, Cécile; Benabdelkader, Tarek; Poirot, Kévin; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Guitton, Yann; Nicolè, Florence; Baudino, Sylvie; Magnard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we characterize three sTPSs: a germacrene D (LaGERDS), a (E)-β-caryophyllene (LaCARS) and a τ-cadinol synthase (LaCADS). τ-cadinol synthase is reported here for the first time and its activity was studied in several biological models including transiently or stably transformed tobacco species. Three dimensional structure models of LaCADS and Ocimum basilicum γ-cadinene synthase were built by homology modeling using the template structure of Gossypium arboreum δ-cadinene synthase. The depiction of their active site organization provides evidence of the global influence of the enzymes on the formation of τ-cadinol: instead of a unique amino-acid, the electrostatic properties and solvent accessibility of the whole active site in LaCADS may explain the stabilization of the cadinyl cation intermediate. Quantitative PCR performed from leaves and inflorescences showed two patterns of expression. LaGERDS and LaCARS were mainly expressed during early stages of flower development and, at these stages, transcript levels paralleled the accumulation of the corresponding terpene products (germacrene D and (E)-β-caryophyllene). By contrast, the expression level of LaCADS was constant in leaves and flowers. Phylogenetic analysis provided informative results on potential duplication process leading to sTPS diversification in lavender.

  17. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase in fission yeast is a heteromer of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), Fps1, and an FPS-like protein, Spo9, essential for sporulation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanfang; Fujii, Makoto; Hirata, Aiko; Kawamukai, Makoto; Shimoda, Chikashi; Nakamura, Taro

    2007-09-01

    Both farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPS) are key enzymes in the synthesis of various isoprenoid-containing compounds and proteins. Here, we describe two novel Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, fps1(+) and spo9(+), whose products are similar to FPS in primary structure, but whose functions differ from one another. Fps1 is essential for vegetative growth, whereas, a spo9 null mutant exhibits temperature-sensitive growth. Expression of fps1(+), but not spo9(+), suppresses the lethality of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae FPS-deficient mutant and also restores ubiquinone synthesis in an Escherichia coli ispA mutant, which lacks FPS activity, indicating that S. pombe Fps1 in fact functions as an FPS. In contrast to a typical FPS gene, no apparent GGPS homologues have been found in the S. pombe genome. Interestingly, although neither fps1(+) nor spo9(+) expression alone in E. coli confers clear GGPS activity, coexpression of both genes induces such activity. Moreover, the GGPS activity is significantly reduced in the spo9 mutant. In addition, the spo9 mutation perturbs the membrane association of a geranylgeranylated protein, but not that of a farnesylated protein. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses indicate that Fps1 and Spo9 physically interact. Thus, neither Fps1 nor Spo9 alone functions as a GGPS, but the two proteins together form a complex with GGPS activity. Because spo9 was originally identified as a sporulation-deficient mutant, we show here that expansion of the forespore membrane is severely inhibited in spo9Delta cells. Electron microscopy revealed significant accumulation membrane vesicles in spo9Delta cells. We suggest that lack of GGPS activity in a spo9 mutant results in impaired protein prenylation in certain proteins responsible for secretory function, thereby inhibiting forespore membrane formation.

  18. The Small Subunit of Snapdragon Geranyl Diphosphate <