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Sample records for chosanado jigyo kiko

  1. Neurobehavioral deficits in the KIKO mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    McMackin, Marissa Z; Henderson, Chelsea K; Cortopassi, Gino A

    2017-01-01

    Friedreich's Ataxia (FA) is a pediatric neurodegenerative disease whose clinical presentation includes ataxia, muscle weakness, and peripheral sensory neuropathy. The KIKO mouse is an animal model of FA with frataxin deficiency first described in 2002, but neurobehavioral deficits have never been described in this model. The identification of robust neurobehavioral deficits in KIKO mice could support the testing of drugs for FA, which currently has no approved therapy. We tested 13 neurobehavioral tasks to identify a robust KIKO phenotype: Open Field, Grip Strength Test(s), Cylinder, Skilled Forelimb Grasp Task(s), Treadmill Endurance, Locotronic Motor Coordination, Inverted Screen, Treadscan, and Von Frey. Of these, Inverted Screen, Treadscan and Von Frey produced significant neurobehavioral deficits at >8 months of age, and relate to the clinically relevant endpoints of muscle strength and endurance, gait ataxia, and peripheral insensitivity. Thus we identify robust phenotypic measures related to Friedreich's ataxia clinical endpoints which could be used to test effectiveness of potential drug therapy.

  2. The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Elinoff, Victor; Lynn, Steven Jay; Ochiai, Hidy; Hallquist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.

  3. Sensory properties and instrumental texture analysis of chevon patties from intact male Boer and Kiko goats harvested at four endpoints.

    PubMed

    Leick, C M; Behrends, J M; Solaiman, S G; Broadway, P R; Min, B R; Mikel, W B; Williams, J B; Schilling, M W

    2012-07-01

    Intact male Boer and Kiko goats (n=48) were harvested after 0, 4, 8, or 12 weeks on a 16% crude protein concentrate diet. Boneless goat carcass left sides were ground and formed into patties to evaluate cook loss, texture profile analysis, and descriptive sensory characteristics. Increasing feeding duration increased percent fat and decreased moisture in raw ground meat (P<0.05). Boer ground meat had more fat and less moisture than Kiko meat (P<0.05). Breed and feeding duration did not affect cook loss (P>0.05). Increased feeding duration increased aroma intensity and goaty, bloody, musty, and liver/organy aromas; salty, bitter, umami, grassy, goaty, fat, liver/organy, metallic, earthy, and chemical flavors; and juiciness and oiliness, while decreasing chewiness and crumbliness (P<0.05). Boer and Kiko patties had similar sensory properties after 0 and 4weeks on feed, but breeds were more distinguishable after 8 or 12 weeks on feed.

  4. Reproductive and health traits among Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goat does under humid, subtropical pasture conditions of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Browning, R; Leite-Browning, M L; Byars, M

    2011-03-01

    Boer (n = 132), Kiko (n = 92), and Spanish (n = 79) straightbred does were studied across 6 yr to assess doe fitness on southeastern US pastures. Does were exposed to Boer, Kiko, and Spanish bucks in a complete 3-breed diallel mating scheme each fall for spring kidding in March or May. A total of 1,041 doe-yr units were observed with does (ranging from 2 to 8 yr of age) managed together in a semi-intensive manner. The proportion of buck-exposed does delivering at least 1 live kid was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (80%) than for Kiko (96%) and Spanish does (94%). Litter size and litter weight at birth were not affected (P > 0.15) by breed of dam. By weaning at 3 mo, the proportion of available does weaning at least 1 kid was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (53%) than for Kiko (84%) and Spanish does (82%). For does weaning kids, litter size at weaning was greater (P = 0.01) for Spanish does (1.74 kids) than for Kiko (1.59 kids) and Boer does (1.47 kids). Litter weaning weight was lighter (P < 0.01) for Boer dams (23.0 kg) than for Kiko (27.2 kg) and Spanish dams (26.5 kg). The efficiency ratio of litter weight to dam weight at weaning differed (P < 0.05) among all 3 dam breeds: Boer = 51%; Kiko = 62%; Spanish = 68%. Annual rates of lameness, endoparasitism, and attrition, respectively, were greater (P < 0.01) for Boer does (69, 53, and 28%) than for Kiko (32, 24, and 10%) and Spanish does (42, 22, and 11%). Postpartum fecal egg counts for endoparasite loads were less (P < 0.05) for Spanish dams (346 eggs/g) than for Kiko (524 eggs/g) and Boer does (675 eggs/g). Whole-herd annual doe productivity based on all available does was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (11.7 kg weaned/doe) compared with Kiko (22.0 kg weaned/doe) and Spanish does (21.1 kg weaned/doe). Boer does expressed substantially decreased levels of fitness compared with Kiko and Spanish does when semi-intensively managed on humid, subtropical pasture. Kiko and Spanish should be preferred as maternal breeds in

  5. Carcass yield traits of kids from a complete diallel of Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goat breeds semi-intensively managed on humid subtropical pasture.

    PubMed

    Browning, R; Phelps, O; Chisley, C; Getz, W R; Hollis, T; Leite-Browning, M L

    2012-03-01

    Bucklings (n = 275) from a complete diallel of Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goats were slaughtered at 7 mo of age (4 mo postweaning) to evaluate genetic effects on carcass yield. Breed of sire did not affect (P > 0.05) live, carcass, and primal weights. Conversely, breed of dam was a consistently significant source of variation for carcass weight traits. Kiko dams produced kids with heavier (P < 0.05) live, carcass, and primal weights than Boer dams. Weights from Spanish dams were intermediate to Boer and Kiko with the significance of differences varying by trait. Cold carcass dressing percent was affected (P < 0.01) by breeds of sire and dam. Boer sires decreased (P < 0.05) dressing percent compared with Kiko and Spanish sires. Dressing percent was also less (P < 0.01) from Boer dams than from Kiko dams; Spanish dams were intermediate and did not differ (P > 0.05) from Boer or Kiko. Subjective conformation scores for muscularity were affected (P < 0.01) by breeds of sire and dam. Boer-sired kids had better (P < 0.01) live scores than Kiko-sired kids. Progeny of Boer dams had better (P < 0.05) live scores than progeny of Spanish dams. Boer-sired kids also had better carcass scores (P < 0.05) than Kiko-sired and Spanish-sired kids. Breed differences for primal cut proportions were negligible. Proportional boneless meat yields did not vary (P > 0.05) by breeds of sire or dam. Direct effects of Boer were negative for carcass weight, dressing percent, and shoulder weight and positive for proportional leg weight. Direct effects of Kiko were positive for carcass weight and shoulder weight and negative for proportional leg weight. Direct effects of Spanish did not differ (P > 0.10) from 0 for any trait tested. Heterosis levels were similar among breed pairings. Heterosis was substantial (P ≤ 0.05) for live, carcass, and primal weights (5 to 9%) but not for dressing percent, proportional boneless meat yield, or primal weight proportions (<2%). Significant genetic

  6. Birth to weaning kid traits from a complete diallel of Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goat breeds semi-intensively managed on humid subtropical pasture.

    PubMed

    Browning, R; Leite-Browning, M L

    2011-09-01

    Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goats were semi-intensively managed in a complete 3-breed diallel mating scheme to evaluate genetic effects on preweaning kid performance. Over a 6-yr period, 1,547 kids were born in March and May with 1,173 kids raised by their dams to weaning at 3 mo of age. March-born kids were lighter (P < 0.01) at birth, but had greater (P < 0.01) preweaning ADG and survival rates and heavier (P < 0.01) weaning weights than May-born kids. For birth weight, the direct Boer effect was positive (P < 0.01) and direct effects were negative (P < 0.01) for Kiko and Spanish. The direct Kiko effect for preweaning ADG was positive (P < 0.05), whereas other direct breed effects for ADG and all direct effects for weaning weight did not differ from 0 (P > 0.10). Maternal Boer effects were negative (P < 0.01) for birth weight and weaning weight, whereas maternal Kiko effects were significantly (P < 0.05) positive for preweaning ADG and weaning weight. Maternal Spanish effect was positive (P < 0.05) for birth weight, but did not differ from 0 (P > 0.5) for preweaning ADG or weaning weight. Heterosis for birth weight was exhibited (P < 0.01) for each pair of breed crosses, but only between Boer and Kiko for ADG and weaning weight. Kiko and Spanish dams had greater (P < 0.01) preweaning kid survival rates than Boer dams, but the former 2 did not differ (P = 0.72). Significant genetic variation was observed between meat goat breeds for kid performance to weaning. Maternal breed effects were more influential than direct breed effects. Boer goats were not superior to Kiko or Spanish for preweaning kid performance when semi-intensively managed on humid, subtropical pasture. Kiko should be a preferred breed and to a lesser extent Spanish for enhancing birth to weaning kid performance. Findings of this study emphasize the importance of proper doe breed selection in achieving desired kid performance to weaning in meat goats.

  7. On the prevalence of Asiatic cholera in Okinawa, 1879 and "Ryukyu-kiko" Written by Hironobu Tsuchiya.

    PubMed

    Fukase, Y

    1999-09-01

    The greatest prevalence of Asiatic cholera since the adoption of modern statistics was in 1879. Especially in Okinawa Prefecture, its morbidity rate was the largest in Japan in that year. Dr. Hironobu Tsuchiya, who was appointed as an official of the Department of Inner Affairs, wrote "Ryukyu-kiko" as a private memorandum. He wrote more about the situation of administrative confusion than he did about the condition of Asiatic cholera. This paper also mentions the brief sketch of Tsuchiya's life and the description of the manufacturing methods, effectiveness and use of chemical drugs which are contained in his "Sinyaku-shoko".

  8. Comparison of Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goat does for stayability and cumulative reproductive output in the humid subtropical southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Longevity is the amount of time breeding females stay active in a herd by avoiding death or culling because of illness or reproductive failure. This is a trait of economic relevance in commercial small ruminant breeding herds as it affects lifetime reproductive output. The purpose of this study was to determine if breed of meat goat influences breeding doe survival rates and cumulative reproductive performance under semi-intensive management. Results Boer (n = 132), Kiko (n = 92) and Spanish (n = 79) does were evaluated for longevity trends and cumulative kid production. The herd was managed on humid subtropical pasture. Does had the chance to complete 2 to 6 production years. Survival curves were analyzed for 2 culling methods. The actual culling practice removed does after two failures to wean a kid. An alternative culling protocol removed doe records after the first failure to wean a kid. Kid production traits analyzed across herd life were the total number of kids weaned and cumulative kid weight weaned to the 2-, 3-, and 5-year stayability endpoints. Most (82%) doe exits were illness-related under the actual culling method. Reproductive failure represented 51% of doe exits under the alternative culling protocol. Boer does had greater survival declines (P < 0.01) from 2 to 6 years of herd life compared with Kiko and Spanish under both culling protocols. Boer does had lower stayability rates (P < 0.01) at each year endpoint for both culling protocols. Under the alternative protocol, over 50% of Boer does failed to complete 2 years, whereas over 50% of Kiko and Spanish does successfully completed 4 years. Boer does had lower (P < 0.01) total number of kids weaned and cumulative weight weaned through each stayability endpoint compared with Kiko and Spanish. Conclusion Boer does had low stayability and cumulative kid production rates compared with Kiko and Spanish does. Poor health was the primary driver of does exiting the

  9. Effects of breed and harvest age on feed intake, growth, carcass traits, blood metabolites, and lipogenic gene expression in Boer and Kiko goats.

    PubMed

    Solaiman, S; Min, B R; Gurung, N; Behrends, J; McElhenney, W

    2012-07-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of 2 different breeds (BR), Boer and Kiko, and 4 post-weaning harvest ages (HA; Days 0, 29, 56, and 85) on growth, carcass traits, blood metabolites, and lipogenic gene expression. Forty-eight goat (Capra hircus) kids (BW = 23.9 ± 1.50 kg; 3 to 4 mo) were used in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments. Goats were stratified by BW within BR and randomly assigned to 4 HA. Kids were born between March 15 and April 7 to purebred does, and were represented by at least 3 purebred sires within each BR. They were fed a grain/hay (80:20) diet once per day. At designated HA, randomly pre-assigned goats (n = 6) from each BR were transported to the Meat Science Lab at Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, and were harvested. There were no interactions (P > 0.10) between BR and HA. Boer tended (P = 0.08) to have greater initial BW, final BW (P = 0.05), and G/F ratio (P = 0.05). Although the 80:20 grain/hay diet was reinforced by adjusting DMI, both BR had similar total DMI, Boer kept that ratio, while Kiko consumed more (P = 0.001) hay (70:30, grain/hay) and had more (P = 0.001) DMI when expressed as g/kg BW. Boer tended to have greater transportation shrink (P = 0.07), HCW (P = 0.08), and cold carcass weights (CCW; P = 0.08), with greater (P = 0.001) carcass fat. No differences (P > 0.10) were observed in carcass shrink, dressing percentage, 12th rib fat thickness, and LM area between the 2 BR. When expressed as percentage empty BW, carcass bone was similar (P = 0.25), whereas muscle percentage (P = 0.02) was greater for Kiko and fat percentage was greater (P = 0.001) for Boer. Fat as a percentage of CCW remained relatively similar (P > 0.10) for both BR for the 2nd and 3rd HA. Differences were more evident (P = 0.01) at the 4th HA. Boer reached targeted harvest weight (29 kg) at the 3rd HA, while fat deposition continued (P = 0.01) during the 4th HA. Breed had no effect (P > 0.10) on meat color (L

  10. Effects of pine bark supplementation on performance, rumen fermentation, and carcass characteristics of Kiko crossbred male goats.

    PubMed

    Min, B R; Solaiman, S; Gurung, N; Behrends, J; Eun, J-S; Taha, E; Rose, J

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-two Kiko crossbred male goats (Capra hircus; initial BW = 27.5 ± 1.04 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design to determine the effects of feeding pine bark (PB; Pinus taeda L.) on animal performance, rumen fermentation, blood parameters, fecal egg counts (FEC), and carcass characteristics in goats. Experimental treatments included the control diet [0% PB plus 30% wheat straw (WS)], 15% PB plus 15% WS, and 30% PB plus 0% WS (on as-fed basis), where PB replaced WS. Freshly air-dried PB and WS were finely (1.5 to 3.0 mm) ground and incorporated in the grain mixes. Experimental diets provided a total of 1.9, 16.3, and 32 g of condense tannins (CT)/kg DM in 0%, 15%, and 30% PB diets, respectively. The grain mixes were fed daily at 85% of the feed offered, with remaining 15% consisting of Bermuda grass hay (Cynodon dactylon). Animals were fed once a day at 0800 h, and feed offered and refused was monitored for an 83-d performance period. Rumen and blood samples were collected at d 0, 50, and 80 of the study. Carcass traits were assessed after slaughter at the end of performance period. There was no difference in initial BW, hay, and total NDF intake among treatments; however, final BW (P = 0.06), ADG (P < 0.01), grain mix intake (P < 0.001), total DMI (P < 0.001), and G:F (P < 0.04) increased linearly as the PB increased in the diets. Rumen ammonia N, acetate, isovalerate and acetate-to-propionate ratio were reduced linearly (P < 0.05). There was no difference in carcass traits except cold carcass weight (P = 0.06), which tended to increase linearly in goats fed 15% and 30% PB. Breast, sirloin, trim trait, liver, and hide weight increased (linear; P < 0.01) with addition of PB. Blood basophils, alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, albumin, Na, and Cl concentrations decreased (linear; P < 0.02 to 0.01) as PB supplementation increased. Supplementation of PB reduced (linear; P < 0.01) average FEC. Addition of PB in the diets improved

  11. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  12. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  13. A Compact Optical Associative Memory Using Dynamic Holographic Storage Media and Photorefractive Gain and Attenuation Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    following expression for the steady state output: Vi = f(ZVk[ Vk ,]) jk54ko .i f(vkoZ ko ko+ VkVkfrk = k(V f7 o+ E i f7~,~’’ (8) kiko / where j’ko is a...just past the crystal is given by E’ t = T. Ein M = Vkoe-j 2 rof j E AkVk e+27r t(k+ o )f. k=l = I vko 12 Ae+j2r,3ko +j > AVk*Vkoe+27rfkf, (45) kiko The...following expression for the steady state output of each node in the Hopfield architecture V,= f (V koVoko) + , k(V ) (64) kiko / where (.ko is a

  14. Adaptive Algorithms for Control of Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    delay-free case described in section fore, 3.1, for which a first order compensator could stabilize the plant ) = (s+z 0 +k 2)Ro(s)+ kiko (s+z,)Zo(s) of...this stage) the a, are arbitrary coefficients. Then, af- Ra(s) = (s+ze+k2 )Ro(s)+ kiko (s+z,) [Zo(s)-Totn3(s)] (54) ter substitution into (42) and...division by s’-1 of the 3 highest coefficients of 2 R.I(s), we obtain o s2 + (k2 - ksko-rtotC)s + ( kiko - kikort0 tCze) (55) (b) I, where C is the

  15. Activation of Estrogen Response Element-independent ERα signaling protects female mice from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Yasrebi, Ali; Rivera, Janelle A; Krumm, Elizabeth A; Yang, Jennifer A; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-11-30

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates central and peripheral mechanisms that control energy and glucose homeostasis predominantly through estrogen receptor α (ERα) acting via receptor binding to estrogen response elements (ERE). ERα signaling is also involved in mediating the effects of E2 on diet-induced obesity (DIO), although the roles of ERE-dependent and -independent ERα signaling in ameliorating the effects of DIO remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that ERE-dependent ERα signaling is necessary to ameliorate the effects of DIO. We addressed this question using ERαKO (KO) and ERαKIKO (KIKO) female mice; the latter expressing an ERα that lacks a functional ERE binding domain. Females were ovariectomized, fed low-fat (LFD) or high-fat (HFD) diet, and orally dosed with vehicle or estradiol benzoate (EB, 300 μg/kg). After 9 weeks, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance, peptide hormone and inflammatory cytokine levels, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and liver gene expression were assessed. EB reduced body weight and body fat in WT, regardless of diet, and in HFD-fed KIKO, in part by reducing energy intake and feeding efficiency. EB reduced fasting glucose levels in KIKO mice fed both diets but augmented glucose tolerance only in HFD-fed KIKO. Plasma insulin and IL-6 were elevated in KIKO and KO compared to WT on a LFD. Expression of arcuate neuropeptide and receptor genes and liver fatty acid biosynthesis genes was altered by HFD and by EB through ERE-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Therefore, ERE-independent signaling mechanisms in both the brain and peripheral organs mediate, in part, the effects of E2 during DIO.

  16. Estrogen-mediated regulation of Igf1 transcription and uterine growth involves direct binding of estrogen receptor alpha to estrogen-responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Yin; Li, Leping; Korach, Kenneth S

    2010-01-22

    Estrogen enables uterine proliferation, which depends on synthesis of the IGF1 growth factor. This proliferation and IGF1 synthesis requires the estrogen receptor (ER), which binds directly to target DNA sequences (estrogen-responsive elements or EREs), or interacts with other transcription factors, such as AP1, to impact transcription. We observe neither uterine growth nor an increase in Igf1 transcript in a mouse with a DNA-binding mutated ER alpha (KIKO), indicating that both Igf1 regulation and uterine proliferation require the DNA binding function of the ER. We identified several potential EREs in the Igf1 gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed ER alpha binding to these EREs in wild type but not KIKO chromatin. STAT5 is also reported to regulate Igf1; uterine Stat5a transcript is increased by estradiol (E(2)), but not in KIKO or alpha ERKO uteri, indicating ER alpha- and ERE-dependent regulation. ER alpha binds to a potential Stat5a ERE. We hypothesize that E(2) increases Stat5a transcript through ERE binding; that ER alpha, either alone or together with STAT5, then acts to increase Igf1 transcription; and that the resulting lack of IGF1 impairs KIKO uterine growth. Treatment with exogenous IGF1, alone or in combination with E(2), induces proliferation in wild type but not KIKO uteri, indicating that IGF1 replacement does not rescue the KIKO proliferative response. Together, these observations suggest in contrast to previous in vitro studies of IGF-1 regulation involving AP1 motifs that direct ER alpha-DNA interaction is required to increase Igf1 transcription. Additionally, full ER alpha function is needed to mediate other cellular signals of the growth factor for uterine growth.

  17. Selective disruption of ER{alpha} DNA-binding activity alters uterine responsiveness to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; O'Brien, Jeanne E; Jameson, J Larry; Kissling, Grace E; Korach, Kenneth S

    2009-12-01

    In vitro models have been used to demonstrate that estrogen receptors (ERs) can regulate estrogen-responsive genes either by directly interacting with estrogen-responsive element (ERE) DNA motifs or by interacting with other transcription factors such as AP1. In this study, we evaluated estrogen (E(2))-dependent uterine gene profiles by microarray in the KIKO mouse, an in vivo knock-in mouse model that lacks the DNA-binding function of ERalpha and is consequently restricted to non-ERE-mediated responses. The 2- or 24-h E(2)-mediated uterine gene responses were distinct in wild-type (WT), KIKO, and alphaERKO genotypes, indicating that unique sets of genes are regulated by ERE and non-ERE pathways. After 2 h E(2) treatment, 38% of the WT transcripts were also regulated in the KIKO, demonstrating that the tethered mechanism does operate in this in vivo model. Surprisingly, 1438 E(2)-regulated transcripts were unique in the KIKO mouse and were not seen in either WT or alphaERKO. Pathway analyses revealed that some canonical pathways, such as the Jak/Stat pathway, were affected in a similar manner by E(2) in WT and KIKO. In other cases, however, the WT and KIKO differed. One example is the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway; this pathway was impacted, but different members of the pathway were regulated by E(2) or were regulated in a different manner, consistent with differences in biological responses. In summary, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of uterine genes regulated by E(2) via ERE and non-ERE pathways.

  18. Estrogen response element-independent signaling partially restores post-ovariectomy body weight gain but is not sufficient for 17β-estradiol’s control of energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    The steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates energy homeostasis by reducing feeding behavior and increasing energy expenditure primarily through estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated mechanisms. Intact ERαKO female mice develop obesity as adults exhibiting decreased energy expenditure and increased fat deposition. However, intact transgenic female mice expressing a DNA-binding-deficient ERα (KIKO) are not obese and have similar energy expenditure, activity and fat deposition to wild type (WT) females, suggesting that non-Estrogen Response Element (ERE)-mediated signaling is important in E2 regulation of energy homeostasis. However, initial reports did not examine the effects of ovariectomy on energy homeostasis or E2’s attenuation of post-ovariectomy body weight gain. Therefore, we sought to determine if low physiological doses of E2 (250 ng QOD) known to suppress post-ovariectomy body weight gain in WT females, would suppress body weight gain in ovariectomized KIKO females. We observed that the post-ovariectomy increase in body weight was significantly greater in WT females than in KIKO females. Furthermore, E2 did not significantly attenuate the body weight gain in KIKO females as it did in WT females. E2 replacement suppressed food intake and fat accumulation while increasing nighttime oxygen consumption and activity only in WT females. E2 replacement also increased arcuate POMC gene expression in WT females only. These data suggest that in the intact female, ERE-independent mechanisms are sufficient to maintain normal energy homeostasis and to partially restore the normal response to ovariectomy. However, they are not sufficient for E2’s suppression of post-ovariectomy body weight gain and attenuation of decreases in metabolism and activity. PMID:24252383

  19. Attenuation and Detection Capability of Regional Phases Recorded at NORESS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-25

    The inversion also requires that we assume the geometric spread- -t ing function. Following Herrmann and Kijko [1983], we express the spreading...thickness. Measuring the decay rate of syn- thetic Lg phases computed for an elastic medium, Herrmann and Ki/ko [19831 verified that Lg frequency domain...s. The possibility that these spectra are contaminated by Sn coda at high frequency [Chun et al., 1987; Ringdal, 1986; Shin and Herrmann , 1987] is

  20. Estrogen response element-independent signaling partially restores post-ovariectomy body weight gain but is not sufficient for 17β-estradiol's control of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mamounis, Kyle J; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2014-03-01

    The steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates energy homeostasis by reducing feeding behavior and increasing energy expenditure primarily through estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated mechanisms. Intact ERαKO female mice develop obesity as adults exhibiting decreased energy expenditure and increased fat deposition. However, intact transgenic female mice expressing a DNA-binding-deficient ERα (KIKO) are not obese and have similar energy expenditure, activity and fat deposition as to wild type (WT) females, suggesting that non-estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated signaling is important in E2 regulation of energy homeostasis. Initial reports did not examine the effects of ovariectomy on energy homeostasis or E2's attenuation of post-ovariectomy body weight gain. Therefore, we sought to determine if low physiological doses of E2 (250 ng QOD) known to suppress post-ovariectomy body weight gain in WT females would suppress body weight gain in ovariectomized KIKO females. We observed that the post-ovariectomy increase in body weight was significantly greater in WT females than in KIKO females. Furthermore, E2 did not significantly attenuate the body weight gain in KIKO females as it did in WT females. E2 replacement suppressed food intake and fat accumulation while increasing nighttime oxygen consumption and activity only in WT females. E2 replacement also increased arcuate POMC gene expression in WT females only. These data suggest that in the intact female, ERE-independent mechanisms are sufficient to maintain normal energy homeostasis and to partially restore the normal response to ovariectomy. However, they are not sufficient for E2's suppression of post-ovariectomy body weight gain and its effects on metabolism and activity.

  1. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  2. Targeting lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial imbalance in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Abeti, Rosella; Uzun, Ebru; Renganathan, Indhushri; Honda, Tadashi; Pook, Mark A; Giunti, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by reduced levels of the protein frataxin. This protein is located in the mitochondria, where it functions in the biogenesis of iron-sulphur clusters (ISCs), which are important for the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Moreover, disruption in iron biogenesis may lead to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can be the cause and/or the consequence of mitochondrial energy imbalance, leading to cell death. Fibroblasts from two FRDA mouse models, YG8R and KIKO, were used to analyse two different categories of protective compounds: deuterised poly-unsaturated fatty acids (dPUFAs) and Nrf2-inducers. The former have been shown to protect the cell from damage induced by lipid peroxidation and the latter trigger the well-known Nrf2 antioxidant pathway. Our results show that the sensitivity to oxidative stress of YG8R and KIKO mouse fibroblasts, resulting in cell death and lipid peroxidation, can be prevented by d4-PUFA and Nrf2-inducers (SFN and TBE-31). The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of YG8R and KIKO fibroblasts revealed a difference in their mitochondrial pathophysiology, which may be due to the different genetic basis of the two models. This suggests that variable levels of reduced frataxin may act differently on mitochondrial pathophysiology and that these two cell models could be useful in recapitulating the observed differences in the FRDA phenotype. This may reflect a different modulatory effect towards cell death that will need to be investigated further.

  3. Protective effect of a poly-phytocompound on early stage nephropathy secondary to experimentally-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marotta, F; Harada, M; Dallah, E D; Yadav, H; Solimene, U; Di Lembo, S; Minelli, E; Jain, S; Chui, D H

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a severe and life-threatening complication of long-standing diabetes. As one of the main causes of end-stage renal disease, the prevention and treatment of DN in early stage, and the slowing down of DN progression are of utmost importance and are topics of several ongoing research studies. Nutraceuticals endowed with antioxidant-anti-inflammatory properties may offer an opportunity of integrative treatment for this condition. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups. One group of rats (diabetic group) received a single tail-vein injection of STZ compound (50 mg/kg) under light anaesthesia. A protective dose of 0.5 ml of 5 percent dextrose was given intraperitoneally 30 min before the administration of STZ. One diabetic group was fed a normal pellet diet (group A) while group B was fed the diet added with DTS (panax pseudoginseng, eucommia ulmoides), (Kyotsu Jigyo, Tokyo, Japan) in the proportion of 50/25 (percent weight/weight), at the dose of 50 mg/kg/day throughout the experimental period. At the end of 8 weeks, 24-hour urine was collected for the measurement of the albumin concentration: blood samples were collected for serum biochemistry and the rats were sacrificed for kidney measurement of oxidative stress and histomorphological features. Nephrin and Macrophage Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) gene expression were also assessed by fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR after RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. STZ-treated animals showed significantly increased in lipid peroxidation in the kidney and in proteinuria. DTS supplementation did not affect plasma glucose but significantly decreased malonyldialdehyde (MDA) plasma level and the overall redox parameters together with a partial mitigation of proteinuria. Histological analysis showed also that DTS significantly reduced the glomerular volume together with glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis score (p less than 0.05), the latter two being correlated to

  4. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  5. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennifer A.; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2’s actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B’s actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression. PMID:26768413

  6. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Binding to ERE is Required for Full Tlr7- and Tlr9-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Melissa A; Wirth, Jena R; Naga, Osama; Eudaly, Jackie; Gilkeson, Gary S

    2014-01-20

    We previously found that a maximum innate inflammatory response induced by stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7 and 9 requires ERα, but does not require estrogen in multiple cell types from both control and lupus-prone mice. Given the estrogen-independence, we hypothesized that ERα mediates TLR signaling by tethering to, and enhancing, the activity of downstream transcription factors such as NFκB, rather than acting classically by binding EREs on target genes. To investigate the mechanism of ERα impact on TLR signaling, we utilized mice with a knock-in ERα mutant that is unable to bind ERE. After stimulation with TLR ligands, both ex vivo spleen cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) isolated from mutant ERα ("KIKO") mice produced significantly less IL-6 compared with cells from wild-type (WT) littermates. These results suggest that ERα modulation of TLR signaling does indeed require ERE binding for its effect on the innate immune response.

  7. Multiscale approach to the control of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kenneth C.; Flamm, David S.; Guthart, Gary S.; Ueberschaer, Ronald M.

    1996-05-01

    The development of control technology specifically for smart structures and materials has lagged substantially behind that of the base materials, transducers, and embedding techniques. Still, development of smart structures with ever-greater numbers of embedded elements continues, spurred by potential uses that require large arrays of sensors and actuators. For example, rather than implementing a control design that is sensitive to the particular device layout, a densely sampled array allows the controller to optimize the use of sensor information and actuator authority. No control technology suitable for such large arrays exists, however, and this presents a barrier to future applications. In this paper we report on recent progress in developing and demonstrating technology capable of controlling hundreds or thousands of sensors and actuators embedded in the base material. We have dubbed this the `KIKO control problem' (Kilo-Input/Kilo-Output) for smart materials. This paper focuses on a new multiscale/multirate theory of hierarchical design based on the wavelet transform. In the context of this theory, we develop efficient and highly scalable implementations of control systems using multiprocessor architectures. The paper describes our multiscale control approach and presents simulation results on a flexible plate.

  8. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Min, Byeng R; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon; Eun, Jong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  9. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byeng R.; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats. PMID:24669219

  10. Multiscale approach to the control of smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kenneth C.; Guthart, Gary S.; Flamm, David S.

    1995-05-01

    The development of control technology specifically for smart materials has lagged substantially behind that of the base materials, transducers and embedding techniques. Still, development of materials with ever- greater numbers of embedded elements continues, spurred by potential uses that require large arrays of sensors and actuators. No control technology suitable for such large arrays exists, however, and this presents a barrier to future applications. In this paper we report on work aimed at developing and demonstrating technology capable of controlling hundreds or thousands of sensors and actuators embedded in the base material. We have dubbed this the 'KIKO control problem' (Kilo- Input/Kilo-Output) for smart materials. This paper focuses on a new multiscale/multirate theory of hierarchical design based on the wavelet transform. In the context of this theory, we develop efficient and highly scalable implementations of control systems using multiprocessor architectures. The paper covers: a description of our multiscale control approach, simulation results on an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and open issues.

  11. Outgrowth of fibroblast cells from goat skin explants in three different culture media and the establishment of cell lines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahipal; Sharma, Anil K

    2011-02-01

    Three different commercially available media, known to support human and porcine-specific fibroblast cultures, were tested for their growth potential on goat skin explants. Although outgrowth of fibroblasts was observed in all media tested, irrespective of breed, porcine-specific media exhibited higher rate of growth. Using this media, three fibroblast cell lines (GSF289, GSF737, and GSF2010) from ear skin explants of normal healthy dairy goats of Kiko and Saanen breed were successfully established in culture. Liquid nitrogen stocks of these frozen cells had a viability rate of 96.2% in in vitro cultures. These cells were morphologically indistinguishable from the cell stocks prior to freezing. Analysis of the growth of a fifth passage culture revealed an 'S' shaped growth curve with a population doubling time of 25 h. The cell lines were found negative for microbial, fungal, and mycoplasma contaminations. These goat skin fibroblast lines and the simple method of their isolation and freezing with high rate of viability will provide additional tools to study molecular mechanisms that regulate fibroblast function and for genetic manipulation of small ruminants.

  12. A weather analysis system for the Baja California peninsula: tropical cyclone season of 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, L. M.; Cosio, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    General characteristics of tropical weather systems were documented on a real-time basis. The geographical area of interest is the Baja California peninsula, located in northwestern Mexico. This study covers the warm season of 2007, from May through October, and includes observations derived from radar and satellite imagery as well as reports from a network of rain gauges. A set of graphical products were generated and they were available to the public through the internet. The analysis system has been in operation since the summer of 2005 and it is focused to document the development of tropical cyclones in eastern Pacific Ocean. During the season of 2007, this basin had a total of 11 tropical storms and four of them were within 800 km from the west coast of Mexico (Dalila, Ivo, Juliette and Kiko). Only one system made landfall in the area of interest: Hurricane Henriette which moved across Baja California, the Gulf of California and a portion of the state of Sonora. This presentation provides an overview of the graphical products along with lessons learned from the season studied, collaborations with local emergency managers and plans for the upcoming season of 2008.

  13. Efficacy of copper oxide wire particles against gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Soli, F; Terrill, T H; Shaik, S A; Getz, W R; Miller, J E; Vanguru, M; Burke, J M

    2010-02-26

    Profitable sheep and goat production in the USA is severely limited by gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism, particularly by Haemonchus contortus. Copper oxide wire particles (COWP) have anti-parasitic properties in the diet of small ruminants, but efficacy of COWP may differ between sheep and goats. In a study with weaned kids (Kiko x Spanish cross, 6 months old) and lambs (Katahdin or Dorper x Blackface crosses, 5 months old), grazing the same pasture area in Central Georgia, 2g of COWP in a gel capsule was given to half the animals of each species, while the other half were given no COWP. Fecal and blood samples were taken weekly to determine GIN fecal egg counts (FEC) and blood packed cell volume (PCV). After COWP treatment, animals were grazed for 4 weeks and then slaughtered, with adult GIN recovered from the abomasum and small intestines for counting and identification to species. For both sheep and goats, COWP treatment reduced EPG (P<0.05), increased PCV (P<0.05), and lowered abomasal GIN numbers (P<0.05). For EPG, these differences were 82.5 and 90.5% for sheep and goats, respectively, 26 days after treatment, while adult H. contortus were 67.2 and 85.8% lower for COWP-treated sheep and goats, respectively. In this study, COWP treatment was equally effective against H. contortus infection in lambs and kids and appears to be an effective method of controlling H. contortus infection for up to 6 weeks in small ruminants following weaning.

  14. Alterations in the Levels of Amyloid-β, Phospholipid Hydroperoxide, and Plasmalogen in the Blood of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: Possible Interactions between Amyloid-β and These Lipids.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinji; Kiko, Takehiro; Fujiwara, Hironori; Hashimoto, Michio; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kinoshita, Mikio; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Aside from accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been reported as being associated with peroxidation of major phospholipids (e.g., phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho)) and degradation of antioxidative phospholipids (e.g., ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn)). In addition to its presence in the brain, Aβ is also found in blood; however, there is still little information about the levels of PtdCho hydroperoxide (PCOOH) and PlsEtn in the blood of patients with AD. In this study, by assuming a possible interaction among Aβ, PCOOH, and PlsEtn in blood circulation, we evaluated the levels of these molecules and correlations in blood samples that had been obtained from our former AD study for PCOOH measurement (Kiko et al., J Alzheimers Dis28, 593-600, 2012). We found that when compared to controls, plasma from patients with AD showed lower concentrations of PlsEtn species, especially PlsEtn bearing the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) moiety. In addition, lower PlsEtn and higher PCOOH levels were observed in red blood cells (RBCs) of patients with AD. In both AD and control blood samples, RBC PCOOH levels tended to correlate with plasma levels of Aβ40, and each PlsEtn species showed different correlations with plasma Aβ. These results, together with in vitro data suggesting Aβ aggregation due to a decrease in levels of PlsEtn having DHA, led us to deduce that Aβ is involved in alterations in levels of PCOOH and PlsEtn species observed in the blood of patients with AD.

  15. Membrane potential of smooth muscle cells in K-free solution

    PubMed Central

    Casteels, R.; Droogmans, G.; Hendrickx, H.

    1971-01-01

    1. The changes of the ion content, the membrane potential and of the membrane permeability of taenia coli cells have been studied during exposure to K-free solutions. The relative value of the total membrane conductance was determined by measuring the electrotonic potential during constant current pulses with an intracellular electrode. The PK values were calculated from 42K-efflux in K-free solutions. 2. In solutions containing penetrating anions the cells initially depolarize. Thereafter they hyperpolarize to about - 85 mV and again depolarize after 90 min to - 5 mV. These potential changes are much smaller if large anions are used as chloride substitutes. Moreover, the final depolarization is only reached after 4-5 hr. This hyperpolarization is not inhibited by 10-5 M ouabain. 3. These potential changes are accompanied by a progressive exchange of intracellular K by Na. In solutions containing chloride or nitrate the relative value of the total membrane conductance increases to a maximal value, corresponding to the peak value of the calculated PK. Such changes of the membrane conductance and of PK do not occur in K-free solutions containing large anions. 4. It is proposed that the initial depolarization is probably caused by an inhibition of an electrogenic Na pump. In chloride or nitrate solution the hyperpolarization is due to an increase of the [K]i/[K]o ratio and to an increase of the K permeability. In the presence of large anions the hyperpolarization remains small because this increase of PK does not occur. PMID:5097600

  16. Effect of pelleting on efficacy of sericea lespedeza hay as a natural dewormer in goats.

    PubMed

    Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Moore, D A; Shaik, S A; Miller, J E; Burke, J M; Muir, J P; Wolfe, R

    2007-05-15

    Resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) to anthelmintic treatment has increased pressure to find alternative, non-chemical control methods. Feeding hay of the high condensed tannin (CT) forage sericea lespedeza [SL; Lespedeza cuneata (Dum-Cours.) G. Don.] to sheep and goats has reduced GIN fecal egg count (FEC) and worm numbers in the abomasum and small intestines. This effect has been reported with both unground (long) and ground hay. Pelleting of ground hay increases ease of storage, transport, and feeding, but heating during the pelleting process could reduce biological activity of CT. Eighteen naturally GIN-infected 5-6-month-old Kiko-Spanish cross bucks were fed pelleted and ground SL hay and ground bermudagrass [BG; Cynodon dactyon (L.) Pers.] hay diets (n=6 per treatment) in a confinement trial. The bucks were fed the ground BG hay (75% of daily intake) plus a pelleted 16% CP commercial goat chow (25% of daily intake) for 3 weeks, after which they were assigned to treatment groups based upon FEC, 12 animals were switched to ground and pelleted SL hay plus goat chow for 4 weeks, and then all animals were fed the BG ration for one additional week. Throughout the trial, feces and blood were collected from individual animals weekly to determine FEC and blood packed cell volume (PCV), respectively. All goats were slaughtered at the end of the trial, with adult worms in the abomasum and small intestines recovered, counted, and identified to species. Both forms of SL hay reduced (P<0.05) FEC in goats relative to BG hay-fed animals, with a greater reduction in goats fed the SL pellets. There was no effect on PCV until the final sampling date, when the SL pellet-fed goats' PCV increased (P<0.05) compared with the other treatments. Feeding pelleted SL reduced (P<0.05) abomasal worms, primarily Haemonchus contortus, relative to the BG hay-fed goats. Worm numbers in the goats fed ground SL hay were intermediate. Pelleting SL hay enhanced its efficacy against

  17. Cell type complexity in the basal metazoan Hydra is maintained by both stem cell based mechanisms and transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Stefan; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the stability of the differentiated cell state is a fundamental problem in biology. To characterize the critical regulatory events that control stem cell behavior and cell plasticity in vivo in an organism at the base of animal evolution, we have generated transgenic Hydra lines [Wittlieb, J., Khalturin, K., Lohmann, J., Anton-Erxleben, F., Bosch, T.C.G., 2006. Transgenic Hydra allow in vivo tracking of individual stem cells during morphogenesis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 6208-6211] which express eGFP in one of the differentiated cell types. Here we present a novel line which expresses eGFP specifically in zymogen gland cells. These cells are derivatives of the interstitial stem cell lineage and have previously been found to express two Dickkopf related genes [Augustin, R., Franke, A., Khalturin, K., Kiko, R., Siebert, S. Hemmrich, G., Bosch, T.C.G., 2006. Dickkopf related genes are components of the positional value gradient in Hydra. Dev. Biol. 296 (1), 62-70]. In the present study we have generated transgenic Hydra in which eGFP expression is under control of the promoter of one of them, HyDkk1/2/4 C. Transgenic Hydra recapitulate faithfully the previously described graded activation of HyDkk1/2/4 C expression along the body column, indicating that the promoter contains all elements essential for spatial and temporal control mechanisms. By in vivo monitoring of eGFP+ gland cells, we provide direct evidence for continuous transdifferentiation of zymogen cells into granular mucous cells in the head region. We also show that in this tissue a subpopulation of mucous gland cells directly derives from interstitial stem cells. These findings indicate that both stem cell-based mechanisms and transdifferentiation are involved in normal development and maintenance of cell type complexity in Hydra. The results demonstrate a remarkable plasticity in the differentiation capacity of cells in an organism which diverged before

  18. Preslaughter diet management in sheep and goats: effects on physiological responses and microbial loads on skin and carcass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen crossbred buck goats (Kiko x Spanish; BW = 32.8 kg) and wether sheep (Dorset x Suffolk; BW = 39.9 kg) were used to determine the effect of preslaughter diet and feed deprivation time (FDT) on physiological responses and microbial loads on skin and carcasses. Experimental animals were fed either a concentrate (CD) or a hay diet (HD) for 4 d and then deprived of feed for either 12-h or 24-h before slaughter. Blood samples were collected for plasma cortisol and blood metabolite analyses. Longisimus muscle (LM) pH was measured. Skin and carcass swabs were obtained to assess microbial loads. Plasma creatine kinase activity (863.9 and 571.7 ± 95.21 IU) and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations (1,056.1 and 589.8 ± 105.01 mEq/L) were different (P < 0.05) between sheep and goats. Species and diet treatments had significant effects on the ultimate pH of LM. Pre-holding total coliform (TCC) and aerobic plate counts (APC) of skin were significantly different between species. Goats had lower (P < 0.05) TCC (2.1 vs. 3.0 log10 CFU/cm2) and APC (8.2 vs. 8.5 log10 CFU/cm2) counts in the skin compared to sheep. Preslaughter skin E. coli counts and TCC were different (P < 0.05) between species. Goats had lower (P < 0.05) counts of E. coli (2.2 vs. 2.9 log10 CFU/cm2) and TCC (2.3 vs. 3.0 log10 CFU/cm2) in the skin compared with those in sheep. Diet, species, and FDT had no effect (P > 0.05) on E. coli and TCC in carcass swab samples. The APC of carcass swab samples were only affected (P < 0.05) by the FDT. The results indicated that preslaughter dietary management had no significant changes on hormone and blood metabolite concentrations and sheep might be more prone for fecal contamination than goats in the holding pens at abattoir. PMID:25343027

  19. Preslaughter diet management in sheep and goats: effects on physiological responses and microbial loads on skin and carcass.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Govind; Gutta, Venkat R; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kouakou, Brou; Getz, Will R; McCommon, George W

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen crossbred buck goats (Kiko x Spanish; BW = 32.8 kg) and wether sheep (Dorset x Suffolk; BW = 39.9 kg) were used to determine the effect of preslaughter diet and feed deprivation time (FDT) on physiological responses and microbial loads on skin and carcasses. Experimental animals were fed either a concentrate (CD) or a hay diet (HD) for 4 d and then deprived of feed for either 12-h or 24-h before slaughter. Blood samples were collected for plasma cortisol and blood metabolite analyses. Longisimus muscle (LM) pH was measured. Skin and carcass swabs were obtained to assess microbial loads. Plasma creatine kinase activity (863.9 and 571.7 ± 95.21 IU) and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations (1,056.1 and 589.8 ± 105.01 mEq/L) were different (P < 0.05) between sheep and goats. Species and diet treatments had significant effects on the ultimate pH of LM. Pre-holding total coliform (TCC) and aerobic plate counts (APC) of skin were significantly different between species. Goats had lower (P < 0.05) TCC (2.1 vs. 3.0 log10 CFU/cm(2)) and APC (8.2 vs. 8.5 log10 CFU/cm(2)) counts in the skin compared to sheep. Preslaughter skin E. coli counts and TCC were different (P < 0.05) between species. Goats had lower (P < 0.05) counts of E. coli (2.2 vs. 2.9 log10 CFU/cm(2)) and TCC (2.3 vs. 3.0 log10 CFU/cm(2)) in the skin compared with those in sheep. Diet, species, and FDT had no effect (P > 0.05) on E. coli and TCC in carcass swab samples. The APC of carcass swab samples were only affected (P < 0.05) by the FDT. The results indicated that preslaughter dietary management had no significant changes on hormone and blood metabolite concentrations and sheep might be more prone for fecal contamination than goats in the holding pens at abattoir.

  20. The effects of feeding sericea lespedeza hay on growth rate of goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Moore, D A; Terrill, T H; Kouakou, B; Shaik, S A; Mosjidis, J A; Miller, J E; Vanguru, M; Kannan, G; Burke, J M

    2008-09-01

    Goat production is increasing in the United States due to high ethnic demand, but infection with gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites is a major constraint to the industry. Increasing GIN resistance to chemical anthelmintics worldwide has led to the development of alternative control strategies, including use of forages containing condensed tannins (CT). An experiment was designed using infected and dewormed male kids (Kiko x Spanish, 6 mo old, 18.9 +/- 3.25 kg) fed diets containing 25% concentrate and either 75% sericea lespedeza [SL; Lespedeza cuneata (Dum-Cours.) G. Don], a high CT forage (87 to 181 g of CT/kg), or 75% bermudagrass [BG; Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] hay (n = 10/treatment). The kids were weighed every 14 d, and fecal and blood samples were taken weekly for fecal egg counts and packed cell volume determination, respectively. Fecal cultures were processed every 14 d to determine CT effect on larval development. At slaughter, adult GIN were collected from the abomasum and small intestines for counting and speciation. Blood samples were also analyzed for plasma urea-N, and ruminal VFA and pH were determined. The infected SL-fed kids had consistently lower (P < 0.05) fecal egg counts than the infected BG goats throughout the trial and greater (P < 0.05) packed cell volume beginning by d 77. Average daily gain was greater (P < 0.001) in kids fed SL- than BG-based diets, regardless of infection status (104.3 +/- 5.0 and 75.5 +/- 4.8 g/d, respectively). Total VFA and acetate concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) in the BG- than in SL-fed goats, whereas propionate levels were unaffected by diet. Acetate:propionate ratio (P = 0.01) and plasma urea-N (P = 0.03) levels were greater in BG-fed goats, whereas rumen pH was greater (P < 0.001) in the SL-fed goats. Feeding SL hay can reduce GIN infection levels and increase performance of goats compared with BG hay.

  1. Efficacy of sericea lespedeza hay as a natural dewormer in goats: dose titration study.

    PubMed

    Terrill, T H; Dykes, G S; Shaik, S A; Miller, J E; Kouakou, B; Kannan, G; Burke, J M; Mosjidis, J A

    2009-07-07

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) parasitism is the greatest threat to economic sheep and goat production in the southern USA, and there is widespread prevalence of GIN resistance to broad-spectrum anthelmintics in this region. A natural alternative for controlling GIN in small ruminants is feeding hay of sericea lespedeza [SL, Lespedeza cuneata (Dum.-Cours., G. Don)], a perennial warm-season legume high in condensed tannins. To determine the level of SL needed to reduce GIN infection, a confinement study was completed with 32 Spanish/Boer/Kiko cross yearling bucks offered one of four diets with 75% hay and 25% concentrate (n=8, 2 pens/treatment, 4 goats/pen). The hay portion of each diet consisted of a combination of ground SL (0%, 25%, 50%, and 75% of the diet) and bermudagrass [BG, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.; 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0% of the diet]. The bucks were allowed to acquire a natural GIN infection on pasture prior to moving to the pens. After a 3-week adjustment period in the pens, the goats were stratified by fecal egg count (FEC) and packed cell volume (PCV), randomly assigned to treatments and pens, and then fed the treatment diets for six weeks. During the experimental period, fecal and blood samples were collected from individual animals weekly to determine FEC and PCV, respectively. Adult worms from abomasum and small intestines were collected for counting and identification of species at slaughter. Goats fed SL hay at 25%, 50%, and 75% of the diet had 45.3% (P=0.2048), 66.3% (P=0.0134), and 74.5% (P=0.0077) lower FEC than control animals (75% BG hay) after 21 days. The 50% and 75% SL goats had 84.6% (P=0.0625) and 91.9% (P=0.0340) lower FEC than controls by day 42. The 75% SL-fed goats tended to have higher (P=0.0624) PCV and had fewer (P=0.035) abomasal worms than control animals, while PCV and adult worm numbers of the 50% and 25% SL goats were not different from controls. The optimum level of SL hay in the diet for reducing worm numbers of small

  2. Effects of co-grazing dairy heifers with goats on animal performance, dry matter yield, and pasture forage composition.

    PubMed

    Dennis, T S; Unruh-Snyder, L J; Neary, M K; Nennich, T D

    2012-12-01

    Mixed livestock grazing can offer an alternative management system for rearing dairy replacement heifers (Bos taurus). A 2-yr study was conducted during 2009 (yr 1) and 2010 (yr 2) to determine the effects of co-grazing Holstein heifers under rotational stocking with Boer × Kiko goats on animal performance, pasture DM yield, and botanical composition. Each year, 24 heifers (134 ± 6 d of age and 147.4 ± 31.2 kg BW in yr 1; 166 ± 11 d of age and 168.0 ± 27.6 kg BW in yr 2) and 6 goats (2 yr old and 39.7 ± 16.2 kg BW in yr 1; 1 yr old and 33.7 ± 7.4 kg BW in yr 2) were divided into 6 paddocks with 4 heifers and 2 goats, where applicable, per group. Low endophyte-infected tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and white clover (Trifolium repens L.) pastures were used to evaluate 2 grazing strategies (heifers grazed alone [HO] or heifers co-grazed with goats [HG]). In addition, 6 goats were assigned to 2 paddocks and grazed alone (GO) each year to estimate goat pasture forage intake and compare Haemonchus contortus infection to co-grazed goats. Forage samples were taken monthly to assess DM yield and botanical composition. Samples collected for botanical composition were manually sorted into grass, legume, and weed species. Forage DMI was estimated using a rising plate meter before and after grazing. Heifer BW at the conclusion of yr 1 and yr 2 did not differ between HO and HG (P = 0.40 and P = 0.12, respectively). Likewise, overall ADG did not differ between HO and HG, averaging 0.65 kg/d and 0.63 kg/d over both grazing seasons (P = 0.70). Grazing strategy did not affect forage or total DMI in yr 1; however, HO consumed 2.3 kg/d more forage DM than HG (P < 0.01), resulting in greater total DMI for HO in yr 2 (P < 0.01). Heights at the hip and withers were greater for HO than for HG during both grazing seasons (P < 0.05). Weed presence did not differ between grazing strategies over both grazing seasons as determined by manual harvesting, but visual estimation

  3. Use of pelleted sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) for natural control of coccidia and gastrointestinal nematodes in weaned goats.

    PubMed

    Kommuru, D S; Barker, T; Desai, S; Burke, J M; Ramsay, A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Miller, J E; Mosjidis, J A; Kamisetti, N; Terrill, T H

    2014-08-29

    Infection with Eimeria spp. (coccidia) can be devastating in goats, particularly for young, recently-weaned kids, resulting in diarrhea, dehydration, and even death. Feeding dried sericea lespedeza [SL; Lespedeza cuneata (Dum.-Cours.) G. Don.] to young goats has been reported to reduce the effects of internal parasites, including gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) but there have been no reports of the effects of feeding this forage on Eimeria spp. in goats. Two confinement feeding experiments were completed on recently-weaned intact bucks (24 Kiko-cross, Exp. 1; 20 Spanish, Exp. 2) to determine effects of SL pellets on an established infection of GIN and coccidia. The bucks were assigned to 1 of 2 (Exp. 1) or 3 (Exp. 2) treatment groups based upon the number of Eimeria spp. oocysts per gram (OPG) of feces. In Exp. 1, the kids were fed 1 of 2 pelleted rations ad libitum; 90% SL leaf meal+10% of a liquid molasses/lignin binder mix and a commercial pellet with 12% crude protein (CP) and 24% acid detergent fiber (n=12/treatment group, 2 animals/pen). For Exp. 2, treatment groups were fed (1) 90% SL leaf meal pellets from leaves stored 3 years (n=7), (2) 90% SL pellets from leaf meal stored less than 6 months, (n=7), and the commercial pellets (n=6) ad libitum. For both trials, fecal and blood samples were taken from individual animals every 7 days for 28 days to determine OPG and GIN eggs per gram (EPG) and packed cell volume (PCV), respectively. In Exp. 2, feces were scored for consistency (1=solid pellets, 5=slurry) as an indicator of coccidiosis. In Exp. 1, EPG (P<0.001) and OPG (P<0.01) were reduced by 78.7% and 96.9%, respectively, 7 days after initiation of feeding in goats on the SL pellet diet compared with animals fed the control pellets. The OPG and EPG remained lower in treatment than control animals until the end of the trial. In Exp. 2, goats fed new and old SL leaf meal pellets had 66.2% and 79.2% lower (P<0.05) EPG and 92.2% and 91.2% lower (P<0.05) OPG

  4. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    /^20Ne)solar ratio is initially 585 (as in the Solar Wind), increases smoothly as etching proceeds, and, after reaching a maximum around 680, decreases to approximately 230 (Fig. 1, upper panel). These variations, especially in the last two steps of the experiment, where the solar gases are depleted in He, are most probably due to different depth distributions for He and Ne, with the implantation range of the lighter nuclide being shorter than that of the heavier one (5). Ignoring the implantation range effect, the variations imply that the ^4He/^20Ne ratio of the SW and the SEP do not differ by more than 20%. Although we do not recognize significant variations in the (^20Ne/^36Ar)solar ratio (Fig. 1 lower panel), possibly because of larger experimental errors, the data imply again that SW and the SEP do not differ by more than 20% in the ^20Ne/^36Ar ratio also. References (1) Wieler et al. (1986) GCA 50, 1997-2017. (2) Benkert et al. (1988) LPSC IXX. (3) Wieler et al. (1992) LPSC XXIII (4) Anders and Grevesse GCA 53, 197-214 (5) Kiko et al. (1978) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 9th, 1655-1665.