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Sample records for chromatographic peak capacities

  1. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everwhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separation components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m0-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory.

  2. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 17 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  3. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 9 figures, 1 table.

  4. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  5. A linear modulation-based stochastic resonance algorithm applied to the detection of weak chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Xiang, Bingren; Liao, Xuewei; Xie, Shaofei

    2006-12-01

    A simple stochastic resonance algorithm based on linear modulation was developed to amplify and detect weak chromatographic peaks. The output chromatographic peak is often distorted when using the traditional stochastic resonance algorithm due to the presence of high levels of noise. In the new algorithm, a linear modulated double-well potential is introduced to correct for the distortion of the output peak. Method parameter selection is convenient and intuitive for linear modulation. In order to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio for the output signal, the performance of two-layer stochastic resonance was evaluated by comparing it with wavelet-based stochastic resonance. The proposed algorithm was applied to the quantitative analysis of dimethyl sulfide and the determination of chloramphenicol residues in milk, and the good linearity of the method demonstrated that it is an effective tool for detecting weak chromatographic peaks.

  6. Chromatographic peak alignment using derivative dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Bork, Christopher; Ng, Kenneth; Liu, Yinhan; Yee, Alex; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chromatogram overlays are frequently used to monitor inter-batch performance of bioprocess purification steps. However, the objective analysis of chromatograms is difficult due to peak shifts caused by variable phase durations or unexpected process holds. Furthermore, synchronization of batch process data may also be required prior to performing multivariate analysis techniques. Dynamic time warping was originally developed as a method for spoken word recognition, but shows potential in the objective analysis of time variant signals, such as manufacturing data. In this work we will discuss the application of dynamic time warping with a derivative weighting function to align chromatograms to facilitate process monitoring and fault detection. In addition, we will demonstrate the utility of this method as a preprocessing step for multivariate model development. PMID:23292764

  7. A simple multi-scale Gaussian smoothing-based strategy for automatic chromatographic peak extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Yan; Guo, Jun-Wei; Yu, Yong-Jie; Li, He-Dong; Cui, Hua-Peng; Liu, Ping-Ping; Wang, Bing; Wang, Sheng; Lu, Peng

    2016-06-24

    Peak detection is a critical step in chromatographic data analysis. In the present work, we developed a multi-scale Gaussian smoothing-based strategy for accurate peak extraction. The strategy consisted of three stages: background drift correction, peak detection, and peak filtration. Background drift correction was implemented using a moving window strategy. The new peak detection method is a variant of the system used by the well-known MassSpecWavelet, i.e., chromatographic peaks are found at local maximum values under various smoothing window scales. Therefore, peaks can be detected through the ridge lines of maximum values under these window scales, and signals that are monotonously increased/decreased around the peak position could be treated as part of the peak. Instrumental noise was estimated after peak elimination, and a peak filtration strategy was performed to remove peaks with signal-to-noise ratios smaller than 3. The performance of our method was evaluated using two complex datasets. These datasets include essential oil samples for quality control obtained from gas chromatography and tobacco plant samples for metabolic profiling analysis obtained from gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results confirmed the reasonability of the developed method.

  8. [Resolution of overlapping chromatographic peaks by radial basis function neural network].

    PubMed

    Li, Y B; Huang, X Y; Sha, M; Meng, X S

    2001-03-01

    A new algorithm-resolution of overlapping chromatographic peaks by radial basis function neural network(RBFNN) is presented. A two-phase genetic algorithm(GA) which has robustness and random globe optimization is used to train RBFNN so that it has the ability on the resolution of overlapping chromatographic peaks. The two-phase genetic algorithm involves two procedures: training structure and optimizing parameter. The first procedure uses GA to train the architectures of RBFNN, the second procedure uses gradient descent to train the center(tR) and the width(sigma) of RBFNN. The alternate use of these two procedures makes the network having the ability to learn structure, therefore makes itself adaptable to resolution of the chromatographic peaks with unknown number of components. The method proposed here needs no artificial interference, not only has it robustness and globalism, but also the ability of accurate resolution to completely overlapped chromatographic peaks. The simulation experiments show that this method is more accurate than other methods. PMID:12541651

  9. Leveraging probabilistic peak detection to estimate baseline drift in complex chromatographic samples.

    PubMed

    Lopatka, Martin; Barcaru, Andrei; Sjerps, Marjan J; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-01-29

    Accurate analysis of chromatographic data often requires the removal of baseline drift. A frequently employed strategy strives to determine asymmetric weights in order to fit a baseline model by regression. Unfortunately, chromatograms characterized by a very high peak saturation pose a significant challenge to such algorithms. In addition, a low signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. s/n<40) also adversely affects accurate baseline correction by asymmetrically weighted regression. We present a baseline estimation method that leverages a probabilistic peak detection algorithm. A posterior probability of being affected by a peak is computed for each point in the chromatogram, leading to a set of weights that allow non-iterative calculation of a baseline estimate. For extremely saturated chromatograms, the peak weighted (PW) method demonstrates notable improvement compared to the other methods examined. However, in chromatograms characterized by low-noise and well-resolved peaks, the asymmetric least squares (ALS) and the more sophisticated Mixture Model (MM) approaches achieve superior results in significantly less time. We evaluate the performance of these three baseline correction methods over a range of chromatographic conditions to demonstrate the cases in which each method is most appropriate. PMID:26774434

  10. Peak distortion in the column liquid chromatographic determination of omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, T; Collijn, E; Tivert, A M; Rosén, L

    1991-11-22

    Injection of a sample containing omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer (pH 9.2) into a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6) as the mobile phase and a C18 surface-modified silica as the solid phase resulted under special conditions in split peaks of omeprazole. The degree of peak split and the retention time of omeprazole varied with the concentration of borax in the sample solution and the ionic strength of the mobile phase buffer as well as with the column used. Borax is eluted from the column in a broad zone starting from the void volume of the column. The retention is probably due to the presence of polyborate ions. The size of the zone varies with the concentration of borax in the sample injected. In the borax zone the pH is increased compared with the pH of the mobile phase, and when omeprazole (a weak acid) is co-eluting in the borax zone its retention is affected. In the front part and in the back part of the borax zone, pH gradients are formed, and these gradients can induce the peak splitting. When the dissolving medium is changed to a phosphate buffer or an ammonium buffer at pH 9 no peak distortion of omeprazole is observed.

  11. Multivariate curve resolution based chromatographic peak alignment combined with parallel factor analysis to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Akvan, Nadia

    2014-03-13

    In the present contribution, a new combination of multivariate curve resolution-correlation optimized warping (MCR-COW) with trilinear parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is developed to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements. In MCR-COW, the complexity of the chromatographic data is reduced by arranging the data in a column-wise augmented matrix, analyzing using MCR bilinear model and aligning the resolved elution profiles using COW in a component-wise manner. The aligned chromatographic data is then decomposed using trilinear model of PARAFAC in order to exploit pure chromatographic and spectroscopic information. The performance of this strategy is evaluated using simulated and real high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) datasets. The obtained results showed that the MCR-COW can efficiently correct elution time shifts of target compounds that are completely overlapped by coeluted interferences in complex chromatographic data. In addition, the PARAFAC analysis of aligned chromatographic data has the advantage of unique decomposition of overlapped chromatographic peaks to identify and quantify the target compounds in the presence of interferences. Finally, to confirm the reliability of the proposed strategy, the performance of the MCR-COW-PARAFAC is compared with the frequently used methods of PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), and MCR-COW-MCR. In general, in most of the cases the MCR-COW-PARAFAC showed an improvement in terms of lack of fit (LOF), relative error (RE) and spectral correlation coefficients in comparison to the PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, MCR-ALS and MCR-COW-MCR results.

  12. Photosynthetic capacity peaks at intermediate size in temperate deciduous trees.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sean C

    2010-05-01

    Studies of age-related changes in leaf functional biology have generally been based on dichotomous comparisons of young and mature individuals (e.g., saplings and mature canopy trees), with little data available to describe changes through the entire ontogeny of trees, particularly of broadleaf angiosperms. Leaf-level gas-exchange and morphological parameters were quantified in situ in the upper canopy of trees acclimated to high light conditions, spanning a wide range of ontogenetic stages from saplings (approximately 1 cm in stem diameter) to trees >60 cm d.b.h. and nearing their maximum lifespan, in three temperate deciduous tree species in central Ontario, Canada. Traits associated with growth performance, including leaf photosynthetic capacity (expressed on either an area, mass or leaf N basis), stomatal conductance, leaf size and leaf N content, generally showed a unimodal ('hump-shaped') pattern, with peak values at an intermediate ontogenetic stage. In contrast, leaf mass per area (LMA) and related morphological parameters (leaf thickness, leaf tissue density, leaf C content) increased monotonically with tree size, as did water-use efficiency; these monotonic relationships were well described by simple allometric functions of the form Y = aX(b). For traits showing unimodal patterns, tree size corresponding to the trait maximum differed markedly among traits: all three species showed a similar pattern in which the peak for leaf size occurred in trees approximately 2-6 cm d.b.h., followed by leaf chemical traits and photosynthetic capacity on a mass or leaf N basis and finally by photosynthetic capacity on a leaf area basis, which peaked approximately at the size of reproductive onset. It is argued that ontogenetic increases in photosynthetic capacity and related traits early in tree ontogeny are general among relatively shade-tolerant tree species that have a low capacity for leaf-level acclimation, as are declines in this set of traits late in tree ontogeny.

  13. Peak tailoring concept in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic pollutants in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chieh-Heng; Chang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2005-09-16

    An automated gas chromatographic system aiming at performing unattended analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed in laboratory. To encompass VOCs of a wide range of volatility, two different designs of enrichment and separation methods were adopted and compared with performance in analyzing ozone precursors of C3-C12. In the dual-trap dual-column design, lower boiling species (C3-C6) are enriched and separated by one set of trap and column (porous layer open tubular (PLOT)), whereas the enrichment and separation for the higher boiling species (C6-C12) are performed by the other set (wall-coated open tubular (WCOT)). Undesired peaks also inevitably appear on both chromatograms often causing annoyances. To reduce complexity of both the apparatus and the resulting chromatograms, the heart-cut technique was adopted as a base for developing a system, which only uses one trap and one flame ionization detector for constructing two-dimensional GC with PLOT and DB-1. Methods were developed to allow the auxiliary flow pressure in the heart-cut device to be programmed to create dual effects, which not only can perform regular heart-cut actions but can also temporally hold up species in the precolumn for prescribed time intervals. Because it is characteristic for PLOT chromatograms to have reproducible blank retention time windows, segments of a DB-1 trace are produced by the auxiliary flow program aligning perfectly in time with the gaps of the PLOT trace. Subsequently, the two column flows are merged and channeled into single flame ionization detector to produce a very condensed "tailored" chromatogram which is equivalent to overlaying a PLOT and a DB-1 chromatogram on top of each other, except that no peaks are overlapped. This innovative "peak tailoring" concept based on the heart-cut technique is simple in design, easy to build, and extremely rugged for long-term continuous operation as fewer moving parts are involved, which is beneficial for deploying

  14. Theoretical evaluation of peak capacity improvements by use of liquid chromatography combined with drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2015-10-16

    In the domain of liquid phase separations, the quality of separation obtainable is most readily gauged by consideration of classical chromatographic peak capacity theory. Column-based multidimensional strategies for liquid chromatography remain the most attractive and practical route for increasing the number of spatially resolved components in order to reduce stress on necessary mass spectrometric detection. However, the stress placed on a chromatographic separation step as a second dimension in a comprehensive online methodology (i.e. online LC×LC) is rather high. As an alternative to online LC×LC combinations, coupling of HPLC with ion mobility spectrometry hyphenated to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) has emerged as an attractive approach to permit comprehensive sampling of first dimension chromatographic peaks and subsequent introduction to an orthogonal IMS separation prior to measurement of ions by a mass spectrometer. In the present work, utilization of classical peak capacity and ion mobility theory allows theoretical assessment of the potential of two- (LC×IMS-MS) or even three-dimensional (LC×LC×IMS-MS) experimental setups to enhance peak capacity and, therefore, the number of correctly annotated features within the framework of complex, non-targeted analysis problems frequently addressed using HPLC-MS strategies. Theoretical calculations indicate that newly-available drift tube IMS-MS instrumentation can yield peak capacities of between 10 and 40 using nitrogen drift gas for typical non-targeted metabolomic, lipidomic and proteomic applications according to the expected reduced mobilities of components in the respective samples. Theoretically, this approach can significantly improve the overall peak capacity of conventional HPLC-(MS) methodologies to in excess of 10(4) depending upon the column length and gradient time employed. A more elaborate combination of LC×LC×IMS-MS would improve the ion suppression limitation and possibly allow access to

  15. Theoretical evaluation of peak capacity improvements by use of liquid chromatography combined with drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2015-10-16

    In the domain of liquid phase separations, the quality of separation obtainable is most readily gauged by consideration of classical chromatographic peak capacity theory. Column-based multidimensional strategies for liquid chromatography remain the most attractive and practical route for increasing the number of spatially resolved components in order to reduce stress on necessary mass spectrometric detection. However, the stress placed on a chromatographic separation step as a second dimension in a comprehensive online methodology (i.e. online LC×LC) is rather high. As an alternative to online LC×LC combinations, coupling of HPLC with ion mobility spectrometry hyphenated to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) has emerged as an attractive approach to permit comprehensive sampling of first dimension chromatographic peaks and subsequent introduction to an orthogonal IMS separation prior to measurement of ions by a mass spectrometer. In the present work, utilization of classical peak capacity and ion mobility theory allows theoretical assessment of the potential of two- (LC×IMS-MS) or even three-dimensional (LC×LC×IMS-MS) experimental setups to enhance peak capacity and, therefore, the number of correctly annotated features within the framework of complex, non-targeted analysis problems frequently addressed using HPLC-MS strategies. Theoretical calculations indicate that newly-available drift tube IMS-MS instrumentation can yield peak capacities of between 10 and 40 using nitrogen drift gas for typical non-targeted metabolomic, lipidomic and proteomic applications according to the expected reduced mobilities of components in the respective samples. Theoretically, this approach can significantly improve the overall peak capacity of conventional HPLC-(MS) methodologies to in excess of 10(4) depending upon the column length and gradient time employed. A more elaborate combination of LC×LC×IMS-MS would improve the ion suppression limitation and possibly allow access to

  16. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. Materials and Methods: One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at −4°C. Results: Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes using UFLC analysis. The contaminant peak detected was prominent, sharp detectable at 9.176 ± 0.138 min on a Waters 250–4.6 mm, 4 μ, Nova-Pak C18 column with mobile phase consisting of methanol:water (70:30). Conclusion: It was evident from the study that long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peak. Further, this may mislead in future reporting an unnatural compound by researchers. SUMMARY Long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peakContamination peak with higher area under the curve (609993) was obtained in ultra-flow liquid chromatographic run for methanol stored in PP microcentrifuge tubesContamination peak was detected at retention time 9.113 min with a lambda max of 220.38 nm and 300 mAU intensity on the given chromatographic conditionsGlass vials serve better option over PP microcentrifuge tubes for storing biological samples. Abbreviations used: UFLC: Ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography; LC: Liquid Chromatography; MS: Mass spectrometry; AUC: Area Under Curve. PMID:27563216

  17. From molecular model to sparse representation of chromatographic signals with an unknown number of peaks.

    PubMed

    Bertholon, F; Harant, O; Foan, L; Vignoud, S; Jutten, C; Grangeat, P

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of a fluid mixture using a chromatographic system is a standard technique for many biomedical applications such as in-vitro diagnostic of body fluids or air and water quality assessment. The analysis is often dedicated towards a set of molecules or biomarkers. However, due to the fluid complexity, the number of mixture components is often larger than the list of targeted molecules. In order to get an analysis as exhaustive as possible and also to take into account possible interferences, it is important to identify and to quantify all the components that are included in the chromatographic signal. Thus the signal processing aims to reconstruct a list of an unknown number of components and their relative concentrations. We address this question as a problem of sparse representation of a chromatographic signal. The innovative representation is based on a stochastic forward model describing the transport of elementary molecules in the chromatography column as a molecular random walk. We investigate three methods: two probabilistic Bayesian approaches, one parametric and one non-parametric, and a determinist approach based on a parsimonious decomposition on a dictionary basis. We examine the performances of these 3 approaches on an experimental case dedicated to the analysis of mixtures of the micro-pollutants Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in a methanol solution in two cases of high and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Peak deconvolution to correctly assess the band broadening of chromatographic columns.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2016-09-23

    The present study provides experimental evidence for the fact that the peak deconvolution method can be applied to accurately measure the column-only dispersion of the current generation of high speed and high efficiency columns. Unlike the conventional variance difference method, it furthermore preserves any prevailing asymmetry of the column-only peak. This has been demonstrated by testing the same column on three different system configurations, with different extra-column volumes, and showing that, after deconvolution, the resulting column-only peaks coincide very well and produce very similar column-only plate height values (typical relative standard deviation comprising all runs on three different system configurations is 2-2.5%). Extensively studying a large set of theoretically produced peaks (with exactly known variance and asymmetry), it could be shown that the main criterion for the validity of the deconvolution method is that the variance of the system-only peak is minimum 1.5 times smaller than the variance of the column+system peak. The need to add a radial mixer unit to accurately assess the system-only contributions has been demonstrated as well. To illustrate its use and merits, the deconvolution method has been used to establish so-called multiple van Deemter curves, wherein plate height curves relating to different peak width definitions are shown in the same plot. These plots can give new insights in the intrinsic asymmetry of the column-only dispersion. PMID:27578411

  19. Peak capacity, peak-capacity production rate, and boiling point resolution for temperature-programmed GC with very high programming rates

    PubMed

    Grall; Leonard; Sacks

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in column heating technology have made possible very fast linear temperature programming for high-speed gas chromatography. A fused-silica capillary column is contained in a tubular metal jacket, which is resistively heated by a precision power supply. With very rapid column heating, the rate of peak-capacity production is significantly enhanced, but the total peak capacity and the boiling-point resolution (minimum boiling-point difference required for the separation of two nonpolar compounds on a nonpolar column) are reduced relative to more conventional heating rates used with convection-oven instruments. As temperature-programming rates increase, elution temperatures also increase with the result that retention may become insignificant prior to elution. This results in inefficient utilization of the down-stream end of the column and causes a loss in the rate of peak-capacity production. The rate of peak-capacity production is increased by the use of shorter columns and higher carrier gas velocities. With high programming rates (100-600 degrees C/min), column lengths of 6-12 m and average linear carrier gas velocities in the 100-150 cm/s range are satisfactory. In this study, the rate of peak-capacity production, the total peak capacity, and the boiling point resolution are determined for C10-C28 n-alkanes using 6-18 m long columns, 50-200 cm/s average carrier gas velocities, and 60-600 degrees C/min programming rates. It was found that with a 6-meter-long, 0.25-mm i.d. column programmed at a rate of 600 degrees C/min, a maximum peak-capacity production rate of 6.1 peaks/s was obtained. A total peak capacity of about 75 peaks was produced in a 37-s long separation spanning a boiling-point range from n-C10 (174 degrees C) to n-C28 (432 degrees C).

  20. Loading capacity and chromatographic behavior of a porous graphitic carbon column for polychlorinated biphenyls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, K.R.; Gale, R.W.; Feltz, K.; O'Laughlin, J.; Tillitt, D.E.; Schwartz, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    A porous graphitic carbon column (Hypercarb) was used for the fractionation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into classes of 2-4 ortho chlorines, 1 ortho chlorine and 0 ortho chlorine congeners. A method was developed that combined the fractionation of PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in a variety of biotic environmental samples. Many of these samples have high concentrations of PCBs which cause fractionation problems as adsorption sites on the graphitic surface are occupied. The loading capacity of the column for PCBs was determined by injecting up to 1 mg of total PCBs and monitoring changes in chromatographic behavior of tetra-/di-ortho, mono-ortho and non-ortho substituted PCBs. Effective loading capacities were 1 mg for tetra-/di-ortho PCBs, but only 3- 5 ??g for non-ortho PCBs and about 2 ??g for mono-ortho PCBs. Loading capacity of the PGC column for environmental fish and avian egg samples was determined to depend on the mono-ortho and non-ortho PCB levels found in these samples.

  1. Evaluation of injection methods for fast, high peak capacity separations with low thermal mass gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Mannion, Brandyn C; To, Khang; Hoac, Trinh; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) was evaluated for rapid, high peak capacity separations with three injection methods: liquid, headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), and direct vapor. An Agilent LTM equipped with a short microbore capillary column was operated at a column heating rate of 250 °C/min to produce a 60s separation. Two sets of experiments were conducted in parallel to characterize the instrumental platform. First, the three injection methods were performed in conjunction with in-house built high-speed cryo-focusing injection (HSCFI) to cryogenically trap and re-inject the analytes onto the LTM-GC column in a narrower band. Next, the three injection methods were performed natively with LTM-GC. Using HSCFI, the peak capacity of a separation of 50 nl of a 73 component liquid test mixture was 270, which was 23% higher than without HSCFI. Similar peak capacity gains were obtained when using the HSCFI with HS-SPME (25%), and even greater with vapor injection (56%). For the 100 μl vapor sample injected without HSCFI, the preconcentration factor, defined as the ratio of the maximum concentration of the detected analyte peak relative to the analyte concentration injected with the syringe, was determined to be 11 for the earliest eluting peak (most volatile analyte). In contrast, the preconcentration factor for the earliest eluting peak using HSCFI was 103. Therefore, LTM-GC is demonstrated to natively provide in situ analyte trapping, although not to as great an extent as with HSCFI. We also report the use of LTM-GC applied with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) detection for rapid, high peak capacity separations from SPME sampled banana peel headspace.

  2. Peak capacity optimization of peptide separations in reversed-phase gradient elution chromatography: fixed column format.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Stoll, Dwight R; Schellinger, Adam P; Carr, Peter W

    2006-05-15

    The optimization of peak capacity in gradient elution RPLC is essential for the separation of multicomponent samples such as those encountered in proteomic research. In this work, we study the effect of gradient time (tG), flow rate (F), temperature (T), and final eluent strength (phi(final)) on the peak capacity of separations of peptides that are representative of the range in peptides found in a tryptic digest. We find that there are very strong interactions between the individual variables (e.g., flow rate and gradient time) which make the optimization quite complicated. On a given column, one should first set the gradient time to the longest tolerable and then set the temperature to the highest achievable with the instrument. Next, the flow rate should be optimized using a reasonable but arbitrary value of phi(final). Last, the final eluent strength should be adjusted so that the last solute elutes as close as possible to the gradient time. We also develop an easily implemented, highly efficient, and effective Monte Carlo search strategy to simultaneously optimize all the variables. We find that gradient steepness is an important parameter that influences peak capacity and an optimum range of gradient steepness exists in which the peak capacity is maximized.

  3. Non-parametric linear regression of discrete Fourier transform convoluted chromatographic peak responses under non-ideal conditions of internal standard method.

    PubMed

    Korany, Mohamed A; Maher, Hadir M; Galal, Shereen M; Fahmy, Ossama T; Ragab, Marwa A A

    2010-11-15

    This manuscript discusses the application of chemometrics to the handling of HPLC response data using the internal standard method (ISM). This was performed on a model mixture containing terbutaline sulphate, guaiphenesin, bromhexine HCl, sodium benzoate and propylparaben as an internal standard. Derivative treatment of chromatographic response data of analyte and internal standard was followed by convolution of the resulting derivative curves using 8-points sin x(i) polynomials (discrete Fourier functions). The response of each analyte signal, its corresponding derivative and convoluted derivative data were divided by that of the internal standard to obtain the corresponding ratio data. This was found beneficial in eliminating different types of interferences. It was successfully applied to handle some of the most common chromatographic problems and non-ideal conditions, namely: overlapping chromatographic peaks and very low analyte concentrations. For example, a significant change in the correlation coefficient of sodium benzoate, in case of overlapping peaks, went from 0.9975 to 0.9998 on applying normal conventional peak area and first derivative under Fourier functions methods, respectively. Also a significant improvement in the precision and accuracy for the determination of synthetic mixtures and dosage forms in non-ideal cases was achieved. For example, in the case of overlapping peaks guaiphenesin mean recovery% and RSD% went from 91.57, 9.83 to 100.04, 0.78 on applying normal conventional peak area and first derivative under Fourier functions methods, respectively. This work also compares the application of Theil's method, a non-parametric regression method, in handling the response ratio data, with the least squares parametric regression method, which is considered the de facto standard method used for regression. Theil's method was found to be superior to the method of least squares as it assumes that errors could occur in both x- and y-directions and

  4. Management of nonmatrix interfering peaks in a chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic assay produced by solid-phase extraction of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Kagel, J R; Rossi, D T; Lathia, C D

    1997-02-28

    PD 146923, under evaluation as an alkylating radiosensitizing drug, contains one chiral center and one chemically reactive aziridine ring. A method was developed to evaluate possible in vivo enantiomeric inversion of PD 146923 in rat plasma. Normal-phase chiral HPLC was necessary to separate the enantiomers, but a typical aqueous-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) was needed to isolate the analytes from plasma. SPE at higher analyte concentrations removed all interfering peaks and gave acceptable recoveries. However, peaks (A-G) from seven new components interfering with analyte detection at lower concentrations were produced by SPE. The interfering peaks overlapped each other, so some were not observed until other, more intense interfering peaks had been managed. The low separation efficiency of the chiral column precluded management of interfering peaks by modifying chromatographic parameters. Chemical reactivity of the analytes forced the use of mild conditions for management of interfering peaks. Peaks A-F were: (A) water from the SPE cartridge; (B) SPE sorbent endcapping; (C, E and F) nonvolatile salts of the SPE elution acid reacting with bases from the injection solvent or with unidentified bases from the SPE cartridge; (D and G) analyte degradation products. This study identifies the nonmatrix peaks coeluting with the analytes, and describes how an aqueous-based SPE method was developed for isolating these very polar, highly reactive analytes in plasma for separation in a normal-phase chiral HPLC assay. Additionally, B, C, E or F probably are present in many other solid-phase extractions, but are not observed because of polarity or solubility properties.

  5. Half-width plots, a simple tool to predict peak shape, reveal column kinetics and characterise chromatographic columns in liquid chromatography: state of the art and new results.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Baeza, J J; Ruiz-Ángel, M J; García-Álvarez-Coque, M C; Carda-Broch, S

    2013-11-01

    Peak profiles in chromatography are characterised by their height, position, width and asymmetry; the two latter depend on the values of the left and right peak half-widths. Simple correlations have been found between the peak half-widths and the retention times. The representation of such correlations has been called half-width plots. For isocratic elution, the plots are parabolic, although often, the parabolas can be approximated to straight-lines. The plots can be obtained with the half-widths/retention time data for a set of solutes experiencing the same kinetics, eluted with a mobile phase at fixed or varying composition. When the analysed solutes experience different resistance to mass transfer, the plots will be solute dependent, and should be obtained with the data for each solute eluted with mobile phases at varying composition. The half-width plots approach is a simple tool that facilitates the prediction of peak shape (width and asymmetry) with optimisation purposes, reveal the interaction kinetics of solutes in different columns, and characterise chromatographic columns. This work shows half-width plots for different situations in isocratic elution, including the use of different flows, the effect of temperature, the modification of the stationary phase surface by an additive, the existence of specific interactions within the column, and the comparison of columns. The adaptation to gradient elution is also described. Previous knowledge on half-width plots is structured and analysed, to which new results are added.

  6. Maintained peak leg and pulmonary VO2 despite substantial reduction in muscle mitochondrial capacity.

    PubMed

    Boushel, R; Gnaiger, E; Larsen, F J; Helge, J W; González-Alonso, J; Ara, I; Munch-Andersen, T; van Hall, G; Søndergaard, H; Saltin, B; Calbet, J A L

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the circulatory and muscle oxidative capacities of the arm after prolonged low-intensity skiing in the arctic (Boushel et al., 2014). In the present study, leg VO2 was measured by the Fick method during leg cycling while muscle mitochondrial capacity was examined on a biopsy of the vastus lateralis in healthy volunteers (7 male, 2 female) before and after 42 days of skiing at 60% HR max. Peak pulmonary VO2 (3.52 ± 0.18 L.min(-1) pre vs 3.52 ± 0.19 post) and VO2 across the leg (2.8 ± 0.4L.min(-1) pre vs 3.0 ± 0.2 post) were unchanged after the ski journey. Peak leg O2 delivery (3.6 ± 0.2 L.min(-1) pre vs 3.8 ± 0.4 post), O2 extraction (82 ± 1% pre vs 83 ± 1 post), and muscle capillaries per mm(2) (576 ± 17 pre vs 612 ± 28 post) were also unchanged; however, leg muscle mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity was reduced (90 ± 3 pmol.sec(-1) .mg(-1) pre vs 70 ± 2 post, P < 0.05) as was citrate synthase activity (40 ± 3 μmol.min(-1) .g(-1) pre vs 34 ± 3 vs P < 0.05). These findings indicate that peak muscle VO2 can be sustained with a substantial reduction in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity. This is achieved at a similar O2 delivery and a higher relative ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at a higher mitochondrial p50. These findings support the concept that muscle mitochondrial respiration is submaximal at VO2max , and that mitochondrial volume can be downregulated by chronic energy demand.

  7. Combined use of algorithms for peak picking, peak tracking and retention modelling to optimize the chromatographic conditions for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fluocinolone acetonide and its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Mattias J; Petersson, Patrik; Axelsson, Bengt-Olof; Bylund, Dan

    2011-10-17

    A strategy for rapid optimization of liquid chromatography column temperature and gradient shape is presented. The optimization as such is based on the well established retention and peak width models implemented in software like e.g. DryLab and LC simulator. The novel part of the strategy is a highly automated processing algorithm for detection and tracking of chromatographic peaks in noisy liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data. The strategy is presented and visualized by the optimization of the separation of two degradants present in ultraviolet (UV) exposed fluocinolone acetonide. It should be stressed, however, that it can be utilized for LC-MS analysis of any sample and application where several runs are conducted on the same sample. In the application presented, 30 components that were difficult or impossible to detect in the UV data could be automatically detected and tracked in the MS data by using the proposed strategy. The number of correctly tracked components was above 95%. Using the parameters from the reconstructed data sets to the model gave good agreement between predicted and observed retention times at optimal conditions. The area of the smallest tracked component was estimated to 0.08% compared to the main component, a level relevant for the characterization of impurities in the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Upper body muscle strength and endurance in relation to peak exercise capacity during cycling in healthy sedentary male subjects.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Åsa B; Holmbäck, Anna M; Elzyri, Targ; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Ringsberg, Karin; Groop, Leif; Thorsson, Ola; Wollmer, Per

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between upper body muscle strength and endurance, and exercise capacity during an incremental cycle exercise test in sedentary healthy male subjects before and after 6 months of combined supervised group training. Exercise capacity was measured as maximal oxygen consumption (VO₂peak) and maximum work rate (WR(peak)). Muscle strength and endurance of the upper body were assessed by bench press and isometric measurement of trunk extensor and flexor maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and trunk extensor and flexor endurance. Thirty-one subjects were studied before and after the training period. Bench press and trunk extensor MVC correlated to exercise capacity at baseline and after training. Training improved VO₂peak and WR(peak). The correlation between trunk extensor MVC and exercise capacity improved after training. Upper body strength may affect exercise capacity by increasing the rider's ability to generate force on the handlebar that can be transmitted to the pedals. Resistance training of the arms, chest, and trunk may help improve cycling performance.

  9. Relative Economic Merits of Storage and Combustion Turbines for Meeting Peak Capacity Requirements under Increased Penetration of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, Paul; Diakov, Victor; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Batteries with several hours of capacity provide an alternative to combustion turbines for meeting peak capacity requirements. Even when compared to state-of-the-art highly flexible combustion turbines, batteries can provide a greater operational value, which is reflected in a lower system-wide production cost. By shifting load and providing operating reserves, batteries can reduce the cost of operating the power system to a traditional electric utility. This added value means that, depending on battery life, batteries can have a higher cost than a combustion turbine of equal capacity and still produce a system with equal or lower overall life-cycle cost. For a utility considering investing in new capacity, the cost premium for batteries is highly sensitive to a variety of factors, including lifetime, natural gas costs, PV penetration, and grid generation mix. In addition, as PV penetration increases, the net electricity demand profile changes, which may reduce the amount of battery energy capacity needed to reliably meet peak demand.

  10. Bedrest-induced peak VO2 reduction associated with age, gender, and aerobic capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D. J.; Sandler, H.

    1986-01-01

    A study measuring the peak oxygen uptake (V02), heart rate (HR), and exercise tolerance time of 15 men of 55 + or - 2 yr and 17 women of 55 + or - 1 yr after 10 days of continuous bed rest (BR) is presented. The experimental conditions and procedures are described. Following BR a decrease in peak VO2 of 8.4 percent in men and 6.8 percent in women, a reduction in exercise tolerance time by 8.1 percent in men and 7.3 percent in women, and an increse in HR of 4.4 percent and 1.3 percent for men and women, respectively, are observed. These data are compared with data from Convertino et al. (1977) for men 21 + or - 1 yr and women 28 + or - 2yr. It is concluded that BR-induced aerobic deconditioning is independent of age and sex, since the relative decrease in peak V02 in the older and younger subjects and men and women are similar.

  11. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  12. Comparative studies of peak intensities and chromatographic separation of proteolytic digests, PTMs, and intact proteins obtained by nanoLC-ESI MS analysis at room and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Moskovets, Eugene V; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates that the chromatographic separation performed at highly stabilized elevated temperature results in significant improvements in sensitivity, quantitative accuracy, chromatographic resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility of nanoLC-MS analysis of complex peptides mixtures. A newly developed platform was shown to provide conditions for accurate temperature stabilization and temperature homogeneity when performing nanoLC-ESI MS analysis. We quantitatively assessed and compared the recovery of peptides and small proteins from nanoLC columns at room and elevated temperatures. We found that analyses performed at highly stabilized elevated temperatures led to improved detection sensitivity, reproducibility, and chromatographic resolution in reversed-phase LC separation of unmodified peptides (both hydrophilic and hydrophobic), post-translationally modified peptides (O-phosphorylated), and small intact proteins. The analytical benefits of elevated temperatures for qualitative and quantitative proteomic LC-MS profiling were demonstrated using mixtures of synthetic peptides, tryptic digests of mixtures of model proteins, and digested total lysates of isolated rat kidney mitochondria. The effect of elevated temperature on the ion suppression was also demonstrated. Graphical Abstract A fragment of overlaid LC retention time-m/z planar views demonstrates the improved separation performance in the analysis of a complex peptide mixture at elevated temperature. Retention time-m/z 2D peptide features detected at 60 °C (magenta) were matched and aligned with features detected at room temperature (green).

  13. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  14. Brain natriuretic peptide predicts forced vital capacity of the lungs, oxygen pulse and peak oxygen consumption in physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Popovic, Bojana; Petrovic, Milan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Kocijancic, Aleksandar; Banovic, Marko; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Markovic, Vidan; Damjanovic, Svetozar S

    2013-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is used as marker of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. However, the predictive value of circulating NT-pro-BNP for cardiac and pulmonary performance is unclear in physiological conditions. Standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler and forced spirometry at rest were used to assess cardiac parameters and forced vital capacity (FVC) in two groups of athletes (16 elite male wrestlers (W), 21 water polo player (WP)), as different stress adaptation models, and 20 sedentary subjects (C) matched for age. Cardiopulmonary test on treadmill (CPET), as acute stress model, was used to measure peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), maximal heart rate (HRmax) and peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/HR). NT-pro-BNP was measured by immunoassey sandwich technique 10min before the test - at rest, at the beginning of the test, at maximal effort, at third minute of recovery. FVC was higher in athletes and the highest in W (WP 5.60±0.29 l; W 6.57±1.00 l; C 5.41±0.29 l; p<0.01). Peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR were higher in athletes and the highest in WP. HRmax was not different among groups. In all groups, NT-pro-BNP decreased from rest to the beginning phase, increased in maximal effort and stayed unchanged in recovery. NT-pro-BNP was higher in C than W in all phases; WP had similar values as W and C. On multiple regression analysis, in all three groups together, ΔNT-pro-BNP from rest to the beginning phase independently predicted both peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR (r=0.38, 0.35; B=37.40, 0.19; p=0.007, 0.000, respectively). NT-pro-BNP at rest predicted HRmax (r=-0.32, B=-0.22, p=0.02). Maximal NT-pro-BNP predicted FVC (r=-0.22, B=-0.07, p=0.02). These results show noticeable predictive value of NT-pro-BNP for both cardiac and pulmonary performance in physiological conditions suggesting that NT-pro-BNP could be a common regulatory factor coordinating adaptation of heart and lungs to stress condition.

  15. Separation of intact proteins on γ-ray-induced polymethacrylate monolithic columns: A highly permeable stationary phase with high peak capacity for capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simone, Patrizia; Pierri, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Gasparrini, Francesca; Mazzoccanti, Giulia; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Ursini, Ornella; Ciogli, Alessia; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Polymethacrylate-based monolithic capillary columns, prepared by γ-radiation-induced polymerization, were used to optimize the experimental conditions (nature of the organic modifiers, the content of trifluoroacetic acid and the column temperature) in the separation of nine standard proteins with different hydrophobicities and a wide range of molecular weights. Because of the excellent permeability of the monolithic columns, an ion-pair reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry method has been developed by coupling the column directly to the mass spectrometer without a flow-split and using a standard electrospray interface. Additionally, the high working flow and concomitant high efficiency of these columns allowed us to employ a longer column (up to 50 cm) and achieve a peak capacity value superior to 1000. This work is motivated by the need to develop new materials for high-resolution chromatographic separation that combine chemical stability at elevated temperatures (up to 75°C) and a broad pH range, with a high peak capacity value. The advantage of the γ-ray-induced monolithic column lies in the batch-to-batch reproducibility and long-term high-temperature stability. Their proven high loading capacity, recovery, good selectivity and high permeability, moreover, compared well with that of a commercially available poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monolithic column, which confirms that such monolithic supports might facilitate analysis in proteomics.

  16. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  17. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  18. Heat capacity peak at the quantum critical point of the transverse Ising magnet CoNb2O6

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tian; Koohpayeh, S. M.; Krizan, J. W.; McQueen, T. M.; Cava, R. J.; Ong, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    The transverse Ising magnet Hamiltonian describing the Ising chain in a transverse magnetic field is the archetypal example of a system that undergoes a transition at a quantum critical point (QCP). The columbite CoNb2O6 is the closest realization of the transverse Ising magnet found to date. At low temperatures, neutron diffraction has observed a set of discrete collective spin modes near the QCP. Here, we ask if there are low-lying spin excitations distinct from these relatively high-energy modes. Using the heat capacity, we show that a significant band of gapless spin excitations exists. At the QCP, their spin entropy rises to a prominent peak that accounts for 30% of the total spin degrees of freedom. In a narrow field interval below the QCP, the gapless excitations display a fermion-like, temperature-linear heat capacity below 1 K. These novel gapless modes are the main spin excitations participating in, and affected by, the quantum transition. PMID:26146018

  19. Spectrophotometric and chromatographic assessment of contributions of carotenoids and chlorophylls to the total antioxidant capacities of plant foods.

    PubMed

    Sözgen Başkan, Kevser; Tütem, Esma; Özer, Nihat; Apak, Reşat

    2013-11-27

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic compounds and also efficient antioxidants. This study aims to identify and quantify carotenoids and chlorophylls in some vegetables (carrot, tomato, spinach), to measure the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of these samples with two spectrophotometric methods, to correlate TAC data with carotenoid structure, and to compare the TAC results with HPLC findings. Separation of the individual antioxidant pigments was achieved on a C30 column using a developed gradient elution program involving methanol-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) with 0.1% (v/v) triethylamine (TEA) (A) and acetone (B) mobile phases. Total antioxidant capacities of the acetone extracts of studied samples, in trolox and β-carotene equivalents, were in the order: spinach > tomato > carrot by both CUPRAC and ABTS methods. CUPRAC responded favorably to both chlorophylls a and b. The TAC calculated with aid of combined HPLC-spectrophotometry was very close to the spectrophotometric value (93-108%) for real samples and synthetic mixtures. PMID:24168293

  20. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature.

  1. [A novel multiple-channel apparatus for packing capillary chromatographic column and its application].

    PubMed

    Lü, Yayao; Hao, Feiran; Wang, Huanhuan; Fu, Bin; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-11-01

    A novel multiple-channel apparatus for packing capillary chromatographic column was designed and manufactured for packing six capillary chromatographic columns with close column efficiency at the same time. Briefly, it consists of a magnetic stirrer, a liquid chromatographic pump and a multiple-channel can. The reagents used for preparing ODS (C18) slurry and stirring condition of the magnetic stirrer were optimized in the study. Two batches of capillary chromatographic columns were packed under the optimum condition, and these packed capillary chromatographic columns were evaluated in the terms of peak capacity, sequence coverage, retention times of three peptide ions and column pressure using the tryptic digest of a bovine serum albumin (BSA) and detected by LC-MS in electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. The experimental results showed that the six capillary chromatographic columns packed at the same time had close column efficiencies, however, the column efficiencies of twelve capillary chromatographic columns packed at two times were significantly different. In addition, there was no significant column efficiency difference when packing one or six capillary chromatographic columns at the same time. The multiple-channel apparatus designed by us is simple, time-saving, and can be applied to pack capillary chromatographic columns with similar column efficiencies, thus it is of evident advantage over traditional one-channel apparatus.

  2. Maximizing the peak capacity using coupled columns packed with 2.6 μm core-shell particles operated at 1200 bar.

    PubMed

    Vaast, Axel; De Vos, Jelle; Broeckhoven, Ken; Verstraeten, Matthias; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Desmet, Gert

    2012-09-21

    We report on the peak capacity that can be produced by operating a state-of-the-art core-shell particle type (d(p)=2.6 μm) at its kinetic optimum at ultra-high pressures of 600 and 1200 bar. The column-length optimization needed to arrive at this kinetic optimum was realized using column coupling. Whereas the traditional operating mode (using a single 15 cm column operated at its optimum flow rate of 0.4 mL/min) offered a peak capacity of 162 in 10.8 min, a fully optimized train of 60 cm (4×15 cm) columns offered a peak capacity of 325 in 61 min when operated at 1200 bar. Even though the particles have a reputed low flow resistance and a relatively large size (>2 μm), it was found that the increase in performance that can be generated when switching from a fully optimized 600 bar operation to a fully optimized 1200 bar operation is significant (roughly 50% reduction of the analysis time for the same peak capacity and approximately a 20% increase in peak capacity if compared for the same analysis time). This has been quantified in a generic way using the kinetic plot method and is illustrated by showing the chromatograms corresponding to some of the data points of the kinetic plot curve.

  3. Use of lipophilic ion adsorption isotherms to determine the surface area and the monolayer capacity of a chromatographic packing, as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for its adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, T

    2005-04-29

    A method that champions the approaches of two independent research groups, to quantitate the chromatographic stationary phase surface available for lipophilic ion adsorption, is presented. For the first time the non-approximated expression of the electrostatically modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used. The non approximated Gouy-Chapman (G-C) theory equation was used to give the rigorous surface potential. The method helps model makers, interested in ionic interactions, determine whether the potential modified Langmuir isotherm can be linearized, and, accordingly, whether simplified retention equations can be properly used. The theory cultivated here allows the estimates not only of the chromatographically accessible surface area, but also of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the adsorption of the amphiphile, the standard free energy of its adsorption, and the monolayer capacity of the packing. In addition, it establishes the limit between a theoretical and an empirical use of the Freundlich isotherm to determine the surface area. Estimates of the parameters characterising the chromatographic system are reliable from the physical point of view, and this greatly validates the present comprehensive approach.

  4. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. Method: The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Results: Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Conclusion: Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:27741123

  5. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    PubMed

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  6. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    PubMed

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success. PMID:26681834

  7. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hatchett, A; Judge, LW; Breaux, ME; Marcus, L

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success. PMID:26681834

  8. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  9. Elimination of chromatographic and mass spectrometric problems in GC-MS analysis of Lavender essential oil by multivariate curve resolution techniques: Improving the peak purity assessment by variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Moazeni-Pourasil, Roudabeh Sadat; Sereshti, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    In analysis of complex natural matrices by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), many disturbing factors such as baseline drift, spectral background, homoscedastic and heteroscedastic noise, peak shape deformation (non-Gaussian peaks), low S/N ratio and co-elution (overlapped and/or embedded peaks) lead the researchers to handle them to serve time, money and experimental efforts. This study aimed to improve the GC-MS analysis of complex natural matrices utilizing multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods. In addition, to assess the peak purity of the two-dimensional data, a method called variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis (VSMW-EFA) is introduced and examined. The proposed methodology was applied to the GC-MS analysis of Iranian Lavender essential oil, which resulted in extending the number of identified constituents from 56 to 143 components. It was found that the most abundant constituents of the Iranian Lavender essential oil are α-pinene (16.51%), camphor (10.20%), 1,8-cineole (9.50%), bornyl acetate (8.11%) and camphene (6.50%). This indicates that the Iranian type Lavender contains a relatively high percentage of α-pinene. Comparison of different types of Lavender essential oils showed the composition similarity between Iranian and Italian (Sardinia Island) Lavenders. PMID:25621436

  10. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  11. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  12. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  13. High-performance liquid-chromatographic separation of subcomponents of antimycin-A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Using a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique, a mixture of antimycins A was separated into eight hitherto unreported subcomponents, Ala, Alb, A2a, A2b, A3a, A3b, A4a, and A4b. Although a base-line resolution of the known four major antimycins Al, A2, A3, and A4 was readily achieved with mobile phases containing acetate buffers, the separation of the new antibiotic subcomponents was highly sensitive to variation in mobile phase conditions. The type and composition of organic modifiers, the nature of buffer salts, and the concentration of added electrolytes had profound effects on capacity factors, separation factors, and peak resolution values. Of the numerous chromatographic systems examined, a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water (70:30) and 0.005 M tetrabutylammonium phosphate at pH 3.0 yielded the most satisfactory results for the separation of the subcomponents. Reversed-phase gradient HPLC separation of the dansylated or methylated antibiotic compounds produced superior chromatographic characteristics and the presence of added electrolytes was not a critical factor for achieving separation. Differences in the chromatographic outcome between homologous and structural isomers were interpretated based on a differential solvophobic interaction rationale. Preparative reversed-phase HPLC under optimal conditions enabled isolation of pure samples of the methylated antimycin subcomponents for use in structural studies.

  14. [Development of online conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Hong, Guangfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2014-04-01

    Human plasma is one of the proteins-containing samples most difficult to characterize on account of the wide dynamic concentration range of its intact proteins. Herein, we developed a high-throughput conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma in online mode. In the system, a conventional strong-anion exchange chromatographic column was used as the first separation dimension and eight parallel conventional reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns were integrated as the second separation dimension. The fractions from the first dimension were sequentially transferred into the corresponding reversed-phase liquid chromatographic precolumns for retention and enrichment using a 10-port electrically actuated multi-position valve. The second dimensional solvent flow was directly and identically split into 8 channels. The fractions were concurrently back-flushed from the precolumns into the 8 conventional RP columns and were separated simultaneously. An 8-channel fraction collector was refitted to collect the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic fractions for further investigation. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) dyein solution was conveniently used for high-abundance protein location. Two separation dimensions were relatively independent parts, as well as each channel of the second dimensional array separation. Therefore, the new system could improve the separation throughput and total peak capacity. The system was successfully applied for the separation of human plasma intact proteins. The results indicated the established system is an effective method for removing high abundance proteins in plasma and in-depth research in plasma proteomics.

  15. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  16. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  17. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  18. Reliable peak selection for multisample analysis with comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography is a powerful technology for analyzing the patterns of constituent compounds in complex samples, but matching chromatographic features across large sample sets is difficult. This paper describes a new, automated method for selecting chromatographic peaks ...

  19. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  20. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  1. Improving the Sensitivity, Resolution, and Peak Capacity of Gradient Elution in Capillary Liquid Chromatography with Large-Volume Injections by Using Temperature-Assisted On-Column Solute Focusing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachael E; Groskreutz, Stephen R; Weber, Stephen G

    2016-05-17

    Capillary HPLC (cLC) with gradient elution is the separation method of choice for the fields of proteomics and metabolomics. This is due to the complementary nature of cLC flow rates and electrospray or nanospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The small column diameters result in good mass sensitivity. Good concentration sensitivity is also possible by injection of relatively large volumes of solution and relying on solvent-based solute focusing. However, if the injection volume is too large or solutes are poorly retained during injection, volume overload occurs which leads to altered peak shapes, decreased sensitivity, and lower peak capacity. Solutes that elute early even with the use of a solvent gradient are especially vulnerable to this problem. In this paper, we describe a simple, automated instrumental method, temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF), that is capable of focusing large volume injections of small molecules and peptides under gradient conditions. By injecting a large sample volume while cooling a short segment of the column inlet at subambient temperatures, solutes are concentrated into narrow bands at the head of the column. Rapidly raising the temperature of this segment of the column leads to separations with less peak broadening in comparison to solvent focusing alone. For large volume injections of both mixtures of small molecules and a bovine serum albumin tryptic digest, TASF improved the peak shape and resolution in chromatograms. TASF showed the most dramatic improvements with shallow gradients, which is particularly useful for biological applications. Results demonstrate the ability of TASF with gradient elution to improve the sensitivity, resolution, and peak capacity of volume overloaded samples beyond gradient compression alone. Additionally, we have developed and validated a double extrapolation method for predicting retention factors at extremes of temperature and mobile phase composition. Using this method

  2. Chromatographic analysis of olopatadine in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maksić, Jelena; Jovanović, Marko; Rakić, Tijana; Popović, Igor; Ivanović, Darko; Jančić-Stojanović, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, chromatographic analysis of active substance olopatadine hydrochloride, which is used in eye drops as antihistaminic agent, and its impurity E isomer by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and application of design of experiments (DoE) methodology are presented. In addition, benzalkonium chloride is very often used as a preservative in eye drops. Therefore, the evaluation of its chromatographic behavior in HILIC was carried out as well. In order to estimate chromatographic behavior and set optimal chromatographic conditions, DoE methodology was applied. After the selection of important chromatographic factors, Box-Behnken design was utilized, and on the basis of the obtained models factor effects were examined. Then, multi-objective robust optimization is performed aiming to obtain chromatographic conditions that comply with several quality criteria simultaneously: adequate and robust separation of critical peak pair and maximum retention of the first eluting peak. The optimal conditions are identified by using grid point search methodology. The experimental verification confirmed the adequacy of the defined optimal conditions. Finally, under optimal chromatographic conditions, the method was validated and applicability of the proposed method was confirmed.

  3. Electrochemical behavior of chlorogenic acid at a boron-doped diamond electrode and estimation of the antioxidant capacity in the coffee samples based on its oxidation peak.

    PubMed

    Yardım, Yavuz

    2012-04-01

    In this study, an electroanalytical methodology for the determination of chlorogenic acid (CGA) was achieved at a boron-doped diamond electrode under adsorptive transfer stripping voltammetric conditions. The values obtained for CGA were used to estimate the antioxidant properties of the coffee sample based on CGA oxidation. By using square-wave stripping mode, the compound yielded a well-defined voltammetric response at +0.49 V with respect to Ag/AgCl in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 3.0 (after 120 s accumulations at a fixed potential of 0.40 V). At the optimum experimental conditions, linear calibration curve is obtained within the concentration range of 0.25 to 4.0 μg mL⁻¹ with the limit of detection 0.049 μg mL⁻¹ . The developed protocol was successfully applied for the analysis of antioxidant capacity in the coffee products such as Turkish coffee and instant coffee.

  4. General theory of peak compression in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2016-02-12

    A new and general expression of the peak compression factor in liquid chromatography is derived. It applies to any type of gradients induced by non-uniform columns (stationary) or by temporal variations (dynamic) of the elution strength related to changes in solvent composition, temperature, or in any external field. The new equation is validated in two ideal cases for which the exact solutions are already known. From a practical viewpoint, it is used to predict the achievable degree of peak compression for curved retention models, retained solvent gradients, and for temperature-programmed liquid chromatography. The results reveal that: (1) curved retention models affect little the compression factor with respect to the best linear strength retention models, (2) gradient peaks can be indefinitely compressed with respect to isocratic peaks if the propagation speed of the gradient (solvent or temperature) becomes smaller than the chromatographic velocity, (3) limitations are inherent to the maximum intensity of the experimental intrinsic gradient steepness, and (4) dynamic temperature gradients can be advantageously combined to solvent gradients in order to improve peak capacities of microfluidic separation devices.

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  6. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  7. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  8. Chromatographic separation and concentration of quercetin and (+)-catechin using mesoporous composites based on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. I.; Belanova, N. A.; Korabel'nikova, E. O.; Nedosekina, I. V.; Roessner, F.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Data on chromatographic separation of quercetin and (+)-catechin-flavonoids with similar physicochemical (including sorption) properties—are presented. The highest efficiency of chromatographic process at high sorption capacity of the material with respect to quercetin and slightly lower capacity for (+)-catechin were observed when silylated composites of ordered MCM-41 type materials were used. The application of acetonitrile as a solvent increased the sorption capacity of the material and can be recommended for separation of related polyphenol substances and their determination using ordered MCM-41 modified with trimethylchlorosilane as a stationary phase in a chromatographic column.

  9. Chromatographic fingerprints analysis for evaluation of Ginkgo Biloba products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaf extract of Ginkgo biloba has purported value for improving mental capacities in Alzheimer’s patients. The flavonoids and the terpene lactones are considered to be the two main active components that influence human health. This paper compared an LC/UV chromatographic fingerprint method wi...

  10. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv.

  11. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv. PMID:16509343

  12. Making sense of peak load cost allocations

    SciTech Connect

    Power, T.M.

    1995-03-15

    When it comes to cost allocation, common wisdom assigns costs in proportion to class contributions to peak loads, The justification is simple: Since the equipment had to be sized to meet peak day loads, those costs should be allocated on the same basis. Many different peak allocators have been developed on this assumption: single coincident peak contribution, sum of coincident peaks, noncoincident peak, average and excess demand, peak and average demand, base and extra capacity, and so on. Such pure peak-load allocators may not be politically acceptable, but conceptually, at least, they appear to offer the only defensible approach. Nevertheless, where capacity can be added with significant economies of scale, making cost allocations in proportion to peak loads violates well-known relationships between economics and engineering. What is missing is any tracing of the way in which the peak-load design criteria actually influence the cost incurred.

  13. New Method for Evaluating Irreversible Adsorption and Stationary Phase Bleed in Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bob W.; Wright, Cherylyn W.

    2012-10-26

    A novel method for the evaluation of gas chromatographic (GC) column inertness has been developed using a tandem GC approach. Typically column inertness is measured by analyte peak shape evaluation. In general, silica, glass, and metal surfaces are chemically reactive and can cause analyte adsorption, which typically is observed as chromatographic peak tailing. Adsorption processes produce broad, short chromatographic peaks that confound peak area determinations because a significant portion can reside in the noise. In addition, chromatographic surfaces and stationary phases can irreversibly adsorb certain analytes without obvious degradation of peak shape. The inertness measurements described in this work specifically determine the degree of irreversible adsorption behavior of specific target compounds at levels ranging from approximately 50 picograms to 1 nanogram on selected gas chromatographic columns. Chromatographic columns with 5% phenylmethylsiloxane, polyethylene glycol (wax), trifluoropropylsiloxane, and 78% cyanopropylsiloxane stationary phases were evaluated with a variety of phosphorus- and sulfur- containing compounds selected as test compounds due to their ease of adsorption and importance in trace analytical detection. In addition, the method was shown effective for characterizing column bleed.

  14. The association of forced expiratory volume in one second and forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity, peak expiratory flow parameters, and blood eosinophil counts in exercise-induced bronchospasm in children with mild asthma

    PubMed Central

    Tahan, Fulya; Gungor, Hatice Eke

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), which describes acute airway narrowing that occurs as a result of exercise, is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is the most commonly used spirometric test in the diagnosis of EIB in exercise challenge in asthma. Other parameters such as forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity (FEF50%) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) are used less often in the diagnosis of EIB. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of FEV1 and FEF50%, PEF parameters, blood eosinophil counts in EIB in children with mild asthma. Methods Sixty-seven children (male: 39, female: 28) with mild asthma were included in this study. Pulmonary functions were assessed before and at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after exercise. The values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, PEF, and blood eosinophil counts were evaluated in EIB in children with mild asthma. Results There was a positive correlation between FEV1 with FEF50% and PEF values (p<0.05; FEF50%, r=0.68; PEF, r=0.65). Also, a positive correlation was found between blood eosinophil counts and the values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, and PEF (p<0.05; FEV1, r=0.54; FEF50%, r=0.42; PEF, r=0.26). In addition to these correlations, in the exercise negative group for FEV1, the FEF50% and PEF values decreased more than the cutoff values in 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Conclusion According to the presented study, eosinophil may play a major role in the severity of EIB in mild asthma. FEF50% and PEF values can decrease in response to exercise without changes in FEV1 in mild asthmatic patients. PMID:25938074

  15. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  16. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  17. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  18. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, T.G.; Ives, J.T.

    1993-12-28

    A method and apparatus are presented for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means. 16 figures.

  19. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, Thomas G.; Ives, Jeffrey T.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means.

  20. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  1. Ask the experts: chromatographic baselines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; James, Christopher A; Scott, Rebecca; Woolf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Bioanalysis invited a selection of leading researchers to express their views on chromatographic baseline assignment in the bioanalytical laboratory. The topics discussed include the challenges presented with ensuring automated baseline assignment is correct, when reintegration is necessary, regulation and consistency in terminology. Their enlightening responses provide a valuable insight into developing an industry consensus towards reintegration. An accompanying commentary article in this issue, authored by Howard Hill and colleagues (Huntingdon Life Sciences), provides background to this much debated topic.

  2. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  3. Systematic Robustness Testing of a Liquid Chromatographic Method: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Mannemala, Sai Sandeep; Kannappan, Valliappan

    2015-01-01

    Robustness testing of a method plays a crucial role in establishing its reliability. It examines the potential sources of variability in one or more responses of the proposed method. In this study, the robustness testing of a method proposed for simultaneous determination of warfarin and its two process related impurities was evaluated by using two level, fractional factorial design. Factors that are sensitive to a variation during method transfer were selected as independent variables [aqueous content (range: 39-43%, v/v), concentration of acetic acid (range: 0.08-0.12%, v/v), flow rate (range: 0.93-1.33 mL/min), and wavelength (range: 218-222 nm)]. Variables that determine the quality of separation, viz., retention factor of the first peak, resolution between the critical peak pair, tailing factor of warfarin, and total analysis time were selected as responses. Robustness was assessed by graphical (half normal probability and Pareto plots) and statistical (analysis of variance) methods. It was found that, among the studied variables, aqueous content had a significant effect on capacity factor and analysis time. Furthermore, non-significant intervals for significant factors were established by contour profiling. This study demonstrated the significance of experimental design and other statistical tools in understanding the effects of investigating factors of the chromatographic system and in defining their limits. PMID:26651591

  4. Improving peak shapes with counter gradients in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul G; Bassanese, Danielle N; Conlan, Xavier A; Barnett, Neil W

    2014-04-11

    To achieve the greatest peak capacity in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) a gradient should be operated in both separation dimensions. However, it is known that when an injection solvent that is stronger than the initial mobile phase composition is deleterious to peak performance, thus causing problems when cutting a portion from one gradient into another. This was overcome when coupling hydrophilic interaction with reversed phase chromatography by introducing a counter gradient that changed the solvent strength of the second dimension injection. It was found that an injection solvent composition of 20% acetonitrile in water gave acceptable results in one-dimensional simulations with an initial composition of 5% acetonitrile. When this was transferred to a 2D-HPLC separation of standards it was found that a marked improvement in peak shape was gained for the moderately retained analytes (phenol and dimethyl phthalate), some improvement for the weakly retained caffeine and very little change for the strongly retained n-propylbenzene and anthracene which already displayed good chromatographic profiles. This effect was transferred when applied to a 2D-HPLC separation of a coffee extract where the indecipherable retention profile was transformed to a successful application multidimensional chromatography with peaks occupying 71% of the separation space according to the geometric approach to factor analysis. PMID:24636564

  5. Improving peak shapes with counter gradients in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul G; Bassanese, Danielle N; Conlan, Xavier A; Barnett, Neil W

    2014-04-11

    To achieve the greatest peak capacity in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) a gradient should be operated in both separation dimensions. However, it is known that when an injection solvent that is stronger than the initial mobile phase composition is deleterious to peak performance, thus causing problems when cutting a portion from one gradient into another. This was overcome when coupling hydrophilic interaction with reversed phase chromatography by introducing a counter gradient that changed the solvent strength of the second dimension injection. It was found that an injection solvent composition of 20% acetonitrile in water gave acceptable results in one-dimensional simulations with an initial composition of 5% acetonitrile. When this was transferred to a 2D-HPLC separation of standards it was found that a marked improvement in peak shape was gained for the moderately retained analytes (phenol and dimethyl phthalate), some improvement for the weakly retained caffeine and very little change for the strongly retained n-propylbenzene and anthracene which already displayed good chromatographic profiles. This effect was transferred when applied to a 2D-HPLC separation of a coffee extract where the indecipherable retention profile was transformed to a successful application multidimensional chromatography with peaks occupying 71% of the separation space according to the geometric approach to factor analysis.

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  7. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry method for determining isotopic distributions in organic compounds used in the chemical approach to stable isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.M.; Spall, W.D.; Smith, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods have been developed to resolve benzene, benzophenone, anthracene, fluorenone, and their respective stable isotope analogs from other components by gas chromatography. The ratio of stable isotope-labeled material to natural isotopic abundance compounds is determined from the mass spectra averaged across the chromatographic peak. Both total ion and selective ion chromatographic approaches were used for relative data and comparison. 9 refs., 11 tabs.

  8. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  9. [A method for the analysis of overlapped peaks in the high performance liquid chromatogram based on spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao; Fan, Xiaoming; Huo, Shengnan; Zhou, Lili; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Mei; Zhu, Jianhua

    2011-12-01

    A method was established to analyse the overlapped chromatographic peaks based on the chromatographic-spectra data detected by the diode-array ultraviolet detector. In the method, the three-dimensional data were de-noised and normalized firstly; secondly the differences and clustering analysis of the spectra at different time points were calculated; then the purity of the whole chromatographic peak were analysed and the region were sought out in which the spectra of different time points were stable. The feature spectra were extracted from the spectrum-stable region as the basic foundation. The nonnegative least-square method was chosen to separate the overlapped peaks and get the flow curve which was based on the feature spectrum. The three-dimensional divided chromatographic-spectrum peak could be gained by the matrix operations of the feature spectra with the flow curve. The results displayed that this method could separate the overlapped peaks.

  10. Chromatographic background drift correction coupled with parallel factor analysis to resolve coelution problems in three-dimensional chromatographic data: quantification of eleven antibiotics in tap water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Jie; Wu, Hai-Long; Fu, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Juan; Li, Yuan-Na; Li, Shu-Fang; Kang, Chao; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-08-01

    Chromatographic background drift correction has been an important field of research in chromatographic analysis. In the present work, orthogonal spectral space projection for background drift correction of three-dimensional chromatographic data was described in detail and combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to resolve overlapped chromatographic peaks and obtain the second-order advantage. This strategy was verified by simulated chromatographic data and afforded significant improvement in quantitative results. Finally, this strategy was successfully utilized to quantify eleven antibiotics in tap water samples. Compared with the traditional methodology of introducing excessive factors for the PARAFAC model to eliminate the effect of background drift, clear improvement in the quantitative performance of PARAFAC was observed after background drift correction by orthogonal spectral space projection.

  11. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  12. Influence of solvents and gas chromatographic injector conditions on the detectability of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, M; Lahrz, T; Spyra, W

    2001-05-18

    We investigated the influence of four common solvents and of several liner packings of a split/splitless injector on the gas chromatographic behavior of trinitrotoluenes and related nitroaromatic compounds. The highest peaks are observed using toluene in combination with an empty liner or with a prepacked CarboFrit liner. In particular, the peaks of trinitrotoluene isomers and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene significantly decreased or even totally disappeared when using quartz wool or glass wool, even when treated with dimethylchlorosilane. Similiar peak reductions are obtained with methanol or acetonitrile. Effects of decreasing peak are accompanied by the formation of two additional products when using methanol.

  13. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  14. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  15. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  16. The gas chromatographic resolution of DL-isovaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Van Dort, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Isovaline is of cosmological interest because it is one of the 12 non-protein amino acids which have been isolated from the Murchison meteorite, and unlike the other chiral amino acids in this meteorite, it has no alpha-hydrogen at its asymmetric center and hence cannot racemize by the customary alpha-hydrogen-dependent mechanisms which engender racemization in ordinary amino acids. Experiments were conducted in which a .01 M solution of N-TFA-DL-isovalyl-L-leucine isopropyl ester in nitromethane was injected into the capillary column of a gas chromatograph coupled to a digital electronic integrator-recorder. Efflux times and integrated peak area percents are shown next to each diastereometer peak.

  17. Chromatographic separation of fructose from date syrup.

    PubMed

    Al Eid, Salah M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a process for separating fructose from a mixture of sugars containing essentially fructose and glucose, obtained from date palm fruits. The extraction procedure of date syrup from fresh dates gave a yield of 86.5% solids after vacuum drying. A process for separating fructose from an aqueous solution of date syrup involved adding the date syrup solutions (20, 30 and 40% by weight) to a chromatographic column filled with Dowex polystyrene strong cation exchange gel matrix resin Ca2 + and divinylbenzene, a functional group, sulfonic acid, particle size 320 microm, with a flow rate of 0.025 and 0.05 bed volume/min, under 30 and 70 degrees C column temperature. After the date sugar solution batch, a calculated quantity of water was added to the column. Glucose was retained by the resin more weakly than fructose and proceeded faster into the water batch flowing ahead. Three fractions were collected: a glucose-rich fraction, a return fraction, and a fructose-rich fraction. The return fraction is based on when the peaks of fructose and glucose were reached, which could be determined by means of an analyzer (polarimeter) based on the property of glucose and fructose solutions to turn the polarization level of polarized light. A high yield of fructose is obtained at 70 degrees C column temperature with a flow rate of 0.025 bed volume/min and date syrup solution containing 40% sugar concentration. The low recovery by weight obtained using date syrup solutions having a sugar concentration of 20 and 30%, encourages the use of a concentration of 40%. However, with the 40% date syrup supply the average concentrations of glucose and fructose in the return fractions were more than 40%, which can be used for diluting the thick date syrup solution extracted from dates.

  18. Chromatographic separation of fructose from date syrup.

    PubMed

    Al Eid, Salah M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a process for separating fructose from a mixture of sugars containing essentially fructose and glucose, obtained from date palm fruits. The extraction procedure of date syrup from fresh dates gave a yield of 86.5% solids after vacuum drying. A process for separating fructose from an aqueous solution of date syrup involved adding the date syrup solutions (20, 30 and 40% by weight) to a chromatographic column filled with Dowex polystyrene strong cation exchange gel matrix resin Ca2 + and divinylbenzene, a functional group, sulfonic acid, particle size 320 microm, with a flow rate of 0.025 and 0.05 bed volume/min, under 30 and 70 degrees C column temperature. After the date sugar solution batch, a calculated quantity of water was added to the column. Glucose was retained by the resin more weakly than fructose and proceeded faster into the water batch flowing ahead. Three fractions were collected: a glucose-rich fraction, a return fraction, and a fructose-rich fraction. The return fraction is based on when the peaks of fructose and glucose were reached, which could be determined by means of an analyzer (polarimeter) based on the property of glucose and fructose solutions to turn the polarization level of polarized light. A high yield of fructose is obtained at 70 degrees C column temperature with a flow rate of 0.025 bed volume/min and date syrup solution containing 40% sugar concentration. The low recovery by weight obtained using date syrup solutions having a sugar concentration of 20 and 30%, encourages the use of a concentration of 40%. However, with the 40% date syrup supply the average concentrations of glucose and fructose in the return fractions were more than 40%, which can be used for diluting the thick date syrup solution extracted from dates. PMID:16849117

  19. An open tubular ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Min; Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-01

    We describe an open tubular ion chromatograph (OTIC) that uses anion exchange latex coated 5 μm radius silica and 9.8 μm radius poly(methyl methacrylate) tubes and automated time/pressure based hydrodynamic injection for pL-nL scale injections. It is routinely possible to generate 50,000 plates or more (up to 150,000 plates/m, columns between 0.3 and 0.8 m have been used), and as such, fast separations are possible, comparable to or in some cases better than the current practice of IC. With an optimized admittance detector, nonsuppressed detection permits LODs of submicromolar to double digit micromolar for a variety of analytes. However, large volume injections are possible and can significantly improve on this. A variety of eluents, the use of organic modifiers, and variations of eluent pH can be used to tailor a given separation. The approach is discussed in the context of extraterrestrial exploration, especially Mars, where the existence of large amounts of perchlorate in the soil needs to be confirmed. These columns can survive drying and freezing, and small footprint, low power consumption, and simplicity make OTIC a good candidate for such a mission. PMID:25394230

  20. Determining orthogonal and similar chromatographic systems from the injection of mixtures in liquid chromatography-diode array detection and the interpretation of correlation coefficients color maps.

    PubMed

    Van Gyseghem, E; Crosiers, I; Gourvénec, S; Massart, D L; Vander Heyden, Y

    2004-02-13

    Generic orthogonal chromatographic systems might be helpful tools as potential starting points in the development of methods to separate impurities and the active substance in drugs with unknown impurity profiles. The orthogonality of 38 chromatographic systems was evaluated from weighted-average-linkage dendrograms and color maps, both based on the correlation coefficients between the retention factors on the different systems. On each chromatographic system, 68 drug substances were injected as mixtures of three or four components to increase the throughput. The (overlapping) peaks were identified and resolved with a peak purity algorithm, orthogonal projection approach (OPA). The visualization techniques applied allowed a simple evaluation of orthogonal and (groups of) similar systems.

  1. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  2. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  3. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  4. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  5. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  6. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  7. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  8. On the trail of double peak hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Hissler, Christophe; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Juilleret, Jérôme; François Iffly, Jean; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    and the plateau) equally contribute to the generation of delayed peaks in double peak hydrographs. We found evidence of catchment storage being a dominant control on the delayed peak activation. The amount of this storage threshold was consistent over a 3-year period. Hillslopes were connected to the stream at low discharge values, whereas the plateau contribution to discharge was significant when storage reached a certain threshold value. The latter seems to trigger the generation of the delayed peak in the double peak events. We also observed a non-linear relationship between storage and discharge, which leads to hysteretic relationships between both variables. During single peak hydrographs and first peaks in double peak hydrographs discharge increases faster and peaks before catchment storage, resulting in counter-clockwise hysteretic loops. This was explained by the fact that these runoff peaks are generated by precipitation falling directly into the stream or near stream locations, and/or by the contribution of water flowing through preferential flowpaths that quickly reached the stream network. When catchment storage exceeded the threshold for the generation of double peak hydrographs, events showed clockwise hysteretic loops. It is the stored water in the catchment that will peak first and consequently generate the delayed peak in the hydrograph as a result of the capacity exceedance of a subsurface storage.

  9. Peptidoglycan at its peaks: how chromatographic analyses can reveal bacterial cell-wall structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Samantha M.; De Pedro, Miguel A.; Cava, Felipe; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall is a unique macromolecule responsible for both shape determination and cellular integrity under osmotic stress in virtually all bacteria. A quantitative understanding of the relationships between PG architecture, morphogenesis, immune system activation, and pathogenesis can provide molecular-scale insights into the function of proteins involved in cell-wall synthesis and cell growth. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) has played an important role in our understanding of the structural and chemical complexity of the cell wall by providing an analytical method to quantify differences in chemical composition. Here, we present a primer on the basic chemical features of wall structure that can be revealed through HPLC, along with a description of the applications of HPLC PG analyses for interpreting the effects of genetic and chemical perturbations to a variety of bacterial species in different environments. We describe the physical consequences of different PG compositions on cell shape, and review complementary experimental and computational methodologies for PG analysis. Finally, we present a partial list of future targets of development for HPLC and related techniques. PMID:23679048

  10. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  11. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  12. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  13. A Peak of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color rendering of an image taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a view of the peak-like outcrop atop 'West Spur.' Spirit will attempt to drive up the north slope of the 'Columbia Hills' to reach similar rock outcrops and investigate the composition of the hills. The image was taken on sol 178 (July 4, 2004) using the camera's 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  14. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  15. Simple automatic strategy for background drift correction in chromatographic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Yan; Li, He-Dong; Yu, Yong-Jie; Wang, Bing; Lu, Peng; Cui, Hua-Peng; Liu, Ping-Ping; She, Yuan-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Chromatographic background drift correction, which influences peak detection and time shift alignment results, is a critical stage in chromatographic data analysis. In this study, an automatic background drift correction methodology was developed. Local minimum values in a chromatogram were initially detected and organized as a new baseline vector. Iterative optimization was then employed to recognize outliers, which belong to the chromatographic peaks, in this vector, and update the outliers in the baseline until convergence. The optimized baseline vector was finally expanded into the original chromatogram, and linear interpolation was employed to estimate background drift in the chromatogram. The principle underlying the proposed method was confirmed using a complex gas chromatographic dataset. Finally, the proposed approach was applied to eliminate background drift in liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight samples used in the metabolic study of Escherichia coli samples. The proposed method was comparable with three classical techniques: morphological weighted penalized least squares, moving window minimum value strategy and background drift correction by orthogonal subspace projection. The proposed method allows almost automatic implementation of background drift correction, which is convenient for practical use.

  16. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  17. Influence of barometric pressure on the results of chromatographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sivchenko, V.Ya.; Mal'tsev, E.K.; Voloshina, I.V.; Simonov, V.M.

    1986-07-01

    Changes in barometric pressure introduce an additional error to the results obtained with different types of gas analyzers. These errors can be reduced or eliminated by technical steps or by the application of corrections to the results obtained. In this paper, the authors present the results of their determinations of correction coefficients for gases measured by the Poisk chromatograph in the range of barometric pressures from 80 to 120 kPa (from 600 to 900 mm Hg). The authors designed their investigations to simulate increased and reduced barometric pressures with respect to the calibration pressure simultaneously at the outlet from the chromatographic columns (carrier gas discarding tube) and in the dosed volume. A head in the dosing volume and in the carrier gas outlets from the columns, simulating an increase in atmospheric pressure, was created by using compressed gas from a cylinder and a regulating valve; dilution, corresponding to a decrease in atmospheric pressure, was created by a flow rate stimulator and a regulating valve. A storage capacity eliminated fluctuations of the reduced or excess pressure.

  18. Ion chromatographic determination of sulfur in fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizisin, C. S.; Kuivinen, D. E.; Otterson, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The sulfur content of fuels was determined using an ion chromatograph to measure the sulfate produced by a modified Parr bomb oxidation. Standard Reference Materials from the National Bureau of Standards, of approximately 0.2 + or - 0.004% sulfur, were analyzed resulting in a standard deviation no greater than 0.008. The ion chromatographic method can be applied to conventional fuels as well as shale-oil derived fuels. Other acid forming elements, such as fluorine, chlorine and nitrogen could be determined at the same time, provided that these elements have reached a suitable ionic state during the oxidation of the fuel.

  19. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic column packings with different particle sizes: chromatographic behavior for the quality analysis of HuanglianShangqing pill.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Li, Ying; Yang, Fangxiu; Du, Yan; Li, Yinjie; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Daoquan

    2015-02-01

    The chromatographic separation of traditional Chinese medicines is still a highly challenging task in analytical science with respect to its hundreds and thousands of chemical compounds, while increase of separation efficiency can greatly improve the separation power of chromatographic column for traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, 13 bioactive components in HuanglianShangqing pill were selected as an index to optimize the separation conditions and evaluate the system suitability of three commercially available columns packed with 1.8, 3.5, and 5.0 μm particles. The chromatographic separations were obtained by the most appropriate Eclipse Plus C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) within 45 min using gradient elution with aqueous-ammonium acetate (10 mmol/L, pH 5.0) and acetonitrile, at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and an operating temperature of 30°C. The quality of HuanglianShangqing pill was assessed through combining simultaneous quantification of 13 compounds with fingerprint analysis. For the qualitative analysis, mass spectrometry was used to confirm the 13 compounds. All the validation data conformed to the acceptable requirements. For the fingerprint analysis, 32 peaks were selected as the common peaks at 254 nm to evaluate the similarities among HuanglianShangqing pills obtained from ten manufacturers.

  1. Improving the quality of biomarker candidates in untargeted metabolomics via peak table-based alignment of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Bean, Heather D; Hill, Jane E; Dimandja, Jean-Marie D

    2015-05-15

    The potential of high-resolution analytical technologies like GC×GC/TOF MS in untargeted metabolomics and biomarker discovery has been limited by the development of fully automated software that can efficiently align and extract information from multiple chromatographic data sets. In this work we report the first investigation on a peak-by-peak basis of the chromatographic factors that impact GC×GC data alignment. A representative set of 16 compounds of different chromatographic characteristics were followed through the alignment of 63 GC×GC chromatograms. We found that varying the mass spectral match parameter had a significant influence on the alignment for poorly-resolved peaks, especially those at the extremes of the detector linear range, and no influence on well-chromatographed peaks. Therefore, optimized chromatography is required for proper GC×GC data alignment. Based on these observations, a workflow is presented for the conservative selection of biomarker candidates from untargeted metabolomics analyses.

  2. Chromatographic behaviour of steroidal saponins studied by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Porter, Elaine A; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2007-05-01

    The chromatographic behaviour of steroidal saponins found in Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Asparagus officinalis, Convallaria majalis, Digitalis purpurea and Ruscus aculeatus was studied by HPLC-MS using a C-18 reversed-phase column and aqueous acetonitrile or aqueous methanol mobile phase gradients, with or without the addition of 1% acetic acid. The behaviour was compared to that of triterpene saponins found in Aesculus hippocastanum, Centella asiatica, Panax notoginseng and Potentilla tormentilla. Inclusion of methanol in the mobile phase under acidic conditions was found to cause furostanol saponins hydroxylated at C-22 to chromatograph as broad peaks, whereas the peak shapes of the spirostanol saponins and triterpene saponins studied remained acceptable. In aqueous methanol mobile phases without the addition of acid, furostanol saponins chromatographed with good peak shape, but each C-22 hydroxylated furostanol saponin was accompanied by a second chromatographic peak identified as its C-22 methyl ether. Methanolic extracts analysed in non-acidified aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases also resolved pairs of C-22 hydroxy and C-22 methoxy furostanol saponins. The C-22 methyl ether of deglucoruscoside was found to convert to deglucoruscoside during chromatography in acidified aqueous acetonitrile, or by dissolving in water. Poor chromatography of furostanol saponins in acidified aqueous methanol is due to the interconversion of the C-22 hydroxy and C-22 methoxy forms. It is recommended that initial analysis of saponins by HPLC-MS using a C-18 stationary phase is performed using acidified aqueous acetonitrile mobile phase gradients. The existence of naturally-occurring furostanol saponins methoxylated at C-22 can be investigated with aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases and avoiding methanol in the extraction solvent. PMID:17391684

  3. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  5. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  6. Chromatographic methods in the study of autism.

    PubMed

    Żurawicz, Ewa; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Rynkowski, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    Research into biomarkers of autism is a new means of medical intervention in this disease. Chromatographic techniques, especially coupled with mass spectrometry, are widely used in determination of biomarkers and assessment of effectiveness of autism therapy owing to their sensitivity and selectivity. Among the chromatographic techniques gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, especially high-performance liquid chromatography, have found application in clinical trials. The high-performance liquid chromatography technique allows an analysis of liquid samples with a wide range of molecules, small and large, providing an opportunity to perform advanced assays within a short time frame. Gas chromatography with the appropriate preparation of samples (gaseous and liquid) and a selection of analysis conditions enables the separation of thermally stable, volatile and non-volatile organic substances in short runtimes. The chromatographic techniques that are currently used in metabolic studies in autism are designed to identify abnormalities in three areas: the metabolism of neurotransmitters, nutritional and metabolic status and manifestations of oxidative stress. This review presents a necessary theoretical introduction and examples of applications of chromatographic studies of disorder markers in autism.

  7. VALIDATION OF AN EPA METHOD FOR THE ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS USING A POLYVINYL ALCOHOL GEL RESIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the key points of a joint study between the EPA and Metrohm-Peak, Inc., on the use of polyvinyl alcohol [PVA] columns for the ion chromatographic determination of percholorate in aqueous leachates or solutions of fertilizers. A series of fertilizer samples ...

  8. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark L.

    1997-01-01

    An extraction chromatographic material for extracting metal cations from a iquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support.

  9. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1997-07-29

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  10. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1998-12-22

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methane-diphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  11. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark L.

    1998-12-22

    An extraction chromatographic material for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support.

  12. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  13. Tadpole toxicity prediction using chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pumarega, Alejandro; Amézqueta, Susana; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2015-10-30

    Toxicity has been emulated in tadpole species through chromatographic systems. The parameter studied to evaluate the non-specific toxicity of a compound is the narcosis concentration (Cnar), which is defined as the concentration needed for the immobilization of the organism. Because experimental investigation with animals is lengthy, costly, technically difficult, and ethically questionable, there is a great interest in developing surrogate physicochemical systems able to emulate biological systems to obtain the same information in a faster, more economic, and easier manner. In order to see which chromatographic systems would be able to emulate tadpole narcosis, both, tadpole narcosis data and data in several chromatographic and electrophoretic systems, were fitted to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model. Thus, by comparison of the models it was possible to see which of the chromatographic systems were more similar to the biological one. The physicochemical systems that best emulate tadpole narcosis were an HPLC system based on an immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) column, and two micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) systems based on sodium taurocholate (STC) and a mixture of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Brij 35 as surfactants. A system based on a RP18 HPLC column also was selected for comparison because it is a common column in most analytical laboratories. To establish the models, a set of compounds with known Cnar values were analyzed in the chromatographic, and electrophoretic selected systems and, then, the retention factor (k) was correlated to the concentration of narcosis. Statistics showed that the system based on STC micelles was the best to emulate toxicity in tadpoles. The robustness and predictive ability of the developed models were validated.

  14. Emergency gas-chromatographic assay of phenobarbital and phenytoin and liquid-chromatographic assay of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Shihabi, Z K

    1978-09-01

    Phenobarbital and phenytoin are extracted and concentrated in a single step, without solvent evaporation, followed by on-column methylation and gas-chromatographic quanitation. A similar extraction step for the assay of theophylline by high-pressure liquid chromatography is described. The extraction step can be completed in less than 2 min, the chromatographic step in less than 8 min. This extraction method yields clean chromatograms, avoids evaporating health-hazardous solvents, and is applicable to other drugs.

  15. Mobile phase additives for enhancing the chromatographic performance of astaxanthin on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin shows peak deformation and reduced peak area response when eluted with methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded HPLC phases. The present study tested different column manufacturers, column batches, and ten mobile phase additives including acids, bases, buffers, complexing and antioxidant agents for improvement of peak shape and peak area response. Concerning chromatographic benefits and feasibility, ammonium acetate was found to be the best additive followed by triethylamine for all columns tested. Variation of the mobile phase pH equivalent and the column temperature showed no synergistic effects on peak shape and peak area response. Results indicate that peak tailing and variation of peak area response are due to different on-column effects. Possible mechanisms of the observed phenomenon will be discussed. PMID:19051191

  16. Sunset over Twin Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. Fuzzy C-means clustering for chromatographic fingerprints analysis: A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry case study.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Bazrafshan, Alisina

    2016-03-18

    Fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) is proposed as a promising method for the clustering of chromatographic fingerprints of complex samples, such as essential oils. As an example, secondary metabolites of 14 citrus leaves samples are extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The obtained chromatographic fingerprints are divided to desired number of chromatographic regions. Owing to the fact that chromatographic problems, such as elution time shift and peak overlap can significantly affect the clustering results, therefore, each chromatographic region is analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to address these problems. Then, the resolved elution profiles are used to make a new data matrix based on peak areas of pure components to cluster by FCM. The FCM clustering parameters (i.e., fuzziness coefficient and number of cluster) are optimized by two different methods of partial least squares (PLS) as a conventional method and minimization of FCM objective function as our new idea. The results showed that minimization of FCM objective function is an easier and better way to optimize FCM clustering parameters. Then, the optimized FCM clustering algorithm is used to cluster samples and variables to figure out the similarities and dissimilarities among samples and to find discriminant secondary metabolites in each cluster (chemotype). Finally, the FCM clustering results are compared with those of principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Kohonon maps. The results confirmed the outperformance of FCM over the frequently used clustering algorithms.

  18. Boson Peaks in Crystals and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhansl, James

    2004-03-01

    In spite of the impression that phonon physics had been well understood by the mid 1900's, particularly with the advent of inelastic neutron scattering, when a number of workers in the later 1900's measured the low temperature heat capacity of some glasses they found, on comparing with Debye theory, a large peaked excess density of states in the energy region 0.1-0.5 Tdeb. The states obeyed boson statistics with variation of T, thus the "boson peak". Over the period after Born, so many measurements of heat capacity on crystals followed Debye theory so well, "within a few percent", that these newer results on glasses were then presented with great excitement to indicate the presence of very complex non-phonon states due to the loss of long range order. For several decades, even until the present, the boson peak has been assumed to hold answers to the physics of the glassy state. I have attempted to understand this phenomenon over the past several years, by careful quantitative analysis of data on materials which can be prepared in either crystalline or amorphous form, e.g. Ge. To my surprise; first, purely from experimental data, many good crystalline materials also have boson peaks essentially identical to those in their amorphous form; loss of long range order certainly does not occur there nor is relevant!! Second, in fact, given the neutron data for Ge, a semi-quantitative thermodynamic Green's function can produce the crystalline boson peak. In short, the boson peaks are not special physical excitations associated with glassy materials, but rather are artifacts of questionable data interpretation approximations. Many experimental data will be cited, as well as the quartz anomaly.

  19. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  20. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Separation of substrates and closely related glucuronide metabolites using various chromatographic modes.

    PubMed

    Romand, Stéphanie; Rudaz, Serge; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-02-26

    The aim of this study was to assess the retention and selectivity of a cocktail of 10 substrates of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) and their respective glucuronides using four chromatographic approaches. For this purpose, seven different stationary phases were employed in reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), two in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), one in aqueous normal phase chromatography (ANPC) and four in subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Highly orthogonal separations were achieved with these chromatographic modes. Hydrophobic interactions mainly governed the retention of the substrates and their polar glucuronides in RPLC despite the use of different chemical stationary phase bonding, involving additional possible interactions. In ANPC, atypical separations and poor peak shapes were observed with the selected compounds. In HILIC and SFC conditions, the metabolites were more retained than the substrates because of the polarity increase related to the glucuronic acid moiety. For the latter, a very high proportion of organic solvent (up to 80%) was required to elute the glucuronides that often displayed poor peak shapes. Finally, the selectivity of nine chromatographic systems was compared for the separation of isomeric and diastereoisomeric compounds. The stationary phases used in RPLC mode were more selective towards the two positional isomers of morphine glucuronides since they possess distinct lipophilicity. HILIC and SFC columns were found to be promising for the separation of a critical diastereoisomers pair, namely epitestosterone-glucuronide and testosterone-glucuronide. PMID:26818236

  2. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D assay. Evalution of chromatographic and non-chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Skinner, R K; Wills, M R

    1977-11-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is described in which normal human serum is used as the source of binding protein. A serum sample is extracted with diethyl ether/methanol and then chromatographed using silica gel. Validation of the method is reported. Silica gel chromatography is compared with LH20 chromatography. The method is also compared with extraction techniques using diethyl ether and ethanol without subsequent chromatography. It is concluded that chromatography with either silica gel or LH20 is essential. The non-chromatographic methods investigated, in addition to giving much higher values than chromatographic methods, did not meet validation requirements with respect to accuracy and behaviour of samples on dilution.

  3. Chromatographic fingerprint similarity analysis for pollutant source identification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juan-Ping; Ni, Hong-Gang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a similarity analysis method was proposed to evaluate the source-sink relationships among environmental media for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were taken as the representative contaminants. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis has been widely used in the fields of natural products chemistry and forensic chemistry, but its application to environmental science has been limited. We established a library of various sources of media containing contaminants (e.g., plastics), recognizing that the establishment of a more comprehensive library allows for a better understanding of the sources of contamination. We then compared an environmental complex mixture (e.g., sediment, soil) with the profiles in the library. These comparisons could be used as the first step in source tracking. The cosine similarities between plastic and soil or sediment ranged from 0.53 to 0.68, suggesting that plastic in electronic waste is an important source of PBDEs in the environment, but it is not the only source. A similarity analysis between soil and sediment indicated that they have a source-sink relationship. Generally, the similarity analysis method can encompass more relevant information of complex mixtures in the environment than a profile-based approach that only focuses on target pollutants. There is an inherent advantage to creating a data matrix containing all peaks and their relative levels after matching the peaks based on retention times and peak areas. This data matrix can be used for source identification via a similarity analysis without quantitative or qualitative analysis of all chemicals in a sample. PMID:26440782

  4. Chromatographic fingerprint similarity analysis for pollutant source identification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juan-Ping; Ni, Hong-Gang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a similarity analysis method was proposed to evaluate the source-sink relationships among environmental media for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were taken as the representative contaminants. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis has been widely used in the fields of natural products chemistry and forensic chemistry, but its application to environmental science has been limited. We established a library of various sources of media containing contaminants (e.g., plastics), recognizing that the establishment of a more comprehensive library allows for a better understanding of the sources of contamination. We then compared an environmental complex mixture (e.g., sediment, soil) with the profiles in the library. These comparisons could be used as the first step in source tracking. The cosine similarities between plastic and soil or sediment ranged from 0.53 to 0.68, suggesting that plastic in electronic waste is an important source of PBDEs in the environment, but it is not the only source. A similarity analysis between soil and sediment indicated that they have a source-sink relationship. Generally, the similarity analysis method can encompass more relevant information of complex mixtures in the environment than a profile-based approach that only focuses on target pollutants. There is an inherent advantage to creating a data matrix containing all peaks and their relative levels after matching the peaks based on retention times and peak areas. This data matrix can be used for source identification via a similarity analysis without quantitative or qualitative analysis of all chemicals in a sample.

  5. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  6. Superheated water as chromatographic eluent for parabens separation on octadecyl coated zirconia stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Paola; Buonasera, Katia; Crupi, Maria Lucia; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2007-05-01

    In this study, the use of pure water at superheated temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C, as a mobile phase for RP separation is explored. Instrumental parameters, such as temperature, flow rate, preheating and cooling, have shown significant effects on the quality of the chromatographic peaks. The properties of superheated water as an eluent were investigated by observing the chromatographic behaviour of four parabens on a carbon-clad zirconia (ZR) phase with covalently bonded octadecyl groups. Results were compared with those obtained at 30 degrees C on a silica-based phase with octadecyl groups, using water and ACN as mobile phase. The optimized method was finally applied to analyse parabens in a commercial body cream. PMID:17595947

  7. Characterization and optimization of a chromatographic process based on ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetra(methylphosphonic) acid-modified zirconia particles.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Carr, Peter W; McNeff, Clayton V; Subramanian, Anu

    2003-06-25

    The primary objective of work was to characterize, optimize and model a chromatographic process based on ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetra(methylphosphonic) acid (EDTPA)-modified zirconia particles. Zirconia particles were produced by spray-drying colloidal zirconia. Zirconia spheres produced were further classified, calcined and modified with EDTPA to yield a solid-phase support for use in bio-chromatography (r_PEZ). Specifically, the ability of r_PEZ to selectively bind and enrich IgG, IgA, and IgM from biological fluids was evaluated and demonstrated. To better understand the force of interaction between the IgG and the r_PEZ, the equilibrium disassociation constant (K(d)) was determined by static binding isotherms, as a function of temperature and by frontal analysis at different linear velocities. The maximum static binding capacity (Q(max)) was found to be in the range 55-65 mg IgG per ml of beads, and unaffected by temperature. The maximum dynamic binding capacity (Q(x)) was found to be in the range 20-12 mg IgG per ml of beads. The adsorption rate constant (k(a)) was determined by a split-peak approach to be between 982 and 3242 l mol(-1) s(-1) depending on the linear velocity. The standard enthalpy and entropy values were estimated for this interaction of IgG with this novel support. PMID:12767327

  8. A novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the formulated complex system using chromatographic fingerprints combined with some chemometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuan; Yan, Jun; Li, Yan-Chun; Kong, Bo; Lu, Hong-Bing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a novel strategy based on chromatographic fingerprints and some chemometric techniques is proposed for quantitative analysis of the formulated complex system. Here, the formulated complex system means a formulated type of complicated analytical system containing more than one kind of raw material under some concentration composition according to a certain formula. The strategy is elaborated by an example of quantitative determination of mixtures consist of three essential oils. Three key steps of the strategy are as follows: (1) remove baselines of the chromatograms; (2) align retention time; (3) conduct quantitative analysis using multivariate regression with entire chromatographic profiles. Through the determination of concentration compositions of nine mixtures arranged by uniform design, the feasibility of the proposed strategy is validated and the factors that influence the quantitative result are also discussed. This strategy is proved to be viable and the validation indicates that quantitative result obtained using this strategy mainly depends on the efficiency of the alignment method as well as chromatographic peak shape of the chromatograms. Previously, chromatographic fingerprints were only used for identification and/or recognition of some products. This work demonstrates that with the assistance of some effective chemometric techniques, chromatographic fingerprints are also potential and promising in solving quantitative problems of complex analytical systems.

  9. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  10. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  11. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  12. Packed multi-channels for parallel chromatographic separations in microchips.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea; Gaspar, Attila

    2013-08-23

    Here we report on a simple method to fabricate microfluidic chip incorporating multi-channel systems packed by conventional chromatographic particles without the use of frits. The retaining effectivities of different bottlenecks created in the channels were studied. For the parallel multi-channel chromatographic separations several channel patterns were designed. The obtained multipackings were applied for parallel separations of dyes. The implementation of several chromatographic separation units in microscopic size makes possible faster and high throughput separations.

  13. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species. PMID:25313278

  14. Use of an acoustic wave device to detect target analytes during chromatographic separations

    SciTech Connect

    Tom-Moy, M.; Doherty, T.P.; Baer, R.L.

    1995-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories has developed a proprietary acoustic wave device which permits the detection of specific analyte in a flowing system. By coupling specific chemistry to the surface of the device, the mass loading of the target analyte is detected as a shift in phase is measured in real time. In process monitoring, the analyte of interest is isolated by passing the sample through a series of chromatographic columns. Conventional HPLC systems monitor the protein peaks using UV-VIS. The peaks are collected and biochemical assays are performed to determine the specific peak of interest. We have configured our acoustic sensors to make specific chemical measurements without the use of labeled reagents or enzymes to generate a real time signal of specific analyte as it elutes from the column. The output signal can be integrated over time to yield a concentration. Such a detector has the potential to increase productivity in process chromatography in biopharmaceutical applications.

  15. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions.

    PubMed

    Andrawes, F; Holzer, G; Roedder, E; Gibson, E K; Oro, J

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These conclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusion on a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crushing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the processes involved in the history of the samples analyzed. PMID:11541990

  16. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  17. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  18. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  19. The spatial resolution of epidemic peaks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Harriet L; Riley, Steven

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of novel respiratory pathogens can challenge the capacity of key health care resources, such as intensive care units, that are constrained to serve only specific geographical populations. An ability to predict the magnitude and timing of peak incidence at the scale of a single large population would help to accurately assess the value of interventions designed to reduce that peak. However, current disease-dynamic theory does not provide a clear understanding of the relationship between: epidemic trajectories at the scale of interest (e.g. city); population mobility; and higher resolution spatial effects (e.g. transmission within small neighbourhoods). Here, we used a spatially-explicit stochastic meta-population model of arbitrary spatial resolution to determine the effect of resolution on model-derived epidemic trajectories. We simulated an influenza-like pathogen spreading across theoretical and actual population densities and varied our assumptions about mobility using Latin-Hypercube sampling. Even though, by design, cumulative attack rates were the same for all resolutions and mobilities, peak incidences were different. Clear thresholds existed for all tested populations, such that models with resolutions lower than the threshold substantially overestimated population-wide peak incidence. The effect of resolution was most important in populations which were of lower density and lower mobility. With the expectation of accurate spatial incidence datasets in the near future, our objective was to provide a framework for how to use these data correctly in a spatial meta-population model. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental spatial resolution for any pathogen-population pair. If underlying interactions between pathogens and spatially heterogeneous populations are represented at this resolution or higher, accurate predictions of peak incidence for city-scale epidemics are feasible. PMID:24722420

  20. Single-molecule insights into retention at a reversed-phase chromatographic interface.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Joshua N; Skaug, Michael J; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    The efficiency of chromatographic separations decreases markedly when peaks exhibit asymmetry (e.g., "peak tailing"). Theoretically, these effects can arise from heterogeneous adsorption kinetics. To investigate the nature and consequences of such heterogeneity, we used a combination of single-molecule imaging and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). In both single-molecule and macroscopic RPLC experiments, the stationary phase was hydrophobic end-capped (trimethylsilyl-functionalized) silica, which we exposed to different methanol/water solutions (50%-62% methanol), containing a fluorescent fatty acid analyte. Super-resolution maps based on single-molecule observations revealed rare, strong adsorption sites with activity that varied significantly with methanol concentration. The adsorption and desorption kinetics on the strong sites were heterogeneous and positively correlated, suggesting a broad underlying distribution of site binding energies. Adsorption equilibrium on the strong sites was more sensitive to solution conditions than overall retention measured in RPLC experiments, suggesting that the effect of strong sites on the overall adsorption kinetics should change with solution conditions. Interestingly, in RPLC experiments, peak tailing had a nonmonotonic dependence on methanol concentration within the range studied. Using the stochastic model of chromatography, we showed quantitatively that our single-molecule kinetic results were consistent with this macroscopic trend. This approach to identifying and quantifying adsorption sites should be useful for designing better chromatographic separations and for identifying the role of heterogeneous surface chemistry in molecular dynamics. PMID:25188676

  1. Predictability of enantiomeric chromatographic behavior on various chiral stationary phases using typical reversed phase modeling software.

    PubMed

    Wagdy, Hebatallah A; Hanafi, Rasha S; El-Nashar, Rasha M; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-09-01

    Pharmaceutical companies worldwide tend to apply chiral chromatographic separation techniques in their mass production strategy rather than asymmetric synthesis. The present work aims to investigate the predictability of chromatographic behavior of enantiomers using DryLab HPLC method development software, which is typically used to predict the effect of changing various chromatographic parameters on resolution in the reversed phase mode. Three different types of chiral stationary phases were tested for predictability: macrocyclic antibiotics-based columns (Chirobiotic V and T), polysaccharide-based chiral column (Chiralpak AD-RH), and protein-based chiral column (Ultron ES-OVM). Preliminary basic runs were implemented, then exported to DryLab after peak tracking was accomplished. Prediction of the effect of % organic mobile phase on separation was possible for separations on Chirobiotic V for several probes: racemic propranolol with 97.80% accuracy; mixture of racemates of propranolol and terbutaline sulphate, as well as, racemates of propranolol and salbutamol sulphate with average 90.46% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 98.39% for the effect of pH; and racemic warfarin with 93.45% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 99.64% for the effect of pH. It can be concluded that Chirobiotic V reversed phase retention mechanism follows the solvophobic theory. PMID:23775938

  2. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  3. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  4. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  5. Chromatographic and electrophoretic approaches in ink analysis.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, J A; Smith, F P

    1999-10-15

    Inks are manufactured from a wide variety of substances that exhibit very different chemical behaviors. Inks designed for use in different writing instruments or printing methods have quite dissimilar components. Since the 1950s chromatographic and electrophoretic methods have played important roles in the analysis of inks, where compositional information may have bearing on the investigation of counterfeiting, fraud, forgery, and other crimes. Techniques such as paper chromatography and electrophoresis, thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, gel electrophoresis, and the relatively new technique of capillary electrophoresis have all been explored as possible avenues for the separation of components of inks. This paper reviews the components of different types of inks and applications of the above separation methods are reviewed. PMID:10572985

  6. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  7. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  8. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  9. Off-peak electric heat for broiler houses

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, K.M.; Beston, T.A.; Collins, N.E.; McCarthy, G.S.

    1983-06-01

    An instrumented broiler house (5,000 bird capacity) was heated from September 1982 to February 1983 using off-peak electric energy. A storage/exchange tank containing water received heat energy from 10 PM to 6 AM and transferred heat to house air to maintain temperature. Cost of construction and operation are presented. Off-peak pricing was evaluated using our systems analysis model.

  10. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  11. Chromatographic determination of amino acids in foods.

    PubMed

    Peace, Robert W; Gilani, G Sarwar

    2005-01-01

    Amino acids in foods exist in a free form or bound in peptides, proteins, or nonpeptide bonded polymers. Naturally occurring L-amino acids are required for protein synthesis and are precursors for essential molecules, such as co-enzymes and nucleic acids. Nonprotein amino acids may also occur in animal tissues as metabolic intermediates or have other important functions. The development of bacterially derived food proteins, genetically modified foods, and new methods of food processing; the production of amino acids for food fortification; and the introduction of new plant food sources have meant that protein amino acids and amino acid enantiomers in foods can have both nutritional and safety implications for humans. There is, therefore, a need for the rapid and accurate determination of amino acids in foods. Determination of the total amino acid content of foods requires protein hydrolysis by various means that must take into account variations in stability of individual amino acids and resistance of different peptide bonds to the hydrolysis procedures. Modern methods for separation and quantitation of free amino acids either before or after protein hydrolysis include ion exchange chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. Chemical derivatization of amino acids may be required to change them into forms amenable to separation by the various chromatographic methods or to create derivatives with properties, such as fluorescence, that improve their detection. Official methods for hydrolysis and analysis of amino acids in foods for nutritional purposes have been established. LC is currently the most widely used analytical technique, although there is a need for collaborative testing of methods available. Newer developments in chromatographic methodology and detector technology have reduced sample and reagent requirements and improved identification, resolution, and sensitivity of amino acid analyses

  12. Computer monitoring, capture and analysis of gas/liquid chromatograph traces.

    PubMed

    Bulleid, N; Schofield, J

    1986-12-01

    The work described here is effectively the computerization of a gas/liquid chromatograph of the pen recorder type using a BBC microcomputer. The output from the g.l.c. can be captured by the computer in accordance with a series of parameters. The sampling rate can be altered, as can an averaging facility to reduce noise, and a threshold level to eliminate the storage of irrelevant and space-consuming data. The unprocessed readings are initially stored on the computer's floppy disk, then later retrieved and cut into smaller sections to allow maximum resolution for on-screen analysis. In the main analysis stage of the system all processing is shown graphically on the computer monitor at all stages. The principal steps in analysis involve the mathematical modelling and elimination of the solvent peak, the fixing of the retention time for each subsequent peak and its disentangling from any following peaks, and finally the calculation of the area under each individual peak. Several alternative methods are made available for disentangling peaks, which can be tried successively on a single peak then each printed out with comments for comparison later. All readings and results in table form and screen dumps of all trace images are available via a dot matrix printer.

  13. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  14. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  15. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  16. Chromatographic fingerprint investigation for quality evaluation and control of Shengui hair-growth tincture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Zhao, Chenxi; Wang, Xiaomei; Liang, Yizeng; Zeng, Yingxu; Wu, Hai; Xu, Qingsong; Lv, Huiying

    2010-03-01

    The quality assessment and control of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) has received a great deal of attention worldwide with its tremendous increasing use. Chromatographic fingerprinting is thought to be a good approach for this task and has been used for the quality assessment and control of many herbal medicines. However, there are only a few reports on the quality control of TCM preparation by chromatographic fingerprinting. In the present work, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combined with chemometric methods were used for the chromatographic fingerprint analysis and characterization of Shengui hair-growth tincture (SGHGT), which is a complex TCM prescription made from 9 herbs. Thirteen "common peaks" were identified by MS and a comparison of retention indices. The software "The Traditional Chinese Medicine Quality Control System 1.0" (TCMQCS, developed by Research Center of Modernization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Central South University) was used to evaluate the similarities. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for the classification of 23 batches of SGHGT samples provided by Hunan Fusheng Hairgrowth Pharmaceutical Factory. The 23 batches of samples made in different years had similar GC-MS fingerprints. Four clusters were obtained from PCA treatment according to their production year. The proposed method was validated in precision and repeatability through the calculation of relative retention times and relative peak areas of the 13 common compounds to the reference compound eugenol. The result indicated that the method is feasible and applicable for the quality control of SGHGT. SUPPORTING INFORMATION available online at http://www.thieme-connect.de/ejournals/toc/plantamedica. PMID:19757357

  17. A theoretical plate model accounting for slow kinetics in chromatographic elution.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Baeza, J J; García-Álvarez-Coque, M C

    2011-08-01

    The chromatographic elution has been studied from different perspectives. However, in spite of the simplicity and evident deficiencies of the plate model proposed by Martin and Synge, it has served as a basis for the characterization of columns up-to-date. This approach envisions the chromatographic column as an arbitrary number of theoretical plates, each of them consisting of identical repeating portions of mobile phase and stationary phase. Solutes partition between both phases, reaching the equilibrium. Mobile phase transference between the theoretical plates is assumed to be infinitesimally stepwise (or continuous), giving rise to the mixing of the solutions in adjacent plates. This yields an additional peak broadening, which is added to the dispersion associated to the equilibrium conditions. It is commonly assumed that when the solute concentration is sufficiently small, chromatographic elution is carried out under linear conditions, which is the case in almost all analytical applications. When the solute concentration increases above a value where the stationary phase approximates saturation (i.e. becomes overloaded), non-linear elution is obtained. In addition to overloading, another source of non-linearity can be a slow mass transfer. An extended Martin and Synge model is here proposed to include slow mass-transfer kinetics (with respect to flow rate) between the mobile phase and stationary phase. We show that there is a linear relationship between the variance and the ratio of the kinetic constants for the mass transfer in the flow direction (τ) and the mass transfer between the mobile phase and stationary phase (ν), which has been called the kinetic ratio (κ=τ/ν). The proposed model was validated with data obtained according to an approach that simulates the solute migration through the theoretical plates. An experimental approach to measure the deviation from the equilibrium conditions using the experimental peak variances and retention times at

  18. Chromatographic Separations of Enantiomers and Underivatized Oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying

    2004-01-01

    My graduate research has focused on separation science and bioanalytical analysis, which emphasized in method development. It includes three major areas: enantiomeric separations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Super/subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE); drug-protein binding behavior studies using CE; and carbohydrate analysis using liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Enantiomeric separations continue to be extremely important in the pharmaceutical industry. An in-depth evaluation of the enantiomeric separation capabilities of macrocyclic glycopeptides CSPs with SFC mobile phases was investigated using a set of over 100 chiral compounds. It was found that the macrocyclic based CSPs were able to separate enantiomers of various compounds with different polarities and functionalities. Seventy percent of all separations were achieved in less than 4 min due to the high flow rate (4.0 ml/min) that can be used in SFC. Drug-protein binding is an important process in determining the activity and fate of a drug once it enters the body. Two drug/protein systems have been studied using frontal analysis CE method. More sensitive fluorescence detection was introduced in this assay, which overcame the problem of low sensitivity that is common when using UV detection for drug-protein studies. In addition, the first usage of an argon ion laser with 257 nm beam coupled with CCD camera as a frontal analysis detection method enabled the simultaneous observation of drug fluorescence as well as the protein fluorescence. LC-ESI-MS was used for the separation and characterization of underivatized oligosaccharide mixtures. With the limits of detection as low as 50 picograms, all individual components of oligosaccharide mixtures (up to 11 glucose-units long) were baseline resolved on a Cyclobond I 2000 column and detected using ESI-MS. This system is characterized by high chromatographic

  19. A rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine in effervescent tablets.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, MaryJean; Kumar, Vimal

    2003-09-01

    A rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure is developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine extracted from an effervescent tablet. The method uses a Hypersil C18 column (5 micro m, 15 cm x 4.6 mm) for an isocratic elution in a water-methanol-acetic acid mobile phase at a wavelength of 275 nm. The tablets' buffering effects and acid neutralizing capacity require an extraction solvent of methanol-formic acid. The range of linearity for aspirin is 0.5-1.25 mg/mL, caffeine 0.065-0.195 mg/mL, and salicylic acid 0.4-6.0% of aspirin. The overall recovery is 100.2%, 100.7%, and 99.2% for aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid, respectively. Under the conditions of the method, aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid are adequately resolved with proper peak symmetry in less than 7 min.

  20. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  1. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  2. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  3. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C M; Koo, J C

    2001-01-10

    Gas chromatography is a prominent technique for separating complex gases and then analyzing the relative quantities of the separate components. This analytical technique is popular with scientists in a wide range of applications, including environmental restoration for air and water pollution, and chemical and biological analysis. Today the analytical instrumentation community is to working towards moving the analysis away from the laboratory to the point of origin of the sample (''the field'') to achieve real-time data collection and lower analysis costs. The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has developed a hand-held, real-time detection gas chromatograph (GC) through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this GC is approximately 8 pounds, and it measures 8 inches by 5 inches by 3 inches. It consumes approximately 12 watts of electrical power and has a response time on the order of 2 minutes. The current detector is a glow discharge detector with a sensitivity of parts per billion. The average retention time is about 30 to 45 seconds. Under optimum conditions, the calculated effective plate number is 40,000. The separation column in the portable GC is fabricated completely on silicon wafers. Silicon is a good thermal conductor and provides rapid heating and cooling of the column. The operational temperature can be as high as 350 degrees Celsius. The GC system is capable of rapid column temperature ramping and cooling operations. These are especially important for organic and biological analyses in the GC applications.

  4. First-generation hybrid MEMS gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Jung; Steinecker, William H; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Oborny, Michael C; Nichols, Jamie M; Agah, Masoud; Potkay, Joseph A; Chan, Helena K L; Driscoll, Jeffrey; Sacks, Richard D; Wise, Kensall D; Pang, Stella W; Zellers, Edward T

    2005-10-01

    The fabrication, assembly, and initial testing of a hybrid microfabricated gas chromatograph (microGC) is described. The microGC incorporates capabilities for on-board calibration, sample preconcentration and focused thermal desorption, temperature-programmed separations, and "spectral" detection with an integrated array of microsensors, and is designed for rapid determinations of complex mixtures of environmental contaminants at trace concentrations. Ambient air is used as the carrier gas to avoid the need for on-board gas supplies. The microsystem is plumbed through an etched-Si/glass microfluidic interconnection substrate with fused silica capillaries and employs a miniature commercial pump and valve subsystem for directing sample flow. The latest performance data on each system component are presented followed by first analytical results from the working microsystem. Tradeoffs in system performance as a function of volumetric flow rate are explored. The determination of an 11-vapor mixture of typical indoor air contaminants in less than 90 s is demonstrated with projected detection limits in the low part-per-billion concentration range for a preconcentrated air-sample volume of 0.25 L.

  5. New supervised alignment method as a preprocessing tool for chromatographic data in metabolomic studies.

    PubMed

    Struck, Wiktoria; Wiczling, Paweł; Waszczuk-Jankowska, Małgorzata; Kaliszan, Roman; Markuszewski, Michał Jan

    2012-09-21

    The purpose of this work was to develop a new aligning algorithm called supervised alignment and to compare its performance with the correlation optimized warping. The supervised alignment is based on a "supervised" selection of a few common peaks presented on each chromatogram. The selected peaks are aligned based on a difference in the retention time of the selected analytes in the sample and the reference chromatogram. The retention times of the fragments between known peaks are subsequently linearly interpolated. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been tested on a series of simulated and experimental chromatograms. The simulated chromatograms comprised analytes with a systematic or random retention time shifts. The experimental chromatographic (RP-HPLC) data have been obtained during the analysis of nucleosides from 208 urine samples and consists of both the systematic and random displacements. All the data sets have been aligned using the correlation optimized warping and the supervised alignment. The time required to complete the alignment, the overall complexity of both algorithms, and its performance measured by the average correlation coefficients are compared to assess performance of tested methods. In the case of systematic shifts, both methods lead to the successful alignment. However, for random shifts, the correlation optimized warping in comparison to the supervised alignment requires more time (few hours versus few minutes) and the quality of the alignment described as correlation coefficient of the newly aligned matrix is worse 0.8593 versus 0.9629. For the experimental dataset supervised alignment successfully aligns 208 samples using 10 prior identified peaks. The knowledge about retention times of few analytes' in the data sets is necessary to perform the supervised alignment for both systematic and random shifts. The supervised alignment method is faster, more effective and simpler preprocessing method than the correlation optimized

  6. [Assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity].

    PubMed

    Dreßing, H; Foerster, K; Leygraf, J; Schneider, F

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity require thorough knowledge of the legal framework and the relevant case law. This paper explains the concept of the legal capacity to contract and the concept of testamentary capacity with respect to German civil law. The relevance of major mental disorders for the assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity is discussed.

  7. Orthogonal chromatographic descriptors for modelling Caco-2 drug permeability.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Verstraete, T; Van Gyseghem, E; Vander Heyden, Y; Coomans, D

    2012-03-01

    The use of chromatographic descriptors as alternative for Caco-2 permeability in drug absorption screening was evaluated. Therefore, retentions were measured on 17 Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatographic systems, considered to be orthogonal or dissimilar, and an Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) system. Retentions on a Micellar Liquid Chromatography system were taken from the literature. From this set of systems, those found dissimilar for the used data set were selected. The retention factors on these systems were then used as descriptors in QSAR modelling. Modelling was performed using Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression. This resulted in a model using only two chromatographic systems with good descriptive and acceptable predictive properties. A high qualitative model was obtained by combining both chromatographic systems selected in the previous model with a lipophilicity parameter (the squared Moriguchi n-octanol/water partition coefficient) and the molecular volume.

  8. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  9. CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE AND THREE PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONAMIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromatographic and mass spectral characteristics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and three nitrogen-substituted perfluorooctanesulfonamides have been obtained. A methyl/phenol mixed phase fused silica capillary column was used for GC analysis, while a C18 reversed phase ...

  10. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques in studies on oxidative stress in autism.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Jóźwik-Pruska, Jagoda

    2016-04-15

    Healthy body is characterized by the presence of a dynamic and balanced equilibrium between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant capacity. In oxidative stress this balance is switched to reactions of oxidation leading to increased production of ROS, exceeding the capacity of physiological antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress is known to be linked to many disturbances, disorders and diseases. One of these is the autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder manifested by abnormalities in social communication and interaction, as well as by occurrence of repetitive, restricted patterns of behavior or activities. It is believed that adequate knowledge about the oxidative stress biomarkers and the possibility of their reliable measuring could be useful in broadening knowledge on various diseases including ASD. A high number of compounds have been proposed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Some of these are connected with the severity of ASD. The present review gives a summary of the chromatographic techniques used for the determination of biomarkers for oxidative stress in autism, and of other compounds important in this context. The first part of the review focuses on the correlation between oxidative stress and autism. The second part describes applications of chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods to the analysis of different metabolites connected with oxidative stress in biological fluids of autistic children. Advantages as well as disadvantages of the application of these methods for the analysis of different types of oxidative stress biomarkers are discussed.

  11. Ion chromatographic separation of inorganic ions using a combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic column and cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kaori; Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    A combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) column and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (WCX) column was used for simultaneous separation of inorganic anions and cations by ion chromatography (IC). Firstly, the capability of HILIC column for the separation of analyte ions was evaluated under acidic eluent conditions. The columns used were SeQuant ZIC-HILIC (ZIC-HILIC) with a sulfobetaine-zwitterion stationary phase (ZIC-HILIC) and Acclaim HILIC-10 with a diol stationary phase (HILIC-10). When using tartaric acid as the eluent, the HILIC columns indicated strong retentions for anions, based on ion-pair interaction. Especially, HILIC-10 could strongly retain anions compared with ZIC-HILIC. The selectivity for analyte anions of HILIC-10 with 5 mmol/L tartaric acid eluent was in the order of I(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > H2PO4(-). However, since HILIC-10 could not separate analyte cations, a WCX column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was connected after the HILIC column in series. The combination column system of HILIC and WCX columns could successfully separate ten ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, H2PO4(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO3(-) and I(-)) with elution of 4 mmol/L tartaric acid plus 8 mmol/L 18-crown-6. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of analyte ions by the system were in the ranges of 0.02% - 0.05% in retention times and 0.18% - 5.3% in peak areas through three-time successive injections. The limits of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.24 - 0.30 micromol/L for the cations and 0.31 - 1.2 micromol/L for the anions. This system was applied for the simultaneous determination of the cations and the anions in a vegetable juice sample with satisfactory results.

  12. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  13. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  15. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  16. Fundulus heteroclitus gonadotropins.5: Small scale chromatographic fractionation of pituitary extracts into components with different steroidogenic activities using homologous bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Wai Peter; Petrino, Teresa R; Wallace, Robin A

    2004-01-01

    Fractionation and characterization of gonadotropins (GtH) from Fundulus heteroclitus pituitary extracts were carried out using a biocompatible liquid chromatographic procedure (Pharmacia FPLC system). Chromatographic fractions were monitored for gonadotropic activities (induction of oocyte maturation and steroid production) using homologous follicle bioassays in vitro. Size-exclusion chromatography eluted gonadotropic activity in one major protein peak (Mr ~ 30,000). Anion-exchange and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography (HIC) yielded two distinct peaks of 17beta-estradiol (E2)- and 17alpha-hydroxy,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP)-promoting activity with associated oocyte maturation. Two-dimensional chromatography (chromatofocusing followed by HIC) resolved pituitary extracts into two active fractions; both induced E2 synthesis, but one was relatively poor in eliciting DHP and testosterone production. Thus, using homologous bioassays, at least two quantitatively different gonadotropic (steroidogenic) activities: an E2-promoting gonadotropin (GtH I-like) and a DHP-promoting gonadotropin (GtH II-like), which has a lower isoelectric point but greater hydrophobicity than the former, can be distinguished from F. heteroclitus pituitaries by a variety of chromatographic procedures. This study complements previous biochemical and molecular data in F. heteroclitus and substantiates the duality of GtH function in a multiple-spawning teleost. PMID:15040801

  17. Combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions to identify biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

    PubMed

    Kuromitsu, Sadao; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Hiramoto, Masashi; Yuri, Masatoshi; Naitou, Masanori; Nakamura, Naoto; Kawabata, Shigeki; Kobori, Masato; Katoh, Masao; Furuchi, Kiyoshi; Mita, Haruhisa; Yamada, Tetsuo

    2009-06-01

    Purification of biologically active proteins from complex biological sources is a difficult task, usually requiring large amounts of sample and many separation steps. We found an active substance in a serum response element-dependent luciferase reporter gene bioassay in interstitial cystitis urine that we attempted to purify with column chromatography and the bioassay. With anion-exchange Mono Q and C4 reversed-phase columns, apparently sharp active peaks were obtained. However, more than 20 kinds of proteins were identified from the active fractions with MS, indicating that the purification was not complete. As further purification was difficult, we chose a candidate molecule by means of studying the correlation between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses of chromatographic fractions near the active peaks. As a result, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was nominated as a candidate molecule among the identified proteins because the elution profile of EGF was consistent with that of the bioassay, and the correlation coefficient of EGF between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses was the highest among all the identified proteins. With recombinant EGF and anti-EGF and anti-EGF receptor antibodies, EGF was confirmed to be the desired substance in interstitial cystitis urine. This approach required only 20 ml of urine sample and two column chromatographic steps. The combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions may be useful for identifying biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

  18. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  19. Chemiluminescent photon yields measured in the flame photometric detector on chromatographic peaks containing sulfur, phosphorus, manganese, ruthenium, iron or selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aue, Walter A.; Singh, Hameraj

    2001-05-01

    Photon yields — the number of photons generated per analyte atom — are of obvious analytical and mechanistic importance in flame chemiluminescence. However, such numbers are unavailable for spectral detectors in gas chromatography (as well as for most conventional spectroscopic systems). In this study, photon yields have been determined for the chemiluminescence of several elements in the flame photometric detector (FPD). The number of photons generated per atom of FPD-active element was 2×10 -3 for sulfur (emitter S 2*, test compound thianaphthene), 3×10 -3 for phosphorus [HPO*, tris(pentafluorophenyl)phosphine], 8×10 -3 for manganese (Mn*, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl), 3×10 -3 for ruthenium (emitter unknown, ruthenocene), 4×10 -5 for iron (Fe*, ferrocene) and 2×10 -4 for selenium (Se 2*, dimethylbenzselenazole). Total flows, maximum thermocouple temperatures, and visible flame volumes have also been estimated for each element under signal/noise-optimized conditions in order to provide a database for kinetic calculations.

  20. Separation and identification of various vulcanization agents and antioxidants in two types of rubber by chromatographic and spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, S; Hamon, M; Leleu, E

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to separate and identify by chromatographic and spectrometric methods, the various allergenic vulcanization agents and antioxidants used in the manufacture of industrial rubber. Specimens of elastomers were manufactured specially for this study. The specificity of the gas chromatographic method developed allows separation of all the manufacturing additives in the selected rubber types after one injection only, even though they belong to extremely varied chemical categories. The GLC method was coupled with mass spectrometry, which permitted identification of the peaks obtained and the study of the fragmentation of the 4 reference products under various conditions. Separation by TLC was performed in parallel on the same extracts, allowing rapid identification of the products tested for, and showed new spots after vulcanization.

  1. Quantitative analysis combined with chromatographic fingerprint for comprehensive evaluation of Xiaoer Chaigui Tuire granules by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ming; Nie, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of eight major components combined with chromatographic fingerprint based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the quality evaluation of Xiaoer Chaigui Tuire granules (XCTG), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparation. Each compound was analyzed by comparing its retention time and UV spectrum of each chromatographic peak with the corresponding retention time and UV spectrum of each standard compound. Baseline separation was achieved on an Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column with gradient elution of acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) phosphoric acid. The developed method was validated by linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and recovery and was subsequently applied to quality evaluation of 12 batches of XCTG with similarity analysis, principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Quantitative analysis combined with HPLC fingerprint could offer an efficient, reliable and practical approach for quality evaluation of XCTG.

  2. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  3. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  4. Reduction in peak oxygen uptake after prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1982-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnitude of the reduction in peak oxygen uptake (VO2) after bed rest is directly proportional to the level of pre-bed rest peak VO2 is tested. Complete pre and post-bed rest working capacity and body weight data were obtained from studies involving 24 men (19-24 years old) and 8 women (23-34 years old) who underwent bed rest for 14-20 days with no remedial treatments. Results of regression analyses of the present change in post-bed rest peak VO2 on pre-bed rest peak VO2 with 32 subjects show correlation coefficients of -0.03 (NS) for data expressed in 1/min and -0.17 for data expressed in ml/min-kg. In addition, significant correlations are found that support the hypothesis only when peak VO2 data are analyzed separately from studies that utilized the cycle ergometer, particularly with subjects in the supine position, as opposed to data obtained from treadmill peak VO2 tests. It is concluded that orthostatic factors, associated with the upright body position and relatively high levels of physical fitness from endurance training, appear to increase the variability of pre and particularly post-bed rest peak VO2 data, which would lead to rejection of the hypothesis.

  5. Preparation and characterization of high capacity, strong cation-exchange fiber based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Schwellenbach, Jan; Taft, Florian; Villain, Louis; Strube, Jochen

    2016-05-20

    Motivated by the demand for more economical capture and polishing steps in downstream processing of protein therapeutics, a novel strong cation-exchange chromatography stationary phase based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) high surface area short-cut fibers is presented. The fiber surface is modified by grafting glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and a subsequent derivatization leading to sulfonic acid groups. The obtained cation-exchange fibers have been characterized and compared to commercially available resin and membrane based adsorbers. High volumetric static binding capacities for lysozyme (90mg/mL) and polyclonal human IgG (hIgG, 92mg/mL) were found, suggesting an efficient multi-layer binding within the grafted hydrogel layer. A packed bed of randomly orientated fibers has been tested for packing efficiency, permeability and chromatographic performance. High dynamic binding capacities for lysozyme (50mg/mL) and hIgG (54mg/mL) were found nearly independent of the bed-residence time, revealing a fast mass-transport mechanism. Height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) values in the order of 0.1 cm and a peak asymmetry factor (AF) of 1.8 have been determined by tracer experiments. Additionally inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) revealed a bimodal structure within the fiber bed, consisting of larger transport channels, formed by the voidage between the fibers, and a hydrogel layer with porous properties. PMID:27106396

  6. Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.) honey quality parameters: chromatographic fingerprints, chemical biomarkers, antioxidant capacity and others.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Piotr Marek; Jerković, Igor; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Congiu, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The samples of cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.) honey from Poland were subjected to ultrasonic solvent extraction applying the mixture of pentane and diethyl ether 1:2v/v (solvent A) as well as dichloromethane (solvent B). The major compounds of the extracts (analysed by GC-MS/GC-FID) were C13 and C9 norisoprenoids. Among them, (E)-3-oxo-retro-α-ionol (2.4-23.9% (solvent A); 3.9-14.4% (solvent B)) and (Z)-3-oxo-retro-α-ionol (3.7-29.9% (solvent A); 8.4-20.4% (solvent B)) were found to be useful as chemical biomarkers of this honey. Other abundant compounds were: methyl syringate (0.0-31.4% (solvent A); 0.0-25.4% (solvent B)) and 3-hydroxy-4-phenylbutan-2-one (1.6-15.8% (solvent A); 5.1-15.1% (solvent B)). HPLC-DAD analysis of the samples revealed lumichrome (4.7-10.0mg/kg), riboflavin (1.9-2.7mg/kg) and phenyllactic acid (112.1-250.5mg/kg) as typical compounds for this honey type. Antioxidant and antiradical properties as well as total phenolic content of the samples were found to be rather moderate by FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power), DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical) and Folin-Ciocalteu assays, respectively. Additionally, CIE L(∗)a(∗)b(∗)C(∗)h chromatic coordinates were evaluated. Colour attributes of cornflower honey were characterised by elevated values of L(∗) and particularly high values of b(∗) and h coordinates, which correspond to medium bright honey with intense yellow colour.

  7. Simulation of elution profiles for two-dimensional dynamic gas chromatographic experiments.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver; Shellie, Robert; Marriott, Philip; Schurig, Volker

    2003-09-01

    The interconversion of E and Z isomers of acetaldoxime 1 and butyraldoxime 2 have been investigated by comprehensive two-dimensional dynamic gas chromatography (DGCxDGC) and computer simulation. Time-resolved cryogenic modulation is capable of revealing the precise isomeric ratio as a fine structure under the dynamic elution profile, which is characterized in one-dimensional experiments by a plateau formation or peak coalescence caused by interconversion of the isomers during the separation process. The chromatographic theoretical plate model has been extended for the computer simulation of comprehensive two-dimensional dynamic chromatographic experiments. A novel program, ChromWin 2D, based on the new algorithm has been developed for computer simulation to evaluate and predict the elution profiles of DGCxDGC experiments. ChromWin 2D allows the determination of rate constants and barriers of isomerization, epimerization, and enantiomerization processes occurring during chromatographic separations. The Eyring activation parameters of the E/Z and Z/E isomerization barriers in the presence of the stationary phase BP21 (poly(ethylene glycol) terephthalate terminated) were determined by temperature-dependent experiments between 80 and 90 degrees C for 1 and 70 and 130 degrees C for 2. The thermodynamic Gibbs free energy of the E/Z equilibrium of the isomers has been determined from the time-resolved chromatograms by cryogenic modulation. The method described here constitutes a new and important tool for the determination of isomerization barriers, which are of great interest, for example, for the quantitative determination of derivatized aldehydes, such as dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives, in trace analysis.

  8. Accuracy of peak VO2 assessments in career firefighters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of on-duty death in United States firefighters. Accurately assessing cardiopulmonary capacity is critical to preventing, or reducing, cardiovascular events in this population. Methods A total of 83 male firefighters performed Wellness-Fitness Initiative (WFI) maximal exercise treadmill tests and direct peak VO2 assessments to volitional fatigue. Of the 83, 63 completed WFI sub-maximal exercise treadmill tests for comparison to directly measured peak VO2 and historical estimations. Results Maximal heart rates were overestimated by the traditional 220-age equation by about 5 beats per minute (p < .001). Peak VO2 was overestimated by the WFI maximal exercise treadmill and the historical WFI sub-maximal estimation by ~ 1MET and ~ 2 METs, respectively (p < 0.001). The revised 2008 WFI sub-maximal treadmill estimation was found to accurately estimate peak VO2 when compared to directly measured peak VO2. Conclusion Accurate assessment of cardiopulmonary capacity is critical in determining appropriate duty assignments, and identification of potential cardiovascular problems, for firefighters. Estimation of cardiopulmonary fitness improves using the revised 2008 WFI sub-maximal equation. PMID:21943154

  9. Chromatographic behaviors of proteins on cation-exchange column.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Guo-Liang; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2004-12-01

    A weak cation-exchanger (XIDACE-WCX) has been synthesized by the indirect method. The chromatographic characteristics of the synthesized packing was studied in detail. The standard protein mixture and lysozyme from egg white were separated with the prepared chromatographic column. The chromatographic thermodynamics of proteins was studied in a wide temperature range. Thermodynamic parameters standard enthalpy change (deltaH0) and standard entropy change (deltaS0) and compensation temperature (beta) at protein denaturation were determined in the chromatographic system. By using obtained deltaS0, the conformational change of proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationship between deltaH0 and deltaS0 can be used to identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in the weak cation-exchange chromatography. The interaction between weak cation-exchanger and metal ions was investigated. Several metal chelate columns were prepared. The effects of introducing metal ion into the naked column on protein retention and the retention mechanism of proteins in the metal chalet affinity chromatography were discussed. PMID:15689030

  10. Peak clustering in two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection based on theoretical calculation of two-dimensional peak shapes: the 2DAid approach.

    PubMed

    van Stee, Leo L P; Brinkman, Udo A Th

    2011-10-28

    A method is presented to facilitate the non-target analysis of data obtained in temperature-programmed comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF-MS). One main difficulty of GC×GC data analysis is that each peak is usually modulated several times and therefore appears as a series of peaks (or peaklets) in the one-dimensionally recorded data. The proposed method, 2DAid, uses basic chromatographic laws to calculate the theoretical shape of a 2D peak (a cluster of peaklets originating from the same analyte) in order to define the area in which the peaklets of each individual compound can be expected to show up. Based on analyte-identity information obtained by means of mass spectral library searching, the individual peaklets are then combined into a single 2D peak. The method is applied, amongst others, to a complex mixture containing 362 analytes. It is demonstrated that the 2D peak shapes can be accurately predicted and that clustering and further processing can reduce the final peak list to a manageable size.

  11. Method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Gjerde, Douglas T.; Schmuckler, Gabriella

    1981-06-09

    An improved apparatus and method for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single eluent and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  12. Headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl bromide in food ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, J.W.; Broge, J.M.; Schroeder, J.P.; Bowers, R.H.; Larson, P.A.; Burns, N.M.

    1985-11-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic (GC) method, which can be automated, has been developed for determination of methyl bromide. This method has been applied to wheat, flour, cocoa, and peanuts. Samples to be analyzed are placed in headspace sample vials, water is added, and the vials are sealed with Teflon-lined septa. After an appropriate equilibration time at 32 degrees C, the samples are analyzed within 10 h. A sample of the headspace is withdrawn and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Methyl bromide levels were quantitated by comparison of peak area with a standard. The standard was generated by adding a known amount of methyl bromide to a portion of the matrix being analyzed and which was known to be methyl bromide free. The detection limit of the method was 0.4 ppb. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.5% for wheat, 8.3% for flour, 3.3% for cocoa, and 11.6% for peanuts.

  13. Molten salt thermal energy storage for utility peaking loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, A.; Haslett, R.; Joyce, J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the use of thermal energy storage (TES) in molten salts to increase the capacity of power plants. Five existing fossil and nuclear electric utility plants were selected as representative of current technology. A review of system load diagrams indicated that TES to meet loads over 95% of peak was a reasonable goal. Alternate TES heat exchanger locations were evaluated, showing that the stored energy should be used either for feedwater heating or to generate steam for an auxiliary power cycle. Specific salts for each concept are recommended. Design layouts were prepared for one plant, and it was shown that a TES tube/shell heat exchanger system could provide about 7% peaking capability at lower cost than adding steam generation capacity. Promising alternate heat exchanger concepts were also identified.

  14. [Chromatographic separation of aminoglutethimide enantiomers on cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) chiral stationary phase].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoiian; Gong, Rujin; Li, Ping; Yu, Jianguo

    2014-08-01

    Aminoglutethimide (AG) has been used clinically as a drug in the treatment of hormone-dependent metastatic breast cancer. It was reported that S-(-)-AG enantiomer had small activity and sometimes might cause side effects. Therefore, it was of great significance to obtain the high-purity R-(+)-AG by enantioseparation. In this work, aminoglutethimide enantiomers were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using an analytical column which was packed with cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) stationary phase (Chiralcel OD-H). The solubilities of racemic AG in two different solvent compositions, n-hexane/ethanol and n-hexane/isopropanol, were measured, separately. The effects of alcohol content and monoethanolamine additive on the separation performance of racemic AG by HPLC were investigated. According to the experiments, n-hexane-ethanol (30:70, v/v) with 0.1% monoethanolamine additive was selected as the mobile phase. The separation factor, resolution, asymmetry factor, number of theoretical plates and maximum column capacity were measured and analyzed for the chromatographic separation of racemic AG at a flow-rate of 0. 6 mL/min and column temperature of 25-40 °C, with Chiralcel OD-H as stationary phase and n-hexane-ethanol (30:70, v/v) with 0. 1% monoethanolamine as mobile phase. This work provides the basic information of chromatographic separation for the batch and continuous production of aminoglutethimide enantiomers.

  15. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  16. Biospecific affinity chromatographic purification of octopine dehydrogenase from molluscs.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, P; Griffin, T; O'Carra, P

    1997-02-01

    The development of a biospecific affinity chromatographic method for the purification of octopine dehydrogenase from molluscs is described. The method utilizes immobilized NAD+ derivatives in conjunction with soluble specific substrates to promote binding. Using this method, octopine dehydrogenase has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in a single chromatographic step from three different marine invertebrate sources [the queen scallop, Chlamys opercularis (adductor muscle), the great scallop, Pecten maximus (adductor muscle), and the squid Loligo vulgaris (mantle muscle)]. However, the system is not applicable to the purification of octopine dehydrogenase from some other marine invertebrate sources investigated (the mussel Mytilus edulis and the topshell Monodonta lineata). PMID:9116492

  17. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of morphine, heroin, and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Prager, M J; Harrington, S M; Governo, T F

    1979-03-01

    Morphine, heroin, and cocaine are quantitatively determined with the same gas-liquid chromatographic system. The compounds are separated on a 6 ft X 2 mm id glass column packed with a 1:1 mixture of 5% SE-30 on 80--100 mesh Chromosorb W and 3% OV-17 on 80--100 mesh Varaport 30. The column is temperature-programmed. Flame ionization detector responses are measured with a computer-based data system. Heroin and cocaine are chromatographed directly; morphine is derivatized first. The procedure was evaluated with previously analyzed commercial and forensic samples. Accuracy and precision were 5 and 3%, respectively. PMID:447602

  18. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  19. Beta2-agonist extraction procedures for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    dos Ramos, F J

    2000-06-01

    Normally, different procedures were necessary to prepare sample matrices for chromatographic determination of beta2-agonists. The present review includes sampling, pre-treatment and extraction/purification for urine, plasma, liver, meat, feeds, hair and milk powder, as previous steps for chromatographic analysis of beta2-agonists. Six methodologies were especially revised for extraction/purification namely, liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction (SPE), matrix solid-phase dispersion, immunoaffinity chromatography, dialysis and supercritical fluid extraction. SPE was discussed in detail and five mechanisms were described: adsorption, apolar, polar, ion-exchange and mixed phase. A brief conclusion in this field was also outlined.

  20. Scope of partial least-squares regression applied to the enantiomeric composition determination of ketoprofen from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Osorio-Grisales, Jaiver; Arancibia, Juan A; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-07-01

    Valuable quantitative information could be obtained from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles of two enantiomers by using proper chemometric methods. Complete separation profiles where the peaks are fully resolved are difficult to achieve in chiral separation methods, and this becomes a particularly severe problem in case that the analyst needs to measure the chiral purity, i.e., when one of the enantiomers is present in the sample in very low concentrations. In this report, we explore the scope of a multivariate chemometric technique based on unfolded partial least-squares regression, as a mathematical tool to solve this quite frequent difficulty. This technique was applied to obtain quantitative results from partially overlapped chromatographic profiles of R- and S-ketoprofen, with different values of enantioresolution factors (from 0.81 down to less than 0.2 resolution units), and also at several different S:R enantiomeric ratios. Enantiomeric purity below 1% was determined with excellent precision even from almost completely overlapped signals. All these assays were tested on the most demanding condition, i.e., when the minor peak elutes immediately after the main peak. The results were validated using univariate calibration of completely resolved profiles and the method applied to the determination of enantiomeric purity of commercial pharmaceuticals. PMID:25929676

  1. Scope of partial least-squares regression applied to the enantiomeric composition determination of ketoprofen from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Osorio-Grisales, Jaiver; Arancibia, Juan A; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-07-01

    Valuable quantitative information could be obtained from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles of two enantiomers by using proper chemometric methods. Complete separation profiles where the peaks are fully resolved are difficult to achieve in chiral separation methods, and this becomes a particularly severe problem in case that the analyst needs to measure the chiral purity, i.e., when one of the enantiomers is present in the sample in very low concentrations. In this report, we explore the scope of a multivariate chemometric technique based on unfolded partial least-squares regression, as a mathematical tool to solve this quite frequent difficulty. This technique was applied to obtain quantitative results from partially overlapped chromatographic profiles of R- and S-ketoprofen, with different values of enantioresolution factors (from 0.81 down to less than 0.2 resolution units), and also at several different S:R enantiomeric ratios. Enantiomeric purity below 1% was determined with excellent precision even from almost completely overlapped signals. All these assays were tested on the most demanding condition, i.e., when the minor peak elutes immediately after the main peak. The results were validated using univariate calibration of completely resolved profiles and the method applied to the determination of enantiomeric purity of commercial pharmaceuticals.

  2. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  3. Establishment of peak bone mass.

    PubMed

    Mora, Stefano; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    Among the main areas of progress in osteoporosis research during the last decade or so are the general recognition that this condition, which is the cause of so much pain in the elderly population, has its antecedents in childhood and the identification of the structural basis accounting for much of the differences in bone strength among humans. Nevertheless, current understanding of the bone mineral accrual process is far from complete. The search for genes that regulate bone mass acquisition is ongoing, and current results are not sufficient to identify subjects at risk. However, there is solid evidence that BMD measurements can be helpful for the selection of subjects that presumably would benefit from preventive interventions. The questions regarding the type of preventive interventions, their magnitude, and duration remain unanswered. Carefully designed controlled trials are needed. Nevertheless, previous experience indicates that weight-bearing activity and possibly calcium supplements are beneficial if they are begun during childhood and preferably before the onset of puberty. Modification of unhealthy lifestyles and increments in exercise or calcium assumption are logical interventions that should be implemented to improve bone mass gains in all children and adolescents who are at risk of failing to achieve an optimal peak bone mass. PMID:12699292

  4. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application. PMID:12085699

  5. A high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the enantiomers of bevantolol in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Rose, S E; Randinitis, E J

    1991-06-01

    A method was developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of (+)- and (-)-bevantolol in human plasma. The assay involves plasma protein precipitation, derivatization of racemic bevantolol to its diastereomeric thioureas with 2,3,4,5-tetra-o-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl isothiocyanate, and solid-phase extraction of the diastereomers from 0.5 ml human plasma. Chromatographic separation was accomplished under isocratic conditions using a reversed-phase C-18 analytical column and mobile phase consisting of equal parts of 75 mM dibasic ammonium phosphate buffer (adjusted to pH 3.5 with phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile, with a detection wavelength of 220 nm. The absolute peak-height method was employed for quantitation. Retention times for the diastereomers of (+)- and (-)-bevantolol were 7.4 and 6.4 min, respectively. The method is suitable for the quantification of the enantiomers over a concentration range of 40 to 800 ng/ml per enantiomer.

  6. Uncertainty in liquid chromatographic analysis of pharmaceutical product: influence of various uncertainty sources.

    PubMed

    Leito, Signe; Mölder, Kadi; Künnapas, Allan; Herodes, Koit; Leito, Ivo

    2006-07-14

    An ISO GUM measurement uncertainty estimation procedure was developed for a liquid-chromatographic drug quality control method-assay of simvastatin in drug formulation. In quantification of uncertainty components several practical approaches for including difficult-to-estimate uncertainty sources (such as uncertainty due to peak integration, uncertainty due to nonlinearity of the calibration curve, etc.) have been presented. Detailed analysis of contributions of the various uncertainty sources was carried out. The results were calculated based on different definitions of the measurand and it was demonstrated that unequivocal definition of the measurand is essential in order to get rigorous uncertainty estimate. Two different calibration methods - single-point (1P) and five-point (5P) - were used and the obtained uncertainties and uncertainty budgets were compared. Results calculated using 1P and 5P calibrations agree very well. The uncertainty estimate for 1P is only slightly larger than with 5P calibration. PMID:16756985

  7. Comparative study of two chromatographic columns used in the GLC determination of methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Najdek, M.; Bazulic, D.

    1985-02-01

    A large effort has gone into finding an adequate analytical method for the determinations of methylmercury. Various stationary phases in GC determination have been tested. It was obvious with every method that the stationary phase had to be saturated to give a stable response without tailing the peaks or walking the retention time. To accomplish this several authors have reported treatments which included the injection of the solutions containing inorganic or organic mercuric chloride metoxyethylmercuric iodide, or large amount of potassium iodide. The authors report here a simple and efficient way to obtain satisfactory stable response from the chromatographic column based on the use of 10% diethyleneglycol adipate (DEGA) and 3% polyethyleneglycol (Carbowax 20 M).

  8. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application.

  9. Ion-chromatographic determination of L-tartrate in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Petrarulo, M; Marangella, M; Bianco, O; Linari, F

    1991-01-01

    We propose using ion chromatography to determine tartrate concentration in urine. A 100-microL sample of urine is diluted and injected into the chromatograph. Tartrate is eluted within 11.5 min as a distinct and well-resolved peak. The sensitivity of the standard procedure (signal-to-noise ratio, 3/1) is 30 mumol/L. The intra-run and interrun coefficients of variation are 2.5% and 4.1%, respectively. Mean analytical recovery of known amounts of added tartrate ranges between 94.2% and 104.0%. We investigated the specificity of the procedure by analyzing urine containing added dicarboxylic acids structurally related to tartrate. The reliability of the procedure makes it suitable for investigating tartrate metabolism, e.g., the potential role of tartrate as an inhibitor of crystallization in calcium nephrolithiasis.

  10. Reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of aspartame in beverages and beverage mixes.

    PubMed

    Webb, N G; Beckman, D D

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for determining the artificial sweetener aspartame in beverages and beverage mixes by liquid chromatography. Aspartame is separated on a microC18 column, using a mobile phase of acetic acid, water, and isopropyl alcohol at pH 3.0 and UV detection at 254 nm. Beverages are filtered through 0.45 micron filters and injected directly into the chromatograph. Aspartame is eluted in approximately 7 min. Detection of aspartame is confirmed by a UV scan of the trapped peak. Aspartame is quantitated in the presence of other beverage additives such as saccharin, caffeine, sodium benzoate, artificial colors, and artificial flavors. Results are presented for spiked soda beverages, beverages from fruit-flavored mixes, instant tea, reconstituted presweetened drink mixes, and a powdered tabletop sweetener.

  11. High performance liquid chromatographic procedure for the simultaneous determination of theophylline, caffeine, and phenobarbital in neonates.

    PubMed

    Soto-Otero, R; Mendez-Alvarez, E; Sierra-Marcuño, G

    1985-05-01

    A sensitive HPLC method is reported for the simultaneous determination of theophylline, caffeine, and phenobarbital in 100 microliters of plasma. After a single extraction of the drugs with chloroform/isopropanol (90 + 10 by volume) at low pH in the presence of an excess of ammonium sulphate they are resolved and quantified using a reversed-phase column (Spherisorb 5 ODS). The drugs are eluted with a binary-solvent gradient system (acetonitrile/phosphate buffer pH 4.6) at room temperature and monitored at 204 nm. Quantitation is based on peak-height ratio of analyte to interval standard (8-chlorotheophylline). Complete chromatographic resolution of all drugs is achieved within 15 min. The method is linear to 40 mg/l of theophylline and caffeine, and to 80 mg/l of phenobarbital. Numerous drugs and xanthine metabolites tested do not interfere.

  12. Measuring peak expiratory flow in general practice: comparison of mini Wright peak flow meter and turbine spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K P; Mullee, M A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate taken by the mini Wright peak flow meter and the turbine spirometer. DESIGN--Pragmatic study with randomised order of use of recording instruments. Phase 1 compared a peak expiratory flow type expiration recorded by the mini Wright peak flow meter with an expiration to forced vital capacity recorded by the turbine spirometer. Phase 2 compared peak expiratory flow type expirations recorded by both meters. Reproducibility was assessed separately. SETTING--Routine surgeries at Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton. SUBJECTS--212 Patients aged 4 to 78 presenting with asthma or obstructive airways disease. Each patient contributed only once to each phase (105 in phase 1, 107 in phase 2), but some entered both phases on separate occasions. Reproducibility was tested on a further 31 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--95% Limits of agreement between measurements on the two meters. RESULTS--208 (98%) Of the readings taken by the mini Wright meter were higher than the corresponding readings taken by the turbine spirometer, but the 95% limits of agreement (mean difference (2 SD] were wide (1 to 173 l/min). Differences due to errors in reproducibility were not sufficient to predict this level of disagreement. Analysis by age, sex, order of use, and the type of expiration did not detect any significant differences. CONCLUSIONS--The two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate were not comparable. The mini Wright meter is likely to remain the preferred instrument in general practice. PMID:2142611

  13. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  14. Separation and recovery of food coloring dyes using aqueous biphasic extraction chromatographic resins.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, J G; Willauer, H D; Boaz, K R; Rogers, R D

    1998-06-26

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) and aqueous biphasic extraction chromatographic (ABEC) resins are currently under investigation for their utility in the removal of color from textile plant wastes. The structures of several widely used food colorings, suggest that these dyes would also be retained on the resins. In work currently in progress, we have begun to investigate the retention and resolution of several common food colorings including indigo carmine, amaranth, carminic acid. erythrosin B, tartrazine and quinoline yellow. The relationship between the uptake of these dyes on ABEC resins in terms of the binding strengths and capacities of the resins and their partitioning behavior in ABS is illustrated. Some possible theoretical and practical approaches to the prediction of the partitioning and retention behavior is discussed. PMID:9699992

  15. Chromatographic separation of inorganic ions on thin layers of titanium phosphate ion-exchanger.

    PubMed

    Ghoulipour, Vanik; Safari, Moharram

    2014-12-01

    The chromatographic behavior of 30 inorganic cations has been studied on thin layers of titanium phosphate ion-exchanger using several aqueous, organic and mixed mobile phases. The separation of one ion from several other ions and also ternary and binary separations have been developed. Some important analytical separations are reported. The effect of pH of the mobile phase on retention factor (Rf) values of the cations in the presence of complex-forming anion along with the separation power of the ion-exchanger were studied. This ion-exchanger exhibits high sorption capacity and varying selectivity towards metal ions and makes it a suitable stationaiy phase in thin layer chromatography.

  16. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Derivatization procedure for gas chromatographic determination of hydroxylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Pesselman, R.L.; Foral, M.J.; Langer, S.H.

    1987-04-15

    Hydroxylamine has been of special interest recently because of the possibilities of manufacturing it by using electrochemical methods in which ammonia might also be formed. Its general chemistry and applications have been described elsewhere. Presently, there are two gas chromatographic methods reported for the determination of hydroxylamine in aqueous media. The first involves reacting the hydroxylamine to form acetone oxime and subsequently injecting the aqueous solution directly into a gas chromatograph equipped with nitrogen and flame ionization detectors. The second involves oxidizing hydroxylamine to nitrous oxide and trapping the gas for determination in an electron capture equipped gas chromatograph. Limits of detection are in the micromolar range for the former and the nanomolar range for the latter. Here, an alternate gas chromatographic procedure for determining hydroxylamine as the acetone oxime is described. Neither direct aqueous injection nor elaborate instrumentation is required. Extraction of the oxime into an ether phase allows for concentrating the analyte ad facilitates the use of an internal standard. The limitations and inconveniences of direct aqueous injection are avoided included column degradation and filament burnout in mass spectrometry detectors.

  18. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  19. Chromatographic profiles of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An LC-DAD-ESI/MS method was developed to obtain chromatographic profiles for the flavonoids and terpene lactones of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected G. biloba products. The method was used to identify 46 glycosylated flavonols and flavones, 3 free flavonol aglycones, catechin, 10 biflavones, a dihy...

  20. Radioimmunoassay of methaqualone in human urine compared with chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S J; Kogan, M; Jukofsky, D

    1978-09-01

    The 125I-radioimmunoassay for methaqualone in human urine was evaluated by a comparison with newly modified gas-liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic methods. The statistically significant sensitivity value for the radioimmunoassay was at 2 microgram of methaqualone per liter of urine. The coefficient of variation was 2.88 +/- 0.39% interassay and 2.71 +/- 0.16% intraassay. There was cross-reactivity only with metabolites of methaqualone, 4'-hydroxymethaqualone being twice as sensitively measured as methaqualone. There was complete agreement between results by radioimmunoassay and by gas-liquid chromatography in 96.7% of the samples analyzed. Only 1.2% of the radioimmunoassay values were false positives, and 2.1% false negatives (phi = 0.8917, P less than 0.001). Comparisons between the thin-layer chromatographic data and the gas-liquid chromatographic or radioimmunoassay data showed less agreement because of the 50- to 200-fold higher sensitivity of the latter two techniques. Gas-liquid chromatography therefore appears to represent the best reference method for the evaluation of the radioimmunoassay, which appears to be a very sensitive and reliable technique for detecting methaqualone and its metabolites in human urine.

  1. [Gas chromatographic analysis of benzodiazepines. 2. Diazepam and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, V V; Mallach, H J; Moosmayer, A

    1975-04-01

    A gas-chromatographic method is reported which completely resolves diazepam and its major metabolites and thus enables the specific quantitation of these compounds after extraction from serum and urine. The sensitivity limits are about 3 ng/ml if 4 ml serum or urine are extracted.

  2. Dynamic technique for measuring adsorption in a gas chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuel, C. L.; Hultgren, N. W.; Mobert, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic procedure, together with mathematical analysis of adsorption isotherm, allows relative surface areas and adsorptive powers for trace concentrations to be determined in a few minutes. Technique may be used to evaluate relative surface areas of different adsorbates, expressed as volume of adsorbent/gram of adsorbate, and to evaluate their relative adsorptive power.

  3. OpenChrom: a cross-platform open source software for the mass spectrometric analysis of chromatographic data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Today, data evaluation has become a bottleneck in chromatographic science. Analytical instruments equipped with automated samplers yield large amounts of measurement data, which needs to be verified and analyzed. Since nearly every GC/MS instrument vendor offers its own data format and software tools, the consequences are problems with data exchange and a lack of comparability between the analytical results. To challenge this situation a number of either commercial or non-profit software applications have been developed. These applications provide functionalities to import and analyze several data formats but have shortcomings in terms of the transparency of the implemented analytical algorithms and/or are restricted to a specific computer platform. Results This work describes a native approach to handle chromatographic data files. The approach can be extended in its functionality such as facilities to detect baselines, to detect, integrate and identify peaks and to compare mass spectra, as well as the ability to internationalize the application. Additionally, filters can be applied on the chromatographic data to enhance its quality, for example to remove background and noise. Extended operations like do, undo and redo are supported. Conclusions OpenChrom is a software application to edit and analyze mass spectrometric chromatographic data. It is extensible in many different ways, depending on the demands of the users or the analytical procedures and algorithms. It offers a customizable graphical user interface. The software is independent of the operating system, due to the fact that the Rich Client Platform is written in Java. OpenChrom is released under the Eclipse Public License 1.0 (EPL). There are no license constraints regarding extensions. They can be published using open source as well as proprietary licenses. OpenChrom is available free of charge at http://www.openchrom.net. PMID:20673335

  4. Partial least squares model and design of experiments toward the analysis of the metabolome of Jatropha gossypifolia leaves: Extraction and chromatographic fingerprint optimization.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Alan Cesar; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Freire, Rafael Teixeira; Cardoso, Patrícia; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan; Castro-Gamboa, Ian

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in metabolomic studies is how to extract and analyze an entire metabolome. So far, no single method was able to clearly complete this task in an efficient and reproducible way. In this work we proposed a sequential strategy for the extraction and chromatographic separation of metabolites from leaves Jatropha gossypifolia using a design of experiments and partial least square model. The effect of 14 different solvents on extraction process was evaluated and an optimized separation condition on liquid chromatography was estimated considering mobile phase composition and analysis time. The initial conditions of extraction using methanol and separation in 30 min between 5 and 100% water/methanol (1:1 v/v) with 0.1% of acetic acid, 20 μL sample volume, 3.0 mL min(-1) flow rate and 25°C column temperature led to 107 chromatographic peaks. After the optimization strategy using i-propanol/chloroform (1:1 v/v) for extraction, linear gradient elution of 60 min between 5 and 100% water/(acetonitrile/methanol 68:32 v/v with 0.1% of acetic acid), 30 μL sample volume, 2.0 mL min(-1) flow rate, and 30°C column temperature, we detected 140 chromatographic peaks, 30.84% more peaks compared to initial method. This is a reliable strategy using a limited number of experiments for metabolomics protocols. PMID:26757030

  5. Partial least squares model and design of experiments toward the analysis of the metabolome of Jatropha gossypifolia leaves: Extraction and chromatographic fingerprint optimization.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Alan Cesar; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Freire, Rafael Teixeira; Cardoso, Patrícia; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan; Castro-Gamboa, Ian

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in metabolomic studies is how to extract and analyze an entire metabolome. So far, no single method was able to clearly complete this task in an efficient and reproducible way. In this work we proposed a sequential strategy for the extraction and chromatographic separation of metabolites from leaves Jatropha gossypifolia using a design of experiments and partial least square model. The effect of 14 different solvents on extraction process was evaluated and an optimized separation condition on liquid chromatography was estimated considering mobile phase composition and analysis time. The initial conditions of extraction using methanol and separation in 30 min between 5 and 100% water/methanol (1:1 v/v) with 0.1% of acetic acid, 20 μL sample volume, 3.0 mL min(-1) flow rate and 25°C column temperature led to 107 chromatographic peaks. After the optimization strategy using i-propanol/chloroform (1:1 v/v) for extraction, linear gradient elution of 60 min between 5 and 100% water/(acetonitrile/methanol 68:32 v/v with 0.1% of acetic acid), 30 μL sample volume, 2.0 mL min(-1) flow rate, and 30°C column temperature, we detected 140 chromatographic peaks, 30.84% more peaks compared to initial method. This is a reliable strategy using a limited number of experiments for metabolomics protocols.

  6. Hybrid preconcentrator/focuser module for determinations of explosive marker compounds with a micro-scale gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Gustavo; Sukaew, Thitiporn; Zellers, Edward T

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the development and characterization of a partially selective preconcentrator/focuser (PCF) module for a field-portable micro-scale gas chromatograph (μGC) designed to rapidly determine trace levels of two vapor-phase markers of the explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT): 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT). The PCF module has three primary components. The first is a high-volume sampler, comprising a resistively-heated 6-cm long stainless steel tube packed with tandem beds of the graphitized carbons Carbopack B (C-B, 30 mg) and Carbopack Y (C-Y, 15 mg), which traps the markers but permits more volatile interferences to pass through largely unretained. The second component is a microfocuser (μF), comprising a 4.2×9.8 mm Si chip containing a deep-reactive-ion-etched (DRIE) cavity packed with 2mg of C-B, a Pyrex cap, integrated heaters, and etched fluidic channels. The third component is a commercial polymer-membrane filter used as a pre-trap to remove particles and adsorbed low volatility interferences. Markers captured in the sampler are thermally desorbed and transferred to the μF, and then thermally desorbed/injected from the μF into a downstream separation (micro)column and detected. Scrubbed ambient air is used as carrier gas. The adsorbent capacities, baseline temperatures, sampling and desorption flow rates, and heating profiles were optimized for each PCF module component while minimizing the analysis time. An overall transfer efficiency of 86% was achieved at marker concentrations of ~0.2-2.6 ppb. In the final configuration the PCF module requires just 60s to collect a 1-L sample (3 L/min), focus (40 mL/min), and inject the markers (3 mL/min), producing half-maximum injection peak widths of ~2 and 5 s, and preconcentration factors of 4500 and 1800, for DMNB and 2,4-DNT, respectively. PMID:23357747

  7. Discourse Peak as Zone of Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Defining peak as the climax of discourse, this paper argues that it is important to identify peak in order to get at the overall grammar of a given discourse. The paper presents case studies in which four instances of peak in narrative discourses occur in languages from four different parts of the world. It also illustrates the occurrence of a…

  8. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  9. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atlas Peak. 9.140 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.140 Atlas Peak. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Atlas Peak.”...

  10. Ion-exchange chromatographic protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Freydell, Esteban J; van der Wielen, Luuk; Eppink, Michel; Ottens, Marcel

    2010-11-12

    The application of ion-exchange (IEX) chromatography to protein refolding (IExR) has been successfully proven, as supported by various studies using different model proteins, ion-exchange media and flow configurations. Ion-exchange refolding offers a relatively high degree of process intensification, represented by the possibility of performing protein refolding, product purification and product concentration, in one unit operation. Besides its high degree of process intensification, IExR offers an additional set of key advantages including: spatial isolation of the bound protein molecules and the controllable change in chemical composition using gradients. Despite of the acknowledgement of the former advantages, the lack of mechanistic understanding on how they influence the process performance of the ion-exchange refolding reactor, limits the ability to exploit them in order to optimize the performance of the unit. This paper presents a quantitative analysis that assesses the effect that the spatial isolation and the urea gradient, have on the IExR performance, judged on the basis of the refolding yield (Y(N)) and the fractional mass recovery (f(Prot,Rec)). Additionally, this work discusses the effect of the protein load, the protein loading state (i.e., native, denatured, denatured and reduced (D&R)) and the adsorbent type on f(Prot,Rec). The presented work shows: (1) that the protein load has a direct effect on f(Prot,Rec), and the magnitude of this effect depends on the loading state of the protein solution and the adsorbent type; (2) that irrespectively of the type of adsorbent used, the saturation capacity of a denatured protein is less than the native protein and that this difference can be linked to differences in accessible binding surface area; (3) that there is a clear correlation between fractional surface coverage (θ) and f(Prot,Rec), indicating that the former could serve as a good descriptor to assess spatial isolation, and (4) that the urea

  11. A novel ion-pairing chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin components in feed additives: chemometric tools for improving the optimization and validation.

    PubMed

    De Zan, María M; Teglia, Carla M; Robles, Juan C; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2011-07-15

    The development, optimization and validation of an ion-pairing high performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin (NIC) components: 4,4'-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC) and 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (HDP) in bulk materials and feed additives are described. An experimental design was used for the optimization of the chromatographic system. Four variables, including mobile phase composition and oven temperature, were analyzed through a central composite design exploring their contribution to analyte separation. Five responses: peak resolutions, HDP capacity factor, HDP tailing and analysis time, were modelled by using the response surface methodology and were optimized simultaneously by implementing the desirability function. The optimum conditions resulted in a mobile phase consisting of 10.0 mmol L(-1) of 1-heptanesulfonate, 20.0 mmol L(-1) of sodium acetate, pH=3.30 buffer and acetonitrile in a gradient system at a flow rate of 1.00 mL min(-1). Column was an INERSTIL ODS-3 (4.6 mm×150 mm, 5 μm particle size) at 40.0°C. Detection was performed at 300 nm by a diode array detector. The validation results of the method indicated a high selectivity and good precision characteristics, with RSD less than 1.0% for both components, both in intra and inter-assay precision studies. Linearity was proved for a range of 32.0-50.0 μg mL(-1) of NIC in sample solution. The recovery, studied at three different fortification levels, varied from 98.0 to 101.4 for HDP and from 99.1 to 100.2 for DNC. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining DNC and HDP content in raw materials and commercial formulations used for coccidiosis prevention. Assays results on real samples showed that considerable differences in molecular ratio DNC:HDP exist among them.

  12. Countercurrent Chromatographic Separation of Proteins Using an Eccentric Coiled Column with Synchronous and Nonsynchronous Type-J Planetary Motions

    PubMed Central

    SHINOMIYA, Kazufusa; YOSHIDA, Kazunori; TOKURA, Koji; TSUKIDATE, Etsuhiro; YANAGIDAIRA, Kazuhiro; ITO, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation was performed using the high-speed counter-current chromatograph (HSCCC) at both synchronous and nonsynchronous type-J planetary motions. The partition efficiency was evaluated with two different column configurations, eccentric coil and toroidal coil, on the separation of a set of stable protein samples including cytochrome C, myoglobin and lysozyme with a polymer phase system composed of 12.5% (w/w) polyethylene glycol 1000 and 12.5% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate. Better peak resolution was obtained by the eccentric coil than by the toroidal coil using either lower or upper phase as the mobile phase. The peak resolution was further improved using the eccentric coil by the nonsynchronous type-J planetary motion with the combination of 1066 rpm of column rotation and 1000 rpm of revolution. PMID:25765276

  13. Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating Liquid Chromatographic Method for Estimating Olmesartan Medoxomil Using Quality by Design.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Sharma, Gajanand; Katare, O P; Lohan, Shikha; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-08-01

    The current studies entail systematic quality by design (QbD)-based development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and cost-effective stability-indicating method for the estimation of olmesartan medoxomil. Quality target method profile was defined and critical analytical attributes (CAAs) for the reverse-phase liquid chromatography method earmarked. Chromatographic separation accomplished on a C18 column using acetonitrile and water (containing 0.1% orthophosphoric acid, pH 3.5) in 40 : 60 (v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with UV detection at 243 nm. Risk assessment studies and screening studies facilitated comprehensive understanding of the factors affecting CAAs. The mobile phase ratio and flow rate were identified as critical method parameters (CMPs) and were systematically optimized using face-centered cubic design, evaluating for CAAs, namely peak area, retention time, theoretical plates and peak tailing. Statistical modelization was accomplished followed by response surface analysis for comprehending plausible interaction(s) among CMPs. Search for optimum solution was conducted through numerical and graphical optimization for demarcating the design space. Analytical method validation and subsequent forced degradation studies corroborated the method to be highly efficient for routine analysis of drug and its degradation products. The studies successfully demonstrate the utility of QbD approach for developing the highly sensitive liquid chromatographic method with enhanced method performance.

  14. Gel chromatographic behavior of Tc-99m-labeled compounds in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, F.F.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the interaction of Tc-99m-labeled compounds (Tc-99m 0/sub 4/-bar, Tc-99m glucoheptonate, Tc-99m DTPA, Tc-99m disofenin) with the chromatographic gels, to determine their relative molecular sizes and molecular structures in aqueous solution, which are based on their biomenbrane transport mechanism and quality control analysis. Each Tc-99m-labeled compound was eluted and analyzed by three different gel chromatrography systems varying buffers: Sephadex G-25, Sephadex LH-20 and Bio-Gel P-4. The best separation between the elution peaks of all compounds except Tc-99m glucoheptonate was achieved on Sephadex G-25 in methanol-0.025OM Tris-HCL buffer (pH 7.6) (1:1) which could avoid the aromatic interaction with the gels. Tc-99m glucoheptonate was well eluted only on a Bio-Gel P-4 column but its elution peak was not separated from other compounds' peaks. The elution of Tc-99m disofenin was delayed on Sephadex G-25 gel and Bio-Gel P-4 columns in 0.9% NaCl and Tris-HCl buffer(ph 7.6) and on Sephadex LH-20 column in methanol-Tris-HCl buffer, because of the aromatic ring interaction with the gels. The relative molecular size index ( Kav ) calculated from the elution volume of the gel chromatography. Kav of Tc-99m 0/sub 4/-bar(MW=163), Tc-99m DTPA (MW=492.) and TC-99m disofenin (MW=707) on Sephadex G-25 in methanol-0.025OM Tris-HCl buffer(pH 7.6) (1:1), which was the most suitable combination of the gel and the buffer, were 0.976, 0.477 and 0.200, respectively. They inversely correlated with their estimated molecular weight. The interaction of Tc-99m-labeled compounds with the chromatographic gels should be considered in quality control procedure for Tc-99m radiopharamaceuticals.

  15. REPORTING PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW IN OLDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Peak expiratory flow (“peak flow”) predicts important outcomes in older persons. Nevertheless, its clinical application is uncertain because prior strategies for reporting peak flow may not be valid. We thus determined the frequency distribution of peak flow by the conventional strategy of percent predicted (%predicted) and by an alternative method termed standardized residual (SR) percentile, and evaluated how these two metrics relate to health status in older persons. Methods Participants included 754 community-living persons aged ≥ 70 years. Data included chronic conditions, frailty indicators, and peak flow. Results Mean age was 78.4 years, with 63.7% reporting a smoking history, 17.4% chronic lung disease, and 77.1% having one or more frailty indicators. Peak flow ≥ 80 %predicted was recorded in 67.5% of participants, whereas peak flow ≥ 80th SR-percentile was only noted in 15.9%. A graded relationship was observed between peak flow and health status, but %predicted yielded health risk at peak flows currently considered normal (80–100 %predicted), whereas SR-percentile conferred health risk only at severely reduced peak flows (< 50th SR-percentile). Conclusions Peak flow expressed as SR-percentile attains a frequency distribution more consistent with the characteristics of our elderly cohort, and establishes health risk at more appropriate levels of reduced peak flow. These findings establish the need for longitudinal studies based on SR-percentile to further evaluate the use of peak flow as a risk assessment tool in older persons, and to determine if pulmonary function, in general, is better reported in older persons as SR-percentile, rather than as %predicted. PMID:17921429

  16. Green Chromatographic Separation of Coumarin and Vanillins Using Subcritical Water as the Mobile Phase.

    PubMed

    Kayan, Berkant; Akay, Sema; Yang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Pure water was used as the eluent for separation of coumarin, vanillin and ethyl vanillin at temperatures ranging from 100 to 200°C using a homemade subcritical water chromatography (SBWC) system. Chromatographic separations were performed on five commercial columns including XTerra MS C18, XBridge C18, Zorbax RRHD Eclipse Plus, Zorbax SB-Phenyl and Zorbax SB-C18 columns. The retention time of all three solutes decreased with increasing water temperature. The shortest retention time among all acceptable separations, less than 4 min, was achieved on the Zorbax SB-C18 column at 200°C. While separations on the XTerra MS C18 column resulted in fronting peaks and a degradation peak from ethyl vanillin on the Zorbax RRHD Eclipse Plus column was observed, all three other columns yielded reasonable separations under SBWC conditions. In addition to separation of the standard test mixture, separation of coumarin contained in a skincare cream sample was also carried out using SBWC. PMID:27060112

  17. One-step chromatographic procedure for purification of B-phycoerythrin from Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhihong; Jilu Zhao; Ju, Bao; Li, Wenjun; Wen, Shaohong; Pu, Yang; Qin, Song

    2016-07-01

    B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) was separated and purified from microalga Porphyridium cruentum using one-step chromatographic method. Phycobiliproteins in P. cruentum was extracted by osmotic shock and initially purified by ultrafiltration. Further purification was carried out with a SOURCE 15Q exchange column and analytical grade B-PE was obtained with a purity ratio (A545/A280) of 5.1 and a yield of 68.5%. It showed a double absorption peaks at 545 nm and 565 nm and a shoulder peak at 498 nm, and displayed a fluorescence emission maximum at 580 nm. The analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a bulky band between 18 and 20 kDa which could be assigned to subunits α and β and a low intensity band of 27 kDa assigned to γ subunit. Our protocol provides attractive alternative to consider for the purification procedure to obtain analytical grade B-PE at commercial level.

  18. One-step chromatographic procedure for purification of B-phycoerythrin from Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhihong; Jilu Zhao; Ju, Bao; Li, Wenjun; Wen, Shaohong; Pu, Yang; Qin, Song

    2016-07-01

    B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) was separated and purified from microalga Porphyridium cruentum using one-step chromatographic method. Phycobiliproteins in P. cruentum was extracted by osmotic shock and initially purified by ultrafiltration. Further purification was carried out with a SOURCE 15Q exchange column and analytical grade B-PE was obtained with a purity ratio (A545/A280) of 5.1 and a yield of 68.5%. It showed a double absorption peaks at 545 nm and 565 nm and a shoulder peak at 498 nm, and displayed a fluorescence emission maximum at 580 nm. The analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a bulky band between 18 and 20 kDa which could be assigned to subunits α and β and a low intensity band of 27 kDa assigned to γ subunit. Our protocol provides attractive alternative to consider for the purification procedure to obtain analytical grade B-PE at commercial level. PMID:26851659

  19. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    1982-08-12

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a microcolumn liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit is claimed. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  20. TLC chromatographic-densitometric assay of ibuprofen and its impurities.

    PubMed

    Starek, Małgorzata; Krzek, Jan

    2010-11-01

    A simple and sensitive thin-layer chromatographic (TLC)-densitometric method for the quantitative estimation of S(+)-2-[4-isobutylphenyl]propionic acid (ibuprofen) and its impurities in pharmaceutical preparations has been developed. The chromatographic separation was carried out on silica gel 60 F(254) TLC plates using toluene-ethyl acetate-glacial acetic acid (17:13: 1, v/v/v) as the mobile phase. Detection was carried out densitometrically with a UV detector. The developed method has detection and quantitation limits ranging from 0.13 μg per spot to 0.72 μg per spot. For individual constituents the recovery ranged from 96.8% to 99.0%. In addition, the stability of ibuprofen solutions was investigated, including the effect of pH, temperature, and incubation time. The method is rapid, simple, and suitable for routine quality-control analysis of pharmaceuticals containing ibuprofen.

  1. An on-line calibration method for process gas chromatographs

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M.; Wang, F.

    1995-05-01

    Gas chromatographs (GCs) used to measure gas concentrations in process streams usually need calibration for a wide range of concentrations. The gas chromatographs used in process applications are usually equipped with automatic samplers using sample loops. The sampling system can be modified to provide on-line calibration, by adding a vacuum system and a precision pressure gage. In this paper, the authors describe a method using pure gases for the calibration of automatic GCs by varying and measuring precisely the pressure of the sample loop, thus sending known quantities of gas into the column. The concentration of the gas is calculated using the ideal gas law, and they are able to calibrate GCs in a range from 1,000 ppm to 100 vol %.

  2. The selection of suitable columns for a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation of beta-lactam antibiotics and related substances via chromatographic column parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-qing; Hu, Qiu-xin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Ya-ping; Wang, Ming-juan; Hu, Chang-qin

    2014-01-01

    The selection of RP-LC columns suitable for a particular analysis in official compendia is difficult as only a general description of the stationary phase in the description of a LC method is given. General methods to characterize RP-LC columns often assume that each of the column parameters is equally important. This can cause the user to select columns inappropriate for particular analyses. This paper focuses on the relationship between the critical peak pairs and the column parameters (H, S, A, B, and C) in the Snyder/Dolan column characterization methodology to find the key parameters influencing real separations. Some varieties of β-lactam antibiotics and their related compounds were used as test compounds. We found column parameter A to be the most important factor affecting their separation. Parameters B and C also played an important role in some separation processes. This indicated that the hydrogen bonding of column and solute can directly affect the separation of β-lactam antibiotics. Choosing columns for which column parameter A is near 0.1 can facilitate the ideal separations of impurities from β-lactam antibiotics. The most suitable column for any common pharmaceutical analysis could be selected easily if the key column parameters would be given in the description of the chromatographic method. For these reasons, key column parameters should be listed in the monographs of official compendia.

  3. Retention controlling and peak shape simulation in anion chromatography using multiple equilibrium model and stochastic theory.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Krisztián; Olajos, Marcell; Felinger, Attila; Hajós, Péter

    2008-05-01

    The stochastic theory of chromatography and an equilibrium based approach were used for the prediction of peak shape and retention data of anions. This attempt incorporating the potential advantages of two different chromatographic phenomena for analytical purposes. It is an integrated method to estimate kinetic and thermodynamic properties for the same chromatographic run of ions. The stochastic parameters of eluted anions, such as the residence time of the molecule on the surface of the stationary phase, and the average number of adsorption steps were determined on the basis of a retention database of organic and inorganic anions (formate, chloride, bromide, nitrate, sulphate, oxalate, phosphate) obtained by using carbonate/bicarbonate eluent system at different pHs (9-11) and concentrations (7-13 mM). In the investigated IC system the residence times are much higher and the average number of sorption steps is somewhat smaller than in RP-HPLC. The simultaneous application of the stochastic and the multispecies eluent/analyte model was utilized to peak shape simulation and the retention controlling of various anions under elution conditions of practical importance. The similarities between the measured and the calculated chromatograms indicates the predictive and simulation power of the combined application of the stochastic theory and the multiple species eluent/analyte retention model. PMID:17719052

  4. Can enantiomers be separated in achiral chromatographic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davankov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Consideration of chromatography of a nonracemic mixture on an achiral sorbent from a stereochemical point of view allows the claim that partial separation of the excess enantiomer zone from the racemate zone is possible only with analytes capable of self-associating under the conditions of the chromatographic column. It is from these positions that features of this process can be explained and conditions for its maximal proceeding formulated.

  5. Pharmacognostic Screening of Piper trichostachyon Fruits and its Comparative Analysis with Piper nigrum Using Chromatographic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R.; Ankad, Gireesh M.; Hegde, Harsha V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Piper trichostachyon is a wild, endemic Piper species from Western Ghats of India. The folklore healers of Belagavi region use this plant, similar to Piper nigrum. Aims: The present study investigates the comparison between P. nigrum and P. trichostachyon using pharmacognostic parameters. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic evaluation was carried out in terms of morphological, microscopic characters, and phytochemical analysis using standard methods. Comparative physicochemical analysis between P. trichostachyon and P. nigrum was also carried out through estimation of micro-macro nutrients, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) investigation and using piperine as a marker compound for reversed phase-ultra flow liquid chromatographic (RP-UFLC) technique. Results: P. trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to P. nigrum fruits, so the name in Kannada “Kaadu Kalu menasu” (wild/forest black pepper). The microscopy revealed the presence of stone cells, starch grains, oil cells and globules, beaker cells, and yellowish brown pigment layer, parenchymatous cells. The presence of alkaloids, oil, and tannins were observed in P. trichostachyon fruits. The HPTLC studies visibly indicated differences among two species with 12 peaks and varied banding pattern. RP-UFLC results showed less amount of piperine in P. trichostachyon (0.05 ± 0.002 mg/g) than in P. nigrum (16.14 ± 0.807 mg/g). Conclusion: The study reports on pharmacognostic parameters of P. trichostachyon for the 1st time and will be useful for the identification and authentication. The comparative HPTLC and RP-UFLC studies resolve the differentiation impasse among two species. However, further biological efficacy studies are required to establish its use in traditional medicine. SUMMARY Piper trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to Piper nigrum fruitsThe microscopy of P. trichostachyon revealed the

  6. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided. PMID:27492597

  7. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  8. Rayleigh light scattering detection of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists coupled with high performance liquid chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Huanjun; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, Ming Qiong; Zhang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a Rayleigh light-scattering (RLS) detection method combined with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) without any post-column probe was developed for the separation and determination of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists. The quantitative analysis is benefiting from RLS signal enhancement upon addition of methanol which induced molecular aggregation to form an hydrophobic interface between aggregates and water that produce a sort of superficial enhanced scattering effect. A good chromatographic separation among the compounds was achieved using a Gemini 5u C18 reversed phase column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 4 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and ammonium acetate-formic acid buffer solution (25 mM; pH = 3.0) at the flow rate of 0.7 mL min-1. The RLS signal was monitored at λex = λem = 354 nm. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.065-0.70 μg L-1 was reached and a linear range was found between peak height and concentration in the range of 0.75-15 μg L-1 for doxazosin mesylate (DOX), 0.075-3.0 μg L-1 for prazosin hydrochloride (PRH), and 0.25-5 μg L-1 for terazosin hydrochloride (TEH), with linear regression coefficients all above 0.999. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 88.4-99.0% which is within acceptable limits. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive which has been used successfully in human urine samples.

  9. On-line electrodialytic matrix isolation for chromatographic determination of organic acids in wine.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Kuhara, Kenta; Shigetomi, Aki; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuko; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2014-10-31

    Chromatographic determination of organic acids is widely performed, but the matrix often calls for lengthy and elaborate sample preparation prior to actual analysis. Matrix components, e.g., proteins, non-ionics, lipids etc. are typically removed by a combination of centrifugation/filtration and solid phase extraction (SPE) that may include the use of ion-exchange media. Here we report the quantitative electrodialytic transfer of organic acids from complex samples to ultrapure water in seconds using cellulose membranes modified with N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, which essentially eliminates the negative ζ-potential of a regenerated cellulose membrane surface. The transfer characteristics of the ion transfer device (ITD) were evaluated with linear carboxylic acids. While the ion transfer efficiencies may be affected by the acid dissociation constants, in most cases it is possible to achieve quantitative transfer under optimized device residence time (solution flow rate) and the applied voltage. In addition, the transfer efficiency was unaffected by the wide natural variation of pH represented in real samples. The approach was applied to organic acids in various samples, including red wine, considered to represent an especially difficult matrix. While quantitative transfer of the organic acids (as judged by agreement with standard pretreatment procedures involving SPE) was achieved, transfer of other matrix components was <5%. The processed samples could then be chromatographically analyzed in a straightforward manner. We used ion exclusion chromatography with direct UV detection; in treated samples; there was a dramatic reduction of the large early peaks observed compared to only 0.45μm membrane filtered samples.

  10. [Scale-up of conical column with 10 degree opening angle as preparative liquid chromatographic column].

    PubMed

    Lu, Liejuan; Chen, Jie; Guan, Yafeng

    2009-05-01

    A preparative scale liquid chromatographic column with the conical shape of 10 degrees opening angle was constructed and evaluated. The column was designed with the inlet/outlet diameters of 54/27 mm, the column length of 150 mm and the column volume of 200 mL, and packed with the spherical C18 bonded silica with the particle size of 40-75 microm and the aperture of 11 nm. The mobile phase in the conical column showed a plug like flow profile and plug like chromatographic band shape. For naphthalene, the reduced plate height was about 2.11; the maximum sample load was 2.1 mg or 1.7 mL (10% reduction of plate number), which is 20%, 16% and 19% higher than that of cylindrical one of the same length and volume. As the injection mass increased from 2. 4 mg up to 12 mg, the resolution of ethyl paraben/butyl (R, ) reduced from 2. 14 down to 1.71, and the butyl paraben/naphthalene (Rs3) from 2.91 down to 2.52; the injection volume increased from 3 mL up to 19 mL, Rs2, reduced from 2.23 down to 1.28, and Rs3 from 2.95 down to 2.30, while the peaks were still in symmetric shape without tailing. This characteristic of the column shall benefit for the separation of trace components from matrix. This demonstrated the conical shaped preparative columns would have a broad practical applicability for obtaining pure compounds. PMID:19803133

  11. On-line electrodialytic matrix isolation for chromatographic determination of organic acids in wine.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Kuhara, Kenta; Shigetomi, Aki; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuko; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2014-10-31

    Chromatographic determination of organic acids is widely performed, but the matrix often calls for lengthy and elaborate sample preparation prior to actual analysis. Matrix components, e.g., proteins, non-ionics, lipids etc. are typically removed by a combination of centrifugation/filtration and solid phase extraction (SPE) that may include the use of ion-exchange media. Here we report the quantitative electrodialytic transfer of organic acids from complex samples to ultrapure water in seconds using cellulose membranes modified with N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, which essentially eliminates the negative ζ-potential of a regenerated cellulose membrane surface. The transfer characteristics of the ion transfer device (ITD) were evaluated with linear carboxylic acids. While the ion transfer efficiencies may be affected by the acid dissociation constants, in most cases it is possible to achieve quantitative transfer under optimized device residence time (solution flow rate) and the applied voltage. In addition, the transfer efficiency was unaffected by the wide natural variation of pH represented in real samples. The approach was applied to organic acids in various samples, including red wine, considered to represent an especially difficult matrix. While quantitative transfer of the organic acids (as judged by agreement with standard pretreatment procedures involving SPE) was achieved, transfer of other matrix components was <5%. The processed samples could then be chromatographically analyzed in a straightforward manner. We used ion exclusion chromatography with direct UV detection; in treated samples; there was a dramatic reduction of the large early peaks observed compared to only 0.45μm membrane filtered samples. PMID:25465003

  12. Automated optimization and construction of chemometric models based on highly variable raw chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Sinkov, Nikolai A; Johnston, Brandon M; Sandercock, P Mark L; Harynuk, James J

    2011-07-01

    Direct chemometric interpretation of raw chromatographic data (as opposed to integrated peak tables) has been shown to be advantageous in many circumstances. However, this approach presents two significant challenges: data alignment and feature selection. In order to interpret the data, the time axes must be precisely aligned so that the signal from each analyte is recorded at the same coordinates in the data matrix for each and every analyzed sample. Several alignment approaches exist in the literature and they work well when the samples being aligned are reasonably similar. In cases where the background matrix for a series of samples to be modeled is highly variable, the performance of these approaches suffers. Considering the challenge of feature selection, when the raw data are used each signal at each time is viewed as an individual, independent variable; with the data rates of modern chromatographic systems, this generates hundreds of thousands of candidate variables, or tens of millions of candidate variables if multivariate detectors such as mass spectrometers are utilized. Consequently, an automated approach to identify and select appropriate variables for inclusion in a model is desirable. In this research we present an alignment approach that relies on a series of deuterated alkanes which act as retention anchors for an alignment signal, and couple this with an automated feature selection routine based on our novel cluster resolution metric for the construction of a chemometric model. The model system that we use to demonstrate these approaches is a series of simulated arson debris samples analyzed by passive headspace extraction, GC-MS, and interpreted using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA).

  13. Retention Study of Flavonoids Under Different Chromatographic Modes.

    PubMed

    Sentkowska, Aleksandra; Biesaga, Magdalena; Pyrzynska, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the chromatographic behavior of selected flavonoids from their different subgroups (flavonols, flavanones, flavones and isoflavones) in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Chromatographic measurements were made on two different HILIC columns: cross-linked DIOL (Luna HILIC) and zwitterionic sulfoalkylbetaine (SeQuant ZIC-HILIC). Separation parameters such as the content of acetonitrile and pH of an eluent were studied. On the ZIC column, the retention factors of flavonoids increased with decreasing water content in the mobile phase. The increase in pH of the aqueous component mainly affects the polarity of the analytes. DIOL stationary phase shows more or less apparent dual retention mechanism, HILIC at the acetonitrile (ACN) content ≥75% and reversed phase (RP) with lower content of organic modifier. In the presence of ammonium acetate in the mobile phase, the retention of flavonoids onto the DIOL column increases without change in the selectivity of the separations. The similar effect, but considerably smaller was observed for aglycones on the ZIC column. The retention of studied glycosides (hesperidin, rutin) decreases in the presence of salt in the mobile phase. The significantly higher mass spectrometry sensitivity was observed under HILIC conditions in comparison with the most often used RP LC due to much higher content of ACN in the mobile phase. Finally, under optimal chromatographic conditions, the method was validated and applied for the determination of flavonoids in chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) infusion. PMID:26668302

  14. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  15. Origin of weak lensing convergence peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 are improved by a factor of up to ≈2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational data from the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. We found that while high peaks (with height κ >3.5 σκ , where σκ is the rms of the convergence κ ) are typically due to one single massive halo of ≈1 015M⊙ , low peaks (κ ≲σκ ) are associated with constellations of 2-8 smaller halos (≲1 013M⊙ ). In addition, halos responsible for forming low peaks are found to be significantly offset from the line of sight towards the peak center (impact parameter ≳ their virial radii), compared with ≈0.25 virial radii for halos linked with high peaks, hinting that low peaks are more immune to baryonic processes whose impact is confined to the inner regions of the dark matter halos. Our findings are in good agreement with results from the simulation work by Yang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 043529 (2011)].

  16. Studies on improved integrated membrane-based chromatographic process for bioseparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanke

    To improve protein separation and purification directly from a fermentation broth, a novel membrane filtration-cum-chromatography device configuration having a relatively impermeable coated zone near the hollow fiber module outlet has been developed. The integrated membrane filtration-cum-chromatography unit packed with chromatographic beads on the shell side of the hollow fiber unit enjoys the advantages of both membrane filtration and chromatography; it allows one to load the chromatographic media directly from the fermentation broth or lysate and separate the adsorbed proteins through the subsequent elution step in a cyclic process. Interfacial polymerization was carried out to coat the bottom section of the hollow fiber membrane while leaving the rest of the hollow fiber membrane unaffected. Myoglobin (Mb), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a-lactalbumin (a-LA) were used as model proteins in binary mixtures. Separation behaviors of binary protein mixtures were studied in devices using either an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane or a microfiltration (MF) membrane. Experimental results show that the breakthrough time and the protein loading capacities were dramatically improved after coating in both UF and MF modules. For a synthetic yeast fermentation broth feed, the Mb and a-LA elution profiles for the four consecutive cyclic runs were almost superimposable. Due to the lower transmembrane flux in this device plus the periodical washing-elution during the chromatographic separation, fouling was not a problem as it is in conventional microfiltration. A mathematical model describing the hydrodynamic and protein loading behaviors of the integrated device using UF membrane with a coated zone was developed. The simulation results for the breakthrough agree well with the experimental breakthrough curves. The optimal length of the coated zone was obtained from the simulation. A theoretical analysis of the protein mass transfer was performed using a diffusion-convection model

  17. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  18. Development of Chromatographic Fingerprints of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) Roots Using Online Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography (SPE-LC).

    PubMed

    Zaini, Nor Nasriah; Osman, Rozita; Juahir, Hafizan; Saim, Norashikin

    2016-01-01

    E. longifolia is attracting interest due to its pharmacological properties and pro-vitality effects. In this study, an online SPE-LC approach using polystyrene divinyl benzene (PSDVB) and C18 columns was developed in obtaining chromatographic fingerprints of E. longifolia. E. longifolia root samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technique prior to online SPE-LC. The effects of mobile phase compositions and column switching time on the chromatographic fingerprint were optimized. Validation of the developed method was studied based on eurycomanone. Linearity was in the range of 5 to 50 µg∙mL(-1) (r² = 0.997) with 3.2% relative standard deviation of peak area. The developed method was used to analyze 14 E. longifolia root samples and 10 products (capsules). Selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the fingerprint datasets of 37 selected peaks to evaluate the ability of the chromatographic fingerprint in classifying quality of E. longifolia. Three groups were obtained using CA. DA yielded 100% correlation coefficient with 19 discriminant compounds. Using PCA, E. longifolia root samples were clearly discriminated from the products. This study showed that the developed online SPE-LC method was able to provide comprehensive evaluation of E. longifolia samples for quality control purposes. PMID:27144555

  19. Development of Chromatographic Fingerprints of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) Roots Using Online Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography (SPE-LC).

    PubMed

    Zaini, Nor Nasriah; Osman, Rozita; Juahir, Hafizan; Saim, Norashikin

    2016-04-30

    E. longifolia is attracting interest due to its pharmacological properties and pro-vitality effects. In this study, an online SPE-LC approach using polystyrene divinyl benzene (PSDVB) and C18 columns was developed in obtaining chromatographic fingerprints of E. longifolia. E. longifolia root samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technique prior to online SPE-LC. The effects of mobile phase compositions and column switching time on the chromatographic fingerprint were optimized. Validation of the developed method was studied based on eurycomanone. Linearity was in the range of 5 to 50 µg∙mL(-1) (r² = 0.997) with 3.2% relative standard deviation of peak area. The developed method was used to analyze 14 E. longifolia root samples and 10 products (capsules). Selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the fingerprint datasets of 37 selected peaks to evaluate the ability of the chromatographic fingerprint in classifying quality of E. longifolia. Three groups were obtained using CA. DA yielded 100% correlation coefficient with 19 discriminant compounds. Using PCA, E. longifolia root samples were clearly discriminated from the products. This study showed that the developed online SPE-LC method was able to provide comprehensive evaluation of E. longifolia samples for quality control purposes.

  20. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fobes, James L.

    A major challenge confronting the United States Army is to obtain optimal performance from both its human and machine resources. This study examines episodes of peak performance in soldiers and athletes. Three cognitive components were found to enable episodes of peak performance: psychological readiness (activating optimal arousal and emotion…

  1. Do dark matter halos explain lensing peaks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorrilla Matilla, José Manuel; Haiman, Zoltán; Hsu, Daniel; Gupta, Arushi; Petri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a recently proposed halo-based model, Camelus, for predicting weak-lensing peak counts, and compared its results over a collection of 162 cosmologies with those from N-body simulations. While counts from both models agree for peaks with S /N >1 (where S /N is the ratio of the peak height to the r.m.s. shape noise), we find ≈50 % fewer counts for peaks near S /N =0 and significantly higher counts in the negative S /N tail. Adding shape noise reduces the differences to within 20% for all cosmologies. We also found larger covariances that are more sensitive to cosmological parameters. As a result, credibility regions in the {Ωm,σ8} are ≈30 % larger. Even though the credible contours are commensurate, each model draws its predictive power from different types of peaks. Low peaks, especially those with 2 peaks (S /N >3 ). Our results confirm the importance of using a cosmology-dependent covariance with at least a 14% improvement in parameter constraints. We identified the covariance estimation as the main driver behind differences in inference, and suggest possible ways to make Camelus even more useful as a highly accurate peak count emulator.

  2. Weld peaking on heavy aluminum structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Poorman, R.; Sexton, J.

    1978-01-01

    Weld peaking is usually undesirable in any welded structure. In heavy structures, the forces involved in the welding process become very large and difficult to handle. With the shuttle's solid rocket booster, the weld peaking resulted in two major problems: (1) reduced mechanical properties across the weld joint, and (2) fit-up difficulties in subsequent assembly operation. Peaking from the weld shrinkage forces can be fairly well predicted in simple structures; however, in welding complicated assemblies, the amount of peaking is unpredictable because of unknown stresses from machining and forming, stresses induced by the fixturing, and stresses from welds in other parts of the assembly. When excessive peaking is encountered, it can be corrected using the shrinkage forces resulting from the welding process. Application of these forces is discussed in this report.

  3. Evaluation of sample preparation and chromatographic separation for the parallel determination of taurine and edaravone in rat tissues using HILIC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-jie; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Xiao-xiao; Wu, Xiao-wen; Wang, Shi-rui; Guo, Hao; Yu, Yan-yan; Guo, Meng-zhe; Yan, Dong-zhi; Tang, Dao-quan

    2015-05-01

    The quantitative analysis of taurine and edaravone in biological sample is critical in pharmaceutical studies. Although each of them can be individually analyzed by different approaches, concurrent quantification is still a highly challenging task with respect to their great polarity variation and the complex composition of tissue sample. In the present study, to simultaneously determine taurine and edaravone in rat tissue, the sample preparation and chromatographic separation conditions were evaluated and discussed in detail. As for the sample preparation, four kinds of solvent and the volume ratio of the optimal solvent to biological sample were both tested and evaluated based on the chromatographic profile, extraction recovery, and matrix effect (ME). The chromatographic separation was performed in a reverse phase (RP) and two hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) modes, and the corresponding separation efficiencies were assessed using chromatographic parameters like half-width (W 1/2 ), tailing factor (f t), theoretical plates number (N), and ME. Furthermore, adopted composition of two mobile phase systems and the concentrations of the additives in the optimum buffer system were also investigated on an Atlantis HILIC silica column according to the resultant chromatographic profiles and peak areas of the analytes. The optimal results were obtained when the biological samples were deproteined by 4-fold volume of methanol/acetonitrile (1:3, v/v) and separated on a HILIC column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile/water containing 0.2 % formic acid and 10 mM ammonium formate. The proposed approach was validated and successfully applied to the parallel determination of the tissue distribution of edaravone and taurine in rat tissues.

  4. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-01

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at .

  5. Peak tree: a new tool for multiscale hierarchical representation and peak detection of mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Houqiang; Wang, Honghui; Wong, Stephen T C; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is one of the most important steps in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. However, the detection result is greatly affected by severe spectrum variations. Unfortunately, most current peak detection methods are neither flexible enough to revise false detection results nor robust enough to resist spectrum variations. To improve flexibility, we introduce peak tree to represent the peak information in MS spectra. Each tree node is a peak judgment on a range of scales, and each tree decomposition, as a set of nodes, is a candidate peak detection result. To improve robustness, we combine peak detection and common peak alignment into a closed-loop framework, which finds the optimal decomposition via both peak intensity and common peak information. The common peak information is derived and loopily refined from the density clustering of the latest peak detection result. Finally, we present an improved ant colony optimization biomarker selection method to build a whole MS analysis system. Experiment shows that our peak detection method can better resist spectrum variations and provide higher sensitivity and lower false detection rates than conventional methods. The benefits from our peak-tree-based system for MS disease analysis are also proved on real SELDI data.

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of Methylmalonic Acid in Serum, Plasma, and Urine by LC-MS/MS. Method for Analyzing Isomers Without Chromatographic Separation.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Mark M; Nelson, Gordon J; Frank, Elizabeth L; Rockwood, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of methylmalonic acid (MMA) plays an important role in the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is an essential cofactor for the enzymatic carbon rearrangement of methylmalonyl-CoA (MMA-CoA) to succinyl-CoA (SA-CoA), and the lack of vitamin B12 leads to elevated concentrations of MMA. Presence of succinic acid (SA) complicates the analysis because mass spectra of MMA and SA are indistinguishable, when analyzed in negative ion mode and the peaks are difficult to resolve chromatographically. We developed a method for the selective analysis of MMA that exploits the significant difference in fragmentation patterns of di-butyl derivatives of the isomers MMA and SA in a tandem mass spectrometer when analyzed in positive ion mode. Tandem mass spectra of di-butyl derivatives of MMA and SA are very distinct; this allows selective analysis of MMA in the presence of SA. The instrumental analysis is performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in positive ion mode, which is, in combination with selective extraction of acidic compounds, is highly selective for organic acids with multiple carboxyl groups (dicarboxylic, tricarboxylic, etc.). In this method organic acids with a single carboxyl group are virtually undetectable in the mass spectrometer; the only organic acid, other than MMA, that is detected by this method is its isomer, SA. Quantitative measurement of MMA in this method is performed using a deconvolution algorithm, which mathematically resolves the signal corresponding to MMA and does not require chromatographic resolution of the MMA and SA peaks. Because of its high selectivity, the method utilizes isocratic chromatographic separation; reconditioning and re-equilibration of the chromatographic column between injections is unnecessary. The above features of the method allow high-throughput analysis of MMA with analysis cycle time of 1 min. PMID:26602128

  7. High-Throughput Analysis of Methylmalonic Acid in Serum, Plasma, and Urine by LC-MS/MS. Method for Analyzing Isomers Without Chromatographic Separation.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Mark M; Nelson, Gordon J; Frank, Elizabeth L; Rockwood, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of methylmalonic acid (MMA) plays an important role in the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is an essential cofactor for the enzymatic carbon rearrangement of methylmalonyl-CoA (MMA-CoA) to succinyl-CoA (SA-CoA), and the lack of vitamin B12 leads to elevated concentrations of MMA. Presence of succinic acid (SA) complicates the analysis because mass spectra of MMA and SA are indistinguishable, when analyzed in negative ion mode and the peaks are difficult to resolve chromatographically. We developed a method for the selective analysis of MMA that exploits the significant difference in fragmentation patterns of di-butyl derivatives of the isomers MMA and SA in a tandem mass spectrometer when analyzed in positive ion mode. Tandem mass spectra of di-butyl derivatives of MMA and SA are very distinct; this allows selective analysis of MMA in the presence of SA. The instrumental analysis is performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in positive ion mode, which is, in combination with selective extraction of acidic compounds, is highly selective for organic acids with multiple carboxyl groups (dicarboxylic, tricarboxylic, etc.). In this method organic acids with a single carboxyl group are virtually undetectable in the mass spectrometer; the only organic acid, other than MMA, that is detected by this method is its isomer, SA. Quantitative measurement of MMA in this method is performed using a deconvolution algorithm, which mathematically resolves the signal corresponding to MMA and does not require chromatographic resolution of the MMA and SA peaks. Because of its high selectivity, the method utilizes isocratic chromatographic separation; reconditioning and re-equilibration of the chromatographic column between injections is unnecessary. The above features of the method allow high-throughput analysis of MMA with analysis cycle time of 1 min.

  8. Chromatographic selectivity study of 4-fluorophenylacetic acid positional isomers separation.

    PubMed

    Chasse, Tyson; Wenslow, Robert; Bereznitski, Yuri

    2007-07-13

    Unique properties of the fluorine atom stimulate widespread use and development of new organofluorine compounds in agrochemistry, biotechnology and pharmacology applications. However, relatively few synthetic methods exhibit a high degree of fluorination selectivity, which ultimately results in the presence of structurally related fluorinated isomers in the synthetic product. This outcome is undesirable from a pharmaceutical perspective as positional isomers possess different reactivity, biological activity and toxicity as compared to the desired product. It is advantageous to control positional isomers in the early stages of the synthetic process, as rejection and analysis of these isomers will likely become more difficult in later stages. The current work reports the development of a chromatographic analysis of 2- and 3-fluorophenylacetic acid positional isomer impurities in 4-fluorophenylacetic acid (4-FPAA), a building block in the synthesis of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. The method is employed as a part of a Quality by Design Approach to control purity of the starting material in order to eliminate the presence of undesirable positional isomers in the final drug substance. During method development, a wide range of chromatographic conditions and structurally related positional isomer probe molecules were exploited in an effort to gain insight into the specifics of the separation mechanism. For the systems studied it was shown that the choice of organic modifier played a key role in achieving acceptable separation. Further studies encompassed investigation of temperature influence on retention and selectivity of the FPAA isomers separation. Thermodynamic analysis of these data showed that the selectivity of the 2- and 4- fluorophenylacetic acids separation was dominated by an enthalpic process, while the selectivity of the 4- and 3-fluorophenylacetic acids separation was exclusively entropy driven (Delta(DeltaH degrees approximately 0). Studies of

  9. Rotating annular chromatograph for continuous metal separations and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. By continuously introducing the feed material to be separated at a stationary point at the top of the bed and eluent everywhere else around the annulus, elution chromatography occurs. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence, the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effect of annulus width and diameter has recently been studied using the same device with a 50.8-mm-wide annulus and another 0.6-m-long chromatograph with an 89-mm diameter and annulus widths of 6.4, 12.7, and 22.2 mm. These columns have been constructed of Plexiglas and typically operate at a gauge pressure of 175 kPa. To further study the effect of size and pressure, a new 445-mm-diam by 1-m-long column with a 31.8-mm-wide annulus has been fabricated. Its metal construction allows preparative-scale operation with a wide variety of liquids at pressures to 1.3 MPa. Three metal recovery systems have been explored: (1) separation of iron and aluminum in ammonium sulfate-sulfuric acid solutions; (2) separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions; and (3) the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt in ammonium carbonate solutions. This last system simulates the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. It has been studied, using similar conditions, on each of the chromatographs, and the results demonstrate the effect of column dimensions on the quality and quantity of the separation. 8 figures, 1 table.

  10. [Determining thorium level in urine with its preliminary chromatographic extraction].

    PubMed

    Kononykina, N N; Astafurov, V I; Zablotskaia, I D; Popov, V I

    1990-01-01

    The contributors propose a radiometric technique of detecting thorium in urine. The technique is based on a prior concentrating of the nuclide on phosphate residues, with its further separation in extraction-chromatographic vessel filled with diethylhexylphosphorus acid, and reextraction with oxalic acid. Measurements were made in the hard scintillator layer at 90 percent effectiveness. Thorium chemical output was at 85 +/- 3 percent, sensitivity at 5 mBk for a sample. If the sample contained an equal quantity of uranium, the percentage of cleaning thorium from uranium was 100. The proposed technique is economical, simple to perform, and is designed for natural thorium content measurements in human organism. PMID:2086364

  11. Liquid chromatographic determination of ethylenethiourea using pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Doerge, D R; Yee, A B

    1991-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed using pulsed amperometric detection at a gold working electrode to measure residue levels of ethylenethiourea (ETU) in crops and groundwater. Use of the sequential pulsing program eliminates electrode fouling while preserving the sensitive and selective detection of ETU. Minimum detection limits in crops were 5-10 ppb (1.25-2.5 ng on-column) and 5 ppb (0.5 ng) in groundwater. The commercial availability of the pulsed electrochemical detector and its gold working electrode that remains functional with a minimum of conditioning is an improvement in method simplicity.

  12. Gas chromatographic determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes using flame ionization detector in water samples with direct aqueous injection up to 250 microl.

    PubMed

    Kubinec, R; Adamuscin, J; Jurdáková, H; Foltin, M; Ostrovský, I; Kraus, A; Soják, L

    2005-08-19

    A simple method of solventless extraction of volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) from aqueous samples was developed. This method allows direct injection of large volume of water sample into a gas chromatograph using the sorption capacity of the sorbent Chromosorb P NAW applied directly in the injection port of gas chromatograph. The system prevent water penetration into a column, keep it adsorbed on its surface until the analytes are stripped into a column, and the residual water is purging using split flow. The limit of detection ranging from 0.6 for benzene to 1.1 microg l(-1) for o-xylene and limit of quantification ranging 2.0-3.6 microg l(-1) are lower that those reached by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and direct aqueous injection before.

  13. Peak broadening in protein chromatography with monoliths at very fast separations.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R; Jungbauer, A

    2000-10-15

    Monoliths are stationary phases cast as a continuous medium which are interlaced by flow channels ramified with micropores. Pulse response experiments with bovine serum albumin as a model protein were applied for testing polymethacrylate-based monoliths, resulting in peak broadening that practically was not influenced by the chromatographic velocity. An empirical model was developed to describe peak broadening, allowing a term to account for the pore convection and a term for the pore diffusion. A diffusional distance lower than 10 nm was estimated. This corresponds to values observed with monodisperse 1-microm particles. Systematic investigations by changing the response time of the detector showed that the full potential of the monoliths could not be exploited, since the currently available chromatography systems are the limiting factor regarding the speed of data acquisition and virtual peak broadening by the infinite length of the detector. Inertia of the liquid and synchronization between liquid handling and electronic control introduced an additional disturbance. At the lowest possible response time, reliable peak data could be obtained up to a velocity of 35 cm/min. The pressure drop along the continuous bed was much smaller compared to a conventionally packed bed. Different flow patterns and significantly reduced eddy vortexes may be responsible for the high specific permeability. PMID:11055699

  14. Effect of thermal desorption kinetics on vapor injection peak irregularities by a microscale gas chromatography preconcentrator.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Hwan; Liu, Jing; Fan, Xudong; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2012-08-01

    Microscale gas chromatography (μGC) is an emerging analytical technique for in situ analysis and on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in moderately complex mixtures. One of the critical subcomponents in a μGC system is a microfabricated preconcentrator (μ-preconcentrator), which enables detection of compounds existing in indoor/ambient air at low (~sub ppb) concentrations by enhancing their signals. The prevailing notion is that elution peak broadening and tailing phenomena resulting from undesirable conditions of a microfabricated separation column (μ-column) are the primary sources of poor chromatographic resolution. However, previous experimental results indicate that the resolution degradation still remains observed for a μ-column integrated with other μGC subcomponents even after setting optimal separation conditions. In this work, we obtain the evidence that the unoptimized μ-preconcentrator vapor release/injection performance significantly contributes to decrease the fidelity of μGC analysis using our state-of-the-art passive preconcentrator microdevice. The vapor release/injection performance is highly affected by the kinetics of the thermal desorption of compounds trapped in the microdevice. Decreasing the heating rate by 20% from the optimal rate of 90 °Cs(-1) causes a 340% increase in peak tailing as well as 70% peak broadening (30% peak height reduction) to the microscale vapor injection process.

  15. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  16. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  17. Reducing Peak Demand by Time Zone Divisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2014-09-01

    For a large country like India, the electrical power demand is also large and the infrastructure cost for power is the largest among all the core sectors of economy. India has an emerging economy which requires high rate of growth of infrastructure in the power generation, transmission and distribution. The current peak demand in the country is approximately 1,50,000 MW which shall have a planned growth of at least 50 % over the next five years (Seventeenth Electric Power Survey of India, Central Electricity Authority, Government of India, March 2007). By implementing the time zone divisions each comprising of an integral number of contiguous states based on their total peak demand and geographical location, the total peak demand of the nation can be significantly cut down by spreading the peak demand of various states over time. The projected reduction in capital expenditure over a plan period of 5 years is substantial. Also, the estimated reduction in operations expenditure cannot be ignored.

  18. LNG production for peak shaving operations

    SciTech Connect

    Price, B.C.

    1999-07-01

    LNG production facilities are being developed as an alternative or in addition to underground storage throughout the US to provide gas supply during peak gas demand periods. These facilities typically involved a small liquefaction unit with a large LNG storage tank and gas sendout facilities capable of responding to peak loads during the winter. Black and Veatch is active in the development of LNG peak shaving projects for clients using a patented mixed refrigerant technology for efficient production of LNG at a low installed cost. The mixed refrigerant technology has been applied in a range of project sizes both with gas turbine and electric motor driven compression systems. This paper will cover peak shaving concepts as well as specific designs and projects which have been completed to meet this market need.

  19. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  20. Observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin

    1981-01-01

    Presents an abridged version of a chapter from the author's book "In Quest of Telescopes." Includes personal experiences at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and comments on telescopes, photographs, and making observations. (SK)

  1. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  2. Peak Effect in High-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    1996-03-01

    Like many low-Tc superconductors, high-quality YBCO single crystals are found(X.S. Ling and J.I. Budnick, in Magnetic Susceptibility of Superconductors and Other Spin Systems), edited by R.A. Hein, T.L. Francavilla, and D.H. Liebenberg (Plenum Press, New York, 1991), p.377. to exhibit a striking peak effect. In a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the critical current has a pronounced peak below T_c(H). Pippard(A.B. Pippard, Phil. Mag. 19), 217 (1969)., and subsequently Larkin and Ovchinnikov(A.I. Larkin and Yu.N. Ovchinnikov, J. Low Temp. Phys. 34), 409 (1979)., attributed the onset of the peak effect to a softening of the vortex lattice. In this talk, the experimental discovery^1 of the peak effect in high-Tc superconductors will be described, followed by a brief historical perspective of the understanding of this phenomenon and a discussion of a new model(X.S. Ling, C. Tang, S. Bhattacharya, and P.M. Chaikin, cond-mat/9504109, (NEC Preprint 1995).) for the peak effect. In this model, the peak effect is an interesting manifestation of the vortex-lattice melting in the presence of weak random pinning potentials. The rise of critical current with increasing temperature is a signature of the ``melting'' of the Larkin domains. This work is done in collaboration with Joe Budnick, Chao Tang, Shobo Bhattacharya, Paul Chaikin, and Boyd Veal.

  3. Double peak sensory responses: effects of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Aprile, I; Tonali, P; Stalberg, E; Di Stasio, E; Caliandro, P; Foschini, M; Vergili, G; Padua, L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study is to verify whether degeneration of skin receptors or intradermal nerve endings by topical application of capsaicin modifies the double peak response obtained by submaximal anodal stimulation. Five healthy volunteers topically applied capsaicin to the finger-tip of digit III (on the distal phalanx) four times daily for 4-5 weeks. Before and after local capsaicin applications, we studied the following electrophysiological findings: compound sensory action potential (CSAP), double peak response, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. Local capsaicin application causes disappearance or decrease of the second component of the double peak, which gradually increases after the suspension of capsaicin. Conversely, no significant differences were observed for CSAP, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. This study suggests that the second component of the double peak may be a diagnostic tool suitable to show an impairment of the extreme segments of sensory nerve fibres in distal sensory axonopathy in the early stages of damage, when receptors or skin nerve endings are impaired but undetectable by standard nerve conduction studies.

  4. Declines in physiological functional capacity with age: a longitudinal study in peak swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    DONATO, ANTHONY J.; TENCH, KATHLEEN; GLUECK, DEBORAH H.; SEALS, DOUGLAS R.; ESKURZA, IRATXE; TANAKA, HIROFUMI

    2016-01-01

    We followed up swimming performance times of 321 women and 319 men who participated in the US Masters Swimming Championships over a 12-yr period. All swimmers placed in the top 10 in their age group over 3 yr (mean = 5 yr). A random coefficients model for repeated measures was used to derive a line of best fit from a group of regression lines for each subject. Both 50- and 1,500-m swimming performance declined modestly until ~70 yr of age, where a more rapid decline was observed in both men and women. Compared with 1,500-m swimming, the 50-m freestyle declined more modestly and slowly with age. The rate and magnitude of declines in swimming performance with age were greater in women than in men in 50-m freestyle; such sex-related differences were not observed in 1,500-m freestyle. Overall, the variability along a population regression line increased markedly with advancing age. The present longitudinal findings indicate that 1) swimming performance declines progressively until age 70, where the decrease becomes quadratic; 2) the rates of the decline in swimming performance with age are greater in a long-duration than in a short-duration event, suggesting a relatively smaller loss of anaerobic muscular power with age compared with cardiovascular endurance; 3) the age-related rates of decline are greater in women than in men only in a short-duration event; and 4) the variability of the age-related decline in performance increases markedly with advancing age. PMID:12391125

  5. Chromatographic characterisation, under highly aqueous conditions, of a molecularly imprinted polymer binding the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Legido-Quigley, C; Oxelbark, J; De Lorenzi, E; Zurutuza-Elorza, A; Cormack, P A G

    2007-05-15

    The affinity of a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), which was synthesised directly in an aqueous organic solvent, for its template (2,4-D) was studied and compared with the affinity exhibited by two other reference (control) polymers, NIPA and NIPB, for the same analyte. Zonal chromatography was performed to establish the optimal selectivity, expressed as imprinting factor (IF), under chromatographic conditions more aqueous than those described so far in the literature. Frontal analysis (FA) was performed on columns packed with these polymers, using an optimized mobile phase composed of methanol/phosphate buffer (50/50, v/v), to extract adsorption isotherm data and retrieve binding parameters from the best isotherm model. Surprisingly, the template had comparable and strong affinity for both MIP (K = 3.8x10(4) M(-1)) and NIPA (K = 1.9x10(4) M(-1)), although there was a marked difference in the saturation capacities of selective and non-selective sites, as one would expect for an imprinted polymer. NIPB acts as a true control polymer in the sense that it has relatively low affinity for the template (K = 8.0x10(2) M(-1)). This work provides the first frontal chromatographic characterization of such a polymer in a water-rich environment over a wide concentration range. The significance of this work stems from the fact that the chromatographic approach used is generic and can be applied readily to other analytes, but also because there is an increasing demand for well-characterised imprinted materials that function effectively in aqueous media and are thus well-suited for analytical science applications involving, for example, biofluids and environmental water samples.

  6. Analysis of fatty acid steryl esters in tetraploid and hexaploid wheats: identification and comparison between chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Iafelice, Giovanna; Pelillo, Marco; Marconi, Emanuele

    2005-09-21

    Fatty acid steryl esters (FASE) in whole meal of 14 genotypes of tetraploid wheats (Triticum dicocconand T. durum) and 17 genotypes of hexaploid wheats (T. spelta and T. aestivum) were analyzed using different chromatographic strategies. By both GC-FID and HPLC-ELSD, tetraploid wheats are lacking two major peaks. The amounts of FASE, calculated on the basis of the GC-FID analysis, were double in hexaploid species as compared to tetraploids (40 and 20 mg/100 g db, respectively). HPLC with ESI-MS detection enabled the identification of FASE by the characteristic fragmentations and ion-adducts of each molecule. The distribution of steryl residues was not different between the wheat species: the main class of steryl derivatives found was the beta-sitosteryl derivatives, followed by campesteryl derivatives with small amounts of stigmasteryl esters. The esterified fatty acids explain the difference between the hexaploid and tetraploid wheats. In particular, small amounts of campesteryl and beta-sitosteryl, while no trace of stigmasteryl palmitates, were found in T. durum or its hulled ancestor T. dicoccon. Steryl oleates were not detectable in T. aestivum or its hulled ancestor T. spelta, which is consistent with the filogenesis of tetraploid and hexaploid species. Both chromatographic techniques (GC and HPLC) showed that FASE are useful to discriminate between hexaploid and tetraploid wheats from both qualitative and quantitative points of view.

  7. Performance characteristics of an ion chromatographic method for the quantitation of citrate and phosphate in pharmaceutical solutions.

    PubMed

    Jenke, Dennis; Sadain, Salma; Nunez, Karen; Byrne, Frances

    2007-01-01

    The performance of an ion chromatographic method for measuring citrate and phosphate in pharmaceutical solutions is evaluated. Performance characteristics examined include accuracy, precision, specificity, response linearity, robustness, and the ability to meet system suitability criteria. In general, the method is found to be robust within reasonable deviations from its specified operating conditions. Analytical accuracy is typically 100 +/- 3%, and short-term precision is not more than 1.5% relative standard deviation. The instrument response is linear over a range of 50% to 150% of the standard preparation target concentrations (12 mg/L for phosphate and 20 mg/L for citrate), and the results obtained using a single-point standard versus a calibration curve are essentially equivalent. A small analytical bias is observed and ascribed to the relative purity of the differing salts, used as raw materials in tested finished products and as reference standards in the analytical method. The assay is specific in that no phosphate or citrate peaks are observed in a variety of method-related solutions and matrix blanks (with and without autoclaving). The assay with manual preparation of the eluents is sensitive to the composition of the eluent in the sense that the eluent must be effectively degassed and protected from CO(2) ingress during use. In order for the assay to perform effectively, extensive system equilibration and conditioning is required. However, a properly conditioned and equilibrated system can be used to test a number of samples via chromatographic runs that include many (> 50) injections.

  8. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. PMID:26375205

  9. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA.

  10. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-01

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition.

  11. Nanodiamond-Decorated Silica Spheres as a Chromatographic Material.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zuqin; Vinci, John C; Colón, Luis A

    2016-02-17

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles (∼5 nm), obtained from detonation soot, were oxidized and/or thermally hydrogenated. Both, the non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated ND particles were successfully coupled to the surface of micrometer-size organo-silica particles. A thin layer of nanodiamonds (NDs) decorating the surface of the organo-silica particles was visible on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) were used to characterize the NDs prior to coupling and to confirm attachment onto the organo-silica particles. Both, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a chemical initiator were proved to be effective radical initiators for the ND-silica coupling reaction, although for scale-up purposes the chemical initiation was more advantageous to produce the ND-silica composite. Commercially available nanodiamond primary particles were also coupled to the surface of silica particles. The ND-containing silica particles were packed into chromatographic columns to study their initial feasibility as adsorbent material for liquid chromatography. The organo-silica particles decorated with hydrogenated NDs were shown to possess reversed phase type (i.e., hydrophobic) behavior toward the probe compounds, whereas silica particles decorated with the non-hydrogenated NDs showed polar (i.e., hydrophilic) interactions, both under liquid chromatographic conditions. PMID:26790050

  12. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium.

  13. Liquid chromatographic determination of vitamin B-6 in foods.

    PubMed

    Vanderslice, J T; Brownlee, S R; Cortissoz, M E

    1984-01-01

    Chromatographic analysis for vitamin B-6 in complex samples imposes certain requirements on the analyst, who must extract completely the bound, unstable vitamers without loss, remove interfering compounds, and provide clean extracts for analysis. The analyst also has to contend with the problems inherent in all methods, such as sample collection, storage, preparation, and homogenization. However, chromatography provides a means of identifying and quantitating all forms of the vitamin, and thus provides the possibility of addressing the problem of the bioavailability of specific vitamers. It also allows automation, which is absolutely essential in coping with the large numbers of samples that are generated in areas such as quality control. These factors are all addressed here, and chromatographic results for various meat and other food products are presented to illustrate the variations in vitamin content that occur from sample to sample, the agreement with microbiological results, and that liquid chromatography (LC) has come of age in dealing with complex biological samples, such as food and food products.

  14. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-01

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition. PMID:11471811

  15. Chromatographic methods for the bioanalysis of antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Riley, C M; Ault, J M; Klutman, N E

    1990-10-12

    The present review has concentrated on chromatographic techniques for the quantitative determination of antiviral drugs in biological samples. Special attention has been paid to the elements of chromatographic assays that are essential to ensure selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision of the various methods. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to determine the suitability of the methods for application to investigations in pharmacokinetics in man and experimental animals, biopharmaceutics, therapeutic drug monitoring, metabolism and pharmacology. Because of the serious consequences of infection from material contaminated with viruses, special consideration has been given to the handling of contaminated samples. It was convenient to divide the antiviral drugs for the purpose of this review into two groups, the nucleoside and the non-nucleoside antiviral drugs. The nucleosides discussed are vidarabine, cytarabine, ribavirin, riboxamide, acyclovir, ganciclovir, desciclovir, carbovir, 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, zidovudine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, 2',3'-didehydro-3'-deoxythymidine, idoxuridine, 5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 2'-fluoro-5-iodoaracytidine and 5-iodo-2'-deoxycytidine. The non-nucleoside antiviral drugs discussed are arildone, amantidine, rimantidine, moroxydine, enviroxime, foscarnet and ampligen. PMID:2258420

  16. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA. PMID:23185899

  17. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  18. Liquid chromatographic determination of free glutamic acid in soup, meat product, and Chinese food: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Beljaars, P R; van Dijk, R; Bisschop, E; Spiegelenberg, W M

    1996-01-01

    An interlaboratory study of the liquid chromatographic (LC) determination of free glutamic acid in soup, meat product, and Chinese food was performed. Homogenized food samples were extracted with hot water, filtered, and diluted. Aliquot portions were treated with N,N-dimethyl-2-mer-capto-ethyl-ammonium chloride (DMMAC) and o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA) to convert glutamic acid to a stable fluorescent complex. After LC separation on a reversed-phase C18 column with acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 7.0)-water (80 + 180 + 740, v/v) as mobile phase, glutamic acid peaks were measured fluorometrically (excitation, 340 nm, and emission, 389 and/or 440 nm). Homocysteic acid was used as internal standard. Twelve samples (6 blind duplicates) containing about 0.3-1.3% (w/w) of glutamic acid were analyzed singly by 12 laboratories. Results from one participant were excluded. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) varied from 1.3 to 4.5%, and reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 4.1 to 7.1%. Average recovery of glutamic acid determined at 6 levels was 101.5% (range, 98-106%).

  19. An improved extraction chromatographic resin for the separation of uranium from acidic nitrate media.

    PubMed

    Dietz, M L; Horwitz, E P; Sajdak, L R; Chiarizia, R

    2001-07-01

    The preparation and characterization of a new extraction chromatographic resin exhibiting extraordinarily strong retention of hexavalent uranyl ion over a wide range of nitric acid concentrations and very high selectivity for U(VI) over Fe(III) and numerous other cations is described. This new material (designated U/TEVA-2) comprises a novel liquid stationary phase consisting of an equimolar mixture of diamyl amylphosphonate (DA[AP]) and Cyanex 923((R)) (a commercially available trialkyl-phosphine oxide, TRPO) sorbed on silanized silica or Amberchrom CG-71. Cyanex 923 is shown to be preferable to a related TRPO, Cyanex 925((R)), due to its lower viscosity and higher selectivity for U(VI) over Fe(III). The retention of uranyl nitrate by the U/TEVA-2 resin, as measured by the k' values (number of free column values to peak maximum) is >5000 from approximately 0.1 to 8 M HNO(3). The ability of the new resin to strongly and selectively retain U(VI) from such a wide range of acid concentrations, along with its favorable physical properties, make it a good candidate for application in the separation and preconcentration of U(VI) from complex environmental, biological, and nuclear waste samples for subsequent determination.

  20. Liquid chromatographic determination of oxytetracycline in edible fish fillets from six species of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The approved use of oxytetracycline (OTC) in U.S. Aquaculture is limited to specific diseases in salmonids and channel catfish. OTC may also be effective in controlling diseases in other fish species important to public aquaculture, but before approved use of OTC can be augmented, an analytical method for determining OTC in fillet tissue from multiple species of fish will be required to support residue depletion studies. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is accurate, precise, and sensitive for OTC in edible fillets from multiple species of fish. Homogenized fillet tissues from walleye, Atlantic salmon, striped bass, white sturgeon, rainbow trout, and channel catfish were fortified with OTC at nominal concentrations of 10, 20, 100, 1000, and 5000 ng/g. In tissues fortified with OTC at 100, 1000, and 5000 ng/g, mean recoveries ranged from 83 to 90%, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 0.9 to 5.8%. In all other tissues, mean recoveries ranged from 59 to 98%, and RSDs ranged from 3.3 to 20%. Method quantitation limits ranged from 6 to 22 ng/g for the 6 species. The LC parameters produced easily integratable OTC peaks without coelution of endogenous compounds. The method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for OTC in fillet tissue from 6 species of fish from 5 phylogenetically diverse groups.

  1. Liquid chromatographic determination of oxytetracycline in edible fish fillets from six species of fish.

    PubMed

    Meinertz, J R; Stehly, G R; Gingerich, W H

    1998-01-01

    The approved use of oxytetracycline (OTC) in U.S. aquaculture is limited to specific diseases in salmonids and channel catfish. OTC may also be effective in controlling diseases in other fish species important to public aquaculture, but before approved use of OTC can be augmented, an analytical method for determining OTC in fillet tissue from multiple species of fish will be required to support residue depletion studies. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is accurate, precise, and sensitive for OTC in edible fillets from multiple species of fish. Homogenized fillet tissues from walleye, Atlantic salmon, striped bass, white sturgeon, rainbow trout, and channel catfish were fortified with OTC at nominal concentrations of 10, 20, 100, 1000, and 5000 ng/g. In tissues fortified with OTC at 100, 1000, and 5000 ng/g, mean recoveries ranged from 83 to 90%, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 0.9 to 5.8%. In all other tissues, mean recoveries ranged from 59 to 98%, and RSDs ranged from 3.3 to 20%. Method quantitation limits ranged from 6 to 22 ng/g for the 6 species. The LC parameters produced easily integratable OTC peaks without coelution of endogenous compounds. The method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for OTC in fillet tissue from 6 species of fish from 5 phylogenetically diverse groups.

  2. Automated two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for mapping proteins in highly complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Isobe, T; Uchida, K; Taoka, M; Shinkai, F; Manabe, T; Okuyama, T

    1991-12-27

    An automated two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system was developed for systematic protein separations which could serve for analytical mapping and preparative separations of proteins. The system applies the principles of the column-switching technique, and consists of two different columns connected in tandem through an electrical column switching valve, two pumping systems to operate each column independently and a system controller to perform sequential chromatography on the two columns. A protein mixture is applied to the first-dimensional anion-exchange column and is separated by stepwise elution with an increasing sodium chloride concentration. The eluent is introduced directly to the second-dimensional reversed-phase column, and is further separated by gradient elution with an increasing acetonitrile concentration. The two elution stages are synchronized by a computer program. By this system, very complex protein mixtures such as crude cerebellar extracts were resolved reproducibly into ca. 200 peaks within 12 h. The method can be used for the total analysis of proteins in various tissues and cells without complicated premanupulation of samples, and allows the simultaneous analysis of a protein isolated by chromatography. The isolated protein is most suitable for use in the strategy of protein and gene sequence analysis.

  3. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in human placenta and cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Saito, H.; Wakisaka, I.

    1986-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in placenta, maternal blood, cord blood, and milk were carried out. Trichlorobiphenyl, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyls, and hexachlorobiphenyls were identified by the mass chromatogram and the mass spectra. Some minor peaks of PCBs were identified by gas chromatography. The relationship between the PCB concentration in placenta and that in milk is different in each PCB congener. The higher the chlorine content of the PCB congener, the more significant the correlation. No significant but a low negative correlation exists between the concentration of some PCB congeners in the placenta and that in cord blood. On the other hand, a significant linear correlation exists between the concentration of hexachlorobenzene in the placenta and that in cord blood. The transplacental transport of each PCB congener varied depending upon its chemical nature. Trichlorobiphenyl and tetrachlorobiphenyl were more transferable than hexachlorobiphenyls. The results show that the placenta and cord blood are useful human samples to analyze the body burden of environmental pollutants and to estimate their transfer from mother to fetus.

  4. PeakForce Tapping resolves individual microvilli on living cells†

    PubMed Central

    Medalsy, Izhar; Hu, Shuiqing; Slade, Andrea L.; Shaw, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Microvilli are a common structure found on epithelial cells that increase the apical surface thus enhancing the transmembrane transport capacity and also serve as one of the cell's mechanosensors. These structures are composed of microfilaments and cytoplasm, covered by plasma membrane. Epithelial cell function is usually coupled to the density of microvilli and its individual size illustrated by diseases, in which microvilli degradation causes malabsorption and diarrhea. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to study the topography and morphology of living cells. Visualizing soft and flexible structures such as microvilli on the apical surface of a live cell has been very challenging because the native microvilli structures are displaced and deformed by the interaction with the probe. PeakForce Tapping® is an AFM imaging mode, which allows reducing tip–sample interactions in time (microseconds) and controlling force in the low pico‐Newton range. Data acquisition of this mode was optimized by using a newly developed PeakForce QNM‐Live Cell probe, having a short cantilever with a 17‐µm‐long tip that minimizes hydrodynamic effects between the cantilever and the sample surface. In this paper, we have demonstrated for the first time the visualization of the microvilli on living kidney cells with AFM using PeakForce Tapping. The structures observed display a force dependence representing either the whole microvilli or just the tips of the microvilli layer. Together, PeakForce Tapping allows force control in the low pico‐Newton range and enables the visualization of very soft and flexible structures on living cells under physiological conditions. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26414320

  5. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Eglinton, T I; Aluwihare, L I; Bauer, J E; Druffel, E R; McNichol, A P

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for (14)C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the (14)C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that Δ(14)C values generally agreed well (±10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5‰ for δ(13)C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. The addition of carbon accompanying derivatization of functionalized compounds (e.g., fatty acids and sterols) prior to chromatographic separation represents a further source of potential error. This contribution can be removed using a simple isotopic mass balance approach. Based on these preliminary results, the PCGC-based approach holds promise for accurately determining (14)C ages on compounds specific to a given source within complex, heterogeneous samples.

  6. The peaks and geometry of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Barlow, Miriam

    2013-01-21

    Fitness landscapes are central in the theory of adaptation. Recent work compares global and local properties of fitness landscapes. It has been shown that multi-peaked fitness landscapes have a local property called reciprocal sign epistasis interactions. The converse is not true. We show that no condition phrased in terms of reciprocal sign epistasis interactions only, implies multiple peaks. We give a sufficient condition for multiple peaks phrased in terms of two-way interactions. This result is surprising since it has been claimed that no sufficient local condition for multiple peaks exist. We show that our result cannot be generalized to sufficient conditions for three or more peaks. Our proof depends on fitness graphs, where nodes represent genotypes and where arrows point toward more fit genotypes. We also use fitness graphs in order to give a new brief proof of the equivalent characterizations of fitness landscapes lacking genetic constraints on accessible mutational trajectories. We compare a recent geometric classification of fitness landscape based on triangulations of polytopes with qualitative aspects of gene interactions. One observation is that fitness graphs provide information that are not contained in the geometric classification. We argue that a qualitative perspective may help relating theory of fitness landscapes and empirical observations.

  7. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  8. Stability-Indicating High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Apixaban in the Presence of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Prabhune, Swarup Suresh; Jaguste, Rajendra Shankar; Kondalkar, Prakash Laxman; Pradhan, Nitin Sharadchandra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A simple, robust, and stability-indicating reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the analysis of apixaban and its related substances has been successfully developed. Chromatography was performed on a 250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm C18 column with a gradient mixture of a phosphate buffer–methanol 60:40 (v/v) at 1.0 mL min-1. Ultraviolet detection of apixaban was at 220 nm. The method was validated for linearity, precision, repeatability, sensitivity, and selectivity. Selectivity was validated by subjecting apixaban solution to photolytic, acidic, basic, oxidative, and thermal degradation. The peaks from the degradation products did not interfere with that from apixaban. The method was used to quantify the related substances in apixaban in the bulk drug and can be used for routine quality control purposes. PMID:26171323

  9. Multi-channel open tubular traps for headspace sampling, gas chromatographic fraction collection and olfactory assessment of milk volatiles.

    PubMed

    Naudé, Yvette; van Aardt, Marleen; Rohwer, Egmont Richard

    2009-04-01

    A headspace sampling method is described for concentrating milk volatiles onto a multi-channel open tubular silicone rubber trap (MCT) for thermal desorption into a GC-FID. Sections of the chromatographic profile, single peaks or combinations of compounds are recaptured with secondary MCTs during a subsequent run. The recaptured aroma is released in a controlled manner by heating the MCT in a portable heating device. An aroma release window of several minutes allows up to six people the opportunity to sniff each aroma fraction more than once. Olfactory results suggest that a synergistic combination of 2-heptanone and 2-nonanone could be responsible for a pungent cheese, sour milk-like aroma. MCTs containing single components or fractions can be desorbed into a GC-MS for compound identification.

  10. SPANISH PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation and a survey of mines and prospects were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas Counties, in south-central Colorado. Anomalous gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in rocks and in stream sediments from drainage basins in the vicinity of the old mines and prospects on West Spanish Peak indicate a substantiated mineral-resource potential for base and precious metals in the area surrounding this peak; however, the mineralized veins are sparse, small in size, and generally low in grade. There is a possibility that coal may underlie the study area, but it would be at great depth and it is unlikely that it would have survived the intense igneous activity in the area. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas because of the lack of structural traps and the igneous activity.

  11. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  12. Correlation between chromatographic fingerprint and antioxidant activity of Turnera diffusa (Damiana).

    PubMed

    Garza-Juárez, Aurora; Salazar-Cavazos, Ma de la Luz; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Pérez-Meseguer, Jonathan; de Torres, Noemi Waksman

    2011-06-01

    In the present contribution, the partial least squares (PLS) method was used to establish a correlation between the antioxidant activity (obtained by DPPH assay) and chromatographic profiles of TURNERA DIFFUSA extracts. Chromatograms were obtained using HPLC-DAD. A model was constructed using 40 samples with 2550 X variables corresponding to the responses obtained at different times; the Y variables consisted of experimental values of antioxidant activity of each extract (measured as EC₅₀). Prior to this analysis, alignment of chromatograms was performed based on consideration of seven high-intensity signals present in all samples. The PLS1 model was validated by cross-validations; its capacity was evaluated using correlation parameters R², root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP). The best results were achieved with zero order chromatograms using five-point smoothing (R² = 0.96, RMSEC = 3.31, and RMSEP = 7.86). Under these conditions, the optimal number of components was five. The model was applied to the prediction of antioxidant activity of commercial products; no significant differences were found between the experimental and predicted antioxidant activities for 83 % of them. PMID:21259186

  13. Unraveling the complexity of dissolved organic matter with chromatographic and multidimensional NMR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, G.; Simpson, M. J.; Simpson, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    The elucidation of molecular information in dissolved organic matter (DOM) is largely hindered by successful chromatographic techniques coupled with analytical techniques capable of identifying unknown structural formulas. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has the capacity to solve bonding inquiries but cannot tackle such complex samples without substantial reduction in heterogeneity. Directly coupled high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-NMR, the novel application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and the application of 2D-HILIC/HILIC have been explored for application with DOM and are reported in this presentation. HILIC is ideal for constituents that are polar and is shown to be ideal for highly oxidized environmental samples. The resulting 1D 1H NMR spectra from HILIC fractions have sharp signals, indicative of individual molecules within DOM, and structural assignments of a number of organic acids are readily identified. The further application of multidimensional NMR experiments to these simplified fractions results in significant structural assignments suggesting that HILIC is a superior HPLC technique for the separation of DOM. Further development with 2D-HILIC/HILIC results in fractions that are substantially homogenized and structurally distinct such that multidimensional NMR permits insight into new structural identifications of unknowns. 2D- and 3D-NMR experiments reveal strong evidence for the presences of highly oxidized sterols as major constituents present in DOM. Continuing research targeted toward the identification of discrete sterols may provide a wealth of information on the parent material and diagenetic processes affecting this material as it moves through the environment.

  14. Compact program resolves overlapping voltammetric peaks.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2004-05-01

    A simple self-contained program designed to separate overlapping peaks from electrochemical analyses is presented. Combining an original interactive way to define initial parameter estimates with nonlinear curve fitting based on the simplex method of optimization, it allows the user to resolve voltammograms consisting of 2 to 5 analytical peaks raised on a straight base line. The program provides highly intuitive interface, easy operation, and straightforward result documentation. A free package including the program, three data files and user instructions is available on request.

  15. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  16. A validated high performance liquid chromatograph-photodiode array method for simultaneous determination of 10 bioactive components in compound hongdoushan capsule

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liancai; Yang, Xian; Tan, Jun; Wang, Bochu; Zhang, Xue

    2014-01-01

    Background: The compound Hongdoushan capsule (CHC) is widely known as compound herbal preparation and is often used to treat ovarian cancer and breast cancer, and to enhance the body immunity, etc., in clinical practice. Objective: To determine simultaneously 10 bioactive components from CHC, namely glycyrrhetinic acid, liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, baccatin III, 10-deacetylbaccatin III, cephalomannine, taxol, ginsenoside Rg1, ginsenoside Re, and ginsenoside Rb1. Materials and Methods: A high performance liquid chromatograph method coupled with photodiode array detector was developed and validated for the 1st time. Chromatographic analysis was performed on a SHIMADZU C18 by utilizing a gradient elution program. The mobile phase was acetonitrile (A)-water (B) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Results: The calibration curve was linear over the investigated concentration ranges with the values of r2 higher than 0.9993 for all the 10 bioactive components. The average recovery rates range from 98.4% to 100.5% with relative standard deviations ≤2.9%. The developed method was successfully applied to analyze 10 compounds in six CHC samples from different batches. In addition, the herbal sources of 32 chromatographic peaks were identified through comparative studying on chromatograms of standard, the respective extracts of Hongdoushan, RenShen, GanCao, and CHC. Conclusion: All the results imply that the accurate and reproducible method developed has high separation rate and enables the determination of 10 bioactive components in a single run for the quality control of CHC. PMID:24696551

  17. Relationships between peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and modified mercalli intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Heaton, T.H.; Kanamori, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli Intensity (Imm) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV) by comparing horizontal peak ground motions to observed intensities for eight significant California earthquakes. For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities (Imm), we find that for peak acceleration with V ??? Imm ??? VIII, Imm = 3.66 log(PGA) - 1.66, and for peak velocity with V ??? Imm ??? IX, Imm = 3.47 log(PGV) + 2.35. From comparison with observed intensity maps, we find that a combined regression based on peak velocity for intensity > VII and on peak acceleration for intensity < VII is most suitable for reproducing observed Imm patterns, consistent with high intensities being related to damage (proportional to ground velocity) and with lower intensities determined by felt accounts (most sensitive to higher-frequency ground acceleration). These new Imm relationships are significantly different from the Trifunac and Brady (1975) correlations, which have been used extensively in loss estimation.

  18. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  19. Gas chromatographic determination of cyclohexanone leached from hemodialysis tubing.

    PubMed

    Snell, R P

    1993-01-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of cyclohexanone leached from hemodialysis tubing by water. Recoveries were 100% at 2.0 mg/100 mL (20 ppm), 99.0% at 500 microg/100 mL (5 ppm), and 106% at 1.0 microg/100 mL (10 ppb). Reproducibility of the system was 0.152% for 3.0 microL injections of a solution containing cyclohexanone at 5.58 microg/mL. Correlation coefficients were 0.9983 for 0.3672-3.672 ng and 1.0000 for 3.672-367.2 ng. Twenty hemodialysis tubing sets from 4 manufacturers were examined. The leachable cyclohexanone ranged from 1.02 to 43.7 ppm per set. Rinsing the tubing with 1 L 0.9% sodium chloride solution did not remove significant amounts (P = 0.05) of leachable cyclohexanone.

  20. Liquid chromatographic determination of carminic acid in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Jalón, M; Peña, M J; Rivas, J C

    1989-01-01

    A reverse-phase liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of carminic acid in yogurt. A C18 column is used with acetonitrile-1.19M formic acid (19 + 81) as mobile phase and diode array detection. Sample preparation includes deproteinization with papain and purification in a polyamide column. The relative standard deviation for repeated determinations of carminic acid in a commercial strawberry-flavored yogurt was 3.0%. Recoveries of carminic acid added to a natural-flavored yogurt ranged from 87.2 to 95.3% with a mean of 90.2%. The method permits measurement of amounts as low as 0.10 mg/kg. PMID:2708269

  1. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Amnesic Shellfish Poison in Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2000-10-01

    A simple, rapid, high-performance liquid chromatographic experiment suitable for undergraduate students is described for determining amnesic shellfish poison in mussels. The poison itself is an unusual naturally occurring amino acid, domoic acid, that has been found in seafood, particularly shellfish, worldwide. The symptoms of poisoning include amnesia (memory loss), loss of balance, mental confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and in extreme cases death. The domoic acid is extracted from homogenized mussel tissue by boiling in water for 5 minutes. The homogenate is cooled and centrifuged, and an aliquot of the supernatant is diluted and analyzed by isocratic HPLC using a C18 column and an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at pH 2.5 with UV detection at 242 nm.

  2. Evaluation of chemometric techniques to select orthogonal chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Van Gyseghem, E; Dejaegher, B; Put, R; Forlay-Frick, P; Elkihel, A; Daszykowski, M; Héberger, K; Massart, D L; Heyden, Y Vander

    2006-04-11

    Several chemometric techniques were compared for their performance to determine the orthogonality and similarity between chromatographic systems. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) based color maps earlier were used to indicate selectivity differences between systems. These maps, in which the systems were ranked according to decreasing or increasing dissimilarities observed in the weighted-average-linkage dendrogram, were now applied as reference method. A number of chemometric techniques were evaluated as potential alternative (visualization) methods for the same purpose. They include hierarchical clustering techniques (single, complete, unweighted-average-linkage, centroid and Ward's method), the Kennard and Stone algorithm, auto-associative multivariate regression trees (AAMRT), and the generalized pairwise correlation method (GPCM) with McNemar's statistical test. After all, the reference method remained our preferred technique to select orthogonal and identify similar systems.

  3. Flight contaminant trace analyser. Phase 1: Chromatographic input system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development of a chromatographic column capable of resolving compounds associated with spacecraft atmospheres is presented. Consideration is given to sampling techniques, column parameters and operation, and column interface with a mass spectrometer. A capillary column coated with a mixture of polyalkylene glycols is found to provide the best selectivity for resolving multicomponent mixtures found in spacecraft atmospheres. Temperature programming and isothermal operation of the column are evaluated and it is found that temperature programming has a shorter analysis time for a given carrier gas flow rate and overall superior resolution. It is observed that hydrogen provides a 15% savings in analysis time over helium. Following the optimization of column operational parameters, a mixed phase Ucon capillary is prepared for evaluation during the column test period in which the test sample is automatically analyzed. Analysis of the multicomponent test mixture is completed within 45 minutes provided temperature programming is used. All but two of the test compounds are well resolved.

  4. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios.

  5. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  6. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Sitagliptin Phosphate and Metformin Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Moataz S

    2015-12-01

    New UPLC method was developed for determination of sitagliptin and metformin using Symmetry C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) and isocratic elution (methanol 20%), pH (3.5) as a mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was operated at 220 nm and the column temperature was 50°C. Linearity parameters were acceptable over the concentration ranges of 2-12 μgml(-1) and 5-35 μgml(-1) for sitagliptin and metformin, respectively. The variables were premeditated to adjust the chromatographic conditions using design of experiment. The proposed method was proved to be accurate for the quality control of the mentioned drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26759536

  7. A Duffing oscillator algorithm to detect the weak chromatographic signal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2007-02-28

    Based on the Duffing equation, a Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was presented. By simulated and experimental data sets, it was proven that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the weak signal could be greatly enhanced by this method. Using signal enhancement by DOA, this method extends the SNR of low concentrations of methylbenzene from 2.662 to 29.90 and the method can be used for quantitative analysis of methylbenzene, which are lower than detection limit of an analytical system. The Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) might be a promising tool to extend instrumental linear range and to improve the accuracy of trace analysis. The research enlarged the application scope of Duffing equation to chromatographic signal processing.

  8. Extraction, chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sumitra; Nie, Ben; Arnold, Robert D; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-05-01

    Lipids make up a diverse subset of biomolecules that are responsible for mediating a variety of structural and functional properties as well as modulating cellular functions such as trafficking, regulation of membrane proteins and subcellular compartmentalization. In particular, phospholipids are the main constituents of biological membranes and play major roles in cellular processes like transmembrane signaling and structural dynamics. The chemical and structural variety of lipids makes analysis using a single experimental approach quite challenging. Research in the field relies on the use of multiple techniques to detect and quantify components of cellular lipidomes as well as determine structural features and cellular organization. Understanding these features can allow researchers to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms by which lipid-lipid and/or lipid-protein interactions take place within the conditions of study. Herein, we provide an overview of essential methods for the examination of lipids, including extraction methods, chromatographic techniques and approaches for mass spectrometric analysis.

  9. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios. PMID:27265004

  10. Ecdysteroid glycosides: identification, chromatographic properties, and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Maria, Annick; Girault, Jean-Pierre; Saatov, Ziyadilla; Harmatha, Juraj; Dinan, Laurence; Lafont, René

    2005-03-01

    Ecdysteroid glycosides are found in both animals and plants. The chromatographic behavior of these molecules is characteristic, as they appear much more polar than their corresponding free aglycones when analyzed by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), whereas the presence of glycosidic moieties has a very limited (if any) impact on polarity when using reversed-phase HPLC. Biological activity is greatly reduced because the presence of this bulky substituent probably impairs the interaction with ecdysteroid receptor(s). 2-Deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone 22-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, which has been isolated from the dried aerial parts of Silene nutans (Caryophyllaceae), is used as a model compound to describe the rationale of ecdysteroid glycoside purification and identification.

  11. Measurement uncertainty of liquid chromatographic analyses visualized by Ishikawa diagrams.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Veronika R

    2003-09-01

    Ishikawa, or cause-and-effect diagrams, help to visualize the parameters that influence a chromatographic analysis. Therefore, they facilitate the set up of the uncertainty budget of the analysis, which can then be expressed in mathematical form. If the uncertainty is calculated as the Gaussian sum of all uncertainty parameters, it is necessary to quantitate them all, a task that is usually not practical. The other possible approach is to use the intermediate precision as a base for the uncertainty calculation. In this case, it is at least necessary to consider the uncertainty of the purity of the reference material in addition to the precision data. The Ishikawa diagram is then very simple, and so is the uncertainty calculation. This advantage is given by the loss of information about the parameters that influence the measurement uncertainty.

  12. Convective and Diffusive O2 Transport Components of Peak Oxygen Uptake Following Long-duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ade, Carl J.; Moore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight reduces aerobic capacity and may be linked with maladaptations in the O2 transport pathway. The aim was to 1) evaluate the cardiorespiratory adaptations following 6 months aboard the International Space Station and 2) model the contributions of convective (Q (raised dot) O2) and peripheral diffusive (DO2) components of O2 transport to changes in peak O2 uptake (V (raised dot) O2PEAK). To date, 1 male astronaut (XX yrs) completed an incremental exercise test to measure V (raised dot) O2PEAK prior to and 2 days post-flight. Cardiac output (Q (raised dot) ) was measured at three submaximal work rates via carbon dioxide rebreathing. The Q (raised dot) :V (raised dot) O2 relationship was extrapolated to V (raised dot) O2PEAK to determine Q (raised dot) PEAK. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at rest via a venous blood sample. These measurements were used to model the changes in Q (raised dot) O2 and DO2 using Fick's principle of mass conservation and Law of Diffusion as established by Wagner and colleagues (Annu. Rev. Physiol 58: 21-50, 1996 and J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 1067-1076, 1992). V (raised dot) O2PEAK decreased postflight from 3.72 to 3.45 l min-1, but Q (raised dot) PEAK increased from 24.5 to 27.7 l min-1. The decrease in V (raised dot) O2PEAK post-flight was associated with a 21.2% decrease in DO2, an 18.6% decrease in O2 extraction, but a 3.4% increase in Q (raised dot) O2. These preliminary data suggest that long-duration spaceflight reduces peripheral diffusing capacity and that it largely contributes to the post-flight decrease in aerobic capacity.

  13. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  14. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-03-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  15. Double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Wenbin; Chen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), which is unique subset of subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs). A statistical analysis has been carried out for the first time with a database of 454 DSAID events identified from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations from 1987 to 2012. Both case studies and statistical analyses show that the two velocity peaks of DSAIDs are associated with two ion temperature peaks and two region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) peaks in the midlatitude ionospheric trough located in the low-conductance subauroral region. DSAIDs are regional and vary significantly with magnetic local time. DSAIDs can evolve from/to SAIDs during their lifetimes, which are from several minutes to tens of minutes. Comparisons between the ionospheric parameters of DSAIDs and SAIDs indicate that double-layer region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) may be the main driver of DSAIDs. It is also found that DSAIDs happen during more disturbed conditions compared with SAIDs.

  16. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  17. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Short, David

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in predicting peak winds at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron requested the AMU develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network , Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations, and CCAFS sounding s from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created mul tiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence , the temperature inversion depth and strength, wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft.

  18. Some Phenomenological Aspects of the Peak Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; Bartlett, Iris

    1976-01-01

    This article relates the psychological dynamics of "peak experiences" to two concepts, intentionality and paradoxical intention, within the philosophical orientation of phenomenology. A review of early philosophical theories of self (Kant and Hume) is presented and compared with the experiential emphasis found in the phenomenology of Husserl.…

  19. Combined liquid and gas chromatographic characterisation of polyglycerol fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    De Meulenaer, B; Van Royen, G; Vanhoutte, B; Huyghebaert, A

    2000-10-27

    In the present study a combined liquid and gas chromatographic technique is described for the analysis of polyglycerol fatty acid esters. Liquid chromatographic fractionation of samples resulted in pure standards of monoesters of di- and triglycerols and diesters of di- and triglycerols. Confirmation of their identity was achieved by LC-MS analysis. Moreover, a chromatographic identification of the mono- and diesters of cyclic diglycerol was proposed. From the isolation of pure esters and their gas chromatographic analysis, it was revealed that co-elution of several compounds occurred. Thus it was shown that prefractionation of the sample using a simplified liquid chromatographic separation, was necessary in order to characterise the esters correctly. In combination with some other chemical analyses, a complete profile of the chemical composition of polyglycerol fatty acid esters can be obtained.

  20. Evaluation of chromatographic descriptors for the prediction of gastro-intestinal absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Ates, H; Callebaut, N; Van Gyseghem, E; Vander Heyden, Y

    2007-01-01

    The use of chromatographic descriptors in QSAR was evaluated. Therefore, retentions were measured on an immobilized artificial membrane system, 2 micellar liquid chromatography systems and 17 orthogonal or disimilar reversed-phase liquid chromatographic systems. It was investigated whether it was possible to model gastro-intestinal absorption as a function of chromatographic retentions applying two linear and one non-linear multivariate modeling technique. In a second step it was evaluated if models built with theoretical descriptors could be improved by adding the measured retention factors to the data set of descriptive variables. It was seen that gastro-intestinal absorption could be modelled in function of chromatographic retention using the non-linear modeling technique multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). The best models were obtained using a combination of theoretical and chromatographic descriptors with MARS as modeling technique.

  1. [Advancement of colloidal gold chromatographic technique in screening of ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-lu; Wang, Yu-ting; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Zhao, Ming; Ou-Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, existing in a variety of foodstuffs and Chinese medicines. OTA is difficult to be detected in practice because of the characteristics such as trace amounts, toxicity, existing in complex matrices. In the numerous detection technologies, colloidal gold chromatographic techniques are highly sensitive, specific, cost-effective and user-friendly, and are being used increasingly for OTA screening. Recently, with the development of aptamer technology and its application in chromatographic technique, a newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique has been developed. This review elaborates the structures and principles of both traditional and newly colloidal gold chromatographic techniques, focuses on newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique, summarizes and compares their use in rapid detection of OTA. Finally, in order to provide a reference for better research of related work, the development trends of this novel technique are prospected.

  2. Spanish Peaks, Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Spanish Peaks, on the eastern flank of the Sangre de Cristo range, abruptly rise 7,000 feet above the western Great Plains. Settlers, treasure hunters, trappers, gold and silver miners have long sighted on these prominent landmarks along the Taos branch of the Santa Fe trail. Well before the westward migration, the mountains figured in the legends and history of the Ute, Apache, Comanche, and earlier tribes. 'Las Cumbres Espanolas' are also mentioned in chronicles of exploration by Spaniards including Ulibarri in 1706 and later by de Anza, who eventually founded San Francisco (California). This exceptional view (STS108-720-32), captured by the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS108, portrays the Spanish Peaks in the context of the southern Rocky Mountains. Uplift of the Sangre de Cristo began about 75 million years ago and produced the long north-trending ridges of faulted and folded rock to the west of the paired peaks. After uplift had ceased (26 to 22 million years ago), the large masses of igneous rock (granite, granodiorite, syenodiorite) that form the Peaks were emplaced (Penn, 1995-2001). East and West Spanish Peaks are 'stocks'-bodies of molten rock that intruded sedimentary layers, cooled and solidified, and were later exposed by erosion. East Peak (E), at 12,708 ft is almost circular and is about 5 1/2 miles long by 3 miles wide, while West Peak (W), at 13,623 ft is roughly 2 3/4 miles long by 1 3/4 miles wide. Great dikes-long stone walls-radiate outward from the mountains like spokes of a wheel, a prominent one forms a broad arc northeast of East Spanish Peak. As the molten rock rose, it forced its way into vertical cracks and joints in the sedimentary strata; the less resistant material was then eroded away, leaving walls of hard rock from 1 foot to 100 feet wide, up to 100 feet high, and as long as 14 miles. Dikes trending almost east-west are also common in the region. For more information visit: Sangres.com: The Spanish Peaks (accessed January 16

  3. [Preparation of an agglomerated ion chromatographic stationary phase with 2,3-ionene and its application in SO4(2-) analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhua; Liu, Junwei; Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhu, Yan

    2015-07-01

    The poly-electrolyte cation functional group of 2,3-ionene was synthesized with tetramethyl ethylenediamine and 1,3-dibromopropane as the raw materials. Multiporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microsphere particles (PS-DVB) were produced by swelling method with polystyrene as seeds and sulfonated. Then the 2,3-ionene was bonded on the sulfonated multi-porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microsphere particles by agglomeration to get the agglomerative ion-exchange stationary phase. After optimizing the synthetic conditions, the new stationary phase was characterized by the techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis. The chromatographic column was packed by slurry method and applied in the analysis of SO4(2-) with a conductivity detector. SO4(2-) and other six common anions including F-, Cl-, NO2(-), Br-, NO3(-), PO4(3-), were separated and analyzed rapidly on the self-regulating chromatographic column within 8 min. The linear range was from 0.5 to 50 mg/L with correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9992. The LOD was 0.04 mg/L with S/N of 3. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) were 2.4% and 3.1% for the peak area and retention time, respectively. The recoveries were between 99.2% and 101.8%. The retention times of SO4(2-) did not change significantly after long time use of the self-regulating chromatographic column. The self-regulating chromatographic column is suitable for the detection of SO4(2-) in complex matrix samples.

  4. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  5. Contributions of Astronauts Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Time on Change in VO2peak during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Buxton, Roxanne; Moore, Alan; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable variability among astronauts with respect to changes in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) during International Space Station (ISS) missions, ranging from a 5% increase to 30% decline. Individual differences may be due to in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity on change in VO2peak during ISS missions. METHODS: Astronauts (N=11) performed peak cycle tests approx 60 days before flight (L-60), on flight day (FD) approx 14, and every approx 30 days thereafter. Metabolic gas analysis and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the test using the portable pulmonary function system. HR and duration of each in-flight cycle ergometer and treadmill (TM) session were recorded and averaged in time segments corresponding to each peak test. Mixed effects linear regression with exercise mode (TM or cycle) as a categorical variable was used to assess the contributions of exercise intensity (%time >70% peak HR or %time >90% peak HR) and time (min/wk), adjusted for body weight, on %change in VO2peak during the mission, and incorporating the repeated-measures experimental design. RESULTS: 110 observations were included in the model (4-6 peak cycle tests per astronaut, 2 exercise devices). VO2peak was reduced from preflight throughout the mission (FD14: 13+/-13% and FD 105: 8+/-10%). Exercise intensity (%peak HR: FD14=66+/-14; FD105=75+/-8) and time (min/wk: FD14=82+/-46; FD105=158+/-40) increased during flight. The models showed main effects for exercise time and intensity with no interactions between time, intensity, and device (70% peak HR: time [z-score=2.39; P=0.017], intensity [z-score=3.51; P=0.000]; 90% peak HR: time [zscore= 3.31; P=0.001], intensity [z-score=2.24; P=0.025]). CONCLUSION: Exercise time and intensity independently contribute to %change in VO2peak during ISS missions, indicating that there are minimal values for exercise time and intensity

  6. Capillary gas chromatographic assay of camphor and m-cresol in dermatological creams.

    PubMed

    Mirza, T; Tan, H S

    1998-09-01

    Camphor and m-cresol mixtures are used in antiseptic and anti-itching creams. No compendial method exists for these preparations. This paper reports a capillary gas chromatographic method using FID detection with 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol as internal standard on a 30 m x 0.32 mm Supelcowax -10 column (0.25 micron film) with helium as carrier gas. Ramped temperature programming was applied. The method allows simultaneous quantitation of camphor and m-cresol in the presence of o- and p-cresols, calamine and zinc oxide. Overall percent recoveries (+/- SD, n = 9) of camphor, o-, p- and m-cresol from spiked placebo creams, at a labeled amount of 10 (w/w)% were 96.9 +/- 0.6, 98.2 +/- 0.6, 99.2 +/- 0.5 and 101.0 +/- 0.9%, respectively, and at a labeled amount of 1% were 96.7 +/- 0.6, 97.8 +/- 0.9, 97.8 +/- 0.6, and 100.3 +/- 1.0%, respectively. The recovery studies were carried out at +/- 30% of the labeled amounts. Linear peak area or height ratios were obtained (r > 0.999) for camphor, o-, p- and m-cresol covering a concentration range of 10-200% of the labeled amount. Linearity (r > 0.999) was also obtained for m-cresol when the relative concentration of o- and p-cresol was varied from 5 to 100% of the m-cresol concentration. The resolution between the 'critical pair' of p- and m-cresol was > or = 1.1. The limit of quantitation was 23 pg for m-cresol and 9.3 pg for camphor using an injection split of 1:50. The repeatability (%RSD) for all compounds were < 2% for peak area and < 1.4% for peak height ratios. System suitability and robustness of the method were established. The method was successively applied to the assay of available commercial products and allows assay of camphor and the three cresol isomers. PMID:9800662

  7. Effect of reservoir storage on peak flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, William D.

    1962-01-01

    For observation of small-basin flood peaks, numerous crest-stage gages now are operated at culverts in roadway embankments. To the extent that they obstruct the natural flood plains of the streams, these embankments serve to create detention reservoirs, and thus to reduce the magnitude of observed peak flows. Hence, it is desirable to obtain a factor, I/O, by which the observed outflow peaks may be adjusted to corresponding inflow peaks. The problem is made more difficult by the fact that, at most of these observation sites, only peak stages and discharges are observed, and complete hydrographs are not available. It is postulated that the inflow hydrographs may be described in terms of Q, the instantaneous discharge; A, the size of drainage area; Pe, the amount of rainfall excess; H, the time from beginning of rainfall excess; D, the duration of rainfall excess; and T and k, characteristic times for the drainage area, and indicative of the time lag between rainfall and runoff. These factors are combined into the dimensionless ratios (QT/APe), (H/T), (k/T), and (D/T), leading to families of inflow hydrographs in which the first ratio is the ordinate, the second is the abscissa, and the third and fourth are distinguishing parameters. Sixteen dimensionless inflow hydrographs have been routed through reservoir storage to obtain 139 corresponding outflow hydrographs. In most of the routings it has been assumed that the storage-outflow relation is linear; that is, that storage is some constant, K, times the outflow. The existence of nonlinear storage is recognized, and exploratory nonlinear routings are described, but analyses and conclusions are confined to the problems of linear storage. Comparisons between inflow hydrographs and outflow hydrographs indicate that, at least for linear storage, I/O=f(k/T, D/T, K/T) in which I and O are, respectively, the magnitudes of the inflow and the outflow peaks, and T, k, D, and K are as defined above. Diagrams are presented to

  8. Peak exercise oxygen uptake during and following long-duration spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alan D; Downs, Meghan E; Lee, Stuart M C; Feiveson, Alan H; Knudsen, Poul; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-08-01

    This investigation was designed to measure aerobic capacity (V̇o2peak) during and after long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. Astronauts (9 males, 5 females: 49 ± 5 yr, 77.2 ± 15.1 kg, 40.6 ± 6.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) [mean ± SD]) performed peak cycle tests ∼90 days before flight, 15 days after launch, every ∼30 days in-flight, and on recovery days 1 (R + 1), R + 10, and R + 30. Expired metabolic gas fractions, ventilation, and heart rate (HR) were measured. Data were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. The main findings of this study were that V̇o2peak decreased early in-flight (∼17%) then gradually increased during flight but never returned to preflight levels. V̇o2peak was lower on R + 1 and R + 10 than preflight but recovered by R + 30. Peak HR was not different from preflight at any time during or following flight. A sustained decrease in V̇o2peak during and/or early postflight was not a universal finding in this study, since seven astronauts were able to attain their preflight V̇o2peak levels either at some time during flight or on R + 1. Four of these astronauts performed in-flight exercise at higher intensities compared with those who experienced a decline in V̇o2peak, and three had low aerobic capacities before flight. These data indicate that, while V̇o2peak may be difficult to maintain during long-duration ISS missions, aerobic deconditioning is not an inevitable consequence of long-duration spaceflight.

  9. Peak exercise oxygen uptake during and following long-duration spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alan D; Downs, Meghan E; Lee, Stuart M C; Feiveson, Alan H; Knudsen, Poul; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-08-01

    This investigation was designed to measure aerobic capacity (V̇o2peak) during and after long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. Astronauts (9 males, 5 females: 49 ± 5 yr, 77.2 ± 15.1 kg, 40.6 ± 6.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) [mean ± SD]) performed peak cycle tests ∼90 days before flight, 15 days after launch, every ∼30 days in-flight, and on recovery days 1 (R + 1), R + 10, and R + 30. Expired metabolic gas fractions, ventilation, and heart rate (HR) were measured. Data were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. The main findings of this study were that V̇o2peak decreased early in-flight (∼17%) then gradually increased during flight but never returned to preflight levels. V̇o2peak was lower on R + 1 and R + 10 than preflight but recovered by R + 30. Peak HR was not different from preflight at any time during or following flight. A sustained decrease in V̇o2peak during and/or early postflight was not a universal finding in this study, since seven astronauts were able to attain their preflight V̇o2peak levels either at some time during flight or on R + 1. Four of these astronauts performed in-flight exercise at higher intensities compared with those who experienced a decline in V̇o2peak, and three had low aerobic capacities before flight. These data indicate that, while V̇o2peak may be difficult to maintain during long-duration ISS missions, aerobic deconditioning is not an inevitable consequence of long-duration spaceflight. PMID:24970852

  10. Nonequilibrium heat capacity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Dibyendu

    2013-12-01

    Development of steady state thermodynamics and statistical mechanics depends crucially on our ability to extend the notions of equilibrium thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states (NESS). The present paper considers the extension of heat capacity. A modified definition is proposed which continues to maintain the same relation to steady state Shannon entropy as in equilibrium, thus providing a thermodynamically consistent treatment of NESS heat capacity.

  11. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  12. Problems of Excess Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, G.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of excess capacity in the airline industry are discussed with focus on the following topics: load factors; fair rate of return on investment; service-quality rivalry among airlines; pricing (fare) policies; aircraft production; and the impacts of excess capacity on operating costs. Also included is a discussion of the interrelationships among these topics.

  13. Peak picking and the assessment of separation performance in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for 2DHPLC that automated the process of peak recognition, measuring their retention times, and then subsequently plotting the information in a two-dimensional retention plane. Following the recognition of peaks, the software then performed a series of statistical assessments of the separation performance, measuring for example, correlation between dimensions, peak capacity and the percentage of usage of the separation space. Peak recognition was achieved by interpreting the first and second derivatives of each respective one-dimensional chromatogram to determine the 1D retention times of each solute and then compiling these retention times for each respective fraction 'cut'. Due to the nature of comprehensive 2DHPLC adjacent cut fractions may contain peaks common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determined which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculated the peak maximum profile by interpolating the space between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was applied to the analysis of a two-dimensional separation of an apple flesh extract separated in a first dimension comprising a cyano stationary phase and an aqueous/THF mobile phase as the first dimension and a second dimension comprising C18-Hydro with an aqueous/MeOH mobile phase. A total of 187 peaks were detected.

  14. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  15. Central peaking of magnetized gas dischargesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2013-05-01

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature Te, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This "universal" profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  16. Peak oil, food systems, and public health.

    PubMed

    Neff, Roni A; Parker, Cindy L; Kirschenmann, Frederick L; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all.

  17. Random matrix definition of the boson peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, M. Lisa; Liu, Andrea J.

    2014-03-01

    The density of vibrational states for glasses and jammed solids exhibits universal features, including an excess of modes above the Debye prediction known as the boson peak, located at a frequency ω*. We show that the eigenvector statistics for modes in the boson peak are universal and emerge from the interplay of disorder and global translation invariance in the dynamical matrix. We demonstrate that a very large class of random matrices contains a band of modes with this same universal structure, and conjecture the existence of a new universality class. We characterize the eigenvector statistics as a function of coordination number, and find that one member of this new class reproduces the scaling of ω* with coordination number that is observed near the jamming transition.

  18. Improved peak shape fitting in alpha spectra.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Caro Marroyo, B

    2015-02-01

    Peak overlap is a recurrent issue in alpha-particle spectrometry, not only in routine analyses but also in the high-resolution spectra from which reference values for alpha emission probabilities are derived. In this work, improved peak shape formulae are presented for the deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra. They have been implemented as fit functions in a spreadsheet application and optimum fit parameters were searched with built-in optimisation routines. Deconvolution results are shown for a few challenging spectra with high statistical precision. The algorithm outperforms the best available routines for high-resolution spectrometry, which may facilitate a more reliable determination of alpha emission probabilities in the future. It is also applicable to alpha spectra with inferior energy resolution. PMID:25497323

  19. Who needs capacity?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2015-01-01

    The UK Law Commission's Discussion Paper, Criminal Liability: Insanity and Automatism, recommends introducing the concept of capacity to the insanity defence. The concept of capacity has an established role in those parts of the law that concern the validity of the decisions that people make, for instance in composing a will or entering into a contract. Making mental capacity a criterion for criminal responsibility in a mentally disordered defendant, however, is potentially problematic. First, the term capacity already has several different meanings in the literature on the jurisprudence of mental abnormality. Second, using the concept of capacity in the way that the Law Commission proposes poses difficulties that relate to the provision of testimony by expert witnesses.

  20. Who needs capacity?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2015-01-01

    The UK Law Commission's Discussion Paper, Criminal Liability: Insanity and Automatism, recommends introducing the concept of capacity to the insanity defence. The concept of capacity has an established role in those parts of the law that concern the validity of the decisions that people make, for instance in composing a will or entering into a contract. Making mental capacity a criterion for criminal responsibility in a mentally disordered defendant, however, is potentially problematic. First, the term capacity already has several different meanings in the literature on the jurisprudence of mental abnormality. Second, using the concept of capacity in the way that the Law Commission proposes poses difficulties that relate to the provision of testimony by expert witnesses. PMID:25939285

  1. Eyesight and the solar Wien peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.

    2003-03-01

    It is sometimes said that humans see best at yellow-green wavelengths because they have evolved under a Sun whose blackbody spectrum has a Wien peak in the green part of the spectrum. However, as a function of frequency, the solar blackbody spectrum peaks in the infrared. Why did human vision not evolve toward a peak sensitivity in this range, if the eye is an efficient quantum detector of photons? The puzzle is resolved if we assume that natural selection acted in such a way as to maximize the amount of energy that can be detected by the retina across a range of wavelengths (whose upper and lower limits are fixed by biological constraints). It is then found that our eyes are indeed perfectly adapted to life under a class G2 star. Extending this reasoning allows educated guesses to be made about the kind of eyesight that might have evolved in extrasolar planetary systems such as that of the red dwarf Gliese 876.

  2. GLACIER PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, gravity, aeromagnetic, and mine and prospect surveys were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Glacier Peak Wilderness study area and proposed additions in Washington. In the study area, six areas containing several base and precious metals have been identified that have substantiated mineral-resource potential, two of which are in areas recommended for wilderness addition. An additional 10 areas have probable mineral-resource potential. The most important demonstrated resource identified is the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit at Glacier Peak mine near the center of the wilderness study area, where a deposit totaling 1. 9 billion tons of mineralized rock has been delineated by drilling. A possible geothermal potential exists on the east side of the Glacier Peak volcano, and a possible 24-million-cu-yd cinder resource is identified at the White Chuck Cinder Cone in the wilderness study area, but both are remote and no resources were identified. No other energy resource potential was identified in this study.

  3. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  4. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  5. Quantifying peak discharges for historical floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    It is usually advantageous to use information regarding historical floods, if available, to define the flood-frequency relation for a stream. Peak stages can sometimes be determined for outstanding floods that occurred many years ago before systematic gaging of streams began. In the United States, this information is usually not available for more than 100-200 years, but in countries with long cultural histories, such as China, historical flood data are available at some sites as far back as 2,000 years or more. It is important in flood studies to be able to assign a maximum discharge rate and an associated error range to the historical flood. This paper describes the significant characteristics and uncertainties of four commonly used methods for estimating the peak discharge of a flood. These methods are: (1) rating curve (stage-discharge relation) extension; (2) slope conveyance; (3) slope area; and (4) step backwater. Logarithmic extensions of rating curves are based on theoretical plotting techniques that results in straight line extensions provided that channel shape and roughness do not change significantly. The slope-conveyance and slope-area methods are based on the Manning equation, which requires specific data on channel size, shape and roughness, as well as the water-surface slope for one or more cross-sections in a relatively straight reach of channel. The slope-conveyance method is used primarily for shaping and extending rating curves, whereas the slope-area method is used for specific floods. The step-backwater method, also based on the Manning equation, requires more cross-section data than the slope-area ethod, but has a water-surface profile convergence characteristic that negates the need for known or estimated water-surface slope. Uncertainties in calculating peak discharge for historical floods may be quite large. Various investigations have shown that errors in calculating peak discharges by the slope-area method under ideal conditions for

  6. The use of chemometrics to study multifunctional indole alkaloids from Psychotria nemorosa (Palicourea comb. nov.). Part II: Indication of peaks related to the inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase-A.

    PubMed

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz C; Viaene, Johan; Tuenter, Emmy; Salton, Juliana; Gasper, André L; Apers, Sandra; Andries, Jan P M; Pieters, Luc; Henriques, Amélia T; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2016-09-01

    Psychotria nemorosa is chemically characterized by indole alkaloids and displays significant inhibitory activity on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), both enzymes related to neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, 43 samples of P. nemorosa leaves were extracted and fractionated in accordance to previously optimized methods (see Part I). These fractions were analyzed by means of UPLC-DAD and assayed for their BChE and MAO-A inhibitory potencies. The chromatographic fingerprint data was first aligned using correlation optimized warping and Principal Component Analysis to explore the data structure was performed. Multivariate calibration techniques, namely Partial Least Squares (PLS1), PLS2 and Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structure (O-PLS1), were evaluated for modelling the activities as a function of the fingerprints. Since the best results were obtained with O-PLS1 model (RMSECV=9.3 and 3.3 for BChE and MAO-A, respectively), the regression coefficients of the model were analyzed and plotted relative to the original fingerprints. Four peaks were indicated as multifunctional compounds, with the capacity to impair both BChE and MAO-A activities. In order to confirm these results, a semi-prep HPLC technique was used and a fraction containing the four peaks was purified and evaluated in vitro. It was observed that the fraction exhibited an IC50 of 2.12μgmL(-1) for BChE and 1.07μgmL(-1) for MAO-A. These results reinforce the prediction obtained by O-PLS1 modelling. PMID:27511709

  7. Chromatographic and computational assessment of lipophilicity using sum of ranking differences and generalized pair-correlation.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Héberger, Károly

    2015-02-01

    Lipophilicity (logP) represents one of the most studied and most frequently used fundamental physicochemical properties. At present there are several possibilities for its quantitative expression and many of them stems from chromatographic experiments. Numerous attempts have been made to compare different computational methods, chromatographic methods vs. computational approaches, as well as chromatographic methods and direct shake-flask procedure without definite results or these findings are not accepted generally. In the present work numerous chromatographically derived lipophilicity measures in combination with diverse computational methods were ranked and clustered using the novel variable discrimination and ranking approaches based on the sum of ranking differences and the generalized pair correlation method. Available literature logP data measured on HILIC, and classical reversed-phase combining different classes of compounds have been compared with most frequently used multivariate data analysis techniques (principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis) as well as with the conclusions in the original sources. Chromatographic lipophilicity measures obtained under typical reversed-phase conditions outperform the majority of computationally estimated logPs. Oppositely, in the case of HILIC none of the many proposed chromatographic indices overcomes any of the computationally assessed logPs. Only two of them (logkmin and kmin) may be selected as recommended chromatographic lipophilicity measures. Both ranking approaches, sum of ranking differences and generalized pair correlation method, although based on different backgrounds, provides highly similar variable ordering and grouping leading to the same conclusions.

  8. Chromatogram Handler: A unique computer program that efficiently processes data generated in liquid chromatographic investigations of organic ligand adsorption on mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreller, David I.; Young, Stephen P.; Mendez, Eladio A.; McGunigale, Samantha L.

    2012-09-01

    We describe a unique C# computer program developed in our laboratory to efficiently manipulate data generated when a novel liquid chromatographic (LC) 'pulsed addition' technique is used to study organic ligand interactions with mineral surfaces. We are not aware of the existence of a program of this nature elsewhere. Geochemically-relevant ligands studied include dissolved organic matter (DOM) mixtures and single component low molecular weight organic acids. Although our LC system has three optical (absorbance and fluorescence) detection channels, the utility can process data from experiments in which data was collected in one, two or three detection channels. If not automated, data management and processing for the technique is prohibitively complex and time-consuming, due large data volumes and the number of operations involved. The input for the utility in a processing run is the set of detector output files generated during an LC experiment. During processing, the utility generates an MS Excel output file within which, for each detection channel: (i) chromatographic peak areas and peak retention times are determined, (ii) area-normalized per-injection and cumulative adsorption densities are calculated, and (iii) graphical representations of various quantities calculated from the raw data are automatically generated. When processing data from experiments with multiple detection channels, the utility additionally prepares graphs that compare recovery values calculated from data in different detection channels, and calculates (and plots) spectroscopic/chromatographic indices which are ratios of signals in various detection channels. The utility was programmed to perform these additional operations on data from multi-channel experiments because (i) 'Interchannel' comparisons of recovery provide insight into the differing surface behavior of distinct DOM sub-fractions, and (ii) the spectroscopic indices provide a useful new form of data that provides insight into

  9. Effects of urban flood-detention reservoirs on peak discharges in Gwinnett County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, G.W.; Inman, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    from 1 to 38 percent for the 2-year recurrence interval, from 1 to 37 percent for the l O-year recurrence interval, and from 3 to 31 percent for the 100-year recurrence interval. In this study of six basins, several factors influenced the effect of flood-detention reservoirs on peak discharges downstream. The contributing drainage area, the maximum storage capacity, the outflow-structure capacity, and the elevation-to-storage relation of the flood-detention reservoir affected peak discharges in several basins. The location in the drainage basin and number of flood-detention reservoirs affected peak discharges in some basins.

  10. Storage peak gas-turbine power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinkotski, B.

    1980-01-01

    A storage gas-turbine power plant using a two-cylinder compressor with intermediate cooling is studied. On the basis of measured characteristics of a .25 Mw compressor computer calculations of the parameters of the loading process of a constant capacity storage unit (05.3 million cu m) were carried out. The required compressor power as a function of time with and without final cooling was computed. Parameters of maximum loading and discharging of the storage unit were calculated, and it was found that for the complete loading of a fully unloaded storage unit, a capacity of 1 to 1.5 million cubic meters is required, depending on the final cooling.

  11. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  12. Evaluation of the Influence of Sulfur-Fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba on the Quality of Si Wu Tang by Chromatographic and Chemometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Ke; Duan, Yu; Qiao, Feng-Xian; Tu, Si-Cong; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Xiao-Li; Song, Xiao-Qing; Fan, Kai-Lei; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2016-01-01

    An accurate and reliable method of high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint combining with multi-ingredient determination was developed and validated to evaluate the influence of sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba on the quality and chemical constituents of Si Wu Tang. Multivariate data analysis including hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, which integrated with high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint and multi-ingredient determination, was employed to evaluate Si Wu Tang in a more objective and scientific way. Interestingly, in this paper, a total of 37 and 36 peaks were marked as common peaks in ten batches of Si Wu Tang containing sun-dried Paeoniae Radix Alba and ten batches of Si Wu Tang containing sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba, respectively, which indicated the changed fingerprint profile of Si Wu Tang when containing sulfur-fumigated herb. Furthermore, the results of simultaneous determination for multiple ingredients showed that the contents of albiflorin and paeoniflorin decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and the contents of gallic acid and Z-ligustilide decreased to some extent at the same time when Si Wu Tang contained sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba. Therefore, sulfur-fumigation processing may have great influence on the quality of Chinese herbal prescription. PMID:27034892

  13. Multi-wavelength high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprints and chemometrics to predict the antioxidant activity of Turnera diffusa as part of its quality control.

    PubMed

    Lucio-Gutiérrez, J Ricardo; Garza-Juárez, Aurora; Coello, J; Maspoch, S; Salazar-Cavazos, M L; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Waksman de Torres, Noemi

    2012-04-27

    The determination of the antioxidant activity of Turnera diffusa using partial least squares regression (PLSR) on chromatographic data is presented. The chromatograms were recorded with a diode array detector and, for each sample, an enhanced fingerprint was constructed by compiling into a single data vector the chromatograms at four wavelengths (216, 238, 254 and 345 nm). The wavelengths were selected from a contour plot, in order to obtain the greater number of peaks at each of the wavelengths. A further pretreatment of the data that included baseline correction, scaling and correlation optimized warping was performed. Optimal values of the parameters used in the warping were found by means of simplex optimization. A PLSR model with four latent variables (LV) explained 52.5% of X variance and 98.4% of Y, with a root mean square error for cross validation of 6.02. To evaluate its reliability, it was applied to an external prediction set, retrieving a relative standard error for prediction of 7.8%. The study of the most important variables for the regression indicated the chromatographic peaks related to antioxidant activity at the used wavelengths. PMID:22405537

  14. Evaluation of the Influence of Sulfur-Fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba on the Quality of Si Wu Tang by Chromatographic and Chemometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ke; Cai, Hao; Duan, Yu; Qiao, Feng-Xian; Tu, Si-Cong; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Xiao-Li; Song, Xiao-Qing; Fan, Kai-Lei; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2016-01-01

    An accurate and reliable method of high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint combining with multi-ingredient determination was developed and validated to evaluate the influence of sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba on the quality and chemical constituents of Si Wu Tang. Multivariate data analysis including hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, which integrated with high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint and multi-ingredient determination, was employed to evaluate Si Wu Tang in a more objective and scientific way. Interestingly, in this paper, a total of 37 and 36 peaks were marked as common peaks in ten batches of Si Wu Tang containing sun-dried Paeoniae Radix Alba and ten batches of Si Wu Tang containing sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba, respectively, which indicated the changed fingerprint profile of Si Wu Tang when containing sulfur-fumigated herb. Furthermore, the results of simultaneous determination for multiple ingredients showed that the contents of albiflorin and paeoniflorin decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and the contents of gallic acid and Z-ligustilide decreased to some extent at the same time when Si Wu Tang contained sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Radix Alba. Therefore, sulfur-fumigation processing may have great influence on the quality of Chinese herbal prescription.

  15. Optimisation of n-Hexyl Acetate Synthesis in a Chromatographic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipesh; Saha, Basudeb; Wakeman, Richard

    Laboratory scale batch chromatographic reactor experiments were carried for the esterification of acetic acid with n-hexanol to synthesise a value added ester, namely n-hexyl acetate in the presence of an ion exchange resin catalyst, Purolite CT-124. The effect of various parameters such as solvent flow rates in the regeneration step, amount of reactants in the reaction step and reaction step time was studied for optimisation of the reaction condition in a batch chromatographic reactor. This information would be useful for the design, operation and optimisation of n-hexyl acetate synthesis in a continuous chromatographic reactor.

  16. Simple automated liquid chromatographic system for splitless nano column gradient separations.

    PubMed

    Sesták, Jozef; Duša, Filip; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    A simple splitless gradient liquid chromatographic system for micro and nano column separations has been assembled and tested. It consists of an OEM programmable syringe pump equipped with a glass microsyringe and ten-port selector valve. Gradient of mobile phase was created in the syringe barrel due to turbulent mixing. Capability of suggested system to create various gradient profiles was verified using 50-μl, 100-μl, and 250-μl glass syringes. Acetone, thiourea, and uracil were tested as gradient markers and finally, uracil was proved to be an excellent way of water-acetonitrile gradient tracing. It was found that up to 80% of the total syringe volume is available as a linear gradient section. In context to micro and nano column chromatography, the best results were obtained using the 100-μl syringe. Separations were performed on the capillary monolithic column Chromolith CapRod RP-18e (150mm×0.1mm) and system performance was evaluated using a test mixture of six alkylphenones as well as tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin. Results proved that suggested system is able to create uniform gradients with high repeatability of retention times of test solutes (RSD<0.3%). Repeatability of injection of sample volumes in the range of 0.1-3μl was evaluated using on-column preconcentration technique which means that sample was diluted in mobile phase of low eluting strength. Repeatability of the peak areas was measured and statistically evaluated (RSD<5%).

  17. Rapid, fluorimetric-liquid chromatographic determination of malondialdehyde in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Chase, Shawn D

    2002-07-25

    Current chromatographic methods of estimation of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative lipid injury, often require extensive extraction procedures, column cleaning or specialized equipment. A rapid and sensitive HPLC method is described for the determination of MDA in plasma and urine. The mobile phase consisted of 40:60 ratio (v/v) of methanol to 50 mM potassium monobasic phosphate at pH 6.8, pumped at a rate of 1.0 ml/min on a Hewlett-Packard Hypersil 5 micro ODS 100 x 4.6 mm placed in a column warmer set to 37 degrees C. Samples of plasma and urine were treated with the antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene and heat derivatized at 100 degrees C for 1 h with thiobarbituric acid at an acid pH. Samples were extracted with n-butanol and 10 microl of the extract was injected at 1 min intervals using an autosampler. The Hewlett-Packard model 1046A programmable fluorescence detector was set at excitation of 515 nm and emission of 553 nm. Retention time was 1.87 min, however absence of interfering peaks, allowed analysis to be carried out in increments of 1 min per sample. Within day variability in estimation was between 8.6% and 10.3%. Between days variability was 3.6-7.9%. Recovery was between 88 and 101%. Samples of urine and plasma from ten normotensive volunteers were 1.94 +/- 0.79 micromol/g creatinine and 0.69 +/- 0.13 micromol/l respectively and were similar to those reported in the literature. MDA degrades at room temperature at a rate of 10% per hour. It is therefore, suggested that the total assay time be limited to 1 h beginning with sample preparation.

  18. Liquid chromatographic determination of para-toluenesulfonamide in edible fillet tissues from three species of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Schmidt, L.J.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chloramine-T (N-sodium-N-chloro-p-toluene-sulfonamide) is a candidate therapeutic drug for treating bacterial gill disease, a predominant disease of a variety of fish species. Research has been initiated to obtain the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) approval for the use of chloramine-T on a variety of fish species. An attribute of a therapeutic aquaculture drug that must be characterized before the FDA approves its use is depletion of the drug's marker residue (the drug's parent compound or metabolite of highest concentration in an edible tissue). Para-Toluenesulfonamide (p-TSA) is the primary degradation product and marker residue for chloramine-T in rainbow trout. To conduct residue depletion studies for chloramine-T in fish, a robust analytical method sensitive and specific for p-TSA residues in edible fillet tissue from a variety of fish was required. Homogenized fillet tissues from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were fortified at nominal p-TSA concentrations of 17, 67, 200, 333, and 1000 ng/g. Samples were analyzed by isocratic reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with absorbance detection at 226 nm. Mean recoveries of p-TSA ranged from 77 to 93.17%; relative standard deviations ranged from 1.5 to 14%; method quantitation limits ranged from 13 to 18 ng/g; and method detection limits ranged from 3.8 to 5.2 ng/g. The LC parameters produced p-TSA peaks without coelution of endogenous compounds and excluded chromatographic interference from at least 20 chemicals and drugs of potential use in aquaculture.

  19. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of pans with luminol chemilumnescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.; Bornick, R.; Chen, Yu-Harn; Marley, N.

    1996-12-31

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) are important air pollutants in tropospheric chemistry. PANs are known to be potent phytotoxins at low ppb concentrations and are lachrymators. They can also transport the more reactive nitrogen dioxide long distances, because they are in equilibrium with that NO{sub x} species. Since PANs are trapped peroxyradicals, they are a direct measure of the peroxyradical levels and the of {open_quotes}photochemical age{close_quotes} of an air parcel. The PANs are typically measured in the atmosphere by using electron capture detection methods. These methods suffer from large background signals and detector responses to oxygen and water vapor. This paper describes the combination of a capillary gas chromatographic column with a modified luminol chemiluminescent nitrogen dioxide detector (Scintrex, Luminox) for rapid and sensitive detection of nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxypropionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyryl nitrate. Detection limits for this approach in the low tens of parts per trillion have been observed with total analysis times of less than three minutes. We will discuss the potential application of this method to other compounds, particularly, organonitrates, in a pyrolysis system and/or with ozone addition to the sampling streams.

  20. Authenticity analysis of pear juice employing chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2014-12-01

    Pear juice is predominately composed of carbohydrates/polyols (>95% of the total soluble solids), making it susceptible to adulteration by the addition of less expensive commercial sweeteners. In this research, the major carbohydrate and polyol (fructose, glucose, sucrose, and sorbitol) content of 32 pure pear juices representing five world producing regions and three years of production was determined. Additionally, methods employing oligosaccharide profiling to detect the debasing of these samples with four commercial sweeteners (HFCS 55 and 90, TIS, and HIS) were developed using capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (CGC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Detection limits for the four commercial sweeteners ranged from 0.5 to 5.0% (v/v). In addition, the developed CGC-FID method could be used to (a) detect the addition of pear to apple juice via arbutin detection and (b) determine if a pear juice was produced using enzymatic liquefaction via the presence of O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranose (cellobiose), all within a single chromatographic analysis.

  1. Liquid chromatographic determination of amphotericin B in different pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lue, Louis P; Hadman, Susan T; Vancura, Ales

    2002-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is one of the most potent antifungal agents and the drug of choice in the treatment of serious fungal infections. A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed to determine AmB in pharmaceutical formulations for injection, tissue culture, cream, and lotion. pBondapak C18 reversed-phase column and a simple mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (40 + 54 + 6, v/v) was used. The flow rate was 1.8 mL/min and the effluent was monitored at 405 nm. The developed LC method uses piroxicam as an internal standard and has a limit of detection of 10 ng/mL, a limit of quantitation of 30 ng/mL, and the assay is linear from 0.01 to 100 microg/mL. AmB and piroxicam elute with retention times of 12.4 and 4.0 min, respectively, and the resolution between AmB and piroxicam was 10.6. In comparison with the official United States Pharmacopeia microbial assay for AmB, this LC method is more rapid, selective, sensitive, and offers positive identification.

  2. Characterisation of wax works of art by gas chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Regert, M; Langlois, J; Colinart, S

    2005-10-14

    To identify the various natural and synthetic substances used by sculptors at the end of the 19th century, several contemporary reference samples were investigated by high temperature gas chromatography (HT GC) and HT GC-MS. Using specific chromatographic conditions and minimising sample preparation, we could separate, detect and identify a wide range of biomolecular markers covering a great variety of molecular weights and volatilities, with a minimum amount of sample, in a single run. Beeswax, spermaceti, carnauba, candellila and Japan waxes as well as pine resin derivatives, animal fats, paraffin, ozokerite and stearin, used as additives in wax works of art, were chemically investigated. In the case of low volatile compounds, transbutylation was performed. The structure of long-chain esters of spermaceti was elucidated for the first time by HT GC-MS analysis. Such a method was then carried out on 10 samples collected on a statuette of Junon by Antoine-Louis Barye (Louvre Museum, Paris, France) and on a sculpture by Aimé-Jules Dalou (Musée de la Révolution Française, Vizille, France). The analytical results obtained provide new data on the complex recipes elaborated by sculptors at the end of the 19th century.

  3. Authenticity analysis of pear juice employing chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2014-12-01

    Pear juice is predominately composed of carbohydrates/polyols (>95% of the total soluble solids), making it susceptible to adulteration by the addition of less expensive commercial sweeteners. In this research, the major carbohydrate and polyol (fructose, glucose, sucrose, and sorbitol) content of 32 pure pear juices representing five world producing regions and three years of production was determined. Additionally, methods employing oligosaccharide profiling to detect the debasing of these samples with four commercial sweeteners (HFCS 55 and 90, TIS, and HIS) were developed using capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (CGC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Detection limits for the four commercial sweeteners ranged from 0.5 to 5.0% (v/v). In addition, the developed CGC-FID method could be used to (a) detect the addition of pear to apple juice via arbutin detection and (b) determine if a pear juice was produced using enzymatic liquefaction via the presence of O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranose (cellobiose), all within a single chromatographic analysis. PMID:25384245

  4. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  5. Sensitive gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric screening of acetylated benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Borrey, D; Meyer, E; Lambert, W; Van Calenbergh, S; Van Peteghem, C; De Leenheer, A P

    2001-02-23

    GC-MS screening conditions were developed for 15 low-dosed benzodiazepines, covering alprazolam, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, ketazolam, lorazepam and triazolam, and the corresponding metabolites alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, 4-hydroxyalprazolam; 7-aminoflunitrazepam, desmethylflunitrazepam, 7-aminodesmethylflunitrazepam; hydroxyethylflurazepam, N-desalkylflurazepam; oxazepam and alpha-hydroxytriazolam, respectively. Benzodiazepines are analyzed on a polydimethylsiloxane column in both the scan and the multiple ion monitoring modes using on-column injection to attain maximal sensitivity. The reactive compounds are acetylated with pyridine and acetic anhydride for 20 min. The derivatives are stable for at least 4 days. The relative standard deviation observed with standard compounds at the low nanogram-level ranged from 1.13 to 4.87% within-day and from 1.12 to 4.94% between-day. Unequivocal identification potential, high chromatographic resolution and sensitivity are combined with minimal thermal degradation. The presented screening conditions provide the basis for a unique routine screening method for low-dosed benzodiazepines with a broad polarity range.

  6. Reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of some food additives.

    PubMed

    Veerabhadrarao, M; Narayan, M S; Kapur, O

    1987-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic methods are described for the separation and determination of non-nutritive sweeteners, namely, acesulfame, aspartame, saccharin, and dulcin; preservatives such as benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid; and caffeine and vanillin in ready-to-serve beverages, ice candy, ice cream, squash beverage, tomato sauce, and dry beverage mix samples. These additives are separated on a muBondapak C18 column using methanol-acetic acid-water (20 + 5 + 75) as mobile phase and detected by UV absorption at 254 nm. Caffeine, vanillin, dulcin, and benzoic acid can be analyzed quickly by using a mobile phase of methanol-acetic acid-water (35 + 5 + 60). Aspartame can be separated in the presence of caffeine and vanillin by using the mobile phase pH 3 acetate buffer-methanol (95 + 5). Retention factors and minimum detectable limits are described. The percentage error and the percent relative standard deviation for 6 replicate samples ranged from 0.3 to 2.8 and from 1.64 to 3.60, respectively. Recovery of additives added to the foods named and analyzed by the direct method and by extraction ranged from 98.0 to 100.6% and from 91.6 to 101.8%, respectively. The proposed LC techniques are simple, rapid, and advantageous because all the additives can be detected in a single step, which makes it useful for the routine analysis of various food products.

  7. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Husek, Petr; Simek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradnícková, Helena

    2008-04-01

    Novel fluoroalkyl chloroformates with three and four carbon atoms were investigated for the immediate conversion of amino acids into hydrophobic derivatives in water-containing media. Derivatization conditions were extensively studied and optimized sample preparation protocols elaborated. More than 30 amino acids were treated with the particular reagent in isooctane by simply vortexing the reactive organic phase with a slightly basified aqueous medium containing pyridine or 3-picoline as a catalyst. Outstanding separation of nearly all components on 5% phenylmethylsilicone phase in gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with mass spectrometric (MS) or flame ionization detection (FID) required <10 min. Quantitation characteristics involving linearity in the range of 0.1-100 nmol, regression coefficients of 0.999-0.953 (histidine), MS limit of detection (LOD) reaching 0.03 pmol at proline to nearly 20 pmol at glutamic acid, plus electron impact (EI) spectra and diagnostic SIM fragment ions of the derivatives are reported. The novel method is simple, robust and rapid, enabling to treat amino acids in aqueous environment and to analyze them in <15 min. PMID:18242622

  8. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  9. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatographic analysis of poloxamers.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Sanghoon; Chang, Taihyun

    2016-04-15

    Poloxamers are low molar mass triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), having number of applications as non-ionic surfactants. Comprehensive one and two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis of these materials is proposed in this study. The separation of oligomers of both types (PEO and PPO) is demonstrated for several commercial poloxamers. This is accomplished at the critical conditions for one of the block while interaction for the other block. Reversed phase LC at CAP of PEO allowed for oligomeric separation of triblock copolymers with regard to PPO block whereas normal phase LC at CAP of PPO renders oligomeric separation with respect to PEO block. The oligomeric separation with regard to PEO and PPO are coupled online (comprehensive 2D-LC) to reveal two-dimensional contour plots by unconventional 2D IC×IC (interaction chromatography) coupling. The study provides chemical composition mapping of both PEO and PPO, equivalent to combined molar mass and chemical composition mapping for several commercial poloxamers.

  10. Calculating weighted estimates of peak streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, Timothy A.; Berenbrock, Charles; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Federal guidelines for flood-frequency estimation, the uncertainty of peak streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flow at a streamgage, can be reduced by combining the at-site estimate with the regional regression estimate to obtain a weighted estimate of the flow statistic. The procedure assumes the estimates are independent, which is reasonable in most practical situations. The purpose of this publication is to describe and make available a method for calculating a weighted estimate from the uncertainty or variance of the two independent estimates.

  11. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  13. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a “Knudsen heat capacity” as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  14. Post-synthetic modification of MIL-101(Cr) with pyridine for high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Effective separation of tocopherols is challenging and significant due to their structural similarity and important biological role. Here we report the post-synthetic modification of metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-101(Cr) with pyridine for high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation of tocopherols. Baseline separation of four tocopherols was achieved on a pyridine-grafted MIL-101(Cr) packed column within 10 min using hexane/isopropanol (96:4, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1). The pyridine-grafted MIL-101(Cr) packed column gave high column efficiency (85,000 plates m(-1) for δ-tocopherol) and good precision (0.2-0.3% for retention time, 1.8-3.4% for peak area, 2.6-2.7% for peak height), and also offered much better performance than unmodified MIL-101(Cr) and commercial amino-bonded silica packed column for HPLC separation of tocopherols. The results not only show the promising application of pyridine-grafted MIL-101(Cr) as a novel stationary phase for HPLC separation of tocopherols, but also reveal a facile post-modification of MOFs to expand the application of MOFs in separation sciences.

  15. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported. PMID:26661473

  16. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported.

  17. Semi-automated peak trapping recycle chromatography instrument for peak purity investigations.

    PubMed

    Trone, Mark D; Vaughn, Michael S; Cole, Steven R

    2006-11-10

    A peak trapping recycle chromatography system has been developed and optimized for peak purity assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredients analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After being analyzed using a reversed phase analytical column, peaks of interest are trapped and are subsequently introduced to a recycle chromatography system. In addition to the increased effective length afforded the recycling system, the small selectivity difference between the analytical and recycling methods help separate potential impurities under the main peak. For more difficult to separate components, the increased efficiency of recycle chromatography provides the necessary resolution. Over 227,000 theoretical plates have been obtained in the recycle dimension for some compounds. The sensitivity of the system fell short of the target (0.1%), but it did show sensitivity (0.5%) comparable to other peak purity techniques commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry. The recovery and repeatability have also been shown to be adequate for peak purity assessment. The system has also been automated using a Visual Basic macro, simplifying the interface allowing it to be used as an open access instrument.

  18. Panama Canal capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzini, M.S.

    1995-04-27

    Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

  19. Estimation of cardiac reserve by peak power: validation and initial application of a simplified index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, G. P.; Carlier, S. G.; Fukamachi, K.; Thomas, J. D.; Marwick, T. H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To validate a simplified estimate of peak power (SPP) against true (invasively measured) peak instantaneous power (TPP), to assess the feasibility of measuring SPP during exercise and to correlate this with functional capacity. DESIGN: Development of a simplified method of measurement and observational study. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre for cardiothoracic disease. SUBJECTS: For validation of SPP with TPP, seven normal dogs and four dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. To assess feasibility and clinical significance in humans, 40 subjects were studied (26 patients; 14 normal controls). METHODS: In the animal validation study, TPP was derived from ascending aortic pressure and flow probe, and from Doppler measurements of flow. SPP, calculated using the different flow measures, was compared with peak instantaneous power under different loading conditions. For the assessment in humans, SPP was measured at rest and during maximum exercise. Peak aortic flow was measured with transthoracic continuous wave Doppler, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were derived from brachial sphygmomanometry. The difference between exercise and rest simplified peak power (Delta SPP) was compared with maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2)max), measured from expired gas analysis. RESULTS: SPP estimates using peak flow measures correlated well with true peak instantaneous power (r = 0.89 to 0.97), despite marked changes in systemic pressure and flow induced by manipulation of loading conditions. In the human study, VO(2)max correlated with Delta SPP (r = 0.78) better than Delta ejection fraction (r = 0.18) and Delta rate-pressure product (r = 0.59). CONCLUSIONS: The simple product of mean arterial pressure and peak aortic flow (simplified peak power, SPP) correlates with peak instantaneous power over a range of loading conditions in dogs. In humans, it can be estimated during exercise echocardiography, and correlates with maximum oxygen uptake better than ejection

  20. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  1. Comparison of nano and conventional liquid chromatographic methods for the separation of (+)-catechin-ethyl-malvidin-3-glucoside diastereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Kučera, Lukáš; Fanali, Salvatore; Aturki, Zeineb; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Bednář, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Nano-liquid chromatography and conventional HPLC were used for the separation of diastereomers of (+)-catechin-ethyl-malvidin-3-glucoside. Those bridged anthocyanin dyes were obtained by reaction of (+)-catechin with malvidin-3-glucoside in the presence of acetaldehyde. Both diastereomers were isolated with semipreparative chromatography and their structures were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. In-laboratory prepared capillary columns packed with fully porous particles Chromosphere C18, dp=3μm, core-shell particles Kinetex C18, dp=2.6μm (100μm i.d.) and monolithic column Chromolith CapRod (100μm i.d.) were used for the separation of (+)-catechin, malvidin-3-glucoside and both diastereomers. Chromosphere C18 stationary phase provided the best chromatographic performance. Mobile phase containing water:acetonitrile (80:20) acidified with trifluoroacetic acid (0.1%, v/v/v) was used in an isocratic elution mode with a flow rate of 360nLmin(-1). Separation of studied compounds was achieved in less than 7min under optimized conditions. The nano-liquid chromatographic method and a conventional HPLC one using the same fully porous particles (Chromosphere C18, 3μm, 100mm×4.6mm) were compared providing higher separation efficiency with the first analytical method and similar selectivity. A better peak symmetry and higher resolution of the studied diastereomers was achieved by conventional chromatography. Nevertheless, nano-liquid chromatography appeared to be useful for the separation of complex anthocyanin dyes and can be utilized for their analysis in plant and food micro-samples. The developed method was used for analysis of red wine grape pomace. PMID:26433264

  2. , Recorded at Ladron Peak, Central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, J. W.; Kelley, S.; Read, A. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ladron Peak, situated on the western flank of the Rio Grande rift ~30 miles NW of Socorro, NM, is composed of Precambrian granitic and metamorphic assemblages that have been faulted and uplifted during the late Tertiary formation of the rift. The area is bounded on three sides by normal faults, including the anomalously low-angle (~26°) Jeter fault to the east, which places Precambrian rocks in the footwall against Paleozoic and Mesozoic fault slivers, and mainly Cenozoic Santa Fe Group basin fill in the hanging wall. New apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronological data collected at 22 locations along the NE and SE margins of Ladron Peak give a range of ages from 10.9 ± 1.9 to 20.4 ± 8.6 Ma. Samples within the footwall include granitic and metasedimentary rocks that have mean track lengths of 13.1 to 14.1 μm; one quartzite sample has a mean track length of 12.5 μm, suggesting time in the partial annealing zone. Within the hanging wall block, new AFT ages from the Permian Bursum and Abo Formations give cooling ages of 23.1 ± 3.3 Ma. and 59.9 ± 12.4 Ma., respectively. The Bursum Formation sample, with a track length of 13.7 μm, cooled below the 110°C isotherm during the Miocene, while the Abo Formation sample, with a track length of 11.2 μm, was only partially reset prior to rift-related deformation. Mylonitized granitic and metamorphic rocks in the immediate footwall preserve dip-slip lineations that are parallel to slip on the Jeter fault. This suggests that strain associated with exhumation was recorded by both brittle and ductile deformation. Although this type of deformation is common within metamorphic core complexes in highly extended terranes, ductile normal faulting has not been recognized within the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico, though there is some suggestion of ductile deformation around Blanca Peak in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. These observations imply one or both of the following: (1) Ductile deformation at Ladron Peak was

  3. [Chromatographic determination of bile acids in biological fluids with sensitive and selective detection].

    PubMed

    Goto, J

    1990-11-01

    Separation and determination of bile acids in biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography are reviewed. The capacity ratios of bile acids on an ODS column were affected by the number, position and configuration of the hydroxyl group on the steroid nucleus, and the chromatographic behavior was markedly influenced by the pH of a mobile phase according to the conjugated form at C-24. A new pre-column derivatization reagent, 1-anthroyl nitrile, was developed and applied to the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids. Bile acids were derivatized through the 3 alpha-hydroxyl group into the corresponding esters, separated on an ODS column, and monitored by a fluorescence detector with detection limit of 20 fmol. The sensitive method for the determination of bile acids in biological materials by gas chromatography (GC) in combination with negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry is also described. Of various derivatives for the carboxyl group, the pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester provided the highest value of the ratio of the negative to positive ion current. A characteristic carboxylate anion [M-181]- was produced as the most abundant ion by the loss of the PFB group in NICI. PFB esters of bile acids were further derivatized into the dimethylethylsilyl ethers and then separated by GC. The detection limit was 2 fg when the characteristic anion was monitored in the NICI mode. The preparation of 18O-labelled bile acids, as the internal standard for the trace analysis or the tracer for the metabolic study, was developed. Finally, the clean-up procedure for bile acids in biological fluids was investigated. The combined use of solid-phase extraction with a Sep-pak C18 or Bond Elut cartridge and group separation on a lipophilic ion-exchange gel, piperidinohydroxypropyl Sephadex LH-20, was found most effective for this purpose. PMID:2082011

  4. Piper nigrum: micropropagation, antioxidative enzyme activities, and chromatographic fingerprint analysis for quality control.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Rahman, Inayat ur; Fazal, Hina

    2013-04-01

    A reliable in vitro regeneration system for the economical and medicinally important Piper nigrum L. has been established. Callus and shoot regeneration was encouraged from leaf portions on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium augmented with varied concentrations of plant growth regulators. A higher callus production (90 %) was observed in explants incubated on MS medium incorporated with 1.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) along with 0.5 mg L(-1) gibberellic acid after 4 weeks of culture. Moreover, a callogenic response of 85 % was also recorded for 1.0 mg L(-1) BA in combination with 0.25 mg L(-1) α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.25 mg L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or 0.5 mg L(-1) indole butyric acid (IBA) along with 0.25 mg L(-1) NAA and indole acetic acid. Subsequent sub-culturing of callus after 4 weeks of culture onto MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg L(-1) thiodiazoran or 1.5 mg L(-1) IBA induced 100 % shoot response. Rooted plantlets were achieved on medium containing varied concentrations of auxins. The antioxidative enzyme activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)] revealed that significantly higher SOD was observed in regenerated plantlets than in other tissues. However, POD, CAT, and APX were higher in callus than in other tissues. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint analysis protocol was established for quality control in different in vitro-regenerated tissues of P. nigrum L. During analysis, most of the common peaks represent the active principle "piperine." The chemical contents, especially piperine, showed variation from callus culture to whole plantlet regeneration. Based on the deviation in chromatographic peaks, the in vitro-regenerated plantlets exhibit a nearly similar piperine profile to acclimated plantlets. The in vitro regeneration system and HPLC fingerprint analysis established here brought a novel approach to the quality control of in vitro

  5. Time-resolved chromatographic analysis and mechanisms in adsorption and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, Fani

    2009-03-01

    The main object of this review is the study of fundamentals of adsorption and heterogeneous catalysis, a benefit for the understanding of adsorptive and catalytic properties. This work aims to define and record, with the utmost accuracy, the phenomena and the possible reactions. A new methodology for the study of the adsorption is presented, which is a version of the well-known inverse gas chromatography. This reversed-flow inverse gas chromatography (RF-IGC) is technically very simple, and it is combined with a mathematical analysis that gives the possibility for the estimation of various physicochemical parameters related to adsorbent or catalyst characterization, under conditions compatible with the operation of real adsorbents and catalysts. On this base, this methodology has been successfully applied to the study of the impact of air pollutants, volatile organic and/or inorganic, on many solids such as marbles, ceramics, oxide-pigments of works of art, building materials, authentic statues of the Greek Archaeological Museums. Moreover, this methodology proved to be a powerful tool for studying the topography of active sites of heterogeneous surfaces in the nano-scale domain. Thus, some very important local quantities for the surface chemistry have been determined experimentally for many solids including thin films. These physicochemical local quantities (among which adsorption energy and entropy, surface diffusion coefficient, probability density function) have been determined from the experimental pairs of height of extra chromatographic peaks and time by a nonlinear least-squares method, through personal computer programs written in GW BASIC and lately in FORTRAN. Through the time-resolved analysis the surface characterization of the examined materials took place. In addition, the kinetic constants responsible for adsorption/desorption and surface chemical reactions have also been calculated. Thus, important answers have been provided to the following

  6. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  10. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  11. Miniaturized gas chromatograph-Paul ion trap system: applications to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph (GC) and miniature Paul ion trap (PT) mass spectrometer system has been developed for identifying and quantifying chemical species present in closed environments having a complex mixture of gases.

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  13. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  14. Gas chromatographic analysis of simmondsins and simmondsin ferulates in jojoba meal.

    PubMed

    Van Boven, M; Holser, R; Cokelaere, M; Flo, G; Decuypere, E

    2000-09-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of simmondsins and simmondsin ferulates in jojoba meal, in detoxified jojoba meal, in jojoba meal extracts, and in animal food mixtures.

  15. Fluorescence investigation of the chromatographic interactions of nitrogen heterocycles with deactivated silica

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, G.J.; Hurtubise, R.J.

    1988-10-15

    Solid-surface fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the chromatographic interactions of benzo(f)quinoline (B(f)Q) and benzo(h)quinoline (B(h)Q) with water-deactivated silica gel. The results indicated that some of the water was adsorbed on sites in silica that were incapable of proton donation to B(h)Q in the excited singlet state. It was also found that solute localization became more important on the water-deactivated silica. By combination of the luminescence data and the chromatographic data, the mass balance was calculated for three B(h)Q species responsible for the chromatographic bands. Spectral evidence was also obtained that supported a displacement-type of chromatographic mechanism for the systems investigated.

  16. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES ON POLYSACCHARIDE CHIRAL STATIONARY PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the individual enantiomers of 12 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was obtained on polysaccharide enantioselective HPLC columns using alkane-alcohol mobile phase. The OP pesticides were crotoxyphos, dialifor, fonofos, fenamiph...

  17. OpenSlice: Quantitative data sharing from HyperPeaks to global ion chromatograms (GICs).

    PubMed

    Askenazi, Manor; Fenyö, David

    2016-09-01

    Data sharing in the field of MS has advanced greatly thanks to innovations such as the standardized formats, data repositories, and publications guidelines. However, there is currently no data sharing mechanism that enables real-time data browsing and deep linking on a large scale: unrestricted data access (particularly at the quantitative level) ultimately requires the user to download a local copy of the relevant data files (e.g., in order to generate extracted ion chromatograms [XICs]). In this technical resource, we present a set of technologies (collectively termed OpenSlice) that enable the user to quantitatively query hundreds of hours of proteomics discovery data (i.e., nontargeted acquisition) in real time: the user is able to effectively generate XICs for arbitrary masses on the fly and across the entire dataset (so-called global ion chromatograms), interacting with the results through a very intuitive browser-based interface. A key design consideration underlying the OpenSlice approach is the notion that every aspect of the acquired data must be accessible through a RESTful uniform resource locator based application programming interface, up to and including individual chromatographic peaks (hence HyperPeaks). A publicly accessible demonstration of this technology based on the Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium CompRef dataset is made available at http://compref.fenyolab.org.

  18. Statistical analysis of the low-temperature internal friction dislocation peak (Bordoni peak) in nanostructured copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatazhuk, E. N.; Natsik, V. D.

    2011-07-01

    The frequency-temperature relations for internal friction in nanostructured samples of Cu and of fiber composite Cu-32 vol.% Nb with structural fragment sizes of ˜200 nm are analyzed. Data from earlier experiments are used in which a Bordoni peak characteristic of highly deformed copper was found to be localized near a temperature of 90 K in the temperature dependence of the damping decrement for the oscillations (frequencies 73-350 kHz). This peak is caused by a resonance interaction of sound with a system of thermally activated relaxation oscillators, but its width is substantially greater than the width of the standard internal friction peak with a single relaxation time. The peak is analyzed statistically under the assumption that the broadening is caused by the random spread in the activation energy of the relaxation oscillators owing to strong distortions of the crystalline structure of the copper. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental data and the theory of Seeger in which the relaxation oscillators for the Bordoni peak are assumed to be thermally activated kink pairs in rectilinear segments of dislocation lines located in valleys of the Peierls potential relief. It is shown that the experimentally observed height of the peak corresponds to the presence, on the average, of one dislocation segment within a copper crystallite of size 200 nm. Empirical estimates of σP ≈ 2.107 Pa for the Peierls critical stress and ρd ≈ 1013 m-2 for the integrated density of intragrain dislocations are obtained. Nb fibers in the Cu-Nb composite facilitate the formation of nanostructured copper, but have no significant effect on the Bordoni peak.

  19. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  20. Extraction and chromatographic elution behavior of endohedral metallofullerenes: Inferences regarding effective dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, D.; Rietschel, H.; Michel, R.H.; Fischer, A.; Weis, P.; Kappes, M.M.

    1996-01-11

    Chromatographic retention relationships between Ce-, Gd-, La-, and Y- containing endohedral metallofullerenes and a [2-(1-pyrenyl)ethyl]silyl-silica stationary phase were studied using toluene as eluent. Measurements are discussed in comparison to those of empty fullerenes. Both the extraction and chromatographic elution behaviour of the metallofullerenes reflect their polar nature and allow inferences regarding the presence of a dipole moment in M@C{sub 82}. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147

    DOEpatents

    Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-14

    A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

  2. Chromatographic and related reactors. Final report, 1 October 1983-30 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, S.H.

    1988-01-07

    Several variations of gas- and liquid-column chromatographic reactors were investigated. In connection with this, new information on the kinetics and course of the base-catalyzed esterification reaction of tetrachloroterephthaloyl chloride and its derivatives was obtained with /sup 13/C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The operation and conversion in a reverse-phase liquid chromatographic reactor could be analyzed on a quantitative basis when consideration was given to the associative interaction between the stationary phase and elements of the mobile phase. Furthermore, the composition and models for the stationary phase could be examined on the basis of the kinetics of reaction of the tetrachloroterephthaloyl derivatives. A related procedure for determining the phase ratio was developed. Mass-transfer limitations for chromatographic reactions were also analyzed. Incorporation of a void column between two packed liquid-chromatographic columns made it possible to decouple esterification-rate constants for both the mobile and stationary phase. The stopped-flow liquid chromatographic reactor was found to be viable for conversions and operation but not amenable to quantitive analysis because of ionic-strength effects with the systems. Operation of a version of the stopped-flow-gas chromatographic reactor was successful and applications to studies of catalytic reactions were demonstrated. The rate of the CO methanation reaction even could be measured at room temperature on supported nickel, ruthenium, and cobalt catalysts.

  3. Five-descriptor model to predict the chromatographic sequence of natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuying; Wang, Jinhua; Li, Zhangming; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ying; Yang, Songling; Xu, Jia; Zhu, Wenliang

    2016-03-01

    Despite the recent introduction of mass detection techniques, ultraviolet detection is still widely applied in the field of the chromatographic analysis of natural medicines. Here, a neural network cascade model consisting of nine small artificial neural network units was innovatively developed to predict the chromatographic sequence of natural compounds by integrating five molecular descriptors as the input. A total of 117 compounds of known structure were collected for model building. The order of appearance of each compound was determined in gradient chromatography. Strong linear correlation was found between the predicted and actual chromatographic position orders (Spearman's rho = 0.883, p < 0.0001). Application of the model to the external validation set of nine natural compounds was shown to dramatically increase the prediction accuracy of the real chromatographic order of multiple compounds. A case study shows that chromatographic sequence prediction based on a neural network cascade facilitated compound identification in the chromatographic fingerprint of Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza. For natural medicines of known compound composition, our method provides a feasible means for identifying the constituents of interest when only ultraviolet detection is available.

  4. Characterization of lysozyme adsorption in cellulosic chromatographic materials using small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Koshari, Stijn H S; Wagner, Norman J; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-06-19

    Measurements of the nanoscale structure of chromatographic adsorbents and the associated distribution of sorbed protein within the media can facilitate improvements in such media. We demonstrate a new technique for this purpose using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize the nano- to microscale structure of the chromatographic media and sorbed protein under conditions relevant for preparative chromatographic separations. The adsorption of lysozyme on cellulosic S HyperCel™ (Pall Corporation), a strong cation exchanger, was investigated by SANS. The scattering spectrum is reduced to three contributions arising from (1) the chromatographic medium, (2) discrete protein molecules, and (3) the distribution of sorbed protein within the medium. These contributions are quantified for a range of protein loadings. The total concentration of protein in the chromatographic media can be quantified from the SANS spectrum and the protein is observed to retain its tertiary structure upon adsorption, within the resolution of the method. Further analysis of the SANS spectra shows that protein adsorption is uniform in the media. These measurement techniques provide new and valuable nanoscale information about protein sorption in chromatographic media.

  5. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  6. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  7. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters

    PubMed Central

    Takara, Glaucia Nency; Ruas, Gualberto; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Luciana Kawakami; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Jamami, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. METHODS Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman’s test with Dunn’s post-hoc (p<0.05), Spearman’s correlation test and Bland-Altman’s agreement test. RESULTS The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® meters were 428 (263–688 L/min), 450 (350–800 L/min), 420 (310–720 L/min), 380 (300–735 L/min), 400 (310–685 L/min) and 415 (335–610 L/min), respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone® (p<0.001) and Galemed ® (p<0.01) meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed® meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone® meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices’ results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters. PMID:20535364

  8. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  9. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  10. Caffeine supplementation and peak anaerobic power output.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Muniz-Pumares, Daniel; Patterson, Stephen D; Foley, Paul; McInnes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine supplementation on peak anaerobic power output (Wmax). Using a counterbalanced, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 14 well-trained men completed three trials of a protocol consisting of a series of 6-s cycle ergometer sprints, separated by 5-min passive recovery periods. Sprints were performed at progressively increasing torque factors to determine the peak power/torque relationship and Wmax. Apart from Trial 1 (familiarisation), participants ingested a capsule containing 5 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine or placebo, one hour before each trial. The effects of caffeine on blood lactate were investigated using capillary samples taken after each sprint. The torque factor which produced Wmax was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.05) between the caffeine (1.15 ± 0.08 N·m·kg(-1)) and placebo (1.13 ± 0.10 N·m·kg(-1)) trials. There was, however, a significant effect (p < 0.05) of supplementation on Wmax, with caffeine producing a higher value (1885 ± 303 W) than placebo (1835 ± 290 W). Analysis of the blood lactate data revealed a significant (p < 0.05) torque factor × supplement interaction with values being significantly higher from the sixth sprint (torque factor 1.0 N·m·kg(-1)) onwards following caffeine supplementation. The results of this study confirm previous reports that caffeine supplementation significantly increases blood lactate and Wmax. These findings may explain why the majority of previous studies, which have used fixed-torque factors of around 0.75 N·m·kg(-1) and thereby failing to elicit Wmax, have failed to find an effect of caffeine on sprinting performance.

  11. Equivalent peak resolution: characterization of the extent of separation for two components based on their relative peak overlap.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Martin; Svobodová, Jana; Dubský, Pavel; Riesová, Martina; Vigh, Gyula; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    Although the classical formula of peak resolution was derived to characterize the extent of separation only for Gaussian peaks of equal areas, it is often used even when the peaks follow non-Gaussian distributions and/or have unequal areas. This practice can result in misleading information about the extent of separation in terms of the severity of peak overlap. We propose here the use of the equivalent peak resolution value, a term based on relative peak overlap, to characterize the extent of separation that had been achieved. The definition of equivalent peak resolution is not constrained either by the form(s) of the concentration distribution function(s) of the peaks (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) or the relative area of the peaks. The equivalent peak resolution value and the classically defined peak resolution value are numerically identical when the separated peaks are Gaussian and have identical areas and SDs. Using our new freeware program, Resolution Analyzer, one can calculate both the classically defined and the equivalent peak resolution values. With the help of this tool, we demonstrate here that the classical peak resolution values mischaracterize the extent of peak overlap even when the peaks are Gaussian but have different areas. We show that under ideal conditions of the separation process, the relative peak overlap value is easily accessible by fitting the overall peak profile as the sum of two Gaussian functions. The applicability of the new approach is demonstrated on real separations.

  12. The use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Cui, Xianglan; De Beer, Thomas; Liu, Tingting; Tang, Tingting; Sajid, Muhammad; Ouyang, Jin

    2011-07-15

    A new IL-dispersed silica nanoparticles (IL-SNs) capillary column, combining properties of silica nanoparticles and ionic liquid (IL), was used for gas chromatographic separation. By dispersing silica nanoparticles in a conventional IL of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BuMIm][BF6]), a layer of homogeneous interconnected particulate silica networks (thickness: 0.4-0.6 μm) was formed on the inner surface of a capillary column. This coating integrates advantages of silica nanoparticles (high surface area, high dispersed behaviour) and IL (extended liquid-state temperature range, chemical stability), hence increasing interactions between stationary phase and analytes. It was demonstrated that mixtures of a wide range of organic compounds including alcohols, esters, alkanes, aromatic compounds, as well as isomers and non-polar compounds can be well separated using an IL-SNs capillary column. Comparing to traditional support coated open tubular columns, the IL-SNs capillary column displays retention behaviors of separating both polar and non-polar compounds. The much thinner coating film of IL-SNs capillary column, compared to the coating film of SNs capillary column, decreases the resistance to mass transfer, resulting a good column efficiency of 3030 theoretical plates per meter for n-butanol (which is about 5 times higher than for the SNs capillary column). Furthermore, the IL-SNs capillary column decreases the IL retention selectivity dominated by IL structures, and has a higher coating value than neat IL stationary phase. Moreover, the preparation is simple as no modification of ILs or adoption of additional reagents is needed in pretreatments. This manuscript is the first report on the use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatography, which would expand the applicability of silica nanoparticles in analytical chemistry.

  13. New runners to boost peak output at Niagara Falls

    SciTech Connect

    Reason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrofitted Francis turbines will improve the value of power generated from Niagara Falls by increasing the peak output of the hydroturbine units at the Robert Moses hydroelectric plant. The computer-designed runners are expected to add 330 MW to the peak capacity of the 28-yr-old plant and significantly increase the efficiency at high flow rates. Next year, the first new runner will be retrofit to the highly instrumented Unit 4. If the retrofit unit meets it increased-performance expectations, the other 12 units will be upgraded between 1993 and 1998. The work is part of an overall expansion of the Niagara Power Project designed to made better use of the power value of Niagara river water, within the constraints of a treaty with Canada and the scenic value of the falls. These constraints, together with varying flows and heads, introduced enormous complexities into the selection and design of the new runners. The alterations being made to Unit 4, in addition to replacing the turbine runner, include modifying the draft tube-liners, increasing the wicket-gate stroke, replacing the turbine discharge ring (to accommodate longer blades), making various electrical modifications to the generator, and replacing the transformer. But the key to the retrofit is the computer-designed runner. Charles Grose, senior project manager, New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY, emphasizes that such computer design techniques were not available a few years ago; neither were the computer-controlled machining techniques necessary to manufacture the new runners. Other aspects of the upgrading that were analyzed include runner stability, resonance, shaft torsional stress, and runaway speed.

  14. Characterization of low-temperature cofired ceramic tiles as platforms for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B; Gerhardt, Geoff C; Michienzi, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    A gas chromatography (GC) column is fabricated within a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) tile, and its analytical properties are characterized. By using a dual-spiral design, a 100 μm wide square channel up to 15 m in length is produced within an 11 cm × 5.5 cm LTCC tile. The channel is dynamically coated with an OV-101 stationary phase that is cross-linked with dicumyl peroxide. While the uncoated LTCC tiles were able to separate a mixture of n-alkanes, the peak shapes were broad (base width of ~2 min) and tailing. In contrast to this, the coated LTCC tiles produced sharp (base width of ~8-10 s), symmetrical, well-resolved peaks for the same analytes. By using a 7.5 m long channel, about 15,000 plates were obtained for a dodecane test analyte. Further, the coated LTCC tiles were found to produce plate heights that were about 3-fold smaller than those obtained from a conventional capillary GC column of similar length, dimension, and coating operated under the same conditions. As a result, test analyte separations were slightly improved in the LTCC tiles, and their overall performance fared well. In terms of temperature programming, it was found that a series of n-alkanes separated on the LTCC tile provided a cumulative peak capacity of around 54 peaks when using C₈ to C₁₃ as analyte markers. Results indicate that LTCC tiles provide a viable and useful alternative platform for performing good quality GC separations.

  15. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.; Stevens, A. C.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: acs0196@mail.utexas.edu

    2012-06-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotating ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.

  16. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  17. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  18. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  19. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  20. Capacity Maximizing Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged; Jones, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Some non-traditional signal constellations have been proposed for transmission of data over the Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel using such channel-capacity-approaching codes as low-density parity-check (LDPC) or turbo codes. Computational simulations have shown performance gains of more than 1 dB over traditional constellations. These gains could be translated to bandwidth- efficient communications, variously, over longer distances, using less power, or using smaller antennas. The proposed constellations have been used in a bit-interleaved coded modulation system employing state-ofthe-art LDPC codes. In computational simulations, these constellations were shown to afford performance gains over traditional constellations as predicted by the gap between the parallel decoding capacity of the constellations and the Gaussian capacity

  1. Proteomics: capacity versus utility.

    PubMed

    Harry, J L; Wilkins, M R; Herbert, B R; Packer, N H; Gooley, A A; Williams, K L

    2000-04-01

    Until recently scientists studied genes or proteins one at a time. With improvements in technology, new tools have become available to study the complex interactions that occur in biological systems. Global studies are required to do this, and these will involve genomic and proteomic approaches. High-throughput methods are necessary in each case because the number of genes and proteins in even the simplest of organisms are immense. In the developmental phase of genomics, the emphasis was on the generation and assembly of large amounts of nucleic acid sequence data. Proteomics is currently in a phase of technological development and establishment, and demonstrating the capacity for high throughput is a major challenge. However, funding bodies (both in the public and private sector) are increasingly focused on the usefulness of this capacity. Here we review the current state of proteome research in terms of capacity and utility.

  2. Peak-flow frequency relations and evaluation of the peak-flow gaging network in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soenksen, Philip J.; Miller, Lisa D.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.; Watton, Jason R.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of peak-flow magnitude and frequency are required for the efficient design of structures that convey flood flows or occupy floodways, such as bridges, culverts, and roads. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Roads, conducted a study to update peak-flow frequency analyses for selected streamflow-gaging stations, develop a new set of peak-flow frequency relations for ungaged streams, and evaluate the peak-flow gaging-station network for Nebraska. Data from stations located in or within about 50 miles of Nebraska were analyzed using guidelines of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B. New generalized skew relations were developed for use in frequency analyses of unregulated streams. Thirty-three drainage-basin characteristics related to morphology, soils, and precipitation were quantified using a geographic information system, related computer programs, and digital spatial data.For unregulated streams, eight sets of regional regression equations relating drainage-basin to peak-flow characteristics were developed for seven regions of the state using a generalized least squares procedure. Two sets of regional peak-flow frequency equations were developed for basins with average soil permeability greater than 4 inches per hour, and six sets of equations were developed for specific geographic areas, usually based on drainage-basin boundaries. Standard errors of estimate for the 100-year frequency equations (1percent probability) ranged from 12.1 to 63.8 percent. For regulated reaches of nine streams, graphs of peak flow for standard frequencies and distance upstream of the mouth were estimated.The regional networks of streamflow-gaging stations on unregulated streams were analyzed to evaluate how additional data might affect the average sampling errors of the newly developed peak-flow equations for the 100-year frequency occurrence. Results indicated that data from new stations, rather than more

  3. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations with a temperature programmed microfabricated thermal modulator.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Nuñovero, Nicolas; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with a temperature-programmed microfabricated thermal modulator (μTM) is demonstrated. The 0.78 cm(2), 2-stage μTM chip with integrated heaters and a PDMS coated microchannel was placed in thermal contact with a solid-state thermoelectric cooler and mounted on top of a bench scale GC. It was fluidically coupled through heated interconnects to an upstream first-dimension ((1)D) PDMS-coated capillary column and a downstream uncoated capillary or second-dimension ((2)D) PEG-coated capillary. A mixture of n-alkanes C6-C10 was separated isothermally and the full-width-at-half-maximum (fwhm) values of the modulated peaks were assessed as a function of the computer-controlled minimum and maximum stage temperatures of μTM, Tmin and Tmax, respectively. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at -25 and 100°C, respectively, modulated peaks of C6 and C7 had fwhm values<53 ms while the modulated peaks of C10 had a fwhm value of 1.3s, due to inefficient re-mobilization. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at 0 and 210°C, respectively, the fwhm value for the modulated C10 peaks decreased to 67 ms, but C6 and C7 exhibited massive breakthrough. By programming Tmin from -25 to 0°C and Tmax from 100 to 220°C, the C6 and C7 peaks had fwhm values≤50 ms, and the fwhm for C10 peaks remained<95 ms. Using the latter conditions for the GC×GC separation of a sample of unleaded gasoline yielded resolution similar to that reported with a commercial thermal modulator. Replacing the PDMS phase in the μTM with a trigonal-tricationic room temperature ionic liquid eliminated the bleed observed with the PDMS, but also reduced the capacity for several test compounds. Regardless, the demonstrated capability to independently temperature program this low resource μTM enhances its versatility and its promise for use in bench-scale GC×GC systems.

  4. Determination of antioxidants by a novel on-line HPLC-cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) assay with post-column detection.

    PubMed

    Celik, Saliha Esin; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2010-07-26

    A novel on-line HPLC-cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method was developed for the selective determination of polyphenols (flavonoids, simple phenolic and hydroxycinnamic acids) in complex plant matrices. The method combines chromatographic separation, constituent analysis, and post-column identification of antioxidants in plant extracts. The separation of polyphenols was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with two different mobile phase solutions, i.e., MeOH and 0.2% o-phosphoric acid. The HPLC-separated antioxidant polyphenols in the extracts react with copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) reagent in a post-column reaction coil to form a derivative. The reagent is reduced by antioxidants to the copper(I)-neocuproine (Cu(I)-Nc) chelate having maximum absorption at 450 nm. The negative peaks of antioxidant constituents were monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance due to Cu(I)-Nc. The detection limits of polyphenols at 450 nm (in the range of 0.17-3.46 microM) after post-column derivatization were comparable to those at 280 nm UV detection without derivatization. The developed method was successfully applied to the identification of antioxidant compounds in crude extracts of Camellia sinensis, Origanum marjorana and Mentha. The method is rapid, inexpensive, versatile, non-laborious, uses stable reagents, and enables the on-line qualitative and quantitative estimation of antioxidant constituents of complex plant samples.

  5. Some factors that can lead to poor peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography, and possibilities for their remediation.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; McCalley, David V

    2016-01-01

    Some factors which present difficulties for obtaining good peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) were studied. The effect of injection solvent composition and volume was systematically investigated using a selection of weak and stronger basic compounds on a hybrid bare silica phase. Increasing the mismatch between the injection solvent (range 95-0% ACNv/v) and the mobile phase (maintained at 95% ACNv/v) gave increasing deterioration in peak shape. With the 2.1mm ID columns used, injections in the mobile phase of increasing volume (1-20 μL) gave poorer peak shape, but the magnitude of the effect was considerably smaller than that of solvent mismatch over this range. Some solute structural features such as galloyl (trihydroxy benzene), catechol (benzene diol) and phosphate (in nucleotides) gave serious peak tailing, attributed to interactions with metals in the stationary phase or the chromatographic hardware. These undesirable effects can be moderated by including complexing agents in the mobile phase, by changing the stationary phase chemistry, or by altering the mobile phase pH. PMID:26689823

  6. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Lund, Line Naomi; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Michael, Roice; Lindgren, Johan; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Lund, Martin; Houen, Gunnar; Staby, Arne; St Hilaire, Phaedria M

    2012-02-17

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is ∼10⁵ M⁻¹ and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step.

  7. Quercetin-imprinted chromatographic sorbents revisited: optimization of synthesis and rebinding protocols for application to natural resources.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Antonelle; Mespouille, Laetitia; Blankert, Bertrand; Trouillas, Patrick; Surin, Mathieu; Dubois, Philippe; Duez, Pierre

    2014-10-17

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on quercetin and synthesized by either bulk, precipitation or suspension polymerization were characterized in terms of size and shape by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After a study of rebinding protocols, the optimal materials were evaluated as sorbents for solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to confirm the presence of imprinted cavities and to assess their selectivity. Besides quercetin, other structurally related natural compounds, naringenin, daidzein and curcumin, were employed for selectivity tests of MIPs. Although rebinding protocols previously described for such MIPs are typically based on binding, washing and eluting methanol-based solutions, we show that this highly polar solvent leads to weak specific interactions (imprinting factor<1) and poor sorbent properties, most probably because of hydrogen-bonding interferences between the MIP and MeOH. Similar experiments performed in tetrahydrofuran yield to much more improved properties (imprinting factor>2.4). This calls for reviewing most of previously published data on quercetin-MIPs; in proper binding conditions, published MIPs may prove more performing than initially assessed. As expected, tested MIPs exhibited the highest selective rebinding towards quercetin template (imprinting effect, quercetin, 3.41; naringenin, 1.54; daidzein, 1.38; curcumin, 1.67); the differences in selectivity between quercetin analogues were explained by the ligand geometries and H-bonding patterns obtained from quantum-chemical calculations. The evaluation of MIPs under identical analytical conditions allowed investigating the effect of the production method on chromatographic performances. The MIPs in bead materials (for quercetin, peak width, 0.69; number of theoretical plates, 143; symmetry factor, 2.22) provided a significant improvement in chromatographic efficiency over the bulk materials

  8. Torque/velocity properties of human knee muscles: peak and angle-specific estimates.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G E; Adams, W B; Whetstone, M R

    1993-09-01

    Angle-specific (AS) torque/velocity data have been used to avoid angle related variation in peak torque capacity. However, series elastic structures cause the contractile velocity of active force-producing tissue to differ from external joint velocity except at peak torque. Alternatively, angle related variation may be removed by normalizing peak torque to the isometric maximum at that angular position. The AS, peak (P), and normalized peak (NP) methods were compared in isovelocity knee flexion and extension at velocities between 50 and 250 degrees s-1 for 8 male subjects. The P and NP methods gave more similar torque/velocity relations than the AS method. Further, very little variation in peak torque was attributed to differences in joint angle. Both the P and AS methods illustrate that relative quadriceps/hamstrings torque capability (flexor/extensor ratio) increases slightly with velocity. It is proposed that antagonist muscle torque capabilities should be compared at different angular positions to assess muscular imbalance.

  9. The Moral Capacity Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Duffy; Ratheal, Juli D'Ann

    2011-01-01

    Effective counseling practice continues to be inevitably linked to underlying theories of behavioral causality. In this article, the authors present the Moral Capacity Profile of an individual from the perspective of the Amoral, Moral, Quasi-Moral/Quasi-Immoral, and Immoral Model of Behavior, a model that uniquely expands counseling's theoretical…

  10. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  11. Can You Hear That Peak? Utilization of Auditory and Visual Feedback at Peak Limb Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loria, Tristan; de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: At rest, the central nervous system combines and integrates multisensory cues to yield an optimal percept. When engaging in action, the relative weighing of sensory modalities has been shown to be altered. Because the timing of peak velocity is the critical moment in some goal-directed movements (e.g., overarm throwing), the current study…

  12. Peak phosphorus - peak food? The need to close the phosphorus cycle.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The peak in the world production of phosphorus has been predicted to occur in 2033, based on world reserves of rock phosphate (URR) reckoned at around 24,000 million tonnes (Mt), with around 18,000 Mt remaining. This figure was reckoned-up to 71,000 Mt, by the USGS, in 2012, but a production maximum during the present century is still highly probable. There are complex issues over what the demand will be for phosphorus in the future, as measured against a rising population (from 7 billion to over 9 billion in 2050), and a greater per capita demand for fertiliser to grow more grain, in part to feed animals and meet a rising demand for meat by a human species that is not merely more populous but more affluent. As a counterweight to this, we may expect that greater efficiencies in the use of phosphorus - including recycling from farms and of human and animal waste - will reduce the per capita demand for phosphate rock. The unseen game changer is peak oil, since phosphate is mined and recovered using machinery powered by liquid fuels refined from crude oil. Hence, peak oil and peak phosphorus might appear as conjoined twins. There is no unequivocal case that we can afford to ignore the likelihood of a supply-demand gap for phosphorus occurring sometime this century, and it would be perilous to do so.

  13. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    New methods and devices for pursuing performance enhancement through altitude training were developed in Scandinavia and the USA in the early 1990s. At present, several forms of hypoxic training and/or altitude exposure exist: traditional 'live high-train high' (LHTH), contemporary 'live high-train low' (LHTL), intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest (IHE) and intermittent hypoxic exposure during continuous session (IHT). Although substantial differences exist between these methods of hypoxic training and/or exposure, all have the same goal: to induce an improvement in athletic performance at sea level. They are also used for preparation for competition at altitude and/or for the acclimatization of mountaineers. The underlying mechanisms behind the effects of hypoxic training are widely debated. Although the popular view is that altitude training may lead to an increase in haematological capacity, this may not be the main, or the only, factor involved in the improvement of performance. Other central (such as ventilatory, haemodynamic or neural adaptation) or peripheral (such as muscle buffering capacity or economy) factors play an important role. LHTL was shown to be an efficient method. The optimal altitude for living high has been defined as being 2200-2500 m to provide an optimal erythropoietic effect and up to 3100 m for non-haematological parameters. The optimal duration at altitude appears to be 4 weeks for inducing accelerated erythropoiesis whereas <3 weeks (i.e. 18 days) are long enough for beneficial changes in economy, muscle buffering capacity, the hypoxic ventilatory response or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. One critical point is the daily dose of altitude. A natural altitude of 2500 m for 20-22 h/day (in fact, travelling down to the valley only for training) appears sufficient to increase erythropoiesis and improve sea-level performance. 'Longer is better' as regards haematological changes since additional benefits have been shown as hypoxic exposure

  14. NOx control buys to peak in `98

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act provide the legislative framework for a huge NOx reduction program now in operation. This reduction will have a substantial effect in reducing ground-level ozone. A new McIlvaine report concludes that US utilities and industrial companies during the next 10 years will spend more than $800 million annually to meet CAA`s NOx-control regulations. Much of that investment will be for low-NOx burners, which minimize NOx formation. Many utilities and industrial boilers can be retrofitted with a new generation of burners; however, this technology achieves less than 50% NOx reduction. Post-combustion technologies, such as selective catalytic reduction and selective noncatalytic reduction, can reduce NOx as much as 90%. Therefore, plants needing greater NOx reduction will use post-combustion technologies, often in combination with low-NOx burners. The peak order year for NOx-control equipment will be 1998, primarily because Title IV of CAA requires utilities to comply by 2000. Many industrial sources also will be ordering equipment in 1998.

  15. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  16. Satisfying winter peak-power demand with phased gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.H.; Moss, T.E.; Ravikumar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study, commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration, was to investigate application of this concept to the Pacific Northwest. Coal gasification combined-cycle (GCC) plants are receiving serious attention from eastern utilities. Potomac Electric (PEPCO) has engaged Fluor Technology to perform conceptual and preliminary engineering for a nominal 375-MW coal GCC power generation facility to be located in northern Montgomery County, Maryland. Other eastern utilities are engaged in site-specific investigations of satisfying future power requirements employing this alternative, which involves an environmentally superior method of using coal. Coal is combined with oxygen to produce a medium-heating-value fuel gas as an alternative to natural gas. The fuel gas, cleaned to remove sulfur compounds, is burned in gas turbine-generator sets. The hot exhaust gas is used to generate steam for additional power generation. The gasification combined cycle plant is highly efficient and has a high level of flexibility to meet power demands. This study provided background for consideration of one alternative for satisfying winter peak-load demand. The concept is feasible, depending on the timing of the installation of the gasification system, projections of the cost and the availability of natural gas, and restrictions on the use of natural gas. It has the advantage of deferring capacity addition and capital outlay until power is needed and economics are favorable.

  17. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  18. Suspended particle and pathogen peak discharge buffering by a surface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Mulling, Bram T M; van den Boomen, Rob M; van der Geest, Harm G; Kappelhof, Joost W N M; Admiraal, Wim

    2013-03-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been shown to improve the water quality of treated wastewater. The capacity of CWs to reduce nutrients, pathogens and organic matter and restore oxygen regime under normal operating conditions cannot be extrapolated to periods of incidental peak discharges. The buffering capacity of CWs during peak discharges is potentially a key factor for water quality in the receiving waters. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the behaviour of peak discharges of suspended particles, (associated) physiochemical parameters and pathogenic organisms from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in a full scale constructed wetland (CW). By mixing clarified water and sludge rich water from the settlement tank of the WWTP, the suspended particle concentration was increased for 8 h from ± 3.5 to ± 230 mg L(-1), and discharged into a full scale horizontal surface flow constructed wetland. An increase of suspended particle concentration following the peak discharge concurred with increases in turbidity and oxygen demand, total nutrient load (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) and pathogens (Escherichia coli and Enterococci). Temperature, pH, conductivity and dissolved nutrient concentrations (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) were however unaffected by the initial peak discharge. After retention in the unvegetated ponds (the first CW compartment) the applied suspended particle peak with a total load of 86.2 kg was reduced by >99%. Similar peak buffering was observed for the turbidity, oxygen demand and settable volume. Simultaneously dissolved nutrient concentrations increased, indicating partial mineralization of the suspended particles during retention in the unvegetated ponds. The peak buffering of pathogens was lower (40-84%), indicating differences in removal processes between other suspended particles and pathogens. The results indicated that the suspended particles were probably mostly removed by sedimentation and mineralization

  19. Chromatographic metasomatism of the Arabian—Nubian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Mordechai; Navon, Oded; Kessel, Ronit

    1997-11-01

    Trace elements and isotopic ratios of calc-alkaline and tholeiitic dikes from the very last stage of the late Proterozoic, Pan-African orogeny in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), and alkali basalts from the overlying Phanerozoic section are used to constrain the composition and model the evolution of the lithospheric mantle in this region. The dikes and basalts are interpreted as lithospheric melts formed during the post-orogenic (and post-subduction) history of the shield. While the mafic member of all suites share a primitive La/Th ratio, the Nb/Th and Ce/Pb are distinct for each suite. The (Nb/Th) PM (primitive mantle normalized) is ˜0.2 in the calc-alkaline dikes and 1.4 in the tholeiitic dikes and the Phanerozoic alkali basalts. The (Ce/Pb) PM ratios are low in the dikes (0.4 in the calc-alkaline and 0.3 in the tholeiitic) and high in the Phanerozoic basalts (2.8). We suggest that the variations in the trace element ratios reflect sampling of different zones in the lithospheric mantle, which were formed by subduction related metasomatism of the mantle wedge. We constructed a chromatographic model to explain this zonation. In this model a plume-derived oceanic lithosphere is subducted and dehydrates at depth. Fluids released from the dehydrating slab metasomatize the overlying wedge and form amphibole-rich channels. Nb is preferentially taken by the amphibole and is enriched only in the lower zones of the column. The other elements (U, Th, REE and especially Pb and Rb) behave incompatibly. They are enriched in the fluid and transported efficiently to the melting zone in the centre of the wedge. Dehydration of the base of the wedge as it descends below the amphibole stability field depletes this region in Pb and Rb. After the end of subduction, the wedge is fossilized and forms the lithospheric mantle. The zone above the Nb concentration front is sampled by the calc-alkaline magmas. The tholeiitic magmas sample the zone below the Nb front. The

  20. Chromatographic metasomatism of the Arabian-Nubian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, R.; Navon, O.; Stein, M.

    1997-11-01

    Trace elements and isotopic ratios of calc-alkaline and tholeiitic dikes from the very last stage of the late Proterozoic, Pan-African orogeny in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), and alkali basalts from the overlying Phanerozoic section are used to constrain the composition and model the evolution of the lithospheric mantle in this region. The dikes and basalts are interpreted as lithospheric melts formed during the post-orogenic (and post-subduction) history of the shield. While the mafic member of all suites share a primitive La/Th ratio, the Nb/Th and Ce/Pb are distinct for each suite. The (Nb/Th)PM (primitive mantle normalized) is ~0.2 in the calc-alkaline dikes and 1.4 in the tholeiitic dikes and the Phanerozoic alkali basalts. The (Ce/Pb)PM ratios are low in the dikes (0.4 in the calc-alkaline and 0.3 in the tholeiitic) and high in the Phanerozoic basalts (2.8). We suggest that the variations in the trace element ratios reflect sampling of different zones in the lithospheric mantle, which were formed by subduction related metasomatism of the mantle wedge. We constructed a chromatographic model to explain this zonation. In this model a plume-derived oceanic lithosphere is subducted and dehydrates at depth. Fluids released from the dehydrating slab metasomatize the overlying wedge and form amphibole-rich channels. Nb is preferentially taken by the amphibole and is enriched only in the lower zones of the column. The other elements (U, Th, REE and especially Pb and Rb) behave incompatibly. They are enriched in the fluid and transported efficiently to the melting zone in the centre of the wedge. Dehydration of the base of the wedge as it descends below the amphibole stability field depletes this region in Pb and Rb. After the end of subduction, the wedge is fossilized and forms the lithospheric mantle. The zone above the Nb concentration front is sampled by the calc-alkaline magmas. The tholeiitic magmas sample the zone below the Nb front. The Phanerozoic

  1. Chromatographic removal and heat inactivation of hepatitis A virus during manufacture of human albumin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, W L; MacGregor, A; Davies, J R; Hattarki, M; Anderson, D A; Goss, N H

    1998-08-01

    CSL Limited, an Australian biopharmaceutical company, has recently converted its method of manufacture for human albumin from a traditional Cohn-ethanol fractionation method to a method employing chromatographic techniques. Studies were undertaken to determine the efficiency of the chromatographic and pasteurization steps used in the manufacture of Albumex(R) (CSL's trade name for albumin) in removing and inactivating the potential viral contaminant, hepatitis A virus (HAV). The manufacturing process for Albumex(R) includes three chromatographic steps, two of which are ion-exchange steps (DEAE-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow and CM-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow) and the third is a gel-filtration step (Sephacryl(R) S200 HR). The final stage of the Albumex(R) process involves a bulk pasteurization step where product is held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. HAV partitioning experiments on the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF and CM-Sepharose(R) FF ion-exchange and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR gel-filtration columns were performed with scaled-down models of the production-scale chromatographic Albumex(R) process. Production samples collected before each of the chromatographic steps were spiked with HAV and processed through each of the scaled-down chromatographic columns. Samples collected during processing were assayed and the log10 reduction factors calculated. Inactivation kinetics of HAV were examined during the pasteurization of Albumex(R) 5 and 20 [5% and 20% (w/v) albumin solutions] held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Log10 reductions for HAV through the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF, CM-Sepharose(R) FF and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR chromatographic columns were 5.3, 1.5 and 4.2 respectively, whereas a 4.4 and a greater than 3.9 log10 reduction in HAV in Albumex(R) 5 and 20 respectively were achieved during pasteurization.

  2. Exploration and classification of chromatographic fingerprints as additional tool for identification and quality control of several Artemisia species.

    PubMed

    Alaerts, Goedele; Pieters, Sigrid; Logie, Hans; Van Erps, Jürgen; Merino-Arévalo, Maria; Dejaegher, Bieke; Smeyers-Verbeke, Johanna; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2014-07-01

    The World Health Organization accepts chromatographic fingerprints as a tool for identification and quality control of herbal medicines. This is the first study in which the distinction, identification and quality control of four different Artemisia species, i.e. Artemisia vulgaris, A. absinthium, A. annua and A. capillaris samples, is performed based on the evaluation of entire chromatographic fingerprint profiles developed with identical experimental conditions. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with Diode Array Detection (DAD) was used to develop the fingerprints. Application of factorial designs leads to methanol/water (80:20 (v/v)) as the best extraction solvent for the pulverised plant material and to a shaking bath for 30 min as extraction method. Further, so-called screening, optimisation and fine-tuning phases were performed during fingerprint development. Most information about the different Artemisia species, i.e. the highest number of separated peaks in the fingerprint, was acquired on four coupled Chromolith columns (100 mm × 4.6 mm I.D.). Trifluoroacetic acid 0.05% (v/v) was used as mobile-phase additive in a stepwise linear methanol/water gradient, i.e. 5, 34, 41, 72 and 95% (v/v) methanol at 0, 9, 30, 44 and 51 min, where the last mobile phase composition was kept isocratic till 60 min. One detection wavelength was selected to perform data analysis. The lowest similarity between the fingerprints of the four species was present at 214 nm. The HPLC/DAD method was applied on 199 herbal samples of the four Artemisia species, resulting in 357 fingerprints. The within- and between-day variation of the entire method, as well as the quality control fingerprints obtained during routine analysis, were found acceptable. The distinction of these Artemisia species was evaluated based on the entire chromatographic profiles, developed by a shared method, and visualised in score plots by means of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) exploratory data

  3. Structural transitions in polycytidylic acid: proton buffer capacity data.

    PubMed

    Zarudnaya, Margarita I; Samijlenko, Svitlana P; Potyahaylo, Andriy L; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2002-01-01

    The pH-dependences of proton buffer capacity of poly(C) were computed on the basis of the literature data. In these curves there were observed four peaks: two narrow and two wide ones. The first narrow peak reflects the process of cooperative formation of double helices, which is induced by protonation of the N3 atom of nucleotide bases. The first wide peak is assigned to noncooperative process of poly(C) double helices protonation at the N3 nitrogen atom. It is proposed that the second wide peak corresponds to noncooperative protonation of the neutral cytosine bases at the oxygen atom. This reaction causes cooperative dissociation of the poly(C) double helices. The second narrow peak reflects the dissociation process. PMID:11991140

  4. Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China

    SciTech Connect

    Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu

    2010-01-15

    More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Thermal storage in waste-to-energy- facilities for meeting peak steam loads

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Razzak, H.A. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    This paper developes thermoeconomic (second law and present worth) analysis and investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated refuse energy recovery using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. A typical design is envisioned to be modular in nature so that it may be applied to various size loads without major engineering modifications. Each module is rated at 150 tpd of refuse capacity, 750 kW of electrical power, and 26,200 lbm/hr (11,900 kg/hr) of 150 psig (1400 kPa absolute) steam. As an option, condensing turbines are considered to receive unused process steam in the case of reduced steam load. The results indicate that this option is not economically feasible for a typical off-peak utility-purchase rate which leads to the idea of storing the excess energy during off-peak periods and recuperating it during peak periods.

  6. Surface sensitivity of elastic peak electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2016-08-01

    New theoretical model describing the sampling depth of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) has been proposed. Surface sensitivity of this technique can be generally identified with the maximum depth reached by trajectories of elastically backscattered electrons. A parameter called the penetration depth distribution function (PDDF) has been proposed for this description. Two further parameters are descendant from this definition: the mean penetration depth (MPD) and the information depth (ID). From the proposed theory, relatively simple analytical expressions describing the above parameters can be derived. Although the Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used to estimate the sampling depth of EPES, this approach may require a considerable amount of computations. In contrast, the analytical model proposed here (AN) is very fast and provides the parameters PDDF, MPD and ID that very well compare with results of MC simulations. As follows from detailed comparisons performed for four elements (Al, Ni, Pd and Au), the AN model practically reproduced complicated emission angle dependences of the MPDs and the IDs, correctly indicating numerous maximum and minimum positions. In the energy range from 200 eV to 5 keV, the averaged percentage differences between MPDs obtained from the MC and the AN models were close to 4%. An important conclusion resulting from the present studies refers to the procedure of determination of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) from EPES. Frequently, the analyzed sample is deposited as a thin overlayer on a smooth substrate. From an analysis of the presently obtained IDs, is follows that 99% of trajectories in analyzed experimental configurations reaches depth not exceeding 2.39 in units of IMFP. Thus, one can postulate that a safe minimum thickness of an overlayer should be larger than about 3 IMFPs. For example, the minimum thickness of an Al overlayer shoud be about 8 nm at 5000 eV.

  7. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  8. Predicting peak oxygen uptake from submaximal exercise after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Hol, Adrienne T; Eng, Janice J; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the 6-min arm ergometry test (6MAT) in predicting peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak) in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Fifty-two individuals with chronic SCI (age, 38 ± 10 years; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS), A-D; neurological level of injury (NLI), C1-L2; years post-injury (YPI), 13 ± 10 years) completed an incremental arm ergometry V̇O2peak test and a submaximal 6MAT. Oxygen consumption (V̇O2) data from both tests were used to create a predictive equation with regression analysis. Subsequently, a cross-validation group comprising an additional 10 individuals with SCI (age, 39 ± 13 years; AIS, A-D; NLI, C3-L3; YPI, 9 ± 9 years) were used to determine the predictive power of the equation. All participants were able to complete both the V̇O2peak and 6MAT assessments. Regression analysis yielded the following equation to predict V̇O2peak from end-stage 6MAT V̇O2: V̇O2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) = 1.501(6MAT V̇O2) - 0.940. Correlation between measured and predicted V̇O2peak was excellent (r = 0.89). No significant difference was found between measured (17.41 ± 7.44 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and predicted (17.42 ± 6.61 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) V̇O2peak (p = 0.97). When cross-validated with a sample of 10 individuals with SCI, correlation between measured and predicted V̇O2peak remained high (r = 0.89), with no differences between measured (18.81 ± 8.35 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and predicted (18.73 ± 7.27 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) V̇O2peak (p = 0.75). Results suggest that 6MAT V̇O2 can be used to predict V̇O2peak among individuals with chronic SCI. The 6MAT should be used as a clinical tool for assessing aerobic capacity when peak exercise testing is not feasible. PMID:27363732

  9. Predicting peak oxygen uptake from submaximal exercise after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Hol, Adrienne T; Eng, Janice J; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the 6-min arm ergometry test (6MAT) in predicting peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak) in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Fifty-two individuals with chronic SCI (age, 38 ± 10 years; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS), A-D; neurological level of injury (NLI), C1-L2; years post-injury (YPI), 13 ± 10 years) completed an incremental arm ergometry V̇O2peak test and a submaximal 6MAT. Oxygen consumption (V̇O2) data from both tests were used to create a predictive equation with regression analysis. Subsequently, a cross-validation group comprising an additional 10 individuals with SCI (age, 39 ± 13 years; AIS, A-D; NLI, C3-L3; YPI, 9 ± 9 years) were used to determine the predictive power of the equation. All participants were able to complete both the V̇O2peak and 6MAT assessments. Regression analysis yielded the following equation to predict V̇O2peak from end-stage 6MAT V̇O2: V̇O2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) = 1.501(6MAT V̇O2) - 0.940. Correlation between measured and predicted V̇O2peak was excellent (r = 0.89). No significant difference was found between measured (17.41 ± 7.44 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and predicted (17.42 ± 6.61 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) V̇O2peak (p = 0.97). When cross-validated with a sample of 10 individuals with SCI, correlation between measured and predicted V̇O2peak remained high (r = 0.89), with no differences between measured (18.81 ± 8.35 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and predicted (18.73 ± 7.27 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) V̇O2peak (p = 0.75). Results suggest that 6MAT V̇O2 can be used to predict V̇O2peak among individuals with chronic SCI. The 6MAT should be used as a clinical tool for assessing aerobic capacity when peak exercise testing is not feasible.

  10. Effects of regulation on L-moments of annual peak streamflow in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Several techniques exist to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for streamflows that have recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years for natural (unregulated) drainage basins in Texas. Unfortunately, such techniques have limited applicability in regulated basins. There are numerous regulated basins throughout Texas, which has more than 7,000 dams that are identified by Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission permits. The effects on annual peak-streamflow from reservoirs created by these dams range from negligible to the complete suppression of the flood hydrograph; also, reservoirs can artificially create flood-like hydrographs. The large number of reservoirs and their widespread distribution in Texas necessitate an assessment of flood characteristics in regulated basins. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, conducted a study of the effects of regulation on L-moments of annual peak streamflow in Texas. For this report, the State was divided into three regions. Four regression equations to estimate the L-moments of natural annual peak-streamflow data for ungaged sites were derived for each region from data for 367 streamflow-gaging stations in natural basins. The explanatory variables in the equations are contributing drainage area, basin shape factor, and stream slope. The effects of regulation on the L-moments of annual peak-streamflow data were determined by analysis of maximum and normal storage-capacity data from reservoirs for 96 streamflow-gaging stations in variously regulated basins. The results indicate that as potential flood storage (defined by the difference between total maximum and normal capacity) in a basin increases, the mean annual peak-streamflow decreases nonlinearly. Evidence strongly indicates (despite contrary expectation) that the higher L-moments (coefficient of L-variation, L-skew, and L-kurtosis) are unaffected by regulation.

  11. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  12. Haematological rather than skeletal muscle adaptations contribute to the increase in peak oxygen uptake induced by moderate endurance training.

    PubMed

    Montero, David; Cathomen, Adrian; Jacobs, Robert A; Flück, Daniela; de Leur, Jeroen; Keiser, Stefanie; Bonne, Thomas; Kirk, Niels; Lundby, Anne-Kristine; Lundby, Carsten

    2015-10-15

    It remains unclear whether improvements in peak oxygen uptake (V̇(O2peak)) following endurance training (ET) are primarily determined by central and/or peripheral adaptations. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the improvement in V̇(O2peak) following 6 weeks of ET is mainly determined by haematological rather than skeletal muscle adaptations. Sixteen untrained healthy male volunteers (age = 25 ± 4 years, V̇(O2peak) = 3.5 ± 0.5 l min(-1)) underwent supervised ET (6 weeks, 3-4 sessions per week). V̇(O2peak), peak cardiac output (Q̇(peak)), haemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) and blood volumes were assessed prior to and following ET. Skeletal muscle biopsies were analysed for mitochondrial volume density (Mito(VD)), capillarity, fibre types and respiratory capacity (OXPHOS). After the post-ET assessment, red blood cell volume (RBCV) was re-established at the pre-ET level by phlebotomy and V̇(O2peak) and Q̇(peak) were measured again. We speculated that the contribution of skeletal muscle adaptations to the ET-induced increase in V̇(O2peak) would be revealed when controlling for haematological adaptations. V̇(O2peak) and Q̇(peak) were increased (P < 0.05) following ET (9 ± 8 and 7 ± 6%, respectively) and decreased (P < 0.05) after phlebotomy (-7 ± 7 and -10 ± 7%). RBCV, plasma volume and Hb(mass) all increased (P < 0.05) after ET (8 ± 4, 4 ± 6 and 6 ± 5%). As for skeletal muscle adaptations, capillary-to-fibre ratio and total Mito(VD) increased (P < 0.05) following ET (18 ± 16 and 43 ± 30%), but OXPHOS remained unaltered. Through stepwise multiple regression analysis, Q̇(peak), RBCV and Hb(mass) were found to be independent predictors of V̇(O2peak). In conclusion, the improvement in V̇(O2peak) following 6 weeks of ET is primarily attributed to increases in Q̇(peak) and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood in untrained healthy young subjects. PMID:26282186

  13. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  14. Community Capacity Building:

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Crispin N.; Todaro-Rivera, Lea; Brenner, Barbara; Shepard, Peggy; Piedras, Veronica; Horowitz, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful community–academic research partnerships require building the capacity of both community-based organizations (CBOs) and academics to conduct collaborative research of mutual interest and benefit. Yet, information about the needs and goals of research-interested CBOs is lacking. Our partnership aimed to conduct a community research needs assessment and to use results to develop future capacity-building programs for CBOs. Methods: Based on our review of the literature, informal interviews with research-interested CBOs and community-engaged research groups locally and nationally, we developed a needs assessment survey. Key domains of this survey included history and experience with research collaboration, interest in specific research topics, and preference for learning format and structure. We trained community health workers (CHWs) to recruit senior leaders from CBOs in New York City (NYC) and encourage them to complete an on-line survey. Results: Fully 54% (33/61) of CBOs completed the needs assessment. Most (69%) reported involvement with research or evaluation in the last 2 years and 33% had some funding for research. Although 75% had collaborated with academic institutions in the past, 58% did not rate this experience well. The four areas respondents prioritized for skills building were program evaluation, developing needs assessments, building surveys, and understanding statistical analyses. They were less interested in learning to build collaborations with academics. Conclusions: A formal needs assessment of research training and educational needs of CBOs revealed that most had experience, albeit negative, with academic collaborations. CBO leaders wanted to build skills to conduct and analyze assessments and program evaluations. Our community–academic partnership is using these findings to develop a research capacity-building course. Other partnerships should consider conducting such assessments to transform the capacity of CBOs to

  15. D-peaks: a visual tool to display ChIP-seq peaks along the genome.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-sequencing is a method of choice to localize the positions of protein binding sites on DNA on a whole genomic scale. The deciphering of the sequencing data produced by this novel technique is challenging and it is achieved by their rigorous interpretation using dedicated tools and adapted visualization programs. Here, we present a bioinformatics tool (D-peaks) that adds several possibilities (including, user-friendliness, high-quality, relative position with respect to the genomic features) to the well-known visualization browsers or databases already existing. D-peaks is directly available through its web interface http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/dpeaks/ as well as a command line tool.

  16. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  17. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  18. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  19. Improved method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, J.S.; Gjerde, D.T.; Schmuckler, G.

    An improved apparatus and method are described for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single element and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  20. Automatic quality assessment and peak identification of auditory brainstem responses with fitted parametric peaks.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Joaquin T; de la Torre, Angel; Alvarez, Isaac; Segura, Jose Carlos; Thornton, A Roger D; Sainz, Manuel; Vargas, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    The recording of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is used worldwide for hearing screening purposes. In this process, a precise estimation of the most relevant components is essential for an accurate interpretation of these signals. This evaluation is usually carried out subjectively by an audiologist. However, the use of automatic methods for this purpose is being encouraged nowadays in order to reduce human evaluation biases and ensure uniformity among test conditions, patients, and screening personnel. This article describes a new method that performs automatic quality assessment and identification of the peaks, the fitted parametric peaks (FPP). This method is based on the use of synthesized peaks that are adjusted to the ABR response. The FPP is validated, on one hand, by an analysis of amplitudes and latencies measured manually by an audiologist and automatically by the FPP method in ABR signals recorded at different stimulation rates; and on the other hand, contrasting the performance of the FPP method with the automatic evaluation techniques based on the correlation coefficient, FSP, and cross correlation with a predefined template waveform by comparing the automatic evaluations of the quality of these methods with subjective evaluations provided by five experienced evaluators on a set of ABR signals of different quality. The results of this study suggest (a) that the FPP method can be used to provide an accurate parameterization of the peaks in terms of amplitude, latency, and width, and (b) that the FPP remains as the method that best approaches the averaged subjective quality evaluation, as well as provides the best results in terms of sensitivity and specificity in ABR signals validation. The significance of these findings and the clinical value of the FPP method are highlighted on this paper. PMID:24661606