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Sample records for chromatographic-ion trap tandem

  1. Gas Chromatographic-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by Ion-Molecule Reactions Using the Electron-Deficient Reagent Ion CCl{3/+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl{3/+} was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl{3/+} could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl{3/+} with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M + CCl3 - HCl]+ for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH]+ for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H]+ ion for monoterpenes, M·+ for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH3CO]+ for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl{3/+} were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds.

  2. Gas chromatographic-ion trap mass spectrometric analysis of volatile organic compounds by ion-molecule reactions using the electron-deficient reagent ion CCl3(+).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl(3)(+) was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl(3)(+) could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl(3)(+) with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M+CCl(3) - HCl](+) for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH](+) for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H](+) ion for monoterpenes, M(·+) for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH(3)CO](+) for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl(3)(+) were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds. PMID:21952897

  3. Quantification of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Hydrocarbons using a Commercial Gas Chromatograph - Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer at a Ground Site near Fort McKay, AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarek, T. W.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The extraction of fossil fuels from the Alberta oil sands has been the focus of considerable attention due to its association with sizeable emissions of a variety of atmospheric pollutants, the magnitude and impacts of which are currently poorly constrained by observations. In order to more reliably estimate the magnitude and impact of these emissions, an intensive air quality measurement campaign, called "Fort McMurray Oil Sands Strategic Investigation of Local Sources" (FOSSILS), was conducted in the summer of 2013 as part of the Alberta-Canada joint oil sands monitoring program (JOSM) to identify and quantify emissions and their transformations from the Alberta oil sands. The challenge is that the region is surrounded by boreal forest, which provides a substantial background of biogenic hydrocarbons during summer. In this presentation, measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the AMS13 ground site near Fort McKay, Alberta, from Aug 17 to Sept 6, 2013 using a commercial Griffin 450 gas chromatograph equipped with ion trap mass spectrometric detection and Tenax preconcentration are described. The combination of retention information and electron impact mass spectral data allowed unambiguous identification and quantification of the major biogenic monoterpenes, e.g., α and β-pinene, limonene, camphene, and 3Δ-carene, and of many anthropogenically derived hydrocarbons. Mixing ratios of biogenic hydrocarbons varied with time of day, temperature, and solar radiation, with maxima typically occurring at night, rationalized by nocturnal mixing heights and low mixing ratios of the nocturnal oxidants ozone (O3) and the nitrate radical (NO3). In contrast, mixing ratios of anthropogenic VOCs, e.g., benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and o-, p-, and m-xylene (BTEX), strongly depended on meteorological conditions, i.e., local wind direction. During episodes with high BTEX abundance, many additional high molecular weight hydrocarbons were observed which were not

  4. ANALYSIS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY ION TRAP TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer with a wave board and tandem mass spectrometry software was used to analyze gas chromatographically separated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using collision-induced dissociation (CID). The nonresonant (multiple collision) mode was used to...

  5. Production of Ar{sup q+} ions with a tandem linear Paul trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H. Nagayasu, K.; Iwai, T.; Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-06-29

    A tandem linear Paul trap was used to create highly charged Argon ions by electron impact ionizations. By improving the operation scheme, the production of Ar{sup 4+} ions was confirmed. Possible improvements for the future experiments with laser cooled Ca{sup +} ions are suggested.

  6. Hybrid dielectric light trapping designs for thin-film CdZnTe/Si tandem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Zhou, C; Tee, X T; Jung, K-Y; Bermel, P

    2016-07-11

    Tandem solar cells consisting of high bandgap cadmium telluride alloys atop crystalline silicon have potential for high efficiencies exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit. However, experimental results have fallen well below this goal significantly because of non-ideal current matching and light trapping. In this work, we simulate cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) tandems as an exemplary system to show the role that a hybrid light trapping and bandgap engineering approach can play in improving performance and lowering materials costs for tandem solar cells incorporating crystalline silicon. This work consists of two steps. First, we optimize absorption in the crystalline silicon layer with front pyramidal texturing and asymmetric dielectric back gratings, which results in 121% absorption enhancement from a planar structure. Then, using this pre-optimized light trapping scheme, we model the dispersion of the CdxZn1-xTe alloys, and then adjust the bandgap to realize the best current matching for a range of CZT thicknesses. Using experimental parameters, the corresponding maximum efficiency is predicted to be 16.08 % for a total tandem cell thickness of only 2.2 μm. PMID:27410890

  7. 10 K Ring Electrode Trap - Tandem Mass Spectrometer for Infrared Spectroscopy of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebbert, Daniel J.; Meijer, Gerard; Asmis, Knut R.

    2009-03-17

    A novel instrumental setup for measuring infrared photodissociation spectra of buffer gas cooled, mass-selected ions is described and tested. It combines a cryogenically cooled, linear radio frequency ion trap with a tandem mass spectrometer, optimally coupling continuous ion sources to pulsed laser experiments. The use of six independently adjustable DC potentials superimposed over the trapping radio frequency field provides control over the ion distribution within, as well as the kinetic energy distribution of the ions extracted from the ion trap. The scheme allows focusing the ions in space and time, such that they can be optimally irradiated by a pulsed, widely tunable infrared photodissociation laser. Ion intensities are monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer mounted orthogonally to the ion trap axis.

  8. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guijun Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-09

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400–800 nm) and bottom (800–1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  9. Light-trapping design for thin-film silicon-perovskite tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Stephen; John, Sajeev

    2016-09-01

    Using finite-difference time-domain simulations, we investigate the optical properties of tandem silicon/perovskite solar cells with a photonic crystal architecture, consisting of a square-lattice array of inverted pyramids with a center-to-center spacing of 2.5 μm. We demonstrate that near-perfect light-trapping and absorption can be achieved over the 300-1100 nm wavelength range with this architecture, using less than 10 μm (equivalent bulk thickness) of crystalline silicon. Using a one-diode model, we obtain projected efficiencies of over 30% for the two-terminal tandem cell under a current-matching condition, well beyond the current record for single-junction silicon solar cells. The architecture is amenable to mass fabrication through wet-etching and uses a fraction of the silicon of traditional designs, making it an attractive alternative to other silicon-perovskite tandem designs.

  10. Pyramidal surface textures for light trapping and antireflection in perovskite-on-silicon tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bennett W; Lal, Niraj N; Baker-Finch, Simeon; White, Thomas P

    2014-10-20

    Perovskite-on-silicon tandem solar cells show potential to reach > 30% conversion efficiency, but require careful optical control. We introduce here an effective light-management scheme based on the established pyramidal texturing of crystalline silicon cells. Calculations show that conformal deposition of a thin film perovskite solar cell directly onto the textured front surface of a high efficiency silicon cell can yield front surface reflection losses as low as 0.52mA/cm(2). Combining this with a wavelength-selective intermediate reflector between the cells additionally provides effective light-trapping in the high-bandgap top cell, resulting in calculated absolute efficiency gains of 2 - 4%. This approach provides a practical and effective method to adapt existing high efficiency silicon cell designs for use in tandem cells, with conversion efficiencies approaching 35%.

  11. Development of a Tandem Electrodynamic Trap Apparatus for Merging Charged Droplets and Spectroscopic Characterization of Resultant Dried Particles.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Jun-Ya; Higashiura, Tetsu; Eguchi, Takaaki; Miura, Shumpei; Ogawa, Masato

    2016-08-11

    Materials work in multicomponent forms. A wide range of compositions must be tested to obtain the optimum composition for a specific application. We propose optimization using a series of small levitated single particles. We describe a tandem-trap apparatus for merging liquid droplets and analyzing the merged droplets and/or dried particles that are produced from the merged droplets under levitation conditions. Droplet merging was confirmed by Raman spectroscopic studies of the levitated particles. The tandem-trap apparatus enables the synthesis of a particle and spectroscopic investigation of its properties. This provides a basis for future investigation of the properties of levitated single particles. PMID:27438227

  12. Perovskite/c-Si tandem solar cell with inverted nanopyramids: realizing high efficiency by controllable light trapping

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dai; Zeng, Yang; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite/c-Si tandem solar cells (TSCs) have become a promising candidate in recent years for achieving efficiency over 30%. Although general analysis has shown very high upper limits for such TSCs, it remains largely unclear what specific optical structures could best approach these limits. Here we propose the combination of perovskite/c-Si tandem structure with inverted nanopyramid morphology as a practical way of achieving efficiency above 31% based on realistic solar cell parameters. By full-field simulation, we have shown that an ultra-low surface reflectance can be achieved by tuning the pyramid geometry within the range of experimental feasibility. More importantly, we have demonstrated that the index-guided modes can be excited within the top cell layer by introducing a TCO interlayer that prevents coupling of guided light energy into the bottom cell. This light trapping scheme has shown superior performance over the Bragg stack intermediate reflector utilized in previous micropyramid-based TSCs. Finally, by controlling the coupling between the top and bottom cell through the thickness of the interlayer, current generation within the tandem can be optimized for both two- and four-terminal configurations, yielding efficiencies of 31.9% and 32.0%, respectively. These results have provided useful guidelines for the fabrication of perovskite/c-Si TSCs. PMID:26566176

  13. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-06-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/ z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV.

  14. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  15. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were < 6% and < 13%, respectively. This procedure has been applied to quality-control specimens and LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  16. Improved 6-Plex Tandem Mass Tags Quantification Throughput Using a Linear Ion Trap-High-Energy Collision Induced Dissociation MS(3) Scan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jane M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    The use of tandem mass tags (TMT) as an isobaric labeling strategy is a powerful method for quantitative proteomics, yet its accuracy has traditionally suffered from interference. This interference can be largely overcome by selecting MS(2) fragment precursor ions for high-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) MS(3) analysis in an Orbitrap scan. While this approach minimizes the interference effect, sensitivity suffers due to the high AGC targets and long acquisition times associated with MS(3) Orbitrap detection. We investigated whether acquiring the MS(3) scan in a linear ion trap with its lower AGC target would increase overall quantification levels with a minimal effect on precision and accuracy. Trypsin-digested proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were tagged with 6-plex TMT reagents. The sample was subjected to replicate analyses using either the Orbitrap or the linear ion trap for the HCD MS(3) scan. HCD MS(3) detection in the linear ion trap vs Orbitrap increased protein identification by 66% with minor loss in precision and accuracy. Thus, the use of a linear ion trap-HCD MS(3) scan during a 6-plex TMT experiment can improve overall identification levels while maintaining the power of multiplexed quantitative analysis. PMID:27377715

  17. Mass Spectrometry Parameters Optimization for the 46 Multiclass Pesticides Determination in Strawberries with Gas Chromatography Ion-Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Vera, Jose L.; Domingues, Valentina F.; Silva, Luís M. S.; Mateus, Nuno; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Multiclass analysis method was optimized in order to analyze pesticides traces by gas chromatography with ion-trap and tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of some analytical parameters on pesticide signal response was explored. Five ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS) operating parameters, including isolation time (IT), excitation voltage (EV), excitation time (ET), maximum excitation energy or " q" value (q), and isolation mass window (IMW) were numerically tested in order to maximize the instrument analytical signal response. For this, multiple linear regression was used in data analysis to evaluate the influence of the five parameters on the analytical response in the ion trap mass spectrometer and to predict its response. The assessment of the five parameters based on the regression equations substantially increased the sensitivity of IT-MS/MS in the MS/MS mode. The results obtained show that for most of the pesticides, these parameters have a strong influence on both signal response and detection limit. Using the optimized method, a multiclass pesticide analysis was performed for 46 pesticides in a strawberry matrix. Levels higher than the limit established for strawberries by the European Union were found in some samples.

  18. Differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids by positive mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization collision-activated dissociation tandem mass spectrometry in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Lucas M; Owen, Benjamin C; Gallardo, Vanessa A; Habicht, Steven C; Fu, Mingkun; Shea, Ryan C; Mossman, Allen B; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-04-01

    Positive-mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS(n)) was tested for the differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids. Each analyte forms exclusively an abundant protonated molecule upon ionization via positive-mode APCI in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Energy-resolved collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments carried out on the protonated analytes revealed fragmentation patterns that varied based on the location of the functional groups. Unambiguous differentiation between the regioisomers was achieved in each case by observing different fragmentation patterns, different relative abundances of ion-molecule reaction products, or different relative abundances of fragment ions formed at different collision energies. The mechanisms of some of the reactions were examined by H/D exchange reactions and molecular orbital calculations.

  19. Extraction and Analysis of Disperse Dyes from Colored Polyester Single Fibers Using Liquid Chromatography/Linear Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takao; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Handa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Nine disperse dyes extracted from colored polyester threads and single fibers of manufactory-supplied textiles by using centrifugal filtration were analyzed using liquid chromatography/linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LIT-MS(n)). Based on diode array detector data, dimethylformamide (DMF) was found to be a more effective extraction solvent than acetonitrile/water (4:3, v/v) or methanol/water (1:1, v/v) mixtures. The precursor, [M+H](+) ions, were detected for the dyes extracted using DMF. The MS(2) and MS(3) spectra also matched those of the standard disperse dyes. Without relying on comparison clothes, disperse dyes extracted from the single fibers (5 mm in length) were successfully identified by LC/LIT-MS(n) and the custom-built database.

  20. Simultaneous doping analysis of main urinary metabolites of anabolic steroids in horse by ion-trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Kijima-Suda, Isao; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-09-01

    The use of anabolic steroids in racehorses is strictly regulated. We have developed a method for the simultaneous analysis of 11 anabolic steroids: fluoxymesterone, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, methandienone, methandriol, oxymetholone, boldenone, furazabol, methenolone, nandrolone, and stanozolol, for possible application to a doping test in racehorses. We selected 15 kinds of target substances for a doping test from the main metabolites of these anabolic steroids, and established a method for simultaneous analysis. Urine was hydrolyzed and subjected to solid-phase extraction. Then, the residue from the extracts was derivatized by trimethylsilylation. The derivatized samples were subjected to ion-trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and their mass chromatograms and product ion spectra were obtained. The limit of detection of the target substances was 5-50 ng/mL, and the mean recovery and coefficient of variation were 71.3-104.8% and 1.1-9.5%, respectively.

  1. Extraction and Analysis of Disperse Dyes from Colored Polyester Single Fibers Using Liquid Chromatography/Linear Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takao; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Handa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Nine disperse dyes extracted from colored polyester threads and single fibers of manufactory-supplied textiles by using centrifugal filtration were analyzed using liquid chromatography/linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LIT-MS(n)). Based on diode array detector data, dimethylformamide (DMF) was found to be a more effective extraction solvent than acetonitrile/water (4:3, v/v) or methanol/water (1:1, v/v) mixtures. The precursor, [M+H](+) ions, were detected for the dyes extracted using DMF. The MS(2) and MS(3) spectra also matched those of the standard disperse dyes. Without relying on comparison clothes, disperse dyes extracted from the single fibers (5 mm in length) were successfully identified by LC/LIT-MS(n) and the custom-built database. PMID:27682411

  2. Determination of organic acids in urine by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry previous 'in sample' derivatization with trimethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate.

    PubMed

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Villanelli, Fabio; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Calamai, Luca; Boccalon, Pierpaolo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Vecchione, Febe; Alessi, Paolo; Kikic, Ireneo; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2008-10-01

    A method for the determination of the organic acids directly in the urine employing derivatization with trimethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate as a methylating agent and sequential extraction by head space and direct immersion/solid phase microextraction is reported. Furoic acid, hippuric acid, methylhippuric acid, mandelic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid and trans, trans muconic acid contained in urine and proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists as biological exposure indices were determined after a fast and economically convenient preparation step and sensitive gas chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Urine is rather a complex sample and hence the acquisition method required specific GC-MS instrumentation capable of supporting the changeover, fully automated during a single chromatographic separation, from mass to tandem mass spectrometry and both chemical and electron ionization modes. The automation of the analytical method provides a number of advantages, including reduced analysis time for both routine analysis and method development, and greater reproducibility. The equilibrium and kinetics of this substances vs head space/direct immersion-solid phase microextraction were investigated and evaluated theoretically.

  3. A selective and sensitive method for quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in whole blood by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Libong, Danielle; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Ricordel, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    A gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-ion trap MS-MS) method for detection and quantitation of LSD in whole blood is presented. The sample preparation process, including a solid-phase extraction step with Bond Elut cartridges, was performed with 2 mL of whole blood. Eight microliters of the purified extract was injected with a cold on-column injection method. Positive chemical ionization was performed using acetonitrile as reagent gas; LSD was detected in the MS-MS mode. The chromatograms obtained from blood extracts showed the great selectivity of the method. GC-MS quantitation was performed using lysergic acid methylpropylamide as the internal standard. The response of the MS was linear for concentrations ranging from 0.02 ng/mL (detection threshold) to 10.0 ng/mL. Several parameters such as the choice of the capillary column, the choice of the internal standard and that of the ionization mode (positive CI vs. EI) were rationalized. Decomposition pathways under both ionization modes were studied. Within-day and between-day stability were evaluated.

  4. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d.

  5. Tandem photonic-crystal thin films surpassing Lambertian light-trapping limit over broad bandwidth and angular range

    SciTech Connect

    Oskooi, Ardavan Tanaka, Yoshinori; Noda, Susumu

    2014-03-03

    Random surface texturing of an optically thick film to increase the path length of scattered light rays, first proposed nearly thirty years ago, has thus far remained the most effective approach for photon absorption over the widest set of conditions. Here, using recent advances in computational electrodynamics, we describe a general strategy for the design of a silicon thin film applicable to photovoltaic cells based on a quasi-resonant approach to light trapping where two partially disordered photonic-crystal slabs, stacked vertically on top of each other, have large absorption that surpasses the Lambertian limit over a broad bandwidth and angular range.

  6. Fused-core silica column ultra-performance liquid chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry for determination of global DNA methylation status.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ill; Fortin, Marie C; Richardson, Jason R; Buckley, Brian

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, play key roles in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. More recently, global DNA methylation levels have been documented to be altered in several diseases, including cancer, and as the result of exposure to environmental toxicants. Based on the potential use of global DNA methylation status as a biomarker of disease status and exposure to environmental toxicants, we sought to develop a rapid, sensitive, and precise analytical method for the quantitative measurement of global DNA methylation status using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with detection by ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. Using a fused-core silica column, 2'-deoxyguanosine (2dG) and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5mdC) were resolved in less than 1 min with detection limits of 0.54 and 1.47 fmol for 5mdC and 2dG, respectively. The accuracy of detection was 95% or higher, and the day-to-day coefficient of variation was found to be 3.8%. The method was validated by quantification of global DNA methylation status following treatment of cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, which reduced DNA methylation from 3.1% in control cells to 1.1% in treated cells. The sensitivity and high throughput of this method rend it suitable for large-scale analysis of epidemiological and clinical DNA samples.

  7. Analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in vegetable oil samples by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malavia, J; Abalos, M; Santos, F J; Abad, E; Rivera, J; Galceran, M T

    2007-05-18

    Gas chromatography coupled to ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (CG-MS-MS) has been evaluated for the analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) in vegetable oil samples containing different concentration levels (0.2-6 pg WHO-TEQ g(-1) for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs) of the 29 toxic congeners of PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCBs. The effect of potential interfering compounds such as polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated diphenylethers (PCDEs) on the quantification of mono-ortho PCBs has been investigated. In addition, the influence of the clean-up procedure on the final determination by CG-MS-MS was studied, showing that the quality of the results depends to a great extent on this analytical step. Quality parameters have been established and good precisions (CV: 3-19%) and low limits of detection for PCDD/Fs (0.04-0.20 pg g(-1) oil) and dl-PCBs (0.08-0.64 pg g(-1) oil) were obtained. The method was validated by a comparison of the CG-MS-MS results with those obtained by GC-HRMS.

  8. Liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry to evaluate juvenile hormone III levels in bee hemolymph from Nosema spp. infected colonies.

    PubMed

    Ares, A M; Nozal, M J; Bernal, J L; Martín-Hernández, R; M Higes; Bernal, J

    2012-06-15

    It has been described a fast, simple and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to measure juvenile hormone III (JH III), which was used to study of the effects of Nosema spp. infection on JH III levels in bee hemolymph. Honey bee hemolymph was extracted by centrifugation and mixed with a solution of phenylthiourea in methanol. This mixture was then centrifuged and the supernatant removed and evaporated to dryness. The residue was reconstituted in methanol containing the internal standard (methoprene) and injected onto an LC-MS/MS (ion-trap) system coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive mode. Chromatography was performed on a Synergi Hydro-RP column (4 μm, 30 mm × 4.60 mm i.d.) using a mobile phase of 20 mM ammonium formate and methanol in binary gradient elution mode. The method was fully validated and it was found to be selective, linear from 15 to 14,562 pg/μL, precise and accurate, with %RSD values below 5%. The limits of detection and quantification were: LOD, 6 pg/μL; LOQ, 15 pg/μL. Finally, the proposed LC-MS/MS method was used to analyze JH III levels in the hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera iberiensis) experimentally infected with different Nosema spp. (Nosema apis, Spanish and Dutch Nosema ceranae strains). The highest concentrations of JH III were detected in hemolymph from bees infected with Spanish N. ceranae.

  9. Improved characterization of tomato polyphenols using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization linear ion trap quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Jáuregui, Olga; Medina-Remón, Alexander; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2010-10-30

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is the second most important fruit crop worldwide. Tomatoes are a key component in the Mediterranean diet, which is strongly associated with a reduced risk of chronic degenerative diseases. In this work, we use a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques with negative ion detection, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole, for the identification of the constituents of tomato samples. First, we tested for the presence of polyphenolic compounds through generic MS/MS experiments such as neutral loss and precursor ion scans on the triple quadrupole system. Confirmation of the compounds previously identified was accomplished by injection into the high-resolution system (LTQ-Orbitrap) using accurate mass measurements in MS, MS(2) and MS(3) modes. In this way, 38 compounds were identified in tomato samples with very good mass accuracy (<2 mDa), three of them, as far as we know, not previously reported in tomato samples.

  10. Validation of a new liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry ion-trap technique for the simultaneous determination of thirteen anticoagulant rodenticides, drugs, or natural products.

    PubMed

    Fourel, Isabelle; Hugnet, Christophe; Goy-Thollot, Isabelle; Berny, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of anticoagulant (anti-vitamin K or AVK) compounds, including rodenticides, drugs, and natural products because no published method could be found. The proposed method is based on ion-trap technology with electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. Each AVK is identified by means of its retention time, precursor ion, and two product ions. Plasma samples are extracted by liquid-liquid partition on Toxi-tube B((R)). The method was validated on dog plasma and gave good results in terms of specificity, linearity, and percent recovery for the 14 AVK tested (warfarin, acenocoumarol, bromadiolone, brodifacoum, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl, dicoumarol, difenacoum, difethialone, flocoumafen, fluindione, phenindione, and tioclomarol). The limits of detection ranged from 5 to 25 ng/mL. Intraday repeatability was good, but interday repeatability was more variable though still sufficient for our diagnostic purposes. The technique was successfully applied in a series of clinical investigations to demonstrate its applicability in various animal species and gave very high sensitivity and specificity results. PMID:20223102

  11. Validation of a new liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry ion-trap technique for the simultaneous determination of thirteen anticoagulant rodenticides, drugs, or natural products.

    PubMed

    Fourel, Isabelle; Hugnet, Christophe; Goy-Thollot, Isabelle; Berny, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of anticoagulant (anti-vitamin K or AVK) compounds, including rodenticides, drugs, and natural products because no published method could be found. The proposed method is based on ion-trap technology with electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. Each AVK is identified by means of its retention time, precursor ion, and two product ions. Plasma samples are extracted by liquid-liquid partition on Toxi-tube B((R)). The method was validated on dog plasma and gave good results in terms of specificity, linearity, and percent recovery for the 14 AVK tested (warfarin, acenocoumarol, bromadiolone, brodifacoum, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl, dicoumarol, difenacoum, difethialone, flocoumafen, fluindione, phenindione, and tioclomarol). The limits of detection ranged from 5 to 25 ng/mL. Intraday repeatability was good, but interday repeatability was more variable though still sufficient for our diagnostic purposes. The technique was successfully applied in a series of clinical investigations to demonstrate its applicability in various animal species and gave very high sensitivity and specificity results.

  12. [An automatic and sensitive method for the determination of endogenous brassinosteroids in plant tissues by an online trapping-in situ derivatization-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Jiang, Li; Feng, Yuqi

    2014-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of naturally occurring phytohormones with poly- hydroxy steroid structure, which regulate general plant growth and many physiological processes. The reported methods for BR analysis were complicated, and the detection sensitivity was relatively low. To realize the automatic analysis of trace BRs in limited plant tissues, an in-tube solid phase microextraction-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPME-UPLC-MS/MS) system was constructed based on two valves-two pumps. Using C18 PEEK column as the trapping column and 4-(dimethylamino) phenylboronic acid (4-DMAPBA) as the derivatization reagent, an on line trapping and in situ derivatization assay method of BRs was developed. BRs could be programmed to fulfill the procedures of injection, extraction, derivatization, LC separation and MS detection in the system. The detection limits of BRs were improved more than one order of magnitude by the online trapping and in situ derivatization techniques, thus endogenous BRs could be quantified in only 300 mg plant tissues.

  13. Rapid separation and characterization of diterpenoid alkaloids in processed roots of Aconitum carmichaeli using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Dayuan; Huang, Juan; Huang, Zhihai; Bai, Junqi; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2014-10-01

    The lateral root of Aconitum carmichaeli, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used to treat rheumatic diseases. For decades, diterpenoid alkaloids have dominated the phytochemical and biomedical research on this plant. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry was developed to characterize the diterpenoid alkaloids in Aconitum carmichaeli. Based on an optimized chromatographic condition, more than 120 diterpenoid alkaloids were separated with good resolution. Using a systematic strategy that combines high resolution separation, highly accurate mass measurements and a good understanding of the diagnostic fragment-based fragmentation patterns, these diterpenoid alkaloids were identified or tentatively identified. The identification of these chemicals provided essential data for further phytochemical studies and toxicity research of Aconitum carmichaeli. Moreover, the ultra high performance liquid chromatography with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry platform was an effective and accurate tool for rapid qualitative analysis of secondary metabolite productions from natural resources.

  14. Characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry of an ion trap mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector using a tandem mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R; Harper, Jason D; Lukow, Stefan R; Lareau, Richard T; Boudries, Hacene; Lai, Hanh; Brauer, Carolyn S

    2012-09-15

    A commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) based explosive trace detector (ETD) has been interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS) for the purpose of characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry intrinsic to the ITMS instrument. The overall objective of the research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas phase ionization processes in the ITMS based ETD to facilitate the advancement of its operational effectiveness as well as guide the development of next generation ETDs. Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values measured by the ITMS/MS/MS configuration for a suite of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide containing explosives are reported. Molecular formulas, molecular structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions are inferred using the mass and mobility data in conjunction with density functional theory. The predominant product ions are identified as follows: [TNT-H](-) for trinitrotoluene (TNT), [RDX+Cl](-) for cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX), [NO(3)](-) for ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), [NG+NO(3)](-) for nitroglycerine (NG), [PETN+NO(3)](-) for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), [HNO(3)+NO(3)](-) for ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), [HMTD-NC(3)H(6)O(3)+H+Cl](-) for hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), and [(CH(3))(2)CNH(2)](+) for triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The predominant ionization pathways for the formation of the various product ions are determined to include proton abstraction, ion-molecule attachment, autoionization, first-order and multi-order thermolysis, and nucleophilic substitution. The ion trapping scheme in the reaction region of the ITMS instrument is shown to increase predominant ion intensities relative to the secondary ion intensities when compared to non-ion trap operation. PMID:22967626

  15. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  16. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  17. Identification and fragmentation pathways of caffeine metabolites in urine samples via liquid chromatography with positive electrospray ionization coupled to a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (LTQ) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore; Labella, Cristiana; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2009-04-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC) with positive ion electrospray ionization (ESI+) coupled to a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (LTQ) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) was employed for the simultaneous determination of caffeine and its metabolites in human urine within a single chromatographic run. LC/ESI-FTICRMS led to the unambiguous determination of the molecular masses of the studied compounds without interference from other biomolecules. A systematic and comprehensive study of the mass spectral behaviour of caffeine and its fourteen metabolites by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed, through in-source ion trap collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated molecules, [M+H](+). A retro-Diels-Alder (RDA) process along with ring-contraction reactions were the major fragmentation pathways observed during CID. The base peak of xanthine precursors originates from the loss of methyl isocyanate (CH(3)NCO, 57 Da) or isocyanic acid (HNCO, 43 Da), which in turn lose a CO unit. Also uric acid derivatives shared a RDA rearrangement as a common fragmentation process and a successive loss of CO(2) or CO. The uracil derivatives showed a loss of a ketene unit (CH(2)CO, 42 Da) from the protonated molecule along with the loss of H(2)O or CO. To assess the potential of the present method three established metabolite ratios to measure P450 CYP1A2, N-acetyltransferase and xanthine oxidase activities were evaluated by a number of identified metabolites from healthy human urine samples after caffeine intake. PMID:19260028

  18. Comprehensive speciation of low-molecular weight selenium metabolites in mustard seeds using HPLC-electrospray linear trap/Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouerdane, Laurent; Aureli, Federica; Flis, Paulina; Bierla, Katarzyna; Preud'homme, Hugues; Cubadda, Francesco; Szpunar, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    An analytical methodology based on high-resolution high mass accuracy electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem MS assisted by Se-specific detection using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was developed for speciation of selenium (Se) in seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra) grown on Se-rich soil. Size-exclusion LC-ICP MS allowed the determination of the Se distribution according to the molecular mass and the control of the species stability during extraction. The optimization of hydrophilic interaction of LC and cation-exchange HPLC resulted in analytical conditions making it possible to detect and characterize over 30 Se species using ESI MS, including a number of minor (<0.5%) metabolites. Selenoglucosinolates were found to be the most important class of species accounting for at least 15% of the total Se present and over 50% of all the metabolites. They were found particularly unstable during aqueous extraction leading to the loss of Se by volatilization as methylselenonitriles and methylselenoisothiocyanates identified using gas chromatography (GC) with the parallel ICP MS and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS/MS detection. However, selenoglucosinolates could be efficiently recovered by extraction with 70% methanol. Other classes of identified species included selenoamino acids, selenosugars, selenosinapine and selenourea derivatives. The three types of reactions leading to the formation of selenometabolites were: the Se-S substitution in the metabolic pathway, oxidative reactions of -SeH groups with endogenous biomolecules, and chemical reactions, e.g., esterification, of Se-containing molecules and other biomolecules through functional groups not involving Se. PMID:23925428

  19. Determination of sulfonamide antibiotics and metabolites in liver, muscle and kidney samples by pressurized liquid extraction or ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-QqLIT-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Peralba, Maria do Carmo Ruaro; Díaz-Cruz, M Silvia; Barceló, Damià

    2015-03-01

    Sulfonamides are widely used in human and veterinary medicine. The presence of sulfonamides residues in food is an issue of great concern. Throughout the present work, a method for the targeted analysis of 16 sulfonamides and metabolites residue in liver of several species has been developed and validated. Extraction and clean-up has been statistically optimized using central composite design experiments. Two extraction methods have been developed, validated and compared: i) pressurized liquid extraction, in which samples were defatted with hexane and subsequently extracted with acetonitrile and ii) ultrasound-assisted extraction with acetonitrile and further liquid-liquid extraction with hexane. Extracts have been analyzed by liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry. Validation procedure has been based on the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and included the assessment of parameters such as decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy and precision. Method׳s performance has been satisfactory, with CCα values within the range of 111.2-161.4 µg kg(-1), limits of detection of 10 µg kg(-1) and accuracy values around 100% for all compounds.

  20. Validation of a gas chromatography-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the simultaneous quantification of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, morphine, codeine, and 6-acetylmorphine in aqueous solution, blood, and skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Rees, Kelly A; McLaughlin, Poppy A; Osselton, M David

    2012-01-01

    A gas chromatography-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous solid-phase extraction and quantification of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, morphine, codeine, and 6-monoacteylmorphine in blood, muscle tissue, and water. An assay for total morphine in blood and muscle was also validated. The limit of quantification was ≤ 0.01 mg/kg in muscle and ≤ 0.005 mg/L in blood and water. Good linearity was observed over the concentration ranges studied (r ≥ 0.99). The repeatability (% RSD) at the three concentration levels was typically ≤ 15% and never exceeded 17%. Intermediate precision of ≤ 16% was obtained for all matrices. Deviation < 20% of the nominal concentration was obtained in all repeatability and intermediate precision experiments. Extraction recoveries for cocaine and metabolites ranged from 91% to 110% in water, 81% to 110% in blood, and 61% to 75% in muscle. Recoveries for opiates ranged from 59% to 104% in water, 50% to 95% in blood, and 41% to 79% in muscle. The hydrolysis efficiency for the total morphine assay in blood and muscle ranged from 91% to 99% with within-day and intermediate precisions of ≤ 14% and ≤ 12%, respectively. PMID:22290746

  1. Multiresidue analysis of 36 pesticides in soil using a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method by liquid chromatography with tandem quadruple linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; He, Zeying; Wang, Lu; Peng, Yi; Luo, Ming; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous determination of 36 pesticides, including 15 organophosphorus, six carbamate, and some other pesticides in soil was developed by liquid chromatography with tandem quadruple linear ion trap mass spectrometry. The extraction and clean-up steps were optimized based on the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method. The data were acquired in multiple reaction monitoring mode combined with enhanced product ion to increase confidence of the analytical results. Validation experiments were performed in soil samples. The average recoveries of pesticides at four spiking levels (1, 5, 50, and 100 μg/kg) ranged from 63 to 126% with relative standard deviation below 20%. The limits of detection of pesticides were 0.04-0.8 μg/kg, and the limits of quantification were 0.1-2.6 μg/kg. The correlation coefficients (r(2) ) were higher than 0.990 in the linearity range of 0.5-200 μg/L for most of the pesticides. The method allowed for the analysis of the target pesticides in the lower μg/kg concentration range. The optimized method was then applied to the test of real soil samples obtained from several areas in China, confirming the feasibility of the method.

  2. Chemometrics for comprehensive analysis of nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides in Siraitiae Fructus by hydrophilic interaction ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole linear ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guisheng; Wang, Mengyue; Xu, Renjie; Li, Xiao-Bo

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive hydrophilic interaction ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole linear ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry method was validated for the simultaneous determination of 20 nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides (within 3.5 min), and then was employed to test the functional food of Luo-Han-Guo samples. The analysis showed that the Luo-Han-Guo was rich in guanosine and uridine, but contained trace levels of the other target compounds. Chemometrics methods were employed to identify 40 batches of Luo-Han-Guo samples from different cultivated forms, regions and varieties. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to classify Luo-Han-Guo samples based on the level of the 20 target compounds, and the supervised learning method of counter propagation artificial neural network was utilized to further separate clusters and validate the established model. As a result, the samples could be clustered into three primary groups, in which correlation with cultivated varieties was observed. The present strategy could be applied to the investigation of other edible plants containing nucleobases, nucleosides, or nucleotides. PMID:26249158

  3. Determination of tylosins A, B, C and D in bee larvae by liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bernal, J; Martín, Ma T; Toribio, L; Martín-Hernández, R; Higes, M; Bernal, J L; Nozal, M J

    2011-06-01

    A LC-MS/MS method has been developed to simultaneously quantify tylosins A, B, C and D in bee larvae, compounds currently used to treat one of the most lethal diseases affecting honey bees around the world, American Foulbrood (AFB). The influence of different aqueous media, temperature and light exposure on the stability of these four compounds was studied. The analytes were extracted from bee larvae with methanol and chromatographic separation was achieved on a Luna C(18) (150 × 4.6 mm i.d.) using a ternary gradient composed of a diluted formic acid, methanol and acetonitrile mobile phase. To facilitate sampling, bee larvae were initially dried at 60°C for 4h and afterwards, they were diluted to avoid problems of pressure. MSD-Ion Trap detection was employed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The calibration curves were linear over a wide range of concentrations and the method was validated as sensitive, precise and accurate within the limits of quantification (LOQ, 1.4-4.0 ng/g). The validated method was successfully employed to study bee larvae in field tests of bee hives treated with two formulations containing tylosin. In both cases it was evident that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) had been reached. PMID:21498134

  4. Analysis of anthelmintics in surface water by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zrnčić, Mirta; Gros, Meritxell; Babić, Sandra; Kaštelan-Macan, Marija; Barcelo, Damia; Petrović, Mira

    2014-03-01

    A method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqLIT-MS) has been developed to investigate occurrence of 10 anthelmintic drugs from different structural groups (moxidectin, flubendazole, fenbendazole, levamisol, mebendazole, oxibendazole, albendazole, triclabendazole, febantel and praziquantel) in surface water. Analytes were pre-concentrated by solid phase extraction (SPE) using hydrophilic-lipophilic polymeric based sorbent. Quantification of investigated analytes was done using deuterated compounds as internal standards in order to minimize matrix effect. Analyte recoveries from spiked samples at two concentration levels were above 75% for most of the analytes. The main advantages of developed method are fast separation using UHPLC and therefore short analysis time, combined with good sensitivity which is demonstrated by low ngL(-1) detection limits. The developed method was applied for analysis of anthelmintics in the Llobregat River (NE Spain) and its main tributaries (rivers Anoia and Cardener). Eight out of ten anthelmintics were detected in all analyzed samples with the concentrations in low ngL(-1) level. The method fills the gap on analytical methodologies for determination of anthelmintic drugs in the environment.

  5. Approach to the study of flavone di-C-glycosides by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem ion trap mass spectrometry and its application to characterization of flavonoid composition in Viola yedoensis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Yin, Chengle; Qin, Yan; Cheng, Zhihong; Chen, Daofeng

    2014-10-01

    The mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of flavone di-C-glycosides has been a difficult task due to pure standards being unavailable commercially and to that the reported relative intensities of some diagnostic ions varied with MS instruments. In this study, five flavone di-C-glycoside standards from Viola yedoensis have been systematically studied by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-IT-MS(n)) in the negative ion mode to analyze their fragmentation patterns. A new MS(2) and MS(3) hierarchical fragmentation for the identification of the sugar nature (hexoses or pentoses) at C-6 and C-8 is presented based on previously established rules of fragmentation. Here, for the first time, we report that the MS(2) and MS(3) structure-diagnostic fragments about the glycosylation types and positions are highly dependent on the configuration of the sugars at C-6 and C-8. The base peak ((0,2) X1 (0,2) X(2)(-) ion) in MS(3) spectra of di-C-glycosides could be used as a diagnostic ion for flavone aglycones. These newly proposed fragmentation behaviors have been successfully applied to the characterization of flavone di-C-glycosides found in V. yedoensis. A total of 35 flavonoid glycosides, including 1 flavone mono-C-hexoside, 2 flavone 6,8-di-C-hexosides, 11 flavone 6,8-di-C-pentosides, 13 flavone 6,8-C-hexosyl-C-pentosides, 5 acetylated flavone C-glycosides and 3 flavonol O-glycosides, were identified or tentatively identified on the base of their UV profiles, MS and MS(n) (n = 5) data, or by comparing with reference substances. Among these, the acetylated flavone C-glycosides were reported from V. yedoensis for the first time.

  6. DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Braiman, Avital; Thundat, Thomas George; Rudakov, Fedor M

    2011-01-01

    In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

  7. Comparative study of comprehensive gas chromatography-nitrogen chemiluminescence detection and gas chromatography-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry for determining nicotine and carcinogen organic nitrogen compounds in thirdhand tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Vallecillos, Laura; Lewis, Alastair C; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa M; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2015-12-24

    Thirdhand tobacco smoke (THS) constitutes a poorly understood pathway of exposure of non-smokers, especially toddlers, to tobacco-related carcinogens. However, to date most of the carcinogens present in tobacco smoke have not been detected in THS and, therefore, the significance of THS health risk is still unknown. In this study, we have compared the performance of two analytical methods - one based on gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry detection (GC-IT-MS) and the other on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (GC×GC-NCD) - for simultaneously determining, in settled house dust, the presence of 16 organic nitrogen carcinogens already detected in tobacco smoke. The target compounds included four aromatic amines, two nitrocompounds, eight N-nitrosamines and two tobacco-specific nitrosamines, as well as nicotine as a tobacco marker. Dust samples were extracted using in-cell clean up pressurized liquid extraction with silica as clean up sorbent and ethyl acetate as the organic solvent, with average recovery of 89%. Although GC-IT-MS, using chemical ionization with methanol and tandem MS, performed well, the optimized GC×GC-NCD gave lower limits of detection (from 4 to 22ngg(-1)) and better repeatability and reproducibility a low concentration levels (%RSD<8%) and, therefore, was applicable for determining these different groups of carcinogens without the need for derivatization prior to the GC analysis. The performance of the optimized PLE/GC×GC-NCD method was tested by quantifying the target compounds in house dust samples from smokers' and non-smokers' homes. The median carcinogen compounds detected was 3.8μgg(-1) and 1.1μgg(-1) in smokers' and non-smokers' house dust, respectively. In this study, we have detected highly carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitro compounds for the first time in settled house dust complementing the state of knowledge of THS composition and providing

  8. Comparative study of comprehensive gas chromatography-nitrogen chemiluminescence detection and gas chromatography-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry for determining nicotine and carcinogen organic nitrogen compounds in thirdhand tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Vallecillos, Laura; Lewis, Alastair C; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa M; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2015-12-24

    Thirdhand tobacco smoke (THS) constitutes a poorly understood pathway of exposure of non-smokers, especially toddlers, to tobacco-related carcinogens. However, to date most of the carcinogens present in tobacco smoke have not been detected in THS and, therefore, the significance of THS health risk is still unknown. In this study, we have compared the performance of two analytical methods - one based on gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry detection (GC-IT-MS) and the other on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (GC×GC-NCD) - for simultaneously determining, in settled house dust, the presence of 16 organic nitrogen carcinogens already detected in tobacco smoke. The target compounds included four aromatic amines, two nitrocompounds, eight N-nitrosamines and two tobacco-specific nitrosamines, as well as nicotine as a tobacco marker. Dust samples were extracted using in-cell clean up pressurized liquid extraction with silica as clean up sorbent and ethyl acetate as the organic solvent, with average recovery of 89%. Although GC-IT-MS, using chemical ionization with methanol and tandem MS, performed well, the optimized GC×GC-NCD gave lower limits of detection (from 4 to 22ngg(-1)) and better repeatability and reproducibility a low concentration levels (%RSD<8%) and, therefore, was applicable for determining these different groups of carcinogens without the need for derivatization prior to the GC analysis. The performance of the optimized PLE/GC×GC-NCD method was tested by quantifying the target compounds in house dust samples from smokers' and non-smokers' homes. The median carcinogen compounds detected was 3.8μgg(-1) and 1.1μgg(-1) in smokers' and non-smokers' house dust, respectively. In this study, we have detected highly carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitro compounds for the first time in settled house dust complementing the state of knowledge of THS composition and providing

  9. Tandem betatron

    DOEpatents

    Keinigs, Rhonald K.

    1992-01-01

    Two betatrons are provided in tandem for alternately accelerating an electron beam to avoid the single flux swing limitation of conventional betatrons and to accelerate the electron beam to high energies. The electron beam is accelerated in a first betatron during a period of increasing magnetic flux. The eletron beam is extracted from the first betatron as a peak magnetic flux is reached and then injected into a second betatron at a time of minimum magnetic flux in the second betatron. The cycle may be repeated until the desired electron beam energy is obtained. In one embodiment, the second betatron is axially offset from the first betatron to provide for electron beam injection directly at the axial location of the beam orbit in the second betatron.

  10. Characterization of proanthocyanidins from Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) G. Don. (Fabaceae) by Flow Injection Analysis-Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tala, Viviane Raïssa Sipowo; Candida da Silva, Viviane; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Nkengfack, Augustin Ephrem; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Vilegas, Wagner

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigates the chemical composition of the African plant Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae) roots and barks by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization and Direct Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry analysis. Mass spectral data indicated that B-type oligomers are present, namely procyanidins and prodelphinidins, with their gallate and glucuronide derivatives, some of them in different isomeric forms. The analysis evidenced the presence of up to 40 proanthocyanidins, some of which are reported for the first time. In this study, the antiradical activity of extracts of roots and barks from Parkia biglobosa was evaluated using DPPH method and they showed satisfactory activities.

  11. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  12. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  13. Fast and comprehensive multi-residue analysis of a broad range of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals and some of their metabolites in surface and treated waters by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gros, Meritxell; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià

    2012-07-27

    The present work describes the development of an analytical method, based on automated off-line solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-QqLIT) for the determination of 81 pharmaceutical residues, covering various therapeutic groups, and some of their main metabolites, in surface and treated waters (influent and effluent wastewaters, river, reservoir, sea and drinking water). For unequivocal identification and confirmation, two selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions per compound are monitored. Quantification is performed by the internal standard approach, indispensable to correct matrix effects. Moreover, to obtain an extra tool for confirmation of positive findings, an information dependent acquisition (IDA) experiment was performed, with SRM as survey scan and an enhanced product ion (EPI) scan as dependent scan. Compound identification was carried out by library search, matching the EPI spectra achieved at one fixed collision energy with those present in a library. The main advantages of the method are automation and speed-up of sample preparation by the reduction of extraction volumes for some matrices, the fast separation of a big number of pharmaceuticals, its high sensitivity (limits of detection in the low ng/L range), selectivity, due to the use of tandem mass spectrometry, reliability since a significant number of isotopically labeled compounds are used as internal standards for quantification and finally, the analysis of tap, reservoir and sea waters, since information about occurrence of pharmaceuticals in these matrices is still sparse. As part of the validation procedure, the method developed was applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical residues in waste and surface waters from different sites in Catalonia (North East of Spain).

  14. Antihydrogen Trapped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowe[1], Paul

    2011-05-01

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time. Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome. The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained. These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating. The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures,, where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried. The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time.

  15. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detector and Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry to Evaluate Ginseng Roots and Rhizomes from Different Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ping; Zhang, You-Bo; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Yang, Xin-Bao; Xu, Wei; Xu, Feng; Cai, Shao-Qing; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Lian-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng, Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, is an industrial crop in China and Korea. The functional components in ginseng roots and rhizomes are characteristic ginsenosides. This work developed a new high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n)) method to identify the triterpenoids. Sixty compounds (1-60) including 58 triterpenoids were identified from the ginseng cultivated in China. Substances 1, 2, 7, 15-20, 35, 39, 45-47, 49, 55-57, 59, and 60 were identified for the first time. To evaluate the quality of ginseng cultivated in Northeast China, this paper developed a practical liquid chromatography-diode array detection (LC-DAD) method to simultaneously quantify 14 interesting ginsenosides in ginseng collected from 66 different producing areas for the first time. The results showed the quality of ginseng roots and rhizomes from different sources was different due to growing environment, cultivation technology, and so on. The developed LC-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) method can be used to identify many more ginsenosides and the LC-DAD method can be used not only to assess the quality of ginseng, but also to optimize the cultivation conditions for the production of ginsenosides. PMID:27171066

  16. Trapped Antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2012-03-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is made entirely of antiparticles and is believed to be stable. It is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. Low energy (Kelvin scale) antihydrogen has been produced at CERN since 2002. I will describe the experiment which has recently succeeded in trapping antihydrogen in a cryogenic Penning trap for times up to approximately 15 minutes.

  17. First determination of C 60 and C 70 fullerenes and N-methylfulleropyrrolidine C 60 on the suspended material of wastewater effluents by liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Marinella; Pérez, Sandra; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina; Osorio, Victoria; Kantiani, Lina; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià

    2010-03-01

    SummaryThe increasing use and production of carbon-based nanoparticles demands for new analytical approaches able to achieve sensitivities in the low ng/L range in order to assess their presence in environmental samples. This paper describes development, optimization and validation of a novel method for the analysis of C 60 and, C 70 fullerenes and N-methylfulleropyrrolidine C 60 in the environment. The method relies on ultrasonication extraction from suspended solids in wastewater, followed by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QqLIT-MS) for trace quantification. Recoveries obtained were generally higher than 60% for both surface water and wastewaters. The overall variability of the method was below 15%, for the three fullerenes and all tested matrices: ultra-pure water, surface water and wastewater. For the effluents of wastewater treatment plants the method quantification limits (MQL) ranged from 0.2 to 1 ng/L. The precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 1% to 2% and from 5% to 9% for intra and inter-day analysis, respectively. The developed analytical method was applied to the analysis of fullerenes in the effluents of 22 wastewater treatment plants in Catalonia (NE of Spain). 50% of the analyzed samples contained fullerenes, nine of them in the μg/L concentration range. This work constitutes the first report on the occurrence of fullerenes in suspended solids of wastewater effluents highlighting the need of nanotechnologies residues assessment for risk evaluation of nanoparticles in the environment.

  18. Application of a hybrid ordered mesoporous silica as sorbent for solid-phase multi-residue extraction of veterinary drugs in meat by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casado, Natalia; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-08-12

    A quick, sensitive and selective analytical reversed-phase multi-residue method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ion-trap mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-IT-MS/MS) operating in both positive and negative ion mode was developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 veterinary drug residues (β-blockers, β-agonists and Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)) in meat samples. The sample treatment involved a liquid-solid extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthetized and modified with octadecylsilane, and the resulting hybrid material (denoted as SBA-15-C18) was applied and evaluated as SPE sorbent in the purification of samples. The materials were comprehensively characterized, and they showed a high surface area, high pore volume and a homogeneous distribution of the pores. Chromatographic conditions and extraction procedure were optimized, and the method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method detection limits (MDLs) and the method quantification limits (MQLs) were determined for all the analytes in meat samples and found to range between 0.01-18.75μg/kg and 0.02-62.50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries for 15 of the target analytes ranged from 71 to 98%. In addition, for comparative purpose SBA-15-C18 was evaluated towards commercial C18 amorphous silica. Results revealed that SBA-15-C18 was clearly more successful in the multi-residue extraction of the 23 mentioned analytes with higher recovery values. The method was successfully tested to analyze prepacked preparations of mince bovine meat. Traces of propranolol, ketoprofen and diclofenac were detected in some samples.

  19. Application of a hybrid ordered mesoporous silica as sorbent for solid-phase multi-residue extraction of veterinary drugs in meat by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casado, Natalia; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-08-12

    A quick, sensitive and selective analytical reversed-phase multi-residue method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ion-trap mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-IT-MS/MS) operating in both positive and negative ion mode was developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 veterinary drug residues (β-blockers, β-agonists and Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)) in meat samples. The sample treatment involved a liquid-solid extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthetized and modified with octadecylsilane, and the resulting hybrid material (denoted as SBA-15-C18) was applied and evaluated as SPE sorbent in the purification of samples. The materials were comprehensively characterized, and they showed a high surface area, high pore volume and a homogeneous distribution of the pores. Chromatographic conditions and extraction procedure were optimized, and the method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method detection limits (MDLs) and the method quantification limits (MQLs) were determined for all the analytes in meat samples and found to range between 0.01-18.75μg/kg and 0.02-62.50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries for 15 of the target analytes ranged from 71 to 98%. In addition, for comparative purpose SBA-15-C18 was evaluated towards commercial C18 amorphous silica. Results revealed that SBA-15-C18 was clearly more successful in the multi-residue extraction of the 23 mentioned analytes with higher recovery values. The method was successfully tested to analyze prepacked preparations of mince bovine meat. Traces of propranolol, ketoprofen and diclofenac were detected in some samples. PMID:27412322

  20. Online eluent-switching technique coupled anion-exchange liquid chromatography–ion trap tandem mass spectrometry for analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pig serum.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai Chun; Lin, Jyh Shiun; Cheng, Cheanyeh

    2015-11-27

    A novel method for online extraction, pH-gradient separation, and analysis of nine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was developed by coupling online eluent-switching technique to single anion-exchange chromatographic column/ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and used for monitoring NSAIDs residues in pig serum. A neutral eluent and a pH-gradient eluent were used for extraction and separation of NSAIDs, respectively. Each of nine NSAIDs has an MS precursor ion of either [M−H]− or [M−Na]−. The extracted ion chromatogram for a specific product ion of each NSAID was used for its quantitative analysis. The dynamic linear ranges of calibration curves were all 0–200 ng mL−1 (R2 > 0.9950). The analysis accuracies estimated by spiking standard concentrations at 20, 100, and 200 ng mL−1 were 80.5–99.9%. The corresponding intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD%) were 2.5–14.5% and 2.9–15.2%, respectively. The limit of detection/limit of quantitation of NSAIDs were 1.3/4.3, 0.5/1.6, 0.2/0.5, 2.5/8.2, 1.5/4.9, 0.6/2.1, 0.6/2.0, 0.5/1.7, and 0.6/2.1 ng mL−1 for carprofen, diclofenac, flunixin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, meclofenamic acid sodium, mefenamic acid, niflumic acid, and tolfenamic acid, respectively. After 1 h injection of a dose containing 2 mg kg−1 weight pig of flunixin and tolfenamic acid to the pigs, a residue amount of 3480 ± 36 ng mL−1 and 431 ± 13 ng mL−1, respectively, was reached for the incurred pig serum specimens and both residues were reduced to about 20 ng mL−1 at the time of 24 h. PMID:26601710

  1. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  2. Orthogonal tandem catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Tracy L.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2015-06-01

    Tandem catalysis is a growing field that is beginning to yield important scientific and technological advances toward new and more efficient catalytic processes. 'One-pot' tandem reactions, where multiple catalysts and reagents, combined in a single reaction vessel undergo a sequence of precisely staged catalytic steps, are highly attractive from the standpoint of reducing both waste and time. Orthogonal tandem catalysis is a subset of one-pot reactions in which more than one catalyst is used to promote two or more mechanistically distinct reaction steps. This Perspective summarizes and analyses some of the recent developments and successes in orthogonal tandem catalysis, with particular focus on recent strategies to address catalyst incompatibility. We also highlight the concept of thermodynamic leveraging by coupling multiple catalyst cycles to effect challenging transformations not observed in single-step processes, and to encourage application of this technique to energetically unfavourable or demanding reactions.

  3. Reactor issues for tandem mirrors operating in the negative-potential mode

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.; Campbell, R.B.

    1985-12-02

    During 1985, interest has been revived at LLNL in tandem mirrors operating in the negative-potential mode. The negative tandem is formed by combining ECRH-sustained hot electron end cell plasmas with pumping mechanisms to remove trapped ions from the end cells. No sloshing ions are required. The resulting negative potential in the end cells confines the central cell electrons. The requirement of charge neutrality causes the ambipolar potential of the central cell to become negative relative to the end wall (hence, the name ''negative' tandem mirror), thereby providing central cell ion confinement. This potential distribution is the exact inverse of the axial distribution for the conventional (positive) tandem mirror without thermal barriers. In the negative tandem mirror, central cell electrons are confined electrostatically, end cell electrons are confined magnetically, and ions are confined electrostatically everywhere. In this report, we briefly assess the reactor issues pertinent to the operation of the tandem mirror in the negative mode. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen. PMID:21085118

  5. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen.

  6. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  7. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  8. Tandem mirror fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.

    1983-12-02

    The tandem mirror program has evolved considerably in the last decade. Of significance is the viable reactor concept embodied in the MARS design. An aggressive experimental program, culminating in the operation of MFTF-B in late 1986, will provide a firm basis for refining the MARS design as necessary for constructing a reactor prototype in the 1990s.

  9. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  10. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  11. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  12. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  13. Flexible and fragmentable tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, S.; Uran, C.; Bozok, B.; Gungor, K.; Kelestemur, Y.; Lesnyak, V.; Gaponik, N.; Eychmüller, A.; Demir, H. V.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of single monolayers of colloidal water-soluble CdTe and CdHgTe nanocrystals (NCs) in adjacent junctions on a Kapton polymer tape. Owing to the usage of a single NC layer in each junction, noise generation was significantly reduced while keeping the resulting PNS films considerably transparent. In each junction, photogenerated excitons are dissociated at the interface of the semi-transparent Al electrode and the NC layer, with holes migrating to the contact electrode and electrons trapped in the NCs. As a result, the tandem PNSs lead to an open-circuit photovoltage buildup equal to the sum of those of the two single junctions, exhibiting a total voltage buildup of 128.4 mV at an excitation intensity of 75.8 μW cm-2 at 350 nm. Furthermore, we showed that these flexible PNSs could be bent over 3.5 mm radius of curvature and cut out in arbitrary shapes without damaging the operation of individual parts and without introducing any significant loss in the total sensitivity. These findings indicate that the NC skins are promising as building blocks to make low-cost, flexible, large-area UV/visible sensing platforms with highly efficient full-spectrum conversion.We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of

  14. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  15. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  16. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-08-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  17. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  18. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R; Byers, J; Hua, D; Tung, L

    2004-07-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process, and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler) that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S TM. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values. The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma. Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging. Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S-T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution. In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K

  19. Modern tandem control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, J. R.; Marsaudon, J. C.

    1993-04-01

    Nowadays, tandem electrostatic accelerators can benefit greatly from the growing possibilities provided by modern control facilities. Controlling an electrostatic accelerator first requires the solution of technological problems raised by the necessity of fitting inside the tank equipment which is highly stressed by the physical environment. Then, these controls can take advantage of new techniques which appear on the market. Present computer technology provides cheap powerful workstations for efficient operator interfacing, and new modular and distributed control concepts have been developed for general use in experimental physics, in data acquisition and in control systems. The general trend towards standardization is now accepted for both hardware and software and this brings benefits to the designer and the user.

  20. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  1. Interfacial charge trapping in the polymer solar cells and its elimination by solvent annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, A. K.; Gusain, Abhay; Jha, P.; Veerender, P.; Koiry, S. P.; Sridevi, C.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Taguchi, D.; Manaka, T.; Iwamoto, M.

    2016-09-01

    The PCDTBT:PCBM solar cells were fabricated adopting a tandem layer approach to investigate the critical issues of charge trapping, radiation absorption, and efficiency in polymer solar cells. This layered structure was found to be a source of charge trapping which was identified and confirmed by impedance spectroscopy. The low efficiency in multilayered structures was related to trapping of photo-generated carriers and low carrier mobility, and thus an increased recombination. Solvent annealing of the structures in tetrahydrofuran vapors was found beneficial in homogenizing the active layer, dissolving additional interfaces, and elimination of charge traps which improved the carrier mobilities and eventually the device efficiencies.

  2. Product ion scanning using a Q-q-Q linear ion trap (Q TRAP) mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hager, James W; Yves Le Blanc, J C

    2003-01-01

    The use of a Q-q-Q(linear ion trap) instrument to obtain product ion spectra is described. The instrument is based on the ion path of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with Q3 operable as either a conventional RF/DC quadrupole mass filter or a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with axial ion ejection. This unique ion optical arrangement allows de-coupling of precursor ion isolation and fragmentation from the ion trap itself. The result is a high sensitivity tandem mass spectrometer with triple quadrupole fragmentation patterns and no inherent low mass cut-off. The use of the entrance RF-only section of the instrument as accumulation ion trap while the linear ion trap mass spectrometer is scanning enhances duty cycles and results in increased sensitivities by as much as a factor of 20. The instrument is also capable of all of the triple quadrupole scans including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) as well as precursor and constant neutral loss scanning. The high product ion scanning sensitivity allows the recording of useful product ion spectra near the MRM limit of quantitation.

  3. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  4. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  5. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  6. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  7. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  8. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.; Koenig, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. ); Moore, R.B.; Rouleau, G. ); Audi, G. )

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on [sup 78]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] and [sup 84]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  9. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  10. Optical Trapping of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam1. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles1. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec1, which has serious implications for biological matter2,3. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime4. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement5,6. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres7 and 3.4 nm

  11. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  12. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  13. Optically programmable excitonic traps

    PubMed Central

    Alloing, Mathieu; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Dubin, François

    2013-01-01

    With atomic systems, optically programmed trapping potentials have led to remarkable progress in quantum optics and quantum information science. Programmable trapping potentials could have a similar impact on studies of semiconductor quasi-particles, particularly excitons. However, engineering such potentials inside a semiconductor heterostructure remains an outstanding challenge and optical techniques have not yet achieved a high degree of control. Here, we synthesize optically programmable trapping potentials for indirect excitons of bilayer heterostructures. Our approach relies on the injection and spatial patterning of charges trapped in a field-effect device. We thereby imprint in-situ and on-demand electrostatic traps into which we optically inject cold and dense ensembles of excitons. This technique creates new opportunities to improve state-of-the-art technologies for the study of collective quantum behavior of excitons and also for the functionalisation of emerging exciton-based opto-electronic circuits. PMID:23546532

  14. Ion sponge: a 3-dimentional array of quadrupole ion traps for trapping and mass-selectively processing ions in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations.

  15. Ion Sponge: A 3-Dimentional Array of Quadrupole Ion Traps for Trapping and Mass-Selectively Processing Ions in Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations. PMID:24758328

  16. Trace analysis of explosives in seawater using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Griest, W.H.

    1998-07-15

    Complex matrices typically cannot be analyzed directly to obtain the selectivity and sensitivity required for most trace analysis applications. To circumvent this problem, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) techniques were used to preconcentrate analytes selectively prior to gas chromatographic/ion trap mass spectrometric analysis. This approach was applied to the trace analysis of explosives and their metabolites in seawater. The choice of SPME sorbent phase was shown to be important especially for the amino metabolites of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and RDX, which were extracted better on polar phases. Although equilibration times were quite lengthy, on the order of 30 min or greater, a sampling time of only 10 min was shown to be sufficient for achieving low part-per-billion (ppb) to part-per-trillion (ppt) detection limits for TNT and the amino metabolites in real seawater samples. While SPME was ideal for rapid screening of explosives in seawater samples, methods for improving the reproducibility and accuracy of quantification are still being investigated.

  17. Using Biotinylated SUMO-Traps to Analyze SUMOylated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Barrio, Rosa; Sutherland, James D; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) recognize SUMOylated proteins with high specificity allowing to connect SUMO-modified proteins. Multiple SIMs fused to distinct tags have been used to increase their affinity and generate more efficient purification tools. Enrichment of SUMOylated proteins using SIMs arranged in tandem (SUMO-traps) facilitates the identification and characterization of protein targets in vitro and in vivo. Here a protocol to produce biotinylated SUMO-traps (bioSUBEs) to capture SUMO chains and typical SUMOylated proteins such as p53 or IkBα is presented. Biotinylated SUMO-traps represent an alternative to reduce the background associated to bigger tags, e.g., during mass spectrometry analysis. Consequently, bioSUBEs are alternative tools to characterize endogenous SUMO targets. PMID:27631801

  18. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  19. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  20. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  1. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  2. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  3. Structural traps 5

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

  4. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  5. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  6. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  7. Plasmonic polymer tandem solar cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hsu, Wan-Ching; Tan, Hai-ren; Zhang, Xing Wang; Hong, Ziruo; Yang, Yang

    2011-08-23

    We demonstrated plasmonic effects in an inverted tandem polymer solar cell configuration by blending Au nanoparticles (NPs) into the interconnecting layer (ICL) that connects two subcells. Experimental results showed this plasmonic enhanced ICL improves both the top and bottom subcells' efficiency simultaneously by enhancing optical absorption. The presence of Au NPs did not cause electrical characteristics to degrade within the tandem cell. As a result, a 20% improvement of power conversion efficiency has been attained by the light concentration of Au NPs via plasmonic near-field enhancement. The simulated near-field distribution and experimental Raman scattering investigation support our results of plasmonic induced enhancement in solar cell performance. Our finding shows a great potential of incorporating the plasmonic effect with conventional device structure in achieving highly efficient polymer solar cells. PMID:21749062

  8. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  9. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  10. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  11. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  12. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  13. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  14. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  15. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  16. Measurement of Trap Length for an Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2009-01-01

    The trap length along the beam axis for an optical trap formed with an upright, oil-immersion microscope was measured. The goals for this effort were twofold. It was deemed useful to understand the depth to which an optical trap can reach for purposes of developing a tool to assist in the fabrication of miniature devices. Additionally, it was desired to know whether the measured trap length favored one or the other of two competing theories to model an optical trap. The approach was to trap a microsphere of known size and mass and raise it from its initial trap position. The microsphere was then dropped by blocking the laser beam for a pre-determined amount of time. Dropping the microsphere in a free-fall mode from various heights relative to the coverslip provides an estimate of how the trapping length changes with depth in water in a sample chamber on a microscope slide. While it was not possible to measure the trap length with sufficient precision to support any particular theory of optical trap formation, it was possible to find regions where the presence of physical boundaries influenced optical traps, and determine that the trap length, for the apparatus studied, is between 6 and 7 m. These results allow more precise control using optical micromanipulation to assemble miniature devices by providing information about the distance over which an optical trap is effective.

  17. The IAE Peking HI-13 tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju-xian, Yu

    1981-05-01

    A new tandem accelerator laboratory is under construction at the Institute of Atomic Energy in Peking. This institute was built in 1958 and equipped with a reactor, cyclotron, electrostatic accelerator and some other facilities to meet the increasing interest in nuclear study and its application in China. The project of this tandem laboratory was approved in 1978. A 13 MV tandem accelerator will be provided by the High Voltage Engineering Corporation of Burlington, Massachusetts, USA, and a Q3D magnetic spectrometer by AB Scanditronix, Sweden. Some auxiliary systems, experimental equipment and the tank of the tandem are being designed and manufactured in China.

  18. Recent Activities at Tokai Tandem Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Tetsuro

    2010-05-01

    Recent activities at the JAEA-Tokai tandem accelerator facility are presented. The terminal voltage of the tandem accelerator reached 19.1 MV by replacing acceleration tubes. The multi-charged positive-ion injector was installed in the terminal of the tandem accelerator, supplying high-current noble-gas ions. A superconducting cavity for low-velocity ions was developed. Radioactive nuclear beams of 8,9Li and fission products, produced by the tandem accelerator and separated by the ISOL, were supplied with experiment. Recent results of nuclear physics experiments are reported.

  19. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS < 1) and that it is also able to predict tandem duplications involving non coding elements such as pseudo-genes or RNA genes. Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations. PMID:22568762

  20. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  1. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  2. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  3. Ion-molecule adduct formation in tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays most LC-MS methods rely on tandem mass spectrometry not only for quantitation and confirmation of compounds by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), but also for the identification of unknowns from their product ion spectra. However, gas-phase reactions between charged and neutral species inside the mass analyzer can occur, yielding product ions at m/z values higher than that of the precursor ion, or at m/z values difficult to explain by logical losses, which complicate mass spectral interpretation. In this work, the formation of adduct ions in the mass analyzer was studied using several mass spectrometers with different mass analyzers (ion trap, triple quadrupole, and quadrupole-Orbitrap). Heterocyclic amines (AαC, MeAαC, Trp-P-1, and Trp-P-2), photo-initiators (BP and THBP), and pharmaceuticals (phenacetin and levamisole) were selected as model compounds and infused in LCQ Classic, TSQ Quantum Ultra AM, and Q-Exactive Orbitrap (ThermoFisher Scientific) mass spectrometers using electrospray as ionization method. The generation of ion-molecule adducts depended on the compound and also on the instrument employed. Adducts with neutral organic solvents (methanol and acetonitrile) were only observed in the ion trap instrument (LCQ Classic), because of the ionization source on-axis configuration and the lack of gas-phase barriers, which allowed inertial entrance of the neutrals into the analyzer. Adduct formation (only with water) in the triple quadrupole instruments was less abundant than in the ion trap and quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, because of the lower residence time of the reactive product ions in the mass analyzer. The moisture level of the CID and/or damper gas had a great effect in beam-like mass analyzers such as triple quadrupole, but not in trap-like mass analyzers, probably because of the long residence time that allowed adduct formation even with very low concentrations of water inside the mass spectrometer. PMID:26700446

  4. Trapped particle optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Lars; Hertz, Hans M.

    1992-11-01

    A scanned probe optical microscope allowing nondestructive studies of a wide range of objects and surface is described. The microscope utilizes a noninvasive optical trap to position a microscopic probe light source in immediate proximity to the studied object. We demonstrate the method experimentally and show theoretically its potential for optical imaging with subdiffraction limited resolution of, e.g., biological objects.

  5. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  6. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  7. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  8. The Universal Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Paul

    The compulsory system of education is criticized on the grounds that it has become a regimented "universal trap" antithetical to democracy. In contrast to the Jeffersonian concept of education in the service of citizen initiative for the preservation of freedom, current compulsory education is a tool of industrialism and of a rigidly stratified…

  9. Traps and trapping techniques for adult mosquito control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview is presented of the recent advancements in research activities conducted to evaluate mosquito traps, insecticide-impregnated targets baited with combinations of attractants, and strategies for using mass trapping techniques for adult mosquito population management. Technologies that use...

  10. Improved monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1991-04-23

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surf ace of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  11. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  12. Tandem transcription and translation regulatory sensing of uncharged tryptophan tRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangnan; Yanofsky, Charles

    2003-07-11

    The Bacillus subtilis AT (anti-TRAP) protein inhibits the regulatory protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein), thereby eliminating transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon. Transcription of the AT operon is activated by uncharged tryptophan transfer RNA (tRNATrp). Here we show that translation of AT also is regulated by uncharged tRNATrp. A 10-residue coding region containing three consecutive tryptophan codons is located immediately preceding the AT structural gene. Completion of translation of this coding region inhibits AT synthesis, whereas incomplete translation increases AT production. Tandem sensing of uncharged tRNATrp therefore regulates synthesis of AT, which in turn regulates TRAP's ability to inhibit trp operon expression. PMID:12855807

  13. Electron Heat Conduction in the Phaedrus Tandem Mirror.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smatlak, Donna Lynn

    Experiments to investigate electron heat conduction have been performed on the University of Wisconsin tandem mirror Phaedrus. Electron temperature differences along the magnetic field were generated using a mircowave heat pulse. Probe techniques were developed for the continuous measurement of local electron temperatures with a time resolution of less than one microsecond. Parameter studies indicated that the temperature differences were due to collisionless electron heat transport between the trapped and untrapped electron populations in the plugs and the central cell of a tandem mirror. The detailed time-dependent measurements of the electron temperatures in each plug and in the central cell verified that electron heat conduction is reduced across a thermal barrier. The electron temperature decays in the presence of strong gradients were stable and describable by classical processes. The measured electron temperature evolutions in each region were compared to the predictions of a power balance model which incorporated the theoretical expression for the power lost by collisionless heat transfer and an empirical collisional thermal conduction loss term. Good agreement between the results of the model and the experiment was obtained. Examination of the power balance also indicated tht the microwave power absorbed by the electrons was greater than predicted by single pass absorption. The observation of a density threshold for the heating is suggestive of a nonlinear absorption mechanism such as the two plasmon decay instability.

  14. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  15. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  16. Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Design considerations and operational experience for the existing heavy-ion accelerator consisting of a tandem injecting into a superconducting linac are summarized, with emphasis on the general features of the system. This introduction provides the basis for a discussion of the objectives and design of ATLAS, a larger tandem-linac system being formed by expanding the existing superconducting linac.

  17. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value.

  18. Phosphorous trapped within buckminsterfullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J. A.; Greer, J. C.; Harneit, W.; Weidinger, A.

    2002-05-01

    Under normal circumstances, when covalent molecules form, electrons are exchanged between atoms to form bonds. However, experiment and theoretical computations reveal exactly the opposite effect for the formation of group V elements nitrogen and phosphorous encapsulated within a buckminsterfullerene molecule. The C60 carbon cage remains intact upon encapsulation of the atom, whereas the electronic charge cloud of the N or P atom contracts. We have studied the chemical, spin, and thermodynamic properties of endohedral phosphorous (P@C60) and have compared our results with earlier findings for N@C60. From a combined experimental and theoretical vantage, we are able to elucidate a model for the interaction between the trapped group V atom and the fullerene cage. A picture emerges for the electronic structure of these complexes, whereby an atom is trapped within a fullerene, and interacts weakly with the molecular orbitals of the C60 cage.

  19. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  20. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  1. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  2. Towards optical optimization of planar monolithic perovskite/silicon-heterojunction tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Steve; Saliba, Michael; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Jäger, Klaus; Korte, Lars; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Rech, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Combining inorganic–organic perovskites and crystalline silicon into a monolithic tandem solar cell has recently attracted increased attention due to the high efficiency potential of this cell architecture. Promising results with published efficiencies above 21% have been reported so far. To further increase the device performance, optical optimizations enabling device related guidelines are highly necessary. Here we experimentally show the optical influence of the ITO thickness in the interconnecting layer and fabricate an efficient monolithic tandem cell with a reduced ITO layer thickness that shows slightly improved absorption within the silicon sub-cell and a stabilized power output of 17%. Furthermore we present detailed optical simulations on experimentally relevant planar tandem stacks to give practical guidelines to reach efficiencies above 25%. By optimizing the thickness of all functional and the perovskite absorber layers, together with the optimization of the perovskite band-gap, we present a tandem stack that can yield ca 17.5 mA cm‑ 2 current in both sub-cells at a perovskite band-gap of 1.73 eV including losses from reflection and parasitic absorption. Assuming that the higher band-gap of the perovskite absorber directly translates into a higher open circuit voltage, the perovskite sub-cell should be able to reach a value of 1.3 V. With that, realistic efficiencies above 28% are within reach for planar monolithic tandem cells in which the thickness of the perovskite top-cell and the perovskite band-gap are highly optimized. When applying light trapping schemes such as textured surfaces and by reducing the parasitic absorption of the functional layers, for example in spiro-OMeTAD, this monolithic tandem can overcome 30% power conversion efficiency.

  3. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  4. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  5. Evaluation of ion trap mass spectrometry for the determination of ambient nicotine

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Ilgner, R.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    A thermal desorption unit has been interfaced directly with a Finnigan Ion Trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) for the identification and quantification of trace organics in air. No chromatographic separation of the desorbed constituents is performed prior to introduction into the mass spectrometer. Instead, positive identification of a compound is made based on its collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem (MS/MS) mass spectrum. Using this technique, as little as 50 pg of a constituent desorbed from resin trap can be characterized and quantified with a sample turnaround time of only 2--3 minutes. 3 refs.

  6. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1995-01-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are given.

  7. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-03-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser, the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are reported.

  8. The potential of combining ion trap/MS/MS and TOF/MS for identification of emerging contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.; Heine, C.E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a method combining ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and time of flight mass spectrometry (TOF/MS) for identification of emerging contaminates was discussed. The two tools together complemented each other in sensitivity, fragmentation and accurate mass determination. Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS), in positive ion mode of operation, was used to separate and identify specific compounds. Diagnostic fragment ions were obtained for a polyethyleneglycol(PEG) homolog by ion trap MS/MS, and fragments were measured by TOF/MS. It was observed that the combined method gave an exact mass measurement that differed from the calculated mass.

  9. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

  10. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  11. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages.

  12. Spectroscopy of trapped francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Joshua Matus

    Atomic francium, which has no stable isotopes, is an attractive candidate for measurements of parity non-conservation. A heavy ion fusion reaction produces Fr at the Stony Brook superconducting LINAC, and we confine about 10,000 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We made precise measurements (300 ppm) of the hyperfine splitting of the 7P1/2 state. Combining these measurements with previous measurements of the ground state hyperfine splitting, enabled us to extract the hyperfine anomaly in these states, and thus probe the nuclear magnetization. We located the previously unobserved 7D states and measured their energies and hyperfine splittings. Using time-correlated single-photon counting, we measured radiative lifetimes of 73.6 +/- 0.3 ns for the 7D3/2 level and 67.7 +/- 2.9 ns for the 7D5/2 level. We have constructed a new apparatus for efficient trapping of Fr in preparation for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment.

  13. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.

    2005-10-26

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  14. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  15. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  16. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  17. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27150507

  18. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  19. Traps and seals II. Stratigraphic/capillary traps

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This text is a reprint belonging to a series of reprint volumes which in turn are part of the Treatise of Petroleum Geology. This volume contains papers that describe different stratigraphically controlled trap types, the preservation of porosity, and the importance of capillarity in trapping hydrocarbons.

  20. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Area 1 trap limits. The Area 1 trap limit is 800 traps. Federally permitted lobster fishing vessels shall not fish with, deploy in, possess in, or haul back...

  1. Cryogenic ion trapping systems with surface-electrode traps.

    PubMed

    Antohi, P B; Schuster, D; Akselrod, G M; Labaziewicz, J; Ge, Y; Lin, Z; Bakr, W S; Chuang, I L

    2009-01-01

    We present two simple cryogenic rf ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 h. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with (88)Sr(+) ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 min.

  2. Solar energy trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for trapping solar energy for heating a fluid that could be subsequently used in turbines and similar devices. The apparatus includes an elongated vertical light pipe having an open end through which the visible spectrum of electromagnetic radiation from the sun passes to strike a tubular absorber. The light pipe has a coated interior surface of a low absorptivity and a high reflectivity at the visible wavelengths and a high absorptivity/emissivity ratio at infrared wavelengths. The tubular absorber has a coating on the surface for absorbing visible wavelengths to heat the fluid passing through. Infrared wave lengths are radiated from the tubular absorber back into the light pipe for heating fluid passing through a tubular coil wound around it.

  3. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (ii) A non-distance-sensitive component shall be assessed for use of the circuit equipment at the ends... circuits used in the tandem to end office links (or a surrogate based on the proportion of copper and fiber... the relative number of DS1 and DS3 circuits used in the tandem to end office links (or a...

  4. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  5. Nontoxic Antifreeze for Insect Traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propylene glycol in water is a safe and effective alternative to ethylene glycol as a capture liquid in insect traps (pitfalls, flight intercepts, pan traps). Propylene glycol formulations are readily available because it is the primary (95%) ingredient in certain automotive antifreeze formulations...

  6. Trapped surfaces in spherical stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, P.; Malec, E.; O'Murchadha, N.

    1988-09-05

    We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of trapped surfaces in spherically symmetric spacetimes. These conditions show that the formation of trapped surfaces depends on both the degree of concentration and the average flow of the matter. The result can be considered as a partial validation of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis.

  7. Mass trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping has been found to be highly effective for control of pest fruit flies when populations are low and a highly effective lure is available for the target species. Successful population control through mass trapping is an indicator that attract-and-kill bait stations may be equally succes...

  8. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions.

  9. Characteristics of a trapped-vortex (TV) combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-Y.; Gross, L. P.; Trump, D. D.; Roquemore, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of a Trapped-Vortex (TV) combustor are presented. A vortex is trapped in the cavity established between two disks mounted in tandem. Fuel and air are injected directly into the cavity in such a way as to increase the vortex strength. Some air from the annular flow is also entrained into the recirculation zone of the vortex. Lean blow-out limits of the combustor are determined for a wide range of annular air flow rates. These data indicate that the lean blow-out limits are considerably lower for the TV combustor than for flames stabilized using swirl or bluff-bodies. The pressure loss through the annular duct is also low, being less than 2% for the flow conditions in this study. The instantaneous shape of the recirculation zone of the trapped vortex is measured using a two-color PIV technique. Temperature profiles obtained with CARS indicate a well mixed recirculation zone and demonstrate the impact of primary air injection on the local equivalence ratio.

  10. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  11. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2014-03-01

    Optical trapping and tracking is a powerful method for many biological and rheological applications. Recent advances in microrheological techniques, like two-point microrheology, allow probing mechanical properties of viscoelastic networks with mesh size bigger than the size of the microbead itself, but require high signal to noise ratio. Noise level in the system can be reduced by removing active elements, like acousto-optical deflectors or galvo-mirrors from the optical train and making the trap fixed. We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material and allows calibration of a fixed trap. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and based on pulling a particle with one trap while simultaneously holding it with the other. No piezo-stage is needed and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo-mirrors, piezo-mirrors or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. We acknowledge financial support of DARPA grant W911NF-09-1-0378.

  12. Tandem repeats derived from centromeric retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tandem repeats are ubiquitous and abundant in higher eukaryotic genomes and constitute, along with transposable elements, much of DNA underlying centromeres and other heterochromatic domains. In maize, centromeric satellite repeat (CentC) and centromeric retrotransposons (CR), a class of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, are enriched at centromeres. Some satellite repeats have homology to retrotransposons and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expansion, contraction as well as homogenization of tandem repeats. However, the origin and evolution of tandem repeat loci remain largely unknown. Results CRM1TR and CRM4TR are novel tandem repeats that we show to be entirely derived from CR elements belonging to two different subfamilies, CRM1 and CRM4. Although these tandem repeats clearly originated in at least two separate events, they are derived from similar regions of their respective parent element, namely the long terminal repeat (LTR) and untranslated region (UTR). The 5′ ends of the monomer repeat units of CRM1TR and CRM4TR map to different locations within their respective LTRs, while their 3′ ends map to the same relative position within a conserved region of their UTRs. Based on the insertion times of heterologous retrotransposons that have inserted into these tandem repeats, amplification of the repeats is estimated to have begun at least ~4 (CRM1TR) and ~1 (CRM4TR) million years ago. Distinct CRM1TR sequence variants occupy the two CRM1TR loci, indicating that there is little or no movement of repeats between loci, even though they are separated by only ~1.4 Mb. Conclusions The discovery of two novel retrotransposon derived tandem repeats supports the conclusions from earlier studies that retrotransposons can give rise to tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Analysis of monomers from two different CRM1TR loci shows that gene conversion is the major cause of sequence variation. We propose that successive intrastrand deletions

  13. The trapped human experiment.

    PubMed

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  14. The combinatorics of tandem duplication trees.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Olivier; Hendy, Michael D; Jean-Marie, Alain; McLachlan, Robert

    2003-02-01

    We developed a recurrence relation that counts the number of tandem duplication trees (either rooted or unrooted) that are consistent with a set of n tandemly repeated sequences generated under the standard unequal recombination (or crossover) model of tandem duplications. The number of rooted duplication trees is exactly twice the number of unrooted trees, which means that on average only two positions for a root on a duplication tree are possible. Using the recurrence, we tabulated these numbers for small values of n. We also developed an asymptotic formula that for large n provides estimates for these numbers. These numbers give a priori probabilities for phylogenies of the repeated sequences to be duplication trees. This work extends earlier studies where exhaustive counts of the numbers for small n were obtained. One application showed the significance of finding that most maximum-parsimony trees constructed from repeat sequences from human immunoglobins and T-cell receptors were tandem duplication trees. Those findings provided strong support to the proposed mechanisms of tandem gene duplication. The recurrence relation also suggests efficient algorithms to recognize duplication trees and to generate random duplication trees for simulation. We present a linear-time recognition algorithm.

  15. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value. PMID:27203528

  16. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  17. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  18. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  19. Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry: Photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; Booth, M.M.; Eyler, J.R.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Photo-induced dissociation (PID) is the next most frequently used method (after collisional activation) for activation of Polyatomic ions in tandem mass spectrometry. The range of internal energies present after the photon absorption process are much narrower than those obtained with collisional energy transfer. Therefore, the usefulness of PID for the study of ion structures is greatly enhanced. The long storage times and instrumental configuration of the ion trap mass spectrometer are ideally suited for photodissociation experiments. This presentation will focus on both the fundamental and analytical applications of CO{sub 2} lasers in conjunction with ion trap mass spectrometry. The first portion of this talk will examine the fundamental issues of wavelength dependence, chemical kinetics, photoabsorption cross section, and collisional effects on photodissociation efficiency. The second half of this presentation will look at novel instrumentation for electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry, with the concurrent development of photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation of organic compounds and antibiotics.

  20. Modification of a tandem mass-spectrometer for infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) of gas-phase ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Julie M.; Osburn, Sandra M.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.

    2015-05-01

    Infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) is a method of fragmenting molecular ions for structural analysis of the parent molecule. The target ions absorb many photons, increasing the vibrational state of the excited bonds until the dissociation occurs. We have modified a commercial linear quadrupole trap tandem mass spectrometer (Thermo-Fisher LTQ) by installing a removable high-vacuum window in the rear accessory plate of the mass spectrometer. The window allows us to inject laser light into the ion trap. The shape of the injected laser beam is optimized to match the volume of the ion cloud within the ion trap, improving IRMPD efficiency. We present preliminary data of the IRMPD of weakly bound uranyl-acetone and uranyl-dimethyl sulfoxide clusters using a 20-W pulsed CO2 laser (wavelength 10 . 6 μm), showing previously undetected fragmentation products.

  1. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  2. Combined acoustic and optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Meinschad, M.; Hill, M.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-01-01

    Combining several methods for contact free micro-manipulation of small particles such as cells or micro-organisms provides the advantages of each method in a single setup. Optical tweezers, which employ focused laser beams, offer very precise and selective handling of single particles. On the other hand, acoustic trapping with wavelengths of about 1 mm allows the simultaneous trapping of many, comparatively large particles. With conventional approaches it is difficult to fully employ the strengths of each method due to the different experimental requirements. Here we present the combined optical and acoustic trapping of motile micro-organisms in a microfluidic environment, utilizing optical macro-tweezers, which offer a large field of view and working distance of several millimeters and therefore match the typical range of acoustic trapping. We characterize the acoustic trapping forces with the help of optically trapped particles and present several applications of the combined optical and acoustic trapping, such as manipulation of large (75 μm) particles and active particle sorting. PMID:22025990

  3. Titan and Enceladus mission (TANDEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.

    2007-08-01

    Our understanding of Titan's atmosphere and surface has recently been enhanced by the data returned by the Cassini-Huygens mission. The Cassini orbiter will continue to be operational for about 3 more years during its extended mission. After this mission, any unanswered questions will forever remain unknown, unless we go back with an optimized orbital tour and advanced instrumentation. Considering the complementary nature of the geological, chemical and evolutionary history of Titan and Enceladus, we propose to carry out studies for a mission to perform an in situ exploration of these two objects in tandem. In our proposal we determine key science measurements, the types of samples that would be needed and the instrument suites for achieving the science goals. In particular, we develop conceptual designs for delivering the science payload, including orbiters, aerial platforms and probes, and define a launch/delivery/communication management architecture. This mission will require new technologies and capabilities so that the science goals can be achieved within the cost cap and acceptable risks. International participation will play a key role in achieving all the science goals of this mission. We will build this mission concept around a central core of single orbiter, a single Titan aerial probe and a core group of category 1 instruments. Aerobraking with Titan's atmosphere will be given serious consideration to minimize resource requirements and risk. This approach will allow a single orbiter to be used for both Enceladus science and Titan science with final orbit around Titan and later release of aerial probe(s) into Titan's atmosphere. The Titan aerial probe may be a Montgolfière balloon concept that will use the waster heat ~ 1000 watts from a single RTG power system. There will be a release of penetrator(s) on Enceladus also. This proposal addresses directly several of the scientific questions highlighted in the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 call, particularly

  4. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  5. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  6. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    PubMed Central

    Laveissière, C.; Camara, M.; Rayaisse, J.B.; Salou, E.; Kagbadouno, M.; Solano, P.

    2011-01-01

    Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea) one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season. PMID:21678789

  7. Trapping low-energy antiprotons in an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    A fraction of antiprotons from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN are slowed from 5.9 MeV to below 3 keV as they pass through thin foils. Transmitted particle energy distribution and low energy antiproton yield are measured by a time-of-flight technique. The difference in the range of protons and antiprotons (known as the Barkas effect) is observed. While still in flight, up to 1.3 {times} 10{sup 5} antiprotons with energies between 0 eV to 3 keV are stored in an ion trap from a single pulse of 5.9 MeV antiprotons leaving LEAR, thus a trapping efficiency exceeding of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} is established. Trapped antiprotons maintain their initial energy distribution unless allowed to collide with a cloud of trapped electrons, whereupon they slow and cool below 1 meV in 10 s, and fall into a harmonic potential well suited for precision mass measurements. The slowing, trapping and cooling of antiprotons are the main focus of this thesis. The stored antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium at 4.2 K. In this ion trap, the antiproton cyclotron frequency is measured and compared with the proton (or electron) cyclotron frequency. The new measured ratio of the antiproton and proton inertial masses, with its 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} uncertainty, is more than three orders of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements using exotic atoms. This is a most precise test of CPT invariance with baryons. The antiproton lifetime in an ion trap was measured to be more than 103 days by trapping a cloud of antiprotons for 59 days. The indicates the number density of atoms is less than 100/cm{sup 3} which corresponds to the pressure in the vacuum chamber being less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} Torr at 4.2 K if we apply the ideal gas law.

  8. Assessing charge carrier trapping in silicon nanowires using picosecond conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ronald; Kurstjens, Rufi; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-07-11

    Free-standing semiconductor nanowires on bulk substrates are increasingly being explored as building blocks for novel optoelectronic devices such as tandem solar cells. Although carrier transport properties, such as mobility and trap densities, are essential for such applications, it has remained challenging to quantify these properties. Here, we report on a method that permits the direct, contact-free quantification of nanowire carrier diffusivity and trap densities in thin (∼25 nm wide) silicon nanowires-without any additional processing steps such as transfer of wires onto a substrate. The approach relies on the very different terahertz (THz) conductivity response of photoinjected carriers within the silicon nanowires from those in the silicon substrate. This allows quantifying both the picosecond dynamics and the efficiency of charge carrier transport from the silicon nanowires into the silicon substrate. Varying the excitation density allows for quantification of nanowire trap densities: for sufficiently low excitation fluences the diffusion process stalls because the majority of charge carriers become trapped at nanowire surface defects. Using a model that includes these effects, we determine both the diffusion constant and the nanowire trap density. The trap density is found to be orders of magnitude larger than the charge carrier density that would be generated by AM1.5 sunlight.

  9. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells.

  10. Tandem mirror thermal barrier experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Coensgen, F.H.; Drake, R.P.; Simonen, T.C.

    1980-01-02

    This report describes an experimental plan for the development of the Tandem Mirror Thermal Barrier. Included is: (1) a description of thermal barrier related physics experiments; (2) thermal barrier related experiments in the existing TMX and Phaedrus experiments; (3) a thermal barrier TMX upgrade; and (4) initiation of investigations of axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Experimental studies of the first two items are presently underway. Results are expected from the TMX upgrade by the close of 1981 and from axisymmetric tandem mirror experiments at the end of 1983. Plans for Phaedrus upgrades are developing for the same period.

  11. High performance polymer tandem solar cell.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  12. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  13. Improved Isobaric Tandem Mass Tag Quantification by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Isobaric tandem mass tags are an attractive alternative to mass difference tags and label free approaches for quantitative proteomics due to the high degree of multiplexing that can be performed with their implementation. A drawback of tandem mass tags are that the co-isolation and co-fragmentation of labeled peptide precursors can result in chimeric MS/MS spectra that can underestimate the fold-change expression of each peptide. Two methods (QuantMode and MS3) have addressed this concern for ion trap and orbitrap instruments, but there is still a need to solve this problem for quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. Ion mobility (IM) separations coupled to Q-TOF instruments have the potential to mitigate MS/MS spectra chimeracy since IM-MS has the ability to separate ions based on charge, m/z, and collision cross section (CCS). This work presents results that showcase the power of IM-MS to improve tandem mass tag peptide quantitation accuracy by resolving co-isolated differently charged and same charged peptides prior to MS/MS fragmentation. PMID:24677527

  14. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  15. Kinetically Stabilized Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Summary of Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F

    2005-02-08

    The path to practical fusion power through plasma confinement in magnetic fields, if it is solely based on the present front-runner, the tokamak, is clearly long, expensive, and arduous. The root causes for this situation lie in the effects of endemic plasma turbulence and in the complexity the tokamak's ''closed'' field geometry. The studies carried out in the investigations described in the attached reports are aimed at finding an approach that does not suffer from these problems. This goal is to be achieved by employing an axisymmetric ''open'' magnetic field geometry, i.e. one generated by a linear array of circular magnet coils, and employing the magnetic mirror effect in accomplishing the plugging of end leakage. More specifically, the studies were aimed at utilizing the tandem-mirror concept in an axisymmetric configuration to achieve performance superior to the tokamak, and in a far simpler system, one for which the cost and development time could be much lower than that for the tokamak, as exemplified by ITER and its follow-ons. An important stimulus for investigating axisymmetric versions of the tandem mirror is the fact that, beginning from early days in fusion research there have been examples of axisymmetric mirror experiments where the plasma exhibited crossfield transport far below the turbulence-enhanced rates characteristic of tokamaks, in specific cases approaching the ''classical'' rate. From the standpoint of theory, axisymmetric mirror-based systems have special characteristics that help explain the low levels of turbulence that have been observed. Among these are the facts that there are no parallel currents in the equilibrium state, and that the drift surfaces of all of the trapped particles are closed surfaces, as shown early on by Teller and Northrop. In addition, in such systems it is possible to arrange that the radial boundary of the confined plasma terminates without contact with the chamber wall. This possibility reduces the

  16. Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2003-12-09

    Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping carried out by introducing a side stream into the main stream to squeeze the fluid containing particles close to the electrodes producing the dielelectrophoretic forces. The region of most effective or the strongest forces in the manipulating fields of the electrodes producing the dielectrophoretic forces is close to the electrodes, within 100 .mu.m from the electrodes. The particle trapping arrangement uses a series of electrodes with an AC field placed between pairs of electrodes, which causes trapping of particles along the edges of the electrodes. By forcing an incoming flow stream containing cells and DNA, for example, close to the electrodes using another flow stream improves the efficiency of the DNA trapping.

  17. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  18. Acoustic trapping of active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Sho C; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently 'explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  19. Trapping Protoplanets at the Snowlines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Pantin, E.

    2015-12-01

    We follow the viscous evolution of protoplanetary disks by modeling self-consistently their dynamics, thermodynamics, photosphere geometry and composition (Baillié & Charnoz., 2014, ApJ and Baillié et al., 2015, A&A). Our hydrodynamical numerical code allows us to estimate the local gradients in temperature and density that drive the type I migration of planetary embryos. In particular, we identify irregular structures in the disk: shadowed regions that are not directly irradiated by the star, temperature plateaux at the sublimation temperature of the main dust components of the disk. These icelines appear to be related with planetary traps. Though planetary embryos can be trapped temporarily in some early transient traps, the other traps (more permanent) will allow protoplanets to survive and favor their growth by collisions between embryos at some specific orbits.

  20. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  1. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  2. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  3. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C. E.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Bakr, W. S.; Mallard, W. J.; Brown, K. R.; Chuang, I. L.

    2006-03-15

    Chiaverini et al. [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion-trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many-zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of charged particles of 0.44 {mu}m diameter in a vacuum of 15 Pa (10{sup -1} torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion-trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four-rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through intersections. We further propose an additional dc-biased electrode above the trap which increases the trap depth dramatically, and a planar ion-trap geometry that generates a two-dimensional lattice of point Paul traps.

  4. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  5. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23... General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing configurations. The forward structure of a canard or tandem wing configuration must: (a) Meet all requirements of subpart C and subpart D of this part applicable to a wing;...

  6. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23... General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing configurations. The forward structure of a canard or tandem wing configuration must: (a) Meet all requirements of subpart C and subpart D of this part applicable to a wing;...

  7. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23... General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing configurations. The forward structure of a canard or tandem wing configuration must: (a) Meet all requirements of subpart C and subpart D of this part applicable to a wing;...

  8. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23... General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing configurations. The forward structure of a canard or tandem wing configuration must: (a) Meet all requirements of subpart C and subpart D of this part applicable to a wing;...

  9. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23... General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing configurations. The forward structure of a canard or tandem wing configuration must: (a) Meet all requirements of subpart C and subpart D of this part applicable to a wing;...

  10. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.J.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  11. Vortex interaction between two tandem flexible propulsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Goon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Flow Control Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    Schooling behaviors of flying and swimming animals are widespread phenomena in nature. Inspired by schooling behaviors of swimming jellyfish, self-propelling flexible bodies with a paddling-based locomotion were modeled in a tandem configuration. The interactions between surrounding fluids and propulsors were considered by using the immersed boundary method. The hydrodynamic patterns generated by the interactions between tandem flexible propulsors were analyzed in the presen study. As a result of the flow-mediated interactions between them, stable configurations were formed spontaneously in which the gap distance between propulsors increased and decreased during the contraction and relaxation phases of the upstream propulsor. The stable configuration was not affected by the initial gap distance but influenced by the phase difference in the flapping frequency between them. Both tandem propulsors benefited from the tandem configuration in terms of the locomotion as compared with an isolated propulsor. This study was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2015-001828) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  12. Technology for large tandem mirror experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1980-09-04

    Construction of a large tandem mirror (MFTF-B) will soon begin at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Designed to reach break-even plasma conditions, the facility will significantly advance the physics and technology of magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors. This paper describes the objectives and the design of the facility.

  13. Tandem mirror fusion-fission hybrid studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.

    1980-04-01

    The concept of combining nuclear fusion and nuclear fission techniques is discussed. Initial tandem mirror hybrid studies predict the ability to produce large amounts of fissile fuel (2 to 7 tons U233 per year from a 4000 MW plant) at a cost that adds less than 25% to the cost of power from a light water reactor.

  14. Tandem BRCT Domains: DNA's Praetorian Guard.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Rafael D; Woods, Nicholas T; Seabra-Junior, Eloy S; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2010-11-01

    The cell's ability to sense and respond to specific stimuli is a complex system derived from precisely regulated protein-protein interactions. Some of these protein-protein interactions are mediated by the recognition of linear peptide motifs by protein modular domains. BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminal) domains and their linear motif counterparts, which contain phosphoserines, are one such pair-wise interaction system that seems to have evolved to serve as a surveillance system to monitor threats to the cell's genetic integrity. Evidence indicates that BRCT domains found in tandem can cooperate to provide sequence-specific binding of phosphorylated peptides as is the case for the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 and the PAX transcription factor-interacting protein PAXIP1. Particular interest has been paid to tandem BRCT domains as "readers" of signaling events in the form of phosphorylated serine moieties induced by the activation of DNA damage response kinases ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK. However, given the diversity of tandem BRCT-containing proteins, questions remain as to the origin and evolution of this domain. Here, we discuss emerging views of the origin and evolving roles of tandem BRCT domain repeats in the DNA damage response.

  15. Tandem oligonucleotide synthesis using linker phosphoramidites

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Multiple oligonucleotides of the same or different sequence, linked end-to-end in tandem can be synthesized in a single automated synthesis. A linker phosphoramidite [R. T. Pon and S. Yu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 623–631] is added to the 5′-terminal OH end of a support-bound oligonucleotide to introduce a cleavable linkage (succinic acid plus sulfonyldiethanol) and the 3′-terminal base of the new sequence. Conventional phosphoramidites are then used for the rest of the sequence. After synthesis, treatment with ammonium hydroxide releases the oligonucleotides from the support and cleaves the linkages between each sequence. Mixtures of one oligonucleotide with both 5′- and 3′-terminal OH ends and other oligonucleotides with 5′-phosphorylated and 3′-OH ends are produced, which are deprotected and worked up as a single product. Tandem synthesis can be used to make pairs of PCR primers, sets of cooperative oligonucleotides or multiple copies of the same sequence. When tandem synthesis is used to make two self-complementary sequences, double-stranded structures spontaneously form after deprotection. Tandem synthesis of oligonucleotide chains containing up to six consecutive 20mer (120 bases total), various trinucleotide codons and primer pairs for PCR, or self-complementary strands for in situ formation of double-stranded DNA fragments has been demonstrated. PMID:15814811

  16. Incorporating Peer Assessment into Tandem Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, John; Truscott, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    A credit-rated tandem course unit has been running at the University of Manchester for the past six years and an element of peer assessment has always been present in the assessment procedure. Unfortunately, the course leaders found that this element was not entirely satisfactory. Although there were clear criteria in the course documentation for…

  17. Tandem mirror next step conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.; Damm, C.C.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    A study was made to define the features of the experimental mirror fusion device - The Tandem Mirror Next Step, or TMNS - that will bridge the gap between present mirror confinement experiments and a power-producing reactor. We outline the project goals, describe some initial device parameters, and relate the technological requirements to ongoing development programs.

  18. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  19. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  20. Quality evaluation of tandem mass spectral libraries.

    PubMed

    Oberacher, Herbert; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Dresen, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are gaining more and more importance for the identification of unknowns in different fields of research, including metabolomics, forensics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. Particularly, the recent invention of reliable, robust, and transferable libraries has increased the general acceptance of these tools. Herein, we report on results obtained from thorough evaluation of the match reliabilities of two tandem mass spectral libraries: the MSforID library established by the Oberacher group in Innsbruck and the Weinmann library established by the Weinmann group in Freiburg. Three different experiments were performed: (1) Spectra of the libraries were searched against their corresponding library after excluding either this single compound-specific spectrum or all compound-specific spectra prior to searching; (2) the libraries were searched against each other using either library as reference set or sample set; (3) spectra acquired on different mass spectrometric instruments were matched to both libraries. Almost 13,000 tandem mass spectra were included in this study. The MSforID search algorithm was used for spectral matching. Statistical evaluation of the library search results revealed that principally both libraries enable the sensitive and specific identification of compounds. Due to higher mass accuracy of the QqTOF compared with the QTrap instrument, matches to the MSforID library were more reliable when comparing spectra with both libraries. Furthermore, only the MSforID library was shown to be efficiently transferable to different kinds of tandem mass spectrometers, including "tandem-in-time" instruments; this is due to the coverage of a large range of different collision energy settings-including the very low range-which is an outstanding characteristics of the MSforID library.

  1. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  2. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  3. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  4. In situ detection of tandem DNA repeat length

    SciTech Connect

    Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.; Smith, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    A simple method for scoring short tandem DNA repeats is presented. An oligonucleotide target, containing tandem repeats embedded in a unique sequence, was hybridized to a set of complementary probes, containing tandem repeats of known lengths. Single-stranded loop structures formed on duplexes containing a mismatched (different) number of tandem repeats. No loop structure formed on duplexes containing a matched (identical) number of tandem repeats. The matched and mismatched loop structures were enzymatically distinguished and differentially labeled by treatment with S1 nuclease and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  6. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  7. Effect of bait in live trapping Peromyscus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: Evidence from live trapping tests indicated that Peromyscus leucopus did not leave their home ranges because of the attraction of trap bait in nearby areas. A trap line down the center of a heavily live-trapped area caught as many mice before the area trapping as afterward. Thus, there was reason to believe that the area trapping did not serve to pre-bait the mice. Two unbaited lines of live traps caught an equal number of Peromyscus. When one line was baited with rolled oats and peanut butter the efficiency of the traps was improved to the extent that the baited line captured more than twice as many mice as the unbaited line. It is concluded that for the species and habitat tested it is safe to make population calculations based on the assumption that the animals remain within their home ranges and do not tend to move into the trapped area because of the attraction of the trap bait.

  8. Identification of methamphetamines and over-the-counter sympathometic amines by full-scan GC-ion trap MS with electron impact and chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Wu, A H; Onigbinde, T A; Wong, S S; Johnson, K G

    1992-01-01

    An underivatized methane chemical ionization (CI) assay for measuring amphetamines in urine was evaluated against derivatized electron impact (EI) assays using a gas chromatograph-ion trap mass spectrometer. The full-scan CI mass spectra of methamphetamine, ephedrine/pseudoephedrine, and phentermine were compared with the full scan and three-ion EI mass spectra of heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA) and 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl chloride (CB) derivatives. The fragmentation patterns for these compounds were nearly identical for the three major high molecular weight ions (m/z 254, 210, and 169 for EI-HFBA derivatives, and m/z 308, 262, and 280 for EI-CB derivatives). The CI mass spectra of the underivatized drugs contained more discernible differences at the higher molecular weights, including m/z 119, 148, and 150 for methamphetamine, 148, 166, and 176 for ephedrine/pseudoephedrine, and 91, 133, and 150 for phentermine. The within-run precision ranged from 7-9% for CI versus 5-6% for EI with HFBA derivatization (mean 500 ng/mL, n = 5). The limits of detection (LOD) for amphetamine and methamphetamine were 2.4 and 8.6 ng/mL, respectively, for CI versus 0.7 and 1.4 ng/mL for EI. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 4.5 and 19.1 ng/mL for CI versus 1.4 and 5.7 ng/mL for EI. The use of full-scan mass spectral analysis with either electron impact or chemical ionization provides additional qualitative data that may be helpful for measuring methamphetamine in the presence of other sympathomimetic amines.

  9. Comparison of emergence traps of different shape and translucency in the trapping of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kroischke, F; Timmermann, E; Kiel, E

    2016-06-15

    Various types of emergence traps are available for investigations of the breeding habitats of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). In order to assess the potential impact of the trap design on the trapping success, we compared the efficiency of opaque and white (more translucent) emergence traps and two trap shapes (cone-shaped and quadratic), to sample Culicoides emerging from cowpats. Significantly higher numbers of Culicoides chiopterus and Culicoides dewulfi were trapped with opaque traps, while there was no obvious effect of the trap shape. There were no distinct differences in the microclimate among different trap types. PMID:27198792

  10. Neutron Trapping using a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Eighty years after Chadwick discovered the neutron, physicists today still cannot agree on how long the neutron lives. Measurements of the neutron lifetime have achieved the 0.1% level of precision (~ 1 s). However, results from several recent experiments are up to 7 s lower than the (pre-2010) particle data group (PDG) value. Experiments using the trap technique yield lifetime results lower than those using the beam technique. The PDG urges the community to resolve this discrepancy, now 6.5 sigma. Measuring the absolute neutron lifetime is difficult because of several limitations: the low energy of the neutron decay products, the inability to track slow neutrons, and the fact that the neutron lifetime is long (880.1 +/- 1.1 s). Slow neutrons are susceptible to many loss mechanisms other than beta-decay, such as upscattering and absorption on material surfaces. Often, these interactions act on time scales comparable to the neutron beta-decay, making the extraction of the beta-decay lifetime particularly challenging. We will revisit this measurement by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a hybrid magnetic-gravitational trap. The trap consists of a Halbach array of permanent magnets, which can levitate UCN up to 50 neV. These neutrons are also confined vertically up to 0.5 m by gravity. Such a trap minimizes the chance of neutron interactions with material walls. In addition, the open-top geometry allows room to implement novel schemes to detect neutrons and decay particles in-situ. The UCN τ experiment aims to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron lifetime measurement to below 1 second. In this talk, I will report results of our first attempt to trap UCN in 2013 and discuss plans to quantify systematic effects. The work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1306942.

  11. Design of a mosquito trap support pole for use with CDC miniature light traps.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher L; Wozniak, Arthur; McKenna, Bruce; Vaughan, David R; Dowda, Michael C

    2005-03-01

    A mosquito trap support pole constructed from polyvinyl chloride and aluminum pipes was designed to hang a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light trap and dry ice container. Miniature light traps normally hang from tree branches. The trap support pole is designed to hang traps and dry ice bait in areas where no suitable trees exist. PMID:15825774

  12. Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Foster, Stephen; John, Sajeev

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate numerically a 2-D nanostructured design for light trapping in a low band-gap polymer solar cell. Finite element method simulations are used to study the effect of varying nanostructure periodicity, height, and shape on active layer absorption. Maintaining a constant active layer thickness of 100 nm we observe an enhancement in solar absorption of almost 40% relative to a planar cell. Improvements of this magnitude enable single-junction, low-band-gap cells to achieve power conversion efficiencies of 11.2% and perform competitively with even state-of-the-art tandem cells. Our design is also shown to significantly outperform tandem cells at off-normal angles of incidence. PMID:24922256

  13. Trapping biases of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens revealed by comparison of captures in CDC traps, ovitraps, and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny C; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon R; Östman, Örjan; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate three trapping methods for their effectiveness at capturing Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium, both enzootic vectors of bird-associated viruses in Europe. The comparisons, performed in two regions in Sweden, were among CDC traps baited with carbon dioxide, gravid traps, and ovitraps baited with hay infusion. The proportions of the two Culex species in a catch differed between trap types, with CDC traps catching a lower proportion of Cx. torrentium than both gravid traps and ovitraps. Between gravid traps and ovitraps, there was no difference in the proportions of the two species. The results indicate that Cx. torrentium may go undetected or underestimated compared to Cx. pipiens when using carbon dioxide baited CDC traps. The new insight of trap bias presented here adds an important dimension to consider when investigating these vectors of bird-associated viruses in the field.

  14. Ion trap collision-induced dissociation of locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Teng-yi; Kharlamova, Anastasia; McLuckey, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase dissociation of model locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides and functional LNA-DNA chimeras have been investigated as a function of precursor ion charge state using ion trap collision-induced dissociation (CID). For the model LNA 5 and 8 mer, containing all four LNA monomers in the sequence, cleavage of all backbone bonds, generating a/w-, b/x-, c/y-, and d/z-ions, was observed with no significant preference at lower charge states. Base loss ions, except loss of thymine, from the cleavage of N-glycosidic bonds were also present. In general, complete sequence coverage was achieved in all charge states. For the two LNA-DNA chimeras, however, dramatic differences in the relative contributions of the competing dissociation channels were observed among different precursor ion charge states. At lower charge states, sequence information limited to the a-Base/w-fragment ions from cleavage of the 3'C-O bond of DNA nucleotides, except thymidine (dT), was acquired from CID of both the LNA gapmer and mixmer ions. On the other hand, extensive fragmentation from various dissociation channels was observed from post-ion/ion ion trap CID of the higher charge state ions of both LNA-DNA chimeras. This report demonstrates that tandem mass spectrometry is effective in the sequence characterization of LNA oligonucleotides and LNA-DNA chimeric therapeutics.

  15. Numerical simulation and light trapping in perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftiquar, Sk M.; Yi, Junsin

    2016-04-01

    A methyl ammonium lead iodide (H3NH3PbI3)-based solar cell can have photovoltaic conversion efficiency of more than 20%, primarily because the material shows lower defect density, high carrier mobility-lifetime, and broader absorption spectra. A further improvement in device efficiency can be obtained using light capture and trapping schemes, with textured front surface and back reflector. In order to understand characteristic performance of the device, we used numerical simulation and observed that more than 20% device efficiency can be obtained if defect density of the photosensitive material remains lower than 4×1014 cm-3 and thickness 400 nm or more. Investigation of light trapping scheme shows that the current density (J) can be raised with this scheme, but the most effective increase in the J can be observed for 97-nm thick active layers. Reverse saturation current density of these cells that may be directly related to recombination loss of photogenerated carriers, remains low, but increases linearly with the defect density. A tandem cell with pyramidally textured front surface was investigated with such a perovskite-based top cell and Si heterojunction bottom cell; it shows an efficiency of as high as 29.5%.

  16. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  17. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  18. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. PMID:26965413

  19. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system. PMID:21485315

  20. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system.

  1. Ion trapping in Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-06-28

    Transverse instabilities have been observed in the antiproton beam stored in the Fermilab Recycler Ring, resulting in a sudden increase in the transverse emittances and a small beam loss. The instabilities appear to occur a few hours after a change in the ramping pattern of the Main Injector which shares the same tunnel. The phenomena have been studied by inducing similar instabilities. However, the mechanism is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the ions trapped in the beam reach such an intensity that collective coupled transverse oscillation occurs. However, there is no direct evidence of the trapped ions at this moment.

  2. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu Mingwu; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high-abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties--population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, and trap dynamics--is provided.

  3. Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    1999-01-01

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  4. Tritium measurements with a tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.

    1990-06-01

    Tritium concentrations ( 3H: 2H) of less than 10 -15 are readily measurable with almost any tandem accelerator and with an overall detection efficiency as high as 4.5%. The isobar, 3He, and other potential sources of interference (mainly 6Li, 2H and 1H) can all be removed by an absorber in front of the triton detector, so there is little need for analyzing elements other than the negative-and positive-ion magnets found on most tandems. The technique is particularly well suited for detecting tritium in deuterium absorbed in a metal and testing for cold fusion. We caution that tritium can occur in commercial deuterium and heavy water from sources other than cold fusion; one sample was observed to have a tritium-to-deuterium ratio of 10 -10.

  5. Identification of glutamic acid 78 as the active site nucleophile in Bacillus subtilis xylanase using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miao, S; Ziser, L; Aebersold, R; Withers, S G

    1994-06-14

    A new mechanism-based inactivator of beta-1,4-xylanases, 2',4'-dinitrophenyl 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-xylobioside, has been synthesized and used to trap the covalent intermediate formed during catalysis by Bacillus subtilis xylanase. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry of the incorporation of inactivator into the enzyme. Inactivation of xylanase followed the expected pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior, and kinetic parameters were determined. The intermediate trapped was relatively stable toward hydrolytic turnover (t1/2 = 350 min). However, turnover could be facilitated by transglycosylation following the addition of the acceptor benzyl thio-beta-xylobioside, thus demonstrating the catalytic competence of the trapped intermediate. Reactivation kinetic parameters for this process of kre = 0.03 min-1 and Kre = 46 mM were determined. The nucleophilic amino acid was identified as Glu78 by a tandem mass spectrometric technique which does not require the use of radiolabels. The peptic digest of the labeled enzyme was separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the eluent fed into a tandem mass spectrometer via an electrospray ionization device. The labeled peptide was identified as one of m/z = 826 (doubly charged) which fragmented in the collision chamber between the mass analyzers with loss of the mass of a 2-fluoroxylobiosyl unit. Confirmation of the peptide identity was obtained both by tandem mass spectrometric sequencing and by Edman degradation of the purified peptide. Glu78 is completely conserved in all members of this xylanase family and indeed is shown to be located in the active site in the recently determined X-ray crystal structure.

  6. DDES and IDDES of tandem cylinders.

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, R.; Garbaruk, A.; Shur, M.; Strelets, M.; Spalart, P.; New Technologies and Services - Russia; St.-Peterburg State Polytechnic Univ.; Boeing Commercial Airplanes

    2010-09-09

    The paper presents an overview of the authors contribution to the BANC-I Workshop on the flow past tandem cylinders (Category 2). It includes an outline of the simulation approaches, numerics, and grid used, the major results of the simulations, their comparison with available experimental data, and some preliminary conclusions. The effect of varying the spanwise period in the simulations is strong for some quantities, and not others.

  7. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  8. Cold Climate Heat Pumps Using Tandem Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2016-01-01

    In cold climate zones, e.g. ASHRAE climate regions IV and V, conventional electric air-source heat pumps (ASHP) do not work well, due to high compressor discharge temperatures, large pressure ratios and inadequate heating capacities at low ambient temperatures. Consequently, significant use of auxiliary strip heating is required to meet the building heating load. We introduce innovative ASHP technologies as part of continuing efforts to eliminate auxiliary strip heat use and maximize heating COP with acceptable cost-effectiveness and reliability. These innovative ASHP were developed using tandem compressors, which are capable of augmenting heating capacity at low temperatures and maintain superior part-load operation efficiency at moderate temperatures. Two options of tandem compressors were studied; the first employs two identical, single-speed compressors, and the second employs two identical, vapor-injection compressors. The investigations were based on system modeling and laboratory evaluation. Both designs have successfully met the performance criteria. Laboratory evaluation showed that the tandem, single-speed compressor ASHP system is able to achieve heating COP = 4.2 at 47 F (8.3 C), COP = 2.9 at 17 F (-8.3 C), and 76% rated capacity and COP = 1.9 at -13 F (-25 C). This yields a HSPF = 11.0 (per AHRI 210/240). The tandem, vapor-injection ASHP is able to reach heating COP = 4.4 at 47 F, COP = 3.1 at 17 F, and 88% rated capacity and COP = 2.0 at -13 F. This yields a HSPF = 12.0. The system modeling and further laboratory evaluation are presented in the paper.

  9. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  10. Expression of tandem gene duplicates is often greater than twofold

    PubMed Central

    Loehlin, David W.; Carroll, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem gene duplication is an important mutational process in evolutionary adaptation and human disease. Hypothetically, two tandem gene copies should produce twice the output of a single gene, but this expectation has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we show that tandem duplication often results in more than double the gene activity. A naturally occurring tandem duplication of the Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene exhibits 2.6-fold greater expression than the single-copy gene in transgenic Drosophila. This tandem duplication also exhibits greater activity than two copies of the gene in trans, demonstrating that it is the tandem arrangement and not copy number that is the cause of overactivity. We also show that tandem duplication of an unrelated synthetic reporter gene is overactive (2.3- to 5.1-fold) at all sites in the genome that we tested, suggesting that overactivity could be a general property of tandem gene duplicates. Overactivity occurs at the level of RNA transcription, and therefore tandem duplicate overactivity appears to be a previously unidentified form of position effect. The increment of surplus gene expression observed is comparable to many regulatory mutations fixed in nature and, if typical of other genomes, would shape the fate of tandem duplicates in evolution. PMID:27162370

  11. TandEM: Titan and Enceladus mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coustenis, A.; Atreya, S.K.; Balint, T.; Brown, R.H.; Dougherty, M.K.; Ferri, F.; Fulchignoni, M.; Gautier, D.; Gowen, R.A.; Griffith, C.A.; Gurvits, L.I.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Leese, M.R.; Lunine, J.I.; McKay, C.P.; Moussas, X.; Muller-Wodarg, I.; Neubauer, F.; Owen, T.C.; Raulin, F.; Sittler, E.C.; Sohl, F.; Sotin, C.; Tobie, G.; Tokano, T.; Turtle, E.P.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Waite, J.H.; Baines, K.H.; Blamont, J.; Coates, A.J.; Dandouras, I.; Krimigis, T.; Lellouch, E.; Lorenz, R.D.; Morse, A.; Porco, C.C.; Hirtzig, M.; Saur, J.; Spilker, T.; Zarnecki, J.C.; Choi, E.; Achilleos, N.; Amils, R.; Annan, P.; Atkinson, D.H.; Benilan, Y.; Bertucci, C.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G.L.; Blanc, M.; Boireau, L.; Bouman, J.; Cabane, M.; Capria, M.T.; Chassefiere, E.; Coll, P.; Combes, M.; Cooper, J.F.; Coradini, A.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Daglis, I.A.; de Angelis, E.; De Bergh, C.; de Pater, I.; Dunford, C.; Durry, G.; Dutuit, O.; Fairbrother, D.; Flasar, F.M.; Fortes, A.D.; Frampton, R.; Fujimoto, M.; Galand, M.; Grasset, O.; Grott, M.; Haltigin, T.; Herique, A.; Hersant, F.; Hussmann, H.; Ip, W.; Johnson, R.; Kallio, E.; Kempf, S.; Knapmeyer, M.; Kofman, W.; Koop, R.; Kostiuk, T.; Krupp, N.; Kuppers, M.; Lammer, H.; Lara, L.-M.; Lavvas, P.; Le, Mouelic S.; Lebonnois, S.; Ledvina, S.; Li, J.; Livengood, T.A.; Lopes, R.M.; Lopez-Moreno, J. -J.; Luz, D.; Mahaffy, P.R.; Mall, U.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Marty, B.; McCord, T.; Salvan, C.M.; Milillo, A.; Mitchell, D.G.; Modolo, R.; Mousis, O.; Nakamura, M.; Neish, C.D.; Nixon, C.A.; Mvondo, D.N.; Orton, G.; Paetzold, M.; Pitman, J.; Pogrebenko, S.; Pollard, W.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Rannou, P.; Reh, K.; Richter, L.; Robb, F.T.; Rodrigo, R.; Rodriguez, S.; Romani, P.; Bermejo, M.R.; Sarris, E.T.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Selig, A.; Sicardy, B.; Soderblom, L.; Spilker, L.J.; Stam, D.; Steele, A.; Stephan, K.; Strobel, D.F.; Szego, K.; Szopa,

    2009-01-01

    TandEM was proposed as an L-class (large) mission in response to ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Call, and accepted for further studies, with the goal of exploring Titan and Enceladus. The mission concept is to perform in situ investigations of two worlds tied together by location and properties, whose remarkable natures have been partly revealed by the ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission. These bodies still hold mysteries requiring a complete exploration using a variety of vehicles and instruments. TandEM is an ambitious mission because its targets are two of the most exciting and challenging bodies in the Solar System. It is designed to build on but exceed the scientific and technological accomplishments of the Cassini-Huygens mission, exploring Titan and Enceladus in ways that are not currently possible (full close-up and in situ coverage over long periods of time). In the current mission architecture, TandEM proposes to deliver two medium-sized spacecraft to the Saturnian system. One spacecraft would be an orbiter with a large host of instruments which would perform several Enceladus flybys and deliver penetrators to its surface before going into a dedicated orbit around Titan alone, while the other spacecraft would carry the Titan in situ investigation components, i.e. a hot-air balloon (Montgolfi??re) and possibly several landing probes to be delivered through the atmosphere. ?? Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2008.

  12. White tandem OLED with carbon nanotube interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitratos, Alexios; Ovalle Robles, Raquel; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2009-03-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have become well recognized as an important candidate for future lighting and display applications. An existing idea to generate white color places R, G, B pixels in a side-by-side geometry. Also, white tandem OLEDs have been developed by vertically stacking in series multiple electroluminescent layers. However, such structures require a complex interfacial layer which is usually fabricated by strong dopants to form a p+/n+ interface. We have shown earlier that transparent carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be used as effective three dimensional charge injectors in polymer light emitting diodes[1] and OLEDs[2]. Now, we show that CNT can be used as an interlayer in two cell OLEDs with complimentary colors. We show that tandem devices with CNT interlayers, together with selective barriers and PEDOT:PSS coating can control the device color. In addition, the emission intensity can be controlled by independently tuning the driving voltage and current. In the case of overdoped p+/n+ interlayers we do not have this opportunity which is a great advantage of CNT injectors. We also compare the performance of multiwall CNTs vs. that of single wall CNTs in the tandem OLEDS. [1]R.H.Baughman et al.Science, 297,787-792(2002).[2]C.D.Williams et al.Appl. Phys. Lett. 93,183506(2008).

  13. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  14. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  15. Some Examples of Trapped Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2013-03-01

    We present some simple pen and paper examples of trapped surfaces in order to help in visualising this key concept of the theory of gravitational collapse. We collect these examples from time-symmetric initial data, 2+1 dimensions, collapsing null shells, and the Vaidya solution.

  16. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  17. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  18. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  19. "Trap Setting" in Didactic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urdal, Pamela

    1984-01-01

    Trap setting is a concept based on a psycholinguistic explanation of the acquisition of second language skills emphasizing cognitive and creative processes over the auditory, visual, and imitative. It proposes that opportunities for repeated attempts at solving new problems through constant testing and retesting of creative hypotheses bring the…

  20. A Death Trap for Microglia.

    PubMed

    Du, Xu-Fei; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2016-07-25

    Microglia, immune cells of the brain, originate from erythromyeloid precursors, far from the central nervous system. Xu et al. (2016) in this issue of Developmental Cell and Casano et al. (2016) recently in Cell Reports show that apoptotic neurons act as bait to "trap" microglia into colonizing the developing brain. PMID:27459061

  1. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  2. A differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer: a mass spectrometer capable of MS(n) experiments free from interfering reactions.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Schwartz, Jae C; Oglesbee, Rob; Carlsen, Mark; Archibold, Enada F; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2013-12-01

    A novel differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer was designed and built to facilitate tandem MS experiments free from interfering reactions. The instrument consists of two differentially pumped Thermo Scientific linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) systems that have been connected via an ion transfer octupole encased in a machined manifold. Tandem MS experiments can be performed in the front trap and then the resulting product ions can be transferred via axial ejection into the back trap for further, independent tandem MS experiments in a differentially pumped area. This approach allows the examination of consecutive collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and ion-molecule reactions without unwanted side reactions that often occur when CAD and ion-molecule reactions are examined in the same space. Hence, it greatly facilitates investigations of ion structures. In addition, the overall lower pressure of the DLQIT, as compared to commercial LQIT instruments, results in a reduction of unwanted side reactions with atmospheric contaminants, such as water and oxygen, in CAD and ion-molecule experiments. PMID:24171553

  3. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, P<0.001). Juvenile Great Tits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  4. Organic Light-Emitting Devices with Tandem Structure.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takayuki; Pu, Yong-Jin; Kido, Junji

    2016-06-01

    Tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) have attracted considerable attention for solid-state lighting and flat panel displays because their tandem architecture enables high efficiency and long operational lifetime simultaneously. In the tandem OLED structure, plural light-emitting units (LEUs) are stacked in series through a charge generation layer (CGL) and an electron injection layer (EIL). In this chapter, we focus on the key features of tandem OLEDs for high efficiency and long operational lifetimes. We also demonstrate the effect of the CGL comprising a Lewis acid, an n-type semiconductor metal oxide, and an organic electron-accepting material. We discuss the two types of EILs in tandem OLEDs: alkali metals containing n-type compounds and ultra-thin metals. Finally, we focus on the recent progress of the state-of-the-art solution-processed tandem OLEDs. PMID:27573273

  5. [Tandem repeats in rodents genome and their mapping].

    PubMed

    Ostromyshenskii, D I; Kuznetsova, L S; Komissarov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Podgornaya, L

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly-repeated sequences represent a unique class of eukaryotic DNA. Their content in the genome of higher eukaryotes mounts to tens of percents. However, the evolution of this class of sequences is poorly-studied. In our paper, 62 families of Mus musculus tandem repeats are analyzed by bioinformatic methods, and 7 of them are analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. It is shown that the same tandem repeat sets co-occure only in closely related species of mice. But even in such species we observe differences in localization on the chromosomes and the number of individual tandem repeats. With increasing evolutionary distance only some of the tandem repeat families remain common for different species. It is shown, that the use of a combination of bioinformatics and molecular biology techniques is very perspective for further studies of the evolution of tandem repeats.

  6. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  7. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  8. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  9. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  10. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  11. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  12. Geomagnetically trapped energetic helium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Gregory Guzik, T.; Wefel, J.P.; Roger Pyle, K.; Cooper, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei, at high energy ({approximately}40{endash}100 MeV/nucleon), have been measured by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 CRRES mission. The ONR-604 instrument resolved the isotopes of helium with a mass resolution of 0.1 amu. The energetic helium observed at {ital L}{lt}2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field, which is characteristic of a trapped population. Both the trapped {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He show two peaks at {ital L}=1.2 and 1.9. Each isotope{close_quote}s flux, in each peak, can be characterized by a power law energy spectrum. The energy spectrum of the {sup 3}He is different from that of {sup 4}He, indicating that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is energy dependent. Over the energy range of 51{endash}86 MeV/nucleon, the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is 8.7{plus_minus}3.1 at {ital L}=1.1{endash}1.5 and is 2.4{plus_minus}0.6 at {ital L}=1.5{endash}2.3. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time during the CRRES mission, when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during this time period. The decrease in intensity is attributed mainly to the events around {ital L}=1.9. The helium around {ital L}=1.2, dominated by {sup 3}He, does not show a significant temporal evolution, which implies a long-term energetic trapped {sup 3}He population. Two possible origins of the geomagnetically trapped helium isotopes are the interactions of energetic protons with the upper atmosphere and/or the inward diffusion and acceleration of helium ions due to electric-field fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Locating tandem repeats in weighted sequences in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Qing; Iliopoulos, Costas S

    2013-01-01

    A weighted biological sequence is a string in which a set of characters may appear at each position with respective probabilities of occurrence. We attempt to locate all the tandem repeats in a weighted sequence. A repeated substring is called a tandem repeat if each occurrence of the substring is directly adjacent to each other. By introducing the idea of equivalence classes in weighted sequences, we identify the tandem repeats of every possible length using an iterative partitioning technique. We also present the algorithm for recording the tandem repeats, and prove that the problem can be solved in O(n²) time. PMID:23815711

  14. An innovative mosquito trap for testing attractants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe a simple trap modification for testing or using attractants to collect flying mosquitoes. The trap also can test the effectiveness of spatial repellents. The proposed design may facilitate standardized testing of mosquito attractants and repellents. The trap uses a standard Centers f...

  15. 50 CFR 697.27 - Trap transferability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.27 Trap transferability. (a) Federal lobster permit holders may elect to participate in a program that allows them to transfer trap allocation to other participating Federal lobster permit holders... Federal Trap Transfer Program: (i) An individual must possess a valid Federal lobster permit; and (ii)...

  16. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  17. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-08-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 1012 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 1018. While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen.

  18. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Particles leving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E x B drift. This effect which we refer to as 'centrifugal trapping' appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E x B drift speed) plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  19. Trapper readies trap for lizard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    State-licensed animal trapper James Dean sets the open door of an animal trap on KSC. He hopes to catch a large monitor lizard spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  20. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  1. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... switching facilities. (iii) A flat-rated charge for transport of traffic over dedicated transport facilities... defined in § 61.3(x) of this chapter shall then make downward exogenous adjustments to the service band... corresponding upward adjustments to the service band index for the tandem-switched transport service...

  2. Tandem robot control system and method for controlling mobile robots in tandem

    DOEpatents

    Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.

    2002-01-01

    A control system for controlling mobile robots provides a way to control mobile robots, connected in tandem with coupling devices, to navigate across difficult terrain or in closed spaces. The mobile robots can be controlled cooperatively as a coupled system in linked mode or controlled individually as separate robots.

  3. A Hybrid Approach To Tandem Cylinder Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Aeolian tone generation from tandem cylinders is predicted using a hybrid approach. A standard computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is used to compute the unsteady flow around the cylinders, and the acoustics are calculated using the acoustic analogy. The CFD code is nominally second order in space and time and includes several turbulence models, but the SST k - omega model is used for most of the calculations. Significant variation is observed between laminar and turbulent cases, and with changes in the turbulence model. A two-dimensional implementation of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is used to predict the far-field noise.

  4. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juras, R. C.; Blankenship, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in each area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundant circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several years at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  5. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  6. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  7. Flute waves in a tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskaya, L.V.

    1984-03-01

    Stability conditions are derived for flute waves in a short tandem mirror stabilized by end cells with a min B. The frequency spectrum of the flute waves is analyzed. Those conditions under which the resonant excitation of waves by ions and electrons must be taken into account are found. When end cells without a min B are added to a central mirror system, the system becomes destabilized as the result of resonant excitation of waves at a frequency near the precession frequency of ions having a finite energy distribution.

  8. MyriMatch: highly accurate tandem mass spectral peptide identification by multivariate hypergeometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, David L.; Fernando, Christopher G.; Chambers, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics experiments are dependent upon database search engines to identify peptides from tandem mass spectra. Many of these algorithms score potential identifications by evaluating the number of fragment ions matched between each peptide sequence and an observed spectrum. These systems, however, generally do not distinguish between matching an intense peak and matching a minor peak. We have developed a statistical model to score peptide matches that is based upon the multivariate hypergeometric distribution. This scorer, part of the “MyriMatch” database search engine, places greater emphasis on matching intense peaks. The probability that the best match for each spectrum has occurred by random chance can be employed to separate correct matches from random ones. We evaluated this software on data sets from three different laboratories employing three different ion trap instruments. Employing a novel system for testing discrimination, we demonstrate that stratifying peaks into multiple intensity classes improves the discrimination of scoring. We compare MyriMatch results to those of Sequest and X!Tandem, revealing that it is capable of higher discrimination than either of these algorithms. When minimal peak filtering is employed, performance plummets for a scoring model that does not stratify matched peaks by intensity. On the other hand, we find that MyriMatch discrimination improves as more peaks are retained in each spectrum. MyriMatch also scales well to tandem mass spectra from high-resolution mass analyzers. These findings may indicate limitations for existing database search scorers that count matched peaks without differentiating them by intensity. This software and source code is available under Mozilla Public License at this URL: http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/msrc/bioinformatics/. PMID:17269722

  9. Optical trapping inside living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul M.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2005-08-01

    We use optical tweezers to investigate processes happening inside ving cells. In a previous study, we trapped naturally occurring lipid granules inside living yeast cells, and used them to probe the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm. However, we prefer to use probes which can be specifically attached to various organelles within the living cells in order to optically quantify the forces acting on these organelles. Therefore, we have chosen to use nanometer sized gold beads as probes. These gold beads can be conjugated and attached chemically to the organelles of interest. Only Rayleigh metallic particles can be optically trapped and for these it is the case that the larger the beads, the larger the forces which can be exerted and thus measured using optical tweezers. The gold nanoparticles are injected into the cytoplasm using micropipettes. The very rigid cell wall of the S. pombe yeast cells poses a serious obstacle to this injection. In order to be able to punch a hole in the cell, first, the cells have to be turned into protoplasts, where only a lipid bilayer separates the cytoplasm from the surrounding media. We show how to perform micropipette delivery into the protoplasts and also how the protoplasts can be ablated using the trapping laserlight. Finally, we demonstrate that we can transform the protoplasts back to normal yeast cells.

  10. Collision-induced dissociation pathways of anabolic steroids by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fuyu; Soma, Lawrence R; Luo, Yi; Uboh, Cornelius E; Peterman, Scott

    2006-04-01

    Anabolic steroids are structurally similar compounds, and their product-ion spectra obtained by tandem mass spectrometry under electrospray ionization conditions are quite difficult to interpret because of poly-ring structures and lack of a charge-retaining center in their chemical structures. In the present study, the fragmentation of nine anabolic steroids of interest to the racing industry was investigated by using triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer, and a linear ion trap instrument. With the aid of an expert system software (Mass Frontier version 3.0), accurate mass measurements, and multiple stage tandem mass spectrometric (MS(n)) experiments, fragmentation pathways were elucidated for boldenone, methandrostenolone, tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), trenbolone, normethandrolone and mibolerone. Small differences in the chemical structures of the steroids, such as an additional double-bond or a methyl group, result in significantly different fragmentation pathways. The fragmentation pathways proposed in this paper allow interpretation of major product ions of other anabolic steroids reported by other researchers in a recent publication. The proposed fragmentation pathways are helpful for characterization of new steroids. The approach used in this study for elucidation of the fragmentation pathways is helpful in interpretation of complicated product-ion spectra of other compounds, drugs and their metabolites. PMID:16488153

  11. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages. PMID:19939702

  12. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  13. New ion trap for frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap was designed, which permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  14. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  15. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  16. A collapsible trap for capturing ruffe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Andrew J.; Czypinski, Gary D.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    A modified version of the Windermere trap was designed, constructed, and tested for its effectiveness in capturing ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus. The inexpensive, lightweight, collapsible trap was easily deployed and retrieved from a small boat. Field tests conducted at the St. Louis River estuary in western Lake Superior in spring 1995 and 1996 indicated that the trap was effective in capturing ruffe. Proportions of the ruffe in trap and bottom trawl catches were similar in 1995 and 1996. This trap could be a useful tool in surveillance, monitoring, or control programs for ruffe or similar species, either to augment existing sampling programs or especially in situations where gillnetting or bottom trawling are not feasible.

  17. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  18. Deep trap, laser activated image converting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Receiving an optical image on the surface of a photoconducting semiconductor is presented, storing the image in deep traps of the semiconductor, and later scanning the semiconductor with a laser beam to empty the deep traps, thereby producing a video signal. The semiconductor is illuminated with photons of energy greater than the band gap producing electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor which subsequently fill traps in energy from the band edges. When the laser beam of low energy photons excites the trapped electrons and holes out of the traps into the conduction and valence bands, a photoconductivity can be observed.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Effect of trapped charge accumulation on the retention of charge trapping memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Jin; Xiaoyan, Liu; Gang, Du; Jinfeng, Kang; Ruqi, Han

    2010-12-01

    The accumulation process of trapped charges in a TANOS cell during P/E cycling is investigated via numerical simulation. The recombination process between trapped charges is an important issue on the retention of charge trapping memory. Our results show that accumulated trapped holes during P/E cycling can have an influence on retention, and the recombination mechanism between trapped charges should be taken into account when evaluating the retention capability of TANOS.

  20. Characterizing traps causing random telegraph noise during trap-assisted tunneling gate-induced drain leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sung-Won; Shin, Joonha; Seo, Youngsoo; Kim, Hyunsuk; Jeon, Sangbin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of traps causing random telegraph noise (RTN) in trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) current. RTN was shown for the first time to occur as a result of electron trapping rather than hole trapping. In addition, the proper effective permittivity of two different materials is used to accurately determine the distance between two traps causing RTN in TAT GIDL in an oxide.

  1. Analysis of tandem mass spectra by FTMS for improved large-scale proteomics with superior protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Phanstiel, Doug; Wenger, Craig D.; Lee, M. Violet; Coon, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Using a newly developed dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (dcQLT-orbitrap), we demonstrate the utility of collecting high-resolution tandem mass spectral data for large-scale shotgun proteomics. Multiple nanoLC-MS/MS experiments on both an older generation quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid (QLT-orbitrap) and the dcQLT-orbitrap, using both resonant-excitation CAD and beam-type CAD (HCD) were performed. Resulting from various technological advances (e.g., a stacked ring ion guide AP inlet, a dual cell QLT, etc.), the dcQLT-orbitrap exhibited increased duty cycle (~1.5–2×) and sensitivity for both CAD (ion trap detection) and HCD (orbitrap detection) methods. As compared to the older system, the dcQLT-orbitrap produced significantly more unique peptide identification for both methods (~30% improvement for CAD and ~115% improvement for HCD). The sizeable improvement of the HCD method on the dcQLT-orbitrap system, outperforms the current standard method of CAD with ion trap detection for large-scale analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased HCD performance translates to a direct and substantial improvement in protein quantitation precision using isobaric tags. PMID:19938823

  2. Evaluation of trapping-web designs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukacs, P.M.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The trapping web is a method for estimating the density and abundance of animal populations. A Monte Carlo simulation study is performed to explore performance of the trapping web for estimating animal density under a variety of web designs and animal behaviours. The trapping performs well when animals have home ranges, even if the home ranges are large relative to trap spacing. Webs should contain at least 90 traps. Trapping should continue for 5-7 occasions. Movement rates have little impact on density estimates when animals are confined to home ranges. Estimation is poor when animals do not have home ranges and movement rates are rapid. The trapping web is useful for estimating the density of animals that are hard to detect and occur at potentially low densities. ?? CSIRO 2005.

  3. Perfect lens makes a perfect trap.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaolin; Murakowski, Janusz; Schuetz, Christopher A; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J; Samluk, Jesse P; Prather, Dennis W

    2006-03-20

    In this work, we present for the first time a new and realistic application of the "perfect lens", namely, electromagnetic traps (or tweezers). We combined two recently developed techniques, 3D negative refraction flat lenses (3DNRFLs) and optical tweezers, and experimentally demonstrated the very unique advantages of using 3DNRFLs for electromagnetic traps. Super-resolution and short focal distance of the flat lens result in a highly focused and strongly convergent beam, which is a key requirement for a stable and accurate electromagnetic trap. The translation symmetry of 3DNRFL provides translation-invariance for imaging, which allows an electromagnetic trap to be translated without moving the lens, and permits a trap array by using multiple sources with a single lens. Electromagnetic trapping was demonstrated using polystyrene particles in suspension, and subsequent to being trapped to a single point, they were then accurately manipulated over a large distance by simple movement of a 3DNRFL-imaged microwave monopole source.

  4. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  5. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  6. Temperature and trapping characterization of an acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers--towards in-trap temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Evander, Mikael; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Almqvist, Monica; Nilsson, Johan; Laurell, Thomas; Johansson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    An acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers (MITs) for applications in non-contact trapping of cells or particles in a microfluidic channel was characterized by measuring the temperature increase and trapping strength. The fluid temperature was measured by the fluorescent response of Rhodamine B in the microchannel. The trapping strength was measured by the area of a trapped particle cluster counter-balanced by the hydrodynamic force. One of the main objectives was to obtain quantitative values of the temperature in the fluidic channel to ensure safe handling of cells and proteins. Another objective was to evaluate the trapping-to-temperature efficiency for the trap as a function of drive frequency. Thirdly, trapping-to-temperature efficiency data enables identifying frequencies and voltage values to use for in-trap temperature regulation. It is envisioned that operation with only in-trap temperature regulation enables the realization of small, simple and fast temperature-controlled trap systems. The significance of potential gradients at the trap edges due to the finite size of the miniaturized transducers for the operation was emphasized and expressed analytically. The influence of the acoustic near field was evaluated in FEM-simulation and compared with a more ideal 1D standing wave. The working principle of the trap was examined by comparing measurements of impedance, temperature increase and trapping strength with impedance transfer calculations of fluid-reflector resonances and frequencies of high reflectance at the fluid-reflector boundary. The temperature increase was found to be moderate, 7°C for a high trapping strength, at a fluid flow of 0.5mms(-1) for the optimal driving frequency. A fast temperature response with a fall time of 8s and a rise time of 11s was observed. The results emphasize the importance of selecting the proper drive frequency for long term handling of cells, as opposed to the more pragmatic way of selecting the

  7. Progress in the tandem mirror program

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.; Borchers, R.R.

    1981-09-13

    Experimental results in TMX have confirmed the basic principles of the tandem-mirror concept. A center-cell particle confinement parameter eta tau approx. 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ s has been obtained at ion temperatures around 100 eV, which is a hundred-fold improvement over single mirrors at the same temperatures. For TMX these results have been obtained at peak beta values in the center cell in the range 10 to 40%, not yet limited by MHD activity; and ion-cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) in the Phaedrus tandem-mirror experiment has produced beta values approx. 25%, which is several times the ideal MHD limit for that device. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the end fan chambers of TMX simultaneously isolate the hot electrons from the end walls, provide adequate pumping and conveniently dispose of the exhaust plasma energy either by thermal deposition on the end wall or by direct conversion to electricity (at 48% efficiency in agreement with calculations). Also, evidence was obtained for inherent divertor action in TMX, presumably in part responsible for the observed low impurity level (<0.5% low-Z ions in the center cell).

  8. Theoretical studies in tandem mirror physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Auerbach, S.P.; Baldwin, D.E.; Byers, J.A.; Chen, Y.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Freis, R.P.; Gilmore, J.M.; Hammer, J.H.; Kaiser, T.B.

    1984-07-17

    Recent developments in six areas of tandem-mirror theory are explored. Specifically, FLR terms (including electric-field drift) have been added to our 3-D paraxial MHD equilibrium code. Our low-frequency MHD stability analysis with FLR, which previously included only m/sub theta/ = 1 rigid perturbations, has been extended to incorporate moderate m/sub theta/, rotational drive, finite-beta effects on wall stabilization, and the well-digging effect of energetic electrons by using three computational techniques. In addition, we have examined the microstability of relativistic electrons with a loss-cone distribution, emphasizing the whistler and cyclotron-maser instabilities. We have also studied techniques for controlling radial transport, including the floating of segmented end plates and the tuning of transition-region coils, and have quantified the residual transport in a tandem mirror with axisymmetric throttle coils. Earlier work on the effect of ECRH on potentials in thermal-barrier cells has been extended. The transition between the weak- and strong-heating regimes has been examined using Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo codes; an analytic model for the potentials relative to the end wall has been developed. Finally, our investigation of drift-frequency pumping of thermal-barrier ions has demonstrated that pumping is optimized when the magnetic fluctuation is perpendicular to both the unperturbed field and the thin fan, and that an adequate pumping rate is obtainable in future machines.

  9. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  10. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems.

  11. A tandem-based compact dual-energy gamma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.N.; Ludewigt, B.; Tanaka, N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A.J.; Morse, D.H.; Raber, T.

    2009-11-11

    A dual-energy tandem-type gamma generator has been developed at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The tandem accelerator geometry allows higher energy nuclear reactions to be reached, thereby allowing more flexible generation of MeV-energy gammas for active interrogation applications.

  12. 14 CFR 105.45 - Use of tandem parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of tandem parachute systems. 105.45... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.45 Use of tandem parachute systems. (a) No person may conduct a parachute operation using a...

  13. 14 CFR 105.45 - Use of tandem parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of tandem parachute systems. 105.45... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.45 Use of tandem parachute systems. (a) No person may conduct a parachute operation using a...

  14. 14 CFR 105.45 - Use of tandem parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of tandem parachute systems. 105.45... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.45 Use of tandem parachute systems. (a) No person may conduct a parachute operation using a...

  15. 14 CFR 105.45 - Use of tandem parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of tandem parachute systems. 105.45... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.45 Use of tandem parachute systems. (a) No person may conduct a parachute operation using a...

  16. 14 CFR 105.45 - Use of tandem parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of tandem parachute systems. 105.45... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.45 Use of tandem parachute systems. (a) No person may conduct a parachute operation using a...

  17. Form-Focused Interaction in Online Tandem Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Breffni

    2005-01-01

    Tandem language learning--a configuration involving pairs of learners with complementary target/native languages--is an underexploited but potentially very powerful use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in second-language pedagogy. Tandem offers the benefits of authentic, culturally grounded interaction, while also promoting a pedagogical…

  18. Status and outlook of CHIP-TRAP: The Central Michigan University high precision Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redshaw, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Hawks, P.; Gamage, N. D.; Hunt, C.; Kandegedara, R. M. E. B.; Ratnayake, I. S.; Sharp, L.

    2016-06-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP) that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m / q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  19. The physiological effects of cycling on tandem and single bicycles

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, J; Bacharach, D; Burke, E; Langenfeld, M; Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this field study was to compare the physiological responses from cycling on a tandem road bicycle to those from cycling on a single road bicycle. Methods: Nine pairs of experienced, recreational tandem cyclists rode a tandem or their single bicycle for 5 min at each velocity of 19.3, 22.5, 25.8, and 29.0 kph on a flat, paved surface. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and lactic acid (LA) data were collected after each interval. Results: Riding a tandem resulted in lower HR, RPE, and LA mean values across the four velocities compared to the single bicycle. Mean (SD) HR, RPE, and LA for tandem and single bicycles were 126 (20.7) v 142 (20.1) bpm, 10.1 (1.7) v 11.3 (2.6), and 1.46 (1.0) mM/L v 2.36 (1.7) mM/L, respectively. No position differences were observed between the captain and stoker (front and rear positions) when both were on the tandem. Stokers had significantly lower HR, LA, and RPE values when they rode a tandem compared to a single bicycle. No statistical differences were observed between bicycles for the captains. When on the single bicycle, captains exhibited significantly lower HR, RPE, and LA values than stokers. Conclusion: Cycling on a tandem resulted in lower physiological stress than when cycling at the same velocity on a single bicycle. Cyclists were able to ride from 4.8–8.0 kph faster on a tandem than on a single bicycle at similar physiological stress. Apparently, stokers can add to power output on a tandem without adding significantly to wind resistance. PMID:12547743

  20. The Composite Insect Trap: An Innovative Combination Trap for Biologically Diverse Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Laura; Stehouwer, Rachel; Heberling, Jacob Mason; Shea, Katriona

    2011-01-01

    Documentation of insect diversity is an important component of the study of biodiversity, community dynamics, and global change. Accurate identification of insects usually requires catching individuals for close inspection. However, because insects are so diverse, most trapping methods are specifically tailored to a particular taxonomic group. For scientists interested in the broadest possible spectrum of insect taxa, whether for long term monitoring of an ecosystem or for a species inventory, the use of several different trapping methods is usually necessary. We describe a novel composite method for capturing a diverse spectrum of insect taxa. The Composite Insect Trap incorporates elements from four different existing trapping methods: the cone trap, malaise trap, pan trap, and flight intercept trap. It is affordable, resistant, easy to assemble and disassemble, and collects a wide variety of insect taxa. Here we describe the design, construction, and effectiveness of the Composite Insect Trap tested during a study of insect diversity. The trap catches a broad array of insects and can eliminate the need to use multiple trap types in biodiversity studies. We propose that the Composite Insect Trap is a useful addition to the trapping methods currently available to ecologists and will be extremely effective for monitoring community level dynamics, biodiversity assessment, and conservation and restoration work. In addition, the Composite Insect Trap will be of use to other insect specialists, such as taxonomists, that are interested in describing the insect taxa in a given area. PMID:21698160

  1. War and the demographic trap.

    PubMed

    Last, J M

    1993-08-28

    Advice is offered on alleviating environmental damage and the suffering of women and children from the effects of war. It is postured that the demographic trap, which was described by King and Elliott, is responsible for environmental stress and many wars. The surface cause may be identified as ideology, politics, or ethnicity, but as in the case of Bosnia, the "ethnic cleansing" makes farmland available to sustain expanding Serbian or Croatian populations. If the land is environmentally damaged by war, then there is little hope of sustainable development. Conflicts in many countries have driven people to urban areas or periurban slums because of displacement and the failure of subsistence economics. Mortality from wars has reached more than a 100 million since the early 1990s. A comparable number have died indirectly from famine and disease associated with the disruption of agriculture and infrastructure from wars. Since 1945, 66-75% of mortality victims have been civilians, of whom 15 million have been women and children. In 1993, there were at least 30 conflicts ongoing throughout the world. Not all of these conflicts are as "ferocious" as the Bosnian conflict, but these "so called low intensity wars" nonetheless disrupt and kill. The manifestations of the demographic trap can be alleviated through interventions that focus on multisectoral aid and conflict resolution. There must be a cooperative effort on the part of health workers, agricultural scientists, mediators, and development personnel. Unfortunately, the amount of development assistance from Europe and America has been reduced in recent years. The recession has affected the provision of international aid. African nations, in particular, have been affected, yet these countries remain the neediest in the world. It would appear that aid agencies have given up hope that the demographic trap can be closed. Population growth must be limited, as the only hope for relieving environmental stress, ecological

  2. Electronic Tandem Language Learning (eTandem): A Third Approach to Second Language Learning for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cziko, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    Tandem language learning occurs when two learners of different native languages work together to help each other learn the other language. First used in face-to-face contexts, Tandem is now increasingly being used by language-learning partners located in different countries who are linked via various forms of electronic communication, a context…

  3. The hidden traps in decision making.

    PubMed

    Hammond, J S; Keeney, R L; Raiffa, H

    1999-01-01

    Bad decisions can often be traced back to the way the decisions were made--the alternatives were not clearly defined, the right information was not collected, the costs and benefits were not accurately weighed. But sometimes the fault lies not in the decision-making process but rather in the mind of the decision maker. The way the human brain works can sabotage the choices we make. Eight psychological traps that are particularly likely to affect the way we make business decisions are examined. The anchoring trap leads us to give disproportionate weight to the first information we receive. The status-quo trap biases us toward maintaining the current situation--even when better alternatives exist. The sunk-cost trap inclines us to perpetuate the mistakes of the past. The confirming-evidence trap leads us to seek out information supporting an existing predilection and to discount opposing information. The framing trap occurs when we misstate a problem, undermining the entire decision-making process. The overconfidence trap makes us over-estimate the accuracy of our forecasts. The prudence trap leads us to be overcautious when we make estimates about uncertain events. And the recallability trap leads us to give undue weight to recent, dramatic events. The best way to avoid all the traps is awareness--forewarned is forearmed. The authors show how to take action to ensure that important business decisions are sound and reliable.

  4. Introduced species as evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Sherman, P.W.; Blossey, B.; Runge, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species can alter environments in such a way that normal behavioural decision-making rules of native species are no longer adaptive. The evolutionary trap concept provides a useful framework for predicting and managing the impact of harmful invasive species. We discuss how native species can respond to changes in their selective regime via evolution or learning. We also propose novel management strategies to promote the long-term co-existence of native and introduced species in cases where the eradication of the latter is either economically or biologically unrealistic.

  5. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  6. Measurement of the trap properties of a magneto-optical trap by a transient oscillation method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kihwan; Lee, Ki-Hwan; Heo, Myungseon; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2005-05-15

    We have measured the trap frequency as well as the damping coefficient of a magneto-optical trap by using a transient oscillation method. The dependence of such trap properties on the various experimental parameters such as the cooling laser intensity, detuning, and magnetic field gradient is investigated. We find that the measured trap frequency is in excellent agreement with the simple rate-equation analysis based on the Doppler cooling theory. In contrast, the damping coefficient is about twice as large as the calculated one, which is attributed to the existence of the sub-Doppler trap near the trap center.

  7. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of acrylamide in typical Spanish products.

    PubMed

    Bermudo, E; Moyano, E; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T

    2008-07-15

    This paper describes the use of liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of acrylamide in several typical foods produced and consumed in Spain. Christmas sweets, olives, traditionally made potato crisps, pastry products, sweet fritters ("churros") and one of Spain's most famous dishes, Spanish omelette, were selected. Using the mass spectra information provided by an ion trap analyzer in combination with the accurate mass measurements from time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometry a co-extractive interference present in some potato products was identified as valine. A porous graphitic carbon column, which enabled the co-extractive and acrylamide to be separated, and ion trap or triple quadrupole analyzers, depending on the acrylamide concentration, were used to determine this genotoxic compound in foodstuffs. The highest values were found in potato products, sweet fritters, Christmas sweets and pastry products, with values ranging between 70 and 2000 microg/g. Spanish omelette presented relatively low levels, similar to those obtained for dried fruits.

  8. Negative deuterium ions for tandem mirror next step and tandem mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1980-09-25

    Recent designs for mirror fusion reactors with good power balance include ambipolar potential plugs to reduce end losses and thermal barriers to maintain a difference in electron temperature between the large-volume central cell plasma and the confining end plugs. These designs led to several new requirements for D/sup 0/ neutral beams derived from negative ions at energies of 150 to 200 keV and possibly higher. Such beams are required for injection of fat ions into the plugs and the barrier and for charge-exchange pumping of thermal ions diffusing into the barrier. Negative ions are preferred for these purposes because of their relatively high efficiency of neutralization and their high purity of single-energy D/sup -/. Examples of injector designs for Tandem Mirror Next Step (TMNS) and Tandem Mirror Reactors (TMR) are presented.

  9. TMX-U (Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade) tandem-mirror thermal-barrier experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Allen, S.L.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barter, J.D.; Berzins, L.V.; Carter, M.R.; Casper, T.A.; Clauser, J.F.; Coensgen, F.H.; Correll, D.L.

    1986-10-29

    Thermal-barrier experiments have been carried out in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Measurements of nonambipolar and ambipolar radial transport show that these transport processes, as well as end losses, can be controlled at modest densities and durations. Central-cell heating methods using ion-cyclotron heating (ICH) and neutral-beam injection have been demonstrated. Potential mesurements with recently developed methods indicate that deep thermal barriers can be established.

  10. Trapping light in plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Lee, Il-Min; Na, Hyunmin; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Lee, Byoungho

    2010-01-18

    We present comprehensive case studies on trapping of light in plasmonic waveguides, including the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) waveguides. Due to the geometrical symmetry, the guided modes are classified into the anti-symmetric and symmetric modes. For the lossless case, where the relative electric permittivity of metal (epsilon(m)) and dielectric (epsilon(d)) are purely real, we define rho as rho = -epsilon(m)/epsilon(d). It is shown that trapping of light occurs in the following cases: the anti-symmetric mode in the MIM waveguide with 1 < rho < 1.28, the symmetric mode in the MIM waveguide with rho <1, and the symmetric mode in the IMI waveguide with rho <1 . The physical interpretation reveals that these conditions are closely connected with the field distributions in the core and the cladding. Various mode properties such as the number of supported modes and the core width for the mode cut off are also presented.

  11. Experiments with trapped ^210Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; Shi, W.; Simsarian, J. E.; Zhao, W. Z.

    1996-05-01

    Francium, the heaviest of alkali atoms, is an excellent system for the study of weak interactions in atoms because of its large atomic number. It has been difficult to study its atomic structure in great detail since there are no stable isotopes and sufficient quantities have not been available. At the Stony Brook Superconducting LINAC we produce 1 × 10^6 ^210Fr/s in the reaction ^197Au(^18O,5n)^210Fr. The atoms are transported as ions to the vicinity of the trap where they are neutralized and enter the capturing region of a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). From the initial [1] capture of ^210Fr into a MOT we have increased the number of atoms to the point where their fluorescence is visible in a CCD camera. The large number of atoms permits the initiation of experiments to study the atomic structure of francium relevant for a parity non-conservation measurement, such as the location of the 8S and 9S electronic states. Work supported by a Precision Measurement Grant from NIST and by NSF. [1] P. A. Voytas, A. Ghosh, G. Gwinner, L. A. Orozco, J. E. Simsarian, G. D. Sprouse, Postdeadline paper APS NPD, Indiana, October 1995; J. E. Simsarian, A. Ghosh, G. Gwinner, L. A. Orozco, G. D. Sprouse and P. A. Voytas (Preprint Dec. 12, 1995).

  12. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G.

    2011-12-23

    Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

  13. Magnetic alignment of the Tara tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Coleman, J.W.; Irby, J.H.; Olmstead, M.M.; Torti, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Techniques developed for the alignment of high-energy accelerators have been applied to the alignment of the Tara tandem mirror magnetic confinement device. Tools used were: a transit/laser surveyor's system for establishing an invariant reference; optical scattering from ferromagnetic crystallites for establishing magnetic centers in the quadrupole anchor/transition modules; an electron-optical circle-generating wand for alignment of the solenoidal plug and central cell modules; and four differently configured electron emissive probes, including a 40-beam flux mapping e gun, for testing the alignment of the coils under vacuum. Procedures are outlined, and results are given which show that the magnetic axes of the individual coils in the Tara set have been made colinear with each other and with the reference to within +- 1.0 mm over the length of the machine between the anchor midplanes.

  14. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

  15. Tandem mass spectrometry of low solubility polyamides.

    PubMed

    Barrère, Caroline; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Afonso, Carlos; Rejaibi, Majed; Kebir, Nasreddine; Désilles, Nicolas; Lecamp, Laurence; Burel, Fabrice; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne

    2014-01-15

    The structural characterization of polyamides (PA) was achieved by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with a laser induced dissociation (LID) strategy. Because of interferences for precursor ions selection, two chemical modifications of the polymer end groups were proposed as derivatization strategies. The first approach, based on the addition of a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) molecule, yields principally to complementary bn and yn product ions. This fragmentation types, analogous to those obtained with peptides or other PA, give only poor characterization of polymer end-groups [1]. A second approach, based on the addition of a basic diethylamine (DEA), permits to fix the charge and favorably direct the fragmentation. In this case, bn ions were not observed. The full characterization of ω end group structure was obtained, in addition to the expected yn and consecutive fragment ions. PMID:24370089

  16. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  17. Tandem mass spectrometry of low solubility polyamides.

    PubMed

    Barrère, Caroline; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Afonso, Carlos; Rejaibi, Majed; Kebir, Nasreddine; Désilles, Nicolas; Lecamp, Laurence; Burel, Fabrice; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne

    2014-01-15

    The structural characterization of polyamides (PA) was achieved by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with a laser induced dissociation (LID) strategy. Because of interferences for precursor ions selection, two chemical modifications of the polymer end groups were proposed as derivatization strategies. The first approach, based on the addition of a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) molecule, yields principally to complementary bn and yn product ions. This fragmentation types, analogous to those obtained with peptides or other PA, give only poor characterization of polymer end-groups [1]. A second approach, based on the addition of a basic diethylamine (DEA), permits to fix the charge and favorably direct the fragmentation. In this case, bn ions were not observed. The full characterization of ω end group structure was obtained, in addition to the expected yn and consecutive fragment ions.

  18. Parametric systems analysis for tandem mirror hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.; Chapin, D.L.; Chi, J.W.H.

    1980-09-01

    Fusion fission systems, consisting of fissile producing fusion hybrids combining a tandem mirror fusion driver with various blanket types and net fissile consuming LWR's, have been modeled and analyzed parametrically. Analysis to date indicates that hybrids can be competitive with mined uranium when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cost is about 100 $/lb., adding less than 25% to present day cost of power from LWR's. Of the three blanket types considered, uranium fast fission (UFF), thorium fast fission (ThFF), and thorium fission supressed (ThFS), the ThFS blanket has a modest economic advantage under most conditions but has higher support ratios and potential safety advantages under all conditions.

  19. Tandem mass spectrometry studies of metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, J.H.; Nelson, H.; McElvany, S.W.; Ross, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    As interest in the chemistry of fullerenes grows, many laboratories are now directing their efforts toward the synthesis of fullerene derivatives such as metallofullerenes (endohedral complexes). Tandem mass spectrometry has proven useful in the characterization of such derivatives. In tandem mass spectrometry, ions of interest are selected with one mass analyzer, collided or reacted with a gas, and the products of the reaction are subsequently analyzed with an additional stage of mass analysis. The authors have used low- and high-energy collisions with reactive and inert target gas molecules to probe the structures, properties and reactivities of endohedral metallofullerene complexes. These studies have shown that metallofullerenes have properties similar to those of fullerenes, including the ability to take up He during keV collisions, forming complexes such as La{sub 2}He@C{sub 80} These studies indicate that the metal is not on the outside of the cage, although the formation of La{sub 2}He@C{sub 80} suggests that one of the metal atoms may be incorporated as part of the cage. Fragmentation processes in the metallofullerenes are similar to those of the fullerenes (e.g. successive C{sub 2} loss), lending further support for the proposed endohedral structure of the fullerenes. The behavior of the metallofullerenes in reactive collisions with oxygen has also been studied, indicating that their reactivities are similar to those of the fullerenes. Fourier transform spectroscopy studies are currently underway to further probe the reactivities, ionization energies and gas phase proton affinities of the metallofullerenes.

  20. Orientation of Culex mosquitoes to carbon dioxide-baited traps: flight manoeuvres and trapping efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cooperband, M F; Cardé, R T

    2006-03-01

    Females of Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Culex tarsalis Coquillet (Diptera: Culicidae) in the host-seeking stage were released and video recorded in three dimensions in a large field wind tunnel as they flew to four kinds of CO2-baited mosquito traps. The trapping efficiency (number of mosquitoes approaching compared to the number caught) was determined for each trap type. The Encephalitis Virus Surveillance (EVS), Mosquito Magnet Freedom (MMF) and Mosquito Magnet Liberty (MML) traps captured only 13-16% of approaching Cx. quinquefasciatus females, whereas the Mosquito Magnet-X (MMX) trap captured 58%. Similar results were obtained for Cx. tarsalis. Orientation behaviour and flight parameters of mosquitoes approaching the four traps were compared. Mosquitoes spent the most time orienting to the EVS trap. Flight speed decreased as mosquitoes entered the vicinity of each trap and a large portion of their time was spent within 30 cm downwind of the traps. Flights became highly tortuous downwind of the poorly performing traps and just upwind of the MMX trap. Differences between traps and possible explanations for the superior performance of the MMX trap are considered.

  1. Improved Linear-Ion-Trap Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept for linear-ion-trap (LIT) frequency-standard apparatus proposed. Apparatus contains lengthened linear ion trap, and ions processed alternately in two regions: ions prepared in upper region of trap, then transported to lower region for exposure to microwave radiation, then returned to upper region for optical interrogation. Improved design intended to increase long-term frequency stability of apparatus while reducing size, mass, and cost.

  2. State-insensitive bichromatic optical trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-08-15

    We study a scheme for state-insensitive trapping of neutral atoms by using light with two independent wavelengths. In particular, we describe the use of trapping and control lasers to minimize the variance of the potential experienced by a trapped Rb atom in ground and excited states. We present calculated values of wavelength pairs for which the 5s and 5p{sub 3/2} levels have the same ac Stark shifts in the presence of two laser fields.

  3. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  4. The ''Kinetic Stabilizer'': A Simpler Tandem Mirror Confinement?

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-06-15

    In the search for better approaches to magnetic fusion it is important to keep in mind the lessons learned in the 50 years that fusion plasma confinement has been studied. One of the lessons learned is that ''closed'' and ''open'' fusion devices differ fundamentally with respect to an important property of their confinement, as follows: Without known exception closed systems such as the tokamak, the stellarator, or the reversed-field pinch, have been found to have their confinement times limited by non-classical, i.e., turbulence-related, processes, leading to the requirement that such systems must be scaled-up in dimensions to sizes much larger than would be the case in the absence of turbulence. By contrast, from the earliest days of fusion research, it has been demonstrated that open magnetic systems of the mirror variety can achieve confinement times close to that associated with classical, i.e., collisional, processes. While these good results have been obtained in both axially symmetric fields and in non-axisymmetric fields, the clearest cases have been those in which the confining fields are solenoidal and axially symmetric. These observations, i.e., of confinement not enhanced by turbulence, can be traced theoretically to such factors as the absence of parallel currents in the plasma, and to the constraints on particle drifts imposed by the adiabatic invariants governing particle confinement in axisymmetric open systems. In the past the MHD instability of axially symmetric open systems has been seen as a barrier to their use. However, theory predicts MHD-stable confinement is achievable if sufficient plasma is present in the ''good curvature'' regions outside the mirrors. This theory has been confirmed by experiments on the Gas Dynamic Trap mirror-based experiment at Novosibirsk, In this paper a new way of exploiting this stabilizing principle, involving creating a localized ''stabilizer plasma'' outside a mirror, will be discussed. To create this plasma

  5. Ecological traps: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Robin; Swearer, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological traps, which occur when animals mistakenly prefer habitats where their fitness is lower than in other available habitats following rapid environmental change, have important conservation and management implications. Empirical research has focused largely on assessing the behavioural effects of traps, by studying a small number of geographically close habitat patches. Traps, however, have also been defined in terms of their population-level effects (i.e. as preferred habitats of sufficiently low quality to cause population declines), and this is the scale most relevant for management. We systematically review the ecological traps literature to (i) describe the geographical and taxonomic distribution of efforts to study traps, (ii) examine how different traps vary in the strength of their effects on preference and fitness, (iii) evaluate the robustness of methods being used to identify traps, and (iv) determine whether the information required to assess the population-level consequences of traps has been considered. We use our results to discuss key knowledge gaps, propose improved methods to study traps, and highlight fruitful avenues for future research. PMID:26865295

  6. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  7. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples. PMID:27396834

  8. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples.

  9. Non-destructive ion trap mass spectrometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Frankevich, Vladimir E.; Soni, Manish H.; Nappi, Mario; Santini, Robert E.; Amy, Jonathan W.; Cooks, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to an ion trap mass spectrometer of the type having an ion trapping volume defined by spaced end caps and a ring electrode. The ion trap includes a small sensing electrode which senses characteristic motion of ions trapped in said trapping volume and provides an image current. Ions are excited into characteristic motion by application of an excitation pulse to the trapped ions. The invention also relates to a method of operating such an ion trap.

  10. Resonance of the Macromotion of Ions Trapped in a RF Trap by the Subharmonic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Jun; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko

    1992-11-01

    Yb+ ions were trapped in an uncompensated rf trap with light buffer gas and then the storage time, as well as the total number of the trapped ions, was determined by the rf resonance method. When the ratio of the frequency of the trapping field to that of the macromotion of the trapped ions was an integer, the total number and the storage time were smaller and shorter, respectively, than those obtained when the ratio was a half-integer. A theoretical calculation shows that this effect, called the subharmonic oscillation, is caused by excitation of the macromotion of the trapped ions by the leaked trapping rf field, in the case in which the ion trap has an octupole besides a quadrupole potential.

  11. A tandem-based compact dual-energy gamma generator.

    PubMed

    Persaud, A; Kwan, J W; Leitner, M; Leung, K-N; Ludewigt, B; Tanaka, N; Waldron, W; Wilde, S; Antolak, A J; Morse, D H; Raber, T

    2010-02-01

    A dual-energy tandem-type gamma generator has been developed at E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The tandem accelerator geometry allows higher energy nuclear reactions to be reached, thereby allowing more flexible generation of MeV-energy gammas for active interrogation applications. Both positively charged ions and atoms of hydrogen are created from negative ions via a gas stripper. In this paper, we show first results of the working tandem-based gamma generator and that a gas stripper can be utilized in a compact source design. Preliminary results of monoenergetic gamma production are shown.

  12. Excimer Emission from Pulsed Tandem Microhollow Cathode Discharges in Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon; Iberler, Marcus; Teske, Christian; Jacoby, Joachim; Frank, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes an extension of a basic single microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) to a tandem MHCD, i.e., two discharges in series from an anode-cathode-anode configuration. When a high-voltage pulse is superimposed with a direct current (DC) tandem MHCD, an intense excimer emission along the discharge axis in a high pressure xenon gas is generated which is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the DC tandem MHCD. In addition, the emission intensity increases to almost twice by increasing cathode thickness from 250 to 1000 µm. The emission is further enhanced by increasing the gas pressure from 400 to 800 mbar.

  13. Tandem Bond-Forming Reactions of 1-Alkynyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Minehan, Thomas G

    2016-06-21

    Electron-rich alkynes, such as ynamines, ynamides, and ynol ethers, are functional groups that possess significant potential in organic chemistry for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. While the synthetic utility of ynamides has recently been expanded considerably, 1-alkynyl ethers, which possess many of the reactivity features of ynamides, have traditionally been far less investigated because of concerns about their stability. Like ynamides, ynol ethers are relatively unhindered to approach by functional groups present in the same or different molecules because of their linear geometry, and they can potentially form up to four new bonds in a single transformation. Ynol ethers also possess unique reactivity features that make them complementary to ynamides. Research over the past decade has shown that ynol ethers formed in situ from stable precursors engage in a variety of useful carbon-carbon bond-forming processes. Upon formation at -78 °C, allyl alkynyl ethers undergo a rapid [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement to form allyl ketene intermediates, which may be trapped with alcohol or amine nucleophiles to form γ,δ-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives. The process is stereospecific, takes place in minutes at cryogenic temperatures, and affords products containing (quaternary) stereogenic carbon atoms. Trapping of the intermediate allyl ketene with carbonyl compounds, epoxides, or oxetanes instead leads to complex α-functionalized β-, γ-, or δ-lactones, respectively. [3,3]-Sigmatropic rearrangement of benzyl alkynyl ethers also takes place at temperatures ranging from -78 to 60 °C to afford substituted 2-indanones via intramolecular carbocyclization of the ketene intermediate. tert-Butyl alkynyl ethers containing pendant di- and trisubstituted alkenes and enol ethers are stable to chromatographic isolation and undergo a retro-ene/[2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction upon mild thermolysis (90 °C) to afford cis-fused cyclobutanones and donor

  14. Optimizing Trap Design and Trapping Protocols for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Renkema, Justin M; Buitenhuis, Rosemarije; Hallett, Rebecca H

    2014-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a recent invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Europe. Carpophagous larvae render fruit unmarketable and may promote secondary rot-causing organisms. To monitor spread and develop programs to time application of controls, further work is needed to optimize trap design and trapping protocols for adult D. suzukii. We compared commercial traps and developed a new, easy-to-use plastic jar trap that performed well compared with other designs. For some trap types, increasing the entry area led to increased D. suzukii captures and improved selectivity for D. suzukii when populations were low. However, progressive entry area enlargement had diminishing returns, particularly for commercial traps. Unlike previous studies, we found putting holes in trap lids under a close-fitting cover improved captures compared with holes on sides of traps. Also, red and black traps outperformed yellow and clear traps when traps of all colors were positioned 10-15 cm apart above crop foliage. In smaller traps, attractant surface area and entry area, but not other trap features (e.g., headspace volume), appeared to affect D. suzukii captures. In the new, plastic jar trap, tripling attractant volume (360 vs 120 ml) and weekly attractant replacement resulted in the highest D. suzukii captures, but in the larger commercial trap these measures only increased by-catch of large-bodied Diptera. Overall, the plastic jar trap with large entry area is affordable, durable, and can hold high attractant volumes to maximize D. suzukii capture and selectivity. PMID:26470076

  15. Comparison of Trapping Performance Between the Original BG-Sentinel® Trap and BG-Sentinel 2® Trap (1).

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Hanayo; Harwood, James F; Nunn, Peter J; Richardson, Alec G; Gordon, Scott; Obenauer, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the BG-Sentinel® trap (BGS) trap has been reconfigured for increased durability during harsh field conditions. We evaluated the attractiveness of this redesigned trap, BG-Sentinel 2® (BGS2), and its novel granular lure cartridge system relative to the original trap and lure. Granular lures containing different combinations of lactic acid, ammonia, hexanoic acid, and octenol were also evaluated. Lure cartridges with all components except octenol trapped significantly more Aedes albopictus than lures containing octenol. This new granular lure combination and original BG-Lure® system were paired with BGS and BGS2 traps to compare relative attractiveness of the lures and the traps. All evaluations were conducted under field conditions in a suburban neighborhood in northeastern Florida from July to October 2014. Overall, the average numbers of Ae. albopictus collected by BGS or BGS2 were similar regardless of the lure type (i.e., mesh bag versus granules) (P  =  0.56). The functionality and durability of both trap models are discussed. PMID:26675464

  16. Classroom Tandem--Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjalainen, Katri; Pörn, Michaela; Rusk, Fredrik; Björkskog, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues…

  17. Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, Nader H.

    1998-09-01

    We study dynamics of a planetary system that consists of a star and two planets taking into account dynamical friction. Numerical integrations of a restricted planar circular three body model of this system indicate resonance capture. The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of an extensive numerical experiment performed on this model and also to present analytical arguments for the observed resonance trapping and its consequences. The equations of motion are written in terms of Delaunay variables and the recently developed method of partial averaging near resonance* is employed in order to account for the behavior of the system at resonance. * C.Chicone, B.Mashhoon and D.Retzloff, Ann.Inst.Henri Poincare, Vol.64, no 1, 1996, p.87-125.

  18. Quantum mechanics in rotating-radio-frequency traps and Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    2010-03-15

    Quantum-mechanical analysis of ion motion in a rotating-radio-frequency (rrf) trap or in a Penning trap with a quadrupole rotating field is carried out. Rrf traps were introduced by Hasegawa and Bollinger [Phys. Rev. A 72, 043404 (2005)]. The classical motion of a single ion in this trap is described by only trigonometric functions, whereas in the conventional linear radio-frequency (rf) traps it is by the Mathieu functions. Because of the simple classical motion in the rrf trap, it is expected that the quantum-mechanical analysis of the rrf traps is also simple compared to that of the linear rf traps. The analysis of Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field is also possible in a way similar to the rrf traps. As a result, the Hamiltonian in these traps is the same as the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and energy levels and wave functions are derived as exact results. In these traps, it is found that one of the vibrational modes in the rotating frame can have negative energy levels, which means that the zero-quantum-number state (''ground'' state) is the highest energy state.

  19. A toroidal trap for cold {}^{87}{Rb} atoms using an rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold {}87{Rb} atoms in a toroidal geometry using a radio frequency (rf) dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong rf-field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has the minimum potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates trapping in toroidal geometry. In these experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in a quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in an rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for the rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in the realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  20. Comparison of Data Acquisition Strategies on Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Canterbury, Jesse D.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Goodlett, David R.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Shaffer, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    A common strategy in mass spectrometry analyses of complex protein mixtures is to digest the proteins to peptides, separate the peptides by microcapillary liquid chromatography and collect tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) on the eluting, complex peptide mixtures, a process commonly termed “shotgun proteomics”. For years, the most common way of data collection was via data-dependent acquisition (DDA), a process driven by an automated instrument control routine that directs MS/MS acquisition from the highest abundant signals to the lowest, a process often leaving lower abundant signals unanalyzed and therefore unidentified in the experiment. Advances in both instrumentation duty cycle and sensitivity allow DDA to probe to lower peptide abundance and therefore enable mapping proteomes to a more significant depth. An alternative to acquiring data by DDA is by data-independent acquisition (DIA), in which a specified range in m/z is fragmented without regard to prioritization of a precursor ion or its relative abundance in the mass spectrum. As a consequence, DIA acquisition potentially offers more comprehensive analysis of peptides than DDA and in principle can yield tandem mass spectra of all ionized molecules following their conversion to the gas-phase. In this work, we evaluate both DDA and DIA on three different linear ion trap instruments: an LTQ, an LTQ modified in-house with an electrodynamic ion funnel, and an LTQ-Velos. These instruments were chosen as they are representative of both older (LTQ) and newer (LTQ-Velos) ion trap designs i.e., linear ion trap and dual ion traps, respectively, and allow direct comparison of peptide identification using both DDA and DIA analysis. Further, as the LTQ-Velos has an improved “S-lens” ion guide in the high-pressure region to improve ion flux, we found it logical to determine if the former LTQ model could be leveraged by improving sensitivity by modifying with an electrodynamic ion guide of significantly different

  1. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  2. Laser-induced hybrid trap for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhu; Ni, H. Q.; Li, Yong Qing; Xu, Yuguang; Lu, Baolong; Shao, Wei

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of stable trapping of a transparent microparticle. The trap is a light induced hybrid one which consists of both light pressure force and fluid force. A theoretical analysis and experimental results are given. The possible applications are also discussed.

  3. Collisions of trapped molecules with slow beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Pavlovic, Z.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Cote, R.

    2010-08-15

    We present a theoretical study of molecular-trap loss induced by collisions with slow atomic beams based on an explicit analysis of collision kinematics in the laboratory frame and a rigorous quantum description of atom-molecule scattering in external fields. The theory is applied to elucidate the effects of nonuniform magnetic and optical trapping fields on low-temperature collisions of OH (J=3/2,M{sub J}=3/2,f) molecules with {sup 4}He atoms. Our calculations quantify the extent to which both elastic and inelastic cross sections are suppressed by external trapping fields, clarify the role of small-angle scattering in trap loss, and may benefit future experiments on collisional cooling of molecules in electromagnetic traps. The calculated cross sections for trap loss in {sup 4}He + OH collisions are consistent with recent experimental observations at low beam energies [B. C. Sawyer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 203203 (2008)], demonstrating the importance of including the effects of nonuniform trapping fields in theoretical simulations of cold collision experiments with trapped molecules and slow atomic beams.

  4. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  5. Traps for the Unwary Financial Aid Officer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    Describes 11 regulatory traps that can result in fraud and abuse charges. The traps are admissions process, ability to benefit, inability to document attendance, satisfactory academic progress, fictitious students, false eligibility, misstated needs, misuse of funds by students, theft and misuse of funds, lender kickbacks, and loan defaults.…

  6. Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1991-01-01

    Report describes principle of operation, design, and results of initial measurements on trapped-mercury-ion frequency-standard apparatus at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. New frequency standard being developed. Based on linear ion trap described in (NPO-17758). Expected to show much better short-term frequency stability because of increased ion-storage capacity.

  7. Compression of antiproton clouds for antihydrogen trapping.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; El Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  8. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  9. Optical trapping map of dielectric spheres.

    PubMed

    Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-05-20

    Many applications use a focused Gaussian laser beam to manipulate spherical dielectric particles. The axial trapping efficiency of this process is a function of (i) the particle radius r, (ii) the ratio of the refractive index of particle over the medium, and (iii) the numerical aperture of the delivered light beam. During what we believe is the first comprehensive simulation of its kind, we uncovered optical trapping regions in the three-dimensional (3D) parameter space forming an iso-surface landscape with ridge-like contours. Using specific points in the parameter space, we drew attention to difficulties in using the trapping efficiency and stiffness metrics in defining how well particles are drawn into and held in the trap. We have proposed an alternative calculation based on the maximum forward and restoration values of the trapping efficiency in the axial sense, called the trapping quality. We also discuss the manner in which the ridge regions may be harnessed for effective particle sorting, how the optical trapping blind spots can be used in applications that seek to eschew photothermal damage, and how trapping can proceed when many parameters change, such as when swelling occurs. PMID:23736236

  10. A CF4 based positron trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Srdjan; Bankovic, Ana; Dujko, Sasa; Deller, Adam; Cooper, Ben; Cassidy, David; Petrovic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    All positron buffer gas traps in use rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed a1 Π electronic excitation cross section that is large enough to compete with positronium (Ps) formation in the threshold region. Its energy loss of 8.5 eV is sufficient to capture positrons into a potential well upon a single collision. The competing Ps formation, however, limits the efficiency of the two stage trap to 25 %. As positron moderators produce beams with energies of several eV we have proposed to use CF4 in the first stage of the trap, due to its large vibrational excitation cross section, where several vibrational excitations would be sufficient to trap the positrons with small losses. Apart from the simulations we also report the results of attempts to apply this approach to an existing Surko-type positron trap. Operating the unmodified trap as a CF4 based device proved to be unsuccessful, due primarily to excessive scattering due to high CF4 pressure in the first stage. However, the performance was consistent with subsequent simulations using the real system parameters. This agreement indicates that an efficient CF4 based scheme may be realized in an appropriately designed trap. also at Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Knez Mihajlova 35, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.

  11. 49 CFR 236.728 - Circuit, trap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circuit, trap. 236.728 Section 236.728... Circuit, trap. A term applied to a circuit used where it is desirable to provide a track circuit but where it is impracticable to maintain a track circuit....

  12. 49 CFR 236.728 - Circuit, trap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circuit, trap. 236.728 Section 236.728... Circuit, trap. A term applied to a circuit used where it is desirable to provide a track circuit but where it is impracticable to maintain a track circuit....

  13. 49 CFR 236.728 - Circuit, trap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit, trap. 236.728 Section 236.728... Circuit, trap. A term applied to a circuit used where it is desirable to provide a track circuit but where it is impracticable to maintain a track circuit....

  14. Evaluating the metapopulation consequences of ecological traps.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robin; Treml, Eric A; Swearer, Stephen E

    2015-04-01

    Ecological traps occur when environmental changes cause maladaptive habitat selection. Despite their relevance to metapopulations, ecological traps have been studied predominantly at local scales. How these local impacts scale up to affect the dynamics of spatially structured metapopulations in heterogeneous landscapes remains unexplored. We propose that assessing the metapopulation consequences of traps depends on a variety of factors that can be grouped into four categories: the probability of encounter, the likelihood of selection, the fitness costs of selection and species-specific vulnerability to these costs. We evaluate six hypotheses using a network-based metapopulation model to explore the relative importance of factors across these categories within a spatial context. Our model suggests (i) traps are most severe when they represent a large proportion of habitats, severely reduce fitness and are highly attractive, and (ii) species with high intrinsic fitness will be most susceptible. We provide the first evidence that (iii) traps may be beneficial for metapopulations in rare instances, and (iv) preferences for natal-like habitats can magnify the effects of traps. Our study provides important insight into the effects of traps at landscape scales, and highlights the need to explicitly consider spatial context to better understand and manage traps within metapopulations. PMID:25761712

  15. Local trap spectroscopy in superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A. G.; Wigmore, J. K.; Peacock, A.; Poelaert, A.; Verhoeve, P.; den Hartog, R.; Brammertz, G.

    2001-06-04

    We show that thermal activation of quasiparticles from local traps is responsible for the temperature variation of responsivity observed for some superconducting tunneling junction photon detectors. With this model, the depth of the local traps in two different proximized Ta structures was found to be the same, 0.20{+-}0.02 meV. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. High efficiency francium trap for precision spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Seth Andre Morgan

    We cooled and trapped francium in a high efficiency magneto-optical trap. The francium is produced artificially in a nuclear fusion reaction using the Stony Brook superconducting LINAC. We observed an average trap population of 50,000 210Fr, corresponding to a trapping efficiency of 1.2%. The trapped atoms are cooled to a temperature of 75 muK. We used the new trapping apparatus for spectroscopic studies of the 9S 1/2 level of 210Fr to test the precision of atomic theory. We measured the hyperfine splitting of the 9S1/2 level, and with time-correlated single photon counting, we measured its radiative lifetime. We found a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns and a hyperfine splitting of 4045.1 +/- 1.1 MHz. We characterized the optical properties of a dipole trap based on an axicon lens to provide a low perturbation environment for precision spectroscopy. The axicon generates a region of darkness surrounded by light. For blue-detuned light, cold atoms are trapped in the dark region and experience almost no perturbing fields. This work continues the spectroscopic studies of francium for tests of atomic theory and opens the way for nuclear anapole moment measurements.

  17. 49 CFR 236.728 - Circuit, trap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circuit, trap. 236.728 Section 236.728... Circuit, trap. A term applied to a circuit used where it is desirable to provide a track circuit but where it is impracticable to maintain a track circuit....

  18. Review of statistical analysis of trapped gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmittroth, F.A.

    1996-03-19

    A review was conducted of trapped gas estimates in Hanford waste tanks. Tank waste levels were found to correlate with barometric pressure changes giving the possibility to infer amounts of trapped gas. Previous models of the tank waste level were extended to include other phenomena such as evaporation in a more complete description of tank level changes.

  19. Heavy-ion injection from tandems into an isochronous cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, M.J.; Chasman, C.

    1981-01-01

    A design has been realized for the injection of heavy ion beams generated by the BNL 3-stage tandem facility into a proposed isochronous cyclotron. The tandem beams are bunched into +- 1/sup 0/ R.F. phase (less than or equal to 0.5 nsec) in two stages. The beam is then injected into the cyclotron through a valley, past a hill, and into the next valley on to a stripper foil. Only a single steerer is required to make trajectory corrections for the different beams. Two achromats are used to regulate the tandem potential and to provide phase control. A final section of the injection optics provides matching of transverse phase space to the acceptance of the cyclotron. The calculations use realistic tandem emittances and magnetic fields for the cyclotron based on measurements with a model magnet.

  20. D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH UPCOILER. BACKUP ROLLS, 40 TONS. WORK ROLLS, 20 TONS., C. 1900. OPERATING SPEED, 600'/MINUTE. AUTOMATIC GAUGE CONTROL. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  1. SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent Symmetric Tandem Mirror Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D; Fowler, T

    2004-06-15

    A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport model in symmetric tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of symmetric mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-symmetric transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior.

  2. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and cleanouts. (a) Traps—(1) Traps required. Each plumbing fixture, except listed toilets, shall be separately trapped by approved water seal “P” traps. All traps shall be effectively vented. (2) Dual fixtures... level may be connected to one “P” trap and may be considered as a single fixture for the purpose...

  3. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and cleanouts. (a) Traps—(1) Traps required. Each plumbing fixture, except listed toilets, shall be separately trapped by approved water seal “P” traps. All traps shall be effectively vented. (2) Dual fixtures... level may be connected to one “P” trap and may be considered as a single fixture for the purpose...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and cleanouts. (a) Traps—(1) Traps required. Each plumbing fixture, except listed toilets, shall be separately trapped by approved water seal “P” traps. All traps shall be effectively vented. (2) Dual fixtures... level may be connected to one “P” trap and may be considered as a single fixture for the purpose...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and cleanouts. (a) Traps—(1) Traps required. Each plumbing fixture, except listed toilets, shall be separately trapped by approved water seal “P” traps. All traps shall be effectively vented. (2) Dual fixtures... level may be connected to one “P” trap and may be considered as a single fixture for the purpose...

  6. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement. PMID:27453496

  7. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    PubMed

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  8. A dynamical model for the Utricularia trap.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Coraline; Argentina, Médéric; Bouret, Yann; Marmottant, Philippe; Vincent, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    We propose a model that captures the dynamics of a carnivorous plant, Utricularia inflata. This plant possesses tiny traps for capturing small aquatic animals. Glands pump water out of the trap, yielding a negative pressure difference between the plant and its surroundings. The trap door is set into a meta-stable state and opens quickly as an extra pressure is generated by the displacement of a potential prey. As the door opens, the pressure difference sucks the animal into the trap. We write an ODE model that captures all the physics at play. We show that the dynamics of the plant is quite similar to neuronal dynamics and we analyse the effect of a white noise on the dynamics of the trap. PMID:22859569

  9. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  10. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement.

  11. Inexpensive, floating, insect-emergence trap

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    1983-11-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the usefulness of aquarium microcosms and ponds for the quantification and predictions of toxicant effects on freshwater systems. Ideally, concepts and methods applicable to both 150-L microcosms and 15,000-L ponds would bridge the gap between the two. The effort of processing the benthic samples, as well as the destructiveness of the sampling in small ponds, limited the number of samples that could be taken. Therefore, the author developed an inexpensive emergence trap appropriate for use in small outdoor ponds, as one method of increasing sampling efficiency and economy. To prevent the possibility of trapping adults from adjacent ponds, which would confound the results, the traps had to be designed such that they could only trap insects from the ponds upon which they were floating. The design of this trap is described.

  12. New vanadium trap proven in commercial trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dougan, T.J. ); Alkemade, U.; Lakhanpal, B. ); Boock, L.T. )

    1994-09-26

    A vanadium trap technology called RV4+ has demonstrated in a variety of commercial fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) units its ability to reduce vanadium on equilibrium catalyst by more than 20%. Reducing vanadium loading increases microactivity and zeolite surface area retention, confirming that RV4+ protects zeolites from vanadium deactivation. Sulfur competition had prevented some previous traps from working commercially, but was not a factor with the new trap. The technology can save refiners millions of dollars per year in catalyst costs, or allow them to process feeds containing higher vanadium concentrations. The paper discusses vanadium traps, deactivation mechanism, history of traps, vanadium mobility, intraparticle mobility, interparticle mobility, measuring performance, commercial results, sulfur competition, and economic value.

  13. Magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D.; Sokolov, A.; Chebakov, K.; Akimov, A.; Kanorsky, S.; Kolachevsky, N.; Sorokin, V.

    2010-07-15

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to 7x10{sup 4} atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40-cm-long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the magneto-optical trap which varies between 0.3 and 1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s{sup -1}. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  14. Adjustable multiple sub-Doppler traps in an asymmetric magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Myoung-sun; Kim, Kihwan; Lee, Ki-Hwan; Yum, Dahyun; Shin, Soyoung; Kim, Yonghee; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2007-02-15

    We have realized adjustable multiple sub-Doppler traps (SDT's) in a six-beam magneto-optical trap (MOT) under asymmetric trap conditions. In the simplest case, one obtains an array of three SDT's, one usual trap at the origin and two additional traps symmetrically but oppositely located at equal and controllable distances from the origin, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The easily adjustable array of SDT's readily available in the asymmetric MOT may open the possibility of novel atom optics or quantum optics experiments such as atom interferometer or quantum information.

  15. The hidden traps in decision making.

    PubMed

    Hammond, J S; Keeney, R L; Raiffa, H

    1998-01-01

    Bad decisions can often be traced back to the way the decisions were made--the alternatives were not clearly defined, the right information was not collected, the costs and benefits were not accurately weighted. But sometimes the fault lies not in the decision-making process but rather in the mind of the decision maker. The way the human brain works can sabotage the choices we make. John Hammond, Ralph Keeney, and Howard Raiffa examine eight psychological traps that are particularly likely to affect the way we make business decisions: The anchoring trap leads us to give disproportionate weight to the first information we receive. The statusquo trap biases us toward maintaining the current situation--even when better alternatives exist. The sunk-cost trap inclines us to perpetuate the mistakes of the past. The confirming-evidence trap leads us to seek out information supporting an existing predilection and to discount opposing information. The framing trap occurs when we misstate a problem, undermining the entire decision-making process. The overconfidence trap makes us overestimate the accuracy of our forecasts. The prudence trap leads us to be overcautious when we make estimates about uncertain events. And the recallability trap leads us to give undue weight to recent, dramatic events. The best way to avoid all the traps is awareness--forewarned is forearmed. But executives can also take other simple steps to protect themselves and their organizations from the various kinds of mental lapses. The authors show how to take action to ensure that important business decisions are sound and reliable.

  16. A CF4 based positron trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, Srdjan; Banković, Ana; Cassidy, David; Cooper, Ben; Deller, Adam; Dujko, Saša; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2016-11-01

    All buffer-gas positron traps in use today rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed {{{a}}}1{{\\Pi }} electronic excitation cross-section. The energy loss per excitation in this process is 8.5 eV, which is sufficient to capture positrons from low-energy moderated beams into a Penning-trap configuration of electric and magnetic fields. However, the energy range over which this cross-section is accessible overlaps with that for positronium (Ps) formation, resulting in inevitable losses and setting an intrinsic upper limit on the overall trapping efficiency of ∼25%. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of a device that uses CF4 as the primary trapping gas, exploiting vibrational excitation as the main inelastic capture process. The threshold for such excitations is far below that for Ps formation and hence, in principle, a CF4 trap can be highly efficient; our simulations indicate that it may be possible to achieve trapping efficiencies as high as 90%. We also report the results of an attempt to re-purpose an existing two-stage N2-based buffer-gas positron trap. Operating the device using CF4 proved unsuccessful, which we attribute to back scattering and expansion of the positron beam following interactions with the CF4 gas, and an unfavourably broad longitudinal beam energy spread arising from the magnetic field differential between the source and trap regions. The observed performance was broadly consistent with subsequent simulations that included parameters specific to the test system, and we outline the modifications that would be required to realise efficient positron trapping with CF4. However, additional losses appear to be present which require further investigation through both simulation and experiment.

  17. The habitats exploited and the species trapped in a Caribbean island trap fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, V.H.; Rogers, C.S.; Beets, J.; Friedlander, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    We visually observed fish traps in situ to identify the habitats exploited by the U.S. Virgin Islands fishery and to document species composition and abundance in traps by habitat. Fishers set more traps in algal plains than in any other habitat around St. John. Coral reefs, traditionally targeted by fishers, accounted for only 16% of traps. Traps in algal plain contained the highest number of fishes per trap and the greatest numbers of preferred food species. Traps on coral reefs contained the most species, 41 of the 59 taxa observed in the study. Acanthurus coeruleus was the most abundant species and Acanthuridae the most abundant family observed in traps. Piscivore numbers were low and few serranids were observed. Traps in algal plain contained the most fishes as a result of: ecological changes such as shifts in habitat use, mobility of species and degradation of nearshore habitat (fishery independent); and, catchability of fishes and long-term heavy fishing pressure (fishery dependent). The low number of serranids per trap, dominance of the piscivore guild by a small benthic predator, Epinephelus guttatus, and dominance of trap contents overall by a small, fast-growing species of a lower trophic guild, Acanthurus coeruleus, all point to years of intense fishing pressure.

  18. Mass trapping with MosquiTRAPs does not reduce Aedes aegypti abundance

    PubMed Central

    Degener, Carolin Marlen; de Ázara, Tatiana Mingote Ferreira; Roque, Rosemary Aparecida; Rösner, Susanne; Rocha, Eliseu Soares Oliveira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Nobre, Aline Araújo; Ohly, Jörg Johannes; Geier, Martin; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aedes aegypti mass trapping using the sticky trap MosquiTRAP (MQT) by performing a cluster randomised controlled trial in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. After an initial questionnaire and baseline monitoring of adult Ae. aegypti abundance with BG-Sentinel (BGS) traps in six clusters, three clusters were randomly assigned to the intervention arm where each participating household received three MQTs for mass trapping during 17 months. The remaining three clusters (control arm) did not receive traps. The effect of mass trapping on adult Ae. aegypti abundance was monitored fortnightly with BGS traps. During the last two months of the study, a serological survey was conducted. After the study, a second questionnaire was applied in the intervention arm. Entomological monitoring indicated that MQT mass trapping did not reduce adult Ae. aegypti abundance. The serological survey indicated that recent dengue infections were equally frequent in the intervention and the control arm. Most participants responded positively to questions concerning user satisfaction. According to the results, there is no evidence that mass trapping with MQTs can be used as a part of dengue control programs. The use of this sticky trap is only recommendable for dengue vector monitoring. PMID:25946154

  19. A sensitive detection method for high resolution spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen, hydrogen and other trapped species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz Cesar, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    A method for detection of the weak 1s-2s laser excitation of a few trapped antihydrogen atoms is described. It involves the typical antihydrogen trapping environment that combines a magnetic trap for the atoms as well as a Penning trap for its constituent particles. By photoionization of the excited state the photoion can be kept in a weak Penning trap and at a suitable time be ejected towards a charged particle detector such as a microchannel plate or a channel electron multiplier. Since it does not rely on annihilation, the method is also suitable for trapped hydrogen and may find application with other species when a weak transition to a metastable state is intended and only a few trapped atoms or molecules are available.

  20. Tandem-mirror technology demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.; Logan, B.G.

    1981-09-18

    Preliminary calculations at LLNL indicate that a Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF) consisting of a tandem mirror machine about the size of TMX could begin providing fusion nuclear engineering data as early as 1988. With high density operation based on physics already demonstrated in TMX, this machine would produce 12 MW of DT neutrons in steady-state from a plasma column 0.08 m in radius and 8 m in length. Allowing space for neutral beam injectors at each end of the column, this would permit testing of blanket modules and components at 1 MW/m/sup 2/ neutron wall load over a cylindrical surface 8 m/sup 2/ in area at a radius of 0.25 m; or one could irradiate thousands of small samples at 2 MW/m/sup 2/ at r = 0.125 m (4 m/sup 2/ area). With improved end-plug physics to be tested in TMX-Upgrade in 1982-83, the wall load at 0.25 m could be increased to 2 MW/m/sup 2/ (4 MW/m/sup 2/ at r = 0.125 m). Construction of the TDF could begin in FY84 and be completed in 4 to 5 years, at a cost roughly estimated as $700M in '81 dollars including engineering and 30% contingency.

  1. Small, octopole-stabilized tandem mirror reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.; Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.; Hamilton, G.W.; Johnston, B.W.

    1984-10-03

    It is shown that the use of octopole stabilization in a tandem mirror allows a large reduction in end-cell length. A novel feature of the method proposed in this report is the placement of the minimum IBI region coonsiderably off axis, thus rendering the core plasma more axisymmetric. The region from the core to the field minimum is bridged by a mirror-confined hot-electron mantle. Low ..beta.., ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability, as evaluated with the interchange criterion, yields an upper limit to the required mantle peak ..beta.. of 78% for a center-cell peak ..beta.. of 75% and barrier peak ..beta.. of 30%. Estimates for the worst type of classical radial diffusion - with stochastic displacements per bounce - show that such radial losses are negligible for this configuration. First estimates of power balance indicate Q approx. 10 for a reactor producing 500 MW of fusion power and Q approx. 25 for one producing 1000 MW, using conservative assumptions regarding mantle ..beta.. requirements and synchrotron radiation losses.

  2. Wake-induced vibrations in Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysa, Ravi Chaithanya; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The upstream cylinder is fixed in the tandem cylinders arrangement. The downstream cylinder is placed at a distance of four diameters from the upstream cylinder in the free stream direction and is mounted on a spring. The dynamic response of the downstream cylinder is studied at Reynolds number of 10,000. The transverse displacement amplitude of the downstream cylinder is larger compared to that of single cylinder in the post-lock-in region. The transverse dynamic response of the downstream cylinder in the post-lock-in region is characterized by a dominant low frequency component compared to shed frequency, which is nearer to the structural natural frequency. The interaction of upstream wake with the downstream cylinder is carefully analyzed to understand the introduction of low frequency component in the transverse load along with the shed frequency. We found that the stagnation point moves in proportional to the velocity of the cylinder and is in-phase with the velocity. The low frequency component in the stagnation point movement on the downstream cylinder is sustained by the interaction of upstream wake. The frequencies in the movement of the stagnation point is reflected in the transverse load resulting in large deformation of the cylinder. The authors wish to acknowledge support from A*STAR- SERC and Singapore Maritime Institute.

  3. Software dependability in the Tandem GUARDIAN system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Inhwan; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    Based on extensive field failure data for Tandem's GUARDIAN operating system this paper discusses evaluation of the dependability of operational software. Software faults considered are major defects that result in processor failures and invoke backup processes to take over. The paper categorizes the underlying causes of software failures and evaluates the effectiveness of the process pair technique in tolerating software faults. A model to describe the impact of software faults on the reliability of an overall system is proposed. The model is used to evaluate the significance of key factors that determine software dependability and to identify areas for improvement. An analysis of the data shows that about 77% of processor failures that are initially considered due to software are confirmed as software problems. The analysis shows that the use of process pairs to provide checkpointing and restart (originally intended for tolerating hardware faults) allows the system to tolerate about 75% of reported software faults that result in processor failures. The loose coupling between processors, which results in the backup execution (the processor state and the sequence of events) being different from the original execution, is a major reason for the measured software fault tolerance. Over two-thirds (72%) of measured software failures are recurrences of previously reported faults. Modeling, based on the data, shows that, in addition to reducing the number of software faults, software dependability can be enhanced by reducing the recurrence rate.

  4. Engineering problems of tandem-mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-10-22

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability. This paper discusses some of the many engineering problems facing the designer. We estimated the direct cost to be 2$/W/sub e/. Assuming total (direct and indirect) costs to be twice this number, we need to reduce total costs by factors between 1.7 and 2.3 to compete with future LWRs levelized cost of electricity. These reductions may be possible by designing magnets producing over 20T made possible by use of combinations of superconducting and normal conducting coils as well as improvements in performance and cost of neutral beam and microwave power systems. Scientific and technological understanding and innovation are needed in the area of thermal barrier pumping - a process by which unwanted particles are removed (pumped) from certain regions of velocity and real space in the end plug. Removal of exhaust fuel ions, fusion ash and impurities by action of a halo plasma and plasma dump in the mirror end region is another challenging engineering problem discussed in this paper.

  5. Optimal shortcuts for atomic transport in anharmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Muga, J. G.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Chen, Xi

    2016-06-01

    We design fast trap trajectories to transport cold atoms in anharmonic traps, combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control theory. Among the ideal trajectories for harmonic traps, we choose the ones that minimize the anharmonic energy.

  6. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  7. Trap-related injuries to gray wolves in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuehn, D.W.; Fuller, T.K.; Mech, L.D.; Paul, W.J.; Fritts, S.H.; Berg, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) captured in traps with toothed jaws offset 1.8 cm incurred fewer injuries than those captured in 3 other types of steel traps. Few wolves seriously damaged canine or carnassial teeth while in traps.

  8. Resonance activation and collision-induced-dissociation of ions using rectangular wave dipolar potentials in a digital ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2014-04-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ions by resonance activation in a quadrupole ion trap is usually accomplished by resonance exciting the ions to higher kinetic energy, whereby the high kinetic energy ions collide with a bath gas, such as helium or argon, inside the trap and dissociate to fragments. A new ion activation method using a well-defined rectangular wave dipolar potential formed by dividing down the trapping rectangular waveform is developed and examined herein. The mass-selected parent ions are resonance excited to high kinetic energies by simply changing the frequency of the rectangular wave dipolar potential and dissociation proceeds. A relationship between the ion mass and the activation waveform frequency is also identified and described. This highly efficient (CID) procedure can be realized by simply changing the waveform frequency of the dipolar potential, which could certainly simplify tandem mass spectrometry analysis methods.

  9. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  11. Optical trapping at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Richard W; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Diamond anvil cells allow the behavior of materials to be studied at pressures up to hundreds of gigapascals in a small and convenient instrument. However, physical access to the sample is impossible once it is pressurized. We show that optical tweezers can be used to hold and manipulate particles in such a cell, confining micron-sized transparent beads in the focus of a laser beam. Here, we use a modified optical tweezers geometry, allowing us to trap through an objective lens with a higher working distance, overcoming the constraints imposed by the limited angular acceptance of the anvil cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique by measuring water's viscosity at pressures of up to 1.3 GPa. In contrast to previous viscosity measurements in anvil cells, our technique measures absolute viscosity and does not require scaling to the accepted value at atmospheric pressure. This method could also measure the frequency dependence of viscosity as well as being sensitive to anisotropy in the medium's viscosity.

  12. Entanglement of Multiple Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.

    2000-06-01

    Quantum mechanics allows for many-particle wave functions which cannot be factorized into a product of single-particle wave functions, even when the constituent particles are entirely distinct. Such entangled states explicitly demonstrate the nonclassical correlations of quantum theory,(See for instance J. Bell, Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics). (Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1987); J.-W. Pan, D. Bouwmeester, M. Daniell, H. Weinfurter, and A. Zeilinger, Nature 403, 515 (2000). have been suggested for use in high-precision spectroscopy,( J. Bollinger, W.M. Itano, D. Wineland, and D. Heinzen, Phys. Rev. A) 54, R4649 (1996). and are a fundamental element of schemes for quantum communication, cryptography, and computation.(See for instance H.-K Lo, S. Popescu, and T. Spiller, editors, Introduction to Quantum Computation and Information). (World Scientific, Singapore, 1997). In general, the more particles which can be entangled, the more useful the states are for quantum applications. In pursuit of these goals, we have demonstrated an entanglement technique which is applicable to any number of trapped ions.(K. Mølmer and A. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 82, 1835 (1999). We have used this technique to generate entangled states of two, and for the first time, four atoms.

  13. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  14. Characterisation of phosphorylated nucleotides by collisional and electron‐based tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Andrew T.; Prakash, Aruna S.; Bristow, Anthony W.T.; Sims, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tandem mass spectrometry of phosphorylated ions can often yield a limited number of product ions owing to the labile nature of phosphate groups. Developing techniques to improve dissociation for this type of ion has implications for the structural characterisation of many different phosphorylated ions, such as those from nucleotides, pharmaceutical compounds, peptides and polymers. Methods Solutions of adenosine monophosphate, diphosphate and triphosphate (AMP, ADP and ATP) were studied in a hybrid linear ion trap–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Precursor ions with an overall single positive charge, including protonated nucleotides or nucleotide cations containing one, two or three sodium atoms, were isolated for tandem mass spectrometry. Collision‐induced dissociation (CID) was performed in the linear ion trap, with electron‐induced dissociation (EID) being conducted in the FTICR cell. Results EID resulted in many product ions not seen in CID. EID product ion spectra were seen to vary for AMP, ADP and ATP when the nucleotide cation contained zero, one, two or three sodiums. Precursor cations that contain two or three sodiums mainly formed product ions derived from the phosphate group. Conversely, when a precursor ion containing no sodium underwent EID, product ions mainly relating to the non‐phosphate end of the ion were observed. The number of phosphate groups was not seen to greatly affect either CID or EID product ion spectra. Conclusions The presence of sodium in a precursor ion directs electron‐induced bond dissociation, thus enabling targeted, and therefore tuneable, fragmentation of groups within that precursor ion. For all precursor ions, the most useful product ion spectra were obtained by EID for a precursor ion containing one sodium, with bond dissociation occurring across the entire nucleotide cation. The findings of this study can be used to improve the structural elucidation of many

  15. Tandem mass spectral libraries of peptides in digests of individual proteins: Human Serum Albumin (HSA).

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Yan, Xinjian; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Liang, Yuxue; Mirokhin, Yuri A; Roth, Jeri S; Rudnick, Paul A; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    This work presents a method for creating a mass spectral library containing tandem spectra of identifiable peptide ions in the tryptic digestion of a single protein. Human serum albumin (HSA(1)) was selected for this purpose owing to its ubiquity, high level of characterization and availability of digest data. The underlying experimental data consisted of ∼3000 one-dimensional LC-ESI-MS/MS runs with ion-trap fragmentation. In order to generate a wide range of peptides, studies covered a broad set of instrument and digestion conditions using multiple sources of HSA and trypsin. Computer methods were developed to enable the reliable identification and reference spectrum extraction of all peptide ions identifiable by current sequence search methods. This process made use of both MS2 (tandem) spectra and MS1 (electrospray) data. Identified spectra were generated for 2918 different peptide ions, using a variety of manually-validated filters to ensure spectrum quality and identification reliability. The resulting library was composed of 10% conventional tryptic and 29% semitryptic peptide ions, along with 42% tryptic peptide ions with known or unknown modifications, which included both analytical artifacts and post-translational modifications (PTMs) present in the original HSA. The remaining 19% contained unexpected missed-cleavages or were under/over alkylated. The methods described can be extended to create equivalent spectral libraries for any target protein. Such libraries have a number of applications in addition to their known advantages of speed and sensitivity, including the ready re-identification of known PTMs, rejection of artifact spectra and a means of assessing sample and digestion quality.

  16. Fluorescent prey traps in carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Kurup, R; Johnson, A J; Sankar, S; Hussain, A A; Sathish Kumar, C; Sabulal, B

    2013-05-01

    Carnivorous plants acquire most of their nutrients by capturing ants, insects and other arthropods through their leaf-evolved biological traps. So far, the best-known attractants in carnivorous prey traps are nectar, colour and olfactory cues. Here, fresh prey traps of 14 Nepenthes, five Sarracenia, five Drosera, two Pinguicula species/hybrids, Dionaea muscipula and Utricularia stellaris were scanned at UV 366 nm. Fluorescence emissions of major isolates of fresh Nepenthes khasiana pitcher peristomes were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 366 nm. N. khasiana field pitcher peristomes were masked by its slippery zone extract, and prey capture rates were compared with control pitchers. We found the existence of distinct blue fluorescence emissions at the capture spots of Nepenthes, Sarracenia and Dionaea prey traps at UV 366 nm. These alluring blue emissions gradually developed with the growth of the prey traps and diminished towards their death. On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm. Masking of blue emissions on peristomes drastically reduced prey capture in N. khasiana pitchers. We propose these molecular emissions as a critical factor attracting arthropods and other visitors to these carnivorous traps. Drosera, Pinguicula and Utricularia prey traps showed only red chlorophyll emissions at 366 nm.

  17. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  18. Perfect lens makes a perfect trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaolin; Murakowski, Janusz; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J.; Samluk, Jesse P.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2006-03-01

    In this work, we present for the first time a new and realistic application of the “perfect lens”, namely, electromagnetic traps (or tweezers). We combined two recently developed techniques, 3D negative refraction flat lenses (3DNRFLs) and optical tweezers, and experimentally demonstrated the very unique advantages of using 3DNRFLs for electromagnetic traps. Super-resolution and short focal distance of the flat lens result in a highly focused and strongly convergent beam, which is a key requirement for a stable and accurate electromagnetic trap. The translation symmetry of 3DNRFL provides translation-invariance for imaging, which allows an electromagnetic trap to be translated without moving the lens, and permits a trap array by using multiple sources with a single lens. Electromagnetic trapping was demonstrated using polystyrene particles in suspension, and subsequent to being trapped to a single point, they were then accurately manipulated over a large distance by simple movement of a 3DNRFL-imaged microwave monopole source.

  19. Public acceptance of wildlife trapping in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manfredo, M.J.; Pierce, C.L.; Fulton, D.; Pate, J.; Gill, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    In November 1994, the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) initiated a stakeholder process to develop trapping regulations that would seek to achieve compromise among divergent interests. A telephone survey was conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the Colorado public's acceptance of trapping. A random sample of 900 residents, stratified by geographic region, indicated that the public would vote to ban trapping and that they believed the ban would eliminate a cruel activity and help to preserve endangered wildlife. Most, however, agreed that trapping was acceptable to prevent spread of disease and to protect livestock, but unacceptable on the basis of providing recreation or making money. Beliefs about trapping were found to be rooted in a protection versus use value orientation about wildlife. The regulations subsequently adopted by the CDOW were consistent with survey findings; however, the regulatory process was bypassed by legislative action, giving trapping authority to the Colorado Department of Agriculture. In response, citizen activists succeeded in placing a ballot initiative before voters. In 1996, the ballot initiative passed, banning trapping in Colorado.

  20. A method for trapping breeding adult American Oystercatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, C.P.; Simons, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    We present an efficient and effective method for trapping adult, breeding American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) that minimizes disturbance to nesting birds and the risk of trapping injuries. We used a remote controlled mechanical decoy to lure territorial adults to a leg-hold noose-mat trap. We trapped 25 birds over two seasons and were successful on 54% of our trapping attempts in 2003. We only trapped birds before the breeding season or between nesting attempts to reduce nest-site disturbance.

  1. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  2. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  3. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  4. Modeling of trap-assisted tunneling on performance of charge trapping memory with consideration of trap position and energy level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yun; Zhao, Kai; Du, Gang; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) mechanism is modeled as a two-step physical process for charge trapping memory (CTM). The influence of the TAT mechanism on CTM performance is investigated in consideration of various trap positions and energy levels. For the simulated CTM structure, simulation results indicate that the positions of oxide traps related to the maximum TAT current contribution shift towards the substrate interface and charge storage layer interface during time evolutions in programming and retention operations, respectively. Lower programming voltage and retention operations under higher temperature are found to be more sensitive to tunneling oxide degradation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61404005, 61421005, and 91434201).

  5. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Christian

    Trapped ions constitute a well-isolated small quantum system that offers low decoherence rates and excellent opportunities for quantum control and measurement by laser-induced manipulation of the ions. These properties make trapped ions an attractive system for experimental investigations of quantum information processing. In the following, the basics of storing, manipulating and measuring quantum information encoded in a string of trapped ions will be discussed. Based on these techniques, entanglement can be created and simple quantum protocols like quantum teleportation be realized. This chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of entangling laser-ion interactions for quantum simulations and quantum logic spectroscopy.

  6. Rydberg Excitation of a Single Trapped Ion.

    PubMed

    Feldker, T; Bachor, P; Stappel, M; Kolbe, D; Gerritsma, R; Walz, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2015-10-23

    We demonstrate excitation of a single trapped cold (40)Ca(+) ion to Rydberg levels by laser radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 122 nm. Observed resonances are identified as 3d(2)D(3/2) to 51F, 52F and 3d(2)D(5/2) to 64F. We model the line shape and our results imply a large state-dependent coupling to the trapping potential. Rydberg ions are of great interest for future applications in quantum computing and simulation, in which large dipolar interactions are combined with the superb experimental control offered by Paul traps. PMID:26551109

  7. Trapped antihydrogen in its ground state.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2012-03-16

    Antihydrogen atoms (H¯) are confined in an Ioffe trap for 15-1000 s-long enough to ensure that they reach their ground state. Though reproducibility challenges remain in making large numbers of cold antiprotons (p¯) and positrons (e(+)) interact, 5±1 simultaneously confined ground-state atoms are produced and observed on average, substantially more than previously reported. Increases in the number of simultaneously trapped H¯ are critical if laser cooling of trapped H¯ is to be demonstrated and spectroscopic studies at interesting levels of precision are to be carried out.

  8. Effect of Trapping on Vortices in Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, H.; Shah, H. A.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2008-09-01

    Microscopic trapping of electrons is considered in one- and two-dimensional potential wells (shallow and deep) and its effect on vortex formation is investigated by deriving modified Hasegawa Mima (HM) equations. Inhomogenieties in the number density and magnetic field are taken into account. The modified HM equations are analysed by considering bounce frequencies of the trapped particles. Solitary vortices are obtained via Kortweg deVries (KdV) type of equations and both exact and Sagdeev potential solutions are obtained. In general it is observed that trapping produces stronger non-linearities and this leads to the modification of the original HM equation.

  9. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  10. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  11. Imaging MS Methodology for More Chemical Information in Less Data Acquisition Time Utilizing a Hybrid Linear Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D. C.; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-11-15

    A novel mass spectrometric imaging method is developed to reduce the data acquisition time and provide rich chemical information using a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. In this method, the linear ion trap and orbitrap are used in tandem to reduce the acquisition time by incorporating multiple linear ion trap scans during an orbitrap scan utilizing a spiral raster step plate movement. The data acquisition time was decreased by 43-49% in the current experiment compared to that of orbitrap-only scans; however, 75% or more time could be saved for higher mass resolution and with a higher repetition rate laser. Using this approach, a high spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m was maintained at ion trap imaging, while orbitrap spectra were acquired at a lower spatial resolution, 20-40 {micro}m, all with far less data acquisition time. Furthermore, various MS imaging methods were developed by interspersing MS/MS and MSn ion trap scans during orbitrap scans to provide more analytical information on the sample. This method was applied to differentiate and localize structural isomers of several flavonol glycosides from an Arabidopsis flower petal in which MS/MS, MSn, ion trap, and orbitrap images were all acquired in a single data acquisition.

  12. Landmarks and ant search strategies after interrupted tandem runs.

    PubMed

    Basari, Norasmah; Bruendl, Aisha C; Hemingway, Charlotte E; Roberts, Nicholas W; Sendova-Franks, Ana B; Franks, Nigel R

    2014-03-15

    During a tandem run, a single leading ant recruits a single follower to an important resource such as a new nest. To examine this process, we used a motorized gantry, which has not previously been used in ant studies, to track tandem running ants accurately in a large arena and we compared their performance in the presence of different types of landmark. We interrupted tandem runs by taking away the leader and moved a large distant landmark behind the new nest just at the time of this separation. Our aim was to determine what information followers might have obtained from the incomplete tandem run they had followed, and how they behaved after the tandem run had been interrupted. Our results show that former followers search by using composite random strategies with elements of sub-diffusive and diffusive movements. Furthermore, when we provided more landmarks former followers searched for longer. However, when all landmarks were removed completely from the arena, the ants' search duration lasted up to four times longer. Hence, their search strategy changes in the presence or absence of landmarks. Even after extensive search of this kind, former followers headed back to their old nest but did not return along the path of the tandem run they had followed. The combination of the position to which the large distant landmark behind the new nest was moved and the presence or absence of additional landmarks influenced the orientation of the former followers' paths back to the old nest. We also found that these ants exhibit behavioural lateralization in which they possibly use their right eye more than their left eye to recognize landmarks for navigation. Our results suggest that former follower ants learn landmarks during tandem running and use this information to make strategic decisions. PMID:24198259

  13. The Impact of Genome Triplication on Tandem Gene Evolution in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication (TD) are both important modes of gene expansion. However, how WGD influences tandemly duplicated genes is not well studied. We used Brassica rapa, which has undergone an additional genome triplication (WGT) and shares a common ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Thellungiella parvula, to investigate the impact of genome triplication on tandem gene evolution. We identified 2,137, 1,569, 1,751, and 1,135 tandem gene arrays in B. rapa, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, and T. parvula respectively. Among them, 414 conserved tandem arrays are shared by the three species without WGT, which were also considered as existing in the diploid ancestor of B. rapa. Thus, after genome triplication, B. rapa should have 1,242 tandem arrays according to the 414 conserved tandems. Here, we found 400 out of the 414 tandems had at least one syntenic ortholog in the genome of B. rapa. Furthermore, 294 out of the 400 shared syntenic orthologs maintain tandem arrays (more than one gene for each syntenic hit) in B. rapa. For the 294 tandem arrays, we obtained 426 copies of syntenic paralogous tandems in the triplicated genome of B. rapa. In this study, we demonstrated that tandem arrays in B. rapa were dramatically fractionated after WGT when compared either to non-tandem genes in the B. rapa genome or to the tandem arrays in closely related species that have not experienced a recent whole genome polyploidization event.

  14. The Impact of Genome Triplication on Tandem Gene Evolution in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lu; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication (TD) are both important modes of gene expansion. However, how WGD influences tandemly duplicated genes is not well studied. We used Brassica rapa, which has undergone an additional genome triplication (WGT) and shares a common ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Thellungiella parvula, to investigate the impact of genome triplication on tandem gene evolution. We identified 2,137, 1,569, 1,751, and 1,135 tandem gene arrays in B. rapa, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, and T. parvula respectively. Among them, 414 conserved tandem arrays are shared by the three species without WGT, which were also considered as existing in the diploid ancestor of B. rapa. Thus, after genome triplication, B. rapa should have 1,242 tandem arrays according to the 414 conserved tandems. Here, we found 400 out of the 414 tandems had at least one syntenic ortholog in the genome of B. rapa. Furthermore, 294 out of the 400 shared syntenic orthologs maintain tandem arrays (more than one gene for each syntenic hit) in B. rapa. For the 294 tandem arrays, we obtained 426 copies of syntenic paralogous tandems in the triplicated genome of B. rapa. In this study, we demonstrated that tandem arrays in B. rapa were dramatically fractionated after WGT when compared either to non-tandem genes in the B. rapa genome or to the tandem arrays in closely related species that have not experienced a recent whole genome polyploidization event. PMID:23226149

  15. India in the demographic trap.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P H

    1989-12-01

    Since 1980, India has experienced no further declines in the birth rate while mortality continues to drop. The birth rate has remained constant at 32-33/1000 despite dramatic increases in the proportion of couples protected from unwanted pregnancy from 24% in 1980-81 to 41% in 1986-87. Without a national family planning program, India's birth rate certainly would have increased substantially during this period. Among the social factors that appear to have undone the effects of rising contraceptive prevalence are increases in the proportion of women in the 15-29 year age group, improved maternal nutritional and health status so that fecundability is increasing, and the erosion of traditional customs such as prolonged breastfeeding and remarriage by widows. In terms of economic conditions, there have been no improvements in the 1980s in per capita income that would push India into the 3rd stage of the demographic transition. Of concern is the theory that, when societies become trapped too long in this 2nd stage, economic decline and ecological deterioration occur. At present, foodgrain production has been able to keep pace with population increases, but such production cannot increase indefinitely without soil erosion, deforestation, and other environmental degradations. Moreover, when no more grasslands and forests are available for conversion to cropland, the number of landless households will increase. In fact, the number of landless households has already grown from 15 million in 1961 to 26 million in 1981 and is projected to reach 44 million by the year 2000. Among the implications of landlessless are agrarian conflicts, rural political unrest, low life expectancy, malnutrition, and illiteracy. To avoid the consequences of stagnation in the rate of fertility decline, the Government of India is urged to adopt an aggressive population control effort.

  16. The smart-talk trap.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Sutton, R I

    1999-01-01

    In today's business world, there's no shortage of know-how. When companies get into trouble, their executives have vast resources at their disposal: their own experiences, colleagues' ideas, reams of computer-generated data, thousands of publications, and consultants armed with the latest managerial concepts and tools. But all too often, even with all that knowledge floating around, companies are plagued with an inertia that comes from knowing too much and doing too little--a phenomenon the authors call the knowing-doing gap. The gap often can be traced to a basic human propensity: the willingness to let talk substitute for action. When confronted with a problem, people act as though discussing it, formulating decisions, and hashing out plans for action are the same as actually fixing it. And after researching organizations of all shapes and sizes, the authors concluded that a particular kind of talk is an especially insidious inhibitor of action: "smart talk." People who can engage in such talk generally sound confident and articulate; they can spout facts and may even have interesting ideas. But such people often exhibit the less benign aspects of smart talk as well: They focus on the negative, and they favor unnecessarily complex or abstract language. The former lapses into criticism for criticism's sake; the latter confuses people. Both tendencies can stop action in its tracks. How can you shut the smart-talk trap and close the knowing-doing gap? The authors lay out five methods that successful companies employ in order to translate the right kind of talk into intelligent action. PMID:10387575

  17. Optical trapping of anisotropic nanocylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareil, Paul B.; Sheng, Yunlong

    2013-09-01

    The T-matrix method with the Vector Spherical Wave Function (VSWF) expansions represents some difficulties for computing optical scattering of anisotropic particles. As the divergence of the electric field is nonzero in the anisotropic medium and the VSWFs do not satisfy the anisotropic wave equations one questioned whether the VSWFs are still a suitable basis in the anisotropic medium. We made a systematic and careful review on the vector basis functions and the VSWFs. We found that a field vector in Euclidean space can be decomposed to triplet vectors {L, M, N}, which as non-coplanar. Especially, the vector L is designed to represent non-zero divergence component of the vector solution, so that the VSWF basis is sufficiently general to represent the solutions of the anisotropic wave equation. The mathematical proof can be that when the anisotropic wave equations is solved in the Fourier space, the solution is expanded in the basis of the plan waves with angular spectrum amplitude distributions. The plane waves constitute an orthogonal and complete set for the anisotropic solutions. Furthermore, the plane waves are expanded into the VSWF basis. These two-step expansions are equivalent to the one-step direct expansion of the anisotropic solution to the VSWF basis. We used direct VSWF expansion, along with the point-matching method in the T-matrix, and applied the boundary condition to the normal components displacement field in order to compute the stress and the related forces and torques and to show the mechanism of the optical trap of the anisotropic nano-cylinders.

  18. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  19. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  20. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  1. Stable voltage source for Penning trap experiments.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, David B; Blaum, Klaus; Biesiadzinski, Tomasz P; Zafonte, Steven L; Van Dyck, Robert S

    2009-06-01

    A voltage reference has been developed to bias ring electrodes of two Penning traps between -90 and 0 V. For output voltages near -90 V, the Allan deviation of the system's voltage instability is less than 1 part in 10(8) over all time scales shorter than 10(4) s. For averaging times longer than several seconds, the system's stability is determined almost completely by the noise, drift, and aging of the zener diodes in the array of voltage reference integrated circuits. For shorter averaging times, active filters built into the new system significantly reduce the intrinsic noise of the zener diodes. The system makes it possible to continuously adjust the ring voltages for frequency locking the axial motion in the two Penning traps. By keeping electrical noise highly correlated between the two traps, measurement uncertainty should be reduced for precision experiments such as Penning trap mass spectrometry.

  2. Trapped Ion Optical Clocks at NPL

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H. S.; Barwood, G. P.; Hosaka, K.; Klein, H. A.; Lea, S. N.; Walton, B. R.; Webster, S. A.; Gill, P.; Huang, G.; Stannard, A.

    2006-11-07

    Forbidden transitions in single laser-cooled trapped ions provide highly stable and accurate references for optical frequency standards. This paper describes recent progress on strontium and ytterbium ion optical frequency standards under development at NPL.

  3. An off-axis rotating atom trap.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Moscatelli, F; Oh, E

    2006-06-12

    We present a novel configuration of a magneto-optical trap for cold atoms. The trap is very simple in design, employing only a small permanent magnet and an external Helmholtz bias coil. The trap's principal advantage is that the entire volume of the overlapping laser beams can be used for atom guiding and manipulation. An especially interesting effect is the rotation of the trapped atoms in circular motion as the permanent magnet is rotated. Clouds containing on the order of 2*10(6) atoms are rotated up to 60Hz forming a 5 mm diameter ring. This rotation can potentially be used in studying the behavior of cold atoms in 2-dimensional potential as well as applications for rotational sensors. We also present a classical theoretical model to simulate the experiment.

  4. Scaling the ion trap quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C; Kim, J

    2013-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are standards for quantum information processing, serving as quantum memories, hosts of quantum gates in quantum computers and simulators, and nodes of quantum communication networks. Quantum bits based on trapped ions enjoy a rare combination of attributes: They have exquisite coherence properties, they can be prepared and measured with nearly 100% efficiency, and they are readily entangled with each other through the Coulomb interaction or remote photonic interconnects. The outstanding challenge is the scaling of trapped ions to hundreds or thousands of qubits and beyond, at which scale quantum processors can outperform their classical counterparts in certain applications. We review the latest progress and prospects in that effort, with the promise of advanced architectures and new technologies, such as microfabricated ion traps and integrated photonics.

  5. Antihydrogen Production, Trapping, and Antimatter Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, Joel

    2009-09-16

    Since 2002, experiments at CERN have been producing slow, but untrapped, antihydrogen. The ultimate goal of these experiments is to test CPT and the gravitational interactions of matter and antimatter. Most schemes to perform CPT and gravity tests require trapped antihydrogen, but trapping antihydrogen is much more difficult than merely synthesizing it. The principle problems that must be solved before we can trap are how to cool the antiprotons, and how to keep them cold during the synthesis process. While we have already learned how to cool antiprotons by ten orders of magnitude, we must cool them by four more orders of magnitude, a scale set by the relative size of the potentials of the antimatter plasmas from which the antiatoms are synthesized compared to the antihydrogen trap well depth. In this talk, I will discuss antihydrogen synthesis and some of the techniques we are developing to control the energy of the resultant antihydrogen.

  6. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  7. NASA Provides Assistance to Trapped Chilean Miners

    NASA Video Gallery

    Responding to a request received through the U.S. Department of State from the Chilean minister of health, NASA will provide advice in nutritional and behavioral sciences to assist miners trapped a...

  8. Spatial density oscillations in trapped dipolar condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-Y.; Zhang, J.-N.; Qiu, R.-Z.; Yi, S.; Lu, H.; Pu, H.

    2010-08-15

    We investigated the ground-state wave function and the free expansion of a trapped dipolar condensate. We find that dipolar interaction may induce both biconcave and dumbbell density profiles in the pancake- and cigar-shaped traps, respectively. In the parameter plane of the interaction strengths, the oscillating density profile in a harmonically trapped dipolar condensate occurs only when the interaction parameters fall into certain isolated areas. The relation between the positions of these areas and the trap geometry is explored. When a box potential is used to confine the condensate, spatial density oscillation becomes a generic feature. By studying the free expansion of the condensate with an oscillating density profile, we show that the spatial density oscillation is detectable from the time-of-flight image.

  9. Molten Hydroxide Trapping Process for Radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2003-01-28

    A molten hydroxide trapping process has been considered for removing radioiodine species from off-gas streams whereby iodine is reacted directly with molten hydroxides such as NaOH or KOH. The resulting product is the corresponding iodide, which can be separated by simple cooling of the molten mixture to grow the iodide primary phase once the mixture reaches 70-80 mol% in the iodide component. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that such a chemical process is highly favorable. Experimental testing of the trapping process using molecular iodine showed trapping of up to 96% of the volatile iodine. The trapping efficiency was dependent on operational parameters such as temperature and gas-melt contact efficiency, and higher efficiencies are expected as the process is further developed. While an iodide phase could be effectively isolated by slow cooling of a molten iodide-hydroxide mixture, the persistent appearance of hydroxide indicated that an appreciable solubility of hydroxide occurred in the iodide phase.

  10. Are Your Steam Traps Leaking Money?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Contends that small defects in steam heating systems often go unnoticed, while efficiency drops. Presents guidelines for detecting steam loss through trap orifices and determining how much they are costing. (Author/MLF)

  11. Hydrodynamic trapping of molecules in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Peter; McColl, James; Clarke, Richard W.; Ostanin, Victor P.; Jönsson, Bengt; Klenerman, David

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show how hydrodynamic forces can be used to locally trap molecules in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB). The method uses the hydrodynamic drag forces arising from a flow through a conical pipette with a tip radius of 1–1.5 μm, placed approximately 1 μm above the investigated SLB. This results in a localized forcefield that acts on molecules protruding from the SLB, yielding a hydrodynamic trap with a size approximately given by the size of the pipette tip. We demonstrate this concept by trapping the protein streptavidin, bound to biotin receptors in the SLB. It is also shown how static and kinetic information about the intermolecular interactions in the lipid bilayer can be obtained by relating how the magnitude of the hydrodynamic forces affects the accumulation of protein molecules in the trap. PMID:22699491

  12. Microbead dynamics in optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2013-07-01

    Optical near-field techniques allow one to overcome diffraction by positioning an optical element in close proximity to the surface of interest. In optical trap assisted nanopatterning, this optical element is a microbead optically trapped above the substrate in a liquid environment. Using high-speed microscopy, we show that under certain conditions, the laser pulse creates a gas bubble under the bead and that this bubble displaces the bead before disappearing. The bead then returns to its original position under the action of the scattering force of the optical trap. We measure the bead vertical trajectory and extract its terminal velocity in order to calculate the magnitude of the trapping force exerted on the bead. This work opens the way to a better understanding of the bead-surface interactions under laser irradiation and, therefore, contributes to the development of near-field techniques.

  13. Rapid determination of drugs and semivolatile organics by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Buchanan, M.V.; Guerin, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Direct thermal desorption of analytes into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is being investigated as a technique for the rapid screening of a wide variety of samples for target semivolatile organic compounds. This includes the direct detection of drugs in physiological fluids, semivolatile organic pollutants in water and waste samples, and air pollutants collected on sorbent cartridges. In order to minimize the analysis time, chromatographic separation is not performed on the sample prior to introduction into the ITMS. Instead, selective chemical ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are used achieve the specificity required for the target analytes. Detection limits are typically 10--50 ppb using a 1 uL aliquot of a liquid sample without preconcentration. Sample turn-around time is 2 to 5 minutes and 3 to 5 target analytes can be quantitatively determined simultaneously. 6 figs.

  14. Trapping radioactive {sup 82}Rb in an optical dipole trap and evidence of spontaneous spin polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Feldbaum, D.; Wang, H.; Weinstein, J.; Vieira, D.; Zhao, X.

    2007-11-15

    Optical trapping of selected species of radioactive atoms has great potential in precision measurements for testing fundamental physics such as the electric dipole moment, atomic parity nonconservation, and parity-violating {beta}-decay correlation coefficients. We report on the trapping of 10{sup 4} radioactive {sup 82}Rb atoms (t{sub 1/2}=75 s) with a trap lifetime of {approx}55 s in an optical dipole trap. Transfer efficiency from the magneto-optical trap is {approx}14%. We further report evidence of spontaneous spin polarization of the atoms in optical dipole trap loading. These advancements are an important step toward a new generation of precision nuclear-spin-{beta}-emission direction correlation measurements with polarized {sup 82}Rb atoms.

  15. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal.

  16. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal. PMID:25836555

  17. Inhomogeneous electric field effects in a linear RF quadruple trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melborne, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The exact potential corresponding to confining fields inside a linear rf quadrupole particle trap of finite length is presented. The analytic expressions for the trapping potential is derived by introducing a linear trap employing a relatively simple cylindrical geometry and solving Laplace's equation for the trap electrodes. The finite length of linear traps results in field distortion near the trap ends. An exact analytic determination of the fields is useful because the profile of the trapped ion cloud is highly dependent on the fields confining it. It is shown that near the ends of the trap, the effective potential arising from the rf fields acts to propel particles out of the trap, and further, that the addition of a dc bias generates an inhomogeneous in the trap that influences the particles both perpendicularly to and along the trap's long axis.

  18. Modifications of traps to reduce bycatch of freshwater turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Mortality of freshwater turtles varies among types and deployments of traps. There are few or no losses in hoop or fyke traps set where turtles may reach air, including placement in shallows, addition of floats on traps, and tying traps securely to a stake or to shore. Turtle mortality occurs when traps are set deep, traps are checked at intervals >1 day, and when turtles are captured as bycatch. Devices are available that exclude turtles from traps set for crab or game fish harvest. Slotted gates in front of the trap mouth reduce turtle entry, but small individuals still may be trapped. Incidental take of turtles is preventable by integrating several designs into aquatic traps, such as adding floats to the top of traps so turtles may reach air or an extension tube (chimney, ramp) that creates an escape route.

  19. Test of the Tandem transmission at low terminal voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Blumenthal, D.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    For a planned experiment with {sup 18}F beams at energies below 1 MeV/u the transmission of the Tandem-Linac system was investigated. The energies required in the experiment are typically around 600 keV/u, which for the most abundant charge states for F(4{sup +}) corresponds to terminal voltages between 2-3 MV. We studied the transmission from the source to the tandem accelerator and to the spectrograph in area II with {sup 18}O and {sup 19}F beams using two different approaches. In the first method only the tandem accelerator was used producing a 14-MeV DC {sup 18}O beam. In the second method a pulsed beam was accelerated to 33 MeV with the tandem accelerator followed by deceleration to 14 MeV with the first 9 resonators of ATLAS. The total transmission from ion source to target was in both cases about 10%. Because of the smaller complexity we used the first method for the {sup 18}F experiment. In future runs we are planning to use the electrostatic lens in the terminal of the tandem to improve the overall transmission.

  20. Cooperative cell motility during tandem locomotion of amoeboid cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastounis, Effie; Álvarez-González, Begoña; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Firtel, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Streams of migratory cells are initiated by the formation of tandem pairs of cells connected head to tail to which other cells subsequently adhere. The mechanisms regulating the transition from single to streaming cell migration remain elusive, although several molecules have been suggested to be involved. In this work, we investigate the mechanics of the locomotion of Dictyostelium tandem pairs by analyzing the spatiotemporal evolution of their traction adhesions (TAs). We find that in migrating wild-type tandem pairs, each cell exerts traction forces on stationary sites (∼80% of the time), and the trailing cell reuses the location of the TAs of the leading cell. Both leading and trailing cells form contractile dipoles and synchronize the formation of new frontal TAs with ∼54-s time delay. Cells not expressing the lectin discoidin I or moving on discoidin I–coated substrata form fewer tandems, but the trailing cell still reuses the locations of the TAs of the leading cell, suggesting that discoidin I is not responsible for a possible chemically driven synchronization process. The migration dynamics of the tandems indicate that their TAs’ reuse results from the mechanical synchronization of the leading and trailing cells’ protrusions and retractions (motility cycles) aided by the cell–cell adhesions. PMID:26912787

  1. The Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex of LNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.

    2013-07-18

    Heavy ion beams are delivered at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro by the accelerator complex Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE. The Tandem XTU is a Van de Graaff accelerator normally operated at terminal voltages of up to about 15 MV. The Tandem accelerator can be operated in stand-alone mode or as an injector for the linac booster ALPI. The linear accelerator ALPI is built of superconducting resonant cavities and consists of a low-beta branch, particularly important for the acceleration of the heavier mass ions, a medium-beta branch, and a high-beta branch. ALPI can be operated also with the PIAVE injector that consists of a superconducting linac and an ECR source. The PIAVE source was mainly used for the acceleration of intense noble gas beams but most recently also a first metallic beam was delivered to the users. The accelerator complex delivers beams of ions from protons to gold in three experimental areas on 11 different beam lines. A rich scientific activity is ongoing at the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex, beam time being shared between nuclear physics research and applied and interdisciplinary physics research. An overview of the present status and perspectives of the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE complex and its physics program is given in the present paper.

  2. Design of a new tandem wings hybrid airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Ye, ZhengYin; Gao, Chao

    2012-10-01

    It is scientifically important science value and engineering promising to develop the buoyancy-lift integrated hybrid airship for high attitude platform. Through the numerical method, a new tandem wings hybrid airship with both higher utility value and economy efficiency was obtained and its total performance and technical parameters were analyzed in detail. In order to further improve the lift-drag characteristics, we implemented the optimization design for aerodynamic configuration of tandem wings hybrid airship via the response surface method. The results indicate that the tandem wings hybrid airship has considerable volume efficiency and higher aerodynamic characteristics. After optimization, the lift-drag ratio of this hybrid airship was increased by 6.08%. In a given gross lift condition, tandem wings hybrid airship may provide more payload and specific productivity. Furthermore, the size of tandem airship is smaller so the demand for skin flexible materials can be reduced. Results of this study could serve as a new approach to designing buoyancy-lifting integrated hybrid airship.

  3. Dynamic landscape of tandem 3' UTRs during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Sun, Yu; Fu, Yonggui; Li, Mengzhen; Huang, Guangrui; Zhang, Chenxu; Liang, Jiahui; Huang, Shengfeng; Shen, Gaoyang; Yuan, Shaochun; Chen, Liangfu; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2012-10-01

    Tandem 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), produced by alternative polyadenylation (APA) in the terminal exon of a gene, could have critical roles in regulating gene networks. Here we profiled tandem poly(A) events on a genome-wide scale during the embryonic development of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using a recently developed SAPAS method. We showed that 43% of the expressed protein-coding genes have tandem 3' UTRs. The average 3' UTR length follows a V-shaped dynamic pattern during early embryogenesis, in which the 3' UTRs are first shortened at zygotic genome activation, and then quickly lengthened during gastrulation. Over 4000 genes are found to switch tandem APA sites, and the distinct functional roles of these genes are indicated by Gene Ontology analysis. Three families of cis-elements, including miR-430 seed, U-rich element, and canonical poly(A) signal, are enriched in 3' UTR-shortened/lengthened genes in a stage-specific manner, suggesting temporal regulation coordinated by APA and trans-acting factors. Our results highlight the regulatory role of tandem 3' UTR control in early embryogenesis and suggest that APA may represent a new epigenetic paradigm of physiological regulations.

  4. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline Thin Film Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kranz, Lukas; Abate, Antonio; Feurer, Thomas; Fu, Fan; Avancini, Enrico; Löckinger, Johannes; Reinhard, Patrick; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2015-07-16

    A promising way to enhance the efficiency of CIGS solar cells is by combining them with perovskite solar cells in tandem devices. However, so far, such tandem devices had limited efficiency due to challenges in developing NIR-transparent perovskite top cells, which allow photons with energy below the perovskite band gap to be transmitted to the bottom cell. Here, a process for the fabrication of NIR-transparent perovskite solar cells is presented, which enables power conversion efficiencies up to 12.1% combined with an average sub-band gap transmission of 71% for photons with wavelength between 800 and 1000 nm. The combination of a NIR-transparent perovskite top cell with a CIGS bottom cell enabled a tandem device with 19.5% efficiency, which is the highest reported efficiency for a polycrystalline thin film tandem solar cell. Future developments of perovskite/CIGS tandem devices are discussed and prospects for devices with efficiency toward and above 27% are given.

  5. Progress Towards Laser Cooling and Trapping Gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Simien, Clayton

    2016-05-01

    Lanthanide elements are of interest because of their potential for investigating next generation optical clock transitions, novel non-S ground state ultracold collisions, and the physics of quantum degenerate dipolar gases. We present our progress towards laser cooling and trapping atomic Gadolinium (Gd). A magneto-optical trap is the first step towards precision measurements, ultracold collision studies, and for probing dipolar physics of Gd. The design, construction, and performance of the apparatus will be presented.

  6. On biodiversity conservation and poverty traps

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christopher B.; Travis, Alexander J.; Dasgupta, Partha

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a special feature on biodiversity conservation and poverty traps. We define and explain the core concepts and then identify four distinct classes of mechanisms that define important interlinkages between biodiversity and poverty. The multiplicity of candidate mechanisms underscores a major challenge in designing policy appropriate across settings. This framework is then used to introduce the ensuing set of papers, which empirically explore these various mechanisms linking poverty traps and biodiversity conservation. PMID:21873176

  7. Nanostructured tapered optical fibers for paticle trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Mark; Truong, Viet Giang; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2015-05-01

    Optical micro- and nanofibers have recently gained popularity as tools in quantum engineering using laser-cooled, neutral atoms. In particular, atoms can be trapped around such optical fibers, and photons coupled into the fibers from the surrounding atoms could be used to transfer quantum state information within the system. It has also been demonstrated that such fibers can be used to manipulate and trap silica and polystyrene particles in the 1-3 μm range. We recently proposed using a focused ion beam nanostructured tapered optical fiber for improved atom trapping geometries1. Here, we present details on the design and fabrication of these nanostructured optical fibers and their integration into particle trapping platforms for the demonstration of submicron particle trapping. The optical fibers are tapered to approximately 1-2 μm waist diameters, using a custom-built, heat-and-pull fiber rig, prior to processing using a focused ion beam. Slots of about 300 nm in width and 10-20 μm in length are milled right though the waist regions of the tapered optical fibers. Details on the fabrication steeps necessary to ensure high optical transmission though the fiber post processing are included. Fiber transmissions of over 80% over a broad range of wavelengths, in the 700-11100 nm range, are attainable. We also present simulation results on the impact of varying the slot parameters on the trap depths achievable and milling multiple traps within a single tapered fiber. This work demonstrates even further the functionality of optical micro- and nanofibers as trapping devices across a range of regimes.

  8. Two atoms in an anisotropic harmonic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Z.; Calarco, T.

    2005-05-15

    We consider the system of two interacting atoms confined in axially symmetric harmonic trap. Within the pseudopotential approximation, we solve the Schroedinger equation exactly, discussing the limits of quasi-one-and quasi-two-dimensional geometries. Finally, we discuss the application of an energy-dependent pseudopotential, which allows us to extend the validity of our results to the case of tight traps and large scattering lengths.

  9. The ALPHA Experiment: A Cold Antihydrogen Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, W.; Chapman, S.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Gomberoff, K.; Wurtele, J.; Boston, A.; Chartier, M.; Nolan, P.; Page, R.D.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Madsen, N.; Cesar, C.L.; Miranda, D.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M.; Joergensen, L.V.; Telle, H.H.; Werf, D.P. van der

    2005-10-26

    The ALPHA experiment aims to trap antihydrogen as the next crucial step towards a precise CPT test, by a spectroscopic comparison of antihydrogen with hydrogen. The experiment will retain the salient techniques developed by the ATHENA collaboration during the previous phase of antihydrogen experiments at the antiproton decelerator (AD) at CERN. The collaboration has identified the key problems in adding a neutral antiatom trap to the previously developed experimental configuration. The solutions identified by ALPHA are described in this paper.

  10. On the Penning trap coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, M.; Lindroth, E.

    2009-07-01

    Recently, a class of coherent states of a particle in a Penning trap was derived by Fernández and Velázquez (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 085304). By means of the Wigner function and density matrix associated with these states, we show that they are fully consistent with Morikawa's definition of the decoherence degree and hence they provide a possibility to directly access the decoherence process in a Penning trap.

  11. Direct pulsed laser interference texturing for light trapping in a-Si:H/μc-Si:H tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, S.; Neubert, S.; Ruske, F.; Stannowski, B.; Fink, F.; Schlatmann, R.

    2014-05-01

    We present results on direct pulsed laser interference texturing for the fabrication of diffraction gratings in ZnO:Al layers. Micro gratings of 20 micron diameter with a groove period of 860 nm have been written using single pulses of a 355 nm picosecond laser using a home-built two-beam interference setup. The groove depth depends on the local laser intensity, and reaches up to 120 nm. At too high pulse energies, the grooves vanish due to surface melting of the ZnO. The fast scanning stage and the high repetition rate laser of a laser scribe system have been used to write grating textures of several cm2 in ZnO:Al films with a surface coverage of about 80%. A typical laser written grating texture in a ZnO:Al film showed a haze value of about 9% at 700nm. The total transmission of the film was not lowered compared to the film before texturing, while the sheet resistance increased moderately by 15%. A-Si:H/μc-Si:H solar cells with laser textured ZnO:Al front contact layers so far reach an efficiency of 10% and current densities of 11.0 mA/cm2, and 11.2 mA/cm2 for top and bottom cell, respectively. This is an increase of 16% for the bottom cell current as compared to reference cells on planar ZnO:Al. The voltage of the laser textured cells is not reduced compared to the reference cell when slightly overlapping laser pulses of reduced pulse energy are applied. This method allows to write textures in ZnO:Al films that e.g. have been deposited with strongly varying deposition conditions, or cannot be texture etched in HCl. The method can be improved further by using 2D periodic patterns and optimizing the groove pitch, and may be applicable also to other solar cell technologies.

  12. Cellular folate vitamer distribution during and after correction of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case for the methylfolate trap.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Y M; Smith, D E C; Kok, R M; Teerlink, T; Swinkels, D W; Stehouwer, C D A; Jakobs, C

    2006-03-01

    Haematological sequellae of vitamin B12 deficiency are attributed to disturbed DNA synthesis, but vitamin B12 itself plays no role in DNA biosynthesis. A proposed explanation for this is the methylfolate trap hypothesis. This hypothesis states that B12 deficiency impairs overall folate metabolism because 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5MTHF) becomes metabolically trapped. This trap results from the fact that 5MTHF can neither be metabolised via the methionine synthase pathway, nor can it be reconverted to its precursor, methylenetetrahydrofolate. Other manifestations of the methylfolate trap include cellular folate loss because of shorter 5MTHF polyglutamate chains and global hypomethylation. The methylfolate trap has never been demonstrated in humans. We describe a patient with B12 deficiency who was homozygous for the common methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. We analysed red blood cell (RBC) folate vitamers and global DNA methylation by liquid chromatography (LC) in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, and 5MTHF polyglutamate length by LC-electrochemical detection. Compared to post-B12 supplementation values, homocysteine was higher (52.9 micromol/l vs. 16.8 micromol/l), RBC folate was lower (268.92 nmol/l vs. 501.2 nmol/l), the 5MTHF fraction of RBC folate was much higher (94.5% vs. 67.4%), polyglutamate chain length was shorter (more tetra- and pentaglutamates), and global DNA methylation was 22% lower. This is the first time that virtually all features of the methylfolate trap hypothesis have been demonstrated in a human with vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:16445837

  13. Trapped fermionic clouds distorted from the trap shape due to many-body effects.

    PubMed

    Haque, Masudul; Stoof, H T C

    2007-06-29

    We present a general approach for describing trapped Fermi gases, when the cloud shape is distorted with respect to the trap shape. Our approach provides a consistent way to explore physics beyond the local density approximation, if this is necessary due to the distortion. We illustrate this by analyzing in detail experimentally observed distortions in a trapped imbalanced Fermi mixture. In particular, we demonstrate in that case dramatic deviations from ellipsoidal cloud shapes arising from the competition between surface and bulk energies.

  14. Ultra-fast underwater suction traps.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Weisskopf, Carmen; Poppinga, Simon; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas; Joyeux, Marc; Quilliet, Catherine; Marmottant, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Carnivorous aquatic Utricularia species catch small prey animals using millimetre-sized underwater suction traps, which have fascinated scientists since Darwin's early work on carnivorous plants. Suction takes place after mechanical triggering and is owing to a release of stored elastic energy in the trap body accompanied by a very fast opening and closing of a trapdoor, which otherwise closes the trap entrance watertight. The exceptional trapping speed--far above human visual perception--impeded profound investigations until now. Using high-speed video imaging and special microscopy techniques, we obtained fully time-resolved recordings of the door movement. We found that this unique trapping mechanism conducts suction in less than a millisecond and therefore ranks among the fastest plant movements known. Fluid acceleration reaches very high values, leaving little chance for prey animals to escape. We discovered that the door deformation is morphologically predetermined, and actually performs a buckling/unbuckling process, including a complete trapdoor curvature inversion. This process, which we predict using dynamical simulations and simple theoretical models, is highly reproducible: the traps are autonomously repetitive as they fire spontaneously after 5-20 h and reset actively to their ready-to-catch condition.

  15. The Electronic McPhail Trap

    PubMed Central

    Potamitis, Ilyas; Rigakis, Iraklis; Fysarakis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Certain insects affect cultivations in a detrimental way. A notable case is the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae (Rossi)), that in Europe alone causes billions of euros in crop-loss/per year. Pests can be controlled with aerial and ground bait pesticide sprays, the efficiency of which depends on knowing the time and location of insect infestations as early as possible. The inspection of traps is currently carried out manually. Automatic monitoring traps can enhance efficient monitoring of flying pests by identifying and counting targeted pests as they enter the trap. This work deals with the hardware setup of an insect trap with an embedded optoelectronic sensor that automatically records insects as they fly in the trap. The sensor responsible for detecting the insect is an array of phototransistors receiving light from an infrared LED. The wing-beat recording is based on the interruption of the emitted light due to the partial occlusion from insect's wings as they fly in the trap. We show that the recordings are of high quality paving the way for automatic recognition and transmission of insect detections from the field to a smartphone. This work emphasizes the hardware implementation of the sensor and the detection/counting module giving all necessary implementation details needed to construct it. PMID:25429412

  16. The electronic McPhail trap.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Ilyas; Rigakis, Iraklis; Fysarakis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Certain insects affect cultivations in a detrimental way. A notable case is the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae (Rossi)), that in Europe alone causes billions of euros in crop-loss/per year. Pests can be controlled with aerial and ground bait pesticide sprays, the efficiency of which depends on knowing the time and location of insect infestations as early as possible. The inspection of traps is currently carried out manually. Automatic monitoring traps can enhance efficient monitoring of flying pests by identifying and counting targeted pests as they enter the trap. This work deals with the hardware setup of an insect trap with an embedded optoelectronic sensor that automatically records insects as they fly in the trap. The sensor responsible for detecting the insect is an array of phototransistors receiving light from an infrared LED. The wing-beat recording is based on the interruption of the emitted light due to the partial occlusion from insect's wings as they fly in the trap. We show that the recordings are of high quality paving the way for automatic recognition and transmission of insect detections from the field to a smartphone. This work emphasizes the hardware implementation of the sensor and the detection/counting module giving all necessary implementation details needed to construct it. PMID:25429412

  17. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  18. Isotopologue Distributions of Peptide Product Ions by Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Quantitation of Low Levels of Deuterium Incorporation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Anderson, David R.; Jia, Minghong; Previs, Stephen; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated molecular peptide ions and their product ions generated by tandem mass spectrometry appear as isotopologue clusters due to the natural isotopic variations of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. Quantitation of the isotopic composition of peptides can be employed in experiments involving isotope effects, isotope exchange, isotopic labeling by chemical reactions, and studies of metabolism by stable isotope incorporation. Both ion trap and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry are shown to be capable of determining the isotopic composition of peptide product ions obtained by tandem mass spectrometry with both precision and accuracy. Tandem mass spectra obtained in profile-mode of clusters of isotopologue ions are fit by non-linear least squares to a series of Gaussian peaks (described in the accompanying manuscript) which quantify the Mn/M0 values which define the isotopologue distribution (ID). To determine the isotopic composition of product ions from their ID, a new algorithm that predicts the Mn/M0 ratios is developed which obviates the need to determine the intensity of all of the ions of an ID. Consequently a precise and accurate determination of the isotopic composition a product ion may be obtained from only the initial values of the ID, however the entire isotopologue cluster must be isolated prior to fragmentation. Following optimization of the molecular ion isolation width, fragmentation energy and detector sensitivity, the presence of isotopic excess (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) is readily determined within 1%. The ability to determine the isotopic composition of sequential product ions permits the isotopic composition of individual amino acid residues in the precursor ion to be determined. PMID:17559791

  19. Time-of-flights and traps: from the Histone Code to Mars*

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Becker, Luann; Evans-Nguyen, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Two very different analytical instruments are featured in this perspective paper on mass spectrometer design and development. The first instrument, based upon the curved-field reflectron developed in the Johns Hopkins Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, is a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer whose performance and practicality are illustrated by applications to a series of research projects addressing the acetylation, deacetylation and ADP-ribosylation of histone proteins. The chemical derivatization of lysine-rich, hyperacetylated histones as their deuteroacetylated analogs enables one to obtain an accurate quantitative assessment of the extent of acetylation at each site. Chemical acetylation of histone mixtures is also used to determine the lysine targets of sirtuins, an important class of histone deacetylases (HDACs), by replacing the deacetylated residues with biotin. Histone deacetylation by sirtuins requires the co-factor NAD+, as does the attachment of ADP-ribose. The second instrument, a low voltage and low power ion trap mass spectrometer known as the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA), is a prototype for an instrument expected to be launched in 2018. Like the tandem mass spectrometer, it is also expected to have applicability to environmental and biological analyses and, ultimately, to clinical care. PMID:20530839

  20. Screening volatile organics by direct sampling ion trap and glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Hurst, G.B.; Thompson, C.V.; Buchanan, M.V.; Guerin, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Two different types of direct sampling mass spectrometers are currently being evaluated in our laboratory for use as rapid screening tools for volatile organics in a wide range of environmental matrices. These include a commercially available ITMS ion trap mass spectrometer and a specially designed tandem source glow discharge quadrupole mass spectrometer. Both of these instruments are equipped with versatile sampling interfaces which enable direct monitoring of volatile organics at part-per-billion (ppb) levels in air, water, and soil samples. Direct sampling mass spectrometry does not utilize chromatographic or other separation steps prior to admission of samples into the analyzer. Instead, individual compounds are measured using one or more of the following methods: spectral subtraction, selective chemical ionization, and tandem mass spectroscopy (MS/MS). For air monitoring applications, an active sniffer'' probe is used to achieve instantaneous response. Water and soil samples are analyzed by means of high speed direct purge into the mass spectrometer. Both instruments provide a range of ionization options for added selectivity and the ITMS can also provide high efficiency collision induced dissociation MS/MS for target compound analysis. Detection limits and response factors have been determined for a large number volatile organics in air, water, and number of different soil types. 4 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A Laplace pressure based microfluidic trap for passive droplet trapping and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Simon, Melinda G; Lin, Robert; Fisher, Jeffrey S; Lee, Abraham P

    2012-03-01

    Here, we present a microfluidic droplet trap that takes advantage of the net Laplace pressure force generated when a droplet is differentially constricted. Mathematical simulations were first used to understand the working range of the component; followed by finite element modeling using the CFD software package to further characterize the behavior of the system. Controlled release of the trapped droplets is also demonstrated through both a mechanical method and a chemical method that manipulates the total pressure exerted on the trapped droplet. The unique design of this trapping device also provides the capability for selection of a single droplet from a train, as well as droplet fusion.

  2. Measurement of the trap parameters of a magneto-optical trap by external periodic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Geol; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Kim, Yonghee; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-03-15

    We report a simple method for trap parameter measurement by realizing forced harmonic oscillation in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Through the resonance curve of the vibrational amplitude of the harmonic oscillation on the driving frequency of the laser intensity, we measured the damping coefficient and trap frequency of trapped atoms in the MOT under various conditions and compared them with those obtained from the parametric resonance. In particular, we report a significant effect of a transverse laser on one-dimensional harmonic oscillation. This effect is expected to explain the discrepancies in other previous experiments between the experimental and theoretical results.

  3. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  4. The query execution engine in Tandem`s new ServerWare SQL product

    SciTech Connect

    Celis, P.; Zeller, H.

    1996-12-31

    Tandem has re-written its SQL compiler and its query execution engine into a new product that will be available on multiple operating systems. The new product uses a novel query execution engine and we will highlight the unique aspects of the new engine. ServerWare SQL uses a data flow and scheduler driven task model to execute queries. Tasks communicate either via in-memory queues or via interprocess communication. Partitioned, pipelined, or independent operations are executed in parallel. By adding new task types the model can be easily extended. Parallelism in a distributed memory environment is implemented as a special {open_quotes}Exchange{close_quotes} task type, as in the Volcano research prototype. Scheduling and load balancing are performed by separate scheduler tasks.

  5. Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Perry

    2009-04-30

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than

  6. Dosimetric Comparison of Tandem and Ovoids vs. Tandem and Ring for Intracavitary Gynecologic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Daphne Menhel, Janna; Rabin, Tanya; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Symon, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated dosimetric differences in tandem and ovoid (TO) and tandem and ring (TR) gynecologic brachytherapy applicators. Seventeen patients with cervical cancer (Stages II-IV) receiving 3 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications (both TO and TR) were studied. Patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scans with contrast in bladder, and were prescribed 8 Gy to ICRU points A, with additional optimization goals of maintaining the pear-shaped dose distribution and minimizing bladder and rectum doses. Bladder and rectum point doses, mean, and maximum doses were calculated. Total treatment time and volumes treated to 95%, 85%, 50%, and 20% or the prescription dose were compared. There were no significant differences between TO and TR applicators in doses to prescription points or critical organs. However, there were significant differences (p < 0.001) between the applicators in treated volumes and total treatment time. The TO treated larger volumes over a longer time. Within each patient, when the applicators were compared, treated volumes were also found to be significantly different (p < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2}). Our results demonstrate that the 2 applicators, while delivering the prescribed dose to points A and keeping critical organ doses below tolerance, treat significantly different volumes. It is unclear if this difference is clinically meaningful. TO applicators may be treating surrounding healthy tissue unnecessarily, or TR applicators may be underdosing tumor tissue. Further investigation with appropriate imaging modalities is required for accurate delineation of target volumes. Clearly, the TO and TR are not identical, and should not be used interchangeably without further study.

  7. High efficiency all-polymer tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianyu; Gu, Jinan; Shi, Guozheng; Sun, Jianxia; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Ma, Wanli

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we have reported for the first time an efficient all-polymer tandem cell using identical sub-cells based on P2F-DO:N2200. A high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.70% was achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for all polymer solar cells and 43% larger than the PCE of single junction cell. The largely improved device performance can be mainly attributed to the enhanced absorption of tandem cell. Meanwhile, the carrier collection in device remains efficient by optimizing the recombination layer and sub-cell film thickness. Thus tandem structure can become an easy approach to effectively boost the performance of current all polymer solar cells.

  8. Tandem photovoltaic solar cells and increased solar energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loferski, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tandem photovoltaic cells, as proposed by Jackson (1955) to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion, involve the construction of a system of stacked p/n homojunction photovoltaic cells composed of different semiconductors. It had been pointed out by critics, however, that the total power which could be extracted from the cells in the stack placed side by side was substantially greater than the power obtained from the stacked cells. A reexamination of the tandem cell concept in view of the development of the past few years is conducted. It is concluded that the use of tandem cell systems in flat plate collectors, as originally envisioned by Jackson, may yet become feasible as a result of the development of economically acceptable solar cells for large scale terrestrial power generation.

  9. mreps: efficient and flexible detection of tandem repeats in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kolpakov, Roman; Bana, Ghizlane; Kucherov, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The presence of repeated sequences is a fundamental feature of genomes. Tandemly repeated DNA appears in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, it is associated with various regulatory mechanisms and plays an important role in genomic fingerprinting. In this paper, we describe mreps, a powerful software tool for a fast identification of tandemly repeated structures in DNA sequences. mreps is able to identify all types of tandem repeats within a single run on a whole genomic sequence. It has a resolution parameter that allows the program to identify ‘fuzzy’ repeats. We introduce main algorithmic solutions behind mreps, describe its usage, give some execution time benchmarks and present several case studies to illustrate its capabilities. The mreps web interface is accessible through http://www.loria.fr/mreps/. PMID:12824391

  10. High efficiency all-polymer tandem solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianyu; Gu, Jinan; Shi, Guozheng; Sun, Jianxia; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Ma, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have reported for the first time an efficient all-polymer tandem cell using identical sub-cells based on P2F-DO:N2200. A high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.70% was achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for all polymer solar cells and 43% larger than the PCE of single junction cell. The largely improved device performance can be mainly attributed to the enhanced absorption of tandem cell. Meanwhile, the carrier collection in device remains efficient by optimizing the recombination layer and sub-cell film thickness. Thus tandem structure can become an easy approach to effectively boost the performance of current all polymer solar cells. PMID:27226354

  11. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  12. Overall Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting using Tandem Cell under Simulated Sunlight.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    A stand-alone photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting system driven only by sunlight was demonstrated with a tandem-scheme of Pt/CdS/CuGa3 Se5 /(Ag,Cu)GaSe2 photocathode and NiOOH/FeOOH/Mo:BiVO4 photoanode in a neutral phosphate buffer solution as an electrolyte. The as-prepared semi-transparent Mo:BiVO4 layer allows sunlight to pass through the top photoanode and reach the bottom photocathode. Consequently, the tandem cell showed stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen evolution with a solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency of 0.67 % over 2 h without degradation. The stability and STH efficiency are the highest among similar configuration of PEC tandem cells.

  13. High efficiency all-polymer tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianyu; Gu, Jinan; Shi, Guozheng; Sun, Jianxia; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Ma, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have reported for the first time an efficient all-polymer tandem cell using identical sub-cells based on P2F-DO:N2200. A high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.70% was achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for all polymer solar cells and 43% larger than the PCE of single junction cell. The largely improved device performance can be mainly attributed to the enhanced absorption of tandem cell. Meanwhile, the carrier collection in device remains efficient by optimizing the recombination layer and sub-cell film thickness. Thus tandem structure can become an easy approach to effectively boost the performance of current all polymer solar cells. PMID:27226354

  14. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  15. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  16. On-chip particle trapping and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Kaelyn Danielle

    The ability to control and manipulate the world around us is human nature. Humans and our ancestors have used tools for millions of years. Only in recent years have we been able to control objects at such small levels. In order to understand the world around us it is frequently necessary to interact with the biological world. Optical trapping and manipulation offer a non-invasive way to move, sort and interact with particles and cells to see how they react to the world around them. Optical tweezers are ideal in their abilities but they require large, non-portable, and expensive setups limiting how and where we can use them. A cheap portable platform is required in order to have optical manipulation reach its full potential. On-chip technology offers a great solution to this challenge. We focused on the Liquid-Core Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguide (liquid-core ARROW) for our work. The ARROW is an ideal platform, which has anti-resonant layers which allow light to be guided in liquids, allowing for particles to easily be manipulated. It is manufactured using standard silicon manufacturing techniques making it easy to produce. The planner design makes it easy to integrate with other technologies. Initially I worked to improve the ARROW chip by reducing the intersection losses and by reducing the fluorescence and background on the ARROW chip. The ARROW chip has already been used to trap and push particles along its channel but here I introduce several new methods of particle trapping and manipulation on the ARROW chip. Traditional two beam traps use two counter propagating beams. A trapping scheme that uses two orthogonal beams which counter to first instinct allow for trapping at their intersection is introduced. This scheme is thoroughly predicted and analyzed using realistic conditions. Simulations of this method were done using a program which looks at both the fluidics and optical sources to model complex situations. These simulations were also used to

  17. The innervation of tandem muscle spindles in the cat neck.

    PubMed

    Richmond, F J; Bakker, G J; Bakker, D A; Stacey, M J

    1986-03-22

    Patterns of innervation were examined in tandem muscle spindles teased from silver-stained muscles of the cat neck. Each tandem spindle was composed of two or more encapsulated receptors linked in series by a shared bag2 fiber. In most tandem spindles, two different types of encapsulation were identified according to differences in their intrafusal fiber content. One type, the b1b2c unit, contained typical bag1, bag2, and chain fibers and was structurally similar to single spindles described in other cat muscles. Each b1b2c unit contained a single primary sensory ending and 1-6 secondary endings. Fusimotor innervation was supplied by many axons. Some fusimotor axons ended in trail ramifications on bag2 and chain fibers, others ended in plates on the bag1 or long chain fiber. The other type of tandem encapsulation, the b2c unit, had only bag2 and chain fibers in its intrafusal fiber bundle. The b2c unit was usually supplied by only one sensory axon that ended on the nucleated part of the intrafusal fiber bundle. This single ending had a more variable terminal morphology than the primary ending in b1b2c units. A few b2c units (3/49) were also supplied by a secondary ending. The fusimotor innervation of the b2c unit was relatively simple. A single pole of the b2c unit was usually supplied by only one to three axons, all ending in trail ramifications. No plate endings were found in b2c units. These morphological specializations suggest that b1b2c and b2c units in tandem spindles differ in both their transductive and fusimotor mechanisms. Thus, the tandem spindle is a specialized structure that may provide additional proprioceptive information beyond that available from single muscle spindles.

  18. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in...