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Sample records for chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

  1. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-05

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min.

  2. Classification of natural resins by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rhourrhi-Frih, B; West, C; Pasquier, L; André, P; Chaimbault, P; Lafosse, M

    2012-09-21

    Twenty-six resins from six botanical sources belonging to the class Magnoliopsida were compared based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data. The extracts were analysed by GC after silylation and by reversed phase LC combined with atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) mass spectrometry. The chromatograms were re-organized in data matrices, where each sample was represented by a single column comprising 2755 observations (intensity, time, m/z) in GC-MS and 360 observations in LC-MS. A simple comparison of resin fingerprints was attempted by organizing data according to a three dimensional bubble chart (retention time against m/z where each point was a bubble which size represented the ion intensity) where it is possible to easily superimpose the fingerprints. Thus the common and different species can be easily observed enabling to classify the resins. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on characteristics of GC-MS and LC-MS profiles affords a complete description of the classes of the resins and shows that 26 resins are divided into five main clusters Commiphora mukul, Daniella oliveri, Gardenia gummifera, Canarium madagascariensis, Boswellia dalzielii and Boswellia serrata, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed method has been applied to three other resinous samples from the Burseraceae family to evaluate their alteration state.

  3. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  4. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments.

  5. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  6. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  7. Analysis of estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal serum and plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Bottalico, Lisa; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A

    2015-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry-based methodology has evolved to the point where accurate analyses of trace levels of estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal serum and plasma can be accomplished with high precision and accuracy. A suite of derivatization procedures has been developed, which together with modern mass spectrometry instrumentation provide investigators with robust and sensitive methodology. Pre-ionized derivatives are proving to be useful as they are not subject to suppression of the electrospray signal. Postmenopausal women with elevated plasma or serum estrogens are thought to be at increased risk for breast and endometrial cancer. Therefore, significant advances in risk assessment should be possible now that reliable methodology is available. It is also possible to conduct analyses of multiple estrogens in plasma or serum. Laboratories that are currently employing liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology can now readily implement this strategy. This will help conserve important plasma and serum samples available in Biobanks, as it will be possible to conduct high sensitivity analyses using low initial sample volumes. Reported levels of both conjugated and non-conjugated estrogen metabolites are close to the limits of sensitivity of many assays to date, urging caution in the interpretation of these low values. The analysis of serum androgen precursors in postmenopausal women has not been conducted routinely in the past using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology. Integration of serum androgen levels into the panel of metabolites analyzed could provide additional information for assessing cancer risk and should be included in the future.

  8. Verification of chemical composition of commercially available propolis extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Konończuk, Joanna; Teul, Joanna; Drągowski, Paweł; Pawlak-Morka, Renata; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    Propolis is a resin that is collected by honeybees from various plant sources. Due to its pharmacological properties, it is used in commercial production of nutritional supplements in pharmaceutical industry. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied for quality control analysis of the three commercial specimens containing aqueous-alcoholic extracts of bee propolis. More than 230 constituents were detected in analyzed products, including flavonoids, chalcones, cinnamic acids and their esters, phenylpropenoid glycerides, and phenylpropenoid sesquiterpenoids. An allergenic benzyl cinnamate ester was also identified in all tested samples. This analytical method allows to evaluate biological activity and potential allergenic components of bee glue simultaneously. Studies on chemical composition of propolis samples may provide new approach to quality and safety control analysis in production of propolis supplementary specimens.

  9. High-speed, low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for essential oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Samuel D H; Shellie, Robert A

    2008-07-18

    Analysis of parsley and fennel essential oils was performed by using low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The low-pressure instrument configuration was achieved by fitting a GC-MS instrument with a 530microm I.D. capillary column and an appropriate capillary restrictor at the inlet of the column. Comparison of the performance of the low-pressure GC-MS setup was made with fast GC-MS using a narrow-bore capillary column. By comparing the two approaches side-by-side the benefits of low-pressure GC-MS for characterisation of moderately complex essential oils comprising less than 50 detectable components can be fully appreciated. Although efficiency is sacrificed, the improved sample capacity of the 530microm I.D. column leads to higher peak intensities and in-turn better mass spectral library matching thus providing highly satisfactory results.

  10. Analysis of beechwood creosote by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Baba, T

    1989-12-01

    Compounds in beechwood creosote were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 22 major constituents were identified. Of these, 19 were phenolic compounds, i. e., guaiacol, phenol, two cresol isomers, four methylguaiacol (creosol) isomers, six xylenol isomers, two trimethylphenol isomers, 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-ethyl-5-methylguaiacol, and 4-propylguaiacol. The remaining three were hitherto unpredicted five-membered ring compounds, i. e., 3-methyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, 3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, and 3-ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one. The relative quantities of these compounds were also compared with those obtained by high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography. This report probably represents the first extensive analysis of beechwood creosote.

  11. Analysis of Iranian rosemary essential oil: application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Moazeni, Rudabeh Sadat; Sereshti, Hassan

    2011-05-06

    This paper focuses on characterization of the components of Iranian rosemary essential oil using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approach was used to overcome the problem of background, baseline offset and overlapping/embedded peaks in GC-MS. The analysis of GC-MS data revealed that sixty eight components exist in the rosemary essential oil. However, with the help of MCR this number was extended to ninety nine components with concentrations higher than 0.01%, which accounts for 98.23% of the total relative content of the rosemary essential oil. The most important constituents of the Iranian rosemary are 1,8-cineole (23.47%), α-pinene (21.74%), berbonone (7.57%), camphor (7.21%) and eucalyptol (4.49%).

  12. Analysis of radioactive mixed hazardous waste using derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Lerner, B.D.; Bean, R.M.; Grant, K.E.; Lucke, R.B.; Mong, G.M.; Clauss, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitroso-iminodiacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid. The chelator of highest concentration was ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids.

  13. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  14. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  15. Issues pertaining to the analysis of buprenorphine and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Dong-Liang; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Meng-Yan; Liu, Ray H; Su, Lien-Wen; Cheng, Pai-Sheng; Liu, Chiareiy; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2010-03-05

    "Substitution therapy" and the use of buprenorphine (B) as an agent for treating heroin addiction continue to gain acceptance and have recently been implemented in Taiwan. Mature and widely utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology can complement the low cost and highly sensitive immunoassay (IA) approach to facilitate the implementation of analytical tasks supporting compliance monitoring and pharmacokinetic/pharmacogenetic studies. Issues critical to GC-MS analysis of B and norbuprenorphine (NB) (free and as glucuronides), including extraction, hydrolysis, derivatization, and quantitation approaches were studied, followed by comparing the resulting data against those derived from IA and two types of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Commercial solid-phase extraction devices, highly effective for recovering all metabolites, may not be suitable for the analysis of free B and NB; acetyl-derivatization products exhibit the most favorable chromatographic, ion intensity, and cross-contribution characteristics for GC-MS analysis. Evaluation of IA, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS data obtained in three laboratories has proven the 2-aliquot GC-MS protocol effective for the determination of free B and NB and their glucuronides.

  16. Recent Advance in Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Environmental Analysis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The techniques and measurement methods developed in the Environmental Survey and Monitoring of Chemicals by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment, as well as a large amount of knowledge archived in the survey, have led to the advancement of environmental analysis. Recently, technologies such as non-target liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with micro bore column have further developed the field. Here, the general strategy of a method developed for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of environmental chemicals with a brief description is presented. Also, a non-target analysis for the identification of environmental pollutants using a provisional fragment database and “MsMsFilter,” an elemental composition elucidation tool, is presented. This analytical method is shown to be highly effective in the identification of a model chemical, the pesticide Bendiocarb. Our improved micro-liquid chromatography injection system showed substantially enhanced sensitivity to perfluoroalkyl substances, with peak areas 32–71 times larger than those observed in conventional LC/MS. PMID:26819891

  17. Identification and Quantification of Pesticides in Environmental Waters With Solid Phase Microextraction and Analysis Using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-10

    Microextraction and Analysis using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Name of Candidate: CPT Michael J. Nack...in the thesis manuscript entitled: Identification and Quantification of Pesticides in Environmental Waters with Solid Phase Microextraction ...Pesticides in Environmental Waters with Solid Phase Microextraction and Analysis using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

  18. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  19. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  20. Enhanced analysis of steroids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using microwave-accelerated derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Colosi, Dominic M; Stutts, Whitney L; Mora-Montero, Diana C; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2009-08-15

    Derivatization of steroids is typically required before analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); nevertheless, the derivatization process can often be time-consuming and irreproducible. Although several strategies have been employed to enhance this process, few have the potential of microwave-accelerated derivatization (MAD) to be more efficient than traditional thermal derivatization methods. MAD using a synthesis microwave system was evaluated and compared to traditional thermal derivatization methods in terms of yield, reproducibility, and overall analysis time. Parameters affecting MAD, including reaction temperature, time, and power, were systematically optimized for several silyl reagents (BSTFA with TMCS, MSTFA, and BSA) and other derivatization procedures (MOX reagent and MTBSTFA). MSTFA was found to derivatize best with the microwave, as demonstrated by the enhanced relative response factors (RRFs). BSTFA with TMCS, on the other hand, did not couple as well, but RRF values improved significantly upon addition of polar solvents. The rapid (1 min) derivatization reactions associated with MAD had comparable RRFs for all reagents with those obtained with thermal heating (>30 min). This study highlights the best methods for analyzing a comprehensive variety of steroids and also provides ideal strategies for MAD of steroids on an individual or class level.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of lipids in biological systems by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics has been a subject of dramatic developments over the past decade. This review focuses on state of the art in LC-MS-based lipidomics, covering all the steps of global lipidomic profiling. On the basis of review of 185 original papers and application notes, we can conclude that typical LC-MS-based lipidomics methods involve: (1) extraction using chloroform/MeOH or MTBE/MeOH protocols, both with addition of internal standards covering each lipid class; (2) separation of lipids using short microbore columns with sub-2-μm or 2.6–2.8-μm (fused-core) particle size with C18 or C8 sorbent with analysis time <30 min; (3) electrospray ionization in positive- and negative-ion modes with full spectra acquisition using high-resolution MS with capability to MS/MS. Phospholipids (phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylglycerols) followed by sphingomyelins, di- and tri-acylglycerols, and ceramides were the most frequently targeted lipid species. PMID:25309011

  2. [Analysis of 7-aminonitrazepam in urine by trimethylsilyl derivatization-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Tan, Jia-Yi; Sun, Yu-Qing

    2002-09-01

    A highly sensitive method has been developed for the analysis of 7-aminonitrazepam (7-ANIZ), the major metabolite of nitrazepam, in urine by trimethylsilyl derivatization-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urine samples were extracted with ethyl ether-ethyl acetate (99:1, volume ratio). The extracts were derivatized with N,O-bis (trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide, and the total ion current chromatograms of derivatives were acquired. 7-ANIZ was identified by the relative abundance of major characteristic ions in the mass spectrum of its derivative and the retention time of the mass chromatogram peaks of these characteristic ions. Based on the mass chromatogram of the base peak ion, quantification was performed using 7-aminoclonazepam (7-ACLZ) as the internal standard. The extraction efficiency of 7-ANIZ was 82.8%. The linear range was 10 microg/L - 500 microg/L. The limit of detection was 1.2 microg/L and the limit of quantification was 3.5 microg/L. The recoveries were 94.7% - 103.5%, and the RSDs were 3.9% - 5.4%. 7-ANIZ in the urine sample excreted by the subject over 96 h period after oral administration of 10 mg nitrazepam was measured. It is demonstrated that the method can be applied to the forensic identification.

  3. Analysis of macrolide antibiotics, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in food, biological and environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Macrolides are a group of antibiotics that have been widely used in human medical and veterinary practices. Analysis of macrolides and related compounds in food, biological, and environmental matrices continue to be the focus of scientists for the reasons of food safety, pharmacokinetic studies, and environmental concerns. This article presents an overview on the primary biological properties of macrolides and their associated analytical issues, including extraction, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), method validation, and measurement uncertainty. The main techniques that have been used to extract macrolides from various matrices are solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Conventional liquid chromatography (LC) with C18 columns plays a dominant role for the determination of macrolides, whereas ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) along with sub-2 microm particle C18 columns reduces run time and improves sensitivity. Mass spectrometry (MS), serving as a universal detection technique, has replaced ultraviolet (UV), fluorometric, and electrochemical detection for multi-macrolide analysis. The triple-quadrupole (QqQ), quadrupole ion trap (QIT), triple-quadrupole linear ion trap, time-of-flight (TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometers are current choices for the determination of macrolides, including quantification, confirmation, identification of their degradation products or metabolites, and structural elucidation. LC or UPLC coupled to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode (LC/MS/MS) is the first choice for quantification. UPLC-TOF or UPLC-QqTOF has been recognized as an emerging technique for accurate mass measurement and unequivocal identification of macrolides and their related compounds.

  4. Analysis of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Murphy, Timothy P

    2004-12-20

    A procedure was developed for the determination of low levels of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin A (barbalin) in aloe products based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of the trimethyl silyl (TMS) derivatives of these analytes in the presence of Chrysophanol used as internal standard. The method was used to analyze several aloe based commercial products (liquids, gels and solids). Wide variation in the level of these anthraquinones was observed among the different products. The method had a sensitivity of 0.005 ppm of aloe-emodin and 0.05 ppm of aloin.

  5. Supervised pattern recognition procedures for discrimination of whiskeys from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry congener analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Arjona, Domingo; López-Pérez, Germán; González-Gallero, Víctor; González, A Gustavo

    2006-03-22

    The volatile congener analysis of 52 commercialized whiskeys (24 samples of single malt Scotch whiskey, 18 samples of bourbon whiskey, and 10 samples of Irish whiskey) was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Pattern recognition procedures were applied for discrimination of different whiskey categories. Multivariate data analysis includes linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k nearest neighbors (KNN), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), procrustes discriminant analysis (PDA), and artificial neural networks techniques involving multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and probabilistic neural networks (PNN). Classification rules were validated by considering the number of false positives (FPs) and false negatives (FNs) of each class associated to the prediction set. Artificial neural networks led to the best results because of their intrinsic nonlinear features. Both techniques, MLP and PNN, gave zero FPs and zero FNs for all of the categories. KNN is a nonparametric method that also provides zero FPs and FNs for every class but only when selecting K = 3 neighbors. PDA produced good results also (zero FPs and FNs always) but only by selecting nine principal components for class modeling. LDA shows a lesser classification performance, because of the building of linear frontiers between classes that does not apply in many real situations. LDA led to one FP for bourbons and one FN for scotches. The worse results were obtained with SIMCA, which gave a higher number of FPs (five for both scotches and bourbons) and FNs (six for scotchs and two for bourbons). The possible cause of these findings is the strong influence of class inhomogeneities on the SIMCA performance. It is remarkable that in any case, all of the methodologies lead to zero FPs and FNs for the Irish whiskeys.

  6. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W.; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2009-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified 8 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAH in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAH. The limits of quantitation for different PAH varied between 0.3 ng/g tobacco and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300-mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that include various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAH in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (± 3.7) µg/g dry weight, 20% of this amount being comprised by carcinogenic PAH. The levels of PAH in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff, the sum of all detected PAH averaging 1.3 (±0.28) µg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAH one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco, along with tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in the U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced. PMID:19860436

  7. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified eight different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAHs in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAHs. The limits of quantitation for different PAHs varied between 0.3 and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300 mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that included various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAHs in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (+/-3.7) microg/g dry weight; 20% of this amount was comprised of carcinogenic PAHs. The levels of PAHs in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff; the sum of all detected PAHs averaged 1.3 (+/-0.28) microg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAHs one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced.

  8. Analysis of acetylene in blood and urine using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Takamoto, Mutsuo; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-09-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of acetylene in blood and urine samples was investigated. Using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), acetylene was measured with isobutane as the internal standard in the headspace method, which revealed a linear response over the entire composite range with an excellent correlation coefficient, both in blood (R = 0.9968, range = 5.39-43.1 microg/ml) and urine (R = 0.9972, range = 2.16-10.8 microg/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) for blood ranged from 2.62 to 11.6% for intra-day and 4.55 to 10.4% for inter-day. The CV for urine ranged from 2.38 to 3.10% for intra-day and 4.83 to 11.0% for inter-day. The recovery rate as an index of accuracy ranged from 83 to 111%. The present method showed good reliability, and is also simple and rapid. In actual samples from a charred cadaver due to acetylene explosion, the measured concentrations of acetylene by this method were 21.5 microg/ml for femoral vein blood, 17.9 microg/ml for right atrial blood, 25.5 microg/ml for left atrial blood and 7.49 microg/ml for urine. Quantification of acetylene provides important information, because the acetylene concentration is a vital reaction or sign. For example, when acetylene is filled in a closed space and then explodes, in antemortem explosion, the blood acetylene concentration of the cadaver might be significant. On the other hand, in postmortem explosion, acetylene is not detected in blood. Furthermore, when several victims are involved in one explosion, comparison of the sample concentrations can also provide useful information to establish the conditions at the accident scene; therefore, the present method is useful in forensics.

  9. Linker-assisted immunoassay and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the analysis of glyphosate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Bhullar, B.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, sensitive, linker-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (L'ELISA) was compared to on-line solidphase extraction (SPE) with high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) for the analysis of glyphosate in surface water and groundwater samples. The L'ELISA used succinic anhydride to derivatize glyphosate, which mimics the epitotic attachment of glyphosate to horseradish peroxidase hapten. Thus, L'ELISA recognized the derivatized glyphosate more effectively (detection limit of 0.1 μg/L) and with increased sensitivity (10-100 times) over conventional ELISA and showed the potential for other applications. The precision and accuracy of L'ELISA then was compared with on-line SPE/HPLC/MS, which detected glyphosate and its degradate derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate using negative-ion electrospray (detection limit 0.1 μg/L, relative standard deviation ±15%). Derivatization efficiency and matrix effects were minimized by adding an isotope-labeled glyphosate (2-13C15N). The accuracy of L'ELISA gave a false positive rate of 18% between 0.1 and 1.0 μg/L and a false positive rate of only 1% above 1.0 μg/L. The relative standard deviation was ±20%. The correlation of L'ELISA and HPLC/MS for 66 surface water and groundwater samples was 0.97 with a slope of 1.28, with many detections of glyphosate and its degradate in surface water but not in groundwater.

  10. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of nitrite in biological fluids without derivatization.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke; Mitschke, Anja

    2010-06-15

    We report on a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the quantification of nitrite in biological fluids without preceding derivatization. This method is based on the solvent extraction with ethyl acetate of nitrous acid (HONO, pK(a) = 3.29), i.e., HO(14)NO and (15)N-labeled nitrous acid (HO(15)NO) which was supplied as the sodium salt of (15)N-labeled nitrite and served as the internal standard. HO(14)NO and HO(15)NO react within the injector (at 300 degrees C) of the gas chromatograph with the solvent ethyl acetate to form presumably unlabeled and (15)N-labeled acetyl nitrite, respectively. Under negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) conditions with methane as the reagent gas, these species ionize to form O(14)NO(-) (m/z 46) and O(15)NO(-) (m/z 47), respectively. Quantification is performed by selected ion monitoring of m/z 46 for nitrite and m/z 47 for the internal standard. Nitrate at concentrations up to 20 mM does not interfere with nitrite analysis in this method. The GC-MS method was validated for the quantification of nitrite in aqueous buffer, human urine (1 mL, acidification) and saliva (0.1-1 mL, acidification), and hemolysates. The method was applied in studying reactions of nitrite (0-10 mM) with oxyhemoglobin ( approximately 6 mM) in lysed human erythrocytes (100 microL aliquots, no acidification).

  11. Preparative monohydroxyflavanone syntheses and a protocol for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of monohydroxyflavanones.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hitoshi; Shigematsu, Asako; Ohta, Shigeru; Harigaya, Yoshihiro

    2005-05-01

    We describe a facile efficient, and preparative approach for monohydroxyflavanone syntheses. Using this protocol, a hydroxyl is regio-selectively introduced at one carbon of a flavanone A- or B-ring per synthesis. The seven possible isomers were each synthesized from the corresponding monomethoxymethoxylated 2'-hydroxychalcones in acidic solution. These monohydroxyflavanones were characterized using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system that incorporated a DB-5 capillary column. Ours is the first report of a preparative synthetic method during which a single hydroxyl can be selectively added to a flavanone A- or B-ring at any position. We are also the first to develop a procedure that separates the seven isomers by GC and characterizes the mass spectra of the isomers. Both the synthetic method and the GC-MS conditions may become important tools during future flavanone metabolism and oxidation studies.

  12. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants.

  13. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement.

  14. On-line solid-phase extraction for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Paolo; Núñez, Oscar

    2014-10-01

    Public concern about pesticides in food and water has increased dramatically in the last two decades. In order to guarantee consumers' health and safety, analytical methods that could provide fast and reliable answers without compromising accuracy and precision are required. Sample treatment is probably the most tedious and time-consuming step in many analytical procedures and, despite the significant advances in chromatographic separations and mass spectrometry techniques, sample treatment is still one of the most important parts of the analytical process for achieving good analytical results. Therefore, over the last years, considerable efforts have been made to simplify the stage and to develop fast, accurate, and robust methods that allow the determination of a wide range of pesticides without compromising the integrity of the extraction process. This review article intends to give a short overview of recently developed on-line solid-phase extraction, preconcentration, and clean-up procedures for the determination of pesticides in complex matrices by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques.

  15. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  16. Multiclass mycotoxin analysis in food, environmental and biological matrices with chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Mold metabolites that can elicit deleterious effects on other organisms are classified as mycotoxins. Human exposure to mycotoxins occurs mostly through the intake of contaminated agricultural products or residues due to carry over or metabolite products in foods of animal origin such as milk and eggs, but can also occur by dermal contact and inhalation. Mycotoxins contained in moldy foods, but also in damp interiors, can cause diseases in humans and animals. Nephropathy, various types of cancer, alimentary toxic aleukia, hepatic diseases, various hemorrhagic syndromes, and immune and neurological disorders are the most common diseases that can be related to mycotoxicosis. The absence or presence of mold infestation and its propagation are seldom correlated with mycotoxin presence. Mycotoxins must be determined directly, and suitable analytical methods are necessary. Hundreds of mycotoxins have been recognized, but only for a few of them, and in a restricted number of utilities, a maximum acceptable level has been regulated by law. However, mycotoxins seldom develop alone; more often various types and/or classes form in the same substrate. The co-occurrence might render the individual mycotoxin tolerance dose irrelevant, and therefore the mere presence of multiple mycotoxins should be considered a risk factor. The advantage of chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS) is that many compounds can be determined and confirmed in one analysis. This review illustrates the state-of-the-art of mycotoxin MS-based analytical methods for multiclass, multianalyte determination in all the matrices in which they appear. A chapter is devoted to the history of the long-standing coexistence and interaction among humans, domestic animals and mycotoxicosis, and the history of the discovery of mycotoxins. Quality assurance, although this topic relates to analytical chemistry in general, has been also examined for mycotoxin analysis as a preliminary to the systematic literature excursus

  17. Chemical analysis of surface hydrocarbons in fireflies by direct contact extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shibue, Keiko; Goto, Yoshimasa; Kawashima, Itsuro; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2004-12-01

    We characterized three Japanese firefly species (Luciola lateralis, Luciola cruciata, and Lucidina biplagiata) and three North American firefly species (Lucidota atra, Photuris lucicrescens, and Photuris cinctipennis) based on their surface hydrocarbons. The analysis of firefly extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed clear differences in the chromatographic profiles and mass spectra. Each firefly could be distinguished by its GC-MS profile. A major difference was observed between Japanese fireflies and North American fireflies. Among the North American fireflies, non-luminous fireflies, Lucidota atra, showed much more complicated GC-MS profile than those of luminous fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and Photuris cinctipennis.

  18. Urinary Succinylacetone Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjie; Yu, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Succinylacetone (SA) is used for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with tyrosinemia type I (Tyr I). SA is exclusively elevated in blood and urine of patients with Tyr I. As urinary SA concentration is much higher than blood, SA is usually tested in urine samples. Urinary SA quantitation by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described in this chapter. The urine sample in the amount of 1 μmol creatinine is used for testing. 3,4,5,6,7-(13)C5-succinylacetone ((13)C5-SA) is used as an internal standard (IS). SA and (13)C5-SA are oximated and extracted from urine with organic solvents, and then derivatized to form trimethylsilane (TMS) derivatives. TMS derivatives of SA and (13)C5-SA are detected and quantified by GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM). The assay is linear from 0.05 to 450 mmol/mol creatinine to cover the broad range of urinary SA concentrations.

  19. Quantitative Metabolome Analysis Based on Chromatographic Peak Reconstruction in Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-07-21

    Generating precise and accurate quantitative information on metabolomic changes in comparative samples is important for metabolomics research where technical variations in the metabolomic data should be minimized in order to reveal biological changes. We report a method and software program, IsoMS-Quant, for extracting quantitative information from a metabolomic data set generated by chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Unlike previous work of relying on mass spectral peak ratio of the highest intensity peak pair to measure relative quantity difference of a differentially labeled metabolite, this new program reconstructs the chromatographic peaks of the light- and heavy-labeled metabolite pair and then calculates the ratio of their peak areas to represent the relative concentration difference in two comparative samples. Using chromatographic peaks to perform relative quantification is shown to be more precise and accurate. IsoMS-Quant is integrated with IsoMS for picking peak pairs and Zero-fill for retrieving missing peak pairs in the initial peak pairs table generated by IsoMS to form a complete tool for processing CIL LC-MS data. This program can be freely downloaded from the www.MyCompoundID.org web site for noncommercial use.

  20. Direct analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in rubber compounds by automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Kim

    1999-01-01

    Two analytical methods, automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS) and pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), were applied as direct methods for the analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in a vulcanized rubber. The ATD-GC/MS method, based on discontinuous volatile extraction, was found to be an effective means for direct analysis of the oligomeric tackifying resins contained in a vulcanized rubber. The oligomeric tackifying resins, such as t-octylphenolformaldehyde (TOPF) resin, rosin-modified terpene resin, and cashew resin, could be directly analyzed in vulcanized rubber by ATD-GC/MS. Much simpler total ion chromatograms were obtained by ATD-GC/MS than by flash pyrolysis with a Curie-point pyrolyzer, permitting much easier interpretation. Ions at m/z 206, 135, and 107 were fingerprints in the characteristic mass spectra obtained by ATD-GC/MS for TOPF resin in the vulcanized rubber. 1H-Indene, styrene, and isolongifolene were observed as their characteristic mass spectra in the pyrolyzate of the rosin-modified terpene resin. From the cashew resin, phenol, 3-methylphenol, and 4-(1,1,3, 3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were obtained as the characteristic pyrolyzates by discontinuous thermal extraction via ATD-GC/MS. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of metabolites in natural and artificial agarwood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoxia; Xie, Mingrong; Liu, Shaofeng; Guo, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhong, Zhaojian; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-09-15

    Agarwood is a resinous material formed in wounded Aquilaria sinensis in China, which is widely used as an effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This study is aimed to use gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods to create reliable criteria for accurate identification of natural agarwood and artificial agarwood, as well as for quality evaluation of artificial agarwood. Natural agarwood and artificial agarwood (stimulated by formic acid or formic acid plus fungal inoculation) were used as standards and controls for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. The identification criteria developed were applied to commercial agarwood. A reliable criteria including correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 markers of metabolism in natural and artificial agarwood was constructed. Compared with chemically stimulated agarwood (formic acid) and in terms of the 22 markers, artificial agarwood obtained by formic acid stimulation and fungal inoculation were much closer to natural agarwood. The study demonstrates that the chemical components of artificial agarwood obtained by comprehensive stimulated method (formic acid plus fungal inoculation) are much closer to the natural agarwood than those obtained by chemically stimulated method (formic acid), as times goes by. A reliable criteria containing correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 metabolism markers can be used to evaluate the quality of the agarwood. As an application case, three samples were identified as natural agarwood from the 25 commercial agarwood by using the evaluation method.

  2. Analysis of polar lipids in the serum from rats fed shiitake by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shanggong; Peng, Min; Ronis, Martin; Badger, Thomas; Fang, Nianbai

    2010-12-22

    Consumption of a shiitake mushroom diet has been reported to have effects on serum phospholipids. However, much less is known about the effect on serum polar lipids including lysophospholipids and free fatty acids. In the present study, the effects of a shiitake diet were evaluated on the basis of identification and quantification of individual polar lipid components in rat serum using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. By comparison with standards and published data, 50 lysophospholipids and 32 free fatty acids were identified, and the concentrations of 27 polar lipids in rat serum were determined. Shiitake diets decreased the levels of all individual polar lipid components in the serum of male rat. The total level of serum polar lipids in males fed 4% shiitake diets (1365.71 mol/L) was significantly lower than that of the control (2270.26 mol/L). However, shiitake diets did not significantly affect the levels of serum polar lipids in female rats.

  3. Analysis of the venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider, Atrax robustus using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duffield, P H; Duffield, A M; Carroll, P R; Morgans, D

    1979-03-01

    Thirteen compounds have been identified using gas chromatography mass spectrometry in the venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider, Atrax robustus. The compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl or pentafluoropropionate derivatives and were citric acid, lactic acid, phosphoric acid, glycerol, urea, glucose, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and octopamine. Female venom contained trace quantities of 5-methyoxytryptamine which was not detected in male venom. Quantitative determination of tyramine and octopamine was achieved using chemical ionization (CH4) gas chromatography mass spectrometry and deuterated internal standards.

  4. Predicting percent composition of blends of biodiesel and conventional diesel using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and partial least squares analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karisa M; Schale, Stephen P

    2011-01-30

    The percent composition of blends of biodiesel and conventional diesel from a variety of retail sources were modeled and predicted using partial least squares (PLS) analysis applied to gas chromatography-total-ion-current mass spectrometry (GC-TIC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-total-ion-current mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TIC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) separations of the blends. In all four cases, the PLS predictions for a test set of chromatograms were plotted versus the actual blend percent composition. The GC-TIC plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.773 and y-intercept=2.89, and the average percent error of prediction was 12.0%. The GC-MS plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.864 and y-intercept=1.72, and the average percent error of prediction was improved to 6.89%. The GCxGC-TIC plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.983 and y-intercept=0.680, and the average percent error was slightly improved to 6.16%. The GCxGC-MS plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.980 and y-intercept=0.620, and the average percent error was 6.12%. The GCxGC models performed best presumably due to the multidimensional advantage of higher dimensional instrumentation providing more chemical selectivity. All the PLS models used 3 latent variables. The chemical components that differentiate the blend percent compositions are reported.

  5. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Constituent Oil from Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes), from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Reginald Chibueze; Bassey, Essien Eka

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of constituent oil from dried Ganoderma lucidum was carried out. Fresh G. lucidum obtained from its natural environment was thoroughly washed with distilled water and air-dried for 2 weeks and the component oils were extracted and analyzed. Four predominant components identified were pentadecanoic acid, 14-methyl-ester (retention time [RT] = 19.752 minutes; percentage total = 25.489), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z)- (RT = 21.629 minutes and 21.663 minutes; percentage total = 25.054), n-hexadecanoic acid (RT = 20.153 minutes; percentage total = 24.275), and 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, methyl ester (RT = 21.297 minutes; percentage total = 13.027). The two minor oils identified were 9,12-octadecadienoic acid, methyl ester, (E,E)- and octadecanoic acid, methyl ester (RT = 21.246 minutes and 21.503 minutes; percentage total = 7.057 and 5.097, respectively).

  6. Protocol: A simple protocol for quantitative analysis of bio-oils through gas- chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Mattia; Rosi, Luca; Frediani, Marco; Frediani, Piero

    2016-01-01

    A new and simple protocol for quantitative analysis of bio-oils using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry is suggested. Compounds were identified via their mass spectra, and then unavailable response factors were calculated with respect to diphenyl as the internal standard using a modified method previously suggested for gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This new protocol was applied to the characterization of bio-oils obtained from the pyrolysis of woods of different sources or using different pyrolysis procedures. This protocol allowed evaluation of the yields of products from poplar pyrolysis (among 50% and 99%), while a reduced amounts of products were identified from the pyrolysis of cellulose (between 46% and 58%). The main product was always acetic acid, but it was formed in very large yields from poplar while lower yields were obtained from cellulose.

  7. Characterisation of odorants in roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Koshi, Erina; Take, Harumi; Michihata, Toshihide; Maruya, Masachika; Enomoto, Toshiki

    2017-04-01

    Roasted stem tea has a characteristic flavour, which is obtained by roasting tea stems, by-product of green tea production. This research aims to understand the characteristic odorants in roasted stem tea by comparing it to roasted leaf tea. We revealed potent odorants in commercial roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry with aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The difference between roasted stem and leaf tea derived from the same tea plants were investigated using GC-MS. Pyrazine compounds exhibited a roasted odour and high flavour dilution (FD) factors, as determined via AEDA. Roasted stem tea was richer in these pyrazines than roasted leaf tea. Geraniol and linalool exhibited high FD factors and a floral odour, and roasted stem tea was richer in these compounds than roasted leaf tea. These results may have a positive impact on the development of tea products.

  8. The analysis of tire rubber traces collected after braking incidents using Pyrolysis-GasChromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Garry

    2007-09-01

    Automobile tire marks can routinely be found at the scenes of crime, particularly hit-and-run accidents and are left on road surfaces because of sudden braking or the wheels spinning. The tire marks are left due to the friction between the tire rubber and the solid road surface, and do not always demonstrate the tire tread pattern. However, the tire mark will contain traces of the tire. In this study, Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze 12 tires from different manufacturer's and their traces collected after braking incidents. Tire marks were left on a conglomerate road surface with sudden braking. The samples were pyrolysed without removal of contaminant in a micro-furnace type pyrolyser. Quantitative and qualitative analysis were performed on all the samples. All 12 samples were distinguished from each other. Each of the tire traces were identified as coming from there original source.

  9. Analysis of CYP3A inhibitory components of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Shinzo; Shimizu, Eri; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Manabu; Hidaka, Muneaki; Yamada, Mitsuko; Sakushima, Akiyo

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the CYP3A inhibitory components of star fruit Averrhoa carambola L., using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The stereoisomer of procyanidin B1 and B2 and/or the trimer consisting of catechin and/or epicatechin were suggested to be potent inhibitory components.

  10. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  11. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  12. [Preparation of flavonoid reference standards from Scutellariae Radix under the guidance of high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Henan; Yang, Xuedong; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Wenfeng

    2012-07-01

    Flavonoid reference standards were targeted-prepared from Scutellariae Radix under the guidance of high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis. With HPLC-MS analysis of Scutellariae Radix, 19 flavonoid components were identified by analyzing and comparing their retention times, ultraviolet spectra, and mass spectrometry data with literature. The separation and purification protocols of all targeted flavonoid reference standards were optimally designed according to the results of HPLC-MS analysis and related literature. The ethanol extract of Scutellariae Radix was suspended in water and extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol successively. The ethyl acetate extract and n-butanol extract were separately subjected to primary separation by low pressure reverse phase preparative chromatography. Then the fractions containing targeted compounds were further purified by low pressure reverse and normal phases preparative chromatography. Finally, baicalin and wogonoside reference standards were obtained from n-butanol extract; baicaelin, wogonin, and oroxylin A reference standards were obtained from ethyl acetate extract. The structures of the 5 reference standards were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. The HPLC analytical results showed that the purities of the 5 reference standards were all above 98%. It is demonstrated that the rapid targeted-preparation method under the guidance of the HPLC-MS analysis is applicable for the isolation and preparation of chemical components in traditional Chinese medicines.

  13. Supercritical-fluid extraction and chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of mycotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1982-07-01

    The use of direct supercritical-fluid injection-mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of mycotoxins of the tricothecene group is demonstrated. A solution containing diacetoxyscirpenol or T-2 toxin is injected into a fluid consisting primarily of pentane or carbon dioxide and is rapidly brought to supercritical conditions. Direct injection of the fluid stream into a chemical ionization source allows thermally labile compounds to be analyzed. Under these conditions trichothecene mass spectra showing significant (M + 1)/sup +/ ions and distinctive fragmentation patterns are obtained. Detection limits are in the subnanogram range. Direct analysis from complex substrates using selective supercritical-fluid extraction is proposed. 4 figures.

  14. High Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Serum Proteins Using Glycopeptide Capture and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Yi, Eugene C.; Li, Xiao-jun; Mallick, Parag; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Aebersold, Reudi

    2005-02-01

    It is expected that the composition of the serum proteome can provide valuable information about the state of the human body in health and disease and that this information can be extracted via quantitative proteomic measurements. Suitable proteomic techniques need to be sensitive, reproducible, and robust to detect potential biomarkers below the level of highly expressed proteins, generate data sets that are comparable between experiments and laboratories, and have high throughput to support statistical studies. Here we report a method for high throughput quantitative analysis of serum proteins. It consists of the selective isolation of peptides that are N-linked glycosylated in the intact protein, the analysis of these now deglycosylated peptides by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and the comparative analysis of the resulting patterns. By focusing selectively on a few formerly N-linked glycopeptides per serum protein, the complexity of the analyte sample is significantly reduced and the sensitivity and throughput of serum proteome analysis are increased compared with the analysis of total tryptic peptides from unfractionated samples. We provide data that document the performance of the method and show that sera from untreated normal mice and genetically identical mice with carcinogen-induced skin cancer can be unambiguously discriminated using unsupervised clustering of the resulting peptide patterns. We further identify, by tandem mass spectrometry, some of the peptides that were consistently elevated in cancer mice compared with their control littermates.

  15. Analysis of swainsonine and swainsonine N-oxide as trimethylsilyl derivatives by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and their relative occurrence in plants toxic to livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed for the analysis of the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and its N-oxide. The method is based on a one step solvent partitioning extraction procedure followed by trimethylsilylation of the dried extract and subsequent detection and qua...

  16. Quantitative Analysis and Fingerprint Profiles for Quality Control of Fructus Schisandrae by Gas Chromatography: Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Yang, Bing-You; Liang, Jun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Di; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid, and effective quality assessment method for Fructus Schisandrae by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS). The method was established by using specific lignan fingerprint profiles and quantitation of characteristic compounds in this herbal medicine. The GC-MS fingerprints of 15 batches of Schisandra samples from different regions of China showed similar lignan profiles. Five peaks were selected as characteristic peaks, and all of these were identified by using GC-MS techniques. The relative retention times of these characteristic peaks in the GC-MS fingerprint were established as an important parameter for identification of Schisandra samples. Meanwhile, relative peak areas may be a feasible approach to discriminate the S. chinensis and S. sphenanthera. Finally, these pharmacologically active constituents in the titled plant, schisandrins A–C and schizandrols A and B, were quantitatively determined using a validated GC-MS method. PMID:24574919

  17. Analysis of vitamin D and its metabolites using thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watson, D; Setchell, K D; Ross, R

    1991-07-01

    A new method is described for the analysis of vitamin D and its metabolites utilizing thermospray (TSP) mass spectrometry as an on-line detector for high performance liquid chromatography. Ionization conditions were optimized for use with isocratic reversed phase chromatography. TSP mass spectrometry was employed in series with a UV absorbance detector to facilitate comparisons between the two methods of detection. Positive ion TSP mass spectra were recorded for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25(OH)2D3). The spectra contained protonated molecular ions, ammonium adduct ions and fragment ions due to the loss of one or more molecules of water. A comparison of quantitative precision was made by determining UV absorbance and TSP standard curves for vitamin D3 using two different methods: (1) External standard method with post-column (post UV detector) addition of ammonium acetate. (2) As (1) but using the method of internal standards with a closely eluting internal standard (vitamin D2). In each case the quantitative precision (correlation coefficient) for UV absorbance detection was superior owing to intrinsic instability of the TSP ion beam. A stable isotopically labelled internal standard was employed in the development of an assay for 1,25(OH)2D3. The assay was used to quantify in vitro enzymic conversion of 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3 in guinea pig and sheep renal mitochondrial incubations. TSP LC/MS was also applied to analysis of an extract of human blood plasma in which D3 and each of its principal metabolites were identified in a single analysis.

  18. Recent trends in application of multivariate curve resolution approaches for improving gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Parastar, Hadi

    2011-08-15

    Essential oils (EOs) are valuable natural products that are popular nowadays in the world due to their effects on the health conditions of human beings and their role in preventing and curing diseases. In addition, EOs have a broad range of applications in foods, perfumes, cosmetics and human nutrition. Among different techniques for analysis of EOs, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the most important one in recent years. However, there are some fundamental problems in GC-MS analysis including baseline drift, spectral background, noise, low S/N (signal to noise) ratio, changes in the peak shapes and co-elution. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approaches cope with ongoing challenges and are able to handle these problems. This review focuses on the application of MCR techniques for improving GC-MS analysis of EOs published between January 2000 and December 2010. In the first part, the importance of EOs in human life and their relevance in analytical chemistry is discussed. In the second part, an insight into some basics needed to understand prospects and limitations of the MCR techniques are given. In the third part, the significance of the combination of the MCR approaches with GC-MS analysis of EOs is highlighted. Furthermore, the commonly used algorithms for preprocessing, chemical rank determination, local rank analysis and multivariate resolution in the field of EOs analysis are reviewed.

  19. Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides. Preparation of model compounds, chromatography, mass spectrometry, NMR, and environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkkonen, S.; Kolehmainen, E.; Laihia, K.; Koistinen, J.; Rantio, T.

    1993-07-01

    Some polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides were prepared by chlorination of diphenyl sulfide with sulfuryl chloride and by Friedel-Crafts-type reaction from 1,2-dichlorobenzene and sulfur. Individual isomers from the reaction mixtures were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectra show the degree of chlorination of different compounds, and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra verify their structures. Three trichloro isomers were shown to be 2,2{prime}, 4-, 2,4,4{prime}, and 2,4{prime},6-trichlorodiphenyl sulfides and two symmetric tetrachloro isomers bis(2,4-dichlorophenyl) and bis(3,4-dichlorophenyl) sulfides. Chlorine-induced {sup 13}C NMR substituent chemical shifts (SCS) have been calculated and compared with the experimental ones in the case of bis(2,4-dichlorophenyl) sulfide. Four stack gases from a waste incinerator and six pulp mill effluents from two bleaching plants were screened for the polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides. Trichlorodiphenyl sulfides were found from five pulp mill effluent samples and tri- and tetrachlorodiphenyl sulfides from two stack gas samples. 24 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Analytical platform for metabolome analysis of microbial cells using methyl chloroformate derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smart, Kathleen F; Aggio, Raphael B M; Van Houtte, Jeremy R; Villas-Bôas, Silas G

    2010-09-01

    This protocol describes an analytical platform for the analysis of intra- and extracellular metabolites of microbial cells (yeast, filamentous fungi and bacteria) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The protocol is subdivided into sampling, sample preparation, chemical derivatization of metabolites, GC-MS analysis and data processing and analysis. This protocol uses two robust quenching methods for microbial cultures, the first of which, cold glycerol-saline quenching, causes reduced leakage of intracellular metabolites, thus allowing a more reliable separation of intra- and extracellular metabolites with simultaneous stopping of cell metabolism. The second, fast filtration, is specifically designed for quenching filamentous micro-organisms. These sampling techniques are combined with an easy sample-preparation procedure and a fast chemical derivatization reaction using methyl chloroformate. This reaction takes place at room temperature, in aqueous medium, and is less prone to matrix effect compared with other derivatizations. This protocol takes an average of 10 d to complete and enables the simultaneous analysis of hundreds of metabolites from the central carbon metabolism (amino and nonamino organic acids, phosphorylated organic acids and fatty acid intermediates) using an in-house MS library and a data analysis pipeline consisting of two free software programs (Automated Mass Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS) and R).

  1. Analysis of fifteen estrogen metabolites using packed column supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xia; Roman, John M; Veenstra, Timothy D; Van Anda, Jennifer; Ziegler, Regina G; Issaq, Haleem J

    2006-03-01

    Packed column supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was used for the separation of estrone, estradiol, estriol, 16-epiestriol, 17-epiestriol, 16-ketoestradiol, 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, 2-methoxyestrone, 4-methoxyestrone, 2-hydroxyestrone-3-methyl ether, 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 2-hydroxyestrone, 4-hydroxyestrone, and 2-hydroxyestradiol. A gradient of methanol in carbon dioxide (0-30% methanol in 15 min, 2% change/min) at a flow rate of 2 mL/min and cyanopropyl silica column connected in series with a diol column, both 2.1 mm i.d. x 150 mm long, packed with 5-mum spherical silica-based particles, resulted in the separation and quantification of all 15 estrogens in less than 10 min. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) of this pSFC MS/MS method was determined to be 0.5 (S/N = 3), and 5 pg, respectively. Compared with RP-HPLC MS analysis of the same mixture in terms of speed of analysis and sensitivity, pSFC MS is much faster, 10 versus 70 min, with comparable LOD and LOQ.

  2. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  3. [Serum metabolomics analysis on benign prostate hyperplasia in mice based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Geng, Yue; Sun, Fengxia; Ma, Yu; Deng, Ligang; Lü, Jianyun; Li, Teng; Wang, Congcong

    2014-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) increasingly becomes a common factor affecting the quality of life of aging men. Its pathogenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS) was employed to detect the changes of serum metabolites in normal mice, benign prostatic hyperplasia model mice and BPH model mice with finasteride intervention. The serum metabolite profiles of the three groups of mice were analyzed. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used for group differentiation and biomarker selection. The results showed good distinction among the three groups of mice serum metabolite spectra. Three potential biomarkers, 1-hexadecanoyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine and (Z)-13-docosenamide, were discovered and identified. They all indicated the occurrence of benign prostatic hypertrophy is closely related to the disorders of lipid metabolism. Coinpared with the control group, the contents of the first two substances were significantly increased in the serum of BPH model mice, and significantly decreased after intervened by finasteride. The contents of (Z)-13-docosenamide decreased significantly in the serum of model group, and increased after intervened by finasteride. Compared with the control group, the contents of three biomarkers in finasteride group did not recover completely and had significant differences. This study is conductive to open new avenues of diagnosis and medical treatment for BPH.

  4. Systematic Optimization of Long Gradient Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for Deep Analysis of Brain Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Yang, Yanling; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Bing; Wang, Xusheng; Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Tao; Beach, Thomas G.; Peng, Junmun; Wu, Zhiping

    2015-02-06

    Development of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) is essential for improving the sensitivity and throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Here we present systematic optimization of a long gradient LC-MS/MS platform to enhance protein identification from a complex mixture. The platform employed an in-house fabricated, reverse phase column (100 μm x 150 cm) coupled with Q Exactive MS. The column was capable of achieving a peak capacity of approximately 700 in a 720 min gradient of 10-45% acetonitrile. The optimal loading level was about 6 micrograms of peptides, although the column allowed loading as many as 20 micrograms. Gas phase fractionation of peptide ions further increased the number of peptide identification by ~10%. Moreover, the combination of basic pH LC pre-fractionation with the long gradient LC-MS/MS platform enabled the identification of 96,127 peptides and 10,544 proteins at 1% protein false discovery rate in a postmortem brain sample of Alzheimer’s disease. As deep RNA sequencing of the same specimen suggested that ~16,000 genes were expressed, current analysis covered more than 60% of the expressed proteome. Further improvement strategies of the LC/LC-MS/MS platform were also discussed.

  5. Evaluation of beer deterioration by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/multivariate analysis: a rapid tool for assessing beer composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João A; Barros, António S; Carvalho, Beatriz; Brandão, Tiago; Gil, Ana M; Ferreira, António C Silva

    2011-02-18

    Beer stability is a major concern for the brewing industry, as beer characteristics may be subject to significant changes during storage. This paper describes a novel non-targeted methodology for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to accelerated aging (induced by thermal treatment: 18 days at 45 °C), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in tandem with multivariate analysis (GC-MS/MVA). Optimization of the chromatographic run was performed, achieving a threefold reduction of the chromatographic time. Although losing optimum resolution, rapid GC runs showed similar chromatographic profiles and semi-quantitative ability to characterize volatile compounds. To evaluate the variations on the global volatile signature (chromatographic profile and m/z pattern of fragmentation in each scan) of beer during thermal deterioration, a non-supervised multivariate analysis method, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), was applied to the GC-MS data. This methodology allowed not only the rapid identification of the degree of deterioration affecting beer, but also the identification of specific compounds of relevance to the thermal deterioration process of beer, both well established markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfufural (5-HMF), furfural and diethyl succinate, as well as other compounds, to our knowledge, newly correlated to beer aging.

  6. Analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in water by headspace-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Companioni-Damas, E Y; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2012-01-30

    This paper proposes a new method for the analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in water samples based on headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction efficiency of four commercially available SPME-fibres was evaluated and it was found that a 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) coating was the most suitable for the extraction of siloxanes. The method provided good linearity (r>0.999) and precision (RSD % <17%), and low limits of quantification ranging from 0.01 to 0.74 ng L(-1) for linear siloxanes and between 18 and 34 ng L(-1) for cyclic siloxanes. The HS-SPME-GC-MS method was applied to the analysis of linear and cyclic siloxanes in river waters from Catalonia (NE, Spain) and the results showed concentrations of linear and cyclic siloxanes ranging from 0.09 to 3.94 ng L(-1) and 22.2 to 58.5 ng L(-1), respectively.

  7. Development of Sensitive and Specific Analysis of Vildagliptin in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Uçaktürk, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for the determination of vildagliptin (VIL) in pharmaceutical formulation. Prior to GC-MS analysis, VIL was efficiently derivatized with MSTFA/NH4I/β-mercaptoethanol at 60°C for 30 min. The obtained O-TMS derivative of VIL was detected by selected ion monitoring mode using the diagnostic ions m/z 223 and 252. Nandrolone was chosen as internal standard. The GC-MS method was fully validated by the following validation parameters: limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, stability, robustness, and ruggedness. LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.5 and 3.5 ng mL−1, respectively. The GC-MS method is linear in the range of 3.5–300 ng mL−1. The intra- and interday precision values were less than ≤3.62%. The intra- and interday accuracy values were found in the range of −0.26–2.06%. Finally, the GC-MS method was successfully applied to determine VIL in pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:26682085

  8. Assessment of acetone as an alternative to acetonitrile in peptide analysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Ria; Ruth, Wolfgang; Kragl, Udo

    2009-07-01

    Acetonitrile as a solvent used in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) of peptides and proteins is a relatively toxic solvent (LD50 oral; rat; 2,460 mg/kg) compared to alternatives like methanol (LD50 oral; rat; 5,628 mg/kg) and acetone (LD50 oral; rat; 5,800 mg/kg). Strategies to minimize its consumption in LC are either to reduce the inner diameter of the column or replace acetonitrile with a suitable alternative. Methanol is often recommended to replace acetonitrile in peptide analysis. In this study however, the main focus lies on another alternative solvent for LC/MS of peptides; acetone. A number of model proteins were tryptically digested and the peptide solutions were analyzed on a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) mass spectrometer. The performances of acetonitrile, methanol and acetone were compared according to the quality of the chromatograms obtained and identification of the peptides using the BioWorks software developed by Thermo Scientific. In accordance to the elutropic series, acetone was found to significantly reduce the retention times of peptides separated by C18 column material with regard to acetonitrile while methanol led to increased retention times. Acetone was the superior solvent to methanol for most of the tested model proteins reaching similar sequence coverage and numbers of identified peptides as acetonitrile. We therefore propose acetone as an alternative to acetonitrile in LC/MS of peptides.

  9. [Analysis of pesticide multiresidues in rice by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyan; Liu, Qingxue; Ma, Yusong; Liu, Jinwei; Jia, Xuan

    2006-05-01

    A new analytical method was developed to simultaneously determine multiple pesticide residues in rice including organophosphorus, organochlorine, carbamate and pyrethroid. First, the solvents for pesticide extraction were selected for optimization. Eight solvents were screened to find that the extraction efficiency with dichloromethane was the best. Second, clean-up was performed by solid phase extraction using a Florisil cartridge. Various mixtures of hexane and acetone were tested to show that the mixture of hexane-acetone (4:1, v/v) had the best performance. The clean-up helped the sample purification significantly. The prepared sample was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The pesticides were identified with retention time and selected ions and their relative abundances, and they were quantified based on extract of spiking standards in a blank sample. The limits of detection (LODs) were evaluated on the values of the lower concentration fortified sample under the signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. The recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were checked by adding pesticide standard solution at two levels to untreated samples, and the triplicate analysis of the samples were carried out for each spiked level. The LODs were at microg/kg level. The average recoveries of most pesticides were from 75% to 120 %. The RSDs were less than 10.4% (n = 3). These results indicated that this method is simple, rapid, sensitive for the simultaneous determination requirements of multiple pesticide residues in rice.

  10. [Fast analysis of common fatty acids in edible vegetable oils by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunhua; Xie, Xianqing; Fan, Naili; Tu, Yuanhong; Chen, Yan; Liao, Weilin

    2015-04-01

    A fast analytical method for five common fatty acids in six edible vegetable oils was developed by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPC2-MS). The five fatty acids are palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Their contents in the corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil, rapeseed oil and peanut oil were compared. The chromatographic separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPC2 BEH 2-EP column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) using the mobile phases of carbon dioxide and methanol/acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) with gradient elution. The separated compounds were detected by negative electrospray ionization ESF-MS. The results showed that the reasonable linearities were achieved for all the analytes over the range of 0.5-100 mg/L with the correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9985-0.9998. The limits of quantification (S/N ≥ 10) of the five fatty acids were 0.15-0.50 mg/L. The recoveries of the five fatty acids at three spiked levels were in the range of 89.61%-108.50% with relative standard deviations of 0.69%-3.01%. The developed method showed high performance, good resolution and fast analysis for the underivatized fatty acids. It has been successfully used to detect the five fatty acids from corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil rapeseed oil and peanut oil.

  11. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A.; Pérez, Carlos L.; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1–500 µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25–50 µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  12. Development and validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay for hair analysis of amphetamine, methamphetamine and methylenedioxy derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, Mitona; Pichini, Simona; Poudevida, Sandra; Menoyo, Ester; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; Farré, Magí; de la Torre, Rafael

    2003-12-25

    A procedure based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described for the determination of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE or MDEA) and N-methyl-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine (MBDB) in hair. Hair samples were digested with 1 M sodium sulfide at 37 degrees C (by shaking for 3 h and was kept at room temperature overnight), and extracted with two sequential extraction procedures: liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether and solid-phase extraction with Bond-Elut Certify columns. Extracted analytes were derivatised with N-methyl-bis(trifluoroacetamide), separated by a 5% phenylmethylsilicone column and determined by a mass spectrometer detector in selected ion monitoring mode. A good reproducibility (intra-assay R.S.D.=1.5-15.7%), accuracy (intra-assay error = 2.0-11.7%) and sensitivity (LOD=0.03-0.08 ng/mg hair) were attained. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of the proximal (1 cm) hair segment to assess recent self-reported use in "ecstasy" consumers. Otherwise, further studies are needed to validate methodology developed in case of amphetamine consumption.

  13. Evaluation of automated sample preparation, retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and data analysis methods for the metabolomic study of Arabidopsis species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qun; David, Frank; Lynen, Frédéric; Rumpel, Klaus; Dugardeyn, Jasper; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Xu, Guowang; Sandra, Pat

    2011-05-27

    In this paper, automated sample preparation, retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analysis methods for the metabolomics study were evaluated. A miniaturized and automated derivatisation method using sequential oximation and silylation was applied to a polar extract of 4 types (2 types×2 ages) of Arabidopsis thaliana, a popular model organism often used in plant sciences and genetics. Automation of the derivatisation process offers excellent repeatability, and the time between sample preparation and analysis was short and constant, reducing artifact formation. Retention time locked (RTL) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used, resulting in reproducible retention times and GC-MS profiles. Two approaches were used for data analysis. XCMS followed by principal component analysis (approach 1) and AMDIS deconvolution combined with a commercially available program (Mass Profiler Professional) followed by principal component analysis (approach 2) were compared. Several features that were up- or down-regulated in the different types were detected.

  14. High Performance Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectrometry Analysis of High Antioxidant Australian Fruits with Antiproliferative Activity Against Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirdaarta, Joseph; Maen, Anton; Rayan, Paran; Matthews, Ben; Cock, Ian Edwin

    2016-01-01

    g/mL). All other extracts were nontoxic. A total of 145 unique mass signals were detected in the lemon aspen methanolic and aqueous extracts by nonbiased high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Of these, 20 compounds were identified as being of particular interest due to their reported antioxidant and/or anticancer activities. Conclusions: The lack of toxicity and antiproliferative activity of the high antioxidant plant extracts against HeLa and CaCo2 cancer cell lines indicates their potential in the treatment and prevention of some cancers. SUMMARY Australian fruit extracts with high antioxidant contents were potent inhibitors of CaCo2 and HeLa carcinoma cell proliferationMethanolic lemon aspen extract was particularly potent, with IC50 values of 480 μg/mL (HeLa) and 769 μg/mL (CaCo2)High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight analysis highlighted and putatively identified 20 compounds in the antiproliferative lemon aspen extractsIn contrast, lower antioxidant content extracts stimulated carcinoma cell proliferationAll extracts with antiproliferative activity were nontoxic in the Artemia nauplii assay. Abbreviations used: DPPH: di (phenyl)- (2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) iminoazanium, HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, IC50: The concentration required to inhibit by 50%, LC50: The concentration required to achieve 50% mortality, MS: Mass spectrometry. PMID:27279705

  15. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 μg/kg dry weight.

  16. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry computer analysis of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in man and his environment--A multimedia environmental study.

    PubMed

    Barkley, J; Bunch, J; Bursey, J T; Castillo, N; Cooper, S D; Davis, J M; Erickson, M D; Harris, B S; Kirkpatrick, M; Michael, L C; Parks, S P; Pellizzari, E D; Ray, M; Smith, D; Tomer, K B; Wagner, R; Zweidinger, R A

    1980-04-01

    As part of a study to make a comparative analysis of selected halogenated compounds in man and the environmental media, a quantitative gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of the levels of the halogenated compounds found in the breath, blood and urine of an exposed population (Old Love Canal area, Niagara, New York) and their immediate environment (air and water) was undertaken. In addition, levels of halogenated hydrocarbons in air samples taken in the general Buffalo, Niagara Falls area were determined.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of plant metabolites in brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Ric C H; Schipper, Bert; Hall, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    The Brassicaceae family comprises a variety of plant species that are of high economic importance as -vegetables or industrial crops. This includes crops such as Brassica rapa (turnip, Bok Choi), B. oleracea (cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.), and B. napus (oil seed rape), and also includes the famous genetic model of plant research, Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Brassicaceae plants contain a large variety of interesting secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonoids. These metabolites are also of particular importance due to their proposed positive effects on human health. Next to these well-known groups of phytochemicals, many more metabolites are of course also present in crude extracts prepared from Brassica and Arabidopsis plant material.High-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), especially if combined with a high mass resolution instrument such as a QTOF MS, is a powerful approach to separate, detect, and annotate metabolites present in crude aqueous-alcohol plant extracts. Using an essentially unbiased procedure that takes into account all metabolite mass signals from the raw data files, detailed information on the relative abundance of hundreds of both known and, as yet, unknown semipolar metabolites can be obtained. These comprehensive metabolomics data can then be used to, for instance, identify genetic markers regulating metabolic composition, determine effects of (a)biotic stress or specific growth conditions, or establish metabolite changes occurring upon food processing or storage.This chapter describes in detail a procedure for preparing crude extracts and performing comprehensive HPLC-QTOF MS-based profiling of semi-polar metabolites in Brassicaceae plant material. Compounds present in the extract can be (partially or completely) annotated based on their accurate mass, their MS/MS fragments and on other specific chemical characteristics such as retention time and UV

  18. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  19. Integrated microscale analysis system for targeted liquid chromatography mass spectrometry proteomics on limited amounts of enriched cell populations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey G; Rejtar, Tomas; Martin, Stephen A

    2013-11-19

    Limited samples, such as those that are in vivo sourced via biopsy, are closely representative of biological systems and contain valuable information for drug discovery. However, these precious samples are often heterogeneous and require cellular prefractionation prior to proteomic analysis to isolate specific subpopulations of interest. Enriched cells from in vivo samples are often very limited (<10(4) cells) and pose a significant challenge to proteomic nanoliquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nanoLCMS) sample preparation. To enable the streamlined analysis of these limited samples, we have developed an online cell enrichment, microscale sample preparation, nanoLCMS proteomics workflow by integrating fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), focused ultrasonication, microfluidics, immobilized trypsin digestion, and nanoLCMS. To assess the performance of the online FACS-Chip-LCMS workflow, 5000 fluorescent labeled cells were enriched from a 5% heterogeneous cell population and processed for LCMS proteomics in less than 2 h. Within these 5000 enriched cells, 30 peptides corresponding to 17 proteins spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude of cellular abundance were quantified using a QExactive MS. The results from the online FACS-Chip-LCMS workflow starting from 5000 enriched cells were directly compared to results from a traditional macroscale sample preparation workflow starting from 2.0 × 10(6) cells. The microscale FACS-Chip-LCMS workflow demonstrated high cellular enrichment efficiency and high peptide recovery across the wide dynamic range of targeted peptides. Overall the microscale FACS-Chip-LCMS workflow has shown effectiveness in efficiently preparing limited amounts of FACS enriched cells in an online manner for proteomic LCMS.

  20. Fast simultaneous analysis of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in coffee by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Daniel; Donangelo, Carmen Marino; Farah, Adriana

    2008-10-15

    A rapid liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in coffee was developed and validated. The method involved extraction with hot water, clarification with basic lead acetate and membrane filtration, followed by chromatographic separation using a Spherisorb(®) S5 ODS2, 5μm chromatographic column and gradient elution with 0.3% aqueous formic acid/methanol at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. The electrospray ionization source was operated in the negative mode to generate sucrose ions and in the positive mode to generate caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid ions. Ionization suppression of all analytes was found due to matrix effect. Calibrations curves prepared in green and roasted coffee extracts were linear with r(2)>0.999. Roasted coffee was spiked and recoveries ranged from 93.0% to 105.1% for caffeine, from 85.2% to 116.2% for trigonelline, from 89.6% to 113.5% for nicotinic acid and from 94.1% to 109.7% for sucrose. Good repeatibilities (RSD<5%) were found for all analytes in the matrix. The limit of detection (LOD), calculated on the basis of signal-to-noise ratios of 3:1, was 11.9, 36.4, 18.5 and 5.0ng/mL for caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose, respectively. Analysis of 11 coffee samples (regular or decaffeinated green, ground roasted and instant) gave results in agreement with the literature. The method showed to be suitable for different types of coffee available in the market thus appearing as a fast and reliable alternative method to be used for routine coffee analysis.

  1. Analysis of halonitriles in drinking water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2012-02-17

    Halonitriles are a class of nitrogen-containing disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have been reported to be more toxic and carcinogenic than the regulated DBPs. While haloacetonitriles (HANs) are often measured in drinking waters, there is little information on the formation, characteristics, and occurrence of other, higher molecular weight halonitriles. Halopropionitriles and halobutyronitriles have been predicted to be highly toxic and carcinogenic, and may have sufficient potency and selectivity to account for epidemiological associations of chlorinated and chloraminated water with adverse health effects. This paper reports on the development, optimisation, and validation of a simple, robust, and sensitive analytical method for the determination of halonitriles in waters, as well as the application of the method to study the formation and characteristics of halonitriles. This is the first reported method development for analysis halopropionitriles and halobutyronitriles, and the first study on their formation and occurrence as DBPs in drinking waters. The new method uses headspace solid-phase microextraction to extract the halonitriles from water, which are then analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS SPME/GC-S). The method demonstrated good sensitivity (detection limits: 0.9-80 ng L⁻¹) and good precision (repeatability: 3.8-12%), and is linear over three orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (4.1 mg L⁻¹) were shown to be negligible in the analysis of halonitriles. The optimised method was used to study the stability and persistence of halonitriles in aqueous samples, and the formation and occurrence of halonitriles in waters. Results from laboratory-scale disinfection experiments showed that haloacetonitriles were formed in chlorinated and chloraminated samples, but 2,2-dichloropropionitrile was only measured in chloraminated samples. Results from surveys of several drinking water

  2. Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-19

    degradation involves chemical changes that lead to oxidation of fuel molecules to form a variety of oxygenated species, often resulting in the accumulation...D5304, 2006, “Standard Test Method for Assessing Middle Distillate Fuel Storage Stability by Oxygen Overpressure,” ASTM International, West Conshohocken...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--13-9471 Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas

  3. Analysis of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma by desiccated headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Zhang, Qiong; Zhong, Cai-Hong; Guo, Ming-Quan

    2016-04-01

    A new method for desiccated headspace (DHS) sampling of aqueous sample to GC-MS for the analysis of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma in different kiwifruit cultivars has been developed based on the complete hydrate formation between the sample solvent (water) with anhydrous salt (calcium chloride) at an elevated temperature (above the boiling point of the aqueous sample) in a non-contact format, which overcame the water-effect challenge to directly introduce aqueous sample into GC-MS analysis. By means of DHS, the volatile compounds in three different kiwifruit cultivars were analyzed and compared under the optimized operating conditions, mainly time and temperature for headspace equilibration, column temperature program for GC-MS measurement. As a result, 20 peaks of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma were detected and remarkable differences were found in the relative contents of three major volatile compounds among the three different kiwifruit cultivars, i.e., acetaldehyde, ethanol and furfural. The DHS sampling technique used in the present method can make the GC-MS analysis of volatile compounds in the aqueous sample within complex matrix possible without contaminating the GC-MS instrument. In terms of the analysis of volatile compounds in kiwifruit, the present method enabled a direct measurement on the filtrate of the aqueous kiwifruit pulp, without intermediate trap phase for the extraction of analytes, which will be more reliable and simpler as compared with any other headspace method in use. Thus, DHS coupled with GC-MS will be a new valuable tool available for the kiwifruit related research and organoleptic quality control.

  4. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Marais, David J. Des

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of δ13CPDB with a precision of 0.2‰ (1σ, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of δ on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of sample handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of <1‰.

  5. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  6. Analysis of the thermal reaction products of para polyphenylene by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the volatiles and sublimate produced when para-polyphenylene is pyrolyzed to constant weight under vacuum in the temperature range from 380 to 1000 C indicates that the polymer undergoes thermal degradation in two stages. The first stage involved dehydrohalogenation, which is essentially a curing reaction that produces crosslinking between polyphenylene chains resulting from the loss of chlorine from the polymer in the form of hydrogen chloride. The second stage of the thermal degradation is dehydrogenation because hydrogen is the major volatile species. Increasing amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and 9, 10 benzphenanthrene) in the sublimate, concomitant with increasing C/H ratios of the polymeric residue with pyrolysis temperature, is consistent with the buildup of polynuclear structures in the polymer matrix.

  7. Quantitative analysis of arbutin and hydroquinone in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurica, Karlo; Karačonji, Irena Brčić; Šegan, Sandra; Opsenica, Dušanka Milojković; Kremer, Dario

    2015-09-01

    The phenolic glycoside arbutin and its metabolite with uroantiseptic activity hydroquinone occur naturally in the leaves of various medicinal plants and spices. In this study, an extraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine arbutin and hydroquinone content in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves. The method showed good linearity (R2>0.9987) in the tested concentration range (0.5-200 μg mL(-1)), as well as good precision (RSD<5%), analytical recovery (96.2-98.0%), and sensitivity (limit of detection=0.009 and 0.004 μg mL(-1) for arbutin and hydroquinone, respectively). The results obtained by the validated GC-MS method corresponded well to those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The proposed method was then applied for determining arbutin and hydroquinone content in methanolic leaf extracts. The amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Koločep (6.82 mg g(-1) dry weight) was found to be higher (tpaired=43.57, tc=2.92) in comparison to the amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Mali Lošinj (2.75 mg g(-1) dry weight). Hydroquinone was not detected in any of the samples. The analytical features of the proposed GC-MS method demonstrated that arbutin and hydroquinone could be determined alternatively by gas chromatography. Due to its wide concentration range, the method could also be suitable for arbutin and hydroquinone analysis in leaves of other plant families (Rosaceae, Lamiaceae, etc.).

  8. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of diethylcarbamazine in human plasma for clinical pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mark S; King, Christopher L; Thomsen, Edward K; Siba, Peter M; Sanuku, Nelly; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic method using mass spectrometric detection was developed for the determination of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) in human plasma. DEC and its stable isotope internal standard d3-DEC were extracted from 0.25mL of human plasma using solid phase extraction. Chromatography was performed using a Phenomenex Synergi 4μ Fusion-RP column (2mm×250mm) with gradient elution. The retention time was approximately 4.8min. The assay was linear from 4 to 2200ng/mL. Analysis of quality control samples at 12, 300, and 1700ng/mL (N=15) had interday coefficients of variation of 8.4%, 5.4%, and 6.2%, respectively (N=15). Interday bias results were -2.2%, 6.0%, and 0.8%, respectively. Recovery of DEC from plasma ranged from 84.2% to 90.1%. The method was successfully applied to clinical samples from patients with lymphatic filariasis from a drug-drug interaction study between DEC and albendazole and/or ivermectin.

  9. Impurity analysis of pure aldrin using heart-cut multi-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Dai, Xinhua; Yin, Xiong; Li, Ming; Zhao, Yingchen; Zhou, Jian; Huang, Ting; Li, Hongmei

    2013-02-15

    Identification and quantification of related-structure impurity is a research focus in the purity assessment of organic compounds. Determination of the purity value and uncertainty assessment are also important in the metrological research. A method for the determination of related-structure impurity in pure aldrin sample has been developed by using heart-cut multi-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC/MS). Compared to the traditional one-dimensional (1-D) GC system, the two separated columns in the MDGC/MS system can effectively reduce co-elution, enhance separation capability, and thus improve detectability of the trace-level impurities. In addition, MDGC/MS system was simultaneously equipped with flame ionization detector (FID) or electron capture detector (ECD) in the first GC unit and mass spectrometry (MS) detector in the second GC unit. Therefore, accurate quantitative results of the trace-level impurities can be easily achieved by isolation of principal component to the second dimension column using "heart-cut" process. The mass fraction of related-structure impurities in aldrin samples obtained using MDGC/MS system ranged from 6.8×10⁻³ mg g⁻¹ to 26.47 mg g⁻¹ with five orders of magnitude, which is hard to be realized by mean of the 1-D GC. Excellent linearity with correlation coefficients of above 0.999 was achieved for each impurity analysis over a wide range of concentrations. Limits of quantification (LOQ) varied from 250 ng g⁻¹ to 330 ng g⁻¹ for FID, and from 1.0 ng g⁻¹ to 2.0 ng g⁻¹ detected by ECD. The combined standard uncertainty (u(c)) was lower than 0.37 mg g⁻¹ and 0.040 mg g⁻¹ detected using FID and ECD, respectively. Therefore, performance characterization of MDGC/MS used in the study is fit for quantification analysis of trace-level impurity. These results demonstrate that the MDGC/MS is extremely suitable for the purity assessment of organic compounds with medium structural complexity and low

  10. Analysis of polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2010-09-17

    Sulfide and polysulfides are strong nucleophiles and reducing agents that participate in many environmentally significant processes such as the formation of sulfide minerals and volatile organic sulfur compounds. Their presence in drinking water distribution systems are of particular concern and need to be assessed, since these species consume disinfectants and dissolved oxygen, react with metal ions to produce insoluble metal sulfides, and cause taste and odour problems. The analysis of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems is challenging due to their low concentrations, thermal instability and their susceptibility to undergo oxidation and disproportionation reactions. This paper reports on the development and optimisation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the determination of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems. The method uses methyl iodide to derivatize sulfide and polysulfides into their corresponding dimethyl(poly)sulfides, which are then extracted using solid-phase microextraction in the headspace mode and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Good sensitivity was achieved for the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides, with detection limits ranging from 50 to 240 ng L(-1). The method also demonstrated good precision (repeatability: 3-7%) and good linearity over two orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (3.8 mg L(-1)) and from sediment material from a drinking water distribution system were shown to have no interferences in the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides. The method provides a rapid, robust, and reliable mean to analyse trace levels of sulfides and polysulfides in aqueous systems. The new method described here is more accessible and user-friendly than methods based on closed-loop stripping analysis, which have been traditionally used for the analysis of these compounds. The optimised method was used to analyse samples collected

  11. Dissimilarity analysis and automatic identification of monomethylalkanes from gas chromatography mass spectrometry data 1. Principle and protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Liang, Yizeng

    2009-07-03

    Monomethylalkanes are common but important components in many naturally occurring and synthetic organic materials. Generally, this kind of compounds is routinely analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and identified by the retention pattern or similarity matching to the reference mass spectral library. However, these identification approaches rely on the limited standard database or costly standard compounds. When unknown monomethylalkane is absent from the reference library, these approaches might be less useful. In this study, based on the fragmentation rules and empirical observation, many interesting mass spectral characteristics of monomethylalkanes were discovered and employed to infer the number of carbon atoms and methylated position. Combined with the retention pattern, a protocol was described for the identification of monomethylalkane analyzed by GC-MS. After tested by simulated data and GC-MS data of the gasoline sample, it was demonstrated that the developing approach could automatically and correctly identify monomethylalkanes in complicated GC-MS data.

  12. Analysis of Indole Alkaloids from Rhazya stricta Hairy Roots by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Amir; Laakso, Into; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-12-17

    Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae) contains a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). This study focused on the composition of alkaloids obtained from transformed hairy root cultures of R. stricta employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). In the UPLC-MS analyses, a total of 20 TIAs were identified from crude extracts. Eburenine and vincanine were the main alkaloids followed by polar glucoalkaloids, strictosidine lactam and strictosidine. Secodine-type alkaloids, tetrahydrosecodinol, tetrahydro- and dihydrosecodine were detected too. The occurrence of tetrahydrosecodinol was confirmed for the first time for R. stricta. Furthermore, two isomers of yohimbine, serpentine and vallesiachotamine were identified. The study shows that a characteristic pattern of biosynthetically related TIAs can be monitored in Rhazya hairy root crude extract by this chromatographic method.

  13. Titan's organic aerosols: Molecular composition and structure of laboratory analogues inferred from pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Carrasco, Nathalie; Buch, Arnaud; Gautier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Analogues of Titan's aerosols are of primary interest in the understanding of Titan's atmospheric chemistry and climate, and in the development of in situ instrumentation for future space missions. Numerous studies have been carried out to characterize laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), but their molecular composition and structure are still poorly known. If pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about their chemical composition, highly disparate results were obtained with this technique. They can be attributed to the variety of analytical conditions used for pyr-GCMS analyses, and/or to differences in the nature of the analogues analyzed, that were produced with different laboratory set-ups under various operating conditions. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholin's molecular composition by pyr-GCMS, we carried out a systematic study with two major objectives: (i) exploring the pyr-GCMS analytical parameters to find the optimal ones for the detection of a wide range of chemical products allowing a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio in the gaseous reactive medium on the tholin's molecular structure. We used a radio-frequency plasma discharge to synthetize tholins with different concentrations of CH4 diluted in N2. The samples were pyrolyzed at temperatures covering the 200-700°C range. The extracted gases were then analyzed by GCMS for their molecular identification. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for characterizing the molecular composition of our tholins by GCMS analysis is found to be 600°C. This temperature choice results from the best compromise between the number of compounds released, the quality of the signal and the appearance of pyrolysis artifacts. About a hundred molecules are identified as pyrolysates. A common major chromatographic pattern appears clearly for all the

  14. Pressurized liquid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fragrance allergens, musks, phthalates and preservatives in baby wipes.

    PubMed

    Celeiro, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2015-03-06

    Baby wipes and wet toilet paper are specific hygiene care daily products used on newborn and children skin. These products may contain complexes mixtures of harmful chemicals. A method based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sixty-five chemical compounds (fragrance allergens, preservatives, musks, and phthalates) in wipes and wet toilet paper for children. These compounds are legislated in Europe according Regulation EC No 1223/2009, being twelve of them banned for their use in cosmetics, and one of them, 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), is banned in products intended for children under 3 years. Also, propyl-, and butylparaben will be prohibited in leave-on cosmetic products designed for application on the nappy area of children under 3 years from April 2015. PLE is a fast, simple, easily automated technique, which permits to integrate a clean-up step during the extraction process reducing analysis time and stages. The proposed PLE-based procedure was optimized on real non-spiked baby wipe samples by means of experimental design to study the influence on extraction of parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, extraction time, and sorbent type. Under the selected conditions, the method was validated showing satisfactory linearity, and intra-day, and inter-day precision. Recoveries were between 80-115% for most of the compounds with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 15%. Finally, twenty real samples were analyzed. Thirty-six of the target analytes were detected, highlighting the presence of phenoxyethanol in all analyzed samples at high concentration levels (up to 0.8%, 800μgg(-1)). Methyl paraben (MeP), and ethyl paraben (EtP) were found in 40-50% of the samples, and the recently banned isobutyl paraben (iBuP) and isopropyl paraben (iPrP), were detected in one and seven samples, respectively, at concentrations between

  15. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  16. Application of Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Method for Field Sampling and Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A RAPID METHOD FOR FIELD SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A RAPID METHOD FOR FIELD...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 iii ABSTRACT APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

    2008-11-13

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

  18. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    types were determined by use of the capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The performance of each method was assessed by using data on recoveries of compounds in fortified surface-water, wastewater, and reagent-water samples. These experiments (referred to as spike experiments) consist of fortifying (or spiking) samples with known amounts of target analytes. Surface-water-spike experiments were performed by using samples obtained from a stream in Colorado (unfiltered method) and a stream in New York (filtered method). Wastewater spike experiments for both the filtered and unfiltered methods were performed by using a treated wastewater obtained from a single wastewater treatment plant in New York. Surface water and wastewater spike experiments were fortified at both low and high concentrations and termed low- and high-level spikes, respectively. Reagent water spikes were assessed in three ways: (1) set spikes, (2) a low-concentration fortification experiment, and (3) a high-concentration fortification experiment. Set spike samples have been determined since 2009, and consist of analysis of fortified reagent water for target compounds included for each group of 10 to18 environmental samples analyzed at the NWQL. The low-concentration and high-concentration reagent spike experiments, by contrast, represent a one-time assessment of method performance. For each spike experiment, mean recoveries ranging from 60 to 130 percent indicate low bias, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than ( Of the compounds included in the filtered method, 21 had mean recoveries ranging from 63 to 129 percent for the low-level and high-level surface-water spikes, and had low ()132 percent]. For wastewater spikes, 24 of the compounds included in the filtered method had recoveries ranging from 61 to 130 percent for the low-level and high-level spikes. RSDs were 130 percent) or variable recoveries (RSDs >30 percent) for low-level wastewater spikes, or low recoveries ( Of

  19. Rapid and sensitive method for analysis of nitrate in meat samples using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Masoom Raza; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; ALOthman, Zeid A; Rafiquee, M Z A

    2015-12-05

    A sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of nitrate in meat samples. Selected ion reaction (SIR) mode was adopted to identify and quantify the nitrate. Chromatographic analyses were performed on a BEH C-18 column with a mobile phase consisting of a surfactant (Cetylpyridinium chloride) and acetonitrile in equal ratio (50/50, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL min(-1). The limit of detection and limit of quantitation of the developed method was found to be 0.0599 and 0.1817 mg kg(-1), respectively. The linearity of the proposed method was checked in the concentration range of 0.5-10 mg kg(-1) with an excellent correlation coefficient (r) of 0.997. The recovery of the nitrate in the meat samples were in the range of 98.02-98.99%.

  20. Thermospray Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (TSP LC/MS) Analysis of the Alkaloids from Cinchona in vitro Cultures.

    PubMed

    Giroud, C; van der Leer, T; van der Heijden, R; Verpoorte, R; Heeremans, C E; Niessen, W M; Vander Greef, J

    1991-04-01

    The alkaloids from CINCHONA LEDGERIANA shoot cultures and from CINCHONA ROBUSTA shoot cultures and a compact globular structure (CGS) culture were analyzed by thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (TSP LC/MS). Because of the relative stability of the alkaloids under TSP discharge ionization conditions, a protonated molecule was observed in the mass spectra with hardly any fragmentation. When the reference compounds were available, the knowledge of the molecular mass and of the retention time was sufficient to identify most of the alkaloids. HPLC with UV photodiode-array detection complemented LC/MS perfectly by providing information about the aromatic part of the alkaloids (structure and substitution pattern). New alkaloids detected in CINCHONA IN VITRO cultures were 5-methoxytryptamine and corynantheal. In order to determine whether 5-methoxytryptamine was a precursor of the methoxylated quinolines, this indole was incubated with secologanin and several CINCHONA ROBUSTA crude protein extracts. Under all conditions tested, the coupling of 5-methoxytryptamine with secologanin remained unsuccessful. Only tryptamine condensed with secologanin to yield strictosidine. These results indicate that CINCHONA cells are able to methoxylate simple indoles like tryptamine and that 5-methoxytryptamine is very likely not used for the subsequent biosynthesis of the methoxylated quinolines.

  1. Toward understanding molecular heterogeneity of polysorbates by application of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with computer-aided data analysis.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Oleg V; Ji, Junyan A; Wang, Y John; Vega, Felix; Ling, Victor T

    2011-05-15

    Polysorbates (PS) are widely used as oil-in-water emulsifiers, stabilizers, wetting agents, solubilizers, and dispersants in the agricultural, food, personal care, and pharmaceutical industries due to their cost effectiveness, biocompatibility, formulation flexibility, low toxicity, and good stabilizing and protecting properties. The polysorbates are often pictured as polyoxyethylated sorbitan monoesters of saturated and/or unsaturated fatty acids. In reality, polysorbates are complex mixtures of multiple components, as follows from the reactions involved in their production. In this work, we report a novel application of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the characterization of polysorbates. This method takes advantage of accurate mass measurements and information on the identity of a fatty acid from "in-source" generated characteristic dioxolanylium ions. The method allowed us to perform quick profiling of fatty acids in PS 20 and 80 which, combined with a computer-aided peak assignment algorithm, facilitated detailed characterization of their constituents. As a major finding, we determined that different samples of PS 20 varied from 0% to 15% in relative amounts of unsaturated oleic acid. Although the consequences of this difference were not fully evaluated in this work, one might expect that PS 20 with larger amounts of oleic acid will be more prone to autoxidation, thus potentially having greater impact on the oxidative degradation of the biotherapeutics it formulates.

  2. Quantitative ester analysis in cachaca and distilled spirits by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R; Franco, Douglas W

    2008-07-23

    An analytical procedure for the separation and quantification of ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl nonanoate, ethyl decanoate, isoamyl octanoate, and ethyl laurate in cachaca, rum, and whisky by direct injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. The analytical method is simple, selective, and appropriated for the determination of esters in distilled spirits. The limit of detection ranged from 29 (ethyl hexanoate) to 530 (ethyl acetate) microg L(-1), whereas the standard deviation for repeatability was between 0.774% (ethyl hexanoate) and 5.05% (isoamyl octanoate). Relative standard deviation values for accuracy vary from 90.3 to 98.5% for ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate, respectively. Ethyl acetate was shown to be the major ester in cachaca (median content of 22.6 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol), followed by ethyl lactate (median content of 8.32 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol). Cachaca produced in copper and hybrid alembic present a higher content of ethyl acetate and ethyl lactate than those produced in a stainless-steel column, whereas cachaca produced by distillation in a stainless-steel column present a higher content of ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl laurate. As expected, ethyl acetate is the major ester in whiskey and rum, followed by ethyl lactate for samples of rum. Nevertheless, whiskey samples exhibit ethyl lactate at contents lower or at the same order of magnitude of the fatty esters.

  3. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace.

  4. Convenient analysis of vitamin D in cheese and other food matrixes by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dimartino, Gianluca

    2007-01-01

    A convenient method is presented for determination of vitamin D in natural cheese, processed cheese, milk, cereals, noncarbonated soft drinks, and juice by liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Samples were saponified, extracted, evaporated, redissolved in acetonitrile, and injected into an LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-MS system with no preparative chromatographic steps. Vitamin D was determined by selected ion monitoring. MS response was linear for vitamin D3 and its internal standard vitamin D2, and overall average recoveries ranged from 98 to 105%. A blending experiment in which shredded vitamin D3-fortified cheddar was mixed with control nonfortified cheddar showed linearity. The limit of detection for vitamin D was 1.3 ng and the limit of quantitation was 3 ng. The method gave good accuracy and precision, with a standard deviation of 9.5 and relative standard deviation of 6.7%. Results for vitamin D3 obtained with this method for different food matrixes, at different levels, were in agreement with those obtained with the reference LC/UV method currently used by many laboratories and derived from AOAC Official Method 982.29.

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of effects of dietary fish oil on total fatty acid composition in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peiru; Sun, Min; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora; Fisher, Gary J.; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Altering the fatty acid (FA) composition in the skin by dietary fish oil could provide therapeutic benefits. Although it has been shown that fish oil supplementation enhances EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) abundance in the skin, comprehensive skin FA profiling is needed. We established a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method, which allows precise quantification of FA profile using small (<24 mm2 for mice and <12 mm2 for humans) skin specimens that can be readily obtained from live mice and humans. We determined mouse skin FA composition after 2, 4 and 8 weeks of consuming a control diet or a diet supplemented with fish oil. Fish oil markedly enhanced EPA and DHA in mouse skin within 2 weeks, and this increase plateaued after 4 weeks. The FA composition in mouse skin was different from that of serum, indicating that skin has homeostatic control of FA metabolism. Mice fed the control diet designed to simulate Western human diet displayed similar skin FA composition as that of humans. The present study presents a validated method for FA quantification that is needed to investigate the mechanisms of actions of dietary treatments in both mouse and human skin. PMID:28195161

  6. A metabolic profiling analysis of the nephrotoxicity of acyclovir in rats using ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenmin; Gu, Lili; Zhang, Xinyue; Xu, Jiadong; Lu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) exposure is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). The toxicity mechanism of ACV has always been a matter of debate. The present study investigated into the time-effect relationship and dose-effect relationship of ACV-induced nephrotoxicity in rats using metabonomics. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into four groups: a 0.9% NaCl solution group, and 100, 300, and 600mg/kg ACV-treated groups; the ACV or vehicle solution was administered with a single intravenous injection. Urine was collected at different time periods (12h before administration, and 0-6h, 7-12h, and 13-24h after administration). Routine urinalysis was conducted by a urine automatic analyzer. Renal markers, including urine urea nitrogen, urine creatinine, and urinary N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity, were determined using established protocols. Urinary metabolites were evaluated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). In the ACV-treated rats, increased levels of protein (PRO), occult blood (BLD), white blood cell (WBC), and NAG activity in urine were observed, while the urine creatinine and urea nitrogen levels showed a decrease compared with the control. Moreover, urine metabolites significantly changed after the treatment with ACV, and all the effects induced by ACV were dose-time dependent. Finally, 4 metabolites (guanine, 4-guanidinobutyric acid, creatinine, and urea) were identified, which can be used for further research on the mechanism of ACV-induced nephrotoxicity.

  7. Tailored liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis improves the coverage of the intracellular metabolome of HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Cuykx, Matthias; Negreira, Noelia; Beirnaert, Charlie; Van den Eede, Nele; Rodrigues, Robim; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Laukens, Kris; Covaci, Adrian

    2017-03-03

    Metabolomics protocols are often combined with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) using mostly reversed phase chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, e.g. quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometers to measure as many metabolites as possible. In this study, we optimised the LC-MS separation of cell extracts after fractionation in polar and non-polar fractions. Both phases were analysed separately in a tailored approach in four different runs (two for the non-polar and two for the polar-fraction), each of them specifically adapted to improve the separation of the metabolites present in the extract. This approach improves the coverage of a broad range of the metabolome of the HepaRG cells and the separation of intra-class metabolites. The non-polar fraction was analysed using a C18-column with end-capping, mobile phase compositions were specifically adapted for each ionisation mode using different co-solvents and buffers. The polar extracts were analysed with a mixed mode Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) system. Acidic metabolites from glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, together with phosphorylated compounds, were best detected with a method using ion pairing (IP) with tributylamine and separation on a phenyl-hexyl column. Accurate mass detection was performed with the QTOF in MS-mode only using an extended dynamic range to improve the quality of the dataset. Parameters with the greatest impact on the detection were the balance between mass accuracy and linear range, the fragmentor voltage, the capillary voltage, the nozzle voltage, and the nebuliser pressure. By using a tailored approach for the intracellular HepaRG metabolome, consisting of three different LC techniques, over 2200 metabolites can be measured with a high precision and acceptable linear range. The developed method is suited for qualitative untargeted LC-MS metabolomics studies.

  8. Complementary fragmentation pattern analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the precious lignan content of Cirsium weeds.

    PubMed

    Boldizsár, I; Kraszni, M; Tóth, F; Noszál, B; Molnár-Perl, I

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, as novelties to the field, it is confirmed at first, that the fruits of Cirsium species, regarded as injurious weeds, do contain lignans, two, different butyrolactone-type glycoside/aglycone pairs: the well known arctiin/arctigenin and the particularly rare tracheloside/trachelogenin species. These experiences were supported by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/(MS)) and by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The study reflects the powerful impact of the complementary chromatographic mass fragmentation evidences resulting in the identification and quantification, the extremely rare, with on line technique not yet identified and described, tracheloside/trachelogenin pair lignans, without authentic standard compounds. Fragmentation pattern analysis of the trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative of trachelogenin, based on GC-MS, via two different fragmentation pathways confirmed the detailed structure of the trachelogenin molecule. The complementary chromatographic evidences have been unambiguously confirmed, by (1)H and (13)C NMR analysis of trachelogenin, isolated by preparative chromatography. Identification and quantification of the fruit extracts of four Cirsium (C.) species (C. arvense, C. canum, C. oleraceum, and C. palustre), revealed that (i) all four species do accumulate the tracheloside/trachelogenin or the arctiin/arctigenin butyrolactone-type glycoside/aglycone pairs, (ii) the overwhelming part of lignans are present as glycosides (tracheloside 9.1-14.5 mg/g, arctiin 28.6-39.3 mg/g, expressed on dry fruit basis), (iii) their acidic and enzymatic hydrolyses to the corresponding aglycones, to trachelogenin and arctigenin are fast and quantitative and (iv) the many-sided beneficial trachelogenin and arctigenin can be prepared separately, without impurities, excellent for medicinal purposes.

  9. Differentiation of the volatile profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes by dynamic headspace extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Concina, I; Falasconi, M; Gobbi, E; Pardo, M; Sberveglieri, G

    2009-01-15

    The aromatic profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes was analyzed by the dynamic headspace extraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Canned tomatoes contaminated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus carbonarius were analyzed after 2 and 7 days. About 100 volatiles were detected, among which alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were the most abundant compounds. Gas chromatographic peak areas were used for statistical purposes. First, principal component analysis was carried out in order to visualize data trends and clusters. Then, linear discriminant analysis was performed in order to detect the set of volatile compounds ables to differentiate groups of analyzed samples. Five volatile compounds, i.e. ethanol, beta-myrcene, o-methyl styrene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and 1-octanol, were found to be able to better discriminate between uncontaminated and contaminated samples. Prediction ability of the calculated model was estimated to be 100% by the "leave-one-out" cross-validation. An electronic nose device was then used to analyze the same contaminated and not contaminated canned tomato samples. Preliminary results were compared with those obtained by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showing a good agreement.

  10. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions.

  11. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of estrogenic compounds in soil and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zulin; Rhind, Stewart M; Kerr, Christine; Osprey, Mark; Kyle, Carol E

    2011-01-24

    A selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) method, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the simultaneous extraction and clean-up of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), estriol (E3) and bisphenol A (BPA) from soil samples is described. The on-line clean-up of soil by SPLE was achieved using different organic matter retainers, including silica, alumina and Florisil, the most effective being silica. Thus, different amounts of silica, in conjunction with different extraction solvents (acetone, ethyl acetate, isohexane and dichloromethane), either alone or in combination, were used to extract the target chemicals from spiked soil samples. It was shown that 3g silica resulted in satisfactory rates of recovery of target compounds and acetone:dichloromethane (1:3, v/v) was efficient in extracting and eluting estrogenic compounds for SPLE. Variables affecting the SPLE efficiency, including temperature and pressure were studied; the optimum parameters were 60°C and 1500 psi, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method were 0.02-0.37 ng g(-1) for the different estrogenic chemicals studied. The outputs using the proposed method were linear over the range from 0.1 to 120 ng g(-1) for E1, E2, EE2, 0.2-120 ng g(-1) for E3, and 0.5-120 ng g(-1) for BPA. The optimized method was further verified by performing spiking experiments in natural soil matrices; good rates of recovery and reproducibility were achieved for all selected compounds and the method was successfully applied to soil samples from Northeast Scotland, for the determination of the target compounds.

  12. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  13. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  14. Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for improved analysis of geosmin and other fungal "off" volatiles in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valle, H; Silva, L C; Paterson, R R M; Oliveira, J M; Venâncio, A; Lima, N

    2010-10-01

    Geosmin is a volatile fungal metabolite with an earthy aroma produced in grape products from rotten grapes. The accumulation of geosmin in grapes is caused by the interaction of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) has great utility for collecting volatile compounds in wine. However, contamination with earthy odours may have occurred previously in the must and novel methods are required for this commodity. In the present report, several parameters of the SPME were evaluated to optimize geosmin extraction. The method permitted quantification of geosmin and other fungal volatiles by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) at very low concentrations. Limits of detection and quantification (L(D) and L(Q)) for geosmin were 4.7 ng L(-1) and 15.6 ng L(-1) respectively. The RSD was 4.1% and the recovery rates ranged from 115% to 134%. Uniquely, haloanisoles were analyzed by using only one internal standard (2,3,6-trichloroanisole) thus avoiding the synthesis of deuterated anisole analogues that are used as internal standard in other methods. The method was used for the analysis of grape juice samples inoculated with B. cinerea and P. expansum. Geosmin and methylisoborneol were the compounds that appeared to contribute most to earthy odours, although other fungal compounds which are claimed to cause earthy or mouldy off-odours were detected (e.g. 1-octen-3-ol and fenchol).

  15. Trimethylsilyl speciations of cathine, cathinone and norephedrine followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Direct sample preparation and analysis of khatamines.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Borbála; Fodor, Blanka; Boldizsár, Imre; Molnár-Perl, Ibolya

    2016-04-01

    A literature criticism is given on methods using currently gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine cathine (CAT), cathinone (CTN) and norephedrine (NE), jointly khatamines. In this study, khatamines' oximation, trimethylsilylation and mass fragmentation properties-applying N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), its trimethyliodosilane (TMIS) catalyst containing version (MSTFA(TMIS)), N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-was highlighted, at first. Derivatization, mass fragmentation and quantitation related, optimized model investigations have been carried out as a function of the reaction times and conditions. Special emphasis was put (i) on the stability of the primarily formed (CAT-2TMS, NE-2TMS, CTN-TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2), then transformed, fully derived (CAT-3TMS, NE-3MTS, CTN-2TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2) species, and, (ii) on the proportionally formed stable products, suitable to selective quantitation of all three natural amines, simultaneously. Results, as novelty to the field confirmed that (i) TMIS catalyzed trimethylsilyation triggers to form fully derivatized species unfortunately, in part only; while, (ii) khatamines' simultaneous quantitation needs to be carried out in a two steps derivatization process consisting of oximation (1st step, hydroxylamine in pyridine) and trimethylsilylation (2nd step, MSTFA), to the CAT-2TMS, NE-2TMS, CTN-TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2. These species were characterized with their retention, mass fragmentation and analytical performance properties, in model solutions and in the presence of plant tissues, as well: R(2), limit of quantitation (LOQ) data, expressed in pg/1μL injection basis, proved to be 62.5pg (CAT), 20pg (NE) and 62.5pg (CTN), respectively. The practical utility of proposal was enormously enhanced by the novel, direct sample preparation method. In this process, the freshly harvested, freeze-dried, then pulverized leaves of Catha edulis FORKS were

  16. [Analysis of surface-active substances in Sapindus mukurossi by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, X C

    2001-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry method has been developed for the analysis of surface-active substances (hederagenin saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides) in the extracts of the pericarp of Sapindus mukurossi. The method consists of the separation of surface-active substances using C18 HPLC column, followed by detection using a diode-array detector at 210 nm and then on-line mass spectrometry. Hederagenin saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides were characterized as [M - H]- or [M + Na]+. Based on the relative molecular mass, established by mass spectrometry and the structure induced by in-source CID technology, three components that had not been reported in Sapindus mukurossi before were identified. Several surface-active substances were obtained by means of semi-preparative HPLC. Their structures were further confirmed by NMR spectrometry as mukurozi-saponin Y2, mukurozi-saponin X, mukurozioside I a and mukurozioside II a.

  17. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples.

  18. Studies on the metabolism and the toxicological analysis of the nootropic drug fipexide in rat urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Staack, Roland F; Maurer, Hans H

    2004-05-25

    Qualitative studies are described on the metabolism and the toxicological analysis of the nootropic fipexide (FIP) in rat urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). FIP was extensively metabolized to 1-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl)piperazine (MDBP), 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, 1-[2-(4-chlorophenoxy)acetyl]piperazine, N-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzyl)piperazine, piperazine, N-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl)ethylenediamine, and N-[2-(4-chlorophenoxy)acetyl]ethylenediamine. The authors' systematic toxicological analysis (STA) procedure using full-scan GC-MS after acid hydrolysis of one urine aliquot, liquid-liquid extraction and acetylation allowed the detection of FIP via its metabolites in rat urine after administration of a common FIP dose. Therefore, this qualitative procedure should also be suitable for detection of a FIP intake in human urine. Differentiation of an intake of FIP from that of other drugs which form common metabolites is discussed.

  19. Preparation of durable graphene-bonded titanium fibers for efficient microextraction of phthalates from aqueous matrices and analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo-Tao; Li, Hai-Fang; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yanguo; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2014-11-28

    A solid-phase microextraction fiber (SPME) was synthesized for pre-concentration of 15 phthalates from aqueous samples. Graphene oxide was immobilized on Ti wire with titanol groups using a cross-linking agent and subsequently reduced to yield a folded and wrinkled graphene coating. This graphene-Ti fiber demonstrated durable mechanical robustness and enhanced stability for more than 200 extraction cycles due to the Ti substrate and chemical bond. The extraction efficiencies reached highest when the graphene layers were four and their performances were superior to commercial SPME fibers. The prepared fiber was used for pre-concentration of phthalates from aqueous samples by direct immersion extraction and thermal desorption for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of 15 phthalates with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 82.8-97.8% for bottled water and 73.3-102.0% for intravenous drips in plastic packaging.

  20. A headspace solid-phase microextraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in milk samples.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, N; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2008-06-01

    A sensitive and solvent-free method for the determination of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, namely, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene, with up to four aromatic rings, in milk samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection has been developed. A polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber was chosen and used at 75 degrees C for 60 min. Detection limits ranging from 0.2 to 5 ng L(-1) were attained at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, depending on the compound and the milk sample under analysis. The proposed method was applied to ten different milk samples and the presence of six of the analytes studied in a skimmed milk with vegetal fiber sample was confirmed. The reliability of the procedure was verified by analyzing two different certified reference materials and by recovery studies.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  2. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from dairy and swine facilities: Part 5-Simultaneous chemical and sensory analysis with Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry - Olfactometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) for air samples collected at barn exhaust fans were used for quantification and ranking of odor impact of target odorous gases. Fifteen target odorous VOCs (odorants) were selected. Air sampl...

  3. Analysis of Mixed Aryl/Alkyl Esters by Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in the Presence of Perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Locke, D. R.; Lewis, E. K.

    2017-01-01

    Mars is an important target for Astrobiology. A key goal of the MSL mission was to determine whether Mars was habitable in the past, a que-tion that has now been definitely determined to be yes. Another key goal for Mars exploration is to understand the origin and distribution of organic material on Mars; this question is being addressed by the SAM instrument on MSL, and will also be informed by two upcoming Mars exploration missions, ExoMars and Mars 2020. These latter two missions have instrumentation capable of detecting and characterize organic molecules. Over the next decade, these missions will analyze organics in surface, near-surface and sub-surface samples. Each mission has the capability to analyze organics by different methods (pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [py-GC-MS]; laser desorption and thermal volatilization GC-MS; and Raman spectroscopy). Plausibly extraterrestrial organics were recently discovered by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), providing an important first step towards understanding the organic inventory on Mars [1]. The compounds detected were chlorobenzenes and chloroalkanes, but it was argued that chlorination of these compounds occurred during pyrolysis of samples containing unchlorinated organics in the presence of perchlorate. A recent report analyzed a suite of aromatic (benzene, toluene, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, and mellitic acid) and aliphatic (acetic acid, propane, propanol, and hexane) by pyrolysis under SAM-like conditions in the presence of perchlorate to attempt to constrain possible precursor molecules for the organic molecules detected on Mars. For aromatic compounds, the aromatic acids all readily produced SAM-relevant chlorobenzes, whereas benzene and toluene did not. This observation suggests that the chlorobenzene detected on Mars could have derived from compounds like mellitic acid, consistent with the previous hypothesis by Benner et al. [3]. Among the aliphatic molecules, it was shown that

  4. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan monitoring study in the northeast of Spain using a magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay and confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantiani, Lina; Farré, Marinella; Asperger, Danijela; Rubio, Fernando; González, Susana; López de Alda, Maria J.; Petrović, Mira; Shelver, Weilin L.; Barceló, Damià

    2008-10-01

    SummaryFor the first time, the occurrence of triclosan and its metabolite methyl-triclosan was investigated in a typical Mediterranean area using a two-step methodology based on screening using a magnetic particle immunoassay (IA) and confirmatory analysis by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this study, 95 environmental samples were analyzed. A commercial immunoassay was assessed for use in the different types of water selected for this study. A large monitoring study was performed on the influent and the effluent of eight wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), water samples from Ebro and Llobregat rivers, and drinking water. All wastewater samples tested in this study (influents and effluents) showed the presence of triclosan, with concentrations for raw influents being high (10 μg/L as average value). The percentages of triclosan removal for the WWTPs were evaluated (30-70%) along the different treatment processes showing that the best removal rates were obtained by the processes equipped with membrane bioreactors (MBRs). However, important concentrations of triclosan were detected even after treatment by MBRs. The presence of this biocide was confirmed in 50% of the river samples analyzed. Twenty two drinking water samples from the Barcelona city area were investigated, and in this case no triclosan was detected. Due to its properties and the widespread usage of triclosan, there is a need for monitoring and controlling the amounts present in wastewater effluents, river water, drinking water catchments areas, and drinking water. To this end, we present a feasible methodology using a magnetic particle-based immunoassay as a screening, followed by confirmatory analysis using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS).

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds from Aromatic Plants by Means of Dynamic Headspace Extraction and Multiple Headspace Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Alonso, Ibone; Vallejo, Asier; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Seven monoterpenes in 4 aromatic plants (sage, cardamom, lavender, and rosemary) were quantified in liquid extracts and directly in solid samples by means of dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS) and multiple headspace extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MHSE), respectively. The monoterpenes were 1st extracted by means of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and analyzed by an optimized DHS-GC-MS. The optimization of the dynamic extraction step and the desorption/cryo-focusing step were tackled independently by experimental design assays. The best working conditions were set at 30 °C for the incubation temperature, 5 min of incubation time, and 40 mL of purge volume for the dynamic extraction step of these bioactive molecules. The conditions of the desorption/cryo-trapping step from the Tenax TA trap were set at follows: the temperature was increased from 30 to 300 °C at 150 °C/min, although the cryo-trapping was maintained at -70 °C. In order to estimate the efficiency of the SFE process, the analysis of monoterpenes in the 4 aromatic plants was directly carried out by means of MHSE because it did not require any sample preparation. Good linearity (r2) > 0.99) and reproducibility (relative standard deviation % <12) was obtained for solid and liquid quantification approaches, in the ranges of 0.5 to 200 ng and 10 to 500 ng/mL, respectively. The developed methods were applied to analyze the concentration of 7 monoterpenes in aromatic plants obtaining concentrations in the range of 2 to 6000 ng/g and 0.25 to 110 μg/mg, respectively.

  6. The Applications and Features of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in the Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With increasingly improved separation of complex samples and detection of unknown material capabilities, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research. This article describes the principles of liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) and their advantages and disadvantages in qualitative and quantitative analysis of TCM. We retrieved research literatures about the application of LC-MS in TCM published during the past five years at home and abroad. To better guide the analysis of TCM, this review mainly focuses on the applications category of LC-MS, how often different kinds of LC-MS are used, and the qualitative and quantitative ability of various LC-MS in the study of TCM. PMID:27956918

  7. Steroid profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for adrenal diseases.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jeffrey G; Matthew, Susan; Auchus, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    The ability to measure steroid hormone concentrations in blood and urine specimens is central to the diagnosis and proper treatment of adrenal diseases. The traditional approach has been to assay each steroid hormone, precursor, or metabolite using individual aliquots of serum, each with a separate immunoassay. For complex diseases, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia and adrenocortical cancer, in which the assay of several steroids is essential for management, this approach is time consuming and costly, in addition to using large amounts of serum. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of steroid metabolites in urine has been employed for many years but only in a small number of specialized laboratories and suffers from slow throughput. The advent of commercial high-performance liquid chromatography instruments coupled to tandem mass spectrometers offers the potential for medium- to high-throughput profiling of serum steroids using small quantities of sample. Here, we review the physical principles of mass spectrometry, the instrumentation used for these techniques, the terminology used in this field and applications to steroid analysis.

  8. Rapid differentiation of three Chamaecyparis species (Cupressaceae) grown in Taiwan using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ya; Chen, Ying-Ju; Cheng, Sen-Sung; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2011-10-26

    Three Chamaecyparis species (C. formosensis, C. obtusa, and C. obtusa var. formosana) are difficult to distinguish by the naked eye. Therefore, from the chemotaxonomic point of view, it would be valuable to find a simple and rapid method to differentiate these three Chamaecyparis species. In this study, the chemical compositions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from mature leaves were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS). Then cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were conducted for the BVOC constituents to reveal the differences among these three species. Results from SPME-GC/MS showed that the compositions of BVOCs from the three species were distinctly different. Moreover, these species were clearly differentiated according to the results of CA and PCA. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that SPME-GC/MS coupled with CA and PCA is a feasible and rapid technique to differentiate Chamaecyparis species with similar morphological characteristics.

  9. A reverse-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of high-molecular-weight fructooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Scott J; Fraser, Karl; Lane, Geoffrey A; Villas-Boas, Silas; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2009-12-01

    Many important crop and forage plants accumulate polymeric water-soluble carbohydrates as fructooligosaccharides (or fructans). We have developed an improved method for the analysis of the full fructan complement in plant extracts based on porous graphitized carbon chromatography coupled to negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. By the use of profile data collection and multiple charge state ions, the effective mass range of the ion trap was extended to allow for the analysis of very high-molecular-weight oligosaccharides. This method allows the separation and quantification of isomeric fructan oligomers ranging from degree of polymerization (DP) 3 to DP 49.

  10. Analysis of biogenic carbonyl compounds in rainwater by stir bar sorptive extraction technique with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair C; Shaw, Marvin D

    2017-02-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction is a powerful technique for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds in aqueous matrices. Carbonyl compounds are ubiquitous components in rainwater, however, it is a major challenge to accurately identify and sensitively quantify carbonyls from rainwater due to the complex matrix. A stir bar sorptive extraction technique was developed to efficiently extract carbonyls from aqueous samples following chemical derivatization by O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride. Several commercial stir bars in two sizes were used to simultaneously measure 29 carbonyls in aqueous samples with detection by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. A 100 mL aqueous sample was extracted by stir bars and the analytes on stir bars were desorbed into a 2 mL solvent solution in an ultrasonic bath. The preconcentration Coefficient for different carbonyls varied between 30 and 45 times. The limits of detection of stir bar sorptive extraction with gas chromatography mass spectrometry for carbonyls (10-30 ng/L) were improved by ten times compared with other methods such as gas chromatography with electron capture detection and stir bar sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The technique was used to determine carbonyls in rainwater samples collected in York, UK, and 20 carbonyl species were quantified including glyoxal, methylglyoxal, isobutenal, 2-hydroxy ethanal.

  11. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  12. Assessment of a new method for the analysis of decomposition gases of polymers by a combining thermogravimetric solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duemichen, E; Braun, U; Senz, R; Fabian, G; Sturm, H

    2014-08-08

    For analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products of polymers, the common techniques are thermogravimetry, combined with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). These methods offer a simple approach to the decomposition mechanism, especially for small decomposition molecules. Complex spectra of gaseous mixtures are very often hard to identify because of overlapping signals. In this paper a new method is described to adsorb the decomposition products during controlled conditions in TGA on solid-phase extraction (SPE) material: twisters. Subsequently the twisters were analysed with thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS), which allows the decomposition products to be separated and identified using an MS library. The thermoplastics polyamide 66 (PA 66) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) were used as example polymers. The influence of the sample mass and of the purge gas flow during the decomposition process was investigated in TGA. The advantages and limitations of the method were presented in comparison to the common analysis techniques, TGA-FTIR and TGA-MS.

  13. High-Throughput and Comprehensive Lipidomic Analysis Using Ultrahigh-Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2015-07-21

    New analytical approach for high-throughput and comprehensive lipidomic analysis of biological samples using ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is presented in this work as an alternative approach to established shotgun MS or high-performance liquid chromatography-MS. The lipid class separation is performed by UHPSFC method based on 1.7 μm particle-bridged ethylene hybrid silica column with a gradient of methanol-water-ammonium acetate mixture as a modifier. All parameters of UHPSFC conditions are carefully optimized and their influence on the chromatographic behavior of lipids is discussed. The final UHPSFC/ESI-MS method enables a fast separation of 30 nonpolar and polar lipid classes within 6 min analysis covering 6 main lipid categories including fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, and prenols. Individual lipid species within lipid classes are identified based on positive and negative-ion full-scan and tandem mass spectra measured with high mass accuracy and high resolving power. Developed UHPSFC/ESI-MS method is applied for the analysis of porcine brain extract as a complex lipidomic sample, where 24 lipid classes containing 436 lipid species are identified. The method is validated for the quantitative analysis of lipid species in biological tissues using internal standards for each lipid class. This high-throughput, comprehensive and accurate UHPSFC/ESI-MS method is suitable for the lipidomic analysis of large sample sets in the clinical research.

  14. Analysis of liposoluble carboxylic acids metabolome in human serum by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ping; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Peng, Ke; Deng, Qian-Yun; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Fatty acids (FAs) are groups of liposoluble carboxylic acids (LCAs) and play important roles in various physiological processes. Abnormal contents or changes of FAs are associated with a series of diseases. Here we developed a strategy with stable isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-MS) analysis for comprehensive profiling and relative quantitation of LCAs in human serum. In this strategy, a pair of isotope labeling reagents (2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED)) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED) were employed to selectively label carboxyl groups of LCAs. The DMED and d4-DMED labeled products can lose four characteristic neutral fragments of 45 and 49Da or 63 and 67Da in collision-induced dissociation. Therefore, quadruple neutral loss scan (QNLS) mode was established and used for non-targeted profiling of LCAs. The peak pairs of DMED and d4-DMED labeling with the same retention time, intensity and characteristic mass differences were extracted from the two NLS spectra respectively, and assigned as potential LCA candidates. Using this strategy, 241 LCA candidates were discovered in the human serum; 156 carboxylic acid compounds could be determined by searching HMDB and METLIN databases (FAs are over 90%) and 21 of these LCAs were successfully identified by standards. Subsequently, a modified pseudo-targeted method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection mode was developed and used for relative quantification of LCAs in human serum from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. As a result, 81 LCAs were found to have significant difference between T2DM patients and healthy controls. Taken together, the isotope labeling combined with tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated to be a powerful strategy for identification and quantification of LCA compounds in serum samples.

  15. A micellar electrokinetic chromatography-mass spectrometry approach using in-capillary diastereomeric derivatization for fully automatized chiral analysis of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Radu-Cristian; Bodoki, Ede; Kacsó, Timea; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Crommen, Jacques; Oprean, Radu; Fillet, Marianne

    2016-10-07

    In the context of bioanalytical method development, process automatization is nowadays a necessity in order to save time, improve method reliability and reduce costs. For the first time, a fully automatized micellar electrokinetic chromatography-mass spectrometry (MEKC-MS) method with in-capillary derivatization was developed for the chiral analysis of d- and l-amino acids using (-)-1-(9-fluorenyl) ethyl chloroformate (FLEC) as labeling reagent. The derivatization procedure was optimized using an experimental design approach leading to the following conditions: sample and FLEC plugs in a 2:1 ratio (15s, 30mbar: 7.5s, 30mbar) followed by 15min of mixing using a voltage of 0.1kV. The formed diastereomers were then separated using a background electrolyte (BGE) consisting of 150mM ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) (pH=9.5) and detected by mass spectrometry (MS). Complete chiral resolution was obtained for 8 amino acids, while partial separation was achieved for 6 other amino acid pairs. The method showed good reproducibility and linearity in the low micromolar concentration range. The applicability of the method to biological samples was tested by analyzing artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) samples.

  16. Analysis of human skin emanations by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 2. Identification of volatile compounds that are candidate attractants for the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Bernier, U R; Kline, D L; Barnard, D R; Schreck, C E; Yost, R A

    2000-02-15

    Volatile compounds emanated from human skin were studied by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The purpose of this study was to identify compounds that may be human-produced kairomones which are used for host location by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.). The procedure used to collect volatiles was chosen because of prior knowledge that attractive substances can be transferred from skin to glass by handling. Laboratory bioassays have shown that the residuum on the glass remains attractive to mosquitoes until the compounds of importance evaporate. The sampling and analytical procedures modeled the above-cited process as closely as possible except that the evaporation of compounds from the glass surface was accomplished by thermal desorption from glass beads in a heated GC injection port. This made possible the solventless injection of volatiles onto the column. The compounds were cryofocused on the head of the column with liquid nitrogen prior to GC separation. A single stage of mass spectrometry on a triple quadrupole instrument was used for mass analysis. A combination of electron ionization and pulsed positive ion/negative ion chemical ionization modes on two different GC columns (one polar, one relatively nonpolar) was used to identify most of the 346 compound peaks detected by this technique.

  17. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  18. An experimental design approach for optimizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in contaminated soil by pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buco, S; Moragues, M; Sergent, M; Doumenq, P; Mille, G

    2007-06-01

    Pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil without preliminary extraction. Experimental research methodology was used to obtain optimal performance of the system. After determination of the main factors (desorption time, Curie point temperature, carrier gas flow), modeling was done using a Box-Behnken matrix. Study of the response surface led to factor values that optimize the experimental response and achieve better chromatographic results.

  19. Cortisol production rates measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Yergey, A.L. )

    1990-04-01

    Cortisol production rates (FPRs) in physiologic and pathologic states in humans have been investigated over the past 30 years. However, there has been conflicting evidence concerning the validity of the currently accepted value of FPRs in humans (12 to 15 mg/m2/d) as determined by radiotracer methodology. The present study reviews previous methods proposed for the measurement of FPRs in humans and discusses the applications of the first method for the direct determination of 24-hour plasma FPRs during continuous administration of a stable isotope, using a thermospray high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. The technique is fast, sensitive, and, unlike gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, does not require derivatization, allowing on-line detection and quantification of plasma cortisol after a simple extraction procedure. The results of determination of plasma FPRs by stable tracer/mass spectrometry are directly in units of mass/time and, unlike radiotracer methods, are independent of any determination of volume of distribution or cortisol concentration. Our methodology offers distinct advantages over radiotracer techniques in simplicity and reliability since only single measurements of isotope ratios are required. The technique was validated in adrenalectomized patients. Circadian variations in daily FRPs were observed in normal volunteers, and, to date, results suggest a lower FRP in normal children and adults than previously believed. 88 references.

  20. Analysis of Indole-3-Acetic Acid Metabolites from Dalbergia dolichopetala by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostin, A; Monteiro, A M; Crozier, A; Jensen, E; Sandberg, G

    1992-09-01

    A mixture of [2-(14)C(1)] and [(13)C(6)]indole-3-acetic acid was applied to the cotyledons of 6-day-germinated seeds of "jacarandá do cerrado" (Dalbergia dolichopetala) and after 8 hours the seeds were extracted. Analysis of the fractionated extract by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography-radiocounting revealed the presence of five radiolabeled metabolite peaks (I-V). After further purification, the individual peaks of radioactivity were analyzed by combined high performance liquid chromatography-steel filter-fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The metabolite fraction V was found to contain [(14)C(1), (13)C(6)]indole-3-acetylas-partic acid and unlabeled indole-3-acetylglutamic acid. Analysis of the metabolite fraction II revealed the presence of dioxindole-3-acetylaspartic acid and putative dioxindole-3-acetylglutamic acid as well as putative benzene ring-hydroxylated derivatives of oxindole-3-acetylaspartic acid and oxindole-3-acetylglutamic acid. There was no evidence of significant incorporation of label from [2'-(14)C(1)] or [(13)C(6)]indole-3-acetic acid into any of these conjugated indoles.

  1. Analysis of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones, quinolones, triphenylmethane dyes and methyltestosterone in fish and shrimp using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Storey, Joseph M; Clark, Susan B; Johnson, Aaron S; Andersen, Wendy C; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Lohne, Jack J; Burger, Robert J; Ayres, Patrick R; Carr, Justin R; Madson, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) screening method is described for the detection and identification of 26 veterinary drugs in fish and other aquaculture products. The analytes include: 13 sulfonamides, trimethoprim, 3 fluoroquinolones, 3 quinolones, 3 triphenylmethane dyes, 2 leuco dye metabolites, and 1 hormone. In this method, tissue is mixed with EDTA-McIlvaine buffer, double-extracted with acetonitrile, p-toluenesulfonic (p-TSA) acid and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD), and analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Inclusion of p-TSA and TMPD in the extraction procedure was critical for simultaneous analysis of dyes with the other groups of veterinary drugs. The proposed procedure was validated as both a quantitative analysis method and as a semi-quantitative screening method for multiple fish and shrimp matrices. The method was applied to eight types of fish (catfish, eel, pangasius, sablefish, tilapia, swai, salmon, and trout) and shrimp at the appropriate level of concern: 10ng/g for sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and quinolones, 5ng/g for fluoroquinolones, 1ng/g for dyes and their metabolites, and 0.4ng/g for methyltestosterone.

  2. A NEW METHOD OF PEAK DETECTION FOR ANALYSIS OF COMPREHENSIVE TWO-DIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY DATA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Ouyang, Ming; Jeong, Jaesik; Shen, Changyu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-06-01

    We develop a novel peak detection algorithm for the analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF MS) data using normal-exponential-Bernoulli (NEB) and mixture probability models. The algorithm first performs baseline correction and denoising simultaneously using the NEB model, which also defines peak regions. Peaks are then picked using a mixture of probability distribution to deal with the co-eluting peaks. Peak merging is further carried out based on the mass spectral similarities among the peaks within the same peak group. The algorithm is evaluated using experimental data to study the effect of different cut-offs of the conditional Bayes factors and the effect of different mixture models including Poisson, truncated Gaussian, Gaussian, Gamma, and exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) distributions, and the optimal version is introduced using a trial-and-error approach. We then compare the new algorithm with two existing algorithms in terms of compound identification. Data analysis shows that the developed algorithm can detect the peaks with lower false discovery rates than the existing algorithms, and a less complicated peak picking model is a promising alternative to the more complicated and widely used EMG mixture models.

  3. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based structural analysis of new platycoside metabolites transformed by human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Wan; Na, Yun-Cheol; Ha, In Jin; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2010-01-05

    Platycosides, the main active constituents of Platycodi Radix, have been thoroughly studied for the characterization of their potent biological activities. However, metabolism of platycosides has not yet been characterized. A HPLC electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS(n)) approach was applied to new complex platycoside metabolites transformed by human intestinal bacteria to identify their structures and determine metabolic pathway. The molecular weights of metabolites were identified by LC/ESI-MS analysis in both positive and negative modes. Structures for the platycoside metabolites were proposed by the molecular weights and the expected enzymatic activity of intestinal microbes on platycoside. In the second step, successive LC-MS(n) analysis was used to demonstrate the proposed structures. Under ESI tandem mass conditions, the sequential fragmentation patterns of [M+Na](+) ions exclusively showed signals, consistent with the cleavage of glycoside bonds, rearrangement and some cross-ring cleavage, thus allowing the rapid identification of platycoside metabolites. The metabolites identified in the time-dependent metabolism experiments enable us to propose several microbial pathways for platycosides. Even though the metabolites of some platycosides may have unknown structures and low levels, the analytical tools presented in this study made it possible to obtain a rapid and complete characterization of new metabolites and their metabolism pathway in human intestinal bacteria.

  4. Quantitative analysis of menthol in human urine using solid phase microextraction and stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenlin; Blount, Benjamin C; Watson, Clifford H; Watson, Christina; Chambers, David M

    2017-02-15

    To accurately measure menthol levels in human urine, we developed a method using gas chromatography/electron ionization mass spectrometry with menthol-d4 stable isotope internal standardization. We used solid phase microextraction (SPME) headspace sampling for collection, preconcentration and automation. Conjugated forms of menthol were released using β-glucuronidase/sulfatase to allow for measuring total menthol. Additionally, we processed the specimens without using β-glucuronidase/sulfatase to quantify the levels of unconjugated (free) menthol in urine. This method was developed to verify mentholated cigarette smoking status to study the influence of menthol on smoking behaviour and exposure. This objective was accomplished with this method, which has no carryover or memory from the SPME fiber assembly, a method detection limit of 0.0017μg/mL, a broad linear range of 0.002-0.5μg/mL for free menthol and 0.01-10μg/mL for total menthol, a 7.6% precision and 88.5% accuracy, and an analysis runtime of 17min. We applied this method in analysis of urine specimens collected from cigarette smokers who smoke either mentholated or non-mentholated cigarettes. Among these smokers, the average total urinary menthol levels was three-fold higher (p<0.001) among mentholated cigarette smokers compared with non-mentholated cigarette smokers.

  5. Discriminating Brazilian crude oils using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multiway principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Prata, Paloma S; Alexandrino, Guilherme L; Mogollón, Noroska Gabriela S; Augusto, Fabio

    2016-11-11

    The geochemical characterization of petroleum is an essential task to develop new strategies and technologies when analyzing the commercial potential of crude oils for exploitation. Due to the chemical complexity of these samples, the use of modern analytical techniques along with multivariate exploratory data analysis approaches is an interesting strategy to extract relevant geochemical characteristics about the oils. In this work, important geochemical information obtained from crude oils from different production basins were obtained analyzing the maltene fraction of the oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC×GC-QMS), and performing multiway principal component analysis (MPCA) of the chromatographic data. The results showed that four MPC explained 93.57% of the data variance, expressing mainly the differences on the profiles of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction of the oils (C13-C18 and C19-C30n-alkanes and the pristane/phytane ratio). The MPC1 grouped the samples severely biodegraded oils, while the type of the depositional paleoenvironments of the oils and its oxidation conditions (as well as their thermal maturity) could be inferred analysing others relevant MPC. Additionally, considerations about the source of the oil samples was also possible based on the overall distribution of relevant biomarkers such as the phenanthrene derivatives, tri-, tetra- and pentacyclic terpanes.

  6. Headspace in-tube extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of hydroxylic methyl-derivatized and volatile organic compounds in blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Rasanen, Ilpo; Viinamäki, Jenni; Vuori, Erkki; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2010-04-01

    A novel headspace in-tube extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ITEX-GC-MS) approach was developed for broad-scale analysis of low molecular weight organic compounds in blood and/or urine. One sample was analyzed following in-vial derivatization with dimethyl sulfate for ethylene glycol (EG), glycolic acid (GA), formic acid (FA), other hydroxylic compounds, and another sample for underivatized volatile organic compounds. Tenax adsorbent resin was used in the microtrap, and a porous layer, open tubular GC capillary column was used for separation. MS was operated in the full-scan mode, identification was based on the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System, and quantification was based on extracted ions. The limits of quantification for EG, GA, and FA in blood were 10, 50, and 30 mg/L, respectively, and the expanded uncertainties of measurement were 20%, 16%, and 14%, respectively. The procedure allowed for the first time the inclusion of EG and GA as their methyl derivatives within a quantitative HS analysis. The ITEX method described here was more sensitive for analysis of volatile organic compounds than the corresponding static headspace analysis as demonstrated for 11 representative compounds.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  8. Hair analysis of nicotine and cotinine for evaluating tobacco smoke exposure by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chetiyanukornkul, Thaneeya; Toriba, Akira; Kizu, Ryoichi; Kimura, Kazuko; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2004-11-01

    A simple liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human hair was established. In the procedure, a hair sample (10 mg) was washed with dichloromethane and digested in 2.5 M sodium hydroxide. The digest was extracted with dichloromethane and then 25 mM hydrochloric acid in methanol was added to the extract, to prevent loss of analytes. The solution was evaporated and redissolved in the mobile phase, methanol/10 mM ammonium acetate (30/70, v/v). A 20 microL aliquot of redissolved solution was subjected to analysis. Nicotine and cotinine in human hair were quantified by using deuterated analytes as internal standards. The quantification limits were 8 microg/L for nicotine and 0.9 microg/L for cotinine. The proposed method was applied to measure the concentrations of nicotine and cotinine in hair of smokers and non-smokers to evaluate their self-reported smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. In both cases, the method provided good selectivity, accuracy and precision.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-01-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate. PMID:28281659

  10. Online nanoliquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nanofluorescence detection for high-resolution quantitative N-glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Hakan; Ambrosini, Martino; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Parren, Paul W H I; van Kooyk, Yvette; García Vallejo, Juan J

    2012-04-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of glycans at the quantitative and qualitative levels on cells and glycoproteins is a necessary step to the understanding of glycan functions in biology. In addition, there is an increasing demand in the field of biotechnology for the monitoring of glycosylation of recombinant glycoproteins, an important issue with regard to their safety and biological activity. The enzymatic release followed by fluorescent derivatization of glycans and separation by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has proven for many years to be a powerful approach to the quantification of glycans. Characterization of glycans has classically been performed by mass spectrometry (MS) with external standardization. Here, we report a new method for the simultaneous quantification and characterization of the N-glycans on glycoproteins without the need for external standardization. This method, which we call glycan nanoprofiling, uses nanoLC-coupled electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with an intercalated nanofluorescence reader and provides effective single glycan separation with subpicomolar sensitivity. The method relies on the isolation and coumaric derivatization of enzymatically released glycans collected by solid phase extraction with porous graphitized carbon and their separation over polyamide-based nanoHPLC prior to serial nanofluorescence and nanoelectrospray mass spectrometric analysis. Glycan nanoprofiling is a broadly applicable and powerful approach that is sufficient to identify and quantify many glycan oligomers in a single run. Glycan nanoprofiling was successfully applied to resolve the glycans of monoclonal antibodies, showing that this method is a fast and sensitive alternative to available methods.

  11. Tequila volatile characterization and ethyl ester determination by solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón Fernando; del Carmen Estrada-Montoya, María

    2004-09-08

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography were used for tequila volatile characterization and ethyl ester quantitation. Several factors determined the differences in tequila volatile profiles obtained by the SPME technique, namely, sampling mode, fiber coating, and fiber exposure time. Each of these factors determined the most suitable conditions for the analysis of volatile profiles in tequila. Volatile extraction consisted of placing 40 mL of tequila in a sealed vial kept at 40 degrees C. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) fiber was immersed in the liquid for 60 min and desorbed for 5 min into the gas chromatograph. The identified volatiles by mass spectrometry were mainly alcohols, esters, and ketones. The calibration curves for ethyl hexanoate, octanoate, and decanoate followed linear relationships with highly significant (p < 0.001) determination coefficients (R2 = 0.99). The coefficients of variation of less than 10% for ethyl ester concentrations indicated that the technique was reproducible. The limits of quantitation for ethyl esters were 0.05 parts per million, which were below the concentration range (0.27-15.03 ppm) found for different tequila samples. Quantitative differences in ethyl esters were found for the four most commonly known tequila types: silver, gold, aged, and extra-aged.

  12. Reduction of metal adducts in oligonucleotide mass spectra in ion‐pair reversed‐phase chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilar, Martin; Shion, Henry; Yu, Ying Qing; Chen, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI‐MS)‐based techniques commonly used in oligonucleotide analyses are known to be sensitive to alkali metal adduct formation. Adducts directly impact the sensitivity of MS‐based analyses as the available charge is distributed across the parent peak and adduct(s). The current study systematically evaluated common liquid chromatography (LC) components in LC/ESI‐MS configurations used in oligonucleotide analysis to identify metal adduct contributions from LC instrumentation. Methods A UPLC liquid chromatography system was configured with a single quadrupole MS detector (ACQUITY QDa, Waters Corp.) to monitor adduct formation in oligonucleotide separations. An ion‐pairing mobile phase comprised of 15 mM triethylamine and 400 mM hexafluoro‐2‐propanol was used in conjunction with an oligonucleotide separation column (Waters OST BEH C18, 2.1 mm × 50 mm) for all separations. A 10‐min method was used to provide statistical figures of merit and evaluate adduct formation over time. Results Trace alkali metal salts in the mobile phase and reagents were determined to be the main source of metal salt adducts in LC/ESI‐MS‐based configurations. Non‐specific adsorption sites located throughout the fluidic path contribute to adduct formation in oligonucleotide analyses. Ion‐pairing mobile phases prepared at neutral or slightly basic pH result in up to a 57% loss of spectral abundance to adduct formation in the current study. Conclusions Implementation of a short low pH reconditioning step was observed to effectively displace trace metal salts non‐specifically adsorbed to surfaces in the fluidic path and was able to maintain an average MS spectral abundance ≥94% with a high degree of repeatability (relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) 0.8%) over an extended time study. The proposed method offers the ability to rapidly regenerate adsorption sites with minimal impact on productivity while retaining

  13. Metabolic flux analysis of Arthrobacter sp. CGMCC 3584 for cAMP production based on 13C tracer experiments and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Yao, Shiwei; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Li, Bingbing; Liu, Dong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2013-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. CGMCC 3584 are able to produce cAMP from glucose by the purine synthesis pathway via de novo or salvage biosynthesis. In order to gain an improved understanding of its metabolism, (13)C-labeling experiment and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis were employed to determine the metabolic network structure and estimate the intracellular fluxes. GC-MS analysis helps to reflect the activity of the intracellular pathways and reactions. The metabolic network mainly contains glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the inactive glyoxylate shunt. Hypoxanthine as a precursor of cAMP and sodium fluoride as an inhibitor of glycolysis were found to increase the cAMP production, as well as the flux through the PP pathway. The effects of adding hypoxanthine and sodium fluoride are discussed based on the enzyme assays and metabolic flux analysis. In conclusion, our results provide quantitative insights into how cells manipulate the metabolic network under different culture conditions and this may be of value in metabolic regulation for desirable production.

  14. Rapid method for the determination of 16 organochlorine pesticides in sesame seeds by microwave-assisted extraction and analysis of extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Emmanouil N; Vryzas, Zisis; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2006-09-15

    A method for the multiresidue analysis of 16 organochlorine insecticides in sesame seeds has been developed. The method is based on the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of the sesame seeds by the use of a water-acetonitrile mixture followed by Florisil clean-up of the extracts and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. MAE operational parameters (extraction solvent, temperature and time, extractant volume) were optimized with respect to extraction efficiency of the target compounds from sesame seeds with 46% oil content. Recoveries >80% with relative standard deviations (RSD) <12% were obtained for all compounds under the selected parameters. The Florisil clean-up step proved sufficient for the removal of co-extracted substances so that no adverse effect on the chromatographic system was observed. Limit of quantification (LOQ) values were in the range of 5-10 microg/kg. The proposed method was applied in the analysis of sesame seed samples imported to Greece.

  15. Analysis of volatile compounds in beef fat by dynamic-headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Ueda, Y; Higuchi, M; Shiba, N

    2008-06-01

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique has been applied to the determination of the volatile compounds, including diterpenoids and lactones, in cooked beef fat. The ability of static-headspace SPME to extract lactones was disappointing, regardless of the type of SPME fiber or the temperature used. Dynamic-headspace SPME extraction with 50-/30-microm divinylbenzene-Carboxen on a polydimethylsiloxane fiber at 100 degrees C, by contrast, enabled the analysis of volatiles, including delta-lactones, gamma-lactones, and diterpenoids, with 50-/30-microm divinylbenzene-Carboxen on a polydimethylsiloxane fiber at 100 degrees C. Fifty-three compounds were identified from only 0.20 g of rendered beef fat, and 76% of these showed reliable peak size repeatability: the coefficient of variation was less than 10% on the total ion chromatograms obtained from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Some lactones showed higher CV values (>10%), but single-ion mode GC-MS analysis reduced them to 10% or less. In a study of beef samples available to the Japanese market, our analytical procedure revealed significantly higher levels of 1-hexanol, octadecane, ethyl tetradecanoate, gamma-nonalactone, but lower levels of delta-decalactone, delta-dodecalactone, and neophytadiene, in Japanese Black cattle than in beef imported from Australia.

  16. A method by homemade OH/TSO-PMHS fibre solid-phase microextraction coupling with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of antiestrogens in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Shengping; Duan, Hongbin; Chen, Xi; Wei, Zhenyi; Chen, Guonan

    2009-01-05

    A kind of homemade solid-phase microextraction fibre coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for trace analysis of antiestrogens (tamoxifen, cis- and trans-clomiphene) in biological matrices. In this method, derivatization was unnecessary and sample solution could be injected directly after very simple deproteinization operation. The conditions of influencing adsorption of the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre and desorption of the analytes were investigated in details. Matrix effects were studied in different background. Under optimum conditions, the proposed method was further validated by spiking analytes into rabbit liver solutions. Linear ranges of tamoxifen, cis- and trans-clomiphene were 0.02-2.56, 0.08-2.56 and 0.16-2.56 ng mL(-1), respectively. The limits of quantitation were in the range of 0.02-0.16 ng mL(-1). The intra-day accuracy was ranged 96.2-106.2% and precision were in the range of 5.1-8.7%. The extraction recoveries of the antiestrogens in rabbit liver solution were between 73.8% and 113.1%, and R.S.D.s were from 3.6% to 14.1%. The results show that the homemade sol-gel coating is suitable for determination of trace antiestrogens in complex matrices. The proposed approach was proved to be rapid, simple, easy, sensitive and reproducible for trace analysis of antiestrogens in biological matrices.

  17. Microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization for rapid analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mou, Zhao-Li; Hao, Shuang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2012-11-07

    A rapid and practical microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization (MAED) method was developed for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine. Several critical experimental parameters for MAED, including reaction temperature, microwave power and the amount of derivatization reagent (methanol), were optimized with response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and total unsaturated fatty acids content obtained with MAED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional Soxhlet or microwave extraction and then derivatization method. The investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of the derivatization reaction revealed that microwave assistance could reduce activation energy and increase the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor. The MAED method simplified the sample preparation procedure, shortened the reaction time, but improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of lipids and reduced ingredient losses, especially for the oxidization and isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, speed and practicality of this method indicates great potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in natural medicinal samples.

  18. Development of a fast extraction method and optimization of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of phenolic compounds in lentil seed coats.

    PubMed

    Mirali, Mahla; Ambrose, Stephen J; Wood, Stephen A; Vandenberg, Albert; Purves, Randy W

    2014-10-15

    A systematic set of optimization experiments was conducted to design an efficient extraction and analysis protocol for screening six different sub-classes of phenolic compounds in the seed coat of various lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) genotypes. Different compounds from anthocyanidins, flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, flavanones, flavones, and flavonols sub-classes were first optimized for use as standards for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with UV detection. The effect of maceration duration, reconstitution solvent, and extraction solvent were investigated using lentil genotype CDC Maxim. Chromatographic conditions were optimized by examining column separation efficiencies, organic composition, and solvent gradient. The results showed that a 1h maceration step was sufficient and that non-acidified solvents were more appropriate; a 70:30 acetone: water (v/v) solvent was ultimately selected. Using a Kinetex PFP column, the organic concentration, gradient, and flow rate were optimized to maximize the resolution of phenolic compounds in a short 30-min analysis time. The optimized method was applied to three lentil genotypes with different phenolic compound profiles to provide information of value to breeding programs.

  19. Analysis of the volatile organic matter of engine piston deposits by direct sample introduction thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaby, M; Kinani, S; Genty, C; Bouchonnet, S; Sablier, M; Le Negrate, A; El Fassi, M

    2009-12-01

    This article establishes an alternative method for the characterization of volatiles organic matter (VOM) contained in deposits of the piston first ring grooves of diesel engines using a ChromatoProbe direct sample introduction (DSI) device coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The addition of an organic solvent during thermal desorption leads to an efficient extraction and a good chromatographic separation of extracted products. The method was optimized investigating the effects of several solvents, the volume added to the solid sample, and temperature programming of the ChromatoProbe DSI device. The best results for thermal desorption were found using toluene as an extraction solvent and heating the programmable temperature injector from room temperature to 300 degrees C with a temperature step of 105 degrees C. With the use of the optimized thermal desorption conditions, several components have been positively identified in the volatile fraction of the deposits: aromatics, antioxidants, and antioxidant degradation products. Moreover, this work highlighted the presence of diesel fuel in the VOM of the piston deposits and gave new facts on the absence of the role of diesel fuel in the deposit formation process. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of quickly performing the analysis of deposits with small amounts of samples while having a good separation of the volatiles.

  20. Simple and sensitive analysis of nereistoxin and its metabolites in human serum using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Namera, A; Watanabe, T; Yashiki, M; Kojima, T; Urabe, T

    1999-03-01

    A simple method for the analysis of nereistoxin and its metabolites in human serum using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is developed. A vial containing a serum sample, 5M sodium hydroxide, and benzylacetone (internal standard) is heated to 70 degrees C, and an SPME fiber is exposed for 30 min in the headspace of the vial. The compounds extracted by the fiber are desorbed by exposing the fiber in the injection port of the GC-MS. The calibration curves show linearity in the range of 0.05-5.0 micrograms/mL for nereistoxin and N-methyl-N-(2-methylthio-1-methylthiomethyl)ethylamine, 0.01-5.0 micrograms/mL for S,S'-dimethyl dihydronereistoxin, and 0.5-10 micrograms/mL for 2-methylthio-1-methylthiomethylethylamine in serum. No interferences are found, and the analysis time is 50 min for one sample. In addition, this proposed method is applied to a patient who attempted suicide by ingesting Padan 4R, a herbicide. Padan 4R contains 4% cartap hydrochloride, which is an analogue of nereistoxin. Nereistoxin and its metabolites are detected in the serum samples collected from the patient during hospitalization. The concentration ranges of nereistoxin in the serum are 0.09-2.69 micrograms/mL.

  1. Characterization of Penicillium species isolated from grape berries by their internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) sequences and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of geosmin production.

    PubMed

    La Guerche, Stéphane; Garcia, Carole; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis; Labarère, Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol), an earthy-musty compound, has been identified in wines and in grape juice, in which its presence is highly detrimental to the aromatic quality. Geosmin has a biological origin, and the analysis of rotten grape microflora has been done on two grape varieties (Semillon, Cabernet Sauvignon) from six parcels of the Bordeaux region over 3 years (1999, 2000, 2001). Forty-three Penicillium-related species have been analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for their geosmin production. GC-MS analysis has demonstrated that the earthy odor was always correlated with the presence of geosmin. Phenotypic characterization of Penicillium spp. being ambiguous, a molecular characterization by rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) sequencing was performed for all strains. The results evidenced that all strains producing geosmin belonged to only one species, P. expansum, and that the other strains, not producing geosmin, belonged to three species: P. purpurogenum, P. thomii, and Talaromyces wortmanii.

  2. Water analysis of the sixteen environmental protection agency-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons via solid-phase nanoextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Walter B; Hewitt, Udienza; Miller, Mattheu; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-06-06

    The growing concern with a sustainable environment poses a new challenge to analytical chemists facing the routine monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. The new method presented here meets several features of green analytical chemistry. PAHs are extracted from 500 μL of water sample with 1 mL of a gold nanoparticles aqueous solution and released with 100 μL of organic solvents for subsequent analysis via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The relative standard deviations of the overall procedure ranged from 2.4 (acenaphthene) to 7.8% (dibenz[a,h]anthracene). The limits of detection were excellent as well and varied from 4.94 (fluoranthene) to 65.5 ng L(-1) (fluorene). The excellent analytical figures of merit, the simplicity of the experimental procedure, the short analysis time and the reduced solvent consumption demonstrate the potential of this approach for the routine monitoring of the sixteen priority pollutants via and environmentally friendly methodology.

  3. Optimization of a Solid-Phase Microextraction method for the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius Schott) fruit volatiles.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, M F; Sanz, J; Sanz, M L; Giuffrè, A M; Sicari, V; Soria, A C

    2015-07-01

    A Solid-Phase Microextraction method for the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis of blackberry (Rubus sp.) volatiles has been fully optimized by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimized operating conditions (Carboxen/Polydimethylsiloxane fiber coating, 66°C, 20 min equilibrium time and 16 min extraction time) have been applied to the characterization for the first time of the volatile composition of Rubus ulmifolius Schott blackberries collected in Italy and Spain. A total of 74 volatiles of different functionality were identified; esters and aliphatic alcohols were the predominant classes in both sample types. Methylbutanal (2.02-25.70%), ethanol (9.84-68.21%), 2,3-butanedione (2.31-14.71%), trans-2-hexenal (0.49-17.49%), 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (0.08-7.39%), 1-hexanol (0.56-16.39%), 1-octanol (0.49-10.86%) and methylbutanoic acid (0.53-21.48%) were the major compounds in most blackberries analyzed. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of semiquantitative data showed that only two variables (ethyl decanoate and ethyl acetate) were necessary for a successful differentiation of blackberries according to their harvest location.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following microwave distillation and headspace solid-phase microextraction for fast analysis of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-11-10

    In this paper, a novel method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following microwave distillation-headspace solid-phase microextraction (MD-HS-SPME) was developed for the determination of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is dried before being preserved and used, there is too little water to absorb microwave energy and heat the TCM samples. In the work, carbonyl iron powders (CIP) was added and mixed with the dried TCM sample, which was used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of the TCM. At the same time, SPME was used for the extraction and concentration of essential oil after MD. The dry rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea DC was used as the model TCM, and used in the study. The MD-HS-SPME parameters including fiber coating, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added CIP, were studied. To demonstrate the method feasibility, the conventional HS-SPME method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in the TCM. Experimental results show that more compounds were isolated and identified by MD-HS-SPME than those by HS-SPME. Compared to conventional HS-SPME, the advantages of the proposed method are: short extraction time and high extraction efficiency. All experimental results show that the proposed method is an alternative tool for fast analysis of essential oils in dry TCMs.

  5. Application of an automatic thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moltó, J; Varea, M; Galindo, N; Crespo, J

    2009-02-27

    The application of the thermal desorption (TD) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to the analysis of aerosol organics has been the focus of many studies in recent years. This technique overcomes the main drawbacks of the solvent extraction approach such as the use of large amounts of toxic organic solvents and long and laborious extraction processes. In this work, the application of an automatic TD-GC-MS instrument for the determination of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is evaluated. This device offers the advantage of allowing the analysis of either gaseous or particulate organics without any modification. Once the thermal desorption conditions for PAH extraction were optimised, the method was verified on NIST standard reference material (SRM) 1649a urban dust, showing good linearity, reproducibility and accuracy for all target PAHs. The method has been applied to PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected on quartz fibre filters with low volume samplers, demonstrating its capability to quantify PAHs when only a small amount of sample is available.

  6. Use of hydrogen as a carrier gas for the analysis of steroids with anabolic activity by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Guerra, J A; Prado, P; García-Tenorio, S Vargas

    2011-10-14

    Due to the impact in the media and the requirements of sensitivity and robustness, the detection of the misuse of forbidden substances in sports is a really challenging area for analytical chemistry, where any study focused on enhancing the performance of the analytical methods will be of great interest. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of using hydrogen instead of helium as a carrier gas for the analysis of anabolic steroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron ionization. There are several drawbacks related with the use of helium as a carrier gas: it is expensive, is a non-renewable resource, and has limited availability in many parts of the world. In contrast, hydrogen is readily available using a hydrogen generator or high-pressure bottled gas, and allows a faster analysis without loss of efficiency; nevertheless it should not be forgotten that due to its explosiveness hydrogen must be handled with caution. Throughout the study the impact of the change of the carrier gas will be evaluated in terms of: performance of the chromatographic system, saving of time and money, impact on the high vacuum in the analyzer, changes in the fragmentation behaviour of the analytes, and finally consequences for the limits of detection achieved with the method.

  7. Metabolome Analysis of Oryza sativa (Rice) Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Characterizing Organ Specificity of Flavonoids with Anti-inflammatory and Anti-oxidant Activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhigang; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Mori, Tetsuya; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Kitanaka, Susumu; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Oryza sativa L. (rice) is an important staple crop across the world. In the previous study, we identified 36 specialized (secondary) metabolites including 28 flavonoids. In the present study, a metabolome analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was conducted on the leaf, bran, and brown and polished rice grains to better understand the distribution of these metabolites. Principal component analysis using the metabolome data clearly characterized the accumulation patterns of the metabolites. Flavonoids, e.g., tricin, tricin 7-O-rutinoside, and tricin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, were mainly present in the leaf and bran but not in the polished grain. In addition, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity of the metabolites were assayed in vitro. Tricin 4'-O-(erythro-β-guaiacylglyceryl)ether and isoscoparin 2″-O-(6‴-(E)-feruloyl)-glucopyranoside showed the strongest activity for inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging, respectively.

  8. Seized cannabis seeds cultivated in greenhouse: A chemical study by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Kristiane de Cássia; Marcelo, Marcelo Caetano Alexandre; Ortiz, Rafael S; Borille, Bruna Tassi; Dos Reis, Monique; Fett, Mauro Sander; Ferrão, Marco Flôres; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. is cultivated in most regions of the world. In 2013, the Brazilian Federal Police (BFP) reported 220 tons of marijuana seized and about 800,000 cannabis plants eradicated. Efforts to eradicate cannabis production may have contributed to the development of a new form of international drug trafficking in Brazil: the sending of cannabis seeds in small amounts to urban centers by logistics postal. This new and increasing panorama of cannabis trafficking in Brazil, encouraged the chemical study of cannabis seeds cultivated in greenhouses by gas-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) associated with exploratory and discriminant analysis. Fifty cannabis seeds of different varieties and brands, seized by the BFP were cultivated under predefined conditions for a period of 4.5 weeks, 5.5 weeks, 7.5 weeks, 10 weeks and 12 weeks. Aerial parts were analyzed and cannabigerol, cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabichromene Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other terpenoids were detected. The chromatographic chemical profiles of the samples were significantly different, probably due to different variety, light exposition and age. THC content increased with the age of the plant, however, for other cannabinoids, this correlation was not observed. The chromatograms were plotted in a matrix with 50 rows (samples) and 3886 columns (abundance in a retention time) and submitted to PCA, HCA and PLS-DA after pretreatment (normalization, first derivative and autoscale). The PCA and HCA showed age separation between samples however it was not possible to verify the separation by varieties and brands. The PLS-DA classification provides a satisfactory prediction of plant age.

  9. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based comprehensive metabolomics combined with pattern recognition and network analysis methods for characterization of metabolites and metabolic pathways from biological data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Han, Ying; Yan, Guang-li; Yuan, Ye; Song, Gao-chen; Yuan, Xiao-xia; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-08-06

    Metabolomics is the study of metabolic changes in biological systems and provides the small molecule fingerprints related to the disease. Extracting biomedical information from large metabolomics data sets by multivariate data analysis is of considerable complexity. Therefore, more efficient and optimizing metabolomics data processing technologies are needed to improve mass spectrometry applications in biomarker discovery. Here, we report the findings of urine metabolomic investigation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients by high-throughput ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) coupled with pattern recognition methods (principal component analysis, partial least-squares, and OPLS-DA) and network pharmacology. A total of 20 urinary differential metabolites (13 upregulated and 7 downregulated) were identified and contributed to HCV progress, involve several key metabolic pathways such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, histidine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and so forth. Metabolites identified through metabolic profiling may facilitate the development of more accurate marker algorithms to better monitor disease progression. Network analysis validated close contact between these metabolites and implied the importance of the metabolic pathways. Mapping altered metabolites to KEGG pathways identified alterations in a variety of biological processes mediated through complex networks. These findings may be promising to yield a valuable and noninvasive tool that insights into the pathophysiology of HCV and to advance the early diagnosis and monitor the progression of disease. Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the UPLC-MS platform combined with the pattern recognition and network analysis methods that can engender new insights into HCV pathobiology.

  10. Supported liquid membrane-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of cyanobacterial toxins in fresh water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbukwa, Elbert A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasingly becoming of great concern to water resources worldwide due to indiscriminate waste disposal habits resulting in water pollution and eutrophication. When cyanobacterial cells lyse (burst) they release toxins called microcystins (MCs) that are well known for their hepatotoxicity (causing liver damage) and have been found in eutrophic lakes, rivers, wastewater ponds and other water reservoirs. Prolonged exposure to low concentrated MCs are equally of health importance as they are known to be bioaccumulative and even at such low concentration do exhibit toxic effects to aquatic animals, wildlife and human liver cells. The application of common treatment processes for drinking water sourced from HABs infested reservoirs have the potential to cause algal cell lyses releasing low to higher amounts of MCs in finished water. Trace microcystins in water/tissue can be analyzed and quantified using Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) following solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample clean-up procedures. However, extracting MCs from algal samples which are rich in chlorophyll pigments and other organic matrices the SPE method suffers a number of drawbacks, including cartridge clogging, long procedural steps and use of larger volumes of extraction solvents. We applied a supported liquid membrane (SLM) based technique as an alternative sample clean-up method for LC-ESI-MS analysis of MCs from both water and algal cells. Four (4) MC variants (MC-RR, -YR, -LR and -WR) from lyophilized cells of Microcystis aeruginosa and water collected from a wastewater pond were identified) and quantified using LC-ESI-MS following a SLM extraction and liquid partitioning step, however, MC-WR was not detected from water extracts. Within 45 min of SLM extraction all studied MCs were extracted and pre-concentrated in approximately 15 μL of an acceptor phase at an optimal pH 2.02 of the donor phase (sample). The highest

  11. Preparation of Fe3O4@C@PANI magnetic microspheres for the extraction and analysis of phenolic compounds in water samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiaoran; Shi, Chenyi; Wei, Biwen; Yu, Wenjia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-05-20

    In this work, core-shell structure Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres were synthesized using simple hydrothermal reactions. The carbon-coated magnetic microspheres (Fe(3)O(4)@C) were first synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction, and then aniline was polymerized on the magnetic core via another hydrothermal reaction. Then, the obtained Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres were applied as magnetic adsorbents for the extraction of aromatic molecules due to π-π interactions between polyaniline shell and aromatic compounds. In our study, five kinds of phenols including phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP) and bisphenol A (BPA) were selected as the model analytes to verify the extraction ability of Fe(3)O(4)@C@PANI microspheres. After derivatization, the phenols were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dominant parameters affecting enrichment efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of phenols in real water samples. The results demonstrated that our proposed method based on Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres had good linearity (r(2)>0.991), and limits of quantification (2.52-29.7 ng/mL), high repeatability (RSD<13.1%) and good recovery (85.3-110.6%).

  12. Analysis of trace levels of sulfonamide and tetracycline antimicrobials in groundwater and surface water using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, M.E.; Meyer, M.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for the trace analysis of two classes of antimicrobials consisting of six sulfonamides (SAs) and five tetracyclines (TCs), which commonly are used for veterinary purposes and agricultural feed additives and are suspected to leach into ground and surface water. The method used solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with positive ion electrospray. The unique combination of a metal chelation agent (Na2EDTA) with a macroporous copolymer resulted in quantitative recoveries by solid-phase extraction (mean recovery, 98 ?? 12%) at submicrogram-per-liter concentrations. An ammonium formate/formic acid buffer with a methanol/water gradient was used to separate the antimicrobials and to optimize the signal intensity. Mass spectral fragmentation and ionization characteristics were determined for each class of compounds for unequivocal identification. For all SAs, a characteristic m/z 156 ion representing the sulfanilyl fragment was identified. TCs exhibited neutral losses of 17 amu resulting from the loss of ammonia and 35 amu from the subsequent loss of water. Unusual matrix effects were seen only for TCs in this first survey of groundwater and surface water samples from sites around the United States, requiring that TCs be quantitated using the method of standard additions.

  13. The mechanism of adenosine to inosine conversion by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity: A high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polson, A.G.; Crain, P.F.; Pomerantz, S.C.; McCloskey, J.A.; Bass, B.L. )

    1991-12-10

    The authors have used directly combined high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to examine the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity. A double-stranded RNA substrate in which all adenosines were uniformly labeled with {sup 13}C was synthesized. An LC/MS analysis of the nucleoside products from the modified, labeled substrate confirmed that adenosine is modified to inosine during the unwinding/modifying reaction. Most importantly, they found that no carbons are exchanged during the reaction. By including H{sub 2} {sup 18}O in the reaction, they showed that water serves efficiently as the oxygen donor in vitro. These results are consistent with a hydrolytic deamination mechanism and rule out a base replacement mechanism. Although the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity appears to utilize a catalytic mechanism similar to that of adenosine deaminase, coformycin, a transition-state analogue, will not inhibit the unwinding/modifying activity.

  14. Ultrasonic nebulization extraction coupled with headspace single drop microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of the essential oil in Cuminum cyminum L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ziming; Zhang, Huihui; Li, Xueyuan; Zhang, Hanqi

    2009-08-04

    A novel method for analysis of essential oil in Cuminum cyminum L. using simultaneous ultrasonic nebulization extraction and headspace single drop microextraction (UNE-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. Experimental parameters, including the kind of suspended solvent, microdrop volume, sample amount, extraction time, enrichment time and salt concentration were examined and optimized. Compared with hydrodistillation (HD), UNE-HS-SDME provides the advantages of a small amount of sample (50 mg), time-saving (20 min), simplicity, cheapness and low toxicity. In addition, UNE-HS-SDME also provided higher enrichment efficiency and sensitivity compared with stirring extraction (SE)-HS-SDME, ultrasonic assistant extraction (UAE) and UNE. Some constituents in the essential oil, were identified and the detection limits for beta-pinene, p-cymene and gamma-terpinene range from 6.67 pLL(-1) to 14.8 pLL(-1). The results indicated that the UNE-HS-SDME is simple and highly efficient extraction and enrichment technique.

  15. Identification of odorants in frankincense (Boswellia sacra Flueck.) by aroma extract dilution analysis and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense has been known, traded and used throughout the ages for its exceptional aroma properties, and is still commonly used in both secular and religious settings to convey a pleasant odor. Surprisingly, the odoriferous principle(s) underlying its unique odor profile have never been published. In this study, resin samples of Boswellia sacra Flueck. from both Somalia and Oman were investigated by aroma extract dilution analysis. In a comprehensive, odor-activity guided approach both chemo-analytical and human-sensory parameters were used to identify odor active constituents of the volatile fraction of B. sacra. Among the key odorants found were α-pinene, β-myrcene, linalool, p-cresol and two unidentified sesquiterpenoids. Overall, a total of 23 odorants were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry and heart-cut two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry. The majority of the identified odorant compounds were oxygenated monoterpenes, along with some relevant mono- and sesquiterpenes and only one diterpenoid substance. Several of these compounds were reported here for the first time as odorous constituents in B. sacra. Identifying bioactive compounds might support a better understanding with regard to the potential benefits of frankincense, for example in aromatherapy or ecclesial settings.

  16. High-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for characterization and quantitative analysis of ginkgolic acids in Ginkgo biloba plants, extracts, and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jianping; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Wylie, Philip L; Parcher, Jon F; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-12-17

    A high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with selected ion monitor method focusing on the characterization and quantitative analysis of ginkgolic acids (GAs) in Ginkgo biloba L. plant materials, extracts, and commercial products was developed and validated. The method involved sample extraction with (1:1) methanol and 10% formic acid, liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, and derivatization with trimethylsulfonium hydroxide (TMSH). Separation of two saturated (C13:0 and C15:0) and six unsaturated ginkgolic acid methyl esters with different positional double bonds (C15:1 Δ8 and Δ10, C17:1 Δ8, Δ10, and Δ12, and C17:2) was achieved on a very polar (88% cyanopropyl) aryl-polysiloxane HP-88 capillary GC column. The double bond positions in the GAs were determined by ozonolysis. The developed GC/MS method was validated according to ICH guidelines, and the quantitation results were verified by comparison with a standard high-performance liquid chromatography method. Nineteen G. biloba authenticated and commercial plant samples and 21 dietary supplements purported to contain G. biloba leaf extracts were analyzed. Finally, the presence of the marker compounds, terpene trilactones and flavonol glycosides for Ginkgo biloba in the dietary supplements was determined by UHPLC/MS and used to confirm the presence of G. biloba leaf extracts in all of the botanical dietary supplements.

  17. Pyrolysis kinetic and product analysis of different microalgal biomass by distributed activation energy model and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuewei; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Juan; Geng, Shu; Cheng, Jay Jiayang; Sun, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    To assess the energy potential of different microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Monoraphidium were selected for studying the pyrolytic behavior at different heating rates with the analytical method of thermogravimetric analysis (TG), distributed activation energy model (DAEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Results presented that Monoraphidium 3s35 showed superiority for pyrolysis at low heating rate. Calculated by DAEM, during the conversion rate range from 0.1 to 0.7, the activation energies of C. sorokiniana 21 were much lower than that of Monoraphidium 3s35. Both C. sorokiniana 21 and Monoraphidium 3s35 can produce certain amount (up to 20.50%) of alkane compounds, with 9-Octadecyne (C18H34) as the primary compound. Short-chain alkanes (C7-C13) with unsaturated carbon can be released in the pyrolysis at 500°C for both microalgal biomass. It was also observed that the pyrolysis of C. sorokiniana 21 released more alcohol compounds, while Monoraphidium 3s35 produced more saccharides.

  18. Quantitative analysis of fatty-acid-based biofuels produced by wild-type and genetically engineered cyanobacteria by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenna; Zhao, Hui; Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Cong; Yang, Menglong; Bai, Fali

    2011-11-11

    Simple and rapid quantitative determination of fatty-acid-based biofuels is greatly important for the study of genetic engineering progress for biofuels production by microalgae. Ideal biofuels produced from biological systems should be chemically similar to petroleum, like fatty-acid-based molecules including free fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols and fatty alkanes. This study founded a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simultaneous quantification of seven free fatty acids, nine fatty acid methyl esters, five fatty acid ethyl esters, five fatty alcohols and three fatty alkanes produced by wild-type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its genetically engineered strain. Data obtained from GC-MS analyses were quantified using internal standard peak area comparisons. The linearity, limit of detection (LOD) and precision (RSD) of the method were evaluated. The results demonstrated that fatty-acid-based biofuels can be directly determined by GC-MS without derivation. Therefore, rapid and reliable quantitative analysis of fatty-acid-based biofuels produced by wild-type and genetically engineered cyanobacteria can be achieved using the GC-MS method founded in this work.

  19. Essential oil of Thymus capitatus Hoff. et Link. from Matmata, Tunisia: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Mkaddem, Mounira Guedri; Romdhane, Mehrez; Ibrahim, Hany; Ennajar, Monia; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Mathieu, Florence; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2010-12-01

    Thymus capitatus Hoff. et Link. essential oil was constituted by thymol (89.06%) as a major component followed by p-cimene (5.04%) and γ-terpinene (3.19%) after analysis by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antioxidant activity assays of the essential oil used in the inhibition of the radical cation 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) and the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl showed high 50% inhibitory concentration values of 1.24 ± 0.05 mg/L and 0.59 ± 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The essential oil of T. capitatus was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Salmonella analum, Listeria monocytogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherchia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae), fungi (Mucor ramamnianus, Aspergillus ochraceus), and yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans) using the agar well diffusion method. It seemed that L. monocytogenes, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae bacteria were inhibited by the essential oil tested. A strong activity was also observed against fungi and yeasts.

  20. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-04

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences.

  1. Development of a screening method for the analysis of organic pollutants in water using dual stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tölgyessy, Peter; Vrana, Branislav; Krascsenits, Zoltán

    2011-12-15

    The development of a method for screening of organic compounds with a wide range of physico-chemical properties in water, based on dual stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (dual SBSE-TD-GC-MS) is described. The investigated water sample is divided into two aliquots and extracted with stir bar sorptive extraction at two different conditions: using addition of methanol or sodium chloride, respectively. Following extraction, the two stir bars are inserted into the same glass thermal desorption liner and are simultaneously desorbed and analysed by GC-MS. The method optimisation was performed using 45 environmentally harmful substances with different volatilities (boiling point from 193 to 495°C), polarity (logK(ow) from 2.17 to 8.54) and acido-basic properties. The majority of model compounds was selected from the EU list of priority substances in the field of water policy and from the US EPA method 625, respectively. Optimisation was performed for extraction parameters (sample volume, extraction time, stirring rate, addition of modifiers) as well as for the thermal desorption conditions (desorption flow, desorption time, cryofocusing temperature). Performance characteristics (recovery, repeatability, carryover, linearity, limits of detection and quantification) were determined for the optimised method. An example of analysis of a contaminated groundwater sample is presented.

  2. Diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency by urinary metabolite ratios using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis: Reference values for neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Kamrath, Clemens; Hartmann, Michaela F; Boettcher, Claudia; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Wudy, Stefan A

    2016-02-01

    One major issue of newborn screening programs for 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) is the high rate of false-positive results, especially in preterm neonates. Urinary steroid metabolite analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is suitable as a confirmatory diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to analyze retrospectively diagnostic metabolite ratios in neonates and infants with and without 21OHD using GC-MS with emphasis on glucocorticoid metabolism, and to develop reference values for the steroid metabolite ratios for the diagnosis of 21OHD. We retrospectively analyzed urinary steroid hormone metabolites determined by GC-MS of 95 untreated neonates and infants with 21OHD (1-148 days), and 261 neonates and infants (100 preterms) without 21OHD (0-217 days). Metabolites of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone showed specificities below 98%, whereas the 21-deoxycortisol metabolite pregnanetriolone clearly separated 21OHD from non-21OHD subjects. The best diagnostic ratio for 21OHD was pregnanetriolone to 6α-hydroxy-tetrahydrocortisone. The lowest value of this ratio in the 21OHD group (0.47) was at least eight times higher than the highest values in the non-21OHD group (0.055). We have given appropriate reference values for steroid metabolite ratios in the largest 21OHD cohort so far described. Consideration of glucocorticoid metabolism, especially the use of typical neonatal 6α-hydroxylates metabolites, leads to improvement of diagnostic metabolite ratios.

  3. Optimization of two different dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) analysis in water.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wan-Chi; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-01

    Novel sample preparation methods termed "up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME)" and "water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (WLSEME)" coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been developed for the analysis of 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. For UDSA-DLLME, an up-and-down shaker-assisted emulsification was employed. Extraction was complete in 3min. Only 14 μL of 1-heptanol was required, without a dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were in the range 0.022-0.060 µg L(-1). The enrichment factors (EFs) ranged from 392 to 766. Relative recoveries were between 84% and 113% for river, lake, and field water. In WLSEME, 9 μL of 1-nonanol as extraction solvent and 240 μL of 1 mg L(-1) Triton X-100 as surfactant were mixed in a microsyringe to form a cloudy emulsified solution, which was then injected into the samples. Compared with other surfactant-assisted emulsion methods, WLSEME uses much less surfactant. The linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were 0.022-0.13 µg L(-1). The EFs ranged from 388 to 649. The relative recoveries were 86-114% for all three water specimens.

  4. Analysis of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid in Nutritional Ingredients and Milk by Derivatization with Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl Chloride and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Stefan; Reddy, Todime M

    2015-12-09

    A straightforward analytical method based on derivatization with fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed for the analysis of residues of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in a suite of nutritional ingredients derived from soybean, corn, and sugar beet and also in cow's milk and human breast milk. Accuracy and intermediate precision were 91-116% and <10% RSD, respectively, in soy protein isolate. Limits of quantitation were 0.05 and 0.005 μg/g in powdered and liquid samples, respectively. Glyphosate and AMPA were quantified at 0.105 and 0.210 μg/g (soy protein isolate) and 0.850 and 2.71 μg/g (soy protein concentrate, both derived from genetically modified soybean), respectively. Residues were not detected in soy milk, soybean oil, corn oil, maltodextrin, sucrose, cow's milk, whole milk powder, or human breast milk. The method is proposed as a convenient tool for the survey of glyphosate and AMPA in the ingredient supply chain.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  6. Traditional sampling with laboratory analysis and solid phase microextraction sampling with field gas chromatography/mass spectrometry by military industrial hygienists.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip A; Kluchinsky, Timothy A; Savage, Paul B; Erickson, Richard P; Lee, Arthur P; Williams, Kenneth; Stevens, Michael; Thomas, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the United States Department of Defense or the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Rapid on-site detection and identification of environmental contaminants to which personnel may be exposed is often needed during military deployment situations. The availability of military industrial hygienists with capabilities for "complete" on-site exposure assessment of chemical species should allow detection and identification of a number of important stressors almost immediately following sample collection. Portable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) provides a rapid and efficient separation of volatile and semivolatile organic analytes, accompanied by sensitive electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) detection. The use of GC/MS in the field is limited, however, by equipment cost, complexity of the equipment, and the analytical process. Additionally, a skilled operator is needed to obtain useful separations and to interpret mass spectral data. To demonstrate benefits and limitations of "complete" exposure assessment capabilities, a previously unidentified complex mixture, produced by thermal dispersion of riot control agents, was examined. Established active sampling methods were used with laboratory analyses. Solid phase microextraction, a passive sampling method that simplifies preparation for GC/MS analysis, also was used with a field-portable GC/MS system. Both sampling/analysis methods were used to detect CS riot control agent-derived air contaminants dispersed from riot control type canisters through oxidizer-supported combustion of a chemical fuel.

  7. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reichel, W L; Prouty, R M; Gay, M L

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  8. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  9. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples.

  10. Field Analysis of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Soil Using Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) and a Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang; Kruse, Natalie A; Bowman, Jennifer R; Jackson, Glen P

    2016-05-01

    An expedited field analysis method was developed for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil matrices using a portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument. Soil samples of approximately 0.5 g were measured with a portable scale and PCBs were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a 100 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. Two milliliters of 0.2 M potassium permanganate and 0.5 mL of 6 M sulfuric acid solution were added to the soil matrices to facilitate the extraction of PCBs. The extraction was performed for 30 min at 100 ℃ in a portable heating block that was powered by a portable generator. The portable GC-MS instrument took less than 6 min per analysis and ran off an internal battery and helium cylinder. Six commercial PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1016, 1221, 1232, 1242, 1248, 1254, and 1260, could be classified based on the GC chromatograms and mass spectra. The detection limit of this method for Aroclor 1260 in soil matrices is approximately 10 ppm, which is sufficient for guiding remediation efforts in contaminated sites. This method was applicable to the on-site analysis of PCBs with a total analysis time of 37 min per sample. However, the total analysis time could be improved to less than 7 min per sample by conducting the rate-limiting extraction step for different samples in parallel.

  11. Metabolic Disturbances in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease Evaluated Using Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Hung, Wei-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based comprehensive analysis of metabolic profiles with metabolomics approach has potential diagnostic and predictive implications. However, no metabolomics data have been reported in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). This study investigated the metabolomic profiles in AOSD patients and examined their association with clinical characteristics and disease outcome. Methods Serum metabolite profiles were determined on 32 AOSD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS analysis, and the differentially expressed metabolites were quantified using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM)/MS analysis in 44 patients and 42 HC. Pure standards were utilized to confirm the presence of the differentially expressed metabolites. Results Eighteen differentially expressed metabolites were identified in AOSD patents using LC/MS-based analysis, of which 13 metabolites were validated by MRM/MS analysis. Among them, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), urocanic acid and indole were significantly lower, and L-phenylalanine levels were significantly higher in AOSD patients compared with HC. Moreover, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), PhePhe, uridine, taurine, L-threonine, and (R)-3-Hydroxy-hexadecanoic acid were significantly correlated with disease activity scores (all p<0.05) in AOSD patients. A different clustering of metabolites was associated with a different disease outcome, with significantly lower levels of isovalerylsarcosine observed in patients with chronic articular pattern (median, 77.0AU/ml) compared with monocyclic (341.5AU/ml, p<0.01) or polycyclic systemic pattern (168.0AU/ml, p<0.05). Conclusion Thirteen differentially expressed metabolites identified and validated in AOSD patients were shown to be involved in five metabolic pathways. Significant associations of metabolic profiles with disease activity and outcome of AOSD suggest their involvement in AOSD pathogenesis. PMID

  12. Volatile Profiles of Emissions from Different Activities Analyzed Using Canister Samplers and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) Analysis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Orecchio, Santino; Fiore, Michele; Barreca, Salvatore; Vara, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    The objective of present study was to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several sources (fuels, traffic, landfills, coffee roasting, a street-food laboratory, building work, indoor use of incense and candles, a dental laboratory, etc.) located in Palermo (Italy) by using canister autosamplers and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. In this study, 181 VOCs were monitored. In the atmosphere of Palermo city, propane, butane, isopentane, methyl pentane, hexane, benzene, toluene, meta- and para-xylene, 1,2,4 trimethyl benzene, 1,3,5 trimethyl benzene, ethylbenzene, 4 ethyl toluene and heptane were identified and quantified in all sampling sites. PMID:28212294

  13. Volatile Profiles of Emissions from Different Activities Analyzed Using Canister Samplers and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) Analysis: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Fiore, Michele; Barreca, Salvatore; Vara, Gabriele

    2017-02-15

    The objective of present study was to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several sources (fuels, traffic, landfills, coffee roasting, a street-food laboratory, building work, indoor use of incense and candles, a dental laboratory, etc.) located in Palermo (Italy) by using canister autosamplers and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. In this study, 181 VOCs were monitored. In the atmosphere of Palermo city, propane, butane, isopentane, methyl pentane, hexane, benzene, toluene, meta- and para-xylene, 1,2,4 trimethyl benzene, 1,3,5 trimethyl benzene, ethylbenzene, 4 ethyl toluene and heptane were identified and quantified in all sampling sites.

  14. Methods of Analysis - Determination of Pyrethroid Insecticides in Water and Sediment Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    A method for the determination of 14 pyrethroid insecticides in environmental water and sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in response to increasing concern over the effects of pyrethroids on aquatic organisms. The pyrethroids included in this method are ones that are applied to many agricultural and urban areas. Filtered water samples are extracted for pyrethroids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with no additional cleanup steps. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a microwave-assisted extraction system, and the pyrethroids of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences by passing the extracts through stacked graphitized carbon and alumina SPE cartridges, along with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel-permeation chromatography (HPLC/GPC). Quantification of the pyrethroids from the extracted water and sediment samples is done using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS). Recoveries in test water samples fortified at 10 ng/L ranged from 83 to 107 percent, and recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 ug/kg ranged from 82 to 101 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 5 to 9 percent in the water samples and 3 to 9 percent in the sediment samples. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), in water ranged from 2.0 to 6.0 ng/L using GC/MS and 0.5 to 1.0 ng/L using GC/MS/MS. For sediment, the MDLs ranged from 1.0 to 2.6 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS and 0.2 to 0.5 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS/MS. The matrix-spike recoveries for each compound, when averaged for 12 environmental water samples, ranged from 84 to 96 percent, and when averaged for 27 environmental sediment samples, ranged from 88 to 100 percent.

  15. Analysis of tricyclic antidepressant drugs in plasma by means of solid-phase microextraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudete; Santos-Neto, Alvaro J; Fernandes, Christian; Rodrigues, José C; Lanças, Fernando M

    2007-10-01

    Solid-phase microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (SPME-LC-MS) was used to analyze tricyclic antidepressant drugs desipramine, imipramine, nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and clomipramine (internal standard) in plasma samples. SPME was performed by direct extraction on a PDMS/DVB (60 microm) coated fiber, employing a stirring rate of 1200 rpm for 30 min, pH 11.0, and temperature of 30 degrees C. Drug desorption was carried out by exposing the fiber to the liquid chromatography mobile phase for 20 min, using a labmade SPME-LC interface at 50 degrees C. The main variables experimentally influencing LC-MS response were evaluated and mathematically modeled. A rational optimization with fewer experiments was achieved using a factorial design approach. The constructed empirical models were adjusted with 96-98% of explained deviation allowing an adequate data set comprehension. The chromatographic separation was realized using an RP-18 column (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 5 microm particles) and ammonium acetate buffer (0.01 mol/l, pH 5.50) : acetonitrile (50 : 50 v/v) as mobile phase. Low detection levels were achieved with electrospray interface (0.1 ng/ml). The developed method showed specificity, linearity, precision, and limit of quantification adequate to assay tricyclic antidepressant drugs in plasma.

  16. Analysis of urinary metabolic signatures of early hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after surgical removal using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Bin; Yao, Zhenzhen; Yin, Peiyuan; Lu, Xin; Kong, Hongwei; Fan, Fei; Jiao, Binghua; Xu, Guowang

    2012-08-03

    The objective of present study was to offer insights into the metabolic responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to surgical resection and the metabolic signatures latent in early HCC recurrence (one year after operation). Urinary metabolic profiling employing gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) was utilized to investigate the complex physiopathologic regulations in HCC after operational intervention. It was revealed that an intricate series of metabolic regulations including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleoside metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, gut floral metabolism, etc., principally leading to the direction of biomass synthesis, could be observed after tumor surgical removal. Moreover, metabolic differences between recurrent and nonrecurrent patients had emerged 7 days after initial operation. The metabolic signatures of HCC recurrence principally comprised notable up-regulations of lactate excretion, succinate production, purine and pyrimidine nucleosides turnover, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, aromatic amino acid turnover, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and glyoxylate metabolism, similar to metabolic behaviors of HCC burden. Sixteen metabolites were found to be significantly increased in the recurrent patients compared with those in nonrecurrent patients and healthy controls. Five metabolites (ethanolamine, lactic acid, acotinic acid, phenylalanine and ribose) were further defined; they were favorable to the prediction of early recurrence.

  17. [Analysis of the components of floral scent in Glochidion puberum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with dynamic headspace adsorption].

    PubMed

    Huang, Daihong; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Guoping; Li, Houhun; Shi, Fuchen

    2015-03-01

    The floral scent plays the important key role in maintaining the obligate pollination mutualism between Glochidion plants and Epicephala moths. In the study, the dynamic headspace adsorption technique was employed to collect the floral scent emitted by Glochidion puberum, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the detection and identification of volatile chemical components in headspace samples of flowers from G. puberum. The peak area normalization was used to determine the relative contents of each odour component. The results showed that 45 compounds mainly consisting of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were isolated from the floral scent produced by G. puberum. Especially, both linalool (38.06%) and β-elemene (23.84%) were considered as the major scent components of G. puberum. It was speculated that linalool and β-elemene may be the two potential compounds attracting female Epicephala moths. The study provided the basic data for further electroantennographic detection and bioassays to identify the compounds having the actual physiological activity to female Epicephala moths.

  18. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry comprehensive analysis of organophosphorus, brominated flame retardants, by-products and formulation intermediates in water.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Quintana, Jordi; Chaler, Roser; Ventura, Francesc; Lacorte, Silvia

    2012-06-08

    A multiresidue method based on gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to determine organophosphorus flame retardants, polybromodiphenyl ethers (BDEs 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209), new brominated flame retardants, bromophenols, bromoanilines, bromotoluenes and bromoanisoles in water. Two ionization techniques (electron ionization--EI, and electron capture negative ionization--ECNI) and two acquisition modes (selected ion monitoring--SIM, and selected reaction monitoring--SRM) were compared as regards to mass spectral characterization, sensitivity and quantification capabilities. The highest sensitivity, at expenses of identification capacity, was obtained by GC-ECNI-MS/SIM for most of the compounds analyzed, mainly for PBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane while GC-EI-MS/MS in SRM was the most selective technique and permitted the identification of target compounds at the pg level, and identification capabilities increased when real samples were analyzed. This method was further used to evaluate the presence and behavior of flame retardants within a drinking water treatment facility. Organophosphorus flame retardants were the only compounds detected in influent waters at levels of 0.32-0.03 μg L⁻¹, and their elimination throughout the different treatment stages was evaluated.

  19. Analysis of cannabinoids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in milk, liver and hemp seed to ensure food safety.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, Úrsula; Andrés-Costa, María Jesús; Andreu, Vicente; Picó, Yolanda

    2017-08-01

    A method for determining cannabinoids, Δ9-tetrahidrocannabinol (THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THC-COOH) and 11-hidroxy-Δ(9)-THC (THC-OH) in milk, liver and hemp seeds based on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been optimized and validated. Analytes were extracted with methanol and the extracts cleaned-up by solid-phase extraction using Oasis HLB (60mg). The developed method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) ranged from 3.10-10.5ngg(-1) and 3.52-11.5ngg(-1), the recoveries were 76-118% and matrix effect ranged from -17.8% to 19.9% in the three matrices studied. The method was applied to food samples obtaining positive results for THC in hemp seeds (average 0.82μgg(-1)) and three brands of junior formula milk at concentrations from 4.76 to 56.11ngg(-1). The developed method was suitable achieving identification and quantification of cannabinoids in food matrices.

  20. An alternative derivatization method for the analysis of amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Maria José Nunes; Menezes, Helvécio Costa; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Resende, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Cardeal, Zenilda de Lourdes

    2013-07-15

    The determination of the concentrations of l-amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been used to gain biochemical insight into central nervous system disorders. This paper describes a microwave-assisted derivatization (MAD) method using N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as a derivatizing agent for determining the concentrations of l-amino acids in human CSF by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The experimental design used to optimize the conditions showed that the optimal derivatization time was 3min with a microwave power of 210W. The method showed good performance for the validation parameters. The sensitivity was very good, with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.01μmolL(-1) to 4.24μmolL(-1) and limits of quantification (LOQs) ranging from 0.02 to 7.07μmolL(-1). The precision, measured using the relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 4.12 to 15.59% for intra-day analyses and from 6.36 to 18.71% for inter-day analyses. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) were above 0.990 for all amino acids. The optimized and validated method was applied to the determination of amino acid concentrations in human CSF.

  1. Quantification of antidepressants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winecker, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are of great interest to clinical and forensic toxicologists as they are frequently used in suicidal gestures; they can be the source of drug interactions and some have narrow therapeutic indices making the potential for toxicity more likely. There are five categories of antidepressants based on function and/or structure. These are monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), cyclic antidepressants including tricyclic and tetracyclic compounds (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), and atypical compounds. This method is designed to detect the presence of antidepressant drugs in blood/serum, urine, and tissue specimens using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) following liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and identified by relative retention times and mass spectra.

  2. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (<7) were extracted more efficiently under acidic conditions and antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  3. [Analysis of fatty acids in Gmnocypris przewalskii oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with base-catalyzed transesterification].

    PubMed

    Bo, Haibo; Wang, Xia; Zhai, Zongde; Li, Yongmin; Chen, Liren

    2006-03-01

    The composition of fatty acids (FA) in Gymnocypris przewalskii oil was identified and quantified by gas chromatography (GC)/electron impact (EI) mass spectrometry (MS). A base-catalyzed transesterification method was used to convert fatty acids to methyl esters. The lipids were extracted using petroleum ether and the total lipids in dried meat and skin of Gymnocypris przewalskii were about 25%. Forty-seven fatty acids were identified in the current study. Main types of fatty acids found in the oils were normal saturated, mono-branched, multi-branched, cyclopropane, furanoid, normal monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids were approximately 25. 7% of the total, and the main components were C(14:0) (3.4%), C(16:0) (19.4%) and C(18:0) (1.1%). Unsaturated fatty acids were totally 73.6%, and the major components of monounsaturated fatty acids were C(16:1 (9)) (19.8%), C(18:1) (9)) (18. 6%) and C(18:1 (11)) (7.3%); polyunsaturated fatty acids were mainly composed of C(18:2 (9,12)) (4.8%), C(18:3 (9, 12, 15)) (3.1%), C(20:4 (5, 8, 1, 14)) (1.2%), C(20:5 (5, 8, 11, 14, 17)) (EPA, 9.4%) and C(22:6 (4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19)) (DHA, 6.7%). Especially, furyl-, cyclopropane- and several odd and branched chain fatty acids were found in Gymnocypris przewalskii oil. It is thus an important dietary resource of functional fatty acids.

  4. Metabonomics analysis of urine and plasma from rats given long-term and low-dose dimethoate by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhijing; Sun, Xiaowei; Yang, Jindan; Hao, Dongfang; Du, Longfei; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2012-09-30

    This study assessed the effects of long-term, low-dose dimethoate administration to rats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Dimethoate (0.04, 0.12, and 0.36 mg/kg body weight/day) was administered daily to male Wistar rats through their drinking water for 24 weeks. Significant changes in serum clinical chemistry were observed in the middle- and high-dose groups. UPLC-MS revealed evident separate clustering among the different dose groups using global metabolic profiling by supervised partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Metabonomic analysis showed alterations in a number of metabolites (12 from urine and 13 from plasma), such as L-tyrosine, dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP), citric acid, uric acid, suberic acid, glycylproline, allantoin, isovalerylglutamic acid and kinds of lipids. The results suggest that long-term, low-dose exposure to dimethoate can cause disturbances in liver function, antioxidant and nervous systems, as well as the metabolisms of lipids, glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and collagen in rats. DMTP and DMDTP, which had the most significant changes among all other studied biomarkers, were considered as early, sensitive biomarkers of exposure to dimethoate. The other aforementioned proposed toxicity biomarkers in metabonomic analysis may be useful in the risk assessment of the toxic effects of dimethoate. Metabonomics as a systems toxicology approach was able to provide comprehensive information on the dynamic process of dimethoate induced toxicity. In addition, the results indicate that metabonomic approach could detect systemic toxic effects at an earlier stage compared to clinical chemistry. The combination of metabonomics and clinical chemistry made the toxicity of dimethoate on rats more comprehensive.

  5. Serum fatty acid profiles and potential biomarkers of ankylosing spondylitis determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Han, Su; Dong, Daming; Wang, Yansong; Liu, Qingpeng; Xie, Wei; Li, Mi; Yao, Meng

    2015-04-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease. Early and accurate detection is essential for effective disease treatment. Recently, research has focused on genomics and proteomics. However, the associated metabolic variations, especially fatty acid profiles, have been poorly discussed. In this study, the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach and multivariate statistical analysis were used to investigate the metabolic profiles of serum free fatty acids (FFAs) and esterified fatty acids (EFAs) in AS patients. The results showed that significant differences in most of the FFA (C12:0, C16:0, C16:1, C18:3, C20:4, C20:5, C22:5 and C22:6) and EFA (C12:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C20:4 and C22:6) concentrations were found between the AS patients and healthy controls (p < 0.05). Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis were performed to classify the AS patients and controls. Additionally, FFAs C20:4, C12:0, C18:3 and EFAs C22:6, C12:0 were confirmed as potential biomarkers to identify AS patients and healthy controls. The present study highlights that differences in the serum FFA and EFA profiles of AS patients reflect the metabolic disorder. Moreover, FFA and EFA biomarkers appear to have clinical applications for the screening and diagnosis of AS.

  6. Analysis of trace contamination of phthalate esters in ultrapure water using a modified solid-phase extraction procedure and automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsu-Chuan; Den, Walter; Chan, Shu-Fei; Kin, Kuan Tzu

    2008-04-25

    The present study was aimed to develop a procedure modified from the conventional solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for the analysis of trace concentration of phthalate esters in industrial ultrapure water (UPW). The proposed procedure allows UPW sample to be drawn through a sampling tube containing hydrophobic sorbent (Tenax TA) to concentrate the aqueous phthalate esters. The solid trap was then demoisturized by two-stage gas drying before subjecting to thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This process removes the solvent extraction procedure necessary for the conventional SPE method, and permits automation of the analytical procedure for high-volume analyses. Several important parameters, including desorption temperature and duration, packing quantity and demoisturizing procedure, were optimized in this study based on the analytical sensitivity for a standard mixture containing five different phthalate esters. The method detection limits for the five phthalate esters were between 36 ng l(-1) and 95 ng l(-1) and recovery rates between 15% and 101%. Dioctyl phthalate (DOP) was not recovered adequately because the compound was both poorly adsorbed and desorbed on and off Tenax TA sorbents. Furthermore, analyses of material leaching from poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) tubes as well as the actual water samples showed that di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were the common contaminants detected from PVC contaminated UPW and the actual UPW, as well as in tap water. The reduction of DEHP in the production processes of actual UPW was clearly observed, however a DEHP concentration of 0.20 microg l(-1) at the point of use was still being quantified, suggesting that the contamination of phthalate esters could present a barrier to the future cleanliness requirement of UPW. The work demonstrated that the proposed modified SPE procedure provided an effective method for rapid analysis and contamination

  7. Hydrocarbons and fuels analyses with the supersonic gas chromatography mass spectrometry--the novel concept of isomer abundance analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Gordin, Alexander; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-06-27

    Hydrocarbon analysis with standard GC-MS is confronted by the limited range of volatile compounds amenable for analysis and by the similarity of electron ionization mass spectra for many compounds which show weak or no molecular ions for heavy hydrocarbons. The use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (Supersonic GC-MS) significantly extends the range of heavy hydrocarbons that can be analyzed, and provides trustworthy enhanced molecular ion to all hydrocarbons. In addition, unique isomer mass spectral features are obtained in the ionization of vibrationally cold hydrocarbons. The availability of molecular ions for all hydrocarbons results in the ability to obtain unique chromatographic isomer distribution patterns that can serve as a new method for fuel characterization and identification. Examples of the applicability and use of this novel isomer abundance analysis (IAA) method to diesel fuel, kerosene and oil analyses are shown. It is suggested that in similarity to the "three ions method" for identification purposes, three isomer abundance patterns can serve for fuel characterization. The applications of the Supersonic GC-MS for engine motor oil analysis and transformer oil analysis are also demonstrated and discussed, including the capability to achieve fast 1-2s sampling without separation for oil and fuel fingerprinting. The relatively fast analysis of biodiesel is described, demonstrating the provision of molecular ions to heavy triglycerides. Isomer abundance analysis with the Supersonic GC-MS could find broad range of applications including petrochemicals and fuel analysis, arson analysis, environmental oil/fuel spill analysis, fuel adulteration analysis and motor oil analysis.

  8. Separation of Caffeine from Beverages and Analysis Using Thin-Layer Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres y Torres, Janelle L.; Hiley, Shauna L.; Lorimor, Steven P.; Rhoad, Jonathan S.; Caldwell, Benjamin D.; Zweerink, Gerald L.; Ducey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Characterization and Analysis of a Product (CAP) project is used to introduce first-semester general chemistry students to chemical instrumentation through the analysis of caffeine-containing beverage products. Some examples of these products have included coffee, tea, and energy drinks. Students perform at least three instrumental experiments…

  9. Extraction and analysis of different Cannabis samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Yara; Rudaz, Serge; Mathieu, Patrick; Christen, Philippe; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2005-11-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS method was developed for the extraction and analysis of cannabinoids from Cannabis samples. Different commercially available fibres were evaluated; polydimethylsiloxane 100 microm was selected as the most efficient one. In order to enhance sensitivity and reduce analysis time, the sampling temperature was studied and it showed that extraction should be performed at a high temperature (150 degrees C). In relation with the high lipophilicity of cannabinoids, a relatively long desorption time (3 min) was necessary to ensure a total transfer from the fibre into the injection port of the gas chromatograph. The method was finally applied to the extraction of Swiss marijuana samples from different regions. Data treatment by principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis allowed a discrimination of the different batches.

  10. The toxicity of 3-chloropropane-1,2-dipalmitate in Wistar rats and a metabonomics analysis of rat urine by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianshuang; Wang, Sen; Wang, Maoqing; Shi, Wenxiu; Du, Xiaoyan; Sun, Changhao

    2013-11-25

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol(3-MCPD) fatty acid esters can release free 3-MCPD in a certain condition. Free 3-MCPD is a well-known food contaminant and is toxicological well characterized, however, in contrast to free 3-MCPD, the toxicological characterization of 3-MCPD fatty acid esters is puzzling. In this study, toxicological and metabonomics studies of 3-chloropropane-1,2-dipalmitate(3-MCPD dipalmitate) were carried out based on an acute oral toxicity test, a 90-day feeding test and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) analysis. The LD50 value of 3-MCPD dipalmitate was determined to be 1780 mg/kg body weight (bw) for Wistar rats. The results of the 90-day feeding test in male Wistar rats showed that 3-MCPD dipalmitate caused a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in the high-dose group (267 mg/kg bw/day) compared to control rats. Renal tubular epithelium cell degeneration and renal tubular hyaline cast accumulation were the major histopathological changes in rats administered 3-MCPD dipalmitate. Urine samples obtained after the 90-day feeding test and analyzed by UPLC-MS showed that the differences in metabolic profiles between control and treated rats were clearly distinguished by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of the chromatographic data. Five metabolite biomarkers which had earlier and significant variations had been identified, they were first considered to be the early, sensitive biomarkers in evaluating the effect of 3-MCPD dipalmitate exposure, and the possible mechanism of these biomarkers variation was elucidated. The combination of histopathological examination, clinical chemistry and metabolomics analyses in rats resulted in a systematic and comprehensive assessment of the long-term toxicity of 3-MCPD dipalmitate.

  11. Automated and sensitive analysis of 28-epihomobrassinolide in Arabidopsis thaliana by on-line polymer monolith microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ma, Qiao; Li, Min; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Feng, Yuqi; Liu, Huwei

    2013-11-22

    By on-line solid phase microextraction with polymer monolith coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-LC-MS), an automated and sensitive method for analysis of the endogenous 28-epihomobrassinolide (28-epihomoBR) in Arabidopsis thaliana was developed in this work. Firstly, a poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(MAA-co-EDMA)) monolith was prepared in the capillary and applied in in-tube SPME. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as porogen to adjust the specific surface area and hydrophobicity of the target monolith to get satisfactory permeability, high mechanical strength and good stability. The optimized monolith was then served as extraction medium for analysis of the derivatized 28-epihomoBR in plant samples with the cleanup of matrix and enrichment of desired analyte at the same time. Good linearity was obtained in the linear range of 5-500 ng/L with the coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9996. The limit of detection (S/N=3) of 28-epihomoBR was found to be 2.0 ng/L and the limit of quantification (S/N=10) was 5.0 ng/L. Using this method, the endogenous 0.101 ng/g (FW) 28-epihomoBR was successfully detected from only 400mg A. thaliana samples with satisfactory recovery (80.3-92.1%) and reproducibility (RSD 6.8-9.6%). Comparing with other sample pretreatment methods, this automated on-line SPME-LC-MS method is rapid, sensitive, reproducible and laborsaving.

  12. Quantitative analysis of fragrance in selectable one dimensional or two dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous detection of multiple detectors in single injection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Peng; Wan, Tow Shi; Min, Christina Liew Shu; Osborne, Murray; Ng, Khim Hui

    2014-03-14

    A selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system coupled with flame ionization detector (FID) and olfactory detection port (ODP) was employed in this study to analyze perfume oil and fragrance in shower gel. A split/splitless (SSL) injector and a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) injector are connected via a 2-way splitter of capillary flow technology (CFT) in this selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP system to facilitate liquid sample injections and thermal desorption (TD) for stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) technique, respectively. The dual-linked injectors set-up enable the use of two different injector ports (one at a time) in single sequence run without having to relocate the (1)D capillary column from one inlet to another. Target analytes were separated in (1)D GC-MS/FID/ODP and followed by further separation of co-elution mixture from (1)D in (2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP in single injection without any instrumental reconfiguration. A (1)D/(2)D quantitative analysis method was developed and validated for its repeatability - tR; calculated linear retention indices (LRI); response ratio in both MS and FID signal, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), as well as linearity over a concentration range. The method was successfully applied in quantitative analysis of perfume solution at different concentration level (RSD≤0.01%, n=5) and shower gel spiked with perfume at different dosages (RSD≤0.04%, n=5) with good recovery (96-103% for SSL injection; 94-107% for stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption (SBSE-TD).

  13. Analytical performance of three commonly used extraction methods for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of wine volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Andujar-Ortiz, I; Moreno-Arribas, M V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Pozo-Bayón, M A

    2009-10-23

    The analytical performance of three extraction procedures based on cold liquid-liquid extraction using dicloromethane (LLE), solid phase extraction (SPE) using a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer and headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) using a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane coated fibre has been evaluated based on the analysis of 30 representative wine volatile compounds. From the comparison of the three procedures, LLE and SPE showed very good linearity covering a wide range of concentrations of wine volatile compounds, low detection limits, high recovery for most of the volatile compounds under study and higher sensitivity compared to the headspace-SPME procedure. The latter showed in general, poor recovery for polar volatile compounds. Despite some drawbacks associated with the LLE and SPE procedures such as the more tedious sampling treatment and the use of organic solvents, the analytical performance of both procedures showed that they are more adequate for the analysis of wine volatiles.

  14. Analysis of yohimbine alkaloid from Pausinystalia yohimbe by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinhua; Li, Peng; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Kaijun; Liu, Jia; Li, Qiang

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Pausinystalia yohimbe-type alkaloids in the barks of Rubiaceae species is presented using different analytical approaches. Extracts of P. yohimbe were first examined by GC-MS and the major alkaloids were identified. The quantitation of yohimbine was then accomplished by non-aqueous CE (NACE) with diode array detection. This approach was selected in order to use a running buffer fully compatible with samples in organic solvent. In particular, a mixture of methanol containing ammonium acetate (20 mM) and glacial acetic acid was used as a BGE. The same analytical sample was subjected to GC-MS and NACE analysis; the different selectivity displayed by these techniques allowed different separation profiles that can be useful in phytochemical characterization of the extracts. The linear calibration ranges were all 10-1000 microg/mL for yohimbine by GC-MS and NACE analysis. The recovery of yohimbine was 91.2-94.0% with RSD 1.4-4.3%. The LOD for yohimbine were 0.6 microg/mL by GC-MS and 1.0 microg/mL by NACE, respectively. The GC-MS and NACE methods were successfully validated and applied to the quantitation of yohimbine.

  15. Analysis of neutral nitromusks in incenses by capillary electrophoresis in organic solvents and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Roberto; Fiori, Jessica; Mancini, Francesca; Cavrini, Vanni

    2005-09-01

    Nitromusks used as fragrances in a variety of personal-care products, cleansers, and domestic deodorants, including incense sticks, are neutral nitro aromatic compounds; some of these have been reported as photosensitizers. In this work, their analysis was performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in a methanol-based background electrolyte (BGE). In particular, a 10 mM solution of citric acid in methanol was used; under these conditions the strong suppression of the electroosmotic flow favored the use of negatively charged surfactants as additives for the anodic migration of the studied analytes. To this end, sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was supplemented at high concentration (190 mM) to the organic background electrolyte (BGE), showing strong indication of the ability to give micelle-like aggregates. Since nitromusks are characterized by the presence of a nitroaromatic ring with low charge density, their association with TDC aggregates can be ascribed to donor-acceptor interactions. Separation of musk xylene, musk ketone, and the banned musk moskene and musk ambrette was obtained under full nonaqueous BGE; the addition of relatively small water percentages (15% v/v) was found to be useful in improving the separation of pairs of adjacent peaks. Under optimized conditions (190 mM sodium TDC in methanol-water, 85-15 v/v containing citric acid 10 mM) the system was applied to the analysis of nitromusks in incense sticks extracted with methanol. The results were compared with those obtained by the analysis of the same samples using gas chromatography with mass detector. The expected different selectivity of separation obtained using the two techniques can be useful in the unambiguous determination of the analytes; furthermore, a substantial accord of the preliminary quantitative results achieved with the two methods was assumed as the confirmation of the potential reliability of CE performed with high percentage of organic solvent.

  16. Dried blood spots: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Mandrioli, Roberto; Sorella, Vittorio; Somaini, Lorenzo; Giocondi, Daniele; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2013-01-04

    A sensitive and selective HPLC-MS/MS method has been developed for the first time for the analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (the most important active cannabinoid) and its hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites in human Dried Blood Spots (DBSs). The simultaneous determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its two main metabolites allows assessing the time elapsed after the drug intake and distinguishing between acute or former consumption. This is an important information in specific contexts such as "on street" controls by police forces. DBSs have been chosen as the optimal biological matrix for this kind of testing, since they provide information on the actual state of intoxication, without storage and transportation problems usually associated with classical blood testing. The analysis is carried out on a C8 reversed phase column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid in a water/methanol mixture and an electrospray ionisation (ESI) source, coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated according to international guidelines, with satisfactory results in terms of extraction yields, precision, stability and accuracy. Application to real DBS samples from Cannabis abusers gave reliable results, thus confirming the methodology suitability for roadside testing.

  17. Improved high sensitivity analysis of polyphenols and their metabolites by nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Landon; Arabshahi, Ali; Simons, Brigitte; Prasain, Jeevan K; Barnes, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the value of a high resolution, high mass accuracy time-of-flight analyzer in combination with nanoliquid chromatography for the analysis of polyphenols and their metabolites. The goal was to create a method that utilizes small volumes of biological fluids and provides a significant improvement in sensitivity compared with existing methods. Accordingly, nanoLC-MS and nanoLC-pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) methods were developed that had a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 nM for several polyphenols and were linear over 2-3 orders of magnitude (R(2)>0.999). Using urine samples, the ability to observe and quantify polyphenols in such a complex biological fluid depended on much narrower mass windows (0.050 amu or less) on a TOF analyzer than those used on a quadrupole analyzer (0.7 amu). Although a greater selectivity was possible with the low mass resolution of a triple quadrupole instrument using the MRM approach, for the daidzein metabolite O-DMA, a chromatographically resolvable second peak could only be substantially reduced by using a 0.01 amu mass window. The advantage of a TOF analyzer for product ion data is that the whole MSMS spectrum is collected at high mass accuracy and MRM experiments are conducted in silico after the analysis.

  18. Determination of boiling point of petrochemicals by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate regression analysis of structural activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Fakayode, Sayo O; Mitchell, Breanna S; Pollard, David A

    2014-08-01

    Accurate understanding of analyte boiling points (BP) is of critical importance in gas chromatographic (GC) separation and crude oil refinery operation in petrochemical industries. This study reported the first combined use of GC separation and partial-least-square (PLS1) multivariate regression analysis of petrochemical structural activity relationship (SAR) for accurate BP determination of two commercially available (D3710 and MA VHP) calibration gas mix samples. The results of the BP determination using PLS1 multivariate regression were further compared with the results of traditional simulated distillation method of BP determination. The developed PLS1 regression was able to correctly predict analytes BP in D3710 and MA VHP calibration gas mix samples, with a root-mean-square-%-relative-error (RMS%RE) of 6.4%, and 10.8% respectively. In contrast, the overall RMS%RE of 32.9% and 40.4%, respectively obtained for BP determination in D3710 and MA VHP using a traditional simulated distillation method were approximately four times larger than the corresponding RMS%RE of BP prediction using MRA, demonstrating the better predictive ability of MRA. The reported method is rapid, robust, and promising, and can be potentially used routinely for fast analysis, pattern recognition, and analyte BP determination in petrochemical industries.

  19. Simultaneous analysis of pesticides from different chemical classes by using a derivatisation step and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raeppel, Caroline; Nief, Marie; Fabritius, Marie; Racault, Lucie; Appenzeller, Brice M; Millet, Maurice

    2011-11-04

    This work presents a new method to analyse simultaneously by GC-MS 31 pesticides from different chemical classes (2,4 D, 2,4 MCPA, alphacypermethrin, bifenthrin, bromoxynil, buprofezin, carbaryl, carbofuran, clopyralid, cyprodinil, deltamethrin dicamba, dichlobenil, dichlorprop, diflufenican, diuron, fenoxaprop, flazasulfuron, fluroxypyr, ioxynil, isoxaben, mecoprop-P, myclobutanil, oryzalin, oxadiazon, picloram, tau-fluvalinate tebuconazole, triclopyr, trifluralin and trinexapac-p-ethyl). This GC-MS method will be applied to the analysis of passive samplers (Tenax(®) tubes and SPME fiber) used for the evaluation of the indoor and outdoor atmospheric contamination by non-agricultural pesticides. The method involves a derivatisation step for thermo-labile or polar pesticides. Different agents were tested and MtBSTFA (N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide), a sylilation agent producing very specific fragments [M-57], was retained. However, diuron could not be derivatised and the isocyanate product was used for identification and quantification. Pesticides which did not need a derivatisation step were not affected by the presence of the derivatisation agent and they could easily be analysed in mixture with derivatised pesticides. The method can be coupled to a thermal-desorption unit or to SPME extraction for a multiresidue analysis of various pesticides in atmospheric samples.

  20. Simultaneous analysis of amphetamine-type stimulants in plasma by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Kristiane de Cássia; Schuh, Roselena S; Ferranti, Priscila; Ortiz, Rafael S; Souza, Daniele Z; Pechansky, Flavio; Froehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2014-09-01

    Brazil is considered one of the countries with the highest number of amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) users worldwide, mainly diethylpropion (DIE) and fenproporex (FEN). The use of ATS is mostly linked to diverted prescription stimulants and this misuse is widely associated with (ab)use by drivers. A validated method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of amphetamine (AMP), DIE and FEN in plasma samples employing direct immersion-solid-phase microextraction, and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis. Trichloroacetic acid 10% was used for plasma deproteinization. In situ derivatization with propylchloroformate was employed. The linear range of the method covered from 5.0 to 100 ng/mL. The detection limits were 1.0 (AMP), 1.5 (DIE) and 2.0 ng/mL (FEN). The accuracy assessment of the control samples was within 85.58-108.33% of the target plasma concentrations. Recoveries ranged from 46.35 to 84.46% and precision was <15% of the value of relative standard deviation. This method is appropriate for screening and confirmation in plasma forensic toxicology analyses of these basic drugs.

  1. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis as a useful tool in forensic examination of automotive paint traces.

    PubMed

    Zieba-Palus, Janina; Zadora, Grzegorz; Milczarek, Jakub M; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2008-01-25

    Pyrolysis (Py)-GC/MS was applied in comparative analysis of polymer binder of 150 automobile clearcoat samples. It was found that binders of identical type and similar infrared spectra can be, in most cases, effectively differentiated, sometimes based only on the presence of peaks of very low intensity originating from minor paint components. The qualitative procedure of pyrograms comparison was developed. The results obtained, enable one to draw the conclusion that Py-GC/MS appears as valuable, very informative analytical technique of car paint samples examination. Providing identification of paint pyrolysis products, it enables discrimination of samples on the basis of their composition. However, in some cases, paint samples were still indistinguishable on the basis of their pyrograms.

  2. Determination of acidic pharmaceuticals and potential endocrine disrupting compounds in wastewaters and spring waters by selective elution and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Richard; Becerril-Bravo, Elías; Silva-Castro, Vanessa; Jiménez, Blanca

    2007-10-26

    Although the trend in development of analytical methods for emerging contaminants is towards reduced sample preparation and increased detector selectivity, there are still benefits from removal of matrix material during sample preparation. This paper describes a simple method for acidic pharmaceuticals and a range of potential endocrine disrupting compounds in untreated wastewaters and spring waters. It is based on separation of the two classes during elution from the extraction cartridge with final analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 3,4-D was used as the recovery standard for the acids while 4-n-nonylphenol and [2H4]estrone were used for the endocrine disrupters; mean recoveries varied between 89% and 111%. The method was also extensively validated by fortification with the target compounds. Recoveries of acids were from 68% to 97% with relative standard deviations generally less than 10% and recoveries of endocrine disrupters were 68-109% with relative standard deviations less than 20%. Detection limits varied from 0.005 to 1 ng/L in spring water, and from 0.5 to 100 ng/L in untreated wastewater. Concentrations of the analytes in the wastewater ranged from 0.018 to 22.4 microg/L. Values were comparable to reported data, although concentrations were generally relatively high, probably because of a lack of treatment. Triclosan, phthalates, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, ibuprofen, and naproxen were present in the spring water from aquifers recharged indirectly with this wastewater after its use for irrigation; concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 25.0 ng/L. The much lower concentrations compared to wastewater indicate effective removal processes on passage through the soil and subsoil.

  3. A validated method for the analysis of cannabinoids in post-mortem blood using liquid-liquid extraction and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2012-10-10

    A validated method for the identification and quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in post-mortem blood specimens is described. Liquid-liquid extraction was used to extract the cannabinoids from 1 mL of post-mortem blood. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The final derivatized extracts were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was 0.25 ng/mL for all analytes and the limit of quantification of the assay was 0.25 ng/mL for THC, CBN, 11-OH-THC and 0.5 ng/mL for CBD and THC-COOH. The assay was linear across the concentration range 0.25-50 ng/mL (determined with a low and a high calibration range) with correlation coefficients ≥0.992 for all analytes. Inter-day and intra-day accuracy was within ±15% of the target concentration for all analytes. The co-efficients of variation (%CV) for inter-day and intra-day precision were ≤12% for all analytes. The extraction efficiency was >73% for all analytes. The method has successfully been applied to 54 post-mortem blood specimens to date. To the authors knowledge this is the first validated 2D GC-MS method for the analysis of THC, CBD, CBN, 11-OH-THC and THC-COOH following LLE and its application to post-mortem specimens.

  4. Recombinant factor C (rFC) assay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of endotoxin variability in four agricultural dusts.

    PubMed

    Saito, Rena; Cranmer, Brian K; Tessari, John D; Larsson, Lennart; Mehaffy, John M; Keefe, Thomas J; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    Endotoxin exposure is a significant concern in agricultural environments due to relatively high exposure levels. The goals of this study were to determine patterns of 3-hydroxy fatty acid (3-OHFA) distribution in dusts from four types of agricultural environments (dairy, cattle feedlot, grain elevator, and corn farm) and to evaluate correlations between the results of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis (total endotoxin) and biological recombinant factor C (rFC) assay (free bioactive endotoxin). An existing GC/MS-MS method (for house dust) was modified to reduce sample handling and optimized for small amount (<1 mg) of agricultural dusts using GC/EI-MS. A total of 134 breathing zone samples using Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers were collected from agricultural workers in Colorado and Nebraska. Livestock dusts contained approximately two times higher concentrations of 3-OHFAs than grain dusts. Patterns of 3-OHFA distribution and proportion of each individual 3-OHFA varied by dust type. The rank order of Pearson correlations between the biological rFC assay and the modified GC/EI-MS results was feedlot (0.72) > dairy (0.53) > corn farm (0.33) > grain elevator (0.11). In livestock environments, both odd- and even-numbered carbon chain length 3-OHFAs correlated with rFC assay response. The GC/EI-MS method should be especially useful for identification of specific 3-OHFAs for endotoxins from various agricultural environments and may provide useful information for evaluating the relationship between bacterial exposure and respiratory disease among agricultural workers.

  5. Imidacloprid Extraction from Citrus Leaves and Analysis by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Jorge A; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter; Borejsza-Wysocki, Wlodzimierz S; Bauder, Victor S; Morgan, Kelly T

    2016-05-01

    A procedure was developed to extract Imidacloprid (IMD) from newly-flushed and fully-expanded citrus leaves. The extraction was conducted in a bullet blender, using a small sample mass (0.5 g of fresh tissue), stainless-steel beads (24 g), and methanol as extractant (10 mL). The extracts did not require further clean-up before analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. The method was validated with control samples from IMD-untreated Hamlin orange trees. The method limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.04 and 0.12 μg g(-1), respectively. IMD recoveries from fortified leaf tissue were between 92 % and 102 %, with relative standard deviations of <8 %. The method was further evaluated by extracting leaves from Hamlin orange trees treated with IMD. The treated trees showed maximum concentrations of 10.8 and 21.8 µg g(-1), observed at 20 days after applying two soil-drenching rates (0.51 and 1.02 kg IMD ha(-1)), respectively. This extraction technique will generate useful data on IMD plant uptake, foliar concentration, and correlations with Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) mortality or control. The method could be used to generate baseline data to improve IMD soil-drenching applications as the main management practice to control the ACP.

  6. Analysis of Mammalian Cell Proliferation and Macromolecule Synthesis Using Deuterated Water and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Foletta, Victoria C.; Palmieri, Michelle; Kloehn, Joachim; Mason, Shaun; Previs, Stephen F.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Sieber, Oliver M.; Bruce, Clinton R.; Kowalski, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Deuterated water (2H2O), a stable isotopic tracer, provides a convenient and reliable way to label multiple cellular biomass components (macromolecules), thus permitting the calculation of their synthesis rates. Here, we have combined 2H2O labelling, GC-MS analysis and a novel cell fractionation method to extract multiple biomass components (DNA, protein and lipids) from the one biological sample, thus permitting the simultaneous measurement of DNA (cell proliferation), protein and lipid synthesis rates. We have used this approach to characterize the turnover rates and metabolism of a panel of mammalian cells in vitro (muscle C2C12 and colon cancer cell lines). Our data show that in actively-proliferating cells, biomass synthesis rates are strongly linked to the rate of cell division. Furthermore, in both proliferating and non-proliferating cells, it is the lipid pool that undergoes the most rapid turnover when compared to DNA and protein. Finally, our data in human colon cancer cell lines reveal a marked heterogeneity in the reliance on the de novo lipogenic pathway, with the cells being dependent on both ‘self-made’ and exogenously-derived fatty acid. PMID:27754354

  7. Field-Free Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization - Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Steroids within Complex Biological Matrices.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Ross David; Robb, Damon B

    2017-03-06

    A comparison study is presented in which the relative performance of a new orthogonal geometry field-free atmospheric pressure photoionization (FF-APPI) source was evaluated against both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for the analysis of a small panel of clinically relevant steroids, spiked within various complex biological matrices. Critical performance factors like sensitivity and susceptibility to matrix effects were assessed using a simple, isocratic, high throughput LC-MS workflow. FF-APPI was found to provide the best performance in terms of both sensitivity and detection limit for all of the steroids included in the survey. Order-of-magnitude sensitivity advantages were realized for some low polarity analytes including both estradiol and estrone. A robust linear regression, post extraction addition method was used to evaluate the relative impact of matrix effects upon each ionization method using protein precipitated human serum, plasma and Surine (simulated urine) as standard clinical matrices. Under conditions optimized for sensitivity, both the field-free APPI and APCI sources were found to provide similarly high resistance to matrix suppression effects, while ESI performance was impacted the most dramatically. For the prototype FF-APPI source, a strong relationship was established between optimizable source parameters and the degree of ion suppression observed. Through careful optimization of vaporization temperature and nebulizer gas flow rates it was possible to significantly reduce or even eliminate the impact of matrix effects, even for high throughput LC-MS methods.

  8. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in soil by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar; Marín, Cristóbal; Martínez, Carmen M; Flores, Pilar

    2005-10-05

    A rapid multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of 25 fungicides and insecticides in soil was developed. Soil samples are extracted by sonication with a water-acetonitrile mixture, and the pesticides are partitioned into dichloromethane. Final determination was made by gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD). Confirmation analysis of pesticides was carried out by GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The identification of compounds was based on retention time and on comparison of the primary and secondary ions. The average recovery by the GC-NPD method obtained for these compounds varied from 68.5% to 112.1% with a relative standard deviation between 1.8% and 6.2%. The GC-NPD method presents good linearity over the range assayed 50-2000 microg/L, and the detection limit for the pesticides studied varied from 0.1 to 10.4 microg/kg. The proposed method was used to determine pesticide levels in soil samples from experimental greenhouse pepper cultivation.

  9. Lipidome and metabolome analysis of fresh tobacco leaves in different geographical regions using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Lu, Xin; Zhao, Jieyu; Zhang, Junjie; Zhao, Yanni; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang

    2015-07-01

    The combination of the lipidome and the metabolome can provide much more information in plant metabolomics studies. A method for the simultaneous extraction of the lipidome and the metabolome of fresh tobacco leaves was developed. Method validation was performed on the basis of the optimal ratio of methanol to methyl tert-butyl ether to water (37:45:68) from the design of experiments. Good repeatability was obtained. We found that 92.2% and 91.6% of the peaks for the lipidome and the metabolome were within a relative standard deviation of 20%, accounting for 94.6% and 94.6% of the total abundance, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were also satisfactory. A total of 230 metabolites, including 129 lipids, were identified. Significant differences were found in lipidomic and metabolomic profiles of fresh tobacco leaves in different geographical regions. Highly unsaturated galactolipids, phosphatidylethanolamines, predominant phosphatidylcholines, most of the polyphenols, amino acids, and polyamines had a higher content in Yunnan province, and low-unsaturation-degree galactolipids, triacylglycerols, glucosylceramides with trihydroxy long-chain bases, acylated sterol glucosides, and some organic acids were more abundant in Henan province. Correlation analysis between differential metabolites and climatic factors indicated the vital importance of temperature. The fatty acid unsaturation degree of galactolipids could be influenced by temperature. Accumulation of polyphenols and decreases in the ratios of stigmasterols to sitosterols and glucosylstigmasterols to glucosylsitosterols were also correlated with lower temperature in Yunnan province. Furthermore, lipids were more sensitive to climatic variations than other metabolites.

  10. Optimization of the derivatization protocol of pentacyclic triterpenes prior to their gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Jemmali, Zaineb; Chartier, Agnes; Dufresne, Christelle; Elfakir, Claire

    2016-01-15

    This paper focuses on the application of a two-level full factorial design to optimize the key derivatization step before the GC-FID and GC-MS analysis of pentacyclic triterpenes. The derivatization reaction was screened for influential factors and statistically significant parameters with a p value less than 0.05. A multi-response optimization based on a desirability function was then applied, while simultaneously considering overall detection enhancement of compounds. Results showed that derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) in pyridine (22:13:65v/v/v) for 2h at 30°C was the most efficient method of derivatizing all the hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups contained in the triterpene structures. The validity of the method was demonstrated using GC-MS analyzes of a mixture containing eleven standards (β-amyrin, α-amyrin, lupeol, erythrodiol, uvaol, betulin, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, ursolic acid, maslinic acid and corosolic acid). These compounds are representative of different classes of terpene compounds bearing different functional groups such as alcohols, diols, and carboxylic acids. The derivatization procedure was then tested on four plant extracts: apple pomace, salvia sclarea (dried leaves and flowers), sea buckthorn (Hyppophae rhammnoides L.) berries, and B. serrata resin. The identification of triterpenes was based on the comparison of their retention time and mass spectra to those of standards. The presence of compounds already identified in the literature was confirmed and new ones such as maslinic and corosolic acids were identified in apples, sea buckthorn and salvia sclarea.

  11. Global urinary metabolic profiling procedures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2011-09-08

    The role of urinary metabolic profiling in systems biology research is expanding. This is because of the use of this technology for clinical diagnostic and mechanistic studies and for the development of new personalized health care and molecular epidemiology (population) studies. The methodologies commonly used for metabolic profiling are NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this protocol, we describe urine collection and storage, GC/MS and data preprocessing methods, chemometric data analysis and urinary marker metabolite identification. Results obtained using GC/MS are complementary to NMR and LC/MS. Sample preparation for GC/MS analysis involves the depletion of urea via treatment with urease, protein precipitation with methanol, and trimethylsilyl derivatization. The protocol described here facilitates the metabolic profiling of ∼400-600 metabolites in 120 urine samples per week.

  12. [Analysis of volatile components in Qingshanlvshui tea using solid-phase microextraction/accelerated solvent extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiafen; Lu, Sheming; Meng, Zhaoyu; Xiang, Nengjun; Cao, Qiu'e; Miao, Mingming

    2008-05-01

    The volatile components of Qingshanlvshui Tea were extracted using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), and then were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It showed that ninety-one compounds were identified, including forty-nine by SPME, fifty-six by ASE, and fourteen by both of them. The main constituents were beta-myrcene, 3,5,5-trimethyl-1,5-heptadiene, L-limonene, alpha-ocimene, beta-ocimene, beta-pinene, 2-methylbenzaldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural. Both SPME and ASE have their advantages. SPME is excellent at simplicity, rapidity, solvent-free, high enrichment, low detection limit, environment friendly etc. ASE has characteristics of time and solvent saving, automation, simplicity, as well as high efficiency.

  13. Direct chemical-analysis of uv laser-ablation products of organic polymers by using selective ion monitoring mode in gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yirang; Lee, H.W.; Fountain, S.T.; Lubman, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Trace quantities of laser ablated organic polymers were analyzed by using commercial capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; the instrument was modified so that the laser ablation products could be introduced into the capillary column directly and the constituents of each peak in the chromatogram were identified by using a mass spectrometer. The present study takes advantage of the selective ion monitoring mode for significantly improving the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer as a detector, which is critical in analyzing the trace quantities and confirming the presence or absence of the species of interest in laser ablated polymers. The initial composition of the laser ablated polymers was obtained by using an electron impact reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the possible structure of the fragments observed in the spectra was proposed based on the structure of the polymers.

  14. Use of headspace sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in herbal infusions.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2014-08-22

    A solvent-free method is described for the determination of 10 volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), considered as priority pollutants by the EU, in different herbal infusions using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The parameters affecting both the extraction and thermal desorption steps in the HSSE were optimized by means of Plackett-Burman designs. Ten millilitres of the herbal infusion was submitted to the HSSE preconcentration in the presence of salt for 4h at 88 °C. The use of d(10)-phenanthrene as internal standard not only improved the repeatability of the method but allowed quantification of the samples against external aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 11 and 26 ng L(-1).

  15. Microwave distillation followed by headspace single drop microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for fast analysis of volatile components of Echinophora platyloba DC.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Piryaei, Marzieh; Maassoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Papzan, Abdolhamid

    2013-05-01

    To avoid the traditional and time consuming hydrodistillation, the analyses of volatile components in aerial parts of Echinophora platyloba DC was carried out by a simple microwave distillation followed by headspace single drop microextraction (MD-HS-SDME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The headspace volatile compounds were collected after irradiation using a single drop of n-heptadecan. The extraction conditions were optimised using the relative peak areas as index. The chemical composition of the MD-HS-SDME extracts was confirmed according to their retention indexes and mass spectra. Fifty-three components were extracted and identified by using the MD-HS-SDME method. E-β-ocimene (53.81%), R-D-decalactone (12.75%), α-pinene (6.43%), n-heptanol (6.27%), β-phellanderne (2.70%) and linalool (1.89%) were the major constituents.

  16. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Pimpinella junoniae Ceb. & Ort., gathered in La Gomera, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Negueruela, A; Pérez-Alonso, M J; Pérez de Paz, P L; Paúl-Palá, J; Sanz, J

    2003-09-05

    The essential oil from the aerial parts of Pimpinella junoniae Ceb. & Ort., growing in La Gomera, Canary Islands, Spain, was studied by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 43 constituents were identified. The major components were found to be alpha-zingiberene (20.6%), alpha-pinene (17.9%), (E)-beta-farnesene (9.3%), ar-curcumene (7.4%), beta-phellandrene (7.0%), beta-bisabolene (6.1%) and epoxypseudoisoeugenyl 2-methylbutyrate (6.0%). The decomposition product of epoxypseudoisoeugenol derivatives, 5-methoxy-2-methylbenzofuran (5.7%), moderate amounts of other arylpropanoids with the pseudoisoeugenol skeleton (total percentage, 5.2%) and other compounds such as beta-sesquiphellandrene (3.0%), cis-beta-guaiene (1.5%), alpha-phellandrene (1.5%) and alpha-bisabolol (1.3%), were also found.

  17. Analysis of chemical warfare agents in organic liquid samples with magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry for verification of the chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud, Raghavender D; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-05-27

    A simple, sensitive and low temperature sample preparation method is developed for detection and identification of Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and scheduled esters in organic liquid using magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method utilizes Iron oxide@Poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) resin (Fe2O3@Poly(MAA-co-EGDMA)) as sorbent. Variants of these sorbents were prepared by precipitation polymerization of methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (MAA-co-EGDMA) onto Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Fe2O3@poly(MAA-co-EGDMA) with 20% MAA showed highest recovery of analytes. Extractions were performed with magnetic microspheres by MDSPE. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, method showed linearity in the range of 0.1-3.0μgmL(-1) (r(2)=0.9966-0.9987). The repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviations (RSDs) %) were in the range of 4.5-7.6% and 3.4-6.2% respectively for organophosphorous esters in dodecane. Limits of detection (S/N=3/1) and limit of quantification (S/N=10/1) were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1μgmL(-1) and 0.1-0.12μgmL(-1) respectively in SIM mode for selected analytes. The method was successfully validated and applied to the extraction and identification of targeted analytes from three different organic liquids i.e. n-hexane, dodecane and silicon oil. Recoveries ranged from 58.7 to 97.3% and 53.8 to 95.5% at 3μgmL(-1) and 1μgmL(-1) spiking concentrations. Detection of diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP) and O-Ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) in samples provided by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Proficiency Test (OPCW-PT) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals.

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in sediment by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    A method for the determination of 28 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 25 alkylated PAH homolog groups in sediment samples is described. The compounds are extracted from sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography. The compounds are identified and uantitated using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The report presents performance data for full-scan ion monitoring. Method detection limits in laboratory reagent matrix samples range from 1.3 to 5.1 micrograms per kilogram for the 28 PAHs. The 25 groups of alkylated PAHs are homologs of five groups of isomeric parent PAHs. Because of the lack of authentic standards, these homologs are reported semiquantitatively using a response factor from a parent PAH or a specific alkylated PAH. Precision data for the alkylated PAH homologs are presented using two different standard reference manuals produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology: SRM 1941b and SRM 1944. The percent relative standard deviations for identified alkylated PAH homolog groups ranged from 1.55 to 6.98 for SRM 1941b and from 6.11 to 12.0 for SRM 1944. Homolog group concentrations reported under this method include the concentrations of individually identified compounds that are members of the group. Organochlorine (OC) pesticides--including toxaphene, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organophosphate (OP) pesticides--can be isolated simultaneously using this method. In brief, sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethan (95 percent) and methanol (5 percent). The extract is concentrated and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoroethylene syringe filter. The PAH fraction is isolated by quantitatively injecting an aliquot of sample onto two polystyrene-divinylbenzene gel-permeation chromatographic columns connected in series. The compounds are eluted with dichloromethane

  19. Application of fast atom bombardment with tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to the analysis of acylcarnitines in human urine, blood, and tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Millington, D.S.; Norwood, D.L.; Kodo, N.; Roe, C.R.; Inoue, F. )

    1989-08-01

    Using a precursor-ion scan function on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, acylcarnitines were detected in the target matrices at or below concentrations of 1 nmol per gram by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Acylcarnitine profiles from patients with known metabolic disorders were consistent with previously acquired data. Putative acylcarnitine signals were confirmed in one case by administration of stable isotope-labeled carnitine, which equilibrated rapidly with the endogenous pool. The addition of a continuous flow system enabled rapid sequential analysis without operator intervention, indicating the potential for automation of the analytical procedure. Incorporation of a micro-LC column enabled on-line liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis of selected patient samples. Large-scale screening and quantitative analysis of urine or blood for diagnostic acylcarnitines are now practicable.

  20. Characterisation of beeswax in works of art by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedures.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2004-03-05

    Pyrolysis (Py) with in situ derivatisation with hexamethyldisilazane-gas chroma-break tography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure based on microwave-assisted saponification were used to identify the organic components in small sized beeswax samples. With the latter procedure quantitative recoveries can be made and hydrocarbons, alcohols and omega-1-diols in the neutral fraction, and fatty acids and omega-1-hydroxy acids in the acidic fraction can be efficiently separated and detected. Both procedures were used to characterise a wax anatomic sculpture "The Plague" (1691-1694) by Gaetano Zumbo, resulting in the identification of beeswax and a Pinaceae resin. The GC-MS analysis brought to light some essential differences in beeswax composition between the raw material and the old modelled wax thus giving some clear indications about the recipe used by the sculptor.

  1. The use of multivariate curve resolution methods to improve the analysis of muramic acid as bacterial marker using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: an alternative method to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moazeni-Pourasil, Roudabeh Sadat; Piri, Farhad; Ghassempour, Alireza; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2014-02-15

    In analysis of muramic acid (MA) as bacterial marker, two dominant disturbing factors lead the researchers to use gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) technique instead of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). These factors are the trace concentration of MA and fundamental disturbance of base line mass channels in GC-MS technique. This study aimed to utilize multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods combined with GC-MS to improve the analysis of MA. First, the background and noise in GC-MS analysis were corrected and reduced using MCR methods. In addition, the MA overlapped peaks were resolved to its pure chromatographic and mass spectral profiles. Then the two-way response of each component was reconstructed by the outer product of the pure chromatographic and mass spectral profiles. The overall volume integration (OVI) method was used for quantitative determination. The MA peak area was decreased dramatically after the background correction and noise reduction. The findings severely ratify the appropriateness of using MCR techniques combined with GC-MS analysis as a simple, fast and inexpensive method for the analysis of MA in complex mixtures. The proposed method may be considered as an alternative method to GC-MS/MS for thorough analysis of the bacterial marker.

  2. Characterization and quantitative amino acids analysis of analgesic peptides in cinobufacini injection by size exclusion chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Si, Nan; Bo, Gao; Hu, Hao; Yang, Jian; Bian, Baolin; Zhao, Hai Yu; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cinobufacini injection that comes from the water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor skin is widely used for cancer treatment in China. Peptide is one of its major types of constituents, however the biological effects and content of this injection are little reported. In present study, the analgesic effect of peptides was determined and evaluated by in-vivo models. To characterize and quantitatively analyze these peptides, a reliable and efficient method combining size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with amino acid analysis was developed. The peptides presented as a series of analogs with similar molecular weights mostly ranging from 2 to 8 kDa. The amino acid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine both free and combined amino acids (FAA and CAA) in cinobufacini injection. This method achieved good linearity (R(2) , 0.9909-0.9999) and low limit of detection and quantification. FAA and CAA samples were efficiently analyzed by modified Phenomenex EZ: faast procedure. For the sample analysis, the method showed good repeatability (relative standard deviation, RSD ≤ 10%). For most FAA and CAA the mean recoveries were >80% with RSD <10%. The GC-MS based method is useful for quality assurance of both FAA and CAA in cinobufacini injection.

  3. Propolis specimens from different locations of central Italy: chemical profiling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) quantitative analysis of the allergenic esters benzyl cinnamate and benzyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Aliboni, Andrea; D'Andrea, Armando; Massanisso, Paolo

    2011-01-12

    Propolis is a beehive product popular in natural medicine thanks to its noteworthy properties. Propolis is non-toxic but is responsible for allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this paper, we propose a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical methodology for the quantitative analysis of two allergenic esters in propolis specimens, benzyl salicylate and benzyl cinnamate, and test it on specimens from different locations of central Italy. We also present the results obtained in the chemical characterization of the same specimens. The characterization showed that the resin fractions of all of the specimens are of poplar origin.

  4. Analysis of gamma-irradiated melon, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della W M; Wong, Yiu Chung; Yao, Wai Yin

    2006-09-20

    Seeds of melon (Citrullus lanatus var. sp.), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and sunflower (Heliantus annus) were gamma-irradiated at 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to EN1787:2000 and EN1785:2003, respectively. Distinguishable triplet signals due to the presence of induced cellulose radicals were found at 2.0010-2.0047 g in the EPR spectra. The gamma-irradiated radiolytic markers of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) were identified in all irradiated seed samples. Both the free radicals and the alkylcyclobutanones were found to increase with irradiation dose. In general, linear relationships between the amount of radicals and irradiation dosage could be established. Studies at an ambient temperature (20-25 degrees C) in a humidity-controlled environment showed a complete disappearance of the cellulosic peaks for irradiated samples upon 60 days of storage. Such instability behavior was considered to render the usefulness of using EPR alone in the determination of irradiated seed samples. On the other hand, 2-DCB and 2-TCB were also found to decompose rapidly (>85% loss after 120 days of storage), but the radiolytic markers remained quantifiable after 120 days of postirradiation storage. These results suggest that GC-MS is a versatile and complimentary technique for the confirmation of irradiation treatment to seeds.

  5. Determination of bisphenol A in water by micro liquid-liquid extraction followed by silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Casado, A; Navas, N; del Olmo, M; Vílchez, J L

    1998-11-01

    A method for the determination of bisphenol A according to the European Union guideline, which establishes a limit of 0.1 ng/mL for organic pollutants in water, is proposed. The method involves a micro liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane followed by a silylation step. Identification and quantitation are performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using an HP-5MS column. The retention time is 7.02 min. Quantitation is carried out using single-ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 73, 357, and 372. A clean-up is not necessary using SIM mode. Deuterated anthracene (2H10-anthracene) is used as an internal standard. The method is applied to the determination of bisphenol A at very low concentration levels (10.0-250.0 ng/L) in different types of natural water samples. The detection limit obtained is 0.4 ng/L. Recovery efficiencies are close to 100% in all cases.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of thebaine, 6-MAM and six abused opiates in postmortem fluids and tissues using Zymark automated solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Johnson, R D; Hattrup, R A

    2005-08-05

    Opiates are some of the most widely prescribed drugs in America and are often abused. Demonstrating the presence or absence of opiate compounds in postmortem fluids and/or tissues derived from fatal civil aviation accidents can have serious legal consequences and may help determine the cause of impairment and/or death. However, the consumption of poppy seed products can result in a positive opiate drug test. We have developed a simple method for the simultaneous determination of eight opiate compounds from one extraction. These compounds are hydrocodone, dihydrocodeine, codeine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, and thebaine. The inclusion of thebaine is notable as it is an indicator of poppy seed consumption and may help explain morphine/codeine positives in cases where no opiate use was indicated. This method incorporates a Zymark RapidTracetrade mark automated solid-phase extraction system, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and trimethyl silane (TMS) and oxime-TMS derivatives. The limits of detection ranged from 0.78 to 12.5 ng/mL. The linear dynamic range for most analytes was 6.25-1600 ng/mL. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 70 to 103%. We applied this method to eight separate aviation fatalities where opiate compounds had previously been detected.

  7. Analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds in indoor suspended particulate matter by thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Fabien; Glorennec, Philippe; Blanchard, Olivier; Le Bot, Barbara

    2012-09-07

    People are exposed to multiple pollutants, especially indoors. In the perspective of a cumulative risk assessment, a multi-residue analytical method was developed to assess the contamination of indoor suspended particulate matter by 55 semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) including musk fragrances, organochlorines (OCs), organophosphates (OPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), phthalates and pyrethroids. It is based on thermal desorption (TD) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Once the thermal desorption conditions were optimized, the method was validated in terms of quantification limits and accuracy using a standard reference material (SRM 2585). Instrumental quantification limits were 10 pg (some OCs, some pyrethroids, musk fragrances, OPs, PAHs, PBDEs and PCBs), 100 pg (phthalates and other OCs) and 1000 pg (other pyrethroids) corresponding respectively to method quantification limits of 1, 10, and 100 pg/m³ for a sampled air volume of 20 m³. Calibration quadratic curves for ranges of 10-1000, 100-10,000, and 1000-100,000 pg, depending on the substance, exhibit determination coefficients above 0.999. Recoveries were between 61 and 96% for chlorinated pesticides, PAHs, PBDEs and PCBs present in the SRM 2585. A test of the method on indoor particulate matter samples (PM₁₀) collected on quartz fiber filters in French dwellings demonstrated its ability to quantify SVOCs from a small amount of PM.

  8. Multiclass pesticide analysis in fruit-based baby food: A comparative study of sample preparation techniques previous to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Mateus H; Fernandes, José O; Godoy, Helena T; Cunha, Sara C

    2016-12-01

    With the aim to develop a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to analyze 24 pesticide residues in baby foods at the level imposed by established regulation two simple, rapid and environmental-friendly sample preparation techniques based on QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, robust and safe) were compared - QuEChERS with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and QuEChERS with dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE). Both sample preparation techniques achieved suitable performance criteria, including selectivity, linearity, acceptable recovery (70-120%) and precision (⩽20%). A higher enrichment factor was observed for DLLME and consequently better limits of detection and quantification were obtained. Nevertheless, d-SPE provided a more effective removal of matrix co-extractives from extracts than DLLME, which contributed to lower matrix effects. Twenty-two commercial fruit-based baby food samples were analyzed by the developed method, being procymidone detected in one sample at a level above the legal limit established by EU.

  9. Determination of clozapine, and five antidepressants in human plasma, serum and whole blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A simple tool for clinical and postmortem toxicological analysis.

    PubMed

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Rallis, George; Petrikis, Petros; Vougiouklakis, Theodore; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we describe a simple and rapid method for the determination of the antipsychotic drug clozapine and five commonly co-administered antidepressants - bupropion, mirtazapine, sertraline, clomipramine and citalopram - in serum, plasma and whole blood. Sample preparation includes solid phase extraction of analytes and determination of drug concentrations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry without any derivatization steps. The method was fully validated according to international criteria and can be successfully applied for routine analyses. Correlation coefficients of calibration curves for the tested drugs in the three specimens were in the range 0.9977-0.9999. Intra-day and inter-day precisions ranged from 0.81-7.85% and 3.60-12.91% respectively for the studied analytes and matrices. Recoveries were satisfactory for different concentrations of each drug in each specimen allowing accurate determinations in the range from sub-therapeutic to toxic levels. The presented method shows acceptable sensitivity, linearity in wide concentration ranges (sub-therapeutic, therapeutic, supra-therapeutic/toxic levels), it is simple and rapid and it is applicable for qualitative and quantitative routine toxicological analyses of clinical and postmortem cases.

  10. Improvement of a headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of wheat bread volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Carcea, Marina; Castagna, Claudia; Magrì, Andrea

    2015-08-07

    An improved method based on headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was proposed for the semi-quantitative determination of wheat bread volatile compounds isolated from both whole slice and crust samples. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used to extract volatiles from the headspace of a bread powdered sample dispersed in a sodium chloride (20%) aqueous solution and kept for 60min at 50°C under controlled stirring. Thirty-nine out of all the extracted volatiles were fully identified, whereas for 95 other volatiles a tentative identification was proposed, to give a complete as possible profile of wheat bread volatile compounds. The use of an array of ten structurally and physicochemically similar internal standards allowed to markedly improve method precision with respect to previous HS-SPME/GC-MS methods for bread volatiles. Good linearity of the method was verified for a selection of volatiles from several chemical groups by calibration with matrix-matched extraction solutions. This simple, rapid, precise and sensitive method could represent a valuable tool to obtain semi-quantitative information when investigating the influence of technological factors on volatiles formation in wheat bread and other bakery products.

  11. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  12. Heparin stability by determining unsubstituted amino groups using hydrophilic interaction chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Li, Lingyun; Cai, Chao; Li, Guoyun; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-09-15

    The thermal instability of the anticoagulant heparin is associated, in part, with the solvolytic loss of N-sulfo groups. This study describes a new method to assess the increased content of unsubstituted amino groups present in thermally stressed and autoclave-sterilized heparin formulations. N-Acetylation of heparin samples with acetic anhydride-d6 is followed by exhaustive heparinase treatment and disaccharide analysis by hydrophilic interaction chromatography mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS). The introduction of a stable isotopic label provides a sensitive probe for the detection and localization of the lost N-sulfo groups, potentially providing valuable insights into the degradation mechanism and the reasons for anticoagulant potency loss.

  13. Screening of Brazilian fruit aromas using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Augusto, F; Valente, A L; dos Santos Tada, E; Rivellino, S R

    2000-03-17

    Manual headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the qualitative analysis of the aromas of four native Brazilian fruits: cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum, Spreng.), cajá (Spondias lutea. L.), siriguela (Spondias purpurea, L.) and graviola (Anona reticulata, L). Industrialized pulps of these fruits were used as samples, and extractions with SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane, polyacrylate, Carbowax and Carboxen were carried out. The analytes identified included several alcohols, esters, carbonyl compounds and terpernoids. The highest amounts extracted, evaluated from the sum of peak areas, were achieved using the Carboxen fiber.

  14. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  15. Quantitative thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of caffeine using a surface sampling probe electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-07-15

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 mum/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 muL) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by approximately 8% or more) than the literature values.

  16. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  17. The bridge between thin layer chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: The realization of liquid thin layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (LTLC-MS).

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Wang, Jianing; Zhan, Lingpeng; Wleklinski, Michael; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Zhou, Yueming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-08-19

    The combination of thin layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) has been studied for decades, but for most cases MS detection is done after TLC separation is finished. Here, an online simultaneous TLC-MS analysis system, liquid thin layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (LTLC-MS), is developed which successfully synchronize TLC separation process and MS detection process like GC-MS and HPLC-MS do. And there's no need to use specially designed TLC, just regular TLC plates are enough. LTLC-MS method is composed of a newly developed ambient ionization method, glow discharge-matrix assisted infrared desorption ionization (GD-MAIRDI), and forced-flow TLC (FFTLC) technique, which guarantees the MS detection process does not disturb the TLC separation process throughout the whole analysis. The whole LTLC-MS analysis only need two steps and less than 15min. Mixtures as well as the two main components of a pain relief pills have been successfully analyzed by LTLC-MS. This proof of concept study opens up new possibilities of combining TLC with MS, and will further broaden the application abilities of TLC.

  18. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  19. Metabonomics investigation of human urine after ingestion of green tea with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Law, Wai Siang; Huang, Pei Yun; Ong, Eng Shi; Ong, Choon Nam; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2008-08-01

    A method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and (1)H NMR with pattern recognition tools such as principle components analysis (PCA) was used to study the human urinary metabolic profiles after the intake of green tea. From the normalized peak areas obtained from GC/MS and LC/MS and peak heights from (1)H NMR, statistical analyses were used in the identification of potential biomarkers. Metabolic profiling by GC/MS provided a different set of quantitative signatures of metabolites that can be used to characterize the molecular changes in human urine samples. A comparison of normalized metabonomics data for selected metabolites in human urine samples in the presence of potential overlapping peaks after tea ingestion from LC/MS and (1)H NMR showed the reliability of the current approach and method of normalization. The close agreements of LC/MS with (1)H NMR data showed that the effects of ion suppression in LC/MS for early eluting metabolites were not significant. Concurrently, the specificity of detecting the stated metabolites by (1)H NMR and LC/MS was demonstrated. Our data showed that a number of metabolites involved in glucose metabolism, citric acid cycle and amino acid metabolism were affected immediately after the intake of green tea. The proposed approach provided a more comprehensive picture of the metabolic changes after intake of green tea in human urine. The multiple analytical approach together with pattern recognition tools is a useful platform to study metabolic profiles after ingestion of botanicals and medicinal plants.

  20. Analysis of plasticizers and synthetic musks in cosmetic and personal care products by matrix solid-phase dispersion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Llompart, Maria; Celeiro, Maria; Pablo Lamas, J; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen

    2013-06-07

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for the rapid determination of 18 plasticizers (phthalates and adipates), 7 polycyclic musks and 5 nitromusks, which makes a total of 30 targets, in both rinse-off and leave-on cosmetic formulations. The MSPD method was miniaturized and customized to avoid or minimize risks of phthalate contamination and to reduce residues and costs. The amount of sample and extraction solvent employed were 0.1g and 1mL, respectively. The procedure was optimized by means of an experimental design and under the optima conditions it showed satisfactory linearity, repeatability and intermediate precision. LOQs were, in general, in the low ngg(-1), and recoveries were quantitative for all the 18 plasticizers and the 12 fragrances. Twenty-six cosmetic products such as creams, emulsions, lotions, gels for the skin, bath and shower preparations, deodorants, hair-setting, hair-cleansing and hair-conditioning products, shaving products, and sunbathing products, were analyzed. Twenty-five out of thirty targets were detected in the samples. The most frequently found compounds were galaxolide and tonalide reaching concentrations above 0.1% (1000μgg(-1)), and diethyl phthalate (between 0.7 and 357μgg(-1)). The presence of banned substances (Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009) such as dibutyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, dimethoxyethyl phthalate, benzylbutyl phthalate, diethylhexyl phthalate, diisopentyl phthalate and dipentyl phthalate, musk ambrette and musk tibetene was confirmed in sixteen of the twenty-six personal care products (62%).

  1. Development of stir-bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of musks in vegetables and amended soils.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Josu; Bizkarguenaga, Ekhiñe; Iparraguirre, Arantza; Fernández, Luis Ángel; Zuloaga, Olatz; Prieto, Ailette

    2014-02-17

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and environment-friendly method based on stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) to determine 8 synthetic musks (musk ambrette, musk ketone, celestolide, tonalide, galaxolide, phantolide, traseolide, and cashmeran) in vegetables (lettuce, carrot, and pepper) and amended soil samples. In a first step sorptive extraction was studied both in the headspace (HSSE) and in the immerse mode (SBSE). The best results were obtained in the immersion mode which was further studied. The influence of the main factors: methanol (20%) and NaCl addition (0%), extraction temperature (40°C) and time (180 min), extraction solvent volume (9 mL) and stirring rate (600 rpm) on the efficiency of SBSE was evaluated by means of experimental designs. In the case of TD, desorption time (10 min), desorption temperature (300°C), cryo-focusing temperature (-30°C), vent flow (75 mL/min) and vent pressure (7.2 psi) were studied using both a fractioned factorial design and a central composite design (CCD). The method was validated in terms of apparent recoveries (AR%), method detection limits (MDLs) and precision at two different concentration levels. Although quantification using instrumental calibration rendered odd results in most of the cases, satisfactory recoveries (74-126%) were obtained in the case of matrix-matched calibration approach for all of the analytes and matrices studied at the two concentration levels evaluated. MDLs in the range of 0.01-0.8 ng/g and 0.01-1.1 ng/g were obtained for vegetables and amended soil samples, respectively. RSD values within 1-23% were obtained for all the analytes and matrices. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of musks in vegetable and amended soil samples.

  2. MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY (R823292)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with mass spectrometry (MS) is very attractive for the direct identification of analyte molecules, for the possibility of selectivity enhancement, and for the structure confirmation and analysis in a MS-MS mode. The...

  3. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  4. Rapid white truffle headspace analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and comparison with solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Versini, Giuseppe; Märk, Tilmann D; Gasperi, Flavia

    2007-01-01

    The gastronomic relevance and high price of white truffle are related mainly to its unique aroma. Here we evaluate, for the first time, the possibility of characterizing in a rapid and non-destructive way the aroma of white truffles based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We indicate that anonymous PTR-MS fingerprinting allows sample classification and we also compare qualitatively and quantitatively PTR-MS data with measurements made by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC) of the same samples under the same conditions. PTR-MS fragmentation data of truffle-relevant compounds are also published here for the first time. Most of the sulfur-containing compounds detected by GC and relevant for white truffle aroma have a high positive correlation with single PTR-MS peaks. Our work indicates that, after preliminary comparison with GC data, PTR-MS is a new tool for the rapid, quantitative and non-invasive characterization of white truffle by direct headspace injection without any pre-concentration.

  5. Quantitative analysis of polar lipids in the nanoliter level of rat serum by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polar lipids in serum, including lysophospholipids (LPLs) and free fatty acids (FFAs), have a broad range of biological activities and require a suitable method for their quantitative analysis. Conventional methods use multistep procedures to simultaneously purify and analyze polar lipids and non-po...

  6. Quantitative analysis of aberrant fatty acid composition of zebrafish hepatic lipids induced by organochlorine pesticide using stable isotope-coded transmethylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Dong, Linjie; Dong, Qingjian; Ke, Changshu; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Cong; Dai, Ling

    2012-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been extensively used worldwide for agricultural purposes. Due to their resistance to metabolism, a major public health concern has been raised. Aberrant hepatic lipid composition has been a hallmark of many liver diseases associated with exposure to various toxins and chemicals. And thus lots of efforts have been focused on the development of analytical techniques that can rapidly and quantitatively determine the changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids. In this work, changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids in response to DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) exposure were quantitatively analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometric approach based on stable isotope-coded transmethylation. It has been quantitatively demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids including C20:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:6n3 decrease in response to DDT exposure. However, saturated long chain fatty acids including C16:0, C18:0, as well as monounsaturated long chain fatty acid C18:1n9 consistently increase in a DDT-concentration-dependent manner. In particular, much higher changes in the level of hepatic C16:0 and C18:0 for male fish were observed than that for female fish. These experimental results are in accordance with qualitative histopathological analysis that revealed liver morphological alterations. The stable isotope-coded mass spectrometric approach provides a reliable means for investigating hepatotoxicity associated with fatty acid synthesis, desaturation, mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and lipid mobilization. It should be useful in elucidation of hepatotoxic mechanisms and safety assessment of environmental toxins.

  7. Determination of hormonal growth promoters in bovine hair: comparison of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for estradiol benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Eleanor; Rambaud, Lauriane; Le Bizec, Bruno; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2009-04-01

    The detection of steroid residues in hair is a powerful strategy to demonstrate long-term administration of these growth promoters in meat production animals. Analysis of the ester form of administered steroids is an unambiguous approach to prove the illegal use of natural hormones. For detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was generally used. However, recent advances in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology have improved the robustness and potential sensitivity of this method. This paper describes development and validation, according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, of LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS methods, in two separate laboratories, for determination of steroid esters in bovine hair. Bovine hair samples taken from animals treated with estradiol-3-benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate, as well as from an untreated animal, were used to evaluate the comparability of the results of the two validated methods. The results of the inter-comparison demonstrate that both the LC-MS/MS and the GC-MS/MS methods are fit for purpose and capable of determining steroid esters in hair samples from treated bovine animals.

  8. Guilty by dissociation-development of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and other rapid screening methods for the analysis of 13 diphenidine-derived new psychoactive substances (NPSs).

    PubMed

    Geyer, Pierre M; Hulme, Matthew C; Irving, Joseph P B; Thompson, Paul D; Ashton, Ryan N; Lee, Robert J; Johnson, Lucy; Marron, Jack; Banks, Craig E; Sutcliffe, Oliver B

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of new psychoactive substances (NPSs) in forensic casework has increased prominently in recent years. This has given rise to significant legal and analytical challenges in the identification of these substances. The requirement for validated, robust and rapid testing methodologies for these compounds is obvious. This study details the analysis of 13 synthesised diphenidine derivatives encountered in casework using presumptive testing, thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Specifically, the validated GC-MS method provides, for the first time, both a general screening method and quantification of the active components for seized solid samples, both in their pure form and in the presence of common adulterants. Graphical Abstract Chemical synthesis and forensic analysis of 13 diphenidine-derived new psychoactive substance(s).

  9. Comprehensive analysis of a multidimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight mass spectrometer: I. How much of the data is theoretically interpretable by search engines?

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J; Baker, Peter R; Hansen, Kirk C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Allen, Nadia P; Rexach, Michael; Burlingame, Alma L

    2005-08-01

    An in-depth analysis of a multidimensional chromatography-mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight (QqTOF) geometry instrument was carried out. A total of 3269 CID spectra were acquired. Through manual verification of database search results and de novo interpretation of spectra 2368 spectra could be confidently determined as predicted tryptic peptides. A detailed analysis of the non-matching spectra was also carried out, highlighting what the non-matching spectra in a database search typically are composed of. The results of this comprehensive dataset study demonstrate that QqTOF instruments produce information-rich data of which a high percentage of the data is readily interpretable.

  10. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere - Analysis at the parts-per-trillion level by GC-MS. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The propellant gases (Freons) used in aerosol spray cans can diffuse into the earth's upper atmosphere where they can react with the unfiltered ultraviolet radiation from the sun to reduce the earth's protective ozone layer. These Freons have been identified commonly by gas chromatography. Mass spectrometer data confirm other reports on the widespread concentrations of the Freons in the troposphere and demonstrate the presence of Freon 113 which has not been previously identified.

  11. ON-SITE SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ULTRA-TRACE SYNTHETIC MUSKS IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE EFFLUENT USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE FULL-SCAN MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragrance materials such as synthetic musks in aqueous samples, are normally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to provide maximum sensitivity after liquid-liquid extraction of I -L samples. Full-scan mass spectra are requ...

  12. Independent evaluation of a commercial deconvolution reporting software for gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Norli, Hans Ragnar; Christiansen, Agnethe; Holen, Børge

    2010-03-26

    The gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) deconvolution reporting software (DRS) from Agilent Technologies has been evaluated for its ability as a screening tool to detect a large number of pesticides in incurred and fortified samples extracted with acetone/dichloromethane/light petroleum (Mini-Luke method). The detection of pesticides is based on fixed retention times using retention time locking (RTL) and full scan mass spectral comparison with a partly customer built automated mass spectral deconvolution and identification system (AMDIS) database. The GC-MS was equipped with a programmable temperature vaporising (PTV) injector system which enables more sample to be injected. In a blind study of 52 real samples a total number of 158 incurred pesticides were found. In addition to the 85 pesticides found by manual interpretation of GC-NPD/ECD chromatograms, the DRS revealed 73 more pesticides (+46%). The DRS system also shows its potential to discover pesticides which are normally not searched for (EPN in long beans from Thailand). A spiking experiment was performed to blank matrices of apple, orange and lettuce with 177 different pesticides at concentration levels 0.02 and 0.1 mg/kg. The samples were analysed on GC-MS full scan and the AMDIS match factor was used as a mass spectral quality criterion. The threshold level of the AMDIS match factor was set at 20 to eliminate most of the false positives. AMDIS match factors from 20 up to 69 are regarded only as indication of a positive hit and must be followed by manual interpretation. Pesticides giving AMDIS match factors at > or = 70 are regarded as identified. To simplify and decrease the large amount of data generated at each concentration level, the AMDIS match factors > or = 20 was averaged (mean AMF) for each pesticide including the commodities and their replicates. Among 177 different pesticides spiked at 0.02 and 0.1 mg/kg level, the percentage of mean AMF values > or = 70 were 23% and 80

  13. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples.

  14. Detection of thiazide-based diuretics in equine urine by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garbís, S D; Hanley, L; Kalita, S

    1998-01-01

    Thiazide-based diuretics are included in the list of banned drugs in the horse-racing industry. One effect of their misuse is increased urine flow, contributing to dilution of other doping agents. Their determination is essential in ensuring compliance to horse-racing regulation. This study evaluates the feasibility of using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces to analyze thiazidic diuretics in equine urine samples. Existing LC and gas chromatography/MS methods are limited in their applicability to thiazide analysis. Sample preparation, analyte extraction, chromatographic separation, ion-source collision induced dissociation, solvent composition, ionization mode, and ion polarity are discussed. The practicality of LC/MS for this analysis is demonstrated with actual equine administration samples collected at specified time intervals. Detection limits were 270 ng/mL for chlorothiazide, 131 ng/mL for hydrochlorothiazide, and 384 ng/mL for trichlormethiazide.

  15. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-07

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter.

  16. Microextraction with polyethersulfone for bisphenol-A, alkylphenols and hormones determination in water samples by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Ros, O; Vallejo, A; Blanco-Zubiaguirre, L; Olivares, M; Delgado, A; Etxebarria, N; Prieto, A

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, the suitability of polyethersulfone (PES) tube was assessed for the simultaneous sorptive microextraction of commonly found endocrine disrupting compounds in natural waters such as bisphenol-A (BPA), nonylphenol technical mixture (NP mix), 4-tert-octylphenol (4tOP), 4-n-octylphenol (4-nOP), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethynilestradiol (EE2). After the concentration of target compounds in the PES polymer, the analytes were recovered soaking the polymer with a suitable solvent (ethyl acetate or methanol), derivatized using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide with 1% of trimethylchlorosilane (BSTFA+1% TMCS) and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analysis was also performed without derivatization step by means of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Extraction parameters (addition of MeOH, ionic strength, extraction speed and time and desorption time) were evaluated and the optimum conditions were fixed as follows: 150 mL water samples containing a 10% (w/v) of sodium chloride and using 5 tubular PES sorbent fibers (1.5 cm length×0.7 mm o.d.). Equilibrium conditions were achieved after 9 h, with absolute extraction efficiencies ranging from 27 to 56%. On the whole, good apparent recoveries were achieved (68-103% and 81-122% for GC-MS and LC-MS/MS, respectively) using deuterated analogues as surrogates. Achieved quantification limits (LOQs) varied between 2-154 ng/L and 2-63 ng/L for all the compounds using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS, respectively. The effect of organic matter was evaluated previous to apply the final method to the analysis of estuarine and wastewater real samples. The comparison of both methods showed that overall, PES-LC-MS/MS provided shorter sample preparation time and better LODs, but PES-silylation-GC-MS allowed the simultaneous determination of all the studied compounds with adequate repeatability and accuracy.

  17. [Determination of 10 volatile organic compounds in toys by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Suyuan; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao

    2010-08-01

    A headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 10 residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in toys. The experimental conditions such as headspace temperature, headspace time and the analytical conditions of GC-MS were optimized. Toy samples were treated at 140 degrees C for 45 min, and then the evolved products were separated on a DB-624 column, determined by MS and quantified by external standard method. The recoveries were from 79% to 106% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were from 0.4% to 5.6%. The linear range was 0.001 - 2.0 microg with a good linear correlation coefficient (r > 0.994 0) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were less than 0 66 mg/kg. The method is accurate, simple, rapid, and is suitable for the analysis of residual VOCs in various toys.

  18. Use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Nonscience Major Course Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecka, Keith S.; Lerman, Zafra M.; Angelos, Sanford A.

    1996-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been utilized with nonscience majors in the courses: "Modern Methods in Science: Discovering Molecular Secrets"; "The Extraordinary Chemistry of Ordinary Things"; "From Ozone to Oil Spills: Chemistry, the Environment and You"; and "Crime Lab Chemistry: Solving Crime through Analytical Chemistry". Our efforts have centered on introducing prospective science communicators (film, video, radio, television, and journalism majors) to science relative to their majors and personal interests. Quality lecture-discussion topics, "mystery"-based laboratory activities have assisted in introducing and/or explaining specific areas of chemistry that attempt to reduce fear of subject matter. Students have also used GC-MS, as a form of alternative assessment, in course projects that have been based on their majors, personal interests, and cultural backgrounds. Students have also conducted advanced independent work in different areas of chemistry, including the analysis of nail polishes and lacquers and eleven aromatic compounds present in three different brands of gasoline.

  19. [Determination of primary aromatic amines in crayons gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kang, Suyuan; Zhang, Qing; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Lü, Qing

    2011-05-01

    A method for the determination of nine primary aromatic amines in crayon by solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The alkanes in the sample were removed with n-hexane. Then the sample was extracted twice with ultrasonic extraction by methanol. The extract was evaporated, then the concentrated solution reacted with the reducing agent (sodium hydrosulfite) for 30 min at 70 degrees C. After the extraction with a diatomite SPE column, the aromatic amines were collected and separated on an HP-5M column, determined by MS. The nine primary aromatic amines can be separated and determined successfully. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits were 5 mg/kg and the spiked recoveries of the samples were in the range of 86.02%-102.43%. The method is accurate and stable. It can be applied in the analysis of the primary aromatic amine of real crayon samples.

  20. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  1. Subsurface detection of fossil fuel pollutants by photoionization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robbat, Albert; Considine, Thomas; Antle, Patrick M

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes analysis of environmental pollutants at depth without bringing sample to the surface. It is based on an improved 3-stage Peltier freeze trap, which efficiently pre-concentrates volatile coal tar and petroleum hydrocarbons, and an integrated system for detecting pollutants on-line, in real-time by photoionization detection and quantitation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as the probe is advanced into the subsurface. Findings indicate measurement precision and accuracy for volatiles meet EPA criteria for hazardous waste site investigations. When a Teflon membrane inlet is used to detect contaminants in groundwater, its 140 degrees C temperature limit restricts analyte collection in soil to C(2)-phenanthrenes. Two case studies demonstrate the probe is well-suited to tracking petroleum and coal tar plumes from source to groundwater.

  2. DEVELOPMENTS IN DIRECT THERMAL EXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FINE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This examines thermal extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE/GC/MS) applied to aerosols collected on filters. Several different TE/GC/MS systems as a group have speciated hundreds of individual organic constituents in ambient fine aerosols. Molecular marker source ap...

  3. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  4. Proteomic analysis with integrated multiple dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based on elution of ion exchange column using pH steps.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Shieh, Chia Hui; Sheng, Quan-Hu; Zhou, Hu; Zeng, Rong

    2005-09-15

    A novel integrated multidimensional liquid chromatography (IMDL) method is demonstrated for the separation of peptide mixtures by two-dimensional HPLC coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry. The method uses an integrated column, containing both strong cation exchange and reversed-phase sections for two-dimensional liquid chromatography. The peptide mixture was fractionated by a pH step using a series of pH buffers, followed by reversed-phase chromatography. Since no salt was used during separation, the integrated multidimensional liquid chromatography can be directly connected to mass spectrometry for peptide analysis. The pH buffers were injected from an autosampler, and the entire process can be carried out on a one-dimensional liquid chromatography system. In a single analysis, the IMDL system, coupled with linear ion trap mass spectrometry, identified more than 2000 proteins in mouse liver. The peptides were eluted according to their pI distribution. The resolution of the pH fractionation is approximately 0.5 pH unit. The method has low overlapping across pH fractions, good resolution of peptide mixture, and good correlation of peptide pIs with pH steps. This method provides a technique for large-scale protein identification using existing one-dimensional HPLC systems.

  5. Quasi-targeted analysis of hydroxylation-related metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Fan, Ruifang; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Caixing; Ou, Weihui; Jin, Jiabin; Peng, Xianzhi

    2016-08-26

    Metabolite identification is crucial for revealing metabolic pathways and comprehensive potential toxicities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human body. In this work, a quasi-targeted analysis strategy was proposed for metabolite identification of monohydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) in human urine using liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS) combined with liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Potential metabolites of OH-PAHs were preliminarily screened out by LC-QqQ-MS/MS in association with filtering in a self-constructed information list of possible metabolites, followed by further identification and confirmation with LC-HRMS. The developed method can provide more reliable and systematic results compared with traditional untargeted analysis using LC-HRMS. In addition, data processing for LC-HRMS analysis were greatly simplified. This quasi-targeted analysis method was successfully applied to identifying phase I and phase II metabolites of OH-PAHs in human urine. Five metabolites of hydroxynaphthalene, seven of hydroxyfluorene, four of hydroxyphenanthrene, and three of hydroxypyrene were tentatively identified. Metabolic pathways of PAHs in human body were putatively revealed based on the identified metabolites. The experimental results will be valuable for investigating the metabolic processes of PAHs in human body, and the quasi-targeted analysis strategy can be expanded to the metabolite identification and profiling of other compounds in vivo.

  6. Detecting trace components in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry data sets with two-dimensional wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Duane C.; Snapp, Robert R.

    2007-09-01

    TWiGS (two-dimensional wavelet transform with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding) is a novel algorithm for denoising liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data for use in "shot-gun" proteomics. Proteomics, the study of all proteins in an organism, is an emerging field that has already proven successful for drug and disease discovery in humans. There are a number of constraints that limit the effectiveness of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for shot-gun proteomics, where the chemical signals are typically weak, and data sets are computationally large. Most algorithms suffer greatly from a researcher driven bias, making the results irreproducible and unusable by other laboratories. We thus introduce a new algorithm, TWiGS, that removes electrical (additive white) and chemical noise from LC-MS data sets. TWiGS is developed to be a true two-dimensional algorithm, which operates in the time-frequency domain, and minimizes the amount of researcher bias. It is based on the traditional discrete wavelet transform (DWT), which allows for fast and reproducible analysis. The separable two-dimensional DWT decomposition is paired with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding. The Haar, Coiflet-6, Daubechie-4 and the number of decomposition levels are determined based on observed experimental results. Using a synthetic LC-MS data model, TWiGS accurately retains key characteristics of the peaks in both the time and m/z domain, and can detect peaks from noise of the same intensity. TWiGS is applied to angiotensin I and II samples run on a LC-ESI-TOF-MS (liquid-chromatography-electrospray-ionization) to demonstrate its utility for the detection of low-lying peaks obscured by noise.

  7. Identification of organic acids as potential biomarkers in the urine of autistic children using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Żurawicz, Ewa; Struck, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał

    2014-09-01

    There is a need to identify metabolic phenotypes in autism as they might each require unique approaches to prevention. Biological markers can help define autism subtypes and reveal potential therapeutic targets. The aim of the study was to identify alterations of small molecular weight compounds and to find potential biomarkers. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was employed to evaluate major metabolic changes in low molecular weight urine metabolites of 14 children with autism spectrum disorders vs. 10 non-autistic subjects. The results prove the usefulness of an identified set of 21 endogenous compounds (including 14 organic acids), whose levels are changed in diseased children. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method combined with multivariate statistical analysis techniques provide an efficient way of depicting metabolic perturbations of diseases, and may potentially be applicable as a novel strategy for the noninvasive diagnosis and treatment of autism.

  8. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestal, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews techniques for online coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, emphasizing those suitable for application to nonvolatile samples. Also summarizes the present status, strengths, and weaknesses of various techniques and discusses potential applications of recently developed techniques for combined liquid…

  9. Differentiating organically and conventionally grown oregano using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (headspace-GC-FID), and flow injection mass spectrum (FIMS) fingerprints combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Ding, Tingting; Chen, Yineng; Lu, Weiying; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-08-13

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS), and headspace gas chromatography (headspace-GC) combined with multivariate data analysis techniques were examined and compared in differentiating organically grown oregano from that grown conventionally. It is the first time that headspace-GC fingerprinting technology is reported in differentiating organically and conventionally grown spice samples. The results also indicated that UPLC-MS, FIMS, and headspace-GC-FID fingerprints with OPLS-DA were able to effectively distinguish oreganos under different growing conditions, whereas with PCA, only FIMS fingerprint could differentiate the organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. UPLC fingerprinting provided detailed information about the chemical composition of oregano with a longer analysis time, whereas FIMS finished a sample analysis within 1 min. On the other hand, headspace GC-FID fingerprinting required no sample pretreatment, suggesting its potential as a high-throughput method in distinguishing organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. In addition, chemical components in oregano were identified by their molecular weight using QTOF-MS and headspace-GC-MS.

  10. Direct infusion mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for human metabonomics? A serum metabonomic study of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yu, Quan; Yan, Xiaomei; Hang, Wei; Zheng, Jiaxin; Xing, Jinchun; Huang, Benli

    2010-11-01

    Serum samples from kidney cancer patients and healthy controls were analyzed by both direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with a high resolution ESI-Q-TOFMS. The classification and biomarker discovery capacities of the two methods were compared, and MS/MS experiments were carried out to identify potential biomarkers. DIMS had comparable classification and prediction capabilities to LC-MS but consumed only ~5% of the analysis time. With regard to biomarker discovery, twenty-three variables were found as potential biomarkers by DIMS, and 48 variables were obtained by LC-MS. DIMS is recommended to be a fast diagnostic method for kidney cancer, while LC-MS is necessary when comprehensive screening of biomarkers is required.

  11. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  12. Direct thermal desorption in the analysis of cheese volatiles by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: comparison with simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace.

    PubMed

    Valero, E; Sanz, J; Martínez-Castro, I

    2001-06-01

    Direct thermal desorption (DTD) has been used as a technique for extracting volatile components of cheese as a preliminary step to their gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. In this study, it is applied to different cheese varieties: Camembert, blue, Chaumes, and La Serena. Volatiles are also extracted using other techniques such as simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace. Separation and identification of the cheese components are carried out by GC-mass spectrometry. Approximately 100 compounds are detected in the examined cheeses. The described results show that DTD is fast, simple, and easy to automate; requires only a small amount of sample (approximately 50 mg); and affords quantitative information about the main groups of compounds present in cheeses.

  13. Multivariate analysis of the volatile components in tobacco based on infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqin; Pan, Yuanjiang; Zhou, Guojun; Chu, Guohai; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Xia, Qian; Cheng, Changhe

    2016-11-01

    A novel infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method has been developed for the rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco. The optimal extraction conditions for maximizing the extraction efficiency were as follows: 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber, extraction time of 20 min, infrared power of 175 W, and distance between the infrared lamp and the headspace vial of 2 cm. Under the optimum conditions, 50 components were found to exist in all ten tobacco samples from different geographical origins. Compared with conventional water-bath heating and nonheating extraction methods, the extraction efficiency of infrared-assisted extraction was greatly improved. Furthermore, multivariate analysis including principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and similarity analysis were performed to evaluate the chemical information of these samples and divided them into three classifications, including rich, moderate, and fresh flavors. The above-mentioned classification results were consistent with the sensory evaluation, which was pivotal and meaningful for tobacco discrimination. As a simple, fast, cost-effective, and highly efficient method, the infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique is powerful and promising for distinguishing the geographical origins of the tobacco samples coupled to suitable chemometrics.

  14. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods applied for the analysis of a Round Robin sample containing materials present in samples of works of art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keulen, Henk

    2009-07-01

    The Users' Group for Mass Spectrometry and Chromatography (MaSC) was established as a discussion forum for scientists involved in the study of artworks and cultural artefacts who wish to exchange information regarding sampling strategies and protocols, preparation of samples, chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis, data treatment and interpretation of results. Comparing protocols and different approaches to the interpretation of results requires the use of standard reference materials and Round Robin tests. To this end, an artificial, complex Round Robin sample was sent to fifteen laboratories specializing in the analysis of cultural materials. Ten of the participants analyzed the sample and reported their results, which were anonymously discussed at the MaSC meeting in Philadelphia, September 2007. In this paper, the results of the confirming GC/MS analysis of the sample by the author are presented and compared with the results of the participants. The confirming analysis was performed with thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation GC/MS in combination with pyrolysis, and by a combined method for the analysis of proteins and carbohydrates. A number of different instrumental setups and methods were used by the Round Robin participants. The results show that stepwise extraction followed by different types of derivatization is a successful approach for the analysis and identification of complex samples. A disadvantage is the need for relatively large samples, which are not always available in practice. Pyrolysis with or without tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) or hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) was used by four of the participants. The results show that thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation GC/MS in combination with pyrolysis is a powerful technique for the analysis of multi-component samples. The presence of gums and proteins can be indicated. Synthetic resins such as acrylics can also be analyzed in combination with the traditional binders and

  15. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification of haloacetic acids in tap water for simple and sensitive analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Can; Fujii, Yukiko; Yan, Junxia; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant for control of waterborne diseases in drinking water treatment. It can react with natural organic matter in water and form haloacetic acids (HAAs). For analysis of HAA levels, derivatization with diazomethane is commonly recommended as the standard methodology in Japan. However, diazomethane is a carcinogenic alkylating agent. Therefore, in this study, a safe, simple, and sensitive quantification method was developed to monitor HAAs in drinking water. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification was used for pretreatment. The pentafluorobenzyl-ester derivative was detected by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis with very high sensitivity for HAAs analysis. The method has low detection limits (8-94 ng L(-1)) and good recovery rates (89-99%) for HAAs. The method was applied to 30 tap water samples from 15 cities in the Kansai region of Japan. The levels of HAAs detected were in the range 0.54-7.83 μg L(-1). Dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were the major HAAs detected in most of the tap water, and accounted for 29%, 20% and 19% of the total HAAs, respectively. This method could be used for routine monitoring of HAAs in drinking water without exposure of workers to occupational hazards.

  16. Study of the microbiodegradation of terpenoid resin-based varnishes from easel painting using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa; Osete-Cortina, Laura; de la Cruz Cañizares, Juana; Bolívar-Galiano, Fernando; Romero-Noguera, Julio; Fernández-Vivas, María Antonia; Martín-Sánchez, Inés

    2006-08-01

    The alterations produced by microbiological attack on terpenoid resin-based varnishes from panel and canvas paintings have been evaluated using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The proposed methods include the on-line derivatisation of drying oils and diterpenoid resins using hexamethyldisilazane during pyrolysis and the application of methyl chloroformate as a derivatisation reagent for triterpenoid resins in GC-MS. Two types of specimens, consisting of model oil medium prepared from linseed oil and model spirit varnishes prepared from colophony and mastic resins dissolved in turpentine, have been used as reference materials. For a series of specimens upon which different genera of bacteria and fungi were inoculated and encouraged to grow, analyses indicated that no mechanisms that commonly occur during the attack of enzymes on drying oils and terpenoid biodegraders were observed to occur in the oil medium and varnishes studied. Thus, the degradation pathways observed in the performed trials usually occur as consequence of natural ageing. Specific trials consisting of the application of biocides to uninoculated colophony varnish resulted in the identification of processes that produce undesirable degradation of the varnish due to interactions between the biocide and the varnish components. Finally, the studied biocides--Biotin, New-Des and Nipagine--generally exhibited good inhibiting effects on the microorganisms studied, although some interesting differences were found between them regarding the application method and type of biocide.

  17. Application of pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis to study bacteria and fungi in biofilms used for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Fedi, Stefano; Locatelli, Marcello; Locatelli, Clinio; Montalbani, Simona; Cappelletti, Martina

    2013-08-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix, frequently associated with disease and contamination, and also used for engineering applications such as bioremediation. A mixed biofilm formed by bacteria and fungi may provide an optimal habitat for addressing contaminated areas. To exploit the potential of natural microbial communities consisting of bacteria and fungi, it is essential to understand and control their formation. In this work, a method to discriminate among bacteria of genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus with respect to the fungus Pleorotus in a biofilm by means of pyrolysis-gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis is reported. Methylated fatty acids were chosen as biomarkers of microorganisms in the pyrolysates. In situ thermal hydrolysis and methylation was applied. Pyrograms were used as fingerprints, thus allowing for the characterization of whole cells analyzed without any sample pretreatment. Normalized pyrographic peak areas were chosen as variables for chemometric data processing. Principal components analysis was applied as a data exploration tool. Satisfactory results were obtained in analyzing a real biofilm. The influence of growth medium on whole bacteria fatty acid cell composition was also explored.

  18. Nickel Oxide Nanoparticle-Deposited Silica Composite Solid-Phase Extraction for Benzimidazole Residue Analysis in Milk and Eggs by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huan; Yu, Qiong-Wei; He, Hai-Bo; Lu, Qian; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-13

    A novel nickel oxide nanoparticle-deposited silica (SiO2@NiO) composite was prepared via liquid-phase deposition (LPD) and then employed as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent. When the SPE was coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS) analysis, an analytical platform for the sensitive determination of benzimidazole residues in egg and milk was established. The limits of detection of nine benzimidazoles were in the range of 0.8-2.2 ng/mL in milk and 0.3-2.1 ng/g in eggs, respectively, which was 5-10 times superior to the methods with other adsorbents for SPE. The recoveries of nine benzimidazoles spiked in milk and egg ranged from 70.8 to 118.7%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) being less than 18.9%. This work presented the excellent extraction performance of NiO on benzimidazoles for the first time, and the applicability of the LPD technique used as sorbents for trace analysis in complex matrices was also demonstrated.

  19. Direct identification of rituximab main isoforms and subunit analysis by online selective comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Dwight R; Harmes, David C; Danforth, John; Wagner, Elsa; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain

    2015-08-18

    In this proof-of-concept study, rituximab, which is a reference therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb), was characterized through the implementation of online, selective comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (sLC×LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), using a middle-up approach. In this setup, cation exchange chromatography (CEX) and reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) were used as the first and second separation dimensions, respectively. As illustrated in this work, the combination of these two chromatographic modes allows a direct assignment of the identities of CEX peaks, using data from the TOF/MS detector, because RPLC is directly compatible with MS detection, whereas CEX is not. In addition, the resolving power of CEX is often considered to be limited; therefore, this 2D approach provides an improvement in peak capacity and resolution when high-performance second-dimension separations are used, instead of simply using the second-dimension separation as a desalting step. This was particularly relevant when separating rituximab fragments of medium size (25 kDa), whereas most of the resolution was provided by CEX in the case of intact rituximab samples. The analysis of a commercial rituximab sample shows that online sLC×LC-TOF-MS can be used to rapidly characterize mAb samples, yielding the identification of numerous variants, based on the analysis of intact, partially digested, and digested/reduced mAb samples.

  20. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline*

    PubMed Central

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter−1 of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter−1 for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  1. Development of a method for metabolomic analysis of human exhaled breath condensate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Peralbo-Molina, A; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Jurado-Gámez, B; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-08-05

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a promising biofluid scarcely used in clinical analysis despite its non-invasive sampling. The main limitation in the analysis of EBC is the lack of standardized protocols to support validation studies. The aim of the present study was to develop an analytical method for analysis of human EBC by GC-TOF/MS in high resolution mode. Thus, sample preparation strategies as liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction were compared in terms of extraction coverage. Liquid-liquid extraction resulted to be the most suited sample preparation approach providing an average extraction efficiency of 77% for all compounds in a single extraction. Different normalization approaches were also compared to determine which strategy could be successfully used to obtain a normalized profile with the least variability among replicates of the same sample. Normalization to the total useful mass spectrometry signal (MSTUS) proved to be the most suited strategy for the analysis of EBC from healthy individuals (n = 50) reporting a within-day variability below 7% for the 51 identified compounds and a suited data distribution in terms of percentage of metabolites passing the Skewness and Kurtosis test for normality distribution. The composition of EBC was clearly dominated by the presence of fatty acids and derivatives such as methyl esters and amides, and volatile prenol lipids. Therefore, EBC offers the profile of both volatile and non-volatile components as compared to other similar biofluids such as exhaled breath vapor, which only provides the volatile profile. This human biofluid could be an alternative to others such as serum/plasma, urine or sputum to find potential markers with high value for subsequent development of screening models.

  2. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G

    2015-07-31

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter(-1) of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter(-1) for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways.

  3. Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of the Chemical Warfare Agent Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-16

    Title of Thesis: “Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of the Chemical...phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Five commercially available SPME fibers were investigated to determine the

  4. Gas Purge Microextraction Coupled with Stable Isotope Labeling-Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bromophenols in Aquatic Products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shijuan; Yu, Qiuhui; Sheng, Cuncun; You, Jinmao

    2016-12-14

    A green, sensitive, and accurate method was developed for the extraction and determination of bromophenols (BPs) from aquatic products by using organic solvent-free gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) technique in combination with stable isotope labeling (SIL) strategy. BPs were extracted by NaHCO3 buffer solution, with recoveries varying from 92.0% to 98.5%. The extracted solution was analyzed by SIL strategy, during which analytes and standards were labeled by 10-methyl-acridone-2-sulfonyl chloride (d0-MASC) and its deuterated counterpart d3-MASC, respectively. The labeling reaction was finished within 10 min with good stability. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) sensitivity of BPs was greatly enhanced due to the mass-enhancing property of MASC, while the matrix effect was effectively minimized by the SIL strategy. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.10-0.30 μg/kg, while the limits of quantitations (LOQs) were in the range of 0.32-1.0 μg/kg. The proposed method also showed great potential in the qualitative analysis of other bromophenols in the absence of standard.

  5. Tandem Extraction/Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Protocol for the Analysis of Acrylamide and Surfactant-related Compounds in Complex Aqueous Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry (LC‐MS)‐based strategy for the detection and quantitation of acrylamide and surfactant‐related compounds in aqueous complex environmental samples.

  6. Determination of sucrose in equine serum using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS).

    PubMed

    D'Arcy-Moskwa, E; Weston, L; Noble, G N; Raidal, S L

    2011-11-15

    Mucosal integrity may be objectively assessed by determination of the absorption of exogenous substances such as sucrose. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) have been reported for the accurate quantification of low concentrations of sucrose in serum. LC/MS offered the advantage of high sensitivity and mass selectivity without the need for extensive sample derivatization required for GC/MS methods. However, the high polarity and non-volatile nature of the sucrose molecule renders LC/MS techniques challenging. Previously published reports lacked sufficient detail to permit replication of methodology. Problems encountered with existing protocols included poor peak resolution and weak fragmentation of the parent molecule. This communication describes a LC/MS protocol developed to provide improved resolution and product detection.

  7. Sensitive Determination of Onco-metabolites of D- and L-2-hydroxyglutarate Enantiomers by Chiral Derivatization Combined with Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qing-Yun; Xiong, Jun; Huang, Wei; Ma, Qin; Ci, Weimin; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng

    2015-10-13

    2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) is a potent competitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and can inhibit multiple α-KG dependent dioxygenases that function on the epigenetic modifications. The accumulation of 2HG contributes to elevated risk of malignant tumors. 2HG carries an asymmetric carbon atom in its carbon backbone and differentiation between D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) and L-2-hydroxyglutarate (L-2HG) is crucially important for accurate diagnosis of 2HG related diseases. Here we developed a strategy by chiral derivatization combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis for highly sensitive determination of D-2HG and L-2HG enantiomers. N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-L-phenylalanyl chloride (TSPC) was used to derivatize 2HG. The formed diastereomers by TSPC labeling can efficiently improve the chromatographic separation of D-2HG and L-2HG. And derivatization by TSPC could also markedly increase the detection sensitivities by 291 and 346 folds for D-2HG and L-2HG, respectively. Using the developed method, we measured the contents of D-2HG and L-2HG in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. We observed 12.9 and 29.8 folds increase of D-2HG and L-2HG, respectively, in human ccRCC tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. The developed chiral derivatization combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis offers sensitive determination of D-2HG and L-2HG enantiomers, which benefits the precise diagnosis of 2HG related metabolic diseases.

  8. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group?Determination of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in water using online solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Strahan, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 6 acetamide herbicides (acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, flufenacet, metolachlor, and propachlor) and 16 of their degradation products in natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is described in this report. Special consideration was given during the development of the method to prevent the formation of degradation products during the analysis. Filtered water samples were analyzed using octadecylsilane as the solid-phase extraction media on online automated equipment followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method uses only 10 milliliters of sample per injection. Three different water-sample matrices, a reagent-water, a ground-water, and a surface-water sample spiked at 0.10 and 1.0 microgram per liter, were analyzed to determine method performance. Method detection limits ranged from 0.004 to 0.051 microgram per liter for the parent acetamide herbicides and their degradation products. Mean recoveries for the acetamide compounds in the ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 62.3 to 117.4 percent. The secondary amide of acetochlor/metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) was recovered at an average rate of 43.5 percent. The mean recoveries for propachlor and propachlor oxanilic acid (OXA) were next lowest, ranging from 62.3 to 95.5 percent. Mean recoveries from reagent-water samples ranged from 90.3 to 118.3 percent for all compounds. Overall the mean of the mean recoveries of all compounds in the three matrices spiked at 0.10 and 1.0 microgram per liter ranged from 89.9 to 100.7 percent, including the secondary amide of acetochlor/metolachlor ESA and the propachlor compounds. The acetamide herbicides and their degradation products are reported in concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 micrograms per liter. The upper concentration limit is 2.0 micrograms per liter for all compounds without dilution. With the exception of the secondary amide of

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of triazine and phenylurea herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Edward Alan; Strahan, Alex P.; Thurman, Earl Michael

    2002-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 7 triazine and phenylurea herbicides and 12 of their degradation products in natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. Special consideration was given during the development of the method to prevent the formation of degradation products during the analysis. Filtered water samples were analyzed using 0.5 gram graphitized carbon as the solid-phase extraction media followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Three different water-sample matrices?ground-water, surface-water, and reagent-water samples?spiked at 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter were analyzed. Method detection limits ranged from 0.013 to 0.168 microgram per liter for the parent triazine herbicides and the triazine degradation products. Method detection limits ranged from 0.042 to 0.141 microgram per liter for the parent phenylurea herbicides and their degradation products. Mean recoveries for the triazine compounds in the ground- and surface-water samples generally ranged from 72.6 to 117.5 percent, but deethyl-cyanazine amide was recovered at 140.5 percent. Mean recoveries from the ground- and surface-water samples for the phenylurea compounds spiked at the 2.0-micrograms-per-liter level ranged from 82.1 to 114.4 percent. The mean recoveries for the phenylureas spiked at 0.2-microgram per liter were less consistent, ranging from 87.0 to 136.0 percent. Mean recoveries from reagent-water samples ranged from 87.0 to 109.5 percent for all compounds. The triazine compounds and their degradation products are reported in concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 micrograms per liter, with the exception of deethylcyanazine and deethylcyanazine amide which are reported at 0.20 to 2.0 micrograms per liter. The phenylurea compounds and their degradation products are reported in concentrations ranging from 0.20 to 2.0 micrograms per liter. The upper concentration limit was 2

  10. Enantiomeric resolution of biomarkers in space analysis: Chemical derivatization and signal processing for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of chiral amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, M C; Basaglia, G

    2010-02-12

    The work compares two GC-MS methods for enantioselective separation of amino acids as suitable candidate for stereochemical analysis of chiral amino acids on board spacecrafts in space exploration missions of solar system body environments. Different derivatization reagents are used: a mixture of alkyl chloroformate-alcohol-pyridine to obtain the alkyl alkoxy carbonyl esters and a mixture of perfluorinated alcohols and anhydrides to form perfluoroacyl perfluoroalkyl esters. 20 proteinogenic amino acids were derivatized with the two procedures and submitted to GC-MS analysis on a Chirasil-l-Val stationary phase. The results were then compared in terms of the enantiomeric separation achieved and intensity of MS response. The combination of methyl chloroformate (MCF) and heptafluoro-1-butanol (HFB) allows separation of 14 enantiomeric pairs, five of which display a resolution (R(s)>or=1.2) supposed to be sufficient to quantify the enantiomeric excess. Three mixtures of trifluoroacetic (TFAA) and heptafluorobutyric (HFBA) anhydrides were combined with the corresponding perfluorinated alcohols - TFE (2,2,2-trifluoro-1-ethanol) and HFB (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butanol) - to give three different reagents (TFAA-TFE, TFAA-HFB, HFBA-HFB): the derivatives obtained show separation of the same number of proteinogenic amino acids (14 of 20) at a temperature lower than column bleeding limit (200 degrees C) and 8 of them give a separation with R(s)>or=1.2. Linearity study and limit of detection (X(LOD)) computation show that both methods are suitable for quantitative determination of several amino acid diastereomers at trace level (X(LOD) approximately 0.5nmol as derivatized quantity). Both the procedures were coupled with automatic data handling to increase their suitability for space analysis: the simplified data treatment is especially helpful to handle the low quality data recovered from space experiments and labor and time are saved, as imposed by the space experiments

  11. Analysis and quantitation of volatile organic compounds emitted from plastics used in museum construction by evolved gas analysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samide, Michael J; Smith, Gregory D

    2015-12-24

    Construction materials used in museums for the display, storage, and transportation of artwork must be assessed for their tendency to emit harmful pollution that could potentially damage cultural treasures. Traditionally, a subjective metals corrosion test known as the Oddy test has been widely utilized in museums for this purpose. To augment the Oddy test, an instrumental sampling approach based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectral (MS) detection has been implemented for the first time to qualitatively identify off-gassed pollutants under specific conditions. This approach is compared to other instrumental methods reported in the literature. This novel application of the EGA sampling technique yields several benefits over traditional testing, including rapidity, high sensitivity, and broad detectability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Furthermore, unlike other reported instrumental approaches, the EGA method was used to determine quantitatively the amount of VOCs emitted by acetate resins and polyurethane foams under specific conditions using both an external calibration method as well as surrogate response factors. EGA was successfully employed to rapidly characterize emissions from 12 types of common plastics. This analysis is advocated as a rapid pre-screening method to rule out poorly performing materials prior to investing time and energy in Oddy testing. The approach is also useful for rapid, routine testing of construction materials previously vetted by traditional testing, but which may experience detrimental formulation changes over time. As an example, a case study on batch re-orders of rigid expanded poly(vinyl chloride) board stock is presented.

  12. Determination of Dihydroqinghaosu in Blood by Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    capillary the therapeutic range, our laboratory sought to develop new column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( GCMS ) specific and sensitive methodologies...paper, the results on the development and validation of packed for pharmacoklneUc an metabolism studies In animals. and capillary column gas...respectively. Petroleum ether washave been treated with QHS or its derivatives in China with purchased from Mallinckrodt, Inc. (Paris, KY), and ethyl acetate

  13. Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry of Thermoplastic Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    polyethylene (HiFax ), polymethylmethacrylate TM TM TM (PlexiGlas ), polyphenylene ether (Prevex ), polyacetal (Delrin ), * polyamide (Nylon 6,6 TM...including elastomers , plastics, and paints because it allows the analysis of non-volatile high molecular weight compounds with no sample pretreatment; e.g...34 ,’Nylo 6 TM Nylon 6,6 Polyamide White block 261 PlexiglasTM Polymethylmethacrylate Transparent block 90-100* Delrin T Polyacetal White block 179

  14. Silicone rod extraction followed by liquid desorption-large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporiser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for trace analysis of priority organic pollutants in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Alejandra; Posada-Ureta, Oscar; Olivares, Maitane; Vallejo, Asier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2013-12-15

    In this study a priority organic pollutants usually found in environmental water samples were considered to accomplish two extraction and analysis approaches. Among those compounds organochlorine compounds, pesticides, phthalates, phenols and residues of pharmaceutical and personal care products were included. The extraction and analysis steps were based on silicone rod extraction (SR) followed by liquid desorption in combination with large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporiser (LVI-PTV) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Variables affecting the analytical response as a function of the programmable temperature vaporiser (PTV) parameters were firstly optimised following an experimental design approach. The SR extraction and desorption conditions were assessed afterwards, including matrix modification, time extraction, and stripping solvent composition. Subsequently, the possibility of performing membrane enclosed sorptive coating extraction (MESCO) as a modified extraction approach was also evaluated. The optimised method showed low method detection limits (3-35 ng L(-1)), acceptable accuracy (78-114%) and precision values (<13%) for most of the studied analytes regardless of the aqueous matrix. Finally, the developed approach was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in aqueous environmental matrices including estuarine and wastewater samples.

  15. Construction and analysis of correlation networks based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabonomics data for lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and intervention with volatile oil from Angelica sinensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yong-li; Ji, Peng; Xue, Zi-yu; Wei, Yan-ming

    2015-11-01

    Angelica sinensis (AS) is a well-known important traditional Chinese medicine that yields a volatile oil with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the holistic therapeutic effects and the mechanism underlying such effects of the volatile oil of A. sinensis (VOAS) are not yet well understood. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabonomic study was conducted to explore the significantly altered metabolites for better understanding of VOAS and to assess the integral efficacy of VOAS on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation rat model. Principal component analysis was used to investigate the global metabonomic alterations and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of VOAS in rats. Clear separations were observed in the comparison of the metabolite profiles of the normal control (NC) group, the LPS-stimulated group (MI), the VOAS group, and the dexamethasone (Dex) group. VOAS exerted therapeutic effects on the LPS-stimulated group, which were in accordance with the results of cytokine analyses and blood physiobiochemical assay. Furthermore, a total of 20, 17, and 22 metabolites distributed in 27 metabolic pathways were respectively identified in plasma, liver, and lung samples as significantly altered metabolites of MI, VOAS, Dex, and NC of the same background. Network analysis revealed that glycine, glutamate, malic acid, succinate, arachidonic acid, glycerol, galactose, and glucose were hub metabolites of the inflammation correlation network. Results indicated that VOAS exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect by adjusting the Krebs cycle, improving the glucose content, and restoring the fatty acid metabolism.

  16. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry of N- Heptafluorobutyryl Isobutyl Esters of Amino Acids in the Analysis of the Kinetics of [15N]H4+ Assimilation in Lemna minor L

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Myers, Ann C.; Jamieson, Gene

    1981-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive, and selective methods for the determination of the 15N abundance of amino acids in isotopic tracer experiments with plant tissues are described and discussed. Methodology has been directly tested in an analysis of the kinetics of [15N]H4+ assimilation in Lemna minor L. The techniques utilize gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring of major fragments containing the N moiety of N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl esters of amino acids. The ratio of selected ion pairs at the characteristic retention time of each amino acid derivative can be used to calculate 15N abundance with an accuracy of ±1 atom% excess 15N using samples containing as little as 30 picomoles of individual amino acids. Up to 11 individual amino acid derivatives can be selectively monitored in a single chromatogram of 30 minutes. It is suggested that these techniques will be useful in situations where the small quantities of N available for analysis have hitherto hindered the use of 15N-labeled precursors. PMID:16662074

  17. Pesticides in seaweed: optimization of pressurized liquid extraction and in-cell clean-up and analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, R A; Pais, S; Racamonde, I; García-Rodríguez, D; Carro, A M

    2012-07-01

    Chemical residues, such as insecticides and anthelmintics, are frequently redistributed from the aquatic environment to marine species. This work reports on a fast validated protocol for the analysis of azamethiphos, three avermectins, two carbamates and two benzoylurea pesticides and chemotherapeutic agents in seaweeds based on pressurized liquid extraction and separation of analytes by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The variables affecting the efficiency of pressurized liquid extraction, including temperature, number of extraction cycles, static extraction time and percent acetonitrile flush volume, were studied using a Doehlert design. The optimum parameters were 100 °C and one cycle of 3 min with 70 % acetonitrile. Adequate in-cell clean-up of the seaweeds was achieved using 0.8 g of Florisil over 0.1 g of graphitized carbon black on the bottom of the cell. The optimized method was validated using an analyte-free seaweed sample fortified at different concentrations. The limits of quantification ranged from 3.6 μg kg(-1) (azamethiphos) to 31.5 μg kg(-1) (abamectin). The recovery was from 87 to 120 % in most cases at different spiking levels. Finally, the reproducibility of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation and evaluated at concentrations of 10 and 50 μg kg(-1) was in the range 9-14.3 % and 6.1-12.3 %, respectively. The applicability of the method was evaluated with five commercial and 12 wild edible seaweeds, and four target compounds were detected in two wild seaweeds at a concentration below the quantification limit.

  18. Online capillary solid-phase microextraction coupled liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of chiral secondary alcohol products in yeast catalyzed stereoselective reduction cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheanyeh; Nian, Yu-Chuan

    2015-02-06

    An online solid-phase microextraction coupled liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry was developed for the analysis of trace R- and S-4-phenyl-2-butanol (R- and S-pbol) in salt rich cell culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalyzed stereoselective reduction of 4-pheny-2-butanone (pbone). A Supel-Q PLOT capillary column was used for the extraction and deionized distilled water was used as the extraction mobile phase. The extraction flow rate and extraction time were at 0.1 mL min(-1) and 0.95 min, respectively. The three target analytes, pbone, R-pbol, and S-4-pbol, were desorbed and eluted by the mobile phase of water/methanol/isopropanol (55/25/20, v/v/v) with a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1) and analyzed by a chiral column. The mass spectrometric detection of the three target analytes was in positive ion mode with the signal [M+Na](+). The matrix-matched external standard calibration curves with linear concentration range between 0 and 50 μg mL(-1) were used for quantitative analysis. The linear regression correlation coefficients (r(2)) of the standard calibration curves were between 0.9950 and 0.9961. The yeast mediated reduction was performed with a recation culture of yeast incubation culture/glycerol (70/30, v/v) for 4 days. This biotransformation possessed 82.3% yield and 92.9% S-enantomeric excess. The limit of detection (LOD)/limit of quantification (LOQ) for pbone, R-pbol, and S-pbol was 0.02/0.067, 0.01/0.033, and 0.01/0.033 μg mL(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions from repeated measurements were 10.8-21.1% and 11.6-18.7%, respectively. The analysis accuracy from spike recovery was 84-91%.

  19. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  20. Factors That Contribute to Assay Variation in Quantitative Analysis of Sex Steroid Hormones Using Liquid and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The list of physiological events in which sex steroids play a role continues to increase. To decipher the roles that sex steroids play in any condition requires high quality cohorts of samples and assays that provide highly accurate quantitative measures. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS) have…

  1. Characterization of ballpoint pen inks by thermal and desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2005-09-01

    The characterization of ink on paper is of importance for dating and comparing questioned ink entries in forensic document examination. Inks are commonly characterized by their colorant profile that is identified by well-established analytical methods. Numerous ink formulations show identical colorant profiles, though. In order to differentiate inks that are not distinguishable by colorant analysis, a method for the characterization of colorless ink ingredients, namely binders, solvents and additives is necessary. In this paper, we propose a technique for the analysis of colorless compounds in ballpoint inks using direct thermal desorption of the ink on paper followed by chemical analysis of the desorbed volatile compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As compared to liquid extraction and subsequent analysis of the extracts, the technique avoids possible contamination risks. Sensitivity is very high due to the enrichment of volatile components by thermal desorption. Even from old samples, the chromatograms obtained by the method enable the determination of binder polymers, solvents and additives. Pure binders as used by ink manufacturers were analyzed for unambiguous assignment of analytical results to specific polymers. To prove the practical applicability, we analyzed 121 ballpoint pens, not all having the same colorant profile, and grouped the pens into resin and solvent categories.

  2. Vanguard/rearguard strategy for the evaluation of the degradation of yoghurt samples based on the direct analysis of the volatiles profile through headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Carrión, C; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2007-02-02

    A vanguard/rearguard analytical strategy for the monitoring of the degradation of yoghurt samples is proposed. The method is based on the headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) instrumental coupling. In this combination, the chromatographic column is firstly used as an interface between the HS and the MS (vanguard mode) avoiding separation of the volatile components by maintaining the chromatographic oven at high, constant temperature. By changing the thermal conditions of the oven, the aldehydes can be properly separated for individual identification/quantification (rearguard mode). In the vanguard method, the quantification of the volatile aldehydes was calculated through partial least square and given as a total index. The rearguard method permits the detection of the aldehydes at concentrations between 12 and 35 ng/g. Both methods were applied to the study of the environmental factors favouring the presence of the volatile aldehydes (C(5)-C(9)) in the yoghurt samples. Principal component analysis of the total concentration of aldehydes with the time (from 0 to 30 days) demonstrates the capability of the HS-MS coupling for the estimation of the quality losses of the samples. The results were corroborated by the HS-GC-MS which also indicates that pentanal was present in the yoghurt from the beginning of the study and the combination of light/oxygen was the most negative influence for sample conservation.

  3. Direct Analysis of Leucine and Its Metabolites β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyric Acid, α-Ketoisocaproic Acid, and α-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid in Human Breast Milk by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Stefan; Reddy, Todime M

    2015-09-02

    A direct, quantitative, and confirmatory method based on stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the analysis of leucine and metabolites β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric acid (HMB), α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), and α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) in human breast milk. Chromatographic resolution was achieved between isobaric leucine and isoleucine. Accuracy and intermediate precision were 89-117% and <10% relative standard deviation (RSD) across three validation runs. Limits of quantitation for HMB, KIC, HICA, and leucine in human breast milk were 20 μg/L, 20 μg/L, 10 μg/L, and 1 mg/L. Measured concentrations of HMB, KIC, HICA, and free leucine in human breast milk from six donors at various stages of lactation were 42-164 μg/L, < 20-1057 μg/L, < 10 μg/L, and 2.1-88.5 mg/L. HMB and KIC were confirmed in human breast milk by orthogonal hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). This work provides a tool for further study of human breast milk composition and its effect on protein turnover in developing infants.

  4. Determination of organic priority pollutants and emerging compounds in wastewater and snow samples using multiresidue protocols on the basis of microextraction by packed sorbents coupled to large volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Prieto, A; Schrader, S; Moeder, M

    2010-09-17

    This paper describes the development and validation of a new procedure for the simultaneous determination of 41 multi-class priority and emerging organic pollutants in water samples using microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) followed by large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS). Apart from method parameter optimization the influence of humic acids as matrix components on the extraction efficiency of MEPS procedure was also evaluated. The list of target compounds includes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalate esters (PEs), nonylphenols (NPs), bisphenol A (BPA) and selected steroid hormones. The performance of the new at-line microextraction-LVI-GC-MS protocol was compared to standard solid-phase extraction (SPE) and LVI-GC-MS analysis. LODs for 100 mL samples (SPE) ranged from 0.2 to 736 ng L(-1) were obtained. LODs for 800 microL of sample (MEPS) were between 0.2 and 266 ng L(-1). In the case of MEPS methodology even a sample volume of only 800 microL allowed to detect the target compounds. These results demonstrate the high sensitivity of both procedures which permitted to obtain good recoveries (>75%) for all cases. The precision of the methods, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD) was below 21% for all compounds and both methodologies. Finally, the developed methods were applied to the determination of target analytes in various samples, including snow and wastewater.

  5. Residual solvents in methylenedioxymethamphetamine tablets as a source of strategic information and as a tool for comparative analysis: the development and application of a static headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Visser, H A A H; Visser-van Leeuwen, M; Huizer, H

    2005-01-01

    Various solvents can be used in the synthesis of the illicit synthetic drug methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, commonly known as Ecstasy). In the crystallization process, traces of those solvents can be trapped inside crystals; during the following tabletting process, the solvent traces remain present in the tablets. The forensic investigation of tablets for solvents may increase knowledge of production methods and contribute to a possible choice of monitoring or regulating certain organic solvents. Further, the identification and quantification of solvents in MDMA tablets may contribute to the chemical characterization of illicit tablets for comparative examination. The methods of analysis of volatile components in illicit MDMA tablets described so far are often based on solid-phase micro extraction (SPME). To avoid several disadvantages of SPME, a quantitative static headspace method was developed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); for quantification, the standard addition method appeared to be advantageous. The residual solvents in 155 MDMA tablets were analysed and 150 of them were quantified.

  6. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  7. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: acetochlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.50, and 2.0 mg/L (micrograms per liter) ranged from 84 to 112 percent, with relative standard deviations of 18 percent or less. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.20, and 2.0 mg/L ranged from 81 to 125 percent, with relative standard deviations of 20 percent or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 mg/L, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was 0.05 mg/L. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  8. Online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water by automated microscale solid-phase extraction with large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; George, John E; McCarty, Christina L

    2007-12-28

    A fully automated analytical method was developed for the online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water. The method used a large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a fully automated microscale solid-phase extraction technique, which was based on x-y-z robotic techniques. Water samples were extracted by using a 96-well solid-phase extraction plate. For most analytes included in this study, the obtained linear calibrations ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 microg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.996-1.000, the method detection limits were less than 0.1 microg/L, and the relative recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation of less than 15% for fortified reagent water samples. The applications to chlorinated tap water, well water, and river water have been validated. The obtained results were similar to those resulting from fortified reagent water samples for all analytes except metribuzin, bromacil, aldrin, and methoxychlor. Matrix effects were observed for these analytes. In general, this fully automated analytical method was rugged, reliable, and easy to operate, and was capable of providing real-time data to water treatment and distribution systems as well as water reservation and protection systems. In addition, the method could reduce the analytical costs associated with sample collection, transportation, storage, and preparation.

  9. Valid internal standard technique for arson detection based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Pedro A S; Borges, Carlos M F; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N

    2012-09-28

    The most popular procedures for the detection of residues of accelerants in fire debris are the ones published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM E1412-07 and E1618-10). The most critical stages of these tests are the conservation of fire debris from the sampling to the laboratory, the extraction of residues of accelerants from the debris to the activated charcoal strips (ACS) and from those to the final solvent, as well as the analysis of sample extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the interpretation of the instrumental signal. This work proposes a strategy for checking the quality of the sample conservation, the accelerant residues transference to final solvent and GC-MS analysis, using internal standard additions. It is used internal standards ranging from a highly volatile compound for checking debris conservation to low volatile compound for checking GC-MS repeatability. The developed quality control (QC) parameters are not affected by GC-MS sensitivity variation and, specifically, the GC-MS performance control is not affected by ACS adsorption saturation that may mask test performance deviations. The proposed QC procedure proved to be adequate to check GC-MS repeatability, ACS extraction and sample conservation since: (1) standard additions are affected by negligible uncertainty and (2) observed dispersion of QC parameters are fit for its intended use.

  10. Detection of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermarks by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Xueguo; Yang, Ruiqin; Xu, Yingjian

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive and efficient method applying liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermark deposits was described. Using this method, good linear relationship of methamphetamine was obtained in the range of 0.005μg to 0.5μg per cotton swab, the limit of detection was 1.5ng per cotton swab, the limit of quantitation was 5.0ng per cotton swab and the average values of recovery ratios were above 70.1%. Moreover, the influence factors for the detection of methamphetamine in fingermarks, such as kinds of substrates, development methods and extraction methods, were all discussed in details. The results showed that good recovery ratios could be obtained on painted wood and smooth substrates surfaces. Development methods in commercial powder could not influence the quality of examination of exogenous drug in latent fingermark. Furthermore, the results indicated that the method mentioned here could be applied in the analysis of forensic trace evidences and samples obtained in clinically addicted cases.

  11. EIder: A compound identification tool for gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Koo, Imhoi; Kim, Seongho; Shi, Biyun; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-05-27

    We report software entitled EIder (EI mass spectrum identifier) that provides users with eight literature reported spectrum matching algorithms for compound identification from gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. EIder calculates retention index according to experimental conditions categorized by column class, column type and data type, where 9 empirical distribution functions of the absolute retention index deviation to its mean value were constructed using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2011 retention index database to improve the accuracy of compound identification. EIder filters compound candidates based on elementary composition and derivatization reagent, and automatically adds the molecular information of the native compound to each derivatized compound using a manually created database. When multiple samples are analyzed together, EIder performs cross-sample alignment and provides an option of using an average mass spectrum for compound identification. Furthermore, a suite of graphical user interfaces are implemented in EIder to allow users to both manually and automatically modify the identification results using experimental information at various analysis stages. Analysis of three types of GC-MS datasets indicates that the developed EIder software can improve the accuracy of compound identification.

  12. Identifying and quantifying contaminants contributing to endogenous analytes in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2010-09-15

    Contaminants from various sources including medical devices, laboratory materials and the environment, and analytical apparatus may contribute to their endogenous congeners at different stages of the analytical process. Here, an approach is reported for the identification and quantification of contaminating analytes in biological fluids by stable-isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods. This approach is based on the analysis of different sample volumes and determination of the peak area ratio (PAR) of the endogenous analyte to the stable-isotope labeled analogue serving as the internal standard. The PAR is obtained by selected-ion monitoring or selected-reaction monitoring of appropriate ions. Generation of PAR values that correlate inversely with the sample volume subjected to analysis reveals the existence of contamination. The extent of contamination is obtained by plotting the PAR of endogenous analyte to internal standard versus the reciprocal of the sample volume analyzed. Examples are given for uncontaminated and contaminated endogenous analytes in biological samples, including nitrite and nitrate analyzed by GC/MS, and the fatty acid metabolites oleic acid oxide, oleic acid ethanol amide, and arachidonic acid ethanol amide analyzed by GC/MS/MS. Dependence of the PAR of endogenous analyte to its internal standard upon derivatization time reveals a unique kind of contamination that was identified in the GC/MS analysis of nitrate in plasma as pentafluorobenzyl ester. This kind of contamination occurs at the latest stage of GC/MS analysis and cannot be controlled by reference to the internal standard.

  13. [Determination of five representative ultraviolet filters in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiran; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Tingting; Cai, Qian; Luo, Yu; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yuxia; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    A method for the determination of five representative organic UV filters: ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octocrylene (OC), homosalate (HMS) in water was investigated. The method was ased on derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by determination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables involved in the derivatization of BP-3 and HMS were optimized, and SPE conditions were studied. For derivatization, 100 microL N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) was used as derivatization reagent and reacted with BP-3 and HMS at 100 degrees C for 100 min. For SPE, the pH value of water sample was adjusted to 3-5. The Oasis HLB cartridges were employed and the solution of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane (1 : 1, v/v) was used as the eluting solvent, and good recoveries of the target compounds were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) for the five target compounds in water samples were 0.5-1.2 ng/L and 1.4-4.0 ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of spiked water samples were 87.85%-102.34% with good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD < 5%, n = 3) for all the target compounds. Finally, the validated method was applied to analysis the representative UV filters in water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Kunming city of Yunnan province.

  14. Relative quantitation of transfer RNAs using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and signature digestion products.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Colette M; Limbach, Patrick A

    2010-09-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are challenging to identify and quantify from unseparated mixtures. Our lab previously developed the signature digestion approach for identifying tRNAs without specific separation. Here we describe the combination of relative quantification via enzyme-mediated isotope labeling with this signature digestion approach for the relative quantification of tRNAs. These quantitative signature digestion products were characterized using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and we find that up to 5-fold changes in tRNA abundance can be quantified from sub-microgram amounts of total tRNA. Quantitative tRNA signature digestion products must (i) incorporate an isotopic label during enzymatic digestion; (ii) have no m/z interferences from other signature digestion products in the sample and (iii) yield a linear response during LC-MS analysis. Under these experimental conditions, the RNase T1, A and U2 signature digestion products that potentially could be used for the relative quantification of Escherichia coli tRNAs were identified, and the linearity and sequence identify of RNase T1 signature digestion products were experimentally confirmed. These RNase T1 quantitative signature digestion products were then used in proof-of-principle experiments to quantify changes arising due to different culturing media to 17 tRNA families. This method enables new experiments where information regarding tRNA identity and changes in abundance are desired.

  15. Measurement of F2- isoprostanes and isofurans using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ginger L; Gao, Benlian; Terry, Erin S; Zackert, William E; Sanchez, Stephanie C

    2013-06-01

    F2-Isoprostanes (IsoPs) are isomers of prostaglandin F2α formed from the nonenzymatic free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid. Since discovery of these molecules by Morrow and Roberts in 1990, F2-IsoPs have been shown to be excellent biomarkers as well as potent mediators of oxidative stress in vivo in humans. Isofurans (IsoFs) are also oxidation products generated from the nonenzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid. IsoFs are preferentially formed instead of F2-IsoPs in settings of increased oxygen tension. The protocol presented herein is the current methodology that our laboratory uses to quantify F2-IsoPs and IsoFs in biological tissues and fluids using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A variety of analytical procedures to measure F2-IsoPs, including other GC/MS methods and liquid chromatography/MS and immunological approaches, are reported in the literature. This method provides a very low limit of quantitation and is suitable for analysis of both F2-IsoPs and IsoFs from a variety of biological sources including urine, plasma, tissues, cerebral spinal fluid, exhaled breath condensate, and amniotic fluid, among others.

  16. Thermal degradation of α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone during injection in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kuwayama, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-10

    α-Pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP) is a popular recreational drug in Japan. This drug easily undergoes thermal decomposition during gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. We evaluated three factors involved in the decomposition, namely the injection method (splitless or split, split ratio), injector temperature, and surface activity on the inlet liner. Splitless injection of α-PVP using a used deactivated split/splitless liner at an injector temperature of 250 °C caused thermal decomposition. This decomposition was inhibited by split injection. A higher split ratio resulted in greater prevention. Based on the mass spectrum of deuterated α-PVP, the decomposition product was presumed to be an enamine whose double bond was located in the alkyl chain. Lowering the injection temperature from 250 °C to 200 °C did not prevent decomposition. New glass liners, both deactivated and non-deactivated, were compared. The use of a new deactivated liner minimized thermal decomposition, even for splitless injection, while the non-deactivated liner generated an increase in the amount of the decomposition product. These results showed that the injection method and the surface activity on the inlet liner were involved in the thermal decomposition of α-PVP.

  17. Oxysterols in cosmetics-Determination by planar solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schrack, S; Hohl, C; Schwack, W

    2016-11-18

    Sterol oxidation products (SOPs) are linked to several toxicological effects. Therefore, investigation of potential dietary uptake sources particularly food of animal origin has been a key issue for these compounds. For the simultaneous determination of oxysterols from cholesterol, phytosterols, dihydrolanosterol and lanosterol in complex cosmetic matrices, planar solid phase extraction (pSPE) was applied as clean-up tool. SOPs were first separated from more non-polar and polar matrix constituents by normal phase thin-layer chromatography and then focussed into one target zone. Zone extraction was performed with the TLC-MS interface, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. pSPE showed to be effective for cleaning up cosmetic samples as sample extracts were free of interferences, and gas chromatographic columns did not show any signs of overloading. Recoveries were between 86 and 113% with relative standard deviations of below 10% (n=6). Results of our market survey in 2016 showed that some cosmetics with ingredients of plant origin contained phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) in the low ppm range and therefore in line with levels reported for food. In lanolin containing products, total SOPs levels (cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), lanosterol oxidation products (LOPs), dihydrolanosterol oxidation products (DOPs)) being in the low percent range exceeded reported levels for food by several orders of magnitudes.

  18. [Determination of organotin compounds in textile auxiliaries by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanming; Hu, Yongjie; Liu, Jinhua; Guo, Yuliang; Wang, Guiqin

    2011-04-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method has been developed for the determination of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) in textile auxiliaries. The sample was first extracted with n-hexane in acetate buffer solution (pH 4.0) under ultrasonication (for hydrophobic sample) or oscillation extraction (for hydrophilic sample) and then derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate in tetrahydrofuran. The derivative was determined by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The separation and quantification were achieved using a Rxi-5 ms silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm). The linear ranges were 0.1-8.0 mg/L for both DBT and TBT, and 0.1-4.0 mg/L for TPhT. There were good linear relationships between the peak area and concentration in the linear ranges and the correlation coefficients (r2) were 0.9994-0.9998. The detection limits (LOD) were from 0.003 mg/L to 0.005 mg/L. The average recoveries of these organotin compounds at the three spiked levels of 4.0, 10.0 and 40.0 mg/kg were 92.6%-108.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.5%-10.2%. The method is simple and accurate for simultaneous analysis of the DBT, TBT and TPhT in textile auxiliaries.

  19. A novel method for the determination of guanfacine in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haglock, Carrie; Wolf, Carl; Poklis, Alphonse

    2008-10-01

    Guanfacine (Tenex), an antihypertensive available since 1975, has recently been indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children (Intuniv). Because of this new usage, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the determination of guanfacine in urine. Guanfacine and 100 ng of protriptyline (internal standard) were extracted from 1.0 mL urine with 0.5 mL of saturated carbonate/bicarbonate buffer and 2 mL of ethyl acetate. The solvent extract was evaporated and derivatized with heptaflurobutyric anhydride in n-butyl chloride. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a DB-5 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm, 0.25 microm). Ions monitored for guanfacine were m/z 86.1, 272.1, and 274.1, and ions monitored for protriptyline were m/z 191.1 and 189.1. Concentrations were determined using calibrators over the range of 0.1-2.0 mg/L. The linear regression for all calibration curves had r2 values > or = 0.99. The limit of detection was 0.05 mg/L; limit of quantitation was 0.1 mg/L; and upper limit of linearity was 10.0 mg/L. Percent recovery of guanfacine at 0.1 and 2.0 mg/L was 93% and 71%, respectively. The method was found acceptable for routine quantitative analysis of guanfacine in urine.

  20. Identification and differentiation of dragon's blood in works of art using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Ursula; Dietemann, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Dragon's blood is a common but non-specific name for red-coloured resins that are produced by various plants, particularly exudations from plant species belonging to the genera Dracaena and Daemonorops. Although dragon's blood is mentioned in historic sources as a colourant, it has hardly ever been identified in real artworks. This paper reports the identification and discrimination of dragon's blood produced by Dracaena cinnabari, Dracaena draco as well as Daemonorops draco and Daemonorops micracantha by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) within the context of a routine analysis of binding media used in works of art. The detection of specific flavonoid marker compounds in both underivatised and methylated methanol extracts provided the first evidence for the use of dragon's blood from all four species in various works of art from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. Dragon's blood was mainly used as a red colourant in gold lacquers as well as translucent glazes and paints, e.g. in reverse-glass paintings (Hinterglasmalerei).

  1. Evaluation of column hardware on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of phosphorylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takeharu; Lim, Lee Wah; Takeuchi, Toyohide

    2015-02-13

    The influences of column hardware, such as chromatographic tubes and frits, on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of phosphorylated compounds were evaluated. The signal to noise ratio (S/N) and the intensity of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) using a glass lined tube and polyethylene frit (GL-PE) column was approximately 170 and 90 times higher, respectively, than those using conventional stainless steel tube and stainless steel frit (S-S) column. In addition, the retention time of FAD using GL-PE column was the shortest compared to other columns. Interaction between phosphorylated compounds and metal ions in the flow path in the S-S column was stronger than that between them and the GL-PE column. Thus, the metal ions in the flow path in GL-PE column were low. Since the specific surface area of a pair of frits was 70 times larger than that of a chromatographic tube (150 mm×2.1 mm), the frits were found to have more effective improvement of the S/N as well as the intensity than the chromatographic tubes, when phosphorylated compounds were analyzed by LC-MS. When the evaluated phosphorylated compounds were analyzed by LC-MS(/MS) using a GL-PE column, the intensity and S/N were increased.

  2. Determination of pesticides in soil by liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Lee, Hian Kee

    2004-06-04

    Trace amounts of pesticides in soil were determined by liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The technique involved the use of a small amount (3 microl) of organic solvent impregnated in a hollow fiber membrane, which was attached to the needle of a conventional GC syringe. The organic solvent was repeatedly discharged into and withdrawn from the porous polypropylene hollow fiber by a syringe pump, with the pesticides being extracted from a 4 ml aqueous soil sample into the organic solvent within the hollow fiber. Aspects of the developed procedure such as organic solvent selection, extraction time, movement pattern of plunger, concentrations of humic acid and salt, and the proportion of organic solvent in the soil sample, were optimized. Limits of detection (LOD) were between 0.05 and 0.1 microg/g with GC-MS analysis under selected-ion monitoring (SIM). Also, this method provided good precision ranging from 6 to 13%; the relative standard deviations were lower than 10% for most target pesticides (at spiked levels of 0.5 microg/g in aqueous soil sample). Finally, the results were compared to those achieved using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The results demonstrated that LPME was a fast (within 4 min) and accurate method to determine trace amounts of pesticides in soil.

  3. Multi-class method for biomonitoring of hair samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Möder, Monika; Gaudl, Alexander; Alonso, Esteban; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Currently, non-invasive biomonitoring of human exposure to organic pollutants bases upon the analysis mainly of urine and human breast milk. While mostly persistent organic pollutants are the center of interest, the aim of our study was to develop a method for the determination of different chemical classes of emerging pollutants (organophosphorus flame retardants, plastic additives such as phthalates, bisphenol A, insecticides, antimicrobials, preservatives and musk fragrances) in hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The preferred sample preparation included hydrolysis of the hair with trifluoroacetic acid in methanol followed by a liquid-liquid extraction using hexane/ethyl acetate. The validated method is characterized by recoveries higher than 77 % for most analytes, relative standard deviations below 16 % and limits of detection between 2 pg mg(-1) (HHCB) and 292 pg mg(-1) (propylparaben) using 50 mg of dry hair. After respective blank corrections, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and the musk fragrance HHCB were the predominant compounds determined in all hair samples at concentrations between 32 and 59 ng mg(-1) and 0.8-13 ng mg(-1), respectively. The bactericide triclosan and the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) were detected in selected hair samples at 2 and 0.8 ng mg(-1), respectively.

  4. Determination of Morphine and Codeine in Human Urine by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Cao, Gaozhong; Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of morphine and codeine in human urine. The GC-MS conditions were developed. The analysis was carried out on a HP-1MS column (30 m × 0.25 mm, 0.25 μm) with temperature programming, and Helium was used as the carrier gas with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode was used to quantify morphine and codeine. The derivation solvent, temperature, and time were optimized. A mixed solvent of propionic anhydride and pyridine (5 : 2) was finally used for the derivation at 80°C for 3 min. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 25–2000.0 ng/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 25 ng/mL. The intra- and interday precision (RSD) values were below 13%, and the accuracy was in the range 87.2–108.5%. This developed method was successfully used for the determination of morphine and codeine in human urine for forensic identification study. PMID:24222889

  5. Integration of gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods for differentiating ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, David S; Melville, Angela M; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Colburn, Heather A; Victry, Kristin D; Antolick, Kathryn C; Wahl, Jon H; Wahl, Karen L

    2012-05-07

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of Ricinus communis, commonly known as the castor plant. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid, as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods, starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid, or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method, independent of the seed source. In particular, the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid, and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation than would be possible using a single analytical method.

  6. Determination of Synthetic Cathinones in Urine Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Yin; Ko, Ya-Chun; Lin, Mei-Chih; Wang, Po-Yu; Chen, Yu-Pen; Chiueh, Lih-Ching; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Chou, Hsiu-Kuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones has increased considerably. This study proposes a method, based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to analyze and quantify six synthetic cathinones in urine samples: mephedrone (4-MMC), methylone (bk-MDMA), butylone, ethylone, pentylone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In our procedure, the urine samples undergo solid-phase extraction (SPE) and derivatization prior to injection into the GC-MS device. Separation is performed using a HP-5MS capillary column. The use of selective ion monitoring (SIM mode) makes it is good sensitivity in this method, and the entire analysis process is within 18 min. In addition, the proposed method maintains linearity in the calibration curve from 50 to 2,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.995). The limit of detection of this method is 5 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (20 ng/mL); the limit of quantification is 20 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (50 ng/mL). In testing, the extraction performance of SPE was between 82.34 and 104.46%. Precision and accuracy results were satisfactory <15%. The proposed method was applied to six real urine samples, one of which was found to contain 4-MMC and bk-MDMA. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in the identification of synthetic cathinones in urine, with regard to the limits of detection and quantification. This method is highly repeatable and accurate.

  7. Quantitation of ibuprofen in blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerry; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-narcotic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for the treatment of pain, fever, and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is also used for induction of closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in neonates. Although the exact mechanism of action of ibuprofen is not known, it is believed to mediate its therapeutic effects through the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and subsequently by the inhibition of prostacyclin production. As the drug has a number of side effects, which correlate to its circulating concentration, monitoring of ibuprofen in plasma or serum is desired for patients receiving high-dose therapy. Chromatographic methods are frequently used for the assay of ibuprofen, as no immunoassays are currently available.In the method described, the drug is extracted from the serum or plasma using methylene chloride and phosphate buffer (pH 6). Meclofenamic acid is used as an internal standard. The organic phase containing the drug is separated and dried under stream of nitrogen. After trimethylsilyl derivatization, analysis is done using gas-chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Quantification of the drug in a sample is achieved by comparing responses of the unknown sample to the responses of the calibrators using selected ion monitoring.

  8. Metabolic products in urine of preterm infants characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hu; Li, Sitao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hong; Liu, Mengxian; Shi, Congcong; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic products of urine associated with preterm birth, thus providing clinical guidelines for intestinal and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Methods: Urine samples of 47 preterm infants and 45 full-term infants were collected and prepared for trimethylsilylation by treatment with urease. The levels of lysine, phenylalanine, histidine, ornithine, fumaric acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactose, stearic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and statistically analyzed. Results: The normalized concentrations of the following metabolites in preterm infant urine samples were significantly lower than that of full-term infant urine samples: lysine (P = 0.003), phenylalanine (P = 0.001), histidine (P = 0.006), ornithine (P = 0.000), fumaric acid (P = 0.002), malic acid (P = 0.006), succinic acid (P = 0.000), lactose (P = 0.000), stearic acid (P = 0.000) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of the GC/MS analysis indicated that amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism defects exist in preterm infants. The use of GC/MS to determine metabolic products in urine samples could be helpful for prospectively evaluating the nutritional status of preterm infants, and therefore providing clinical guidelines on reasonable nutritional support. PMID:26629171

  9. Aromatic resin characterisation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Raw and archaeological materials.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2006-11-17

    An analytical procedure based on alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethyl-silylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used to study the chemical composition of benzoe and storax resins, water-insoluble exudates of trees of the Styrax and Liquidambar genus. They are chemically characterised by having aromatic acids, alcohols and esters as their main components and are thus known as aromatic and/or balsamic resins. This analytical procedure allowed us to characterise the main components of the two resins and, even though cinnamic acid is the main component of both the resins, the presence of other characteristic aromatic compounds and triterpenes permitted us to distinguish between the two materials. All the compounds identified in benzoe resin were detected in an archaeological organic residue from an Egyptian ceramic censer (fifth to seventh centuries a.d.), thus proving that this resin was used as one of the components of the mixture of organic materials burned as incense. These results provide the first chemical evidence of the presence of benzoe resin in an archaeological material from Mediterranean area.

  10. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the volatiles from the fruits of Ammodaucus leucotrichus subsp. leucotrichus and subsp. nanocarpus grown in North Africa and the Canary Islands, respectively.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Negueruela, A; Pérez-Alonso, M J; Pérez de Paz, P L; Palá-Paúl, J; Sanz, J

    2006-03-10

    The volatiles from the fruits of Ammodaucus leucotrichus subsp. leucotrichus and subsp. nanocarpus (two endemic species, the first from North Africa and the second from the Canary Islands, Spain) were studied by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major components of the volatiles of subsp. nanocarpus were found to be, beta-pinene (22.2-33.6%), bornyl angelate (20.6-21.8%) and camphor (8.3-11.7%) whereas in the fruits of subsp. leucotrichus, the main constituents were perillaldehyde (63.6%) and limonene (26.8%). We also suggest that subsp. nanocarpus should have the status of species and should be named Ammodaucus nanocarpus.

  11. Optimization of solid-phase extraction for the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of harpagoside, 8-para-coumaroyl harpagide, and harpagide in equine plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Colas, Cyril; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Bonnaire, Yves; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Solid-phase extraction cartridges among those usually used for screening in horse doping analyses are tested to optimize the extraction of harpagoside (HS), harpagide (HG), and 8-para-coumaroyl harpagide (8PCHG) from plasma and urine. Extracts are analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with multi-step tandem mass spectrometry. The extraction process retained for plasma applies BondElut PPL cartridges and provides extraction recoveries between 91% and 93%, with RSD values between 8 and 13% at 0.5 ng/mL. Two different procedures are needed to extract analytes from urine. HS and 8PCHG are extracted using AbsElut Nexus cartridges, with recoveries of 85% and 77%, respectively (RSD between 7% and 19%). The extraction of HG involves the use of two cartridges: BondElut PPL and BondElut C18 HF, with recovery of 75% and RSD between 14% and 19%. The applicability of the extraction methods is determined on authentic equine plasma and urine samples after harpagophytum or harpagoside administration.

  12. The detection and quantitative analysis of the psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A, in human biological fluids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Pamela C; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Bosy, Thomas Z; Magluilo, Joseph; Past, Marilyn R

    2008-01-01

    Salvia divinorum, a member of the mint plant family, has hallucinogenic properties that have become increasingly sought after by recreational drug users. The main psychoactive component, salvinorin A, has potency comparable to lysergic acid diethylamide. Though still legal to possess in most of the United States and much of Europe, little is known regarding the compound's long-term health effects, addiction liability, and pharmacokinetics. Limited data are available in the scientific literature, and few analytical methods are published for the detection in human biological fluids. These factors contribute to the unfamiliarity of the compound and complicate the method development process necessary to accommodate special requested testing for salvinorin A. A sensitive analytical method for the detection and quantitation of salvinorin A in human biological fluids was developed and validated to resolve analytical shortcomings. The method utilizes a solid-phase extraction technique coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry operated in selected ion monitoring mode. The assay has a linear range of 5.0-100 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were experimentally determined as 2.5 and 5.0 ng/mL, respectively. The method has been applied to blood and urine samples successfully and can be used to detect the presence of salvinorin A in forensic testing.

  13. Characterization of Human Skin Emanations by Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Extraction of Volatiles and Subsequent Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 Characterization of Human Skin Emanations by Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Extraction of Volatiles and Subsequent Analysis by Gas...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Human Skin Emanations by Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Extraction of Volatiles...3 Characterization of Human Skin Emanations by Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Extraction of Volatiles and Subsequent Analysis by Gas

  14. Analysis of Cocaine, Its Metabolites, Pyrolysis Products, and Ethanol Adducts in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues Using Zymark Automated Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    NA, et al. Solid- phase extraction and GC/MS quantitation of cocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene from meconium , whole...blood, and plasma. J Anal Toxicol 1993;17(6):353-8. 21. Browne SP, Tebbett IR, Moore CM, Dusick A, Co- vert R, Yee GT. Analysis of meconium for...humor. J Anal Toxicol 2000;24(1):59-65. 29. Oyler J, Darwin WD, Preston KL, Suess P, Cone EJ. Cocaine disposition in meconium from newborns of

  15. Development of a dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for on-site analysis of sulfur mustard degradation products in sediments.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Nordlander, T; Östin, A

    2016-01-15

    Sampling teams performing work at sea in areas where chemical munitions may have been dumped require rapid and reliable analytical methods for verifying sulfur mustard leakage from suspected objects. Here we present such an on-site analysis method based on dynamic headspace GC-MS for analysis of five cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products that have previously been detected in sediments from chemical weapon dumping sites: 1,4-oxathiane, 1,3-dithiolane, 1,4-dithiane, 1,4,5-oxadithiephane, and 1,2,5-trithiephane. An experimental design involving authentic Baltic Sea sediments spiked with the target analytes was used to develop an optimized protocol for sample preparation, headspace extraction and analysis that afforded recoveries of up to 60-90%. The optimized method needs no organic solvents, uses only two grams of sediment on a dry weight basis and involves a unique sample presentation whereby sediment is spread uniformly as a thin layer inside the walls of a glass headspace vial. The method showed good linearity for analyte concentrations of 5-200 ng/g dw, good repeatability, and acceptable carry-over. The method's limits of detection for spiked sediment samples ranged from 2.5 to 11 μg/kg dw, with matrix interference being the main limiting factor. The instrumental detection limits were one to two orders of magnitude lower. Full-scan GC-MS analysis enabled the use of automated mass spectral deconvolution for rapid identification of target analytes. Using this approach, analytes could be identified in spiked sediment samples at concentrations down to 13-65 μg/kg dw. On-site validation experiments conducted aboard the research vessel R/V Oceania demonstrated the method's practical applicability, enabling the successful identification of four cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products at concentrations of 15-308μg/kg in sediments immediately after being collected near a wreck at the Bornholm Deep dumpsite in the Baltic Sea.

  16. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based fingerprinting analysis and mass profiling of Euterpe oleracea (açaí) dietary supplement raw materials.

    PubMed

    Mulabagal, Vanisree; Calderón, Angela I

    2012-09-15

    Chemical fingerprinting and mass profiling methods to identify biologically active compounds in botanical dietary supplements is gaining much attention in recent years. Euterpe oleracea (açaí) has been reported to be rich in health-beneficial chemical constituents. We have developed LC/MS based fingerprinting and mass profiling methods to identify fatty acids, anthocyanins and non-anthocyanin polyphenols in three processed raw materials; non-organic açaí powder (ADSR-1), raw-organic açaí powder (ADSR-2) and freeze-dried açaí powder (ADSR-3) that are used in the preparation of botanical dietary supplements. For LC/MS analysis of fatty acids and non-anthocyanin polyphenols, the açaí samples were extracted sequentially with dichloromethane followed by methanol. To study fingerprinting analysis of anthocyanins, açaí samples were extracted with acidic methanol-water. The LC separation of fatty acids, non-anthocyanin polyphenols and anthocyanins in açaí raw materials was achieved using a C18 column with a gradient mobile phase consisting of solvents A (0.1% formic acid in water), and B (0.1% formic acid in methanol). MS experiments were carried out with negative and positive mode electrospray ionization. LC/MS analysis of dichloromethane extracts of (ADSR-1), (ADSR-2) and (ADSR-3) açaí powders have shown to contain fatty acids, γ-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acid. Whereas, the fingerprinting analysis of methanol extracts of ADSR-1, ADSR-2 and ADSR-3 led to the identification of phenolic acids, anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin polyphenols. The results from our study may be useful for the authentication and quality assessment of açaí dietary supplement raw materials.

  17. Integrated sampling and analysis unit for the determination of sexual pheromones in environmental air using fabric phase sorptive extraction and headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alcudia-León, M Carmen; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-03-10

    This article presents a novel unit that integrates for the first time air sampling and preconcentration based on the use of fabric phase sorptive extraction principles. The determination of Tuta absoluta sexual pheromone traces in environmental air has been selected as analytical problem. For this aim, a novel laboratory-built unit made up of commercial brass elements as holder of the sol-gel coated fabric extracting phase has been designed and optimized. The performance of the integrated unit was evaluated analyzing environmental air sampled in tomato crops. The unit can work under sampling and analysis mode which eliminates any need for sorptive phase manipulation prior to instrumental analysis. In the sampling mode, the unit can be connected to a sampling pump to pass the air through the sorptive phase at a controlled flow-rate. In the analysis mode, it is placed in the gas chromatograph autosampler without any instrumental modification. It also diminishes the risk of cross contamination between sampling and analysis. The performance of the new unit has been evaluated using the main components of the sexual pheromone of Tuta absoluta [(3E,8Z,11Z)-tetradecatrien-1-yl acetate and (3E,8Z)-tetradecadien-1-yl acetate] as model analytes. The limits of detection for both compounds resulted to be 1.6μg and 0.8μg, respectively, while the precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) was better than 3.7%. Finally, the unit has been deployed in the field to analyze a number of real life samples, some of them were found positive.

  18. Preliminary construction of integral analysis for characteristic components in complex matrices by in-house fabricated solid-phase microextraction fibers combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhentao; Hou, Wenqian; Liu, Xiuming; Wang, Mingfeng; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-08-26

    Integral analysis plays an important role in study and quality control of substances with complex matrices in our daily life. As the preliminary construction of integral analysis of substances with complex matrices, developing a relatively comprehensive and sensitive methodology might offer more informative and reliable characteristic components. Flavoring mixtures belonging to the representatives of substances with complex matrices have now been widely used in various fields. To better study and control the quality of flavoring mixtures as additives in food industry, an in-house fabricated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared based on sol-gel technology in this work. The active organic component of the fiber coating was multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with hydroxyl-terminated polydimethyldiphenylsiloxane, which integrate the non-polar and polar chains of both materials. In this way, more sensitive extraction capability for a wider range of compounds can be obtained in comparison with commercial SPME fibers. Preliminarily integral analysis of three similar types of samples were realized by the optimized SPME-GC-MS method. With the obtained GC-MS data, a valid and well-fit model was established by partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for classification of these samples (R2X=0.661, R2Y=0.996, Q2=0.986). The validity of the model (R2=0.266, Q2=-0.465) has also approved the potential to predict the "belongingness" of new samples. With the PLS-DA and SPSS method, further screening out the markers among three similar batches of samples may be helpful for monitoring and controlling the quality of the flavoring mixtures as additives in food industry. Conversely, the reliability and effectiveness of the GC-MS data has verified the comprehensive and efficient extraction performance of the in-house fabricated fiber.

  19. Characterization of oil shale waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, D.C.; Baughman, K.J.; Jones, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Characterization work has begun on organic compounds and compound classes to establish a baseline for the evaluation and development of alternative instrumental characterization techniques. For this purpose raw water from two oil shale processes has been subjected to an extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Samples from the R-17 and Rio Blanco processes were chosen for comparison with previous characterization work reported by Poulson et al. (1984, 1985), who used low-cost gas and reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques. In addition, various inorganic and physical parameters were re-evaluated. The preliminary comparison of GC/MS data with the GC and reverse phase LC data previously reported by Poulson et al., indicates a number of positive correlations for both the process waters. Aliphatic carboxylic acids, cresols, xylenols, methyl pyridines, dimethyl pyridines, and trimethyl pyridines were found both in present GC/MS analysis and in earlier GC and LC analyses of the samples. In addition, trimethylphenols were observed in both the present GC/MS analysis and in the previous GC and LC analyses of the Rio Blanco sample. A number of tentatively identified compounds and compound classes were observed in the GC/MS analysis but were unreported in either the GC or LC analyses for both samples. Similarly, several compounds and compound classes previously reported by GC and LC techniques were absent in the GC/MS analysis. These discrepancies may be attributed to either the original GC and LC research design or to a fundamental chemical change in the samples used for the GC/MS characterization. Additional research is necessary in the areas of extraction design, use of comparable GC and GC/MS marker compounds for identification, standardization of chromatographic columns and GC conditions, and the validity of computer library identifications. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Study on the photostability of guaiazulene by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; Albini, Angelo; Cavrini, Vanni

    2008-09-01

    The photostability of guaiazulene (1,4-dimethyl-7-isopropylazulene; GA), a natural azulenic compound used in cosmetic and health-care products, as well as in pharmaceutical preparations, was investigated in solution (methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile), by different techniques: gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and UV detection (LC/APCI-MS and HPLC/UV). A solar simulator (xenon-arc lamp) was used as UV-A radiation source. The study involved: monitoring compound decomposition, identifying products of photodegradation (PPs), assessing the role of oxygen and evaluating the kinetics of the process. Minor PPs are volatile compounds and were characterized by GC/MS, while oligomeric polyoxygenated compounds, tentatively characterized on the basis of MS and MS/MS spectra, were found to be the main photoproducts. The photodegradation was found to be enhanced by the presence of oxygen; nevertheless, determination of the singlet oxygen quantum yield for GA gave a lower value than that for the reference standard Rose Bengal. The obtained results and the developed stability-indicating methods (GC/MS and LC/MS) are of interest for stability studies and/or quality control purposes of GA as raw material or cosmetic products.

  1. Simple and rapid analysis for quantitation of the most important volatile flavor compounds in yogurt by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alonso, L; Fraga, M J

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this experiment is to develop a rapid, simplified, direct gas chromatographic (GC) method for the analysis of volatile flavor compounds in yogurt combining a headspace with constant heating temperature and GC with a mass spectrometric detect ion. Repeatability of the method is assessed. The relative standard deviation for individual flavor compounds range from 3.5% for acetaldehyde to 8.4% for acetone, with a total mean value of 52.4 +/- 2.2 mg/kg for all of the studied aroma components. Recovery for individual flavor compounds range from 63.7% for acetone to 82.4% for acetic acid.

  2. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica.

  3. Comparison of electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods for analysis of ergot alkaloids from endophyte-infected sleepygrass (Achnatherum robustum).

    PubMed

    Jarmusch, Alan K; Musso, Ashleigh M; Shymanovich, Tatsiana; Jarmusch, Scott A; Weavil, Miranda J; Lovin, Mary E; Ehrmann, Brandie M; Saari, Susanna; Nichols, David E; Faeth, Stanley H; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-01-05

    Ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins with an array of biological effects. With this study, we investigated for the first time the application of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as an ionization method for LC-MS analysis of ergot alkaloids, and compared its performance to that of the more established technique of electrospray ionization (ESI). Samples of the grass Achnatherum robustum infected with the ergot producing Epichloë fungus were extracted using cold methanol and subjected to reserved-phase HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC-APPI-MS analysis. The ergot alkaloids ergonovine and lysergic acid amide were detected in these samples, and quantified via external calibration. Validation parameters were recorded in accordance with ICH guidelines. A triple quadrupole MS operated in multiple reaction monitoring yielded the lowest detection limits. The performance of APPI and ESI methods was comparable. Both methods were subject to very little matrix interference, with percent recoveries ranging from 82% to 100%. As determined with HPLC-APPI-MS quantification, lysergic acid amide and ergonovine were extracted from an A. robustum sample infected with the Epichloë fungus at concentrations of 1.143±0.051 ppm and 0.2822±0.0071 ppm, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these concentrations and those determined using ESI for the same samples.

  4. Analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in sewage sludges and urban soils by concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Companioni-Damas, E Y; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2012-12-14

    Concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection (CSR-LVI) is a gas chromatography injection technique that is particularly suitable for determining volatile compounds. In the present work, we evaluated the applicability of this technique for the analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in sewage sludges and soils after solvent extraction to prevent losses of low-molecular-weight compounds. The CSR-LVI injection method was optimised to achieve maximum sensitivity and good chromatographic peak shapes. A liner packed with deactivated glass wool and a 5 m × 0.32 mm I.D. uncoated fused-silica precolumn was used. This made it possible to inject extract volumes of up to 30 μl. Good linearity (r>0.9993) and precision (RSD <15%), with recoveries ranging from 80 to 100% and method limits of quantification from 0.03 to 0.4 ng g(-1) wet weight (0.04-1.5 ng g(-1) dry weight for sewage sludges and 0.01-0.5 ng g(-1) dry weight for soils) were obtained. The developed method was applied to the analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in sewage sludges collected from several wastewater treatment plants in Catalonia (NE Spain) and urban soils from the city of Barcelona.

  5. Analysis of sterols and fatty acids in natural and cultured Cordyceps by one-step derivatization followed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, F Q; Feng, K; Zhao, J; Li, S P

    2009-07-12

    Ten free fatty acids namely lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid, docosanoic acid and lignoceric acid and four free sterols including ergosterol, cholesterol, campesterol and beta-sitosterol in natural (wild) Cordyceps sinensis, Cordyceps liangshanensis and Cordyceps gunnii, as well as cultured C. sinensis and Cordyceps militaris were first determined using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatization and GC-MS analysis. The conditions such as the amount of reagent, temperature and time for TMS derivatization of analytes were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, all calibration curves showed good linearity within the tested ranges. The intra- and inter-day variations for 14 investigated compounds were less than 3.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results showed that palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid and ergosterol are main components in natural and cultured Cordyceps which could be discriminated by hierarchical clustering analysis based on the contents of 14 investigated compounds or the 4 fatty acids, where the contents of palmitic acid and oleic acid in natural Cordyceps are significantly higher than those in the cultured ones.

  6. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. PMID:27454589

  7. Migration analysis of epoxidized soybean oil and other plasticizers in commercial lids for food packaging by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Ferrer, C; Jimenez, A; Garrigos, M C

    2010-10-01

    A modification of the method of Castle et al. (J. Chromatogr. 1988: 437:274-280) for the analysis of epoxidized soybean oil (ESBO) is proposed to simplify the analysis and reduce the time and consumption of reagents. The proposed modifications, particularly the elimination of the internal standard, resulted in a simpler, faster and more economical method. A complete analytical validation, including evaluation of the main analytical parameters, such as detection and quantification limits, linearity, working range, precision, accuracy and selectivity, was carried out. The data demonstrated the suitability of the proposed method for the determination of ESBO in polymer matrices. A specific migration study for ESBO in different food simulants (fat and aqueous) was carried out by applying the method to poly(vinyl chloride) materials prepared with known amounts of ESBO, as well as some commercial lids. High levels of migration of ESBO into fat simulants were found. In the case of commercial lids, in addition to ESBO, some other plasticizers such as citrates, adipates and sebacates were found and quantified to establish their migration under different conditions of use.

  8. Applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolic studies of explosives.

    PubMed

    Yinon, J; Hwang, D G

    1987-05-08

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for the detection and identification of metabolites of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in urine and blood. The metabolites were found in the urine of rats and in the blood of rabbits fed with TNT, in the urine of rats exposed to TNT by skin absorption and in the urine of TNT munition workers. The detected metabolites, formed by reduction processes, included 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene, in addition to untransformed TNT.

  9. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    PubMed

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper.

  10. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of a series of bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Haskins, N J; Eckers, C; Mitchell, R

    1992-09-01

    Pyrolysis of a series of polymers based on polystyrene and used as bile acid sequestrants produced characteristic mixtures of compounds which were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The nature of the substituent groups was clearly apparent while the polymer backbone gave rise to representative styrenes. The reproducibility of the results was examined by experimenting with the temperature of pyrolysis. It was found that at low temperatures very little fragmentation of the polystyrene backbone occurred but the substituents were still released in high yield. The orientation of the various substituted styrenes generated by pyrolysis was confirmed by the use of gas chromatography with infrared and mass spectrometric detection.

  11. Development of a rapid method for the quantitative analysis of four methoxypyrazines in white and red wine using multi-dimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Andreea; Pickering, Gary J; Kotseridis, Yorgos

    2014-10-01

    Alkyl-methoxypyrazines (MPs) are important odour-active constituents of many grape cultivars and their wines. Recently, a new MP - 2,5-dimethyl-3-methoxypyrazine (DMMP) - has been reported as a possible constituent of wine. This study sought to develop a rapid and reliable method for quantifying DMMP, isopropyl methoxypyrazine (IPMP), secbutyl methoxypyrazine (SBMP) and isobutyl methoxypyrazine (IBMP) in wine. The proposed method is able to rapidly and accurately resolve all 4 MPs in a range of wine styles, with limits of detection between 1 and 2 ng L(-1) for IPMP, SBMP and IBMP and 5 ng L(-1) for DMMP. Analysis of a set of 11 commercial wines agrees with previously published values for IPMP, SBMP and IBMP, and shows for the first time that DMMP may be an important and somewhat common odorant in red wines. To our knowledge, this is the first analytical method developed for the quantification of DMMP in wine.

  12. A charged aerosol detector/chemiluminescent nitrogen detector/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system for regular and fragment compound analysis in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yutao; Hascall, Daniel; Li, Delia; Pease, Joseph H

    2015-09-11

    In this paper, we introduce a high throughput LCMS/UV/CAD/CLND system that improves upon previously reported systems by increasing both the quantitation accuracy and the range of compounds amenable to testing, in particular, low molecular weight "fragment" compounds. This system consists of a charged aerosol detector (CAD) and chemiluminescent nitrogen detector (CLND) added to a LCMS/UV system. Our results show that the addition of CAD and CLND to LCMS/UV is more reliable for concentration determination for a wider range of compounds than either detector alone. Our setup also allows for the parallel analysis of each sample by all four detectors and so does not significantly increase run time per sample.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of vetiver essential oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Belhassen, Emilie; Baldovini, Nicolas; Brevard, Hugues; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-05-03

    Vetiver essential oils (VEO) are important raw ingredients used in perfume industry, entering the formula of numerous modern fragrances. Vetiver oils are considered to be among the most complex essential oils, resulting most of the time in highly coeluted chromatograms whatever the analytical technique. In this context, conventional gas chromatography has failed to provide a routine tool for the accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of their constituents. Applying comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography techniques (GC×GC-FID/MS) afforded the mean to separate efficiently vetiver oil constituents in order to identify them in a more reliable way. Moreover, this is the first time that a complete true quantitation of each constituent is carried out on such complex oils by means of internal calibration. Finally, we have studied the influence of the injection mode on the determined chemical composition, and showed that several alcohols underwent dehydration under defined chromatographic conditions (splitless mode) usually recommended for quantitation purposes.

  14. Preparation of phenyl group-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres for fast extraction and analysis of acetaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danni; Sha, Yunfei; Zheng, Saijing; Liu, Baizhan; Deng, Chunhui

    2013-10-15

    Acetaldehyde is regarded as a toxic mainstream cigarette smoke constituent, and measurement of acetaldehyde in complex real samples is difficult owing to its high volatility and reactivity. In this work, phenyl group-functionalized magnetic mesoporous microspheres were developed as the solid-phase extraction sorbents for enrichment and analysis of acetaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke. The functional magnetic microspheres were first synthesized through a facile one-pot co-condensation approach. The prepared nanomaterials possessed abundant silanol groups in the exterior surface and numerous phenyl groups in the interior pore-walls, as well as a large surface area (273.5m(2)/g), strong superparamagnetism and uniform mesopores (3.3 nm). Acetaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke was collected in water and derivatizated with O-2,3,4,5,6-(pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine. The formed acetaldehyde oximes were extracted and enriched by the prepared adsorbents via π-π interactions and subsequently analyzed using GC-MS. Extraction conditions such as amounts of sorbents, eluting solvent, adsorption and desorption time were investigated and optimized to achieve the best efficiency. Method validations including linearity, recovery, repeatability, and limit of detection were also studied. It was found that the suggested methodology provided low detection limit of 0.04 mg/mL, good recovery of 88-92%, intra-day and inter-day RSD values of 4.5% and 10.1%, and linear range of 0.25-4 mg/mL (R(2)=0.999). The results indicated that the proposed method based on phenyl-functionalized magnetic mesoporous microspheres was rapid, efficient and convenient for the enrichment and analysis of acetaldehyde in tobacco.

  15. High sensitivity measurement of amino acid isotope enrichment using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Hans M H; Wijnands, Karolina A P; Bessems, Babs A F M; Olde Damink, Steven W; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Poeze, Martijn

    2012-09-15

    Measurement of the incorporation or conversion of infused stable isotope enriched metabolites in vivo such as amino acids plays a key role in metabolic research. Specific routes are frequently probed in knockout mouse models limiting the available amount of sample. Although less precise as compared to combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (C-IRMS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) techniques are therefore often the method of choice to measure isotopic enrichment of target metabolites. However, under conditions of metabolic depletion, the precision of these systems becomes limiting. In this paper, studies were performed to enhance the sensitivity and precision of isotope enrichment measurements using LC-MS. Ion-statistics and resolution were identified as critical factors for this application when using a linear trap mass spectrometer. The combination with an automated pre-column derivatization and a carefully selected solvent mix allowed us to measure isotopic enrichments down to 0.005% at plasma concentrations as low as 5 μmol/l, an improvement by a factor of 100 compared to alternative methods. The resulting method now allowed measurement of the in vivo conversion of the amino acid arginine into citrulline as a marker for the production of nitric oxide in an in vivo murine endotoxemia model with depleted plasma levels of arginine and citrulline.

  16. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group-Update and Additions to the Determination of Chloroacetanilide Herbicide Degradation Compounds in Water Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Kish, J.L.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Thurman, E.

    2001-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1999 for the analysis of selected chloroacetanilide herbicide degradation compounds in water. These compounds were acetochlor ethane sulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. The HPLC/MS method was updated in 2000, and the method detection limits were modified accordingly. Four other degradation compounds also were added to the list of compounds that can be analyzed using HPLC/MS; these compounds were dimethenamid ESA, dimethenamid OXA, flufenacet ESA, and flufenacet OXA. Except for flufenacet OXA, good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for the updated HPLC/MS method in buffered reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the degradation compounds from water samples spiked at 0.20 and 1.0 ?g/L (microgram per liter) ranged from 75 to 114 percent, with relative standard deviations of 15.8 percent or less for all compounds except flufenacet OXA, which had relative standard deviations ranging from 11.3 to 48.9 percent. Method detection levels (MDL's) using the updated HPLC/MS method varied from 0.009 to 0.045 ?g/L, with the flufenacet OXA MDL at 0.072 ?g/L. The updated HPLC/MS method is valuable for acquiring information about the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of selected herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, J.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Scribner, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the extraction and analysis of eight herbicides and five degradation products using solid-phase extraction from natural water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. This method was developed for dimethenamid; flufenacet; fluometuron and its degradation products, demethylfluometuron (DMFM), 3-(trifluromethyl)phenylurea (TFMPU), 3-(trifluromethyl)-aniline (TFMA); molinate; norflurazon and its degradation product, demethylnorflurazon; pendamethalin; the degradation product of prometryn, deisopropylprometryn; propanil; and trifluralin. The eight herbicides are used primarily in the southern United States where cotton, rice, and soybeans are produced. The exceptions are dimethenamid and flufenacet, which are used on corn in the Midwest. Water samples received by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas, are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then passed through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica (C-18) to extract the compounds. The herbicides and their degradation products are removed from the column by ethyl acetate elution. The eluate is evaporated under nitrogen, and components then are separated, identified, and quantified by injecting an aliquot of the concentrated extract into a high-resolution, fused-silica capillary column of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer under selected-ion mode. Method detection limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ?g/L for all compounds with the exception of TFMPU, which has a method detection limit of 0.32 ?g/L. The mean absolute recovery is 107 percent. This method for the determination of herbicides and their degradation products is valuable for acquiring information about water quality and compound fate and transport in water.

  18. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stroppel, Max E.; Foreman, William T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for the isolation and analysis of 21 parent pesticides and 20 pesticide degradates in natural-water samples is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase-extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the analytes. The columns are dried by using nitrogen gas, and adsorbed analytes are eluted with ethyl acetate. Extracted analytes are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 2 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for most analytes. Single-operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.00 1 to 0.057 ?g/L. Validation data also are presented for 14 parent pesticides and 20 degradates that were determined to have greater bias or variability, or shorter holding times than the other compounds. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes in pesticide-grade water before extraction was 4 days. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes after extraction on the dry solid-phase-extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time. The method complements existing U.S. Geological Survey Method O-1126-95 (NWQL Schedules 2001 and 2010) by using identical sample preparation and comparable instrument analytical conditions so that sample extracts can be analyzed by either method to expand the range of analytes determined from one water sample.

  19. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed.

  20. The role of the acquisition methods in the analysis of natural and synthetic steroids and cholic acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrási, N; Helenkár, A; Vasanits-Zsigrai, A; Záray, Gy; Molnár-Perl, I

    2011-11-11

    An exhaustive GC-MS acquisition study was performed, for the simultaneous analysis of natural and synthetic steroids and cholic acids (in order to insert them into the last tierce of our multiresidue analysis system), such as androsterone, β-estradiol, transdehydroandro-sterone, transdehyroandrosterone, mestranol, dihydrotestosterone, ethinylestradiol, testosterone, norethisterone, estriol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, gestodene, levonorgestrel, etonogestrel, coprostanol, progesterone, cholesterol, medroxyprogesterone-acetate, lithocholic acid, stigmasterol, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, β-sitosterol, ursodeoxycholic acid, 3-hydroxy-7-ketocholic acid and dehydrocholic acid, in total 26 compounds. As novelties to the field, for the trimethylsilyl (TMS) oxime ether/ester derivatives of steroids and cholic acids, at first, a tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS), multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) type acquisition method has been developed in a single run; also for the first time, the three acquisition techniques, the full scan (FS), the selective ion monitoring (SIM), in our case the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) and the currently optimized MRM methods, have been compared; all three, in parallel, under strictly the same derivatization/instrumental conditions, both in matrix free solutions and municipal wastewater from two Hungarian wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Critical evaluation of the three acquisition protocols was collated on their analytical performances and validated under the same conditions. The data of six point calibration curves for FS, MIM and MRM methods, showed that both R² (0.9995, 0.9858, 0.9975) and RSD (5.3, 5.8, 5.0), for two parallel derivatizations, each injected three times, proved to be independent of the acquisition processes. Whereas, for the method limit of quantification (LOQ) and the instrument limit of quantification (ILQ) values showed considerable differences. LOQ data, were decreasing in the FS, MIM, MRM line (expressed in ng

  1. Determination of pharmaceuticals and antiseptics in water by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: analysis via pentafluorobenzylation and stable isotope dilution.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jim T; Bisceglia, Kevin J; Bouwer, Edward J; Roberts, A Lynn; Coelhan, Mehmet

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive yet robust analytical method is presented for the simultaneous determination of 12 human pharmaceuticals (valproic acid, phenytoin, ibuprofen, gabapentin, acetaminophen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen, secobarbital, phenobarbital, 5-fluorouracil, and diclofenac) and 6 antiseptics (biosol, biphenylol, p-chloro-m-cresol, p-chloro-m-xylenol, chlorophene, and triclosan). The method employs solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by a novel pentafluorobenzylation using a mixture of acetontrile/water (1/1, v/v). The method is simple to perform (derivatization can be completed in a single test tube) and eliminates the need for any solvent/SPE cartridge drying or blow-down. It affords excellent resolution, high sensitivity and reproducibility, and freedom from interference even for matrices as complex as untreated sewage. The method was applied to the analysis of sewage samples using 15 isotopically labeled surrogates, which resulted in the detection of 10 of the 12 pharmaceuticals and all of the antiseptics sought. Ten of 15 surrogates were synthesized from pure analytes by a simple H-D exchange reaction employing D(2)O and D(2)SO(4). Measured recoveries were sensitive to matrix effects and varied substantially among analytes, indicative of the limitations associated with using a single surrogate standard.

  2. Universal Route to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Analysis in Foodstuff: Two-Dimensional Heart-Cut Liquid Chromatography-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nestola, Marco; Friedrich, Rainer; Bluhme, Patrick; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2015-06-16

    Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex foodstuff is associated with complicated and work-intensive sample preparation. Chromatographic interference has to be faced in many situations. The scope of the current work was the development of a highly efficient two-dimensional heart-cut LC-LC-GC-MS method. Detection was performed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of the obtained data in terms of cleanup efficiency. Additionally, routine detection was performed with single quadrupole MS. An easy and quick generic sample preparation protocol was realized as a first step. During method development, focus was given to optimizing HPLC cleanup for complex foodstuff. Silica-, polymeric-, and carbon-based HPLC phases were tested. Coupling of silica gel to π-electron acceptor modified silica gel showed the best cleanup properties. A four rotary valve configuration allowed the usage of a single binary HPLC pump. Screening of several fatty and nonfatty food matrices showed the absence of unwanted matrix compounds in the cleaned-up PAH fraction down to the low picogram range using TOF-MS. Limits of quantitation (LOQ) were below 0.1 μg/kg for all EU priority PAHs. Recovery rates ranged from 82 to 111%. Validation data fully complied with EU Regulation 836/2011. Sample preparation was possible in 20 min. Interlacing of HPLC and GC allowed an average method runtime of 40 min per sample.

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of hexafluoroacetone derivatives: First time utilization of a gaseous phase derivatizing agent for analysis of extraterrestrial amino acids.

    PubMed

    Geffroy-Rodier, C; Buch, A; Sternberg, R; Papot, S

    2012-07-06

    Within the perspective of the current and next space missions to Mars (MSL 2011 and Exomars 2016-2018), the detection and enantioselective separation of building blocks such as the amino acids are important subjects which are becoming fundamental for the search for traces of life on the surface and subsurface of Mars. In this work, we have developed and optimized a method adapted to space experimentation to derivatize and analyze amino acids, using hexafluoroacetone as the derivatizing agent. The temperature, duration of the derivative transfer to the analyser, and chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized to meet the instrument design constraints imposed on devices for extraterrestrial experiments. The work presented in this rationale has established that hexafluoroacetone, in addition to its intrinsic qualities, such as the production of light-weight derivatives (no racemization) and great resistance to the drastic operating conditions, has indeed facilitated simple and fast derivatization that appears to be suitable for in situ analysis in space. By using hexafluoroacetone as the derivatizing agent, we successfully identified, 21 amino acids including 12 of the 20 proteinic amino acids without stirring or extraction steps. Ten of these derivatized amino acids were enantioselectively separated. The precision and accuracy measurements for the D/L ratio showed that the proposed method was also suitable for the determination of both enantioselective forms of most of the tested amino acids. The limits of detection obtained were lower than the ppb level of organic molecules detected in Martian meteorites.

  4. Gas chromatography - Mass spectrometry analysis and antibacterial activity of Cinnamomum burmanii essential oil to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by gaseous contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chairunnisa, Tamhid, Hady Anshory; Nugraha, Arde Toga

    2017-03-01

    Infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance becomes a problem that must be resolved. Plant based products are among the alternative agents examined in order to replace conventional antibiotics. Cinnamaldehyde is one of the compound in cinnamon oil that has antibacterial activity. But the other compounds in cinnamon oil has also the potential antibacterial activity. The purpose of this study to conduct GC-MS analysis of cinnamon oil and its antibacterial activity to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by gaseous contact. Cinnamomum burmannii was distilled by water-steam distillation to obtain essential oil. Identification of compounds was analyzed by GC-MS. Antibacterial activity was observed by gaseous contact method in airtight boxes. The GC-MS analyzed showed that there are four major compounds of cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde (56,10%), 1,8-cineole (16,53%), α-pinene (3,44%) and α -terpineol (3,05%). The Minimum Inhibitory Dose (MID) of cinnamon oil to E. coli and S. aureus was 12.5 µL/L and 6.26 µL/L respectively. Gas compounds of cinnamon oil has more effective to gram-positive bacteria than gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Fast quantitative analysis of boric acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with a simple and selective derivatization reaction using triethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Min; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2010-03-01

    A fast, selective, and sensitive GC-MS method has been developed and validated for the determination of boric acid in the drinking water by derivatization with triethanolamine. This analytic strategy successfully converts the inorganic, nonvolatile boric acid B(OH)(3) present in the drinking water to a volatile triethanolamine borate B(OCH(2)CH(2))(3)N in a quantitative manner, which facilitates the GC measurement. The SIM mode was applied in the analysis and showed high accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility, as well as reducing the matrix effect effectively. The calibration curve was obtained from 0.01 microg/mL to 10.0 microg/mL with a satisfactory correlation coefficient of 0.9988. The limit of detection for boric acid was 0.04 microg/L. Then the method was applied for detection of the amount of boric acid in bottled drinking water and the results are in accordance with the reported concentration value of boric acid. This study offers a perspective into the utility of GC-MS as an alternate quantitative tool for detection of B(OH)(3), even for detection of boron in various other samples by digesting the boron compounds to boric acid.

  6. A rapid and sensitive method for methyl tert-butyl ether analysis in water samples by use of solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Piazza, F; Barbieri, A; Violante, F S; Roda, A

    2001-08-01

    This work describes a rapid and sensitive solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method for the isolation and analysis of methyl tert-butyl ether in water samples. Methyl tert-butyl ether was extracted from aqueous solutions using SPME fibre coated with Divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (30 microm film thickness) and analysed by GC-MS with a Hewlett Packard 6890/5973 system equipped with a capillary column coated with Vocol (30 m x 0.25 mm, 1.5 microm film thickness). Extraction parameters and chromatographic separation conditions were optimised. The developed method showed good analytical performance in terms of precision (RSD between 2% and 8%) and accuracy (mean recovery from 96% to 104%) with a detection limit of 14 ppt. Finally the method was applied to surface, tap and commercial mineral water samples, as well as snow samples collected along a busy road of Bologna town area. The median concentration of methyl tert-butyl ether in all these samples (0.05-0.4 ppb) was well below the maximum aqueous contamination levels in water adopted in the United States (13 ppb).

  7. Analysis of volatile phenols in alcoholic beverage by ethylene glycol-polydimethylsiloxane based stir bar sorptive extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C

    2015-04-17

    An ethylene glycol (EG)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) copolymer based stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-GC-MS method was developed for the analysis of volatile phenols (4-ethylphenol, 4-vinylphenol, 4-ethylguaiacol, and 4-vinylguaiacol) in alcoholic beverages. The beverage samples were diluted with phosphate buffer (1M, pH 7) and extracted with an EG/PDMS stir bar. Volatile phenols were thermally desorbed and analyzed by GC-MS. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were studied including ionic strength, pH, extraction time, ethanol content and nonvolatile matrix. Good correlation coefficients with R(2) in the range of 0.994-0.999 were obtained for volatile phenol concentration of 5-500μg/L. Recovery for all phenols were from 95.7% to 104.4% in a beer matrix and 81.4% to 97.6% in a wine matrix. The method had a standard deviation less than 5.8% for all volatile phenols. The limit of quantification (LOQs) in beer samples was lower than 3μg/L. The method was further applied to analyze the concentrations of volatile phenols in beer, wine and other alcoholic beverage samples.

  8. EPA Air Method, Toxic Organics - 15 (TO-15): Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Air Collected in Specially-Prepared Canisters and Analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method T)-15 describes procedures for for preparation and analysis of air samples containing volatile organic compounds collected in specially-prepared canisters, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  9. Search for evidence of life in space: analysis of enantiomeric organic molecules by N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal derivative dependant Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Freissinet, C; Buch, A; Sternberg, R; Szopa, C; Geffroy-Rodier, C; Jelinek, C; Stambouli, M

    2010-01-29

    Within the context of the future space missions to Mars (MSL 2011 and Exomars 2016), which aim at searching for traces of life at the surface, the detection and quantitation of enantiomeric organic molecules is of major importance. In this work, we have developed and optimized a method to derivatize and analyze chiral organic molecules suitable for space experiments, using N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) as the derivatization agent. The temperature, duration of the derivatization reaction, and chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized to meet instrument design constraints imposed upon space experiment devices. This work demonstrates that, in addition to its intrinsic qualities, such as production of light-weight derivatives and a great resistance to drastic operating conditions, DMF-DMA facilitates simple and fast derivatization of organic compounds (three minutes at 140 degrees C in a single-step) that is suitable for an in situ analysis in space. By using DMF-DMA as the derivatization agent, we have successfully identified 19 of the 20 proteinic amino acids and been able to enantiomerically separate ten of the potential 19 (glycine being non-chiral). Additionally, we have minimized the percentage of racemized amino acid compounds produced by optimizing the conditions of the derivatization reaction itself. Quantitative linearity studies and the determination of the limit of detection show that the proposed method is also suitable for the quantitative determination of both enantiomeric forms of most of the tested amino acids, as limits of detection obtained are lower than the ppb level of organic molecules already detected in Martian meteorites.

  10. A strategy for efficient discovery of new natural compounds by integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis: Its application in Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolium and Panax notoginseng to characterize 437 potential new ginsenosides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-zhi; Ye, Min; Qiao, Xue; Liu, Chun-fang; Miao, Wen-juan; Bo, Tao; Tao, Hai-yan; Guo, De-an

    2012-08-20

    To discover new natural compounds from herbal medicines tends to be more and more difficult. In this paper, a strategy integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis was proposed, and was applied for rapid discovery of new ginsenosides from Panax ginseng (PG), Panax quinquefolium (PQ), and Panax notoginseng (PN). The ginsenosides extracts were fractionated by MCI gel×silica gel orthogonal column chromatography. The fractions were then separated on a C(18) HPLC column, eluted with a three-component mobile phase (CH(3)CN/CH(3)OH/3mM CH(3)COONH(4)H(2)O), and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structures of unknown ginsenosides were elucidated by analyzing negative and positive ion mass spectra, which provided complementary information on the sapogenins and oligosaccharide chains, respectively. A total of 623 comprising 437 potential new ginsenosides were characterized from the ethanol extracts of PG, PQ and PN. New acylations, diversified saccharide chains and C-17 side chains constituted novelty of the newly identified ginsenosides. An interpretation guideline was proposed for structural characterization of unknown ginsenosides by LC/MS. To confirm reliability of this strategy, two targeted unknown trace ginsenosides were obtained in pure form by LC/MS-guided isolation. Based on extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis and other techniques, they were identified as 3-O-[6-O-(E)-butenoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl]-20(S)-protopanaxadiol-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (named ginsenoside IV) and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3β,12β,20(S),24(R)-tetra hydroxy-dammar-25-ene-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (ginsenoside V), respectively. The fully established structures were consistent with the MS-oriented structural elucidation. This study expanded our understanding on ginsenosides of Panax species, and the

  11. Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paz; Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Barron, John; Clancy, Gerard; Murray, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simple, rapid and precise quantification of phthalates in drinking water is presented. This method was validated for bis (2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate (DBEP), bis (2-n-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dihexyl phthalate (DHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and dinonyl phthalate (DINP). Linearity of 0.9984>r(2)>0.9975 in the range of 0.075-4.8μg/mL for the selected phthalates was obtained. Accuracy values were in the range of 93-114% and RSD% for the analysis of 1.2μg/mL of each phthalate was below 2.3% (n=9). This new method design has significantly improved the detection in terms of rapidity, specificity, repeatability and accuracy compared to available methods. The procedure has been applied to the analyses of three different brands of commercially available bottled mineral water and the corresponding plastic bottles. Phthalates were extracted with dichloromethane and re-constituted in cyclohexane prior to GC-MS analysis. When the validated GC-MS method was applied to the quantification of the selected phthalates in the samples, only DBP (up to 0.0675±0.0018μg/mL) and DEHP (up to 1.6848±0.1631μg/mL) were found. Furthermore, we provide specific data about the concentration of DBP and DEHP in bottled water attributable to migration of phthalates from respective plastic bottles.

  12. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Combined Targeted and Untargeted Profiling.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small-molecule metabolites (<650 Da), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds sufficiently volatile for gas chromatography. This unit shows how GC-MS-based metabolomics allows integration of targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semiquantify over 200 compounds from human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine, or stool) per study. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to untargeted profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS is a mature technology that uses not only classic detectors (quadrupole) but also target mass spectrometers (triple quadrupole) and accurate mass instruments (quadrupole-time of flight). This unit covers sample preparation from mammalian samples, data acquisition, quality control, and data processing.

  13. Serotonin metabolism in rat skin: characterization by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Semak, Igor; Korik, Elena; Naumova, Marya; Wortsman, Jacobo; Slominski, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    We have recently uncovered the full expression of novel cutaneous serotoninergic and melatoninergic systems in the human and hamster skin. In this work, we have characterized serotonin metabolism in the rat skin using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and found that serotonin undergoes acetylation in the presence of acetyl coenzyme A. Inhibition of serotonin acetylation with Cole bisubstrate inhibitor shows that rat skin expresses both arylalkylamine and arylamine N-acetyltransferase activities. The serotonin degradation product-5-hydroxyindole acetic acid is also detected and pargyline (monoaminooxidase inhibitor) suppresses almost completely 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid accumulation. Together with previous data, the present study clearly demonstrates that biotransformation of serotonin in mammalian skin follows two alternate pathways. In the first pathway, serotonin is acetylated by arylalkylamine and arylamine N-acetyltransferases to generate the precursor of melatonin. Alternately, serotonin may undergo oxidative deamination by monoaminooxidase followed by enzymatic degradation by aldehyde dehydrogenase into 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, which is presumably devoid of biological activity. Thus, the current methodological development of a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based assay allows rapid resolution of the cutaneous metabolism of serotonin.

  14. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Anderson, Bruce D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Soliven, Paul P.; Coffey, Laura J.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) developed and implemented a graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method to determine polar pesticide concentrations in surface- and ground-water samples. Subsequently, the NWQL developed a complementary analysis that uses high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect, identify, and quantify polar pesticides and pesticide metabolites in filtered water at concentrations as low as 10 nanograms per liter. This new method was designed to improve sensitivity and selectivity over the prior method, and to reduce known interferences from natural organic matter. In this new method, pesticides are extracted from filtered water samples by useing a 0.5-gram graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction cartridge, eluted from the cartridge, and concentrations determined by using high-perforance liquid chromatography with elecrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The upper concentratoin limit is 1.000 microgram per liter (ug/L) for most compounds. Single-operator method detection limits in organic-free water samples fortified with pesticdes at a concentration of 0.025 ug/L ranged from 0.0019 to 0.022 ug/L for all compunds in the method. The grand mean (mean of mean recoveries for individual compounds) recoveries in organic-free water samples ranged from 72 to 89 percent, fortified wit hpesticides at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Grand mean recoveries in ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 46 to 119 percent, also fortified with pesticies at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Long-term recoveries from reagent water spikes were used to demonstrate that 38 of 65 compounds can be reported without qualification of the quantitative result across the analytical range of the method. The remaining 27 are reported with qualified estimates of concentration because of greater variability

  15. Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization: a novel ionization method for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Constapel, M; Schellenträger, M; Schmitz, O J; Gäb, S; Brockmann, K J; Giese, R; Benter, Th

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-ionization (LI) source operating at atmospheric pressure (AP) for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. APLI is introduced as a powerful addition to existing AP ionization techniques, in particular atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Replacing the one-step VUV approach in APPI with step-wise two-photon ionization strongly enhances the selectivity of the ionization process. Furthermore, the photon flux during an ionization event is drastically increased over that of APPI, leading to very low detection limits. In addition, the APLI mechanism generally operates primarily directly on the analyte. This allows for very efficient ionization even of non-polar compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The APLI source was characterized with a MicroMass Q-Tof Ultima II analyzer. Both the effluent of an HPLC column containing a number of PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene, fluorene) and samples from direct syringe injection were analyzed with respect to selectivity and sensitivity of the overall system. The liquid phase was vaporized by a conventional APCI inlet (AP probe) with the corona needle removed. Ionization was performed through selective resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization schemes using a high-repetition-rate fixed-frequency excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Detection limits well within the low-fmol regime are readily obtained for various aromatic hydrocarbons that exhibit long-lived electronic states at the energy level of the first photon. Only molecular ions are generated at the low laser fluxes employed ( approximately 1 MW/cm(2)). The design and performance of the laser-ionization source are presented along with results of the analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Quantitation of opioids in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2011-03-01

    Opioids are frequently encountered in Forensic Toxicology casework. A PubMed literature search was conducted to find a method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine whole blood specimens. A previously published method was identified, and an updated version was provided by the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. This procedure was used as a starting point for development and validation of a refined procedure to be used in the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Forensic Toxicology laboratory for routine analysis of antemortem forensic toxicology case samples. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining detection limits from 1 to 10 ng/mL and quantitation limits of 2.5 to 10 ng/mL using 1 mL of whole blood. Target compounds were chosen based on applicability to the method as well as availability and common use in the United States and include dihydrocodeine, codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone. Each analyte demonstrated two zero-order linear ranges (r(2) > 0.990) over the concentrations evaluated (from 2.5 to 500 ng/mL). The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 12%. Quantitative accuracy was within ± 27% at 2.5 ng/mL, ± 11% at 10 ng/mL, and ± 8% at 50 ng/mL. The validated method provides a more sensitive procedure for the quantitation of common opioids in blood using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  17. Quantitation of benzodiazepines in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently encountered in forensic toxicology. A literature search was conducted to find a simple method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GC-MS) to examine whole blood specimens for the most commonly encountered benzodiazepines in the United States. A recently published method was identified in the literature search and used as a starting point for development of a new procedure to be used for routine analysis of forensic toxicology case samples. The procedure was then developed and validated as a rapid and efficient method for the screening and quantitation of benzodiazepines in blood using liquid-liquid extraction and EI-GC-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining LODs from 5 to 50 ng/mL and LOQs of 50 ng/mL or less using 1 mL of sample. Target compounds were chosen based on availability and common use in the United States and include diazepam, desalkylflurazepam, nordiazepam, midazolam, oxazepam, temazepam, lorazepam, clonazepam, and alprazolam (relative elution order). The linear range (r2 > 0.990) was validated from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for all analytes. The CV of replicate analyses at both 50 and 200 ng/mL was less than 4%. Quantitative accuracy was within +/- 16% at 50 ng/mL and within +/- 7% at 200 ng/mL. The validated method provides an efficient procedure for the quantitation of a broad range of the most common benzodiazepines in blood at meaningful limits of detection and quantitation using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  18. [Simultaneous determination of five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiqiu; Huang, Xun; Yu, Jingsun

    2015-03-01

    A fast analytical method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established for the simultaneous determination of tetramine, fluoroacetamide, sodium fluoroacetate, gliftor I and gliftor II in serum. At pH 2.0, sodium fluoroacetate was derivatizated at room temperature for 5 min by using N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine as the derivatization reagent and N, N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as the catalyst. The derivative and other rodenticides were extracted with ethyl acetate and concentrated with nitrogen at 50 °C, then determined by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and quantified with matrix-match standard solutions. The analysis was carried out on an ionic liquid chromatographic capillary column (SLB-IL59, 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 µm, maximum temperature 300 °C) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and the five rodenticides were successfully separated in 15 min when temperature programming was used. The results showed that the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.01-1.0 mg/L, except for fluoroacetamide (0.02-2.0 mg/L) and tetramine (0.02-10 mg/L), with correlation coefficients (R2) greater than 0.995, and the limits of detection (LODs) were 0.001-0.002 mg/L (S/N = 3). The recoveries were 84.0%-110.0% at three different spiked levels, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.9%-7.5% (n = 6). The method is simple, accurate, highly sensitive and suitable for the detection of the five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum for toxicological purposes.

  19. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group - Determination of Glyphosate, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid, and Glufosinate in Water Using Online Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    High - Performance Liquid Chromatography /Mass...Glyphosate, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid, and Glufosinate in Water Using Online Solid-Phase Extraction and High - Performance Liquid Chromatography /Mass...Aminomethylphosphonic Acid, and Glufosinate in Water Using Online Solid-Phase Extraction and High - Performance Liquid Chromatography /Mass

  20. Gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of synthetic ceramides containing phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, S

    1970-05-01

    Ceramides containing phytosphingosine as base and one of the fatty acids 16:0, 18:0, 20:0, 22:0, 23:0, and 24:0, were prepared by direct coupling in the presence of a mixed carbodiimide. The ceramides were analyzed as the 1,3,4-tri-O-trimethylsilyl ether derivatives by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Gas chromatographic data is presented, and structures of mass spectral ions are suggested. The structures are supported by mass spectra of the homologous ceramides, by deuterium-labeling experiments, and by high resolution mass spectrometry. Some ions, formed by cleavage between C-3 and C-4 in the long-chain base, indicate the phytosphingosine nature of the ceramide.

  1. On-line electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the simulation of pesticide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Wiebke; Dötzer, Reinhard; Gütter, Gerald; Van Leeuwen, Suze M; Karst, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    On-line electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (EC/LC/MS) was employed to mimic the oxidative metabolism of the fungicide boscalid. High-resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS experiments were used to identify its electrochemical oxidation products. Furthermore, the introduction of a second electrochemical cell with reductive conditions provided important additional information on the oxidation products. With this equipment, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, formation of a covalent ammonia adduct, and dimerization were detected after initial one-electron oxidation of boscalid to a radical cation. On-line reaction with glutathione yielded different isomeric covalent glutathione adducts. The results of the electrochemical oxidation are in good accordance with previously reported in vivo experiments, showing that EC/LC/MS is a useful tool for studying biotransformation reactions of various groups of xenobiotics.

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of bacteriochlorophylls from Chlorobiaceae: characteristic fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Airs, Ruth L; Keely, Brendan J

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (APCI-LC/MS/MS) has been applied to the study of bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e of phototrophic prokaryotes. Cultures of Chlorobiaceae containing bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e were examined using a high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and APCI-LC/MS/MS employing post-column addition of formic acid. The results reveal complex distributions of bacteriochlorophyll homologues, with some closely eluting species giving isobaric protonated molecules. On-line LC/MS/MS studies reveal characteristic fragment ions for bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e. Fragmentations involving loss of the extended alkyl substituents that are unique to bacteriochlorophylls c, d and e and their derivatives have been rationalised by studying the phaeophorbides and the results applied to the direct study of the bacteriochlorophylls.

  3. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  4. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  5. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-09

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations.

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  7. Determination of seven pyrethroids and six pyrethrins in water by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ccanccapa, alexander; Masia, Ana; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Pyrethroids are the synthetic analogues of pyrethrins which were developed as pesticides from the extracts of dried and powdered flower heads of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium. They are increasingly used in agriculture due to their broad biological activity and slow development of pest resistance. Contamination of fresh-water ecosystems appears either because of the direct discharge of industrial and agricultural effluents or as a result of effluents from sewage treatment works; residues can thus accumulate in the surrounding biosphere [1, 2]. These substances, mostly determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) can be difficult to analyse due to their volatility and degradability. The purpose of this study is, as an alternative, to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue method for the target analysis of 7 pyrethroids and the 6 natural pyrethrins currently used in water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The compounds included in the study were acrinathrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and flumethrin as pyrethroids and a commercial mix of pyrethrins containing Cinerin I, Jasmolin I, pyrethrin I, cinerin II, jasmolin II, pyrethrins II in different percentages. As a preliminary step, the ionization and fragmentation of the compounds were optimized injecting individual solutions of each analyte at 10 ppm in the system, using a gradient elution profile of water-methanol both with 10 mM ammonium formate. The ESI conditions were: capillary voltage 4000 V, nebulizer15 psi, source temperature 300◦C and gas flow 10 L min-1. [M+H]+, [M+Na]+ ,[M+NH3]+ ,[M+NH4+]+ were tested as precursor ions. The most intense signal was for ammonium adduct for all compounds. The optimal fragmentor range for product ions were between 20 to 80 ev and the collision energy ranged between 5 to 86 ev. The efficiency of the method was tested in water samples from Turia River without any known exposure to

  8. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him.

  9. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  10. Confirmatory tests for drugs in the workplace by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Cone, E J

    1994-07-15

    The Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs require the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the confirmation of presumptive positive urine specimens. This review focuses upon GC-MS methods developed specifically for forensic confirmation of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-acid), benzoylecgonine, morphine, codeine and phencyclidine in urine for purposes of workplace drug testing. In addition, current laboratory issues pertaining to each drug class are reviewed. Generally, drug assays utilized either liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction methods, derivatization if necessary, and GC-MS detection operating in the selected ion monitoring mode or by full scan acquisition.

  11. Current Applications of Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry in Pharmaceutical Discovery After a Decade of Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Bradley L.; Berna, Michael J.; Eckstein, James A.; Ott, Lee W.; Chaudhary, Ajai K.

    2008-07-01

    Current drug discovery involves a highly iterative process pertaining to three core disciplines: biology, chemistry, and drug disposition. For most pharmaceutical companies the path to a drug candidate comprises similar stages: target identification, biological screening, lead generation, lead optimization, and candidate selection. Over the past decade, the overall efficiency of drug discovery has been greatly improved by a single instrumental technique, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Transformed by the commercial introduction of the atmospheric pressure ionization interface in the mid-1990s, LC/MS has expanded into almost every area of drug discovery. In many cases, drug discovery workflow has been changed owing to vastly improved efficiency. This review examines recent trends for these three core disciplines and presents seminal examples where LC/MS has altered the current approach to drug discovery.

  12. Trace detection of meglumine and diatrizoate from Bacillus spore samples using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swider, Catherine; Maguire, Kelly; Rickenbach, Michael; Montgomery, Madeline; Ducote, Matthew J; Marhefka, Craig A

    2012-07-01

    Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, letters containing Bacillus anthracis were distributed through the United States postal system killing five people. A complex forensic investigation commenced to identify the perpetrator of these mailings. A novel liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry protocol for the qualitative detection of trace levels of meglumine and diatrizoate in dried spore preparations of B. anthracis was developed. Meglumine and diatrizoate are components of radiographic imaging products that have been used to purify bacterial spores. Two separate chromatographic assays using multiple mass spectrometric analyses were developed for the detection of meglumine and diatrizoate. The assays achieved limits of detection for meglumine and diatrizoate of 1.00 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. Bacillus cereus T strain spores were effectively used as a surrogate for B. anthracis spores during method development and validation. This protocol was successfully applied to limited evidentiary B. anthracis spore material, providing probative information to the investigators.

  13. Simultaneous determination of steviol and steviol glycosides by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shah, Romina; De Jager, Lowri S; Begley, Timothy H

    2012-01-01

    A direct, versatile method for the determination of steviol and nine steviol glycosides in food products has been developed by using electrospray ionisation liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in the negative-ion mode. Ten stevia compounds were readily separated on an amino column by using a gradient separation. Data for analyte quantification were collected in the selected ion monitoring mode, giving the method limit of detection of 0.01-0.34 µg g⁻¹ and repeatability at the limit of quantitation of 2%-15% relative standard deviation. Thirty-four commercially available food products were tested by using the optimised method, and in these products rebaudioside A and stevioside comprised 52%-100% of the total steviol glycosides. Multiple reaction monitoring data were collected to provide analyte confirmation. Stability data for rebaudioside A stored at room temperature, 40°C and 60°C over a period of 1-14 days are shown.

  14. Simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei Ru; Lua, Ahai Chang

    2006-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines (ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine) in urine samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Urine samples were extracted with organic solvent and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The limits of detection and limits of quantification for each analyte were lower than 19 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Within-day and between-day precisions were within 0.5% and 10.6%, respectively. Biases for three levels of control samples were within -10.6% and +7.8%. The concentration of dehydronorketamine was greater than those of ketamine or norketamine in 19 of 35 ketamine-positive samples. A group of 110 human urine samples previously determined to contain at least one of the target analytes was analyzed using the new method, and excellent agreement was observed with previous results.

  15. Principles and Applications of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, James J

    2009-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is now a routine technique with the development of electrospray ionisation (ESI) providing a simple and robust interface. It can be applied to a wide range of biological molecules and the use of tandem MS and stable isotope internal standards allows highly sensitive and accurate assays to be developed although some method optimisation is required to minimise ion suppression effects. Fast scanning speeds allow a high degree of multiplexing and many compounds can be measured in a single analytical run. With the development of more affordable and reliable instruments, LC-MS is starting to play an important role in several areas of clinical biochemistry and compete with conventional liquid chromatography and other techniques such as immunoassay. PMID:19224008

  16. Authentication of Organically and Conventionally Grown Basils by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Chemical Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengfang; Chen, Pei; Yu, Liangli; Harrington, Peter de B.

    2013-01-01

    Basil plants cultivated by organic and conventional farming practices were accurately classified by pattern recognition of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) data. A novel extraction procedure was devised to extract characteristic compounds from ground basil powders. Two in-house fuzzy classifiers, i.e., the fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) and the fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM) for the first time, were used to build classification models. Two crisp classifiers, i.e., soft independent modeling by class analogy (SIMCA) and the partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used as control methods. Prior to data processing, baseline correction and retention time alignment were performed. Classifiers were built with the two-way data sets, the total ion chromatogram representation of data sets, and the total mass spectrum representation of data sets, separately. Bootstrapped Latin partition (BLP) was used as an unbiased evaluation of the classifiers. By using two-way data sets, average classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100 ± 0%, 94.4 ± 0.4%, 93.3 ± 0.4%, and 100 ± 0%, respectively, for 100 independent evaluations. The established classifiers were used to classify a new validation set collected 2.5 months later with no parametric changes except that the training set and validation set were individually mean-centered. For the new two-way validation set, classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100%, 83%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Thereby, the GC/MS analysis was demonstrated as a viable approach for organic basil authentication. It is the first time that a FOAM has been applied to classification. A novel baseline correction method was used also for the first time. The FuRES and the FOAM are demonstrated as powerful tools for modeling and classifying GC/MS data of complex samples and the data pretreatments are demonstrated to be useful to improve the performance of classifiers

  17. Multiresidue determination of pesticides in agricultural products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with large volume injection.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yukio; Kodama, Shuji; Matsunaga, Akinobu; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid determination of pesticide residues in agricultural products. Pesticides were extracted from samples with acetonitrile. To remove pigments and fatty acids, an aliquot of the extract was cleaned up by a minicolumn that was packed both with graphitized carbon black and primary secondary amine. Analysis was performed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry with programmable temperature vaporizer-based large volume injection using a liner packed with phenylmethylsilicone chemically bonded silica. The method was evaluated for 114 pesticides by spiking into tomato, spinach, Japanese pear, grape, and brown rice at various concentrations of each pesticide (0.02-0.4 microg/g). The method, which gave good recovery (>60%) for 108 pesticides, is characterized by high cleanup efficiency and short cleanup time, and is useful as a rapid screening analysis.

  18. Solid-phase microcolumn extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by paper.

    PubMed

    Hrivnák, Ján; Tölgyessy, Peter; Figedyová, Sona; Katuscák, Svetozár

    2009-11-15

    A rapid non-destructive sampling technique for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by paper sheets is described. A capillary, which is connected to a microcolumn packed with Tenax TA, is inserted between two sheets at the centre of a paper stack encapsulated inside a PET/Al/PE composite foil. The other end of the microcolumn is connected to a gas-tight syringe and an appropriate volume of gaseous phase is aspirated. The microcolumn is then thermally desorbed in a modified GC inlet (modification is presented) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the chromatogram from the analysis of artificially aged paper sample 21 compounds were identified. Advantages of the method including the short sampling time (1 min), simplicity and economic aspect are discussed.

  19. Characterization of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in green and fermented leaves of Bergenia crassifolia L. by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ID-CUBE direct analysis in real time-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chernetsova, Elena S; Shikov, Alexander N; Crawford, Elizabeth A; Grashorn, Sebastian; Laakso, I; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Valery G; Hiltunen, Raimo; Galambosi, Bertalan; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2014-01-01

    Chemical compositions of volatile and semi-volatile components in green and fermented leaves of Bergenia crassifolia L. were studied. Leaf components were identified using gas chromatography with low resolution mass spectrometry and direct analysis in real time (DART) high resolution mass spectrometry with an ID-CUBE ion source. Phytol, nerolidol, geraniol, linalool, alpha-bisabolol, alpha-bisabololoxide B, alpha-cadinol, delta-cadinene, alpha-terpineol and several other marker compounds of special interest were defined, for which the process of fermentation significantly changed their content in the leaves. Low resolution El GC-MS and ID-CUBE DART-HRMS were found to be complementary methods, as they provide different information, helpful to increase the confidence of identification.

  20. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences

  1. Headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization of propolis volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Federica; Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Benvenuti, Stefania

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel and efficient method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was developed for the analysis of propolis volatile compounds. The HS-SPME procedure, whose experimental parameters were properly optimized, was carried out using a 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. The GC-MS analyses were performed on a HP-5 MS cross-linked 5% diphenyl-95% dimethyl polysiloxane capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D., 1.00 μm film thickness), under programmed-temperature elution. Ninety-nine constituents were identified using this technique in the samples of raw propolis collected from different Italian regions. The main compounds detected include benzoic acid (0.87-30.13%) and its esters, such as benzyl benzoate (0.16-13.05%), benzyl salicylate (0.34-1.90%) and benzyl cinnamate (0.34-3.20%). Vanillin was detected in most of the samples analyzed in this study (0.07-5.44%). Another relevant class of volatile constituents is represented by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, such as δ-cadinene (1.29-13.31%), γ-cadinene (1.36-8.85%) and α-muurolene (0.78-6.59%), and oxygenated sesquiterpenes, such as β-eudesmol (2.33-12.83%), T-cadinol (2.73-9.95%) and α-cadinol (4.84-9.74%). Regarding monoterpene hydrocarbons, they were found to be present at low level in the samples analyzed in this study, with the exception of one sample from Southern Italy, where α-pinene was the most abundant constituent (13.19%). The results obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS were also compared with those of hydrodistillation (HD) coupled with GC-MS. The HS-SPME-GC-MS method developed in this study allowed us to determine the chemical fingerprint of propolis volatile constituents, thus providing a new and reliable tool for the complete characterization of this biologically active apiary product.

  2. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach for the characterization of goat milk compared with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Scano, Paola; Murgia, Antonio; Pirisi, Filippo M; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the polar metabolite pool of commercial caprine milk was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis. Experimental data were compared with those of cow milk and the discriminant analysis correctly classified milk. By the same means, differences due to heat treatments (UHT or pasteurization) on milk samples were also investigated. Results of the 2 discriminant analyses were combined, with the aim of finding the discriminant metabolites unique for each class and shared by 2 classes. Valine and glycine were specific to goat milk, talose and malic acid to cow milk, and hydroxyglutaric acid to pasteurized samples. Glucose and fructose were shared by cow milk and UHT-treated samples, whereas ribose was shared by pasteurized and goat milk. Other discriminant variables were not attributed to specific metabolites. Furthermore, with the aim to reduce food fraud, the issue of adulteration of caprine milk by addition of cheaper bovine milk has been also addressed. To this goal, mixtures of goat and cow milk were prepared by adding the latter in a range from 0 to 100% (vol/vol) and studied by multivariate regression analysis. The error in the level of cow milk detectable was approximately 5%. These overall results demonstrated that, through the combined approach of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis, we were able to discriminate between milk typologies on the basis of their polar metabolite profiles and to propose a new analytical method to easily discover food fraud and to protect goat milk uniqueness. The use of appropriate visualization tools improved the interpretation of multivariate model results.

  3. Determination of testosterone:epitestosterone ratio after pentafluorophenyldimethylsilyl-trimethylsilyl derivatisation using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in equine urine.

    PubMed

    Choi, M H; Kim, J Y; Chung, B C

    1999-05-01

    A highly specific method is described for measuring the testosterone:epitestosterone ratio in equine urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with stable isotope internal standards. The procedure was based on Serdolit Pad-1 resin extraction, enzymatic hydrolysis, and chemical derivatisation prior to instrumental analysis. The mixed derivatives, 3-trimethylsilyl-17-pentafluorophenyldimethylsilyl ether (3-TMS-17-flophemesyl) testosterone and epitestosterone, were found to have excellent analytical properties. The specificity of the derivatisation method exploits a unique feature of steroids: the selective exchange of the alcoholic flophemesyl ether for the trimethylsilyl ether. The sensitivity and specificity of the mixed 3-TMS-17-flophemesyl derivatives allow adequate determinations of testosterone and epitestosterone, even in urine from mares, in 5 ml samples. The repeatability of testosterone and epitestosterone was 6.2 and 5.7%, respectively, and their reproducibility was in the range of 6.4-8.7%.

  4. Characterization of novel varietal floral hop aromas by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Van Opstaele, Filip; De Causmaecker, Brecht; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2012-12-19

    In this study, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were optimized and implemented to investigate the volatile composition of novel floral hop essences prepared from four German aroma hop varieties. In total, 91 different constituents were assigned, which were further grouped into monoterpene hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, aldehydes, furans, and oxygenated and nonoxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most volatiles belong to the ester group, whereas the monoterpene hydrocarbon β-myrcene appears to be the predominant compound in all hop oil preparations investigated. Furthermore, as demonstrated by principal component analysis, varietal floral hop essences are clearly discriminated on the basis of their characteristic volatile composition. Via GC-olfactometry on the floral essence variety Spalter Select, β-myrcene and 2-undecanone were identified as the most potent odorants. Several hop oil constituents were reported for the first time as impact odorants of hop aroma.

  5. Pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of polyvinyl chloride traces in solid environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tienpont, B; David, F; Vanwalleghem, F; Sandra, P

    2001-03-16

    A novel method based on pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CGC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of polyvinylchloride (PVC) in solid environmental samples like sludge and dust. The samples are extracted and the extract is fractionated by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Possibly interfering biological and frequently occuring synthetic polymers are removed by this clean-up. The final extract is analyzed by pyrolysis-CGC-MS. Selective detection of PVC is performed by using specific markers in the pyrogram. Quantitation is done on naphthalene. Good linearity was obtained in a range from 0.5 to 100 microg applied to the pyrolyser. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) in sludge and dust samples is 10 mg/kg dry mass. A correlation between PVC and phthalates was made for sewage sludge samples.

  6. Capillary ion chromatography-mass spectrometry for simultaneous determination of glucosylglycerol and sucrose in intracellular extracts of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fa, Yun; Liang, Wenhui; Cui, He; Duan, Yangkai; Yang, Menglong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-09-15

    A capillary ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) method was proposed to determine glucosylglycerol (GG), sucrose, and five other carbohydrates. MS conditions and make-up flow parameters were optimized. This method is accurate and sensitive for simultaneous analysis of carbohydrates, with mean correlation coefficients of determination greater than 0.99, relative standard deviation of 0.91-2.81% for eight replicates, and average spiked recoveries of 97.3-104.9%. Limits of detection of sodium adduct were obtained with MS detection in selected ion mode for GG (0.006mg/L), sucrose (0.02mg/L), and other carbohydrates (0.03mg/L). This method was successfully applied to determine GG and sucrose in intracellular extracts of salt-stressed cyanobacteria.

  7. Improved peak selection strategy for automatically determining minute compositional changes in fuels by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Jeffrey A; Begue, Nathan J; Morris, Robert E

    2011-02-11

    During the development of automated computational methods to detect minute compositional changes in fuels, it became apparent that peak selection through the spectral deconvolution of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data is limited by the complexity and noise levels inherent in the data. Specifically, current techniques are not capable of detecting minute, chemically relevant compositional differences with sufficient sensitivity. Therefore, an alternative peak selection strategy was developed based on spectral interpretation through interval-oriented parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). It will be shown that this strategy outperforms the deconvolution-based peak selection strategy as well as two control strategies. Successful application of the PARAFAC-based method to detect minute chemical changes produced during microbiological growth in four different inoculated diesel fuels will be discussed.

  8. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for characterization of fragrances of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Sun; Lee, Dong-Sun

    2004-01-01

    Natural fragrances from lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) were studied by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) techniques followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with six different fibre coatings being tested to evaluate the extraction efficiencies of several selected compounds. A total of 14 compounds were identified in the fragrances of lemon verbena. Geranial and neral were detected as major components and alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and curcumene as minor components. Enantiomeric analysis of chiral compounds from lemon verbena was carried out on a chiral column. alpha-Pinene, limonene, and camphor in the fragrances emitted from lemon verbena were found in the (+), (-), and (-) forms, respectively.

  9. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of biological particulates collected during recent space shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Biological particulates collected on air filters during shuttle missions (STS-40 and STS-42) were identified using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). A method was developed for identifying the atmospheric particles and their sources through the analysis of standard materials and the selection of "marker" compounds specific to the particle type. Pyrolysis spectra of biological standards were compared with those of airborne particles collected during two space shuttle missions; marker compounds present in the shuttle particle spectra were matched with those of the standards to identify the source of particles. Particles of 0,5--1-mm diameter and weighing as little as 40 micrograms could be identified using this technique. The Py-GC/MS method identified rat food and soilless plant-growth media as two sources of particles collected from the shuttle atmosphere during flight.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Studies of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Using an Automated Blood Sampling System and Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tse; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Lin, Chia-Chun; Chien, Chao-Feng; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2012-01-01

    The safety of herbal products is one of the major concerns for the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine, and pharmacokinetic data of medicinal herbs guide us to design the rational use of the herbal formula. This article reviews the advantages of the automated blood sampling (ABS) systems for pharmacokinetic studies. In addition, three commonly used sample preparative methods, protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction, are introduced. Furthermore, the definition, causes and evaluation of matrix effects in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis are demonstrated. Finally, we present our previous works as practical examples of the application of ABS systems and LC/MS for the pharmacokinetic studies of Chinese medicinal herbs. PMID:24716112

  11. Determination of O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wils, E R; Hulst, A G

    1990-12-07

    The determination of the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was studied. The solvent system acetonitrile-methanol-0.25 M ammonium acetate was used on a reversed-phase C18 column. By selected ion monitoring at the protonated molecular ion of VX (m/z 268), the predominant peak in its thermospray mass spectrum, an amount of 200 pg could be detected. For the determination of VX in water at levels below 1 ng/ml, preconcentration by C18 cartridges was investigated. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by the determination of VX in spiked river waters. A concentration of 0.1 ng/ml could be detected starting from a water sample of 50 ml. A second application concerned the analysis of water extracts of spiked soil samples.

  12. Determination of polycyclic and nitro musks in environmental water samples by means of microextraction by packed sorbents coupled to large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, J; Prieto, A; Monperrus, M; Etxebarria, N; Zuloaga, O

    2013-04-22

    In this work the development and validation of a new procedure for the simultaneous determination of 9 nitro and polycyclic musk compounds: musk ambrette (MA), musk ketone (MK), musk mosken (MM), celestolide (ADBI), phantolide (AHMI), tonalide (AHTN), traseolide (ATII), cashmeran (DPMI) and galaxolide (HHCB) in environmental water samples (estuarine and wastewater) using microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) followed by large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS) was carried out. Apart from the optimization of the different variables affecting MEPS (i.e., nature of the sorbent, nature of the solvent elution, sample load, and elution/injection volume) extraction recovery was also evaluated, not only for water samples but also for environmental water matrices such as estuarine and waste water. The use of two deuterated analogs ([(2)H3]-AHTN and [(2)H15]-MX) was successfully evaluated in order to correct matrix effect in complex environmental matrices such as influent samples from wastewater treatment plants. Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 5 to 25 ng L(-1), 7 to 39 ng L(-1) and 8 to 84 ng L(-1) for influent, effluent and estuarine samples, respectively. Apparent recoveries were higher than 75% for all target compounds in all the matrices studied (estuarine water and wastewater) and the precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was below 13.2% at 200 ng L(-1) concentration level and below 14.9% at low level (20 ng L(-1) for all the target analytes, except for AHTN which was set at 40 ng L(-1) and HHCB at 90 ng L(-1), due to the higher MDL values presented by those target compounds). Finally, this MEPS procedure was applied to the determination of the target analytes in water samples, including estuarine and wastewater, from two estuaries, Urdaibai (Spain) and Adour (France) and an established stir-bar sorptive extraction-liquid desorption/large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass

  13. Non-targeted metabolomics study for the analysis of chemical compositions in three types of tea by using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhongda; Ye, Guozhu; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2014-08-01

    Tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world for its benefits to daily life and health. To discover the difference and correlation of chemical compositions in the three typical types of tea, a non-targeted metabolomics method was developed. After the optimization of extraction methods, gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were applied for metabolomics analysis, 1,812 and 2,608 features were obtained, respectively. By comparing with the known compounds in public and/or commercial databases, 173 compounds were tentatively identified, and 109 of them were experimentally confirmed by standards. Totally, 33 tea samples including 12, 12 and 9 samples of green, oolong and black tea, respectively, were analyzed by using the above two methods. Multivatiate analysis, Mann-Whitney U test and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to find and visualize the differential components in the three types of tea. Finally, 90 compounds, which contain catechins, amino acids, organic acids, flavonol glycosides, alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, etc, were found with a significant difference among them. This study demonstrates the potentials and power of metabolomics methods to understand the chemical secrets of tea. This should help a lot to optimize the processes of agriculture, storage, preparation and consumption.

  14. Identification of wild collected mosquito vectors of diseases using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in Jazan Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmed, Azzam M; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed-Yacine; Al Othman, Zeid A; Sallam, Mohamed F

    2013-11-01

    Thirty-three species of mosquitoes have been reported from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Several of these mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae Giles s.l., Anopheles stephensi Liston, Culex pipiens Linnaeus, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles, Stegomyia aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedimorphus vexans arabiensis (Patton) are known vectors of human and animal diseases. In this study, the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of eight mosquito species using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were analyzed. Wild collected fourth-instar larvae were reared, and single, newly emerged, unfed adult females were used for the analysis. A total of 146-160 peaks were detected from the cuticular extracts by gas chromatography. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD Post Hoc test was used to test for quantitative differences in relative hydrocarbon quantity. In addition, a linear regression model was applied using Enter method to determine the diagnostic peaks for the eight mosquito specimens. The ANOVA test indicated that relative peaks were significant (P < 0.05) when selected pairs of peaks were compared. Also, seven compounds showed qualitative differences among the five mosquito vectors tested. The classes of constituents present were n-alkanes, monomethylalkanes, dimethylalkanes, trimethylalkanes, alkenes, branched aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes and esters. These compounds have a carbon chain length ranging from 8 to 18 carbons. The most abundant compound in all adult mosquito specimens was n-hexylacrylate [retention time (RT) 6.73 min], which was not detected in Cx. pipiens. In Cx. pipiens, the most abundant peak was benzaldehyde (RT 2.98 min). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a suitable method to identify adult mosquitoes, especially from focal areas of public health concern such as Jazan Province, Saudi Arabia. This method allows a wide range of adult collected material to be identified with high accuracy.

  15. Environmental and biological determination of acrolein using new cold fiber solid phase microextraction with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cláudia M; Menezes, Helvécio C; Cardeal, Zenilda L

    2017-04-01

    Acrolein is a pollutant released daily to the indoor environment from different sources. The present study reports the development of a simple and sensitive cold fiber solid phase microextraction sampling method for the determination of acrolein in exhaled air and indoor air by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine was used as derivatizing agent supported on a 65-μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene SPME fiber. An acrolein permeation tube at 326.25 ng min(-1) rate was used to generate gaseous standards. The method shows good results for main validation parameters. The limits of detection and quantification were 2.88 and 5.08 μg m(-3), respectively, for indoor analysis; and 2.40 and 3.79 μg m(-3), respectively, for exhaled air analysis. The precision showed standard deviation ranges from 6.00 to 8.00% for intra-assay analyses and from 8.00 to 10.00% for inter-assay analyses. After optimizing the conditions, analyses of real samples were performed on indoor environments contaminated by cigarette smoke, or heated oil, including pastry shops, restaurants, churros stands, and closed parking cars located in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Acrolein breaths of exposed people were also determined. A good Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.901) was observed between the concentration of acrolein in indoor air and exhaled air, allowing to propose acrolein breath as environmental exposure biomarker. Graphical Abstract Cold fiber solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  16. Isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry of D/H by high temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert; Douthitt; Schlüter; Brand

    1999-07-01

    Of all the elements, hydrogen has the largest naturally occurring variations in the ratio of its stable isotopes (D/H). It is for this reason that there has been a strong desire to add hydrogen to the list of elements amenable to isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS). In irm-GC/MS the sample is entrained in helium as the carrier gas, which is also ionized and separated in the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Because of the low abundance of deuterium in nature, precise and accurate on-line monitoring of D/H ratios with an IRMS requires that low energy helium ions be kept out of the m/z 3 collector, which requires the use of an energy filter. A clean mass 3 (HD(+.)) signal which is independent of a large helium load in the electron impact ion source is essential in order to reach the sensitivity required for D/H analysis of capillary GC peaks. A new IRMS system, the DELTA(plus)XL(trade mark), has been designed for high precision, high accuracy measurements of transient signals of hydrogen gas. It incorporates a retardation lens integrated into the m/z 3 Faraday cup collector. Following GC separation, the hydrogen bound in organic compounds must be quantitatively converted into H(2) gas prior to analysis in the IRMS. Quantitative conversion is achieved by high temperature conversion (TC) at temperatures >1400 degrees C. Measurements of D/H ratios of individual organic compounds in complicated natural mixtures can now be made to a precision of 2 per thousand (delta notation) or, better, with typical sample amounts of approximately 200 ng per compound. Initial applications have focused on compounds of interest to petroleum research (biomarkers and natural gas components), food and flavor control (vanillin and ethanol), and metabolic studies (fatty acids and steroids). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Identification of novel circulating coffee metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Redeuil, Karine; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice; Guy, Philippe; Rezzi, Serge; Dionisi, Fabiola; Williamson, Gary; Nagy, Kornél; Renouf, Mathieu

    2011-07-22

    This study reports a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the detection of polyphenol-derived metabolites in human plasma without enzymatic treatment after coffee consumption. Separation of available standards was achieved by reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography and detection was performed by high resolution mass spectrometry in negative electrospray ionization mode. This analytical method was then applied for the identification and relative quantification of circulating coffee metabolites. A total of 34 coffee metabolites (mainly reduced, sulfated and methylated forms of caffeic acid, coumaric acid, caffeoylquinic acid and caffeoylquinic acid lactone) were identified based on mass accuracy (<4 ppm for most metabolites), specific fragmentation pattern and co-chromatography (when standard available). Among them, 19 circulating coffee metabolites were identified for the first time in human plasma such as feruloylquinic acid lactone, sulfated and glucuronidated forms of feruloylquinic acid lactone and sulfated forms of coumaric acid. Phenolic acid derivatives such as dihydroferulic acid, dihydroferulic acid 4'-O-sulfate, caffeic acid 3'-O-sulfate, dimethoxycinnamic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid and coumaric acid O-sulfate appeared to be the main metabolites circulating in human plasma after coffee consumption. The described method is a sensitive and reliable approach for the identification of coffee metabolites in biological fluids. In future, this analytical method will give more confidence in compound identification to provide a more comprehensive assessment of coffee polyphenol bioavailability studies in humans.

  18. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of geosmin and methylisoborneol in water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Ziegler, A.C.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of two common odor-causing compounds in water, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, was modified and verified by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas. The optimized method involves the extraction of odor-causing compounds from filtered water samples using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane cross-link coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. Detection of the compounds is accomplished using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Precision and accuracy were demonstrated using reagent-water, surface-water, and ground-water samples. The mean accuracies as percentages of the true compound concentrations from water samples spiked at 10 and 35 nanograms per liter ranged from 60 to 123 percent for geosmin and from 90 to 96 percent for 2-methylisoborneol. Method detection limits were 1.9 nanograms per liter for geosmin and 2.0 nanograms per liter for 2-methylisoborneol in 45-milliliter samples. Typically, concentrations of 30 and 10 nanograms per liter of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, respectively, can be detected by the general public. The calibration range for the method is equivalent to concentrations from 5 to 100 nanograms per liter without dilution. The method is valuable for acquiring information about the production and fate of these odor-causing compounds in water.

  19. Reliable, rapid and simple method for the analysis of phthalates in sediments by ultrasonic solvent extraction followed by head space-solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Fernández-González, V; Moscoso-Pérez, C; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new reliable, simple and fast method for the determination of six PAEs in sediments, based on ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) followed by head space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination (GC-MS), is proposed. The extraction parameters were studied, and the most favourable conditions were selected. The analytical features of the method were calculated: matrix effect, accuracy (ranged from 90% to 111%), repeatability and intermediate precision (RSD <10%), detection and quantification limits of the method (ranged from 0.001µgg(-1) (DOP) to 0.142µgg(-1) (DEP)), and satisfactory results were obtained. Major advantages of this approach are low consumption of reagents and solvents, no clean-up or evaporation steps were required and minimum sample manipulation. In addition, cross contamination from glassware, solvents and samples is minimized, thus procedural blanks are keeping to a minimum.. The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated analysing sediment samples from Galician coast (NW Spain). The proposed method allows the application in routine laboratory conditions and its implementation in environmental monitoring studies under the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD).

  20. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and on natural ambient air samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Albinet, A; Leoz-Garziandia, E; Budzinski, H; Viilenave, E

    2006-07-14

    This study deals with the development of a routine analytical method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation (GC/NICI-MS) for the determination of 17 nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) present at low concentrations in the atmosphere. This method includes a liquid chromatography purification procedure on solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Application of this analytical procedure has been performed on standard reference material (SRM 1649a: urban dust), giving results in good agreement with the few data available in the literature. The analytical method was also applied on ambient air samples (on both gas and particulate phases) from the French POVA program (POllution des Vallées Alpines). NPAHs concentrations observed for a rural site during the Winter period are about 0.2-100.0pgm(-3) in the particulate phase and about 0.0-20.0pgm(-3) in the gas phase. OPAHs present concentrations 10-100 times higher (0.1-2.0ngm(-3) and 0.0-1.4ngm(-3) for the particulate and the gas phases, respectively). These preliminary results show a good correlation between the characteristics of the sampling site and the compound origins (primary or secondary).

  1. Analysis of enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in plant emissions using portable dynamic air sampling/solid-phase microextraction (PDAS-SPME) and chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Williams, Jonathan

    A portable dynamic air sampler (PDAS) using a porous polymer solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre has been validated for the determination of biogenic enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in air. These compounds were adsorbed in the field, and then thermally desorbed at 250 °C in a gas chromatograph injector port connected via a β-cyclodextrin capillary separating column to a mass spectrometer. The optimized method has been applied for investigating the emissions of enantiomeric monoterpenes from Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) and Lavandula lanata (Lavender) which were selected as representative of coniferous trees and aromatic plants, respectively. The enantiomers of α-pinene, sabinene, camphene, δ-3-carene, β-pinene, limonene, β-phellandrene, 4-carene and camphor were successfully determined in the emissions from the three plants. While Douglas-fir showed a strong predominance toward (-)-enantiomers, Rosemary and Lavender demonstrated a large variation in enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes. The simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of dynamic sampling with porous polymer coated SPME fibres coupled to chiral capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) makes this method potentially useful for in-field investigations of atmosphere-biosphere interactions and studies of optically explicit atmospheric chemistry.

  2. Analysis of MC-LR and MC-RR in tissue from freshwater fish (Tinca tinca) and crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in tench ponds (Cáceres, Spain) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

    PubMed

    Ríos, Victoria; Moreno, Isabel; Prieto, Ana I; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Soria-Díaz, Ma Eugenia; Cameán, Ana M

    2013-07-01

    In the present study a new method has been developed and validated for detecting free microcystins (MCs) (MC-RR, MC-LR and MC-YR) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in the cyprinid Tinca tinca and in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii collected from three ponds in Extremadura (Spain) where the presence of the cyanobacteria species Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena spiroides has been confirmed. Once the method had been validated, free MCs were determined in fish (tench, T. tinca) and crayfish from different ponds in order to understand how they are bioaccumulated through the food web. MCs were not detected in any of the fish samples analyzed. It was confirmed that P. clarkii accumulated MCs in their tissues without losing their organoleptic characteristics, with MC-LR (2.3-18.1 μg MC-LR/g body weight) being the predominant MC variant detected in all the crayfish samples. MC-RR was measured in 50% of the samples analyzed, ranging between 1.4 and 7.8 μg MC-RR/g body weight and no MC-YR was detected. The results indicated that crayfish can accumulate free MCs in higher quantities than tench that live in ponds contaminated by toxic cyanobacteria species, and emphasized the need for regular monitoring if the health risks associated with their consumption are to be avoided.

  3. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the essential oils from the aerial parts of Pimpinella anagodendron Bolle and Pimpinella rupicola Svent., two endemic species to the Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Negueruela, A; Pérez-Alonso, M J; de Paz, P L Pérez; Palá-Paúl, J; Sanz, J

    2005-11-18

    The essential oils from the aerial parts of Pimpinella anagodendron Bolle and Pimpinella rupicola Svent., two endemic species growing in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, were studied by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major components of the flowering tops (flowers+unripe fruits) of P. rupicola (PRFT) were found to be beta-bisabolene (34.8%), limonene (10.9%) and alpha-zingiberene (10.5%), whereas in the flowering tops of P. anagodendron (PAFT), the main constituents were alpha-zingiberene (32.9%), beta-bisabolene (17.9%), beta-pinene (15.8%) and ar-curcumene (11.5%). The major compounds found in the stems+leaves of P. rupicola (PRSL) were beta-bisabolene (31.6%), alpha-zingiberene (11.4%) and limonene (10.8%), whereas those of P. anagodendron (PASL) were alpha-zingiberene (32.3%), beta-bisabolene (14.0%) and ar-curcumene (12.6%). In all the oils were found the characteristic constituents of genus Pimpinella, the pseudoisoeugenol esters. In accordance with the morphological, chorological and chemical differences between both species, we suggest that P. rupicola Svent. is a good taxon and not a synonym of P. anagodendron.

  4. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Identification of Capping Agent Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karthick, V; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Govindaraju, K; Sinha, Sweta; Singaravelu, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using leaf extract of Syzygium jambolanum and capping agent has been explored. The synthesized AuNPs have been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. The AuNPs show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 528 nm and were found to be spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging from 20-30 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the surface morphology of synthesized AuNPs. The capping ligand has been evaluated using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis.

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in toxicological analysis. Studies on the detection of clobenzorex and its metabolites within a systematic toxicological analysis procedure by GC-MS and by immunoassay and studies on the detection of alpha- and beta-amanitin in urine by atmospheric pressure ionization electrospray LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H; Kraemer, T; Ledvinka, O; Schmitt, C J; Weber, A A

    1997-02-07

    GC-MS is the method of choice for toxicological analysis of toxicants volatile in GC while non-volatile and/or thermally labile toxicants need LC-MS for their determination. Studies are presented on the toxicological detection of the amphetamine-like anorectic clobenzorex in urine by GC-MS after acid hydrolysis, extraction and acetylation and by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA, TDx (meth)amphetamine II). After ingestion of 60 mg of clobenzorex, the parent compound and/or its metabolites could be detected by GC-MS for up to 84 h or by FPIA for up to 60 h. Since clobenzorex shows no cross-reactivity with the used immunoassay, the N-dealkylated metabolite amphetamine is responsible for the positive TDx results. The intake of clobenzorex instead of amphetamine can be differentiated by GC-MS detection of hydroxyclobenzorex which is detectable for at least as long as amphetamine. In addition, the described GC-MS procedure allows the simultaneous detection of most of the toxicologically relevant drugs. Furthermore, studies are described on the atmospheric pressure ionization electrospray LC-MS detection of alpha- and beta-amanitin, toxic peptides of amanita mushrooms, in urine after solid-phase extraction on RP-18 columns. Using the single ion monitoring mode with the ions m/z 919 and 920 the amanitins could be detected down to 10 ng/ml of urine which allows us to diagnose intoxications with amanita mushrooms.

  6. [Differentiation of ballpoint pen inks by thermodesorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation and classification of ink entries with dated samples of a reference collection are important aspects in the examination of questioned documents. Classification of writing inks is presently achieved by analysis of dyes and colorants contained in the ink. This technique has its limitations in newly developed ink formulations with identical dye composition but differing in their solvents and binder resins. This paper introduces a method for the determination of solvents and binder resins of an ink sample directly from paper without sample preparation. This aim is accomplished by thermodesorption of the sample followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The method was tested on numerous samples of ballpoint pen inks, which were subsequently grouped into several solvent and resin subgroups. A case study shows the applicability of the newly developed method.

  7. Determination of ortho-phenylphenol in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M J; Brzak, K A; Bormett, G A

    1997-12-05

    A sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed to quantitate total o-phenylphenol (OPP) (free plus conjugates) in human urine. Conjugates of OPP were acid-hydrolyzed to free OPP, derivatized to the pentafluorobenzoyl ester derivative and analyzed via negative-ion chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two stable isotope analogs of OPP were shown to be suitable as internal standards for this method (D2-phenol ring, 13C6-phenyl ring). A synthetic method is presented for the preparation of the D2-OPP internal standard. The 13C6-OPP analog was also shown to be useful as an alternate test material for laboratory-based exposure studies. The limit of quantitation for this method was 1 ng OPP/ml urine. Calibration curves were linear for the analyte over the concentration range of 0.5-1117 ng OPP/ml urine. Relative recovery of OPP from urine ranged from 97.0 to 104.7%. Low levels of OPP (mean=6+/-7 ng/ml; n=22) were found in control human urine samples. The method was validated with urine samples obtained from human volunteers undergoing a dermal exposure study with 12C-/13C6-/14C-OPP. This method was developed to aid in assessments of human exposure to OPP during a variety of uses of the compound.

  8. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  9. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of fragrance allergens in baby bathwater.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2009-07-01

    A method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of fragrance allergens in water samples. This is the first study devoted to this family of cosmetic ingredients performed by SPME. The influence of parameters such as fibre coating, extraction and desorption temperatures, salting-out effect and sampling mode on the extraction efficiency has been studied by means of a mixed-level factorial design, which allowed the study of the main effects as well as two-factor interactions. Excluding desorption temperature, the other parameters were, in general, very important for the achievement of high response. The final procedure was based on headspace sampling at 100 degrees C, using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres. The method showed good linearity and precision for all compounds, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Reliability was demonstrated through the evaluation of the recoveries in different real water samples, including baby bathwater and swimming pool water. The absence of matrix effects allowed the use of external standard calibration to quantify the target compounds in the samples. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of allergens in several real samples. All the target compounds were found in the samples, and, in some cases, at quite high concentrations. The presence and the levels of these chemicals in baby bathwater should be a matter of concern.

  10. Determination of free and ethoxylated alkylphenols in leather with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, He-Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2010-12-10

    An analytical approach was developed to determine nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO(n)) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEO(n)) in leather samples involving the conversion of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) into the corresponding NP and OP. The four targets were extracted from samples using ultrasonic-assisted acetonitrile extraction. NP and OP in the extracts were directly isolated with hexane and quantitatively determined with 4-n-nonylphenol as internal standard by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) in the extracts, they were first converted into NP and OP with aluminum triiodide as cleavage agent, and the yielded NP and OP were determined by GC-MS. The contents of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) were calculated by normalizing to NPEO(9) and OPEO(9), respectively. This method was properly validated and the real sample tests revealed the pollution significance of leather by NPEO(n) and OPEO(n).

  11. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Microwave-assisted derivatization: application to steroid profiling by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casals, Gregori; Marcos, Josep; Pozo, Oscar J; Alcaraz, José; Martínez de Osaba, María Jesús; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2014-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) remains as the gold-standard technique for the study of the steroid metabolome. A main limitation is the need of performing a derivatization step since incubation with strong silylations agents for long periods of time (usually 16 h) is required for the derivatization of hindered hydroxyls present in some steroids of interest. In the present work, a rapid, simple and reproducible microwave-assisted derivatization method was developed. In the method, 36 steroids already treated with methoxyamine (2% in pyridine) were silylated with 50 μl of N-trimethylsilylimidazole by using microwave irradiation, and the formed methyloxime-trimethylsilyl derivatives were analyzed by GC-MS. Microwave power and derivatization time silylation conditions were optimized being the optimum conditions 600 W and 3 min respectively. In order to evaluate the usefulness of this technique, the urine steroid profiles for 20 healthy individuals were analyzed. The results of a comparison of microwave irradiation with the classical heating protocol showed similar derivatization yields, thus suggesting that microwave-assisted silylation is a valid tool for the rapid steroid metabolome study.

  13. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: the combination of targeted and untargeted profiling

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small molecular metabolites (<650 daltons), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds volatile enough for gas chromatography. This unit shows that on GC-MS- based metabolomics easily allows integrating targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated, standardized standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semi-quantify over 200 compounds per study in human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine or stool) samples. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to liquid chromatography-MS untargeted profiling (LC-MS). Hence, GC-MS is a mature technology that not only uses classic detectors (‘quadrupole’) but also target mass spectrometers (‘triple quadrupole’) and accurate mass instruments (‘quadrupole-time of flight’). This unit covers the following aspects of GC-MS-based metabolomics: (i) sample preparation from mammalian samples, (ii) acquisition of data, (iii) quality control, and (iv) data processing. PMID:27038389

  14. Determination of methomyl in the stomach contents of baited wildlife by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, John P; Bokhart, Mark; Johnson, Margaret; Lehner, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The poisoning of wildlife with fly-bait containing the active ingredient methomyl is an intentional and illegal act in many jurisdictions. A case of 2 animals poisoned by methomyl through consumption of tainted bait at multiple stations is described. Although thermally and ultraviolet-labile, methomyl can be identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and is detected in abundance in bait samples; however, it is not readily observed in tissues, owing to its rapid metabolism and elimination. The application of derivatizing functionalities, such as trimethylsilyl groups, stabilizes the methomyl-oxime metabolite to facilitate its detectability during exposure to the relatively harsh conditions of gas chromatography. This brief communication reports on the analytical detection of methomyl in baits and biological samples from poisoned wildlife. Essential to the case were the added determination of a fly-bait coactive ingredient, (Z)-9-tricosene, and identification of a chemical indicator, caffeine, to confirm both the type of pesticide product involved in the poisoning incident and the vehicle used to perpetrate its delivery.

  15. Identification of tartary buckwheat tea aroma compounds with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peiyou; Ma, Tingjun; Wu, Li; Shan, Fang; Ren, Guixing

    2011-08-01

    Tartary buckwheat tea, which is an important and healthy product, has a distinct malty aroma. However, its characteristic aroma compounds have not been elucidated. The aims of present study were identification and quantification of its aroma compounds. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after 3 different isolation techniques. Seventy-seven compounds were identified. Among these compounds, 35 were quantified by available standards. The compounds with a high probability of contribution to the tartary buckwheat tea aroma (OAV ≥ 10) were as follows: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, nonanal, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, benzeneacetaldehyde, maltol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine. Some nutritional and bioactive compounds were also identified in this study, such as linoleic acid, niacin, vanillic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin, butylated hydroxytoluene. Practical Application: Tartary buckwheat, one type of buckwheat, has gained much attention from nutritionists and medical doctors in recent years. It is rich in rutin, quercetin, and other nutrients that are good for health. Tartary buckwheat-based product such as tartary buckwheat tea is an important and popular healthy product in China, Japan,South Korea, European countries as well as in American countries. It has a distinct malty aroma. The present study first identified and quantified of its aroma compounds. The results will draw attention to other researchers in food flavor and buckwheat filed.

  16. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  17. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-10-16

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance.

  18. Determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 as emulsifier by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei-Fei; Yu, Jing; Hu, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Meng-Xia; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Hai-Ling; Han, Jie

    2011-06-03

    A novel approach for identification and determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 (sorbitol mono-oleate) as the emulsifier and their postblast residues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed. 24 kinds of emulsion explosives collected have been processed by transesterification reaction with metholic KOH solution and the emulsifier has turned into methyl esters of fatty acids. From the peak area ratios of their methyl esters, most of these emulsion explosives can be differentiated. In order to detect the postblast residues of emulsion explosives, the sorbitols in the emulsifier Span-80 obtained after transesterification reaction have been further derivatized by silylation reaction with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) as the derivatizing reagent. The derivatization conditions were optimized and the derivatives were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the silylation derivatives of sorbitol and it isomers, combined with hydrocarbon compounds and methyl esters of fatty acids, were the characteristic components for identification of the emulsion explosives. The established approach was applied to analyze the postblast residues of emulsion explosives. It has been found that the method was sensitive and specific, especially when detecting the derivatives of sorbitol and its isomers by GC-MS in selecting ion mode. The information of the characteristic components can help probe the origin of the emulsion explosives and providing scientific evidences and clues for solving the crimes of the emulsion explosive explosion.

  19. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72 μg/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734 mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health.

  20. Measurement of nitrite in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Suchy, Maria-Theresia; Mitschke, Anja; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is enzymatically produced from L-arginine and has a variety of biological functions. Autoxidation of NO in aqueous media yields nitrite (O = N-O(-)). NO and nitrite are oxidized in erythrocytes by oxyhemoglobin to nitrate (NO(3)(-)). Nitrate reductases from bacteria reduce nitrate to nitrite. Nitrite and nitrate are ubiquitous in nature, they are present throughout the body and they are excreted in the urine. Nitrite in urine has been used for several decades as an indicator and measure of bacteriuria. Since the identification of nitrite as a metabolite of NO, circulating nitrite is also used as an indicator of NO synthesis and is considered an NO storage form. In contrast to plasma nitrite, the significance of nitrite in the urine beyond bacteriuria is poorly investigated and understood. This chapter describes a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) protocol for the quantitative determination of nitrite in urine of humans. Although the method is useful for detection and quantification of bacteriuria, the procedures described herein are optimum for urinary nitrite in conditions other than urinary tract infection. The method uses [(15)N]nitrite as internal standard and pentafluorobenzyl bromide as the derivatization agent. Derivatization is -performed on 100-μL aliquots and quantification of toluene extracts by selected-ion monitoring of m/z 46 for urinary nitrite and m/z 47 for the internal standard in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode.

  1. Enantiomeric determination of DOPA in dietary supplements containing Mucuna pruriens by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazunaga; Fukiwake, Tomohide; Saijo, Masaaki; Motoki, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    We developed a simple and rapid liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method for the enantiomeric determination of DOPA in dietary supplements containing Mucuna pruriens. L- and D-DOPA were ultrasonically extracted with 1% formic acid aqueous solution. The isolated extracts were analyzed by LC/MS using a Crownpak CR (-) column at 30℃. The mass spectrometer was operated in the positive mode of electrospray ionization, and the mobile phase was aqueous formic acid (pH 2.0). L-DOPA-ring-d3 was used as an internal standard. The method was validated for a dietary supplement spiked with L- and D-DOPA at 50 and 500 μg/g, respectively, and the recoveries of the DOPA enantiomers were between 97.5% and 101.3%. Relative standard deviation values of repeatability and intermediate precision were less than 7%. The method was applied to 14 dietary supplements. L-DOPA was detected in these supplements in the range of 0.88-12.8 mg/unit. D-DOPA was not detected.

  2. Discriminating Hodgdon Pyrodex(®) and Triple Seven(®) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Routon, Benjamin J; Kocher, Brandon B; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-01-01

    Pyrodex(®) and Triple Seven(®) are black powder substitutes that often find use as fillers in improvised explosive devices, such as pipe bombs. These propellants have essentially the same overall appearance and oxidizers, but different fuels. For example, Pyrodex(®) contains sulfur, sodium benzoate, and dicyandiamide (DCDA), whereas Triple Seven(®) lacks sulfur but also contains 3-nitrobenzoic acid. In this method, intact particles and postblast solid residues were reacted with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide + 1% trimethylchlorosilane in acetonitrile for 30 min at 60°C. The resultant trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic fuels were then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Each derivative was clearly resolved from other components, and high-quality mass spectra were obtained. In addition, characteristic fragments resulting from loss of a methyl radical from the molecular ion (m/z 163 for sulfur, m/z 171 for DCDA, m/z 179 for benzoic acid, and m/z 224 for nitrobenzoic acid) were able to be monitored.

  3. Quantification of busulfan in plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following derivatization with tetrafluorothiophenol.

    PubMed

    Quernin, M H; Poonkuzhali, B; Montes, C; Krishnamoorthy, R; Dennison, D; Srivastava, A; Vilmer, E; Chandy, M; Jacqz-Aigrain, E

    1998-05-08

    A specific and highly sensitive method has been developed for the determination of busulfan in plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a deuterium-labeled busulfan (busulfan-d8) as internal standard. Plasma containing busulfan and busulfan-d8 were extracted with ethyl acetate and derivatized with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorothiophenol prior to the monitoring of specific ions. The limit of quantification of the assay was 20 ng/ml and the calibration curve was linear over the range of 10 to 2000 ng/ml of derivatized busulfan. This method was in good agreement with the GC-MS assay using derivatization with sodium iodide and measuring diiodobutane. In addition, a pharmacokinetic study of busulfan was conducted in six children. The apparent oral clearance was 5.7+/-1.9 ml/kg/min and the volume of distribution was 1.0+/-0.4 l/kg and were similar to those previously reported in pediatric patients.

  4. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to monitor detergents removal from a membrane protein sample.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Han, Fang; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2009-12-01

    In membrane protein biochemical and structural studies, detergents are used to mimic membrane environment and maintain functional, stable conformation of membrane proteins in the absence of lipid bilayers. However, detergent concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent is usually unknown. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) method was developed to quantify four detergents which are frequently used in membrane protein structural studies. To remove excessive detergents, a filtered centrifugation using Centricon tubes was applied. A membrane protein Ig-Beta fragment in four different detergent micelles was exemplified. Detergent concentrations in the upper and lower fraction of the Centricon tube were measured after each round of centrifugation. The results were very consistent to basic properties of detergent micelles in aqueous solvents. Therefore, coupling of GC-MS-SIM and detergent removal by Centricon tubes, detergents concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent could be controlled, which will expedite membrane protein structural and biochemical studies.

  5. Determination of terpenes in tequila by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; Capella, Santiago; Juárez, Rocío; Labastida, Carmen

    2006-11-17

    Solid phase microextraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for the determination of seven terpenes in tequila. The method was selected based on the following parameters: coating selection (PA, PDMS, CW/DVB, and PDMS/DVB), extraction temperature, addition of salt, and extraction time profile. The extraction conditions were: PDMS/DVB fiber, Headspace, 100% NaCl, 25 degrees C extraction temperature, 30 min extraction time and stirring at 1200 rpm. The calibration curves (50-1000 ng/ml) for the terpenes followed linear relationships with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.99, except for trans,trans-farnesol (r = 0.98). RSD values were smaller than 10% confirmed that the technique was precise. Samples from 18 different trade brands of "Aged" tequila analyzed with the developed method showed the same terpenes in different concentrations. The analytical procedure used is selective, robust (more than 100 analyses with the same fiber), fast and of low-cost.

  6. Isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for determination of pyrethroids in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Siu-kay; Yu, Kwok-chiu; Lam, Chi-ho

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the development of a highly precise and accurate analytical method for the determination of three matrix-bound pyrethroids, namely, cypermethrin, permethrin, and bifenthrin, using an isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. Identification of the analytes was confirmed under selective ion monitoring mode by the presence of two dominant ion fragments within specific time windows and matching of relative ion intensities of the ions concerned in samples and calibration standards. Quantitation was based on the measurement of concentration ratios of the natural and isotope analogues in the sample and calibration blends. Intraday and interday repeatabilities of replicate analyses of the pyethroids in an apple juice sample were below 0.5%. The expanded relative uncertainty ranged from 3 to 6%, which was significantly lower than the range obtained using internal or external calibration methods. As a labeled analogue is not available for bifenthrin, bifenthrin was determined using labeled cis-permethrin as the internal standard. The results were counterchecked by a gas chromatography-electron capture detection technique using PCB 209 as the internal standard. The method developed was applied to a recent pilot study organized by CCQM and the results were consistent with those of other participants.

  7. Determination of beta-hydroxybutyrate in blood and urine using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Huda M A; Cooper, Gail A A

    2009-10-01

    Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is considered a potential biomarker for alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). A robust and sensitive method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of BHB in postmortem blood and urine using deuterated gamma-hydroxybutyrate as an internal standard. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following liquid-liquid extraction and silyl derivatization. The limits of detection and lower limits of quantification in blood and urine were 2 and 7 mg/L and 2 and 6 mg/L, respectively. The interday and intraday precision was measured by coefficients of variation for blood and urine and ranged from 1.0 to 12.4% for quality control samples spiked at 50 and 300 mg/L. The linear range of 50-500 mg/L resulted in an average correlation of R(2) > 0.99, and the average extraction recoveries in blood and urine were >or= 82% and >or= 59%, respectively. BHB remains stable in blood spiked at a concentration of 300 mg/L for 15 days when stored within a refrigerator (2-5 degrees C). Postmortem blood and urine samples were analyzed using the validated method for cases where the deceased had a history of chronic alcohol abuse to establish the use of BHB as a potential marker of AKA.

  8. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiles of urinary organic acids in healthy captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Tordiffe, Adrian Stephen Wolferstan; van Reenen, Mari; Reyers, Fred; Mienie, Lodewyk Jacobus

    2017-04-01

    In captivity, cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) frequently suffer from several unusual chronic diseases that rarely occur in their free-ranging counterparts. In order to develop a better understanding of their metabolism and health we documented the urine organic acids of 41 apparently healthy captive cheetahs, in an untargeted metabolomic study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 339 organic acids were detected and annotated. Phenolic compounds, thought to be produced by the anaerobic fermentation of aromatic amino acids in the distal colon, as well as their corresponding glycine conjugates, were present in high concentrations. The most abundant organic acids in the cheetahs' urine were an as yet unidentified compound and a novel cadaverine metabolite, tentatively identified as N(1),N(5)-dimethylpentane-1,5-diamine. Pantothenic acid and citramalic acid concentrations correlated negatively with age, while glutaric acid concentrations correlated positively with age, suggesting possible dysregulation of coenzyme A metabolism in older cheetahs. This study provides a baseline of urine organic acid reference values in captive cheetahs and suggests important avenues for future research in this species.

  9. Contributions of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to "highlights" of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Gelpí, Emilio

    2003-06-06

    Combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques and in particular liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) have been contributing in a decisive way to the progress of life sciences in general. Thus, the number of document entries in the US National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE) for articles dealing with LC-MS was 738 in 1991 and 2285 in 2001, with a total of 13 147 for the whole 10-year period, an increase of 310%. From these figures, we can ascertain that the total usage of combined LC-MS techniques is of the order of 40% relative to all of the MS publications collected in MEDLINE for the same period. However, from the perspective of real advances in medicine, it becomes difficult to identify what is outstanding in this field. The aim of this review was not to provide another LC-MS review, but an overview of the current status of the presence, visibility and impact of combined LC-MS techniques in biomedical research. The idea being to spot "highlight" literature contributions with the potential to become in the short or medium term real assets in a doctor's daily medical practice. In other words, after several truly remarkable technical achievements reported within the past decade, are we any closer to making LC-MS a useful and practical diagnostic tool for molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine? To approach this question, a literature survey was carried out to define: (i) the presence of LC-MS in the biomedical literature (MEDLINE) and its weight relative to the whole field of biological and biomedical mass spectrometry; (ii) the role of LC-MS in recent milestone biomedical contributions; and (iii) the present and future role of new LC-MS technology in medical diagnosis.

  10. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by microwave-assisted silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for simultaneous trace quantification of bisphenol A and 13 ultraviolet filters in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2015-10-02

    A novel multi-residue gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was validated for the simultaneous determination of trace levels (ng/L) of 13 UV-filters and bisphenol A (BPA) in wastewater samples. It was based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLMME) followed by rapid microwave-assisted silylation of the analytes. Several parameters of both extraction and derivatization steps such as type of extractive and dispersive solvents, solvent volumes, pH, salt addition, time and power of microwave were evaluated to achieve the highest yield and to attain the lowest detection limits. Optimized DLLME consisted in the formation of a cloudy solution promoted by the fast addition to the sample (10mL) of a mixture of tetrachloroethylene (50μL, extraction solvent) in acetone (1mL, dispersive solvent). The sedimented phase obtained was evaporated and further silylated under the irradiation of 600W microwave for 5min, being the derivatization yields similar to those obtained after a conventional heating process for 30min at 75°C. Limits of detection and quantification of the method using real samples were 2ng/L and 10ng/L, respectively. Mean extraction efficiency of 82% for three concentrations were achieved, supporting the accuracy of the method. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability of measurements (expressed as relative standard deviation) were lower than 22%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of UV-filters and BPA in samples collected from 15 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Portugal. Eight analytes were detected, among which 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate, octocrylene, and BPA were consistently found in the three seasons of collection.

  11. Monitoring of atmospheric gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in South African platinum mines utilising portable denuder sampling with analysis by thermal desorption-comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, G; Rohwer, E R; Naudé, Y; Forbes, P B C

    2015-02-06

    Concentrations of diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in platinum mine environments are likely to be higher than in ambient air due to the use of diesel machinery in confined environments. Airborne PAHs may be present in gaseous or particle phases each of which has different human health impacts due to their ultimate fate in the body. Here we report on the simultaneous sampling of both phases of airborne PAHs for the first time in underground platinum mines in South Africa, which was made possible by employing small, portable denuder sampling devices consisting of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) multi-channel traps connected in series separated by a quartz fibre filter, which only require small, battery operated portable personal sampling pumps for air sampling. Thermal desorption coupled with comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TofMS) was used to analyse denuder samples taken in three different platinum mines. The samples from a range of underground environments revealed that PAHs were predominantly found in the gas phase with naphthalene and mono-methylated naphthalene derivatives being detected at the highest concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 18 μg m(-3). The particle bound PAHs were found in the highest concentrations at the idling load haul dump vehicle exhausts with a dominance of fluoranthene and pyrene. Particle associated PAH concentrations ranged from 0.47 to 260 ng m(-3) and included benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene. This work highlights the need to characterise both phases in order to assess occupational exposure to PAHs in this challenging sampling environment.

  12. Combined speciation analysis by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, ion chromatography, and solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate biotreatment of concentrated selenium wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Markus; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Farges, François; Nikitenko, Sergei; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lens, Piet N L

    2011-02-01

    In this study we evaluate the potential of anaerobic granular sludge as an inoculum for the bioremediation of selenium-contaminated waters using species-specific analytical methods. Solid species formed by microbial reduction were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the selenium K-edge. Furthermore, dissolved selenium species were specifically determined by ion chromatography (IC) and solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). Least-squares linear combination of the XANES spectra for samples incubated with the highest selenate/selenite concentrations (10(-3) M) show the predominance of elemental selenium and a Se(-I) selenide, such as ferroselite, the thermodynamically most stable iron selenide. In contrast, elemental selenium and Se(-II) selenides are the main species detected at the lower selenate/selenite concentrations. In each repeated fed batch incubation, most aqueous selenite anions were converted into solid selenium species, regardless of the type of electron donor used (acetate or H(2)/CO(2)) and the selenium concentration applied. On the other hand, at higher concentrations of selenate (10(-4) and 10(-3) M), significant amounts of the oxyanion remained unconverted after consecutive incubations. SPME-GC-MS demonstrated selenium alkylation with both electron donors investigated, as dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and dimethyl diselenide (DMDSe). Selenite was even more alkylated in the presence of H(2)/CO(2) (maximum 2156 μg of Se/L of DMSe + DMDSe) as compared to acetate (maximum 50 μg of Se/L). In contrast, selenate was less alkylated using both electron donors (maximum 166 and 3 μg of Se/L, respectively). The high alkylation potential for selenite limits its bioremediation in selenium laden waters involving H(2)/CO(2) as the electron donor despite the fact that nontoxic elemental selenium and thermodynamically stable metal selenide species are formed.

  13. Analysis of phenolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in potato plant flowers, leaves, stems, and tubers and in home-processed potatoes.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyon Woon; Suh, Bong-Soon; Lee, Seung-Un; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Ohnisi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Levin, Carol E; Friedman, Mendel

    2008-05-14

    Potato plants synthesize phenolic compounds as protection against bruising and injury from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Because antioxidative phenolic compounds are also reported to participate in enzymatic browning reactions and to exhibit health-promoting effects in humans, a need exists for accurate methods to measure their content in fresh and processed potatoes. To contribute to our knowledge about the levels of phenolic compounds in potatoes, we validated and used high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure levels of chlorogenic acid, a chlorogenic isomer, and caffeic acid in flowers, leaves, stems, and tubers of the potato plant and in home-processed potatoes. The total phenolic acid content of flowers (626 mg/100 g fresh wt) was 21 and 59 times greater than that of leaves and stems, respectively. For all samples, chlorogenic acid and its isomer contributed 96-98% to the total. Total phenolic acid levels (in g/100 g fresh wt) of peels of five potato varieties grown in Korea ranged from 6.5 to 42.1 and of the flesh (pulp) from 0.5 to 16.5, with peel/pulp ratios ranging from 2.6 to 21.1. The total phenolic acid content for 25 American potatoes ranged from 1.0 to 172. The highest amounts were present in red and purple potatoes. Home processing of pulp with various forms of heat induced reductions in the phenolic content. The described methodology should facilitate future studies on the role of potato phenolic compounds in the plant and the diet.

  14. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful f