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Sample records for chromium carbide coating

  1. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  2. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  3. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  4. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  5. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  6. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  7. A new chromium carbide-based tribological coating for use to 900 C with particular reference to the Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    A new chromium carbide-based coating (PS 200) is described. This coating is shown to have good friction and wear properties over a wide temperature range. A nickel alloy-bonded chromium carbide coating was used as a baseline material for comparison with experimentally formulated coatings. Coatings were plasma sprayed onto metal disks, then diamond ground to a thickness of 0.025 cm. Friction and wear were determined using a pin on disk tribometer at temperatures from 25 to 900 C in hydrogen, helium, and air. Pin materials included several metallic alloys and silicon carbide. It was found that appropriate additions of metallic silver and of barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic to the baseline carbide composition significantly reduced friction coefficients while preserving, and in some cases, even enhancing wear resistance. The results of this study demonstrate that PS 200 is a promising coating composition to consider for high temperature aerospace and advanced heat engine applications. The excellent results in hydrogen make this coating of particular interest for use in the Stirling engine.

  8. Composition optimization of chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings at temperatures to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A test program to determine the optimum composition of chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for compliant gas bearings is described. The friction and wear properties of the coatings are evaluated using a foil gas bearing test apparatus. The various coatings were prepared by powder blending, then plasma sprayed onto Inconel 718 test journals and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness and surface finish. The journals were operated against preoxidized nickel-chromium alloy foils. The test bearings were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14 kPa (2 psi) bearing unit load. The bearings were tested for 9000 start/stop cycles or until the specimen wear reached a predetermined failure level. In general, the addition of silver and eutectic to the chromium carbide base stock significantly reduced foil wear and increased journal coating wear. The optimum coating composition, PS212 (70 wt% metal bonded Cr3C2, 15 wt% Ag, 15% BaF2/CaF2 eutectic), reduced foil wear by a factor of two and displayed coating wear well within acceptable limits. The load capacity of the bearing using the plasma-sprayed coating prior to and after a run-in period was ascertained and compared to polished Inconel 718 specimens.

  9. Effects of atmosphere on the tribological properties of a chromium carbide based coating for use to 760 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of atmosphere on the tribological properties of a plasma-sprayed chromium carbide based self-lubricating coating is reported. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock to which the lubricants silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic are added. It has been denoted as NASA PS200. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring couples for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. Friction and wear studies were performed in helium, hydrogen, and moist air at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. In general, the atmosphere had a significant effect on both the friction and the wear of the coating and counterface material. Specimens tested in hydrogen, a reducing environment, exhibited the best tribological properties. Friction and wear increased in helium and air but are still within acceptable limits for intended applications. A variety of X-ray analyses was performed on the test specimens in an effort to explain the results. The following conclusions are made: (1) As the test atmosphere becomes less reducing, the coating experiences a higher concentration level of chromic oxide at the sliding interface which increases both the friction and wear. (2) Beneficial silver transfer from the parent coating to the counter-face material is less effective in air than in helium or hydrogen. (3) There may be a direct relationship between chromic oxide level present at the sliding interface and the friction coefficient.

  10. The effects of atmosphere on the tribological properties of a chromium carbide based coating for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of atmosphere on the tribological properties of a plasma-sprayed chromium carbide based self-lubricating coating is reported. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock to which the lubricants silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic are added. It has been denoted as NASA PS200. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring couples Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. Friction and wear studies were performed in helium, hydrogen, and moist air at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. In general, the atmosphere had a significant effect on both the friction and the wear of the coating and counterface material. Specimens tested in hydrogen, a reducing environment, exhibited the best tribological properties. Friction and wear increased in helium and air but are still within acceptable limits for intended applications. A variety of X-ray analyses was performed on the test specimens in an effort to explain the results. The following conclusions are made: (1) As the test atmosphere becomes less reducing, the coating experiences a higher concentration level of chromic oxide at the sliding interface which increases both the friction and wear. (2) Beneficial silver transfer from the parent coating to the counter-face material is less effective in air than in helium or hydrogen. (3) There may be a direct relationship between chromic oxide level present at the sliding interface and the friction coefficient.

  11. Tribological composition optimization of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings at temperatures to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    The determination of the tribilogically optimum composition of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings using a foil gas bearing test apparatus is described. The coatings contain a wear resistant chromium carbide `base stock' with the lubricant additives silver and BaF2-CaF2 eutectic. The coating composition is optimized for air-lubricated foil gas bearings at temperatures ranging from 25 to 650 C. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending, then plasma sprayed onto Inconel 718 test journals and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness and surface finish. The journals were operated against preoxidized Ni-Cr alloy foils, and the test bearings were subjected to repeated start-stop cycles under a bearing unit of 14 kPa. Sliding contact between the coated journal and the smooth foil occurs during bearing start-up before lift-off or hydrodynamic lubrication by the air film and during bearing coast-down. The bearings were tested for 9000 start-stop cycles or until specimen reached a predetermined failure level.

  12. A new chromium carbide-based tribological coating for use to 900 deg C with particular reference to the Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    A new chromium carbide-based coating (PS 200) is described. This coating is shown to have good friction and wear properties over a wide temperature range. A nickel alloy-bonded chromium carbide coating was used as a baseline material for comparison with experimental formulated coatings. Coatings were plasma sprayed onto metal disks, then diamond ground to a thickness of 0.025 cm. Friction and wear were determined using a pin on disk tribometer at temperatures from 25 to 900 C in hydrogen, helium, and air. Pin materials included several metallic alloys and silicon carbide. It was found that appropriate additions of metallic silver and of barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic to the baseline carbide composition significantly reduced friction coefficients while preserving, and in some cases, even enhancing wear resistance. The results of this study demonstrate that PS 200 is a promising coating composition to consider for high temperature aerospace and advanced heat engine applications. The excellent results in hydrogen make this coating of particular interest for use in the Stirling engine.

  13. Effects of silver and group II fluoride solid lubricant additions to plasma-sprayed chromium carbide coatings for foil gas bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start-stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 748. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The additional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-Psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rPm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  14. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  15. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  16. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  17. Effect of Particle Morphology on Cold Spray Deposition of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Cermet Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Ruben; Jodoin, Bertrand

    2017-08-01

    Nickel chromium-chromium carbide coatings provide good corrosion and wear resistance at high temperatures, making them ideal for applications where a harsh environment and high temperatures are expected. Thermal spray processes are preferred as deposition technique of cermets, but the high process temperatures can lead to decarburization and reduction of the coatings properties. Cold spray uses lower temperatures preventing decarburization. Since the metallic phase remains solid, the feedstock powder morphology becomes crucial on the deposition behavior. Six commercially available powders were studied, varying in morphology and metal/ceramic ratios. The powders were categorized into 4 groups depending on their morphology. Spherical powders lead to substrate erosion due to their limited overall ductility. Porous agglomerated and sintered powders lead to severely cracked coatings. For dense agglomerated and sintered powders, the outcome depended on the initial metal/ceramic ratio: powders with 25 wt.% NiCr led to substrate erosion while 35 wt.% NiCr powders led to dense coatings. Finally, blended ceramic-metal mixtures also lead to dense coatings. All coatings obtained had lower ceramic content than the initial feedstock powders. Interrupted spray tests, combined with FEA, helped drawing conclusions on the deposition behavior to explain the obtained results.

  18. Electrodeposition of Refractory Carbide Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-30

    refractory carbide coatings from molten salts is described. It consists of the simultaneous reduction of the appropriate metal species dissolved in the...Electrodeposition Molden salts 20. ASSTRACT (Continue an reve.e. 0g.. It necooom wed identify bp block nu.be) A novel method for electrodepositing...respectively. Electrolysis resulted in the formation of millimeter-size crystals on the walls of the graphite crucible which served as the cathode. Analysis of

  19. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  20. A study of lubrication, processing conditions, and material combinations that affect the wear of micro-textured-carbide coated cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy surfaces used for artificial joints implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettienne-Modeste, Geriel A.

    Total joint replacement remains one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. The most common materials used for artificial joints are metals (e.g., cobalt-chrome alloys or titanium alloys), which articulate against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Wear related failures of artificial joints may be reduced with the use of novel micro-textured carbide surfaces. The micro-textured carbide surfaces were deposited on a CoCrMo alloy using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Wear tests were conducted to determine wear mechanisms and properties of the micro-textured surfaces. The research presented in this thesis addresses: (1) rheolgoical behavior of bovine calf serum with and without antibacterial agents to determine whether they can be used as appropriate models for synovial fluid, (2) the wear behavior of the micro-textured CoCrMo surface system, and (3) the mechanical and material properties of the micro-textured CoCrMo alloy surface relevant to wear performance. The rheological studies showed that the apparent viscosity of bovine calf serum increased with an increase in concentration before and after the serum was used for wear testing. The wear analysis showed that the processing conditions (2hr deposition vs. 4hr deposition times) affected the wear properties. The 2hr carbide-on-carbide lubricated in 50% BCS produced the lowest wear factor and rate for the five wear couple systems containing the carbide disk or plate material. Greater wear was produced in serum without penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) compared to the serum containing P/S. A greater carbide coating thickness 10 (micrometers) was produced during the 4hr deposition time than for the 2hr deposition (˜3mum). The nano-hardness value was higher than the micro-hardness for both the 4hr and 2hr carbide surfaces. The micro-hardness results of the worn carbide surfaces showed that an increase in BCS concentration from 0% to 100% increased the micro-hardness (HV) for carbide

  1. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of protective-coupling layers of refractory metal carbides on the graphite fibers prior to their incorporation into composites is presented. Such layers should be directly wettable by liquid aluminum and should act as diffusion barriers to prevent the formation of aluminum carbide. Chemical vapor deposition was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of ZrC on the carbon fibers of tows derived from both rayon and polyacrylonitrile. A wet chemical coating of the fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was used, and showed promise as an alternative coating method. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the ability of aluminum alloys to wet carbide surfaces. Titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and carbide-coated graphite surfaces were successfully wetted. Results indicate that initial attempts to wet surfaces of ZrC-coated carbon fibers appear successful.

  2. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Kane, J.S.; Carpenter, J.H.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1962-01-16

    A method is given for coating graphite with a hard, tenacious layer of niobium carbide up to 30 mils or more thick. The method makes use of the discovery that niobium metal, if degassed and heated rapidly below the carburization temperature in contact with graphite, spreads, wets, and penetrates the graphite without carburization. The method includes the obvious steps of physically contacting niobium powders or other physical forms of niobium with graphite, degassing the assembly below the niobium melting point, e.g., 1400 deg C, heating to about 2200 to 2400 deg C within about 15 minutes while outgassing at a high volume throughput, and thereafter carburizing the niobium. (AEC)

  3. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  4. Investigation of Carbide Precipitation Process and Chromium Depletion during Thermal Treatment of Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, S. Y.; Zhang, M. C.; Zheng, L.; Dong, J. X.

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the effect of heat treatment on carbide morphology and chromium concentration distribution, which are critical to the resistance of alloy 690 to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), a series of thermal treatments was performed. A model taking into account the intercorrelated dynamic process between the carbide precipitation and chemical diffusion of the chromium atom from matrix to grain boundary (GB) was constructed on the basis of classical nucleation theory, Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami law, and diffusion theory. The validity of this model was evaluated by comparing the simulated results of the carbide average size and chromium concentration near the GB with the corresponding measured results. A discontinuous factor was introduced based on the relation linking the interdistance between the carbides and the carbide average size; thus, the carbide morphology and chromium concentration could be predicted by this model. According to the results of the experiments and simulations, a carbide discontinuous factor smaller than 2.2 together with the chromium concentration at the GB higher than a critical value (21 wt pct) were essential for the corrosion resistance ability of the alloy, and then some proper heat-treatment conditions were obtained through predicting the value of the two variables. In addition, the effects of the grain size and composition variation on the carbide discontinuous factor and chromium concentration profile were simulated. The results indicated that an intermediate grain size of approximately 31.8 to ~63.5 μm was beneficial for effectively improving the resistance of the alloy to SCC. Simultaneously, the carbon content should be adjusted near 0.02 pct, and the chromium content should be the highest possible in its chemical composition scale.

  5. Electrodeposition of Dense Chromium Coatings from Molten Salt Electrolytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    AD-A235 978 . JUN 03 391 ELECTRODEPOSITION OF DENSE CHROMIUM COATINGS FROM MOLTEN SALT ELECTROLYTES Final Technical Report J t ]Vgca or by ~ 4 OTC... molten salts , pulsed currents, electrodeposition. 2. The results, on the electrodeposition of dense chromium coatings from molten salt electrolytes... salts dissolved in molten salts using the cell Cl2/C/!Cr 2 + in LiCI-KCI//Cr metal The chromium ions are introduced by anodizing a piece of chromium and

  6. Method of forming impermeable carbide coats on graphite

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of forming an impermeable refractory metal carbide coating on graphite is described in which a metal containing oxidant and a carbide former are applied to the surface of the graphite, heated to a temperature of between 1200 and 1500 deg C in an inert gas, under a vacuum and continuing to heat to about 2300 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  7. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    PubMed

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  9. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    1-Evaluate trivalent chromium pretreatment (TCP) for use on aluminum  2-Evaluate three hexavalent chrome free alternatives to DoD-P-15328 wash...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  11. Surface coating metrology of carbides of cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, V. D.; Basova, G. D.

    2017-10-01

    The coatings were studied by their main sign of the micrometric thickness by means of coating destruction and electron microscopical study of cleavage surfaces. Shock stress ruptures of heated carbides of cutting tools were performed. The discovery of the coating technology and creation of the coating structure for nonuniform and nonequilibrium conditions of the cutting process were dealt with. Multifracture microdestruction of nitride coatings, caused by complex external influences, was analysed to reveal the mechanism of interaction of elementary failures. Positive results were obtained in the form of improving the strength and wear resistance of the product, crack resistance increasing.

  12. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  13. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  14. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  15. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Thin, uniform coats of titanium carbide, deposited on graphite fibers by chemical vapor deposition with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 microns were shown to improve fiber strength significantly. For greater thicknesses, strength was degraded. The coats promote wetting of the fibers and infiltration of the fiber yarns with aluminum alloys, and act as protective barriers to inhibit reaction between the fibers and the alloys. Chemical vapor deposition was used to produce silicon carbide coats on graphite fibers. In general, the coats were nonuniform and were characterized by numerous surface irregularities. Despite these irregularities, infiltration of these fibers with aluminum alloys was good. Small graphite-aluminum composite samples were produced by vacuum hot-pressing of aluminum-infiltrated graphite yarn at temperatures above the metal liquidus.

  16. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  17. Low Temperature Synthesis of Cobalt-Chromium Carbide Nanoparticles-Doped Carbon Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ayman; Brooks, Robert M; Abutaleb, Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; El-Newehy, Mohamed H

    2018-04-01

    Electrospinning has been used to synthesize cobalt-chromium carbide nanoparticles (NPs)-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) (Composite). Electrospun mat comprising of cobalt acetate, chromium acetate and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been carbonized at low temperature (850 °C) for 3 h under argon atmosphere to produce the introduced composite. The process was achieved at low temperature due to the presence of cobalt as an activator. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with EDX techniques were used to determine the products characteristics. The results indicated the formation of pure cobalt (Co), Cr7C3 NPs and crystalline CNFs. The Co and Cr7C3 NPs were covered with CNFs. Overall, the proposed NFs open new avenue to prepare different metals-metal carbides-carbon NFs at low temperature and short reaction time.

  18. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOEpatents

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  19. Effects of silver and group 2 fluorides addition to plasma sprayed chromium carbide high temperature solid lubricant for foil gas bearing to 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start/stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 718. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The addtitional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rpm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  20. An experimental study of flank wear in the end milling of AISI 316 stainless steel with coated carbide inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odedeyi, P. B.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Liman, M.

    2017-05-01

    Stainless steel 316 is a difficult-to-machine iron-based alloys that contain minimum of about 12% of chromium commonly used in marine and aerospace industry. This paper presents an experimental study of the tool wear propagation variations in the end milling of stainless steel 316 with coated carbide inserts. The milling tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds while feed rate and depth of cut were at (0.02, 0.06 and 01) mm/rev and (1, 2 and 3) mm, respectively. The cutting tool used was TiAlN-PVD-multi-layered coated carbides. The effects of cutting speed, cutting tool coating top layer and workpiece material were investigated on the tool life. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined flank wears values. With increasing cutting speed, the flank wear values decreased. The experimental results showed that significant flank wear was the major and predominant failure mode affecting the tool life.

  1. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  2. Porosity and wear resistance of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed coatings offer practical and economical solutions for corrosion and wear protection of components or tools. To improve the coating properties, heat treatment such as preheat is applied. The selection of coating and substrate materials is a key factor in improving the quality of the coating morphology after the heat treatment. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of preheat temperatures, i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C, on porosity and wear resistance of tungsten carbide (WC) coating sprayed by flame thermal coating. The powders and coatings morphology were analyzed by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDS), whereas the phase identification was performed by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD). In order to evaluate the quality of the flame spray obtained coatings, the porosity, micro-hardness and wear rate of the specimens was determined. The results showed that WC coating gives a higher surface hardness from 1391 HVN up to 1541 HVN compared to that of the non-coating. Moreover, the wear rate increased from 0.072 mm3/min. to 0.082 mm3/min. when preheat temperature was increased. Preheat on H13 steel substrate can reduce the percentage of porosity level from 10.24 % to 3.94% on the thermal spray coatings.

  3. The hazardous hexavalent chromium formed on trivalent chromium conversion coating: The origin, influence factors and control measures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Yao, Chenlan; Liu, Yanbiao; Li, Di; Zhou, Baoxue; Cai, Weimin

    2012-06-30

    In this paper, the effects of processing parameters and constituents of treating-agent on the presence of hazardous hexavalent chromium on trivalent chromium conversion coating were studied. Results showed that shorter immersion time, lower bath pH value as well as lower working and baking temperatures retarded the presence of hexavalent chromium. In addition, the concentration of hexavalent chromium on conversion coatings prepared by the oxalic acid treating-agent was far greater than those on conversion coatings prepared by formic acid and acetic acid treating-agents. Results also indicated that the concentration of hexavalent chromium on conversion coatings was enhanced due to the addition of bivalent cobalt and nitrate anion in treating-agent, especially for oxalic acid conversion coating. However, the addition of hydroxyl compound d-gluconic acid in treating-agent could reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium effectively. Moreover, a possible formation mechanism of hexavalent chromium on trivalent conversion coating was proposed. Findings of this study provide a better understanding of the formation of hexavalent chromium on trivalent chromium conversion coating and can facilitate the management of trivalent chromium treating-agents and trivalent chromium fasteners. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  5. Semi-solid processing of high-chromium tool steel to obtain microstructures without carbide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirková, H.; Aišman, D.; Rubešová, K.; Opatová, K.; Mašek, B.

    2017-02-01

    Treatment of high-alloy tool steels that involves transition to the semi-solid state can transform the sharp-edged primary carbides which usually form during solidification. These carbides severely impair toughness and are virtually impossible to eliminate by conventional treatment routes. Upon classical semi-solid processing which dissolves these carbides, the resulting microstructure consists of polyhedral and super-saturated austenite embedded in lamellar austenite-carbide network. This type of microstructure reflects in the mechanical properties, predominantly in material behaviour under tensile loading. Such a network, however, can be removed by appropriate thermomechanical treatment. In the present experiment, various procedures involving heating to the semi-solid state were tested on X210Cr12 tool steel. The feedstock was heated to the temperature range of 1220 - 1280 °C. The heating was followed by procedures involving either water quenching to the forming temperature, room temperature or temperature from the range from 500 °C to 1000 °C followed by reheating to the forming temperature. It was found that the development of the lamellar network strongly depends on the temperature of heating to semi-solid state. Thermomechanical treatment produced microstructures in which the matrix consisted of a mixture of polyhedral austenite grains and the M-A constituent. In addition, the initial lamellar eutectic network was partially or even completely melted and substituted with a mixture of very fine recrystallized austenite grains and precipitates of chromium carbides. Some fine M7C3 carbides were present in the austenitic-martensitic matrix as well. When appropriate processing parameters were chosen, very good mechanical properties were obtained, among them a hardness of 860 HV10.

  6. PROCESS OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM-TITANIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Halden, F.A.; Smiley, W.D.; Hruz, F.M.

    1961-07-01

    A process of coating graphite with niobium - titanium carbide is described. It is found that the addition of more than ten percent by weight of titanium to niobium results in much greater wetting of the graphite by the niobium and a much more adherent coating. The preferred embodiment comprises contacting the graphite with a powdered alloy or mixture, degassing simultaneously the powder and the graphite, and then heating them to a high temperature to cause melting, wetting, spreading, and carburization of the niobium-titanium powder.

  7. Effect of Carbide Dissolution on Chlorine Induced High Temperature Corrosion of HVOF and HVAF Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCrMoNb Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantozzi, D.; Matikainen, V.; Uusitalo, M.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Highly corrosion- and wear-resistant thermally sprayed chromium carbide (Cr3C2)-based cermet coatings are nowadays a potential highly durable solution to allow traditional fluidized bed combustors (FBC) to be operated with ecological waste and biomass fuels. However, the heat input of thermal spray causes carbide dissolution in the metal binder. This results in the formation of carbon saturated metastable phases, which can affect the behavior of the materials during exposure. This study analyses the effect of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix of Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb coatings and its effect on chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. Four coatings were thermally sprayed with HVAF and HVOF techniques in order to obtain microstructures with increasing amount of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix. The coatings were heat-treated in an inert argon atmosphere to induce secondary carbide precipitation. As-sprayed and heat-treated self-standing coatings were covered with KCl, and their corrosion resistance was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ordinary high-temperature corrosion test at 550 °C for 4 and 72 h, respectively. High carbon dissolution in the metal matrix appeared to be detrimental against chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. The microstructural changes induced by the heat treatment hindered the corrosion onset in the coatings.

  8. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  9. Effect of metallic coating on the properties of copper-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Pietrzak, K.; Teodorczyk, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Jarząbek, D.; Zybała, R.; Bazarnik, P.; Lewandowska, M.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2017-11-01

    In the presented paper a coating of SiC particles with a metallic layer was used to prepare copper matrix composite materials. The role of the layer was to protect the silicon carbide from decomposition and dissolution of silicon in the copper matrix during the sintering process. The SiC particles were covered by chromium, tungsten and titanium using Plasma Vapour Deposition method. After powder mixing of components, the final densification process via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method at temperature 950 °C was provided. The almost fully dense materials were obtained (>97.5%). The microstructure of obtained composites was studied using scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis of composites confirmed that regardless of the type of deposited material, there is no evidence for decomposition process of silicon carbide in copper. In order to measure the strength of the interface between ceramic particles and the metal matrix, the micro tensile tests have been performed. Furthermore, thermal diffusivity was measured with the use of the laser pulse technique. In the context of performed studies, the tungsten coating seems to be the most promising solution for heat sink application. Compared to pure composites without metallic layer, Cu-SiC with W coating indicate the higher tensile strength and thermal diffusitivy, irrespective of an amount of SiC reinforcement. The improvement of the composite properties is related to advantageous condition of Cu-SiC interface characterized by well homogenity and low porosity, as well as individual properties of the tungsten coating material.

  10. 77 FR 32998 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4325 (May 2012), entitled Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan...

  11. Carbothermal synthesis of coatings on silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linlin

    Four kinds of protective coatings---carbide derived carbon (CDC), boron nitride (BN), Al-O-N and BN doped Al-O-N (BAN) have been successfully synthesized on the surface of SiC fibers on the target to enhance the mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of the coated SiC fibers for the application as the reinforcements in the Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) in the high temperatures. First of all, CDC coatings have been uniformly produced on Tyranno ZMI SiC fibers with good thickness control within nanometer accuracy by the chlorination in the temperature range of 550--700°C at atmospheric pressure. Kinetics of the carbon coating growth on the fibers has been systematically studied and thus a good foundation was set up for the further coating synthesis. BN coatings have been synthesized on the surface of SiC powders, fibers and fabrics by a novel carbothermal nitridation method. Non-bridging has been achieved in the BN-coated fiber tows by the nitridation in ammonia at atmospheric pressure in a temperature below 1200°C, which is lower compared to the traditional BN synthesis method and does not cause the degradation of the coated-fibers. BN coatings on the carbon nanotubes have also been formed and unlike the common methods, no additional dopant (such as metal catalyst) is introduced into the system during the BN coatings syntheses, thus the contamination of the final product is avoided. A novel Al-O-N coating has been explored with the most impressive point is that a more than 65% improvement in the tensile strength (up to ˜5.1GPa) and a three-time increase in the Weibull modulus compared to the as-received fibers are resulted by the formation of 200nm Al-O-N coating on the SiC fibers. It exceeds the strength of all other small diameter SiC fibers reported in the literature. Furthermore, BAN coating has also been produced on the surface of SiC fibers and about 20% enhancement in mechanical strength is achieved compared to that of the original fibers

  12. Development of RF sputtered chromium oxide coating for wear application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The radio frequency sputtering technique was used to deposite a hard refractory, chromium oxide coating on an Inconel X-750 foil 0.1 mm thick. Optimized sputtering parameters for a smooth and adherent coating were found to be as follows: target-to-substrate spacing, 41.3 mm; argon pressure, 5-10 mTorr; total power to the sputtering module, 400 W (voltage at the target, 1600 V), and a water-cooled substrate. The coating on the annealed foil was more adherent than that on the heat-treated foil. Substrate biasing during the sputter deposition of Cr2O3 adversely affected adherence by removing naturally occurring interfacial oxide layers. The deposited coatings were amorphous and oxygen deficient. Since amorphous materials are extremely hard, the structure was considered to be desirable.

  13. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Natalia L; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-05-24

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum-chromium-nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating.

  14. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  15. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  16. Functional Multi-Nanolayer Coatings of Amorphous Carbon/Tungsten Carbide with Exceptional Mechanical Durability and Corrosion Resistance.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Narguess; Bozorg, Mansoor; Penkov, Oleksiy V; Shin, Dong-Gap; Sadighzadeh, Asghar; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2017-09-06

    A novel functional multilayer coating with periodically stacked nanolayers of amorphous carbon (a:C)/tungsten carbide (WC) and an adhesion layer of chromium (Cr) was deposited on 304 stainless steel using a dual magnetron sputtering technique. Through process optimization, highly densified coatings with high elasticity and shear modulus, excellent wear resistance, and minimal susceptibility to corrosive and caustic media could be acquired. The structural and mechanical properties of the optimized coatings were studied in detail using a variety of analytical techniques. Furthermore, finite element method simulations indicated that the stress generated due to contact against a steel ball was distributed well within the coating, which allowed the stresses to be lower than the yield threshold of the coating. Thus, an ultralow wear rate of ∼10 -12 mm 3 /N mm could be achieved in dry sliding conditions under relatively high Hertzian contact pressures of ∼0.4-0.9 GPa. The amorphous and pinhole-free structure of the individual layers, sufficient number of pairs, and the relatively dense stacked layers resulted in significant polarization resistance (Z″ = 5.5 × 10 6 Ω cm 2 ) and increased the corrosion resistance of the coating by 10-fold compared to that of recently reported corrosion-resistant coatings.

  17. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  18. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-02

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  19. Polyaniline coating with various substrates for hexavalent chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bin; Xu, Cuixia; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Qiang; Gu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xin; Weeks, Brandon L.; Hopper, Jack; Ho, Thomas C.; Guo, Zhanhu; Wei, Suying

    2015-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination is increasingly serious in surface water and groundwater, therefore, its removal attracts increasing attention due to its highly toxic to human health. The cost effective and sustainable adsorbents are urgently needed for the remediation of Cr(VI) pollution. Polyanline (PANI), a conductive polymer, has demonstrated a great performance on Cr(VI) removal. But the recycling is the challenge for its application due to its small size. The PANI coating with various substrates is an effective approach to solve this problem. The synthesis methods and applications of the PANI coated magnetic Fe3O4, carbon fabric and cellulose composites for the Cr(VI) removal were reviewed. Finally, this review analyzed the Cr(VI) removal mechanisms by the PANI composites considering the substrate and the PANI coating.

  20. Effect of bond coat and preheat on the microstructure, hardness, and porosity of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of tool steel materials. Bond coatings are commonly used as intermediate layers deposited on steel substrates (i.e. H13 tool steel) before the top coat is applied in order to enhance a number of critical performance criteria including adhesion of a barrier coating, limiting atomic migration of the base metal, and corrosion resistance. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of nickel bond coat and preheats temperatures (i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C) on microstructure, hardness, and porosity of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed by flame thermal coating. Micro-hardness, porosity and microstructure of tungsten carbide coatings are evaluated by using micro-hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nickel bond coatings reduce the susceptibility of micro crack formation at the bonding area interfaces. The percentage of porosity level on the tungsten carbide coatings with nickel bond coat decreases from 5.36 % to 2.78% with the increase of preheat temperature of the steel substrate of H13 from 200°C to 400°C. The optimum hardness of tungsten carbide coatings is 1717 HVN in average resulted from the preheat temperature of 300°C.

  1. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru; Buzhinskiy, O. I.

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  2. Effect of silicon carbide on devitrification of a glass coating for reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, P. O.

    1978-01-01

    Devitrification (nucleation and growth of cristobalite) were investigated in the LI-0042 coating used for the space shuttle surface insulation. Excessive devitrification was found to be associated with the silicon carbide (SiC) constituent in the coating. Test results show that significant devitrification occurred only when SiC was present in the coating and when the thermal-exposure atmosphere was oxidizing.

  3. Effective load transfer by a chromium carbide nanostructure in a multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungchan; Kikuchi, Keiko; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang; Kim, Yangdo

    2012-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced copper (Cu) matrix composites, which exhibit chromium (Cr) carbide nanostructures at the MWCNT/Cu interface, were prepared through a carbide formation using CuCr alloy powder. The fully densified and oriented MWCNTs dispersed throughout the composites were prepared using spark plasma sintering (SPS) followed by hot extrusion. The tensile strengths of the MWCNT/CuCr composites increased with increasing MWCNTs content, while the tensile strength of MWCNT/Cu composite decreased from that of monolithic Cu. The enhanced tensile strength of the MWCNT/CuCr composites is a result of possible load-transfer mechanisms of the interfacial Cr carbide nanostructures. The multi-wall failure of MWCNTs observed in the fracture surface of the MWCNT/CuCr composites indicates an improvement in the load-bearing capacity of the MWCNTs. This result shows that the Cr carbide nanostructures effectively transferred the tensile load to the MWCNTs during fracture through carbide nanostructure formation in the MWCNT/Cu composite.

  4. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysismore » also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.« less

  5. METHOD OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH STABLE METAL CARBIDES AND NITRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1959-10-27

    A method is presented for forming protective stable nitride and carbide compounds on the surface of graphite. This is accomplished by contacting the graphite surface with a fused heavy liquid metal such as bismuth or leadbismuth containing zirconium, titanium, and hafnium dissolved or finely dispersed therein to form a carbide and nitride of at least one of the dissolved metals on the graphite surface.

  6. Chromium oxide coatings with the potential for eliminating the risk of chromium ion release in orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Oje, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Chromium oxide coatings prepared by radiofrequency reactive magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrates were exposed to Ringer's physiological solution and tested for their electrochemical corrosion stability using an open circuit potential measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Mott–Schottky analysis. The coatings were found to be predominantly Cr2O3, based on the observation of the dominance of A1g and Eg symmetric modes in our Raman spectroscopic investigation and the Eu vibrational modes in our Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements on the coatings. We investigated for the presence of chromium ions in Ringer's solution after all of the above electrochemical tests using atomic absorption spectroscopy, without finding a trace of chromium ions at the ppm level for coatings tested under open circuit and at the lower potentials implants are likely to experience in the human body. The coatings were further exposed to Ringer's solution for one month and tested for adhesion strength changes, and we found that they retained substantial adhesion to the substrates. We expect this finding to be significant for future orthopaedic implants where chromium ion release is still a major challenge. PMID:28791150

  7. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  8. 76 FR 58536 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Notice of Commission Determination To Conduct a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan AGENCY: United.... 1675(c)(5)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated...

  9. Wear and corrosion behaviour of tungsten carbide based coatings with different metallic binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdi, Z.; Apandi, M. N. M.; Ibrahim, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Tungsten carbide based coating has been well known as wear and corrosion resistance materials. However, less study is done on comparing the coating with different binder. Thus, in this work the wear and corrosion behaviour of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings, namely (i) tungsten carbide cobalt and (ii) tungsten carbide nickel will be evaluated. Both coatings were characterised using X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The wear behaviour has been examined using the modified grinder machine by weight loss measurement. Two types of abrasive have been used that include 3 g by weight alumina and silica. While for the corrosion behaviour, it is monitored by three electrodes of electrochemical test and immersion test for 30 days in an acidic environment. The electrolyte used was 0.5 M sulphuric acids (H2SO4). It was found that the cobalt binder shows higher wear resistance compares to the nickel binder for both slurry types. The harder alumina compared to silica results in higher wear rate with removal of carbide and binder is about the same rate. For silica abrasive, due to slightly lower hardness compared to the carbide, the wear is dominated by binder removal followed by carbide detachment. For corrosion, the nickel binder shows four times higher wear resistance compared to the cobalt binder as expected due to its natural behaviour. These finding demonstrate that the selection of coating to be used in different application in this case, wear and corrosion shall be chosen carefully to maximize the usage of the coating.

  10. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates 5a...Coatings for HHA • SurTec 650 - ChromitAL TCP - Trivalent Chrome Pretreatment Developed by NAVAIR for Aluminum. • Chemetall Oxsilan 9810/2 - Non-chrome

  11. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of sputter-deposited titanium-chromium alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Landolt, D.; Robyr, C.; Mettraux, P.

    1998-10-01

    Titanium, chromium, and titanium-chromium alloy coatings were sputter-deposited to study their corrosion behaviors in relation to microstructure and composition. Silicon substrates were used to study the effect of alloying on intrinsic corrosion resistance of the coating materials, and brass substrates were used to study the effect of alloying on the penetrating porosity of the coatings. Corrosion behavior was characterized using linear sweep voltammetry. The crystal structure of the coatings was examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to estimate the real surface area of the coatings. Results showedmore » alloying of titanium with chromium greatly influenced microstructure of the coatings. Alloying led to deposits of higher apparent density and, in some cases, to an x-ray amorphous structure. Alloy coatings showed significantly lower corrosion currents than the constituting metals. The effect was attributed to a smoother surface topography. When corrected of differences in real surface area, the intrinsic corrosion rate of the alloy coatings did not differ significantly from that of the constituting metals. Alloy coatings deposited on brass exhibited a lower porosity than titanium or chromium metal coatings produced under identical conditions.« less

  12. Wear behavior of carbide tool coated with Yttria-stabilized zirconia nano particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Pavandatta M.; Reddy, Narala Suresh Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Wear mechanism takes predominant role in reducing the tool life during machining of Titanium alloy. Challenges of wear mechanisms such as variation in chip, high pressure loads and spring back are responsible for tool wear. In addition, many tool materials are inapt for machining due to low thermal conductivity and volume specific heat of these materials results in high cutting temperature during machining. To confront this issue Electrostatic Spray Coating (ESC) coating technique is utilized to enhance the tool life to an acceptable level. The Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) acts as a thermal barrier coating having high thermal expansion coefficient and thermal shock resistance. This investigation focuses on the influence of YSZ nanocoating on the tungsten carbide tool material and improve the machinability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. YSZ nano powder was coated on the tungsten carbide pin by using ESC technique. The coatings have been tested for wear and friction behavior by using a pin-on-disc tribological tester. The dry sliding wear test was performed on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) disc and YSZ coated tungsten carbide (pin) at ambient atmosphere. The performance parameters like wear rate and temperature rise were considered upon performing the dry sliding test on Ti-6Al-4V alloy disc. The performance parameters were calculated by using coefficient of friction and frictional force values which were obtained from the pin on disc test. Substantial resistance to wear was achieved by the coating.

  13. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu

    2016-09-01

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiCf/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  14. Method of accurate thickness measurement of boron carbide coating on copper foil

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Regmi, Murari

    2017-11-07

    A method is disclosed of measuring the thickness of a thin coating on a substrate comprising dissolving the coating and substrate in a reagent and using the post-dissolution concentration of the coating in the reagent to calculate an effective thickness of the coating. The preferred method includes measuring non-conducting films on flexible and rough substrates, but other kinds of thin films can be measure by matching a reliable film-substrate dissolution technique. One preferred method includes determining the thickness of Boron Carbide films deposited on copper foil. The preferred method uses a standard technique known as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) to measure boron concentration in a liquid sample prepared by dissolving boron carbide films and the Copper substrates, preferably using a chemical etch known as ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). Measured boron concentration values can then be calculated.

  15. METHOD FOR FORMING A COATING OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE ON A CARBON BODY

    DOEpatents

    Simnad, M.T.

    1962-04-01

    A method is described for coating a carbon bodywith molybdenum carbide in such a manner that the carbon body is rendered less permeable to the flow of gases and has increased resistance to corrosion and erosion. The method includes coating a carbon body with molybdenum trioxide by contacting it at a temperature below the condensation temperature with molybdenum trioxide vapors and thereafter carburizing the molybdenum trioxide in situ in an inert atmosphere on the carhon body. (AEC)

  16. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadi, Aliakbar; Saghafian, Hassan; Soltanieh, Mansour; Yang, Zhi-gang

    2017-12-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investigated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5 μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the substrate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  17. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  18. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  19. Characteristics of ZrC/Ni-UDD coatings for a tungsten carbide cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayeuski, V. V.; Zhylinski, V. V.; Rudak, P. V.; Rusalsky, D. P.; Višniakov, N.; Černašėjus, O.

    2018-07-01

    This work deals with the features of the structure of combined ZrC/Ni-ultradisperse diamonds (UDD) coating synthesized by electroplating and cathode arc evaporation physical vapor deposition (CAE-PVD) techniques on the tungsten carbide WC - 2 wt% Co on cutting inserts to improve tool life. The microstructure, phase composition, and micro-scratch test analysis of the ZrC/Ni-UDD coating were studied. The ZrC/Ni-UDD coating consists of separate phases of zirconium carbide ZrC, α-Ni, and Ni-UDD phase. The surface morphology of the coating shows a pattern with pits, pores, and particles. Separated nanodiamond particles are present in the pores of the combined coating. Therefore, the structure of the bottom layer of Ni-UDD affects the morphology of the surface of the ZrC/Ni-UDD coating. The obtained value of the critical loads on the scratch track of the coating in 26 N proves a sufficiently high value of the adhesion strength of the intermediate Ni-UDD-layer with hard alloy of WC-Co substrate. Due to their unique structure ZrC/Ni-UDD-coatings can be used to increase the durability period of a wood-cutting milling tool for cutting chipboard by CNC machines.

  20. Effect of Helmholtz Oscillation on Auto-shroud for APS Tungsten Carbide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Younggil; Choi, Sooseok; Yang, Seung Jae; Park, Chong Rae; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2013-06-01

    The atmospheric-pressure plasma spray (APS) of tungsten coating was performed using tungsten carbide (WC) powder by means of DC plasma torch equipped with a stepped anode nozzle as a potential method of W coating on graphite plasma-facing component of fusion reactors. This nozzle configuration allows Helmholtz oscillation mode dominating in APS arc fluctuation, and the variation of auto-shroud effect with Helmholtz oscillation characteristics can be investigated. Tungsten coating made from WC powder has lower porosity and higher tungsten purity than that made from pure tungsten powder. The porosity and chemical composition of coatings were investigated by mercury intrusion porosimetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The purity of tungsten coating layer is increased with the increasing frequency of Helmholtz oscillation and the increasing arc current. The modulation of Helmholtz oscillation frequency and magnitude may enhance the decarburization of WC to deposit tungsten coating without W-C and W-O bond from WC powder.

  1. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  2. Base-metal saturation of refractory carbide coatings produced by enhanced ceramic jets in electrothermally exploded powder spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hideki; Itaya, Masanobu

    2000-09-01

    Tungsten carbide and tantalum carbide were sprayed onto substrates of mild steel by the electrothermally exploded powder spray (ELTEPS) process. High-speed x-ray radiography revealed that tungsten-carbide jets of molten particles guided inside a nozzle exhibited denser flow than unguided jets at the substrate. The velocity of the jet was approximately 800 m/s at the early stage of jetting. The ceramic coatings obtained from the guided spray consisted of carbides of a few to tens of micrometers in size, which were saturated by the base metal up to the top of the coating. The coatings exhibited diffusion of the sprayed ceramics and base metal at the interface of the deposit and substrate. The enhancement of the jet flow formed a microstructure of the ceramic coating, which was saturated by the base metal even without post heat treatment.

  3. Improved adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on nickel- and titanium-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Rene 41 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were radio frequency sputter coated with titanium carbide by several techniques in order to determine the most effective. Coatings were evaluated in pin-on-disk tests. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate adherence to interfacial chemistry. For Rene 41, good coating adherence was obtained when a small amount of acetylene was added to the sputtering plasma. The acetylene carburized the alloy surface and resulted in better bonding to the TiC coating. For Ti-6Al-4V, the best adherence and wear protection was obtained when a pure titanium interlayer was used between the coating and the alloy. The interlayer is thought to prevent the formation of a brittle, fracture-prone, aluminum oxide layer.

  4. Application of valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy for identification and estimation of amount of carbon covalently bonded to chromium in amorphous Cr-C coatings prepared by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, V. A.; Habazaki, H.; Glatzel, P.; Fishgoit, L. A.; Drozhzhin, O. A.; Lafuerza, S.; Safonova, O. V.

    2018-01-01

    Cr-C coatings containing different amount of carbon ranging from ∼5 to 50 at.% were prepared by the direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering on a polished substrate of polycrystalline silicon. The thickness of the samples was about 400 nm. We characterized the composition and the structure of the as-received coatings and those annealed at 500 °C by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (vtc-XES) methods As follows from XRD measurements, the samples with the carbon content above 35 at.% do not demonstrate any sign of the long-range order and annealing at 500 °C does not change their crystallinity. The vtc-XES curves of the as-prepared and annealed samples can be fitted as a superposition of corresponding spectra of chromium metal and chromium carbide (Cr3C2) phases. After the annealing, the content of carbides in the samples (and, correspondingly, the content of covalently bonded carbon) somewhat increases. This suggests that the as-received coatings contain a certain amount of carbon that is not covalently bonded to chromium (most likely, elemental carbon) and their annealing at 500 °C transforms this carbon into the additional (of the order of 2-5 at.%) amount of chromium carbide compounds. It deserves mentioning that for Cr-C coatings prepared by the electrochemical deposition from Cr(III) electrolytes containing organic compounds we have not observed changes in the vtc-X-ray emission spectra after similar annealing. This suggests that electrochemical deposition method in contrast to magnetron sputtering technique even at low temperatures favors the formation of only covalently bonded carbon.

  5. Development of Protective Coatings for Chromium-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. J.; MacMillan, C. A.; Williams, D. N.; Bartlett, E. S.

    1966-01-01

    Chromium alloy sheet was clad with 5 to 10-mil-thick oxidation-resistant nickel-base alloy foils. Specimens also contained 1/2 to 1-mil-thick intermediate layers of platinum, tungsten, and/or W-25Re. Cladding was done by the isostatic hot gas-pressure bonding,.process. The clad chromium-alloy specimens were cyclic oxidation tested at 2100 F and 2300 F for up to 200 hours to determine the effectiveness of these metal claddings in protecting the chromium alloy Cr-5W from oxidation and contamination. Cladding systems consisting of 5-mil-thick Ni-20Cr-20W modified with 3 to 5 weight percent aluminum and containing a 1 /2-mil tungsten diffusion barrier demonstrated potential for long-time service at temperatures as high as 2300 F.

  6. Chromium

    MedlinePlus

    ... determined because the content of the mineral in foods is substantially affected by agricultural and manufacturing processes and perhaps by contamination with chromium when the foods are analyzed [ 10 , ...

  7. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yansheng; Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn; Goto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakismore » (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.« less

  8. Silicon carbide nanomaterial as a coating for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Feng, Juanjuan; Wang, Xiuqin; Sun, Min; Luo, Chuannan

    2018-01-26

    Silicon carbide has excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance, high strength, oxidation resistance, high temperature, and so on. Based on these properties, silicon carbide was coated on stainless-steel wire and used as a solid-phase microextraction coating, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were employed as model analytes. Using gas chromatography, some important factors that affect the extraction efficiency were optimized one by one, and an analytical method was established. The analytical method showed wide linear ranges (0.1-30, 0.03-30, and 0.01-30 μg/L) with satisfactory correlation coefficients (0.9922-0.9966) and low detection limits (0.003-0.03 μg/L). To investigate the practical application of the method, rainwater and cigarette ash aqueous solution were collected as real samples for extraction and detection. The results indicate that silicon carbide has excellent application in the field of solid-phase microextraction. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium, carbide, molybdenum carbide, and titanium boride coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of titanium carbide, molybdenum carbide and titanium boride were tested as wear resistant coatings on stainless steel in a pin on disk apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the sputtered films with regard to both bulk and interface composition in order to obtain maximum film performance. Significant improvements in friction behavior were obtained when properly biased films were deposited on deliberately preoxidized substrates. XPS depth profile data showed thick graded interfaces for bias deposited films even when adherence was poor. The addition of 10 percent hydrogen to the sputtering gas produced coatings with thin poorly adherent interfaces. Results suggest that some of the common practices in the field of sputtering may be detrimental to achieving maximum adherence and optimum composition for these refractory compounds.

  10. A Novel Nonelectrolytic Process for Chromium and Nickel Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    thermal spraying and involves similar protocols for coating an object. The process proceeds after powder is injected into a plasma jet then superheated...HVOF) High velocity oxygen fuel coating is characteristic of a thermal spray coating process , enhancing anti-corrosion and anti-wear properties of...observations due to limited metal deposition on the surface during treatment. No powder particles were produced during this RES process . a. Optical

  11. The improvement of wave-absorbing ability of silicon carbide fibers by depositing boron nitride coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fang; Zhang, Litong; Yin, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-04-01

    This work investigated electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorption and mechanical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) fibers with and without boron nitride (BN) coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The dielectric property and EM shielding effectiveness of SiC fiber bundles before and after being coated by BN were measured by wave guide method. The EM reflection coefficient of SiC fiber laminates with and without BN coating was determined by model calculation and NRL-arc method, respectively. Tensile properties of SiC fiber bundles with and without BN coating were tested at room temperature. Results show that SiC fibers with BN coating had a great improvement of EMW absorbing property because the composites achieved the impedance matching. BN with the low permittivity and dielectric loss contributed to the enhancive introduction and reduced reflection of EMW. The tensile strength and Weibull modulus of SiC fiber bundles coated by BN increased owing to the decrease of defects in SiC fibers and the protection of coating during loading.

  12. Development and characterization of (Ti, Mo)C carbides reinforced Fe-based surface composite coating produced by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinhong; Zhang, Min; Qu, Shiyao

    2010-09-01

    In this study, in situ multiple carbides reinforced Fe-based surface composite coatings were fabricated successfully by laser cladding a precursor mixture of graphite, ferrotitanium (Fe-Ti) and ferromolybdenum (Fe-Mo) powders. The results showed that (Ti, Mo)C particles with flower-like and cuboidal shapes were in situ formed during the solidification and most shapes of (Ti, Mo)C particles were diversiform according to different contents of Fe-Mo powder in the Fe-Ti-Mo-C system. The growth morphology of the reinforcing (Ti, Mo)C carbide has typically faceted features, indicating that the lateral growth mechanism is still predominant growth mode under rapid solidification conditions. Increasing the amount of Fe-Mo in the reactants led to a decrease of carbide size and an increase of volume fraction of carbides. The coatings had good cracking resistance when the amounts of Fe-Mo were controlled within a range of 15 wt%.

  13. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of chromium (Cr) on glucose and insulin metabolism are well documented. Normal dietary intake of Cr appears to be suboptimal because several studies have reported beneficial effects of Cr in people with elevated blood glucose or type 2 diabetes eating conventional diets. Stresses that ...

  15. Microstructure and thermal properties of copper–diamond composites with tungsten carbide coating on diamond particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qiping; He, Xinbo, E-mail: xb_he@163.com; Ren, Shubin

    2015-07-15

    An effective method for preparing tungsten carbide coating on diamond surfaces was proposed to improve the interface bonding between diamond and copper. The WC coating was formed on the diamond surfaces with a reaction medium of WO{sub 3} in mixed molten NaCl–KCl salts and the copper–diamond composites were obtained by vacuum pressure infiltration of WC-coated diamond particles with pure copper. The microstructure of interface bonding between diamond and copper was discussed. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the obtained copper–diamond composites were investigated. Results indicated that the thermal conductivity of as-fabricated composite reached 658 W m{sup −} {sup 1}more » K{sup −} {sup 1}. Significant reduction in coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite compared with that of pure copper was obtained. - Highlights: • WC coating was successfully synthesized on diamond particles in molten salts. • WC coating obviously promoted the wettability of diamond and copper matrix. • WC coating greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of Cu–diamond composite. • The composites are suitable candidates for heat sink applications.« less

  16. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Si Alloyed Multi-Principal Element Carbide Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Vladescu, Alina; Titorencu, Irina; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Jinga, Victor; Pruna, Vasile; Balaceanu, Mihai; Dinu, Mihaela; Pana, Iulian; Vendina, Viktorija

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we have examined the possibility to improve the biocompatibility of the (TiZrNbTaHf)C through replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si. The coatings were deposited on Si and 316L stainless steel substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar+CH4 mixed atmosphere and were examined for elemental composition, chemical bonds, surface topography, surface electrical charge and biocompatible characteristics. The net surface charge was evaluated at nano and macroscopic scale by measuring the electrical potential and work function, respectively. The biocompatible tests comprised determination of cell viability and cell attachment to the coated surface. The deposited coatings had C/(metal+Si) ratios close to unity, while a mixture of metallic carbide, free-carbon and oxidized species formed on the film surface. The coatings’ surfaces were smooth and no influence of surface roughness on electrical charge or biocompatibility was found. The biocompatible characteristics correlated well with the electrical potential/work function, suggesting a significant role of surface charge in improving biocompatibility, particularly cell attachment to coating's surface. Replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si in the (TiZrNbTaHf)C coating led to an enhanced surface electrical charge, as well as to superior biocompatible properties, with best results for the (TiZrNbSiHf)C coating. PMID:27571361

  17. Modification of the surface of metal products with carbide coatings by electrospark alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.

    2018-04-01

    Electrospark alloying (ESA) technology has existed for a long time (since the middle of the 20th century) but its potential has not been exhausted yet. In the present paper it is proposed to increase the mechanical properties of steel and titanium products by doping with a hard carbide alloy based on "WC-TiC-Co" system. As a result, the hardness of coatings obtained by ESA reaches at least 18-22 GPa with a layer thickness of up to 0.5 mm. The proposed solution can improve the functional qualities of various friction surfaces that are used in engineering, as well as in friction elements.

  18. Chromium Vaporization Reduction by Nickel Coatings For SOEC Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Sergey N. Rashkeev; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-09-01

    The vaporization of Cr-rich volatile species from interconnect materials is a major source of degradation that limits the lifetime of planar solid oxide devices systems with metallic interconnects, including Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells, or SOECs. Some metallic coatings (Ni, Co, and Cu) significantly reduce the Cr release from interconnects and slow down the oxide scale growth on the steel substrate. To shed additional light upon the mechanisms of such protection and find a suitable coating material for ferritic stainless steel materials, we used a combination of first-principles calculations, thermodynamics, and diffusion modeling to investigate which factors determine the quality ofmore » the Ni metallic coating at stainless steel interconnector. We found that the Cr migration in Ni coating is determined by a delicate combination of the nickel oxidation, Cr diffusion, and phase transformation processes. Although the formation of Cr2O3 oxide is more exothermic than that of NiO, the kinetic rate of the chromia formation in the coating layer and its surface is significantly reduced by the low mobility of Cr in nickel oxide and in NiCr2O4 spinel. These results are in a good agreement with diffusion modeling for Cr diffusion through Ni coating layer on the ferritic 441 steel substrate.« less

  19. Morphology of powders of tungsten carbide used in wear-resistant coatings and deposition on the PDC drill bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, E. S.; Markova, I. Yu; Maslov, A. L.; Polushin, N. I.; Laptev, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    Modern drill bits have high abrasive wear in the area of contact with the rock and removed sludge. Currently, these bits have a protective layer on the bit body, which consists of a metal matrix with inclusions of carbide particles. The research matrix of this coating and the wear-resistant particles is a prerequisite in the design and production of drill bits. In this work, complex investigation was made for various carbide powders of the grades Relit (tungsten carbide produced by Ltd “ROSNAMIS”) which are used as wear-resistant particles in the coating of the drill bit body. The morphology and phase composition of the chosen powders as well as the influence of a particle shape on prospects of their application in wear-resistance coating presented in this work.

  20. [beta]-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating are disclosed. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or [mu]c-SiC film on the surface and produce [beta]-SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface. 3 figs.

  1. .beta.-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.

    1994-01-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or .mu.c-SiC film on the surface and produce .beta.--SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface.

  2. Experimental investigation on hard turning of AISI 4340 steel using cemented coated carbide insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep Kumar, J.; Kishore, K. P.; Ranjith Kumar, M.; Saran Karthick, K. R.; Vishnu Gowtham, S.

    2018-02-01

    Hard turning is a developing technology that offers many potential advantages compared to grinding, which remains the standard finishing process for critical hardened surfaces. In this work, an attempt has been made to experimentally investigate hard turning of AISI 4340 steel under wet and dry condition using cemented coated carbide insert. Hardness of the workpiece material is tested using Brinell and Rockwell hardness testers. CNC LATHE and cemented coated carbide inserts of designation CNMG 120408 are used for conducting experimental trials. Significant cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut are considered as controllable input parameters and surface roughness (Ra), tool wear are considered as output response parameters. Design of experiments is carried out with the help of Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. Results of response parameters like surface roughness and tool wear under wet and dry condition are analysed. It is found that surface roughness and tool wear are higher under dry machining condition when compared to wet machining condition. Feed rate significantly influences the surface roughness followed by cutting speed. Depth of cut significantly influences the tool wear followed by cutting speed.

  3. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Lloyd J.; Willey, Melvin G.; Tiegs, Sue M.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  4. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  5. Polarization controlled kinetics and composition of trivalent chromium coatings on aluminum.

    PubMed

    Dardona, Sameh; Chen, Lei; Kryzman, Michael; Goberman, Daniel; Jaworowski, Mark

    2011-08-15

    Combined in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrochemistry have been employed to monitor, in real-time, the formation of trivalent Cr conversion coatings on polished Al substrates at applied sample potentials. It is found that the formation kinetics and chemical composition of the film can be controlled by adjusting the anodic and cathodic reactions. The growth kinetics are accelerated at more positive anodic potentials or more negative cathodic potentials. At more negative potentials, the percentage of chromium in the coating is found to increase, while the zirconium percentage decreases.

  6. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiationmore » damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.« less

  7. Low friction and galling resistant coatings and processes for coating

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roger N.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention describes coating processes and the resultant coated articles for use in high temperature sodium environments, such as those found in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and their associated systems. The substrate to which the coating is applied may be either an iron base or nickel base alloy. The coating itself is applied to the substrate by electro-spark deposition techniques which result in metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. One coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and an aluminum electrode. Another coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and a nickel-base hardfacing alloy electrode.

  8. Effect of Powder-Feeding Modes During Plasma Spray on the Properties of Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi-ming; Du, Xiao-dong; Wu, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A WC-reinforced composite coating was fabricated on the surface of 45 steel samples by plasma, cladding process with WC powder added to the molten pool synchronously or in the tail of the molten pool. The microstructure, phase composition, and element distribution in the coating were analyzed. The results show that the undissolved WC particles and crystallized carbide (WC, W2C) were distributed uniformly in the sub-eutectic matrix in both cases. Fewer of the WC particles are dissolved in the matrix when they are injected into the tail of the molten pool. There are fewer needle-like tungsten carbide formations seen in the composite coating fabricated by back-feeding process than in that formed by synchronous feeding. The former results in a finer microstructure and a higher concentration gradient of elements near the interface between the WC particles and the coating matrix.

  9. Mechanical, Chemical and Microstructural Characterization of Monazite-Coated Silicon Carbide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Wheeler, D. R.; Chen, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    Tensile strengths of as-received Hi-Nicalon and Sylramic fibers and those having monazite surface coatings, deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition, were measured at room temperature and the Weibull statistical parameters determined. The average tensile strengths of uncoated Hi-Nicalon and Sylramic fibers were 3.19 +/- 0.73 and 2.78 +/- 0.53 GPa with a Weibull modulus of 5.41 and 5.52, respectively. The monazite-coated Hi-Nicalon and Sylramic fibers showed strength loss of approx. 10 and 15 percent, respectively, compared with the as-received fibers. The elemental compositions of the fibers and the coatings were analyzed using scanning Auger microprobe and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The LaPO4 coating on Hi-Nicalon fibers was approximately stoichiometric and about 50 nm thick. The coating on the Sylramic fibers extended to a depth of about 100 to 150 nm. The coating may have been stoichiometric LaPO4 in the first 30 to 40 nm of the layer. However, the surface roughness of Sylramic fiber made this profile somewhat difficult to interpret. Microstructural analyses of the fibers and the coatings were done by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Hi-Nicalon fiber consists of fine beta-SiC nanocrystals ranging in size from 1 to 30 mn embedded in an amorphous matrix. Sylramic is a polycrystalline stoichiometric silicon carbide fiber consisting of submicron beta-SiC crystallites ranging from 100 to 300 nm. Small amount of TiB2 nanocrystallites (approx. 50 nm) are also present. The LaPO4 coating on Hi-Nicalon fibers consisted of a chain of peanut shape particles having monazite-(La) structure. The coating on Sylramic fibers consisted of two layers. The inner layer was a chain of peanut shape particles having monazite-(La) structure. The outer layer was comprised of much smaller particles with a microcrystalline structure.

  10. Influence of surface pretreatments on the quality of trivalent chromium process coatings on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulaud, Rémi; Światowska, Jolanta; Seyeux, Antoine; Zanna, Sandrine; Tardelli, Joffrey; Marcus, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The effects of surface pretreatments (degreasing and pickling) on the characteristics of the Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) coating on pure aluminum and on AA2024-T351 aluminum alloy were investigated here by means of surface sensitive techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The XPS and ToF-SIMS results evidence that the TCP coating homogeneity is strongly dependent on the pretreatment process used. The TCP coverage factor, calculated from XPS results, is significantly lower, on both pure aluminum and AA2024-T351 alloy surface, when a pickling step is applied. One of the main effects of pickling pretreatment is strong metallic copper enrichment at the surface of the 2024 alloy, associated with chemical dissolution of Al-Cu intermetallic particles. However, it is evidenced here, that the copper enrichment is not detrimental for the quality of the TCP coating. The coating failure, observed when the pickling step is applied, can be assigned to a faster kinetics of the coating growth leading to formation of thicker conversion coating more susceptible to cracking or to the localized presence of aluminum fluoride species leading to the appearance of coating defects or detachment.

  11. Carbide and nitride precipitation during laser cladding of Inconel 718 alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Li, Zhuguo; Nie, Pulin; Wu, Yixiong

    2013-11-01

    The microstructure of the laser clad Inconel 718 alloy coating was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The chemical composition of precipitation phases was investigated by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and solid phase microextraction (SPME). The crystal structure and lattice constants of precipitation are determined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Vickers hardness of the coatings and the nanohardness of the interstitial phases were measured. The insular carbide (MC) and the tetragonal nitride (MN) with face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are rich in Ti and Nb but depleted in Ni, Fe and Cr due to the interdiffusion and redistribution of alloying elements between MC and MN and supersaturated matrix. MC and MN were precipitated in the forms of (Nb0.12Ti0.88)C1.5 and (Nb0.88Ti0.12)N1.5, and the Gibbs free energies of formation can be expressed as Δ G [ (Nb0.12Ti0.88)C1.5 ] 0 = - 122.654 - 3.1332 T (kJ /mol) and Δ G [ (Nb0.88Ti0.12)N1.5 ] 0 = - 157.814 - 3.0251 T (kJ /mol). The nanohardness and Young's modulus of the MC and MN were much higher than the matrix, and the plastic deformation energy of interstitial phases was lower than the matrix. The precipitation of MC and MN is beneficial to the mechanical properties of coating.

  12. High Chromium Cast Irons: Destabilized-Subcritical Secondary Carbide Precipitation and Its Effect on Hardness and Wear Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitar, María Agustina; Suárez, Sebastián; Prat, Orlando; Duarte Guigou, Martín; Gari, Valentina; Pereira, Gastón; Mücklich, Frank

    2018-05-01

    This work evaluates the effect of a destabilization treatment combined with a subcritical diffusion (SCD) and a subsequent quenching (Q) steps on precipitation of secondary carbides and their influence on the wear properties of HCCI (16%Cr). The destabilization of the austenite at high temperature leads to a final microstructure composed of eutectic and secondary carbides, with an M7C3 nature, embedded in a martensitic matrix. An improved wear resistance was observed in the SCD + Q samples in comparison with the Q one, which was attributed to the size of secondary carbides.

  13. Friction and wear properties of three hard refractory coatings applied by radiofrequency sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The adherence, friction, and wear properties of thin hard refractory compound coatings applied to 440C bearing steel by radiofrequency sputtering were investigated. Friction and wear tests were done with nonconforming pin on disk specimens. The compounds examined were chromium carbide, molybdenum silicide, and titanium carbide. The adherence, friction, and wear were markedly improved by the application of a bias voltage to the bearing steel substrate during coating deposition. Analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the improvement may be due to a reduction in impurities in bias deposited coatings. A fivefold reduction in oxygen concentration in MoSi2 coating by biasing was noted. Chromium carbide was not effective as an antiwear coating. Molybdenum silicide provided some reduction in both friction and wear. Titanium carbide exhibited excellent friction and antiwear properties at light loads. Plastic flow and transfer of the coating material onto the pin specimen appears to be important in achieving low friction and wear.

  14. Grain-boundary type and distribution in silicon carbide coatings and wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancino-Trejo, Felix; López-Honorato, Eddie; Walker, Ross C.; Ferrer, Romelia Salomon

    2018-03-01

    Silicon carbide is the main diffusion barrier against metallic fission products in TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles. The explanation of the accelerated diffusion of silver through SiC has remained a challenge for more than four decades. Although, it is now well accepted that silver diffuse through SiC by grain boundary diffusion, little is known about the characteristics of the grain boundaries in SiC and how these change depending on the type of sample. In this work five different types (coatings and wafers) of SiC produced by chemical vapor deposition were characterized by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The SiC in TRISO particles had a higher concentration of high angle grain boundaries (aprox. 70%) compared to SiC wafers, which ranged between 30 and 60%. Similarly, SiC wafers had a higher concentration of low angle grain boundaries ranging between 15 and 30%, whereas TRISO particles only reached values of around 7%. The same trend remained when comparing the content of coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries, since SiC wafers showed a concentration of more than 30%, whilst TRISO particles had contents of around 20%. In all samples the largest fractions of CSL boundaries (3 ≤ Σ ≤ 17) were the Σ3 boundaries. We show that there are important differences between the SiC in TRISO particles and SiC wafers which could explain some of the differences observed in diffusion experiments in the literature.

  15. Stimulus responsive hydrogel-coated etched fiber Bragg grating for carcinogenic chromium (VI) sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Pabbisetti Vayu Nandana; Madhuvarasu, Sai Shankar; Moru, Satyanarayana

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a chemo-mechanical-optical sensing approach for the detection of carcinogenic chromium (VI) metal ion using an etched fiber Bragg grating (FBG) coated with stimulus responsive hydrogel. Hydrogel synthesized from the blends of (3-acrylamidopropyl)-trimethylammonium chloride, which is highly responsive to chromium ions suffers a volume change when placed in Cr solution. When the proposed sensor system is exposed to various concentrations of Cr (VI) ion solution, FBG peak shifts due to the mechanical strain induced by the swelling of the hydrogel. The peak shift is correlated with the concentration of the Cr (VI) metal ion. Due to the reduction in the cladding diameter of FBG, wastage of swelling force due to hydrogel on FBG is lowered and utilized for more wavelength peak shift of FBG resulting in the increase in the sensitivity. The resolution of the sensor system is found to be 0.072 ppb. Trace amounts of chromium (VI) ion as low as 10 ppb can be sensed by this method. The sensor has shown good sensitivity, selectivity, and repeatability. The salient features of the sensors are its compact size, light weight, and adoptability for remote monitoring.

  16. 76 FR 77013 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  17. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  18. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  19. Study of Chromium-Frit-Type Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D G; Bolz, L H; Pitts, J W; Harrison, W N

    1951-01-01

    The achievement of more compact and efficient power plants for aircraft is dependent, among other factors, on the perfection of heat-resisting materials that are superior to those in current use. Molybdenum is one of the high-melting metals (melting point, 4750 F). It is fairly abundant and also can be worked into many of the shapes required in modern power plants. To permit its widespread use at elevated temperatures, however, some means must first be found to prevent its rapid oxidation. The application of a protective coating is one method that might be used to achieve this goal. In the present work, a number of chromium-frit-type coatings were studied. These were bonded to molybdenum specimens by firing in controlled atmospheres to temperatures in the range of 2400 to 2700 F.

  20. A Performance Comparison Study of Uncoated and TiAlN Coated Carbide End Mill on Machining of the Al-35Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, S.; Hekimoglu, A. P.; Turgut, Y.; Haciosmanoglu, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, Al-35Zn alloy was produced by permanent mold casting. To investigate the cutting performance of uncoated and TiAlN coated carbide end mills on this alloy, a series of tests were carried out in the CNC vertical machining center at a constant cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results obtained from the tests showed that uncoated carbide end mill have lower cutting force and surface roughness than TiAlN coated carbide end mill. These observations are discussed in terms of the alloys properties, cutting tool surfaces, and friction and wear behavior between the cutting tool and the material.

  1. Finite Element Simulations of Micro Turning of Ti-6Al-4V using PCD and Coated Carbide tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadesh, Thangavel; Samuel, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    The demand for manufacturing axi-symmetric Ti-6Al-4V implants is increasing in biomedical applications and it involves micro turning process. To understand the micro turning process, in this work, a 3D finite element model has been developed for predicting the tool chip interface temperature, cutting, thrust and axial forces. Strain gradient effect has been included in the Johnson-Cook material model to represent the flow stress of the work material. To verify the simulation results, experiments have been conducted at four different feed rates and at three different cutting speeds. Since titanium alloy has low Young's modulus, spring back effect is predominant for higher edge radius coated carbide tool which leads to the increase in the forces. Whereas, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tool has smaller edge radius that leads to lesser forces and decrease in tool chip interface temperature due to high thermal conductivity. Tool chip interface temperature increases by increasing the cutting speed, however the increase is less for PCD tool as compared to the coated carbide tool. When uncut chip thickness decreases, there is an increase in specific cutting energy due to material strengthening effects. Surface roughness is higher for coated carbide tool due to ploughing effect when compared with PCD tool. The average prediction error of finite element model for cutting and thrust forces are 11.45 and 14.87 % respectively.

  2. Microstructure-property relationships of chemically vapor deposited zirconia fiber coating for environmentally durable silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao

    In SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites, toughness is obtained by adding a fiber coating, which provides a weak interface for crack deflection and debonding between the fiber and the matrix. However, the most commonly used fiber coatings, carbon and boron nitride, are unstable in oxidative environments. In the present study, the feasibility of using a chemically vapor deposited zirconia (CVD-ZrO2) fiber coating as an oxidation-resistant interphase for SiC/SiC composites was investigated. A study of morphological evolution in the CVD-ZrO2 coating suggested that a size-controlled displacive phase transformation from tetragonal ZrO2 ( t-ZrO2) to monoclinic ZrO2 (m-ZrO 2) was the key mechanism responsible for the weak interface behavior exhibited by the ZrO2 coating. It appeared that a low oxygen partial pressure in the CVD reactor chamber was essential for the nucleation of t-ZrO2 and therefore was responsible for the delamination behavior. With this understanding of the weak interface mechanism, minicomposite specimens containing various ZrO2 fiber coating morphologies were fabricated and tested. A fractographic analysis showed that in-situ fiber strength and minicomposite failure loads were strongly dependent on the phase contents and microstructure of the ZrO2 coating. We determined that an optimum microstructure of the ZrO2 coating should contain a predelaminated interface surrounded by a dense outer layer. The outer layer was needed to protect the fiber from degradation during the subsequent SiC matrix infiltration procedure. A preliminary tensile stress-rupture study indicated that the ZrO2 coating exhibited promising performance in terms of providing the weak interface behavior and maintaining the thermal and oxidative stability at elevated temperatures.

  3. Biocompatibility of Hydrogen-Diluted Amorphous Silicon Carbide Thin Films for Artificial Heart Valve Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Umesh; Swain, Bhabani S.; Rameshbabu, N.; Swain, Bibhu P.

    2018-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films were synthesized using trichloromethylsilane by a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process. The deposited films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm its chemical bonding, structural network and composition of the a-SiC:H films. The optical microscopy images reveal that hydrogen dilution increased the surface roughness and pore density of a-SiC:H thin film. The Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectra reveal chemical network consisting of Si-Si, C-C and Si-C bonds, respectively. The XRD spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate a-SiC:H still has short-range order. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity test ensures the behavior of cell-semiconductor hybrid to monitor the proper coordination. The live-dead assays and MTT assay reveal an increase in green nucleus cell, and cell viability is greater than 88%, respectively, showing non-toxic nature of prepared a-SiC:H film. Moreover, the result indicated by direct contact assay, and cell prefers to adhere and proliferate on a-SiC:H thin films having a positive effect as artificial heart valve coating material.

  4. Green Turning of FCD 700 Ductile Cast Iron Using Coated Carbide Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodzi, Mohd Nor Azmi Mohd; Ghani, Jaharah A.; Eghawail, A. M.; Othman, Kamal; Rahman, Mohd. Nizam Ab.; Haron, Che Hassan Che

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the performance of carbide coated cutting insert in turning FCD700 ductile cast iron in various dry machining conditions (without air, using air and chilled air). The turning parameters studied were, cutting speed of 120 m/min., feed rate of 0.15 mm/rev-0.4 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.6 mm-1.0 mm. The results show that the tool life was significantly controlled by the type of air coolant used, whereas the cutting force and surface roughness were not influenced by these coolants. Chilled air was found to be significantly improved the tool life by about 30% and 40% respectively when compared with normal air and without air conditions. The wear mechanism was predominantly controlled by the flank and crater wears on the flank and rake faces respectively. Due to the low cutting speed used in the experiment, both flank and crater wears were uniformly formed along the cutting edge and no catastrophic failure was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  5. Coating effects on thermal properties of carbon carbon and carbon silicon carbide composites for space thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, M.; Morles, R. B.; Cioeta, F.; Marchetti, M.

    2014-06-01

    Many are the materials for hot structures, but the most promising one are the carbon based composites nowadays. This is because they have good characteristics with a high stability at high temperatures, preserving their mechanical properties. Unfortunately, carbon reacts rapidly with oxygen and the composites are subjected to oxidation degradation. From this point of view CC has to be modified in order to improve its thermal and oxidative resistance. The most common solutions are the use of silicon carbide into the carbon composites matrix (SiC composites) to make the thermal properties increase and the use of coating on the surface in order to protect the composite from the space plasma effects. Here is presented an experimental study on coating effects on these composites. Thermal properties of coated and non coated materials have been studied and the thermal impact on the matrix and surface degradation is analyzed by a SEM analysis.

  6. Effects of yttrium, aluminum, and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted between 990 - 280 C and 1095 - 280 C to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium, and aluminum concentrations in nickel base alloy bond coatings and also the effect of the bond coating thickness on the performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The presence and the concentration of yttrium is very critical. Without yttrium, rapid oxidation of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, and Ni-Cr-Al bond coatings causes zirconia thermal barrier coatings to fail very rapidly. Concentrations of chrominum and aluminum in Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coating have a very significant effect on the thermal barrier coating life. This effect, however, is not as great as that due to yttrium. Furthermore, the thickness and the thickness uniformity also have a very significant effect on the life of the thermal barrier system.

  7. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD; FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a study to evaluate the effect of coatings on dislodgeable arsenic, chromium, and copper residues on the surfaces of chromated copper arsenate (CAA) treated wood. Dislodgeable CCA, determined by wipe sampling the wood surfaces, was the primary evaluation criterion f...

  8. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD, INTERIM DATA REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is approximately 20 months into a project to evaluate the performance of wood coatings as a way to prevent arsenic, chromium and copper exposure from the surfaces of CCA treated wood. Potential dermal exposure, as measured by wipe sampling dislodgeable CCA chemical from wood ...

  9. Processing - microstructure relationships of chemically vapor deposited zirconia fiber coating for environmentally durable silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinil

    In SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites, toughness is obtained by adding a fiber coating which provides a weak interface for crack deflection and debonding between the fiber and the matrix. However, the most commonly used fiber coatings, carbon and boron nitride, are unstable in oxidative environments. In the present study, the feasibility of using a chemically vapor deposited zirconia (CVD-ZrO 2) fiber coating as an oxidation-resistant interphase for SiC/SiC composites was investigated. The feasibility of the CVD-ZrO2 coating as a useful interphase for SiC/SiC composites was investigated with emphasis on developing critical processing-microstructure relationships. A study of morphological evolution in the CVD-ZrO2 coating suggested that a size-controlled displacive phase transformation from tetragonal ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) to monoclinic ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) was the key mechanism responsible for the weak interface behavior exhibited by the ZrO2 coating. The pre-delamination occurred as a result of (i) continuous formation of t-ZrO2 nuclei on the deposition surface; (ii) martensitic transformation of the tetragonal phase to a monoclinic phase upon reaching a critical grain size; and (iii) development of significant compressive hoop stresses due to the volume dilation associated with the transformation. We also discovered that low oxygen partial pressure in the CVD reactor was required for the nucleation of t-ZrO2 and was ultimately responsible for the delamination behavior. The effects of oxygen partial pressure on the nucleation behavior of the CVD-ZrO2 coating was systematically studied by intentionally adding the controlled amount of O2 into the CVD chamber. Characterization results suggested that the number density of t-ZrO2 nuclei apparently decreased with increasing the oxygen partial pressure from 0.004 to 1.6 Pa. Also, the coating layer became more columnar and contained larger m-ZrO2 grains. The observed relationships between the oxygen partial pressure and the morphological

  10. Corrosion, ion release and Mott-Schottky probe of chromium oxide coatings in saline solution with potential for orthopaedic implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Oje, A. M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on chromium oxide thin film coatings that show a negligible ion release during electrochemical corrosion testing in saline solution. The chemical constituents of the films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering were identified to be predominantly Cr2O3 based on Raman spectroscopy anti-symmetric stretching vibration modes for CrIII-O and other peaks and an FTIR spectroscopy E u vibrational mode at 409 cm-1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, multiplet fitting for 2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 states also confirmed the predominantly Cr2O3 stoichiometry in the films. The prepared chromium oxide coatings showed superior pitting corrosion resistance compared to the native chromium oxide films on bare uncoated stainless steel when tested under open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and cyclic voltammetry in saline solution. The chromium ion released into solution during the corrosion testing of stainless steel substrates coated with chromium oxide coatings was found to be negligibly small based on atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements. Our Mott-Schottky analysis investigation showed that the negligibly small ion release from the chromium oxide coated steel substrates is most likely due to a much lower defect density on the surface of the deposited coatings compared to the native oxide layer on the uncoated steel substrates. This opens up the opportunity for using chromium oxide surface coatings in hip, knee and other orthopaedic implants where possible metal ion release in vivo still poses a great challenge.

  11. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Natalia L.; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R.; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M.; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I.; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum–chromium–nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating. PMID:28809266

  12. Preparation of Trivalent Chromium and Rare Earth Composite Conversion Coating on Aluminum Alloy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianzhen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the surface conversion film on 6063 aluminum alloy was prepared by chemical plating process with chromium sulfate, lanthanum sulfate and sodium phosphate as film forming agent. The corrosion resistance and surface morphology of the conversion film were analyzed by pitting corrosion test of copper sulfate and SEM. The results show that when Cr2(SO4)3 is 10 g/L, La2(SO4)3 is 2 g/L, Na3PO4 is 8 g/L, pH value is 3, temperature is 40 °C, reaction time is 10 min, the corrosion resistance of the surface conversion film is the best. The conversion coating is light green, composed of Cr, La, P, Al, O and other elements.

  13. Characterization and in-situ formation mechanism of tungsten carbide reinforced Fe-based alloy coating by plasma cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi-qi; Zhou, Ze-hua; Wu, Lin-tao; Ding, Ying; Wang, Ze-hua

    2018-04-01

    The precursor carbonization method was first applied to prepare W-C compound powder to perform the in-situ synthesis of the WC phase in a Fe-based alloy coating. The in-situ formation mechanism during the cladding process is discussed in detail. The results reveal that fine and obtuse WC particles were successfully generated and distributed in Fe-based alloy coating via Fe/W-C compound powders. The WC particles were either surrounded by or were semi-enclosed in blocky M7C3 carbides. Moreover, net-like structures were confirmed as mixtures of M23C6 and α-Fe; these structures were transformed from M7C3. The coarse herringbone M6C carbides did not only derive from the decomposition of M7C3 but also partly originated from the chemical reaction at the α-Fe/M23C6 interface. During the cladding process, the phase evolution of the precipitated carbides was WC → M7C3 → M23C6 + M6C.

  14. Material Analysis of Coated Siliconized Silicon Carbide (SiSiC) Honeycomb Structures for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Neises-von Puttkamer, Martina; Simon, Heike; Schmücker, Martin; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, thermochemical water splitting with siliconized silicon carbide (SiSiC) honeycombs coated with a zinc ferrite redox material was investigated. The small scale coated monoliths were tested in a laboratory test-rig and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with corresponding micro analysis after testing in order to characterize the changes in morphology and composition. Comparison of several treated monoliths revealed the formation of various reaction products such as SiO2, zircon (ZrSiO4), iron silicide (FeSi) and hercynite (FeAl2O4) indicating the occurrence of various side reactions between the different phases of the coating as well as between the coating and the SiSiC substrate. The investigations showed that the ferrite is mainly reduced through reaction with silicon (Si), which is present in the SiSiC matrix, and silicon carbide (SiC). These results led to the formulation of a new redox mechanism for this system in which Zn-ferrite is reduced through Si forming silicon dioxide (SiO2) and through SiC forming SiO2 and carbon monoxide. A decline of hydrogen production within the first 20 cycles is suggested to be due to the growth of a silicon dioxide and zircon layer which acts as a diffusion barrier for the reacting specie. PMID:28809316

  15. Material Analysis of Coated Siliconized Silicon Carbide (SiSiC) Honeycomb Structures for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Neises-von Puttkamer, Martina; Simon, Heike; Schmücker, Martin; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2013-01-31

    In the present work, thermochemical water splitting with siliconized silicon carbide (SiSiC) honeycombs coated with a zinc ferrite redox material was investigated. The small scale coated monoliths were tested in a laboratory test-rig and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with corresponding micro analysis after testing in order to characterize the changes in morphology and composition. Comparison of several treated monoliths revealed the formation of various reaction products such as SiO₂, zircon (ZrSiO₄), iron silicide (FeSi) and hercynite (FeAl₂O₄) indicating the occurrence of various side reactions between the different phases of the coating as well as between the coating and the SiSiC substrate. The investigations showed that the ferrite is mainly reduced through reaction with silicon (Si), which is present in the SiSiC matrix, and silicon carbide (SiC). These results led to the formulation of a new redox mechanism for this system in which Zn-ferrite is reduced through Si forming silicon dioxide (SiO₂) and through SiC forming SiO₂ and carbon monoxide. A decline of hydrogen production within the first 20 cycles is suggested to be due to the growth of a silicon dioxide and zircon layer which acts as a diffusion barrier for the reacting specie.

  16. Enhanced room-temperature magnetoresistance in self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Biswas, S

    2016-09-14

    Self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic diluted magnetic chromium oxide nanocomposites were developed by a facile chemical synthesis route involving a reaction of CrO3 in the presence of Ag(+) ions in an aqueous solution of poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and sucrose. The tiny ferromagnetic single domains of tetragonal and orthorhombic CrO2 (t-CrO2 and o-CrO2) embedded in a dominantly insulating matrix of antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 and Cr3O8, and paramagnetic CrO3 and Cr2O, with a correlated diamagnetic thin and discontinuous shell layer of Ag efficiently tailor useful magnetic and room-temperature magnetoresistance (RTMR) properties. The t-CrO2, o-CrO2, possible canted ferromagnetism due to spin disorder in the matrix components, and the associated exchange interactions are the elements responsible for the observed ferromagnetism in the composite structure. The chain of ferromagnetic centers embedded in the composite matrix constitutes a type of magnetic tunnel junction through which spin-polarized electrons can effectively move without significant local interruptions. Electrical transport measurements showed that the spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) mechanism in the engineered microstructure of the nanocomposites exists even at room temperature (RT). A typical sample unveils a markedly enhanced RTMR-value, e.g., -80% at an applied field (H) of 3 kOe, compared to the reported values for compacted CrO2 powders or composites. The enhanced RTMR-value observed in the Coulomb blockade regime appears not only due to the considerably suppressed spin flipping at RT but primarily due to a highly effective SDT mechanism through an interlinked structure of Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites.

  17. Ab Initio Predictions of Strong Interfaces in Transition-Metal Carbides and Nitrides for Superhard Nanocomposite Coating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chongze; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    Conceiving strong interfaces represents an effective direction in the development of superhard nanocomposite materials for practical applications in protective coatings. Additionally, in the pursuit of engineering strong nanoscale interfaces between cubic rock-salt (B1) domains, we investigate using density functional theory (DFT) coherent interface models designed based on hexagonal (HX) NiAs and WC structures, as well as experiment. The DFT screening of a collection of transition-metal (M = Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) carbides and nitrides indicates that the interface models provided by the HX polymorphs store little coherency strain and develop an energetic advantage as the valence-electron concentration increases. Finally, ourmore » result suggests that harnessing the polymorphism encountered in transition-metal (M = Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) carbides and nitrides for interface design represents a promising strategy for advancing superhard nanomaterials.« less

  18. Ab Initio Predictions of Strong Interfaces in Transition-Metal Carbides and Nitrides for Superhard Nanocomposite Coating Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Chongze; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G.; ...

    2018-04-19

    Conceiving strong interfaces represents an effective direction in the development of superhard nanocomposite materials for practical applications in protective coatings. Additionally, in the pursuit of engineering strong nanoscale interfaces between cubic rock-salt (B1) domains, we investigate using density functional theory (DFT) coherent interface models designed based on hexagonal (HX) NiAs and WC structures, as well as experiment. The DFT screening of a collection of transition-metal (M = Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) carbides and nitrides indicates that the interface models provided by the HX polymorphs store little coherency strain and develop an energetic advantage as the valence-electron concentration increases. Finally, ourmore » result suggests that harnessing the polymorphism encountered in transition-metal (M = Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) carbides and nitrides for interface design represents a promising strategy for advancing superhard nanomaterials.« less

  19. Chromium(VI) Removal from Aqueous Solution by Magnetite Coated by a Polymeric Ionic Liquid-Based Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thania Alexandra; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Paez-Hernandez, María Elena; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Barrado, Enrique; Hernandez, Prisciliano

    2017-01-01

    An evaluation of the chromium(VI) adsorption capacity of four magnetite sorbents coated with a polymer phase containing polymethacrylic acid or polyallyl-3-methylimidazolium is presented. Factors that influence the chromium(VI) removal such as solution pH and contact time were investigated in batch experiments and in stirred tank reactor mode. Affinity and rate constants increased with the molar ratio of the imidazolium. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 2.0 due to the contribution of electrostatic interactions. PMID:28772865

  20. Comparison of Heavy-Duty Scuffing Behavior between Chromium-Based Ceramic Composite and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Coated Ring Sliding against Cast Iron Liner under Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Yu, Baihong; Lv, Yutao; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    A running-in and starved lubrication experiment is designed to investigate the heavy-duty scuffing behavior of piston ring coatings against cast iron (Fe) cylinder liner using the piston ring reciprocating liner test rig. The scuffing resistance of the piston ring with the chromium-based ceramic composite coating (CKS), and that with the thermally sprayed nickel-chromium-molybdenum coating (NCM) is compared at different nominal pressures (40~100 MPa) and temperatures (180~250 °C). With the failure time as a criterion, the rank order is as follows: NCM/Fe > CKS/Fe. Before the scoring occurs at the interface of the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL), the cast iron liner enters into a “polish wear” stage, and iron-based adhesive materials begin to form on the piston ring surface. With the macroscopic adhesion formation, the plastic shearing cycle causes surface damages mainly due to abrasive effects for the CKS/Fe pairs and adhesive effects for the NCM/Fe pairs. PMID:29036911

  1. Kinetics of carbide formation in the molybdenum-tungsten coatings used in the ITER-like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, H.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Balden, M.; Elgeti, S.; Ruset, C.; Matthews, G. F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of tungsten carbide formation was investigated for tungsten coatings on carbon fibre composite with a molybdenum interlayer as they are used in the ITER-like Wall in JET. The coatings were produced by combined magnetron sputtering and ion implantation. The investigation was performed by preparing focused ion beam cross sections from samples after heat treatment in argon atmosphere. Baking of the samples was done at temperatures of 1100 °C, 1200 °C, and 1350 °C for hold times between 30 min and 20 h. It was found that the data can be well described by a diffusional random walk with a thermally activated diffusion process. The activation energy was determined to be (3.34 ± 0.11) eV. Predictions for the isothermal lifetime of this coating system were computed from this information.

  2. Experimental analysis of pressure controlled atomization process (PCAP) coatings for replacement of hard chromium plating

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.C.; Glovan, R.J.; Witt, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    A four-phase experimental design was utilized to evaluate the abrasive wear and corrosion protection characteristics of VERSAlloy 50 coatings applied to AISI 4130 steel sheet. The coatings were applied with the Pressure Controlled Atomization Process (PCAP), a new thermal spray process being developed for the United States Air Force to replace hard chromium plating. Phase 1 of the design consisted of an evaluation of deposit profiles that were sprayed at five different standoff distances. Profile measurements yielded standard deviations ({sigma}) of the plume at each of the spray distances. Phase 2 consisted of a completely randomized series of eight spraymore » tests in which the track gap or distance between consecutive spray passes was varied by amounts of 0.5{sigma}, 1{sigma}, 2{sigma}, and 3{sigma}. The sprayed test coupons were then evaluated for corrosion protection, abrasive wear resistance, microhardness, and porosity. Results from Phase 2 were used to determine the best track gap or overlap for Phase 3 and Phase 4 testing. Phase 3 consisted of 22-run central composite design. The test coupons were evaluated the same as in Phase 2. Statistical analysis of Phase 3 data revealed that the optimal system operating parameters produced coatings that would either provide superior corrosion protection or resistance to abrasive wear. Phase 4 consisted of four spray tests to validate the results obtained in Phase 3. Phase 4 test coupons were again evaluated with the same analysis as in Phases 2 and 3. The validation tests indicated that PCAP system operating parameters could be controlled to produce VERSAlloy 50 coatings with superior corrosion protection or resistance to abrasive wear.« less

  3. Preparation and Corrosion Resistance of Trivalent Chromium-Zirconium Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in the various industries because of its superior advantages. However there will be a thin oxide layer on the surface of the pure aluminum to inhibit corrosion, when adding some other elements, the obtained aluminum alloy is easy to be corroded. Surface protection is an important means to improve the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys. The formal research had already confirmed that the trivalent chromium conversion coating can significantly improve the corrosion resistance, and the usage of the zirconium solution can also protect the aluminum alloy from corrosion. In this study, we constructed the binary conversion coating with the Cr2(SO4)3 and the K2ZrF6. The optimum reaction conditions are as follows: 10g/L H3PO4, 2g/L K2ZrF6, 28g/L Cr2(SO4)3, pH=2.5∼3.5, temperature 40°C, and reaction time 10 min. Copper sulfate titration experiment confirmed that the corrosion resistance was significantly improved.

  4. Ultraviolet-Diode Pump Solid State Laser Removal of Titanium Aluminium Nitride Coating from Tungsten Carbide Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Chantzis, Dimitrios; Royer, Raphael; Metsios, Ioannis; Antar, Mohammad; Marimuthu, Sundar

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) coating removal from tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate using a diode pump solid state (DPSS) ultraviolet (UV) laser with maximum average power of 90 W, wavelength of 355 nm and pulse width of 50 ns. The TiAlN coating of 1.5 μm thickness is removed from the WC-Co substrate with laser fluence of 2.71 J/cm2 at 285.6 number of pulses (NOP) and with NOP of 117.6 at 3.38 J/cm2 fluence. Titanium oxide formation was observed on the ablated surface due to the re-deposition of ablated titanium residue and also attributed to the high temperature observed during the laser ablation process. Crack width of around 0.2 μm was observed over both TiAlN coating and WC-Co substrate. The crack depth ranging from 1 to 10 μm was observed and is related to the thickness of the melted carbide. The crack formation is a result of the thermal induced stresses caused by the laser beam interaction with the material as well as the higher thermal conductivity of cobalt compared to WC. Two cleaning regions are observed and is a consequence of the Gaussian distribution of the laser beam energy. The surface roughness of the ablated WC-Co increased with increasing laser fluence and NOP.

  5. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  6. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  7. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 °C) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantifiedmore » by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 °C.« less

  8. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel-tungsten composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel-tungsten (Ni-W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni-W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, Ecorr) compared to Ni-W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO4 and SiO2.

  9. Effect of nitrogen-containing plasma on adherence, friction, and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium carbide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440C steel surfaces that were rf sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that the small partial pressure of nitrogen (approximately 0.5 percent) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied to sputter-etched surfaces, oxidized surfaces, or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  10. Robot based deposition of WC-Co HVOF coatings on HSS cutting tools as a substitution for solid cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Schaak, C.; Biermann, D.; Aßmuth, R.; Goeke, S.

    2017-03-01

    Cemented carbide (hard metal) cutting tools are the first choice to machine hard materials or to conduct high performance cutting processes. Main advantages of cemented carbide cutting tools are their high wear resistance (hardness) and good high temperature strength. In contrast, cemented carbide cutting tools are characterized by a low toughness and generate higher production costs, especially due to limited resources. Usually, cemented carbide cutting tools are produced by means of powder metallurgical processes. Compared to conventional manufacturing routes, these processes are more expensive and only a limited number of geometries can be realized. Furthermore, post-processing and preparing the cutting edges in order to achieve high performance tools is often required. In the present paper, an alternative method to substitute solid cemented carbide cutting tools is presented. Cutting tools made of conventional high speed steels (HSS) were coated with thick WC-Co (88/12) layers by means of thermal spraying (HVOF). The challenge is to obtain a dense, homogenous, and near-net-shape coating on the flanks and the cutting edge. For this purpose, different coating strategies were realized using an industrial robot. The coating properties were subsequently investigated. After this initial step, the surfaces of the cutting tools were ground and selected cutting edges were prepared by means of wet abrasive jet machining to achieve a smooth and round micro shape. Machining tests were conducted with these coated, ground and prepared cutting tools. The occurring wear phenomena were analyzed and compared to conventional HSS cutting tools. Overall, the results of the experiments proved that the coating withstands mechanical stresses during machining. In the conducted experiments, the coated cutting tools showed less wear than conventional HSS cutting tools. With respect to the initial wear resistance, additional benefits can be obtained by preparing the cutting edge by means

  11. Investigation of the heating behavior of carbide-bonded graphene coated silicon wafer used for hot embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gao; Li, Lihua; Lee, Wing Bun; Ng, Man Cheung; Chan, Chang Yuen

    2018-03-01

    A recently developed carbide-bonded graphene (CBG) coated silicon wafer was found to be an effective micro-patterned mold material for implementing rapid heating in hot embossing processes owing to its superior electrical and thermal conductivity, in addition to excellent mechanical properties. To facilitate the achievement of precision temperature control in the hot embossing, the heating behavior of a CBG coated silicon wafer sample was experimentally investigated. First, two groups of controlled experiments were conducted for quantitatively evaluating the influence of the main factors such as the vacuum pressure and gaseous environment (vacuum versus nitrogen) on its heating performance. The electrical and thermal responses of this sample under a voltage of 60 V were then intensively analyzed, and revealed that it had somewhat semi-conducting properties. Further, we compared its thermal profiles under different settings of the input voltage and current limiting threshold. Moreover, the strong temperature dependence of electrical resistance for this material was observed and determined. Ultimately, the surface temperature of CBG coated silicon wafer could be as high as 1300 ℃, but surprisingly the graphene coating did not detach from the substrate under such an elevated temperature due to its strong thermal coupling with the silicon wafer.

  12. In situ removal of carbon contamination from a chromium-coated mirror: ideal optics to suppress higher-order harmonics in the carbon K-edge region.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Mase, Kazuhiko; Amemiya, Kenta

    2015-11-01

    Carbon-free chromium-coated optics are ideal in the carbon K-edge region (280-330 eV) because the reflectivity of first-order light is larger than that of gold-coated optics while the second-order harmonics (560-660 eV) are significantly suppressed by chromium L-edge and oxygen K-edge absorption. Here, chromium-, gold- and nickel-coated mirrors have been adopted in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray branch beamline BL-13B at the Photon Factory in Tsukuba, Japan. Carbon contamination on the chromium-coated mirror was almost completely removed by exposure to oxygen at a pressure of 8 × 10(-2) Pa for 1 h under irradiation of non-monochromated synchrotron radiation. The pressure in the chamber recovered to the order of 10(-7) Pa within a few hours. The reflectivity of the chromium-coated mirror of the second-order harmonics in the carbon K-edge region (560-660 eV) was found to be a factor of 0.1-0.48 smaller than that of the gold-coated mirror.

  13. Effects of compound carboxylate-urea system on nano Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings from trivalent chromium baths.

    PubMed

    He, Xinkuai; Hou, Bailong; Cai, Youxing; Wu, Luye

    2013-03-01

    The effects of compound carboxylate-urea system on the nano Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings from trivalent chromium baths have been investigated in ultrasonic field. These results indicated that the SiC and Cr contents and the thickness of the Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings could be obviously improved by the compound carboxylate-urea system. The steady-state polarization curves showed that the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) could be significantly inhibited by the compound carboxylate-urea system, which was benefit to increase the SiC and Cr contents and the thickness of the composite coatings. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) curves showed that both of the Cr(III) and Ni(II) cathodic polarization could be increased in the bath containing the compound carboxylate-urea system. Thus, a compact Ni-Cr/SiC composite coating could be obtained using this technique. The surface morphology of the Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings checked with the scanning electron micrographs (SEM) showed that the surface smoothness could be also improved and the microcracks and pinholes could be decreased due to the presence of the compound carboxylate-urea system. The phase composition of the as-posited coating was measured by the X-ray diffraction. XRD data showed that the as-posited coating was Ni-Cr/SiC composite coating. The chemical composition of the coating was investigated by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. The result showed the Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings with 3.8 wt.% SiC and 24.68 wt.% Cr were obtained in this study, which had best corrosion resistance according to the results of the typical potentiodynamic polarization curves of the Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings.

  14. Material Properties of Silicon Carbide Fibers with Continuously Applied Sol-Gel Alumina Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    71 Coating Characterization ...................... 73 iii Two-Dimensional Plane Strain Analysis .................. 78 VI ...Axial Load in the Coating of Fiber Serie T ...... .82 vi List of Figures (continued) Figure Page 39. Tangential Stress Due to Axial Load in the Coating...residual stress will be presented 17 Fiur Vi o a CaFber EfIVfef Sic=’/. Figure 1. Sectional View of a Coated Fiber first, since these stresses are of

  15. Infrapopliteal stenting with silicon carbide-coated stents in critical limb ischemia: a 12 month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Atar, Eli; Avrahami, Ram; Koganovich, Yuri; Litvin, Sergey; Knizhnik, Michael; Belenky, Alexander

    2009-10-01

    Critical limb ischemia is an increasingly common condition that has high surgical morbidity and limited non-surgical options. To evaluate the use of silicon carbide-coated Motion stents, as compared to reported data for bare metal stents, in elderly patients with infrapopliteal artery stenoses causing critical limb ischemia after failed or complicated percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Between January 2003 and March 2004, 41 stents were inserted into 17 consecutive patients (11 males, 6 females, mean age 82 years, range 75-93) following unsuccessful or complicated PTA. Seven patients had one-vessel run-off, six had two-vessel and four had three vessel run-off. All patients suffered from CLI, had up to three lesions and more than one co-morbid condition, and were considered at high surgical risk. Silicon carbide-coated Motion coronary stents, 2.5-4 mm diameterand 25 and 30 mm length, were used. Pre-intervention assessment included clinical condition, ankle brachial index, Doppler ultrasound and digital subtracted angiography. Postintervention evaluation included clinical condition, ABI and Doppler ultrasound at 3, 6 and 12 months. The technical success rate per lesion was 100% (41/41). Two patients died of unrelated causes after 2 and 8 months respectively. Primary patency rates with duplex ultrasound were 68.7% (11/16) at 3 months, 43.7% (7/16) at 6 months and 40% (6/15) after 12 months. Nine patients developed complete occlusion in 13 stents; three of these patients underwent a below-knee amputation and two patients a partial foot amputation. Re-intervention (PTA only) was performed in 7 patients (43.7%). Secondary patency rate was 81.2% (13/16) at 6 months and 60% (9/15) at one year. Mean ABI index had improved at 6 months from 0.32 to 0.67, and to 0.53 at one year. Clinical improvement was evident in 87.5% (14/16) at 6 months and in 66.6% (10/15) at one year. Silicon carbide-coated stents are comparable to bare metal stents after 6 and 12 months in

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  17. Progress in development of coated indexable cemented carbide inserts for machining of iron based work piece materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czettl, C.; Pohler, M.

    2016-03-01

    Increasing demands on material properties of iron based work piece materials, e.g. for the turbine industry, complicate the machining process and reduce the lifetime of the cutting tools. Therefore, improved tool solutions, adapted to the requirements of the desired application have to be developed. Especially, the interplay of macro- and micro geometry, substrate material, coating and post treatment processes is crucial for the durability of modern high performance tool solutions. Improved and novel analytical methods allow a detailed understanding of material properties responsible for the wear behaviour of the tools. Those support the knowledge based development of tailored cutting materials for selected applications. One important factor for such a solution is the proper choice of coating material, which can be synthesized by physical or chemical vapor deposition techniques. Within this work an overview of state-of-the-art coated carbide grades is presented and application examples are shown to demonstrate their high efficiency. Machining processes for a material range from cast iron, low carbon steels to high alloyed steels are covered.

  18. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  19. Diamondlike carbon coating as a galvanic corrosion barrier between dental implant abutments and nickel-chromium superstructures.

    PubMed

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Erbil, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy, to investigate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating over titanium on galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and Ni-Cr alloy, and to evaluate the effect of DLC coating over titanium abutments on the fit and integrity of prosthetic assemblies by scanning electron microcopy (SEM). Five Ni-Cr and 10 titanium disks with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 3 mm were prepared. DLC coating was applied to five titanium disks. Electrode samples were prepared, and open circuit potential measurements, galvanic current measurements over platinum electrodes, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out. For the SEM evaluation, 20 Ni-Cr alloy and 10 gold alloy superstructures were cast and prepared over 30 abutments. DLC coating was applied to 10 of the abutments. Following the fixation of prosthetic assemblies, the samples were embedded in acrylic resin and cross sectioned longitudinally. Internal fit evaluations were carried out through examination of the SEM images. Titanium showed more noble and electrochemically stable properties than Ni-Cr alloy. DLC coating over the cathode electrode served as an insulating film layer over the surface and prevented galvanic coupling. Results of the SEM evaluations indicated that the DLC-coated and titanium abutments showed no statistically significant difference in fit. Hence, no adverse effects on the adaptation of prosthetic components were found with the application of DLC coating over abutment surfaces. DLC coating might serve as a galvanic corrosion barrier between titanium abutments and Ni-Cr superstructures.

  20. Carbide coated fibers in graphites-aluminum composites. [(fabrication of metal matrix composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities are described for a NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to develop graphite fiber-aluminum matrix composites. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was constructed for continuously coating graphite fibers with TiC. As much as 150 meters of continuously coated fibers were produced. Deposition temperatures were varied from 1365 K to about 1750 K, and deposition time from 6 to 150 seconds. The 6 sec deposition time corresponded to a fiber feed rate of 2.54 m/min through the coater. Thin, uniform, adherent TiC coats, with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 micrometer were produced on the individual fibers of Thornel 50 graphite yarns without affecting fiber strength. Although coat properties were fairly uniform throughout a given batch, more work is needed to improve the batch-to-batch reproducibility. Samples of TiC-coated Thornel 50 fibers were infiltrated with an aluminum alloy and hot-pressed in vacuum to produce small composite bars for flexure testing. Strengths as high as 90% of the rule-of-mixtures strength were achieved. Results of the examination of the fracture surfaces indicate that the bonding between the aluminum and the TiC-coated fibers is better than that achieved in a similar, commercially infiltrated material made with fibers having no observable surface coats. Several samples of Al-infiltrated, TiC-coated Thornel 50 graphite yarns, together with samples of the commercially infiltrated, uncoated fibers, were heated for 100 hours at temperatures near the alloy solidus. The TiC-coated samples appear to undergo less reaction than do the uncoated samples. Photomicrographs are shown.

  1. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  2. Atom probe tomography of a Ti-Si-Al-C-N coating grown on a cemented carbide substrate.

    PubMed

    Thuvander, M; Östberg, G; Ahlgren, M; Falk, L K L

    2015-12-01

    The elemental distribution within a Ti-Si-Al-C-N coating grown by physical vapour deposition on a Cr-doped WC-Co cemented carbide substrate has been investigated by atom probe tomography. Special attention was paid to the coating/substrate interface region. The results indicated a diffusion of substrate binder phase elements into the Ti-N adhesion layer. The composition of this layer, and the Ti-Al-N interlayer present between the adhesion layer and the main Ti-Si-Al-C-N layer, appeared to be sub-stoichiometric. The analysis of the interlayer showed the presence of internal surfaces, possibly grain boundaries, depleted in Al. The composition of the main Ti-Al-Si-C-N layer varied periodically in the growth direction; layers enriched in Ti appeared with a periodicity of around 30 nm. Laser pulsing resulted in a good mass resolution that made it possible to distinguish between N(+) and Si(2+) at 14 Da. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Methylsilane derived silicon carbide particle coatings produced by fluid-bed chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James Henry

    This report describes the research effort that was undertaken to develop and understand processing techniques for the deposition of both low and high density SiC coatings from a non-halide precursor, in support of the Generation IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel development program. The research was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, the feasibility of producing both porous SiC coatings and dense SiC coatings on surrogate fuel particles by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) using gas mixtures of methylsilane and argon was demonstrated. In the second phase, a combined experimental and modeling effort was carried out in order to gain an understanding of the deposition mechanisms that result in either porous or dense SiC coatings, depending on the coating conditions. For this second phase effort, a simplified (compared to the fluid bed) single-substrate chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was employed. Based on the experimental and modeling results, the deposition of SiC from methylsilane is controlled by the extent of gas-phase reaction, and is therefore highly sensitive to temperature. The results show that all SiC coatings are due to the surface adsorption of species that result from gas-phase reactions. The model terms these gas-borne species embryos, and while the model does not include a prediction of coating morphology, a comparison of the model and experimental results indicates that the morphology of the coatings is controlled by the nucleation and growth of the embryos. The coating that results from small embryos (embryos with only two Si-C pairs) appears relatively dense and continuous, while the coating that results from larger embryos becomes less continuous and more nodular as embryo size increases. At some point in the growth of embryos they cease to behave as molecular species and instead behave as particles that grow by either agglomeration or by incorporation of molecular species on their surface. As these particles

  4. Mechanical and tribological properties of thermally sprayed tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yunfei

    Since previous work in our laboratory has shown that very fine microstructures increase the hardness and the resistance to sliding and abrasive wear of bulk, sintered, WC/Co composites, it was decided to explore whether similar benefits can be obtained in coatings of this material deposited by the Thermal Spray Method. The research was a collaborative effort in which a number of companies and universities prepared feedstock powders by a number of methods and deposited coatings by Plasma Spray and High Velocity Oxy Fuel spray techniques. Our role was to study the resistance of these coatings to abrasion and to wear in unlubricated sliding, to relate our findings to the microstructure of the coatings and to the properties of the powder and the parameters of deposition. The results were then used by our partners in the program to modify their processes in order to obtain the best possible performance. The thesis consists of four parts. In the first, we review the literature on WC/Co coatings and present the results of our survey of 45 coatings. This shows that the details of the thermal spray technique determine the tribological performance of the coatings much more than the size of the WC grains in the starting powder. It also shows that abrasive and sliding wear respond differently to the material properties. The remainder of the thesis describes a systematic variation of powders and deposition techniques, based on our earlier findings. In the second part, we describe the microstructures, hardness and toughness of nine coatings deposited by A. Dent at SUNY Stony Brook, with three different powders and three different flame chemistries. We find that the hardness is determined mainly by the flame temperature; hardness is decreased by porosity on the 50-nm size range, and this porosity is produced by insufficient melting of the Co binder. High temperatures and certain powder morphologies cause extensive decarburization, and the latter reduces the adhesion between the

  5. Optimization of cutting parameters in CNC turning of stainless steel 304 with TiAlN nano coated carbide cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasada Rao, V.; Harsha, N.; Raghu Ram, N. S.; Navya Geethika, V.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, turning was performed to optimize the surface finish or roughness (Ra) of stainless steel 304 with uncoated and coated carbide tools under dry conditions. The carbide tools were coated with Titanium Aluminium Nitride (TiAlN) nano coating using Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) method. The machining parameters, viz., cutting speed, depth of cut and feed rate which show major impact on Ra are considered during turning. The experiments are designed as per Taguchi orthogonal array and machining process is done accordingly. Then second-order regression equations have been developed on the basis of experimental results for Ra in terms of machining parameters used. Regarding the effect of machining parameters, an upward trend is observed in Ra with respect to feed rate, and as cutting speed increases the Ra value increased slightly due to chatter and vibrations. The adequacy of response variable (Ra) is tested by conducting additional experiments. The predicted Ra values are found to be a close match of their corresponding experimental values of uncoated and coated tools. The corresponding average % errors are found to be within the acceptable limits. Then the surface roughness equations of uncoated and coated tools are set as the objectives of optimization problem and are solved by using Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm. Also the tool lives of uncoated and coated tools are predicted by using Taylor’s tool life equation.

  6. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  7. SiAlON COATINGS OF SILICON NITRIDE AND SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jan W. Nowok; John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    2000-06-01

    The need for new engineering materials in aerospace applications and in stationary power turbine blades for high-efficiency energy-generating equipment has led to a rapid development of ceramic coatings. They can be tailored to have superior physical (high specific strength and stiffness, enhanced high-temperature performance) and chemical (high-temperature corrosion resistance in more aggressive fuel environments) properties than those of monolithic ceramic materials. Among the major chemical properties of SiAlON-Y ceramics are their good corrosion resistance against aggressive media combined with good thermal shock behavior. The good corrosion resistance results from the yttria-alumina-garnet (YAG), Al{sub 5}Y{sub 3}O{sub 12}, formed during the corrosionmore » process of SiAlON-Y ceramics in combustion gases at 1300 C. The interfacial chemical precipitation of the YAG phase is beneficial. This phase may crystallize in cubic and/or tetragonal modifications and if formed in SiAlON-Y ceramic may simultaneously generate residual stress. Also, this phase can contain a large number of point defects, which is a consequence of the large unit cell and complexity of the YAG structure because it has no close-packed oxygen planes. Therefore, the need exists to elucidate the corrosion mechanism of a multilayered barrier with respect to using SiAlON-YAG as a corrosion-protective coating. Stress corrosion cracking in the grain boundary of a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic enriched in a glassy phase such as SiAlON can significantly affect its mechanical properties. It has been suggested that the increased resistance of the oxynitride glass to stress corrosion is related to the increased surface potential of the fracture surface created in the more durable and highly cross-linked oxynitride glass network structure. We expect that either increased or decreased surface potential of the intergranular glassy phase is brought about by changes in the residual stress of

  8. Application of carbide cutting tools with nano-structured multilayer composite coatings for turning austenitic steels, type 16Cr-10NI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereschaka, Alexey; Migranov, Mars; Oganyan, Gaik; Sotova, Catherine S.; Batako, Andre

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses the challenges of increasing the efficiency of the machining of austenitic stainless steels AISI 321 and S31600 by application of cutting tools with multilayer composite nano-structured coatings. The main mechanical properties and internal structures of the coatings under study (hardness, adhesion strength in the "coating-substrate" system) were investigated, and their chemical compositions were analyzed. The conducted research of tool life and nature of wear of carbide tools with the investigated coatings during turning of the above mentioned steels showed that the application of those coatings increases the tool life by up to 2.5 times. In addition, the use of a cutting tool with coatings allows machining at higher cutting speeds. It was also found that the use of a tool with multilayer composite nano-structured coating (Zr,Nb)N-(Zr,Al,Nb)N ensures better results compared with not only monolithic coating TiN, but also with nano-structured coatings Ti-TiN-(Ti,Al)N and (Zr,Nb)N-(Cr,Zr,Nb,Al)N. The mechanism of failure of the coatings under study was also investigated.

  9. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications. [coated with titanium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Haenni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings for hostile environments were developed. They consist of normal ball bearing steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear-resistant, chemical vapor deposited (C.V.D) TiC. Experiments in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, have shown that such bearings are suitable for space applications.

  10. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  11. Improvement of Corrosion Resistance of Binary Mg-Ca Alloys Using Duplex Aluminum-Chromium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daroonparvar, Mohammadreza; Yajid, Muhamad Azizi Mat; Yusof, Noordin Mohd; Bakhsheshi-Rad, Hamid Reza; Adabi, Mohsen; Hamzah, Esah; Kamali, Hussein Ali

    2015-07-01

    Al-AlCr was coated on Mg-Ca and Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloys using physical vapor deposition method. The surface morphology of the specimens was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results indicated that the average surface roughness of Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Ca alloy is much lower than that of Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy. However, Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Ca alloy presented a more compact structure with fewer pores, pinholes, and cracks than Al-AlCr coating on the Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy. Electrochemical studies revealed that the novel coating (Al-AlCr) can remarkably reduce the corrosion rate of the Mg-Ca alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It was seen that the anodic current density of the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Ca alloy was very small when compared to the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Zn-Ce-La and uncoated alloys. Impedance modulus ( Z) of the Al-AlCr-coated samples was higher than that of the bare Mg alloys. Z of Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Ca alloy was higher than that of the Al-AlCr-coated Mg-Zn-Ce-La alloy at low frequency.

  12. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  13. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Carbide Coatings for Rolling and Sliding Contact Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    C. Mfiller and R. F. Haglund, eds.) Springler-Verlag(1991), Heidelberg, p. 3 0 1 24. L. Wiedeman, and H . Helvajian , I. Appi. Phys. 70, (1991) 4513...films were tested in air (45% R/ H ) using a pin-on-disk test. We found that, in comparison to MoS2 alone, the films with added Cr, Ti and TiC all...American Ceramic Society, v. 84 pp. 672-674 (2001). 10. H . X. Ji, C. C. Amato-Wierda, "Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ti-W-C Thin Films," Surface and Coatings

  14. Interface reactions between silicon carbide and interlayers in silicon carbide copper metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köck, T.; Brendel, A.; Bolt, H.

    2007-05-01

    Novel copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibres are considered as a new generation of heat sink materials for the divertor of future fusion reactors. The divertor is exposed to intense particle bombardment and heat loads of up to 15 MW m-2. This component consists of the plasma-facing material which is bonded to the actively cooled heat sink. Due to its high thermal conductivity of about 400 W m-1 K-1 copper is a promising material for the heat sink. To increase the mechanical properties of copper at working temperature (823 K), silicon carbide fibres with a diameter of 140 μm are used to reinforce the interface area between the plasma-facing material and the heat sink. Push-out tests show that the adhesion between SiC fibre and Cu matrix without any interlayer is very low. To increase the fibre-matrix bonding the fibres are coated with Cr and W with a thickness of 300-400 nm before Cu deposition by magnetron sputtering. Push-out tests on these modified fibres show a significant increase in adhesion compared to the fibres without interlayer. XRD investigations after a heat treatment at 923 K show a chromium carbide (Cr23C6, Cr3C2) formation and the absence of chromium silicides. In the case of a W interlayer a W2C formation is detected and also no tungsten silicides. Single-fibre tensile tests were performed to investigate the influence of the reaction zone on the ultimate tensile strength of the fibres. The ultimate tensile strength for fibres without interlayer remains constant at about 2200 MPa after annealing at 923 K. The fibres with chromium and tungsten interlayers, respectively, show a decrease of about 30% of the ultimate tensile strength after the heat treatment at 923 K.

  15. Effect of Particle and Carbide Grain Sizes on a HVOAF WC-Co-Cr Coating for the Future Application on Internal Surfaces: Microstructure and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsford, J.; Kamnis, S.; Murray, J.; Bai, M.; Hussain, T.

    2018-01-01

    The use of nanoscale WC grain or finer feedstock particles is a possible method of improving the performance of WC-Co-Cr coatings. Finer powders are being pursued for the development of coating internal surfaces, as less thermal energy is required to melt the finer powder compared to coarse powders, permitting spraying at smaller standoff distances. Three WC-10Co-4Cr coatings, with two different powder particle sizes and two different carbide grain sizes, were sprayed using a high velocity oxy-air fuel (HVOAF) thermal spray system developed by Castolin Eutectic-Monitor Coatings Ltd., UK. Powder and coating microstructures were characterized using XRD and SEM. Fracture toughness and dry sliding wear performance at three loads were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer with a WC-Co counterbody. It was found that the finer powder produced the coating with the highest microhardness, but its fracture toughness was reduced due to increased decarburization compared to the other powders. The sprayed nanostructured powder had the lowest microhardness and fracture toughness of all materials tested. Unlubricated sliding wear testing at the lowest load showed the nanostructured coating performed best; however, at the highest load this coating showed the highest specific wear rates with the other two powders performing to a similar, better standard.

  16. PERMANENT PRIMER/REPLACEABLE TOPCOAT AIRCRAFT COATING SYSTEM WITH MINIMUM VOC AND CHROMIUM EXPOSURE - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Phase I, Foster-Miller, Inc., will develop the permanent primer replacement topcoat (PPRT), produce coated test panels, and analyze test panels for key performance properties. Topcoat stripping also will be demonstrated. The team includes coating experts and an aircraft ...

  17. Chromium and reactive element modified aluminide diffusion coatings on superalloys - Environmental testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Smialek, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The high temperature performance of reactive element (RE)-doped and Cr/RE-modified aluminide diffusion coatings on commercial Ni-base alloy substrates was determined. In isothermal oxidation at 1100 C in air, RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC substrates formed a continuous slow-growing n-Al2O3 scale after 44 hrs of exposure. The coatings were protected by either an outer ridge Al2O3 scale with an inner compact Al2O3 scale rich in RE or by a continuous compact scale without any noticeable cracks or flaws. The cyclic oxidation behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and IN 713LC alloys and of RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC alloys at 1100 C in static air was determined. Pack powder entrapment from the powder contacting (PC) process detracted significantly from the overall cyclic oxidation performance. Type I hot corrosion behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and Mar-M247 alloy substrates at 900 C in a catalyzed 0.1 percent SO3/O3 gas mixture was determined. The modified coatings produced from the PC arrangement provided significantly better resistance to hot corrosion attack than commercial low-activity aluminide coatings produced by the above pack arrangement.

  18. Two-component end mills with multilayer composite nano-structured coatings as a viable alternative to monolithic carbide end mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereschaka, Alexey; Mokritskii, Boris; Mokritskaya, Elena; Sharipov, Oleg; Oganyan, Maksim

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the challenges of the application of two-component end mills, which represent a combination of a carbide cutting part and a shank made of cheaper structural material. The calculations of strains and deformations of composite mills were carried out in comparison with solid carbide mills, with the use of the finite element method. The study also involved the comparative analysis of accuracy parameters of machining with monolithic mills and two-component mills with various shank materials. As a result of the conducted cutting tests in milling aluminum alloy with monolithic and two-component end mills with specially developed multilayer composite nano-structured coatings, it has been found that the use of such coatings can reduce strains and, correspondingly, deformations, which can improve the accuracy of machining. Thus, the application of two-component end mills with multilayer composite nano-structured coatings can provide a reduction in the cost of machining while maintaining or even improving the tool life and machining accuracy parameters.

  19. Evaluation of chromium oxide and molybdenum disulfide coatings in self-acting stops of an air-lubricated Rayleigh step thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two coatings for a Rayleigh step thrust bearing were tested when coasting down and stopping under self-acting operation in air. The thrust bearing had an outside diameter of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.), an inside diameter of 5.4 cm (2.1 in.), and nine sectors. The load was 73 N (16.4 lbf). The load pressure was 19.1 kN/per square meter (2.77 lbf/per square inch) on the total thrust bearing area. The chromium oxide coating was good to 150 stops without bearing deterioration, and the molybdenum disulfide coating was good for only four stops before bearing deterioration. The molybdenum disulfide coated bearing failed after nine stops.

  20. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Phillpot, Simon

    300oC and 500 oC, respectively. The coating layer contains both carbon and vanadium elements as quantified by WED, and the phases mainly consist of a mixture of V2C and VC, which was confirmed using X-ray diffraction patterns. In addition, the ratio between V and C varies with processing temperature, and it was observed that a higher temperature promotes the carbon adsorption and increases thickness of the coating. With optimized deposition conditions, we can apply the coating technique toward the actual T91 cladding materials, and provide the possibilities for the real application in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Diffusion couple experiments were performed at both 550 oC and 690 oC, which corresponds to normal and aggressive operating temperatures, respectively. The results show that vanadium carbide coating with wider thickness (8 µm) and lower carbon concentration (27 at.%) reduced the width of the inter diffusion region, indicating that vanadium carbide coating can mitigate FCCI effectively. In specific, inter-diffusion between Fe and Ce was prohibited over most area, but Ce diffusion occurred toward the coating and the Fe substrate through thinner coating layer, which needs further optimization in terms of uniform coating thickness. Overall, it is concluded that this coating process can be successfully applied onto the inner surface of HT9 cladding tubes and the FCCI can be effectively mitigated if not totally eliminated.« less

  1. Zeolite Coating System for Corrosion Control to Eliminate Hexavalent Chromium from DoD Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Beving D.; Munoz R.; Yushan Y. 2005, Hydrothermal Synthesis and Corrosion Resistance of Vanadium ZSM-5 Films, The American Institute of Chemical...Engineers National Meeting, October 30 - November 4, Cincinnati, Ohio. 8) Mao Y.; Beving D.; Munoz R.; Yushan Y. 2005, Hydrothermal Synthesis of...directly at the solid-liquid interface from a synthesis solution during the coating formation process (Figure 2-4)12. The synthesis solution used is a

  2. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C.

  3. Experimental investigation of grain boundaries misorientations and nano twinning induced strengthening on addition of silicon carbide in pulse electrodeposited nickel tungsten composite coating

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, O.S. Asiq; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Sundararajan, G.

    Nanoindentation was performed on silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel-tungsten (Ni-W) composite coating. Addition of 5 vol.% of SiC in Ni-W coating increased the hardness from 10.31 ± 0.65 GPa to 14.32 ± 0.63 GPa and elastic modulus from 119.74 ± 3.15 GPa to 139.26 ± 2.09 GPa. Increased hardness and elastic modulus directly translates to the improved strengthening in the coating. An experimental investigation of strengthening mechanism was carried out in Ni-W-5 vol.% SiC alloy. Two simultaneous phenomena viz. grain refinement and increased internal strain was observed, which increased the dislocation density from 5.51 × 10{sup 18} m{supmore » −2} to 1.346 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} on reinforcement of 5 vol.% of SiC in Ni-W coating. Increased dislocation density promoted the formation of grain boundary misorientations and nano twinning. Low angle grain boundary, high angle grain boundary and nano twinning were identified using high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) image and their role in strengthening mechanism was discussed in details. - Highlights: • SiC reinforced pulse electrodeposition Ni-W coating was deposited on steel. • Nanoindentation showed the increased mechanical properties on addition of SiC. • Grain refinement and increased internal strain was observed in Ni-W-SiC coating. • Dislocation density increased on reinforcement of SiC in Ni-W coating. • Increased dislocation density triggered grain boundary misorientation and twinning.« less

  4. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-20

    Composition, Wgt % Powder Composition, Wgt % Powder WC/17Co Diamalloy 2005 WC/17Co Metco 73F-NS-1 Cr3C2-20 (Ni,Cr) Amdry 5260/Diam 3007 Co-28 Mo - 8 Cr-2...Si** Metco 66F-NS Co-28 Mo -17 Cr-3 Si* Diamalloy 3001 Co-28 Mo - 8 Cr-2 Si** Diamalloy 3002 * Tribaloy 800 ** Tribaloy 400 20 4.4. Coating...Work WC/17Co Diamalloy 2005 Yes -- Cr3C2-20 (Ni,Cr) Amdry 5260/Diam 3007 -- Yes Co-28 Mo -17 Cr-3 Si* Diamalloy 3001 -- Yes Co-28 Mo - 8 Cr-2 Si

  5. The High-Temperature Wear and Oxidation Behavior of CrC-Based HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdková, Šárka; Česánek, Zdeněk; Smazalová, Eva; Lukáč, František

    2018-01-01

    Three commercially available chromium carbide-based powders with different kinds of matrix (Cr3C2-25%NiCr; Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY and Cr3C2-50%NiCrMoNb) were deposited by an HVOF JP-5000 spraying gun, evaluated and compared. The influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and properties, as well as the oxidation resistance in a hot steam environment ( p = 24 MPa; T = 609 °C), was evaluated by SEM and XRD with respect to their potential application in the steam power industry. The sliding wear resistance measured at room and elevated ( T = 600 °C) temperatures according to ASTM G-133. For all three kinds of chromium carbide-based coatings, the precipitation of secondary carbides from the supersaturated matrix was observed during the heat treatment. For Cr3C2-25%NiCr coating annealed in hot steam environment as well as for Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY coating in both environments, the inner carbide oxidation was recorded. The sliding wear resistance was found equal at room temperature, regardless of the matrix composition and content, while at elevated temperatures, the higher wear was measured, varying in dependence on the matrix composition and content. The chromium carbide-based coating with modified matrix composition Cr3C2-50%NiCrMoNb is suitable to replace the Cr3C2-25%NiCr coating in a hot steam environment to eliminate the risk of failure caused by inner carbide oxidation.

  6. Mitigation of chromium poisoning of cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells employing CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating on metallic interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruofan; Sun, Zhihao; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Basu, Soumendra N.

    2018-02-01

    Chromium poisoning is one of the major reasons for cathode performance degradation in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). To mitigate the effect of Cr-poisoning, a protective coating on the surface of interconnect for suppressing Cr vaporization is necessary. Among the various coating materials, Cu-Mn spinel coating is considered to be a potential candidate due to their good thermal compatibility, high stability and good electronic conductivity at high temperature. In this study, Crofer 22 H meshes with no protective coating, those with commercial CuMn2O4 spinel coating and the ones with lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating were investigated. The lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating were deposited on Crofer 22 H mesh by electrophoretic deposition and densified by a reduction and re-oxidation process. With these different Crofer 22 H meshes (bare, CuMn2O4-coated, and CuMn1.8O4-coated), anode-supported SOFCs with Sr-doped LaMnO3-based cathode were electrochemically tested at 800 °C for total durations of up to 288 h. Comparing the mitigating effects of the two types of Cu-Mn spinel coatings on Cr-poisoning, it was found that the performance of the denser lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating was distinctly better, showing no degradation in the cell electrochemical performance and significantly less Cr deposition near the cathode/electrolyte interface after the test.

  7. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  8. Engineering Transition-Metal-Coated Tungsten Carbides for Efficient and Selective Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Methane.

    PubMed

    Wannakao, Sippakorn; Artrith, Nongnuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kolpak, Alexie M

    2015-08-24

    The design of catalysts for CO2 reduction is challenging because of the fundamental relationships between the binding energies of the reaction intermediates. Metal carbides have shown promise for transcending these relationships and enabling low-cost alternatives. Herein, we show that directional bonding arising from the mixed covalent/metallic character plays a critical role in governing the surface chemistry. This behavior can be described by consideration of individual d-band components. We use this model to predict efficient catalysts based on tungsten carbide with a sub-monolayer of iron adatoms. Our approach can be used to predict site-preference and binding-energy trends for complex catalyst surfaces. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  10. An XPS study of the adherence of refractory carbide, silicide, and boride RF-sputtered wear-resistant coatings. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Radio frequency sputtering was used to deposit refractory carbide, silicide, and boride coatings on 440-C steel substrates. Both sputter etched and pre-oxidized substrates were used and the films were deposited with and without a substrate bias. The composition of the coatings was determined as a function of depth by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with argon ion etching. Friction and wear tests were conducted to evaluate coating adherence. In the interfacial region there was evidence that bias may produce a graded interface for some compounds. Biasing, while generally improving bulk film stoichiometry, can adversely affect adherence by removing interfacial oxide layers. Oxides of all film constituents except carbon and iron were present in all cases but the iron oxide coverage was only complete on the preoxidized substrates. The film and iron oxides were mixed in the MoSi2 and Mo2C films but layered in the Mo2B5 films. In the case of mixed oxides, preoxidation enhanced film adherence. In the layered case it did not.

  11. Silicon carbide multilayer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupină, Victor; Lungu, Cristian Petrica; Vladoiu, Rodica; Prodan, Gabriel; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Belc, Marius; Stanescu, Iuliana M.; Vasile, Eugeniu; Rughinis, Razvan

    2014-01-01

    Thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method is currently developing, in particular, to work easily with heavy fusible material for the advantage presented by control of directing energy for the elements forming a plasma. The category of heavy fusible material can recall C and W (high-melting point materials), and are difficult to obtain or to control by other means. Carbon is now used in many areas of special mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. We refer in particular to high-temperature applications where unwanted effects may occur due to oxidation. Changed properties may lead to improper functioning of the item or device. For example, increasing the coefficient of friction may induce additional heat on moving items. One solution is to protect the item in question by coating with proper materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chosen mainly due to compatibility with coated carbon substrate. Recently, SiC has been used as conductive transparent window for optical devices, particularly in thin film solar cells. Using the TVA method, SiC coatings were obtained as thin films (multilayer structures), finishing with a thermal treatment up to 1000°C. Structural properties and oxidation behavior of the multilayer films were investigated, and the measurements showed that the third layer acts as a stopping layer for oxygen. Also, the friction coefficient of the protected films is lower relative to unprotected carbon films.

  12. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  13. Establishment of Wear Resistant HVOF Coatings for 50CrMo4 Chromium Molybdenum Alloy Steel as an Alternative for Hard Chrome Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppasamy, S.; Sivan, V.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Duraiselvam, M.; Dhanuskodi, R.

    2018-05-01

    High cost imported components of seamless steel tube manufacturing plants wear frequently and need replacement to ensure the quality of the product. Hard chrome plating, which is time consuming and hazardous, is conventionally used to restore the original dimension of the worn-out surface of the machine components. High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with NiCrBSi super alloy powder and Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 alloy powder applied on a 50CrMo4 (DIN-1.7228) chromium molybdenum alloy steel, the material of the wear prone machine component, were evaluated for use as an alternative for hard chrome plating in this present work. The coating characteristics are evaluated using abrasive wear test, sliding wear test and microscopic analysis, hardness test, etc. The study results revealed that the HVOF based NiCrBSi and Cr3C2NiCr75/25 coatings have hardness in the range of 800-900 HV0.3, sliding wear rate in the range of 50-60 µm and surface finish around 5 microns. Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 coating is observed to be a better option out of the two coatings evaluated for the selected application.

  14. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  15. Electrodepositing behaviors and properties of nano Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings from trivalent chromium baths containing compound carboxylate-urea system.

    PubMed

    He, Xinkuai; Hou, Bailong; Cai, Youxing; Li, Chen; Jiang, Yumei; Wu, Luye

    2013-06-01

    The nano Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings were prepared using pulse electrodeposition method from trivalent chromium baths containing compound carboxylate-urea system and nano SiC in ultrasonic field. The effects of the carboxylate-urea system on the nano Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings have been investigated. These results indicated that the SiC and Cr contents and the thickness of the Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings could be obviously improved by the compound carboxylate-urea system. The steady-state polarization curves showed that the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) could be significantly inhibited by the compound carboxylate-urea system, which was benefit to increase the SiC and Cr contents and the thickness of the composite coatings. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) curves showed that the cathodic polarization of the matrix metal ions could be increased in the bath containing the compound carboxylate-urea system. Thus, a compact Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coating could be obtained using this technique. The surface morphology of the Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings checked with the scanning electron micrographs (SEM) showed that the surface smoothness could be also improved and the microcracks and pinholes could be decreased due to the presence of the compound carboxylate-urea system. The phase composition of the as-posited coating was measured by the X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD data showed that the as-posited coating was Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coating. The chemical composition of the coating was investigated by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. The result showed the functional Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings with 4.1 wt.% SiC and 25.1 wt.% Cr, and 23.9 microm thickness were obtained in this study, which had best corrosion resistance according to the results of the typical potentiodynamic polarization curves of the Fe-Ni-Cr/SiC composite coatings.

  16. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, G., E-mail: Gregor.Nowak@hzg.de; Störmer, M.; Horstmann, C.

    2015-01-21

    Due to the present shortage of {sup 3}He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with {sup 3}He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid {sup 10}B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system.more » The {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical {sup 10}B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black {sup 3}He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of {sup 3}He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative {sup 3}He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.« less

  17. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, G.; Störmer, M.; Becker, H.-W.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M.; Randau, C.; Lorenz, U.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the present shortage of 3He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with 3He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid 10B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area 10B4C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The 10B4C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical 10B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black 3He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of 3He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative 3He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  18. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Coloma, P.; Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J. B.; Cano, F. J.; Lapeña, N.

    2015-08-01

    Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an oxidation process occurred in the vicinity of the alloy's intermetallic particles. The amount of the Zr deposits at these locations increased with coating's formulations without Ti, which provided the best corrosion resistance. The Cr-free conversion coatings developed in this study for the AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys do not meet yet the strict requirements of the aircraft industry. However, they significantly improved the corrosion

  19. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p<0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p<0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p<0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Tribology and Microstructure of PS212 with a Cr2O3 Seal Coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Benoy, Patricia A.; Korenyi-Both, Andras; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    PS212 is a plasma sprayed metal bonding chrome carbide coating with solid lubricant additives which has lubricating properties at temperatures up to about 900 deg C. The coating is diamond ground to achieve an acceptable tribological surface. But, as with many plasma spray coatings, PS212 is not fully-dense. In this study, a chromium oxide base seal coating is used in an attempt to seal any porosity that is open to the surface of the PS212 coating, and to study the effect of the sealant on the tribological properties of PS212. The results indicate that the seal coating reduces friction and wear when it is applied and then diamond ground leaving a thin layer of seal coating which fills in the surface pits of the PS212 coating.

  1. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 2 year study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of deck sealants in reducing or eliminating potential exposure to arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate-treated wood used in residential settings, like decks and playsets.

  2. Electrically-controlled near-field radiative thermal modulator made of graphene-coated silicon carbide plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid near-field radiative thermal modulator made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. The near-field photon tunneling between the emitter and receiver is modulated by changing graphene chemical potentials with symmetrically or asymmetrically applied voltage biases. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials due to tunable near-field coupling strength between graphene plasmons across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation and switching, which are the key functionalities required for a thermal modulator, are theoretically realized and analyzed. Newly introduced quantities of the modulation factor, the sensitivity factor and switching factor are studied quite extensively in a large parameter range for both graphene chemical potential and vacuum gap distance. This opto-electronic device with faster operating mode, which is in principle only limited by electronics and not by the thermal inertia, will facilitate the practical application of active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing with photon-based near-field thermal transport.

  3. Performance of iron-chromium-aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun; Heuser, Brent J.; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.

    2016-03-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  4. Application of Taguchi Method for Analyzing Factors Affecting the Performance of Coated Carbide Tool When Turning FCD700 in Dry Cutting Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Jaharah A.; Mohd Rodzi, Mohd Nor Azmi; Zaki Nuawi, Mohd; Othman, Kamal; Rahman, Mohd. Nizam Ab.; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Deros, Baba Md

    2011-01-01

    Machining is one of the most important manufacturing processes in these modern industries especially for finishing an automotive component after the primary manufacturing processes such as casting and forging. In this study the turning parameters of dry cutting environment (without air, normal air and chilled air), various cutting speed, and feed rate are evaluated using a Taguchi optimization methodology. An orthogonal array L27 (313), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) are employed to analyze the effect of these turning parameters on the performance of a coated carbide tool. The results show that the tool life is affected by the cutting speed, feed rate and cutting environment with contribution of 38%, 32% and 27% respectively. Whereas for the surface roughness, the feed rate is significantly controlled the machined surface produced by 77%, followed by the cutting environment of 19%. The cutting speed is found insignificant in controlling the machined surface produced. The study shows that the dry cutting environment factor should be considered in order to produce longer tool life as well as for obtaining a good machined surface.

  5. Experimental Evaluation and Optimization of Flank Wear During Turning of AISI 4340 Steel with Coated Carbide Inserts Using Different Cutting Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawal, S. A.; Choudhury, I. A.; Nukman, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of cutting fluids performance in turning process is very important in order to improve the efficiency of the process. This efficiency can be determined based on certain process parameters such as flank wear, cutting forces developed, temperature developed at the tool chip interface, surface roughness on the work piece, etc. In this study, the objective is to determine the influence of cutting fluids on flank wear during turning of AISI 4340 with coated carbide inserts. The performances of three types of cutting fluids were compared using Taguchi experimental method. The results show that palm kernel oil based cutting fluids performed better than the other two cutting fluids in reducing flank wear. Mathematical models for cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and cutting fluids were obtained from regression analysis using MINITAB 14 software to predict flank wear. Experiments were conducted based on the optimized values to validate the regression equations for flank wear and 5.82 % error was obtained. The optimal cutting parameters for the flank wear using S/N ratio were 160 m/min of cutting speed (level 1), 0.18 mm/rev of feed (level 1), 1.75 mm of depth of cut (level 2) and 2.97 mm2/s palm kernel oil based cutting fluid (level 3). ANOVA shows cutting speed of 85.36 %; and feed rate 4.81 %) as significant factors.

  6. PAINT ADHESION AND CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF CHROMIUM-FREE PRETREATMENTS OF 55% AL-ZN-COATED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adhesion and corrosion performances for several pretreatments of 55% Al-Zn-coated steels which were coil-coated with polyester paint systems were determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate new, silane-based metal pretreatments and to compare their performance wit...

  7. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  8. Control of exposure to hexavalent chromium concentration in shielded metal arc welding fumes by nano-coating of electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sivapirakasam, S P; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M C; Thomas Paul, Ashley; Surianarayanan, M

    2017-04-01

    Background Cr(VI) is a suspected human carcinogen formed as a by-product of stainless steel welding. Nano-alumina and nano-titania coating of electrodes reduced the welding fume levels. Objective To investigate the effect of nano-coating of welding electrodes on Cr(VI) formation rate (Cr(VI) FR) from a shielded metal arc welding process. Methods The core welding wires were coated with nano-alumina and nano-titania using the sol-gel dip coating technique. Bead-on plate welds were deposited on SS 316 LN plates kept inside a fume test chamber. Cr(VI) analysis was done using an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS). Results A reduction of 40% and 76%, respectively, in the Cr(VI) FR was observed from nano-alumina and nano-titania coated electrodes. Increase in the fume level decreased the Cr(VI) FR. Discussion Increase in fume levels blocked the UV radiation responsible for the formation of ozone thereby preventing the formation of Cr(VI).

  9. Aluminide coatings

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  10. Method for making hot-pressed fiber-reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Wallace Sr., Terry C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the chemical vapor deposition of a uniform coating of tantalum metal on fibers of a woven graphite cloth is described. Several layers of the coated cloth are hot pressed to produce a tantalum carbide-graphite composite having a uniformly dispersed, fine grained tantalum carbide in graphite with compositions in the range of 15 to 40 volume percent tantalum carbide.

  11. Development of analytical procedures for the determination of hexavalent chromium in corrosion prevention coatings used in the automotive industry.

    PubMed

    Séby, F; Castetbon, A; Ortega, R; Guimon, C; Niveau, F; Barrois-Oudin, N; Garraud, H; Donard, O F X

    2008-05-01

    The European directive 2000/53/EC limits the use of Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. Although a maximum of 2 g of Cr(VI) was authorised per vehicle for corrosion prevention coatings of key components, since July 2007 its use has been prohibited except for some particular applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop direct analytical procedures for Cr(VI) determination in the different steel coatings used for screws. Instead of working directly with screws, the optimisation of the procedures was carried out with metallic plates homogeneously coated to improve the data comparability. Extraction of Cr(VI) from the metallic parts was performed by sonication. Two extraction solutions were tested: a direct water extraction solution used in standard protocols and an ammonium/ammonia buffer solution at pH 8.9. The extracts were further analysed for Cr speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry or HPLC ICP mass spectrometry depending on the concentration level. When possible, the coatings were also directly analysed by solid speciation techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) for validation of the results. Very good results between the different analytical approaches were obtained for the sample of coating made up of a heated paint containing Zn, Al and Cr when using the extracting buffer solution at pH 8.9. After a repeated four-step extraction procedure on the same portion test, taking into account the depth of the surface layer reached, good agreement with XPS and XANES results was obtained. In contrast, for the coatings composed of an alkaline Zn layer where Cr(VI) and Cr(III) are deposited, only the extraction procedure using water allowed the detection of Cr(VI). To elucidate the Cr(VI) reduction during extraction at pH 8.9, the reactivity of Cr(VI) towards different species of Zn generally present in the

  12. Researches on tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    This paper summarizes results of the researches on tungsten carbide (WC), carried out in the 5-year period starting 1989 by the Science and Technology Agency's National Institute for Researches in Inorganic Materials. The high-frequency heating, floating zone technique, generally suited for growth of large-size, single crystals of high melting materials, is inapplicable to the hexagonal WC system, which is decomposed. This problem has been solved by adding boron to the system, to allow it to exist with the W-C-B melt at an equilibrium. The computer-aided control techniques have enabled automatic growth of the single crystals of carbides and borides. The de Haas-Van Alphen effect of the single WC crystals has been observed, to establish the Fermi surface model. The single crystals of transition metal carbides, such as WC, have been coated with the monolayer of graphite at high repeatability, to create the surface layer materials. An attempt has been done to produce the halite type structure by substituting Ti as the atom in the outermost layer of TiC by W. The new method, based on the low-speed deuterium ion scattering, has been developed to analyze the surface bonding conditions, clarifying the conditions of alkalis adsorbed on and bonded to metallic surfaces, and their surface reactivities.

  13. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  14. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than atmore » baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss.« less

  15. Magneto-Resistance in thin film boron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Elena; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, J.; Mei, Wai-Ning; Pasquale, F. L.; Colon Santanta, J.; Dowben, P. A.; Zhang, Le; Kelber, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    Chromium doped semiconducting boron carbide devices were fabricated based on a carborane icosahedra (B10C2H12) precursor via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and the transition metal atoms found to dope pairwise on adjacent icosahedra site locations. Models spin-polarized electronic structure calculations of the doped semiconducting boron carbides indicate that some transition metal (such as Cr) doped semiconducting boron carbides may act as excellent spin filters when used as the dielectric barrier in a magnetic tunnel junction structure. In the case of chromium doping, there may be considerable enhancements in the magneto-resistance of the heterostructure. To this end, current to voltage curves and magneto-transport measurements were performed in various semiconducting boron carbide both in and out plane. The I-V curves as a function of external magnetic field exhibit strong magnetoresistive effects which are enhanced at liquid Nitrogen temperatures. The mechanism for these effects will be discussed in the context of theoretical calculations.

  16. Anticorrosion performance of chromized coating prepared by pack cementation in simulated solution with H2S and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Behnamian, Yashar; Luo, Hong; Wang, Xian-Zong; Leitch, Michael; Zeng, Hongbo; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-10-01

    A hash service environment containing H2S and CO2 in oil industry usually causes corrosion of carbon steel. In this study, the chromized coatings with different deposited time were prepared on the surface of carbon steel by the method of pack cementation to enhance its corrosion resistance. Then the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance as well as the semiconductor behavior of coatings in the simulated solution with saturated H2S and CO2 were investigated. The results show that the content of Cr in coating was increased by prolonging deposited time, and both chromium carbides and chromium nitrides were formed. Furthermore, coatings display higher polarization resistance, Rp, than that of the substrate, indicating a higher resistance to charge transfer on coating surface. The corrosion rates of coatings with different deposited time were significantly lower than that of substrate. Chemical analysis showed the formation of heavy sulfides on the surface of substrates after corrosion, while the least corrosion products were detected on the surface of coating with deposited time of 12 h. Mott-Schottky results indicated that coating of 12 h displayed less defects than the other two coatings with deposited time of 4 h and 8 h, which will be beneficial to improve corrosion resistance. The investigation showed that chromized coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance and owned a potential application in oil industry for corrosion prevention.

  17. Effect of carbide precipitation on the corrosion behavior of Inconel alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, J.M.; Crum, J.R.; Mankins, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Intergranular carbide precipitation reactions have been shown to affect the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in environments relative to nuclear steam generators. Carbon solubility curves, time-temperature-sensitization plots and other carbide precipitation data are presented for alloy 690 as an aid in developing heat treatments for improved SCC resistance.

  18. Plasma metallurgical production of nanocrystalline borides and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    he experience in production and study of properties of nanocrystalline borides and chromium carbides, titanium, silicon was summarized. The design and features of the vertical three-jet once-through reactor with power 150 kW, used in the plasma metallurgical production, was described. The technological, thermotechnical and resource characteristics of the reactor were identified. The parameters of borides and carbides synthesis, their main characteristics in the nanodispersed state and equipment-technological scheme of production were provided. Evaluation of engineering-and-economical performance of the laboratory and industrial levels of borides and carbides production and the state corresponding to the segment of the world market was carried out.

  19. MS212--A Homogeneous Sputtered Solid Lubricant Coating for Use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Waters, William J.; Soltis, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Composite coatings containing chromium carbide, stable fluorides and silver were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The microstructure of the coatings is very homogeneous compared to that of plasma sprayed and sintered versions of the same chemical composition. Friction and wear of MS212-coated and baseline uncoated aluminum and Inconel X-750 are compared. At room temperature, the friction and wear of coated aluminum is dramatically better compared to the baseline. The acceptable load is limited by deformation of the soft aluminum substrate. In the case of the nickel alloy, lower friction is observed for the coated alloy at all temperatures up to the maximum test temperature of 800 C. Pin wear factors for sliding against the coated alloy are lower than the baseline at room temperature and 350 C, and comparable to baseline wear at higher test temperatures. Low baseline wear at high temperatures is due to the lubricious nature of the natural oxides formed on nickel-chromium alloys in a hot, oxidizing atmosphere. No load limit was found for coated Inconel X-750 at loads up to five times the load limit for coated aluminum.

  20. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    PubMed

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was subjected to fretting-wear exposures against uncoated Ti-6Al-4V as a baseline and against various coatings and surface treatments applied to Ti-6Al-4V. The coatings evaluated included plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide with 12 percent cobalt, aluminum oxide with 13 percent titanium oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum bronze with 10 percent aromatic polyester; polymer-bonded polyimide, polyimide with graphite fluoride, polyimide with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and methyl phenyl silicone bonded MoS2, preoxidation surface treatment, a nitride surface treatment, and a sputtered MoS2 coating. Results of wear measurements on both the coated and uncoated surfaces after 300,000 fretting cycles indicated that the polyimide coating was the most wear resistant and caused the least wear to the uncoated mating surface.

  2. Ceramic Coating Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-02

    cobalt , zirconia, boron carbide, BN, SiC, Si3 N4, zirconium carbide, chromium , gold, silver, platinum, osmium, and the like. The TiB2 (melting point 29000...possible with the new diamond doping Periodic Table such as N, P, As, Sb, Bi, V, Cb, Ta, Pa; method. elements in the Sixth Group (0, S, Se, Te, Po, Cr ...also the surface of many reactive others are done at low temperatures to avoid unwanted metals such as aluminum, magnesium, chromium , silicon, thermal

  3. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  4. Carbide-fluoride-silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material is described for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900 C in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  5. Carbide/fluoride/silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900.degree. C. in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  6. Optimizing the dual elemental thermal reactive deposition time in carbide layer formation on SUJ2 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochtar, Myrna Ariati; Putra, Wahyuaji Narottama; Mahardika, Bayu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents developments contributing to the improvement of thermo-reactive deposition (TRD) process in producing hard carbide layers, on automotive components application. The problem in using FeV powder as a coating material that has been applied in the industries is it is high cost. In this study, FeCr powder coating material was mixed into FeV powder with a ratio of 35:65 weight percent. The SUJ2 steel pins components are processed at 980° C, with varying TRD time was 4,6,8 and 10 hours. Scanning Electron microscope (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to analyze the coating layers. The thickness of the carbide layer formed will increase with the longer processing time, which thickness at 4-10 hours is increase from 22.7 to 29.7 micron. The gained thickness tends to be homogeneous. Increasing the TRD process holding time results in a higher hardness of the carbide layerwith hardness at 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours is 2049, 2184, 2175 and 2343 HV. The wear rate at TRD holding time of 4-10 hours with the Ogoshi method was reduced from 5.1 × 10-4 mm3/m to 2.5 × 10-4 mm3/m. Optical microscope observations shows that substrate phases consisting of pearlite and cementite and grains that tend to enlarge with the addition of time. Carbide compounds that are formed are vanadium carbide (V8C7, V6C5, V2C) and chromium carbide (Cr3C2, Cr23C7, Cr3C7). While EDS-Linescan results show complex phase (Fe, V, Cr) xC formed. The research shows that addition of FeCr into FeV powder in TRD process in 980°C with optimum time of 10 hours processing meet the mechanical properties requirement of automotive components.

  7. Thin coatings for heavy industry: Advanced coatings for pipes and valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernhes, Luc

    characteristics suitable for applications such as pipes and valves. From these general objectives, three specific objectives were derived: 1) to select and assess the best candidates for alternatives to hard chromium electroplating, which has been classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an environmentally unfriendly process; 2) to investigate recurrent failures occurring in the field with thermal sprayed HVOF Cr3C 2-NiCr coating applied to Inconel 718 PH when exposed to supercritical steam lines and thermal shocks in supercritical power plants (determining the root causes of coating failures and assessing potential coating alternatives to alleviate these issues); and 3) to develop new coating architectures, including complex microstructures and interfaces, and to better understand and optimize complex tribomechanical properties. The main results are presented in the form of articles in peer-reviewed journals. In the first article, a variety of chromium-free protective coatings were assessed as alternatives to hard chromium (HC) electroplating, such as nanostructured cobalt-phosphor (NCP) deposited by electroplating and tungsten/tungsten carbide (W/WC) applied by chemical vapor deposition. In order to compare performance across the coatings, a series of laboratory tests were performed, including hardness, microscratch, pin-on-disk, and electrochemical polarization measurements. Mechanical and fatigue resistance were also determined using prototype valves with coated ball under severe tribocorrosion conditions. It was found that W/WC coating exhibits superior wear and corrosion resistance due to high hardness and high pitting resistance, respectively, whereas NCP exhibits better wear resistance than HC with alumina ball as well as low corrosion potential, making it suitable for use as sacrificial protective coating. Both nanostructured coatings exhibited superior tribomechanical and functional characteristics compared to HC. The second article presents an

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  9. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  10. Multifunctional Ceramic Nanostructured Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    silicon carbide composites // J. Europ. Cer. Soc. − 2004. − Vol. 24. − P. 2169−2179. 22. Yu. P. Udalov, E. E. Valova, S. S. Ordanian. Fabrication and...by the titanium and tungsten borides and carbides . The analysis was done using the X-ray and electron-optical methods. This information expands our...coating compositions should be based on limited solubility materials. Such systems include carbides , nitrides, borides and silicides based on

  11. Cyclic oxidation of cobalt-chromium-aluminum-yttrium and aluminide coatings on IN-100 and VIA alloys in high velocity gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Embedded-alumina-particle aluminide (EAPA) coated and CoCrAlY coated IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (approximately Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C (2000 F). The EAPA coatings on both alloys performed very similarly to commercial pack aluminide coatings with respect to weight change and thermal fatigue cracking. The CoCrAlY coating on IN-100 had weight changes similar to commercial pack aluminide coatings but no thermal fatigue cracks appeared at 300 hours. The CoCrAlY coating on VIA performed significantly better than the commercial aluminide coatings, providing oxidation protection (based on weight change) to 450 hours and thermal fatigue crack prevention to at least 600 hours.

  12. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  13. Ceramic with zircon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An article comprises a silicon-containing substrate and a zircon coating. The article can comprise a silicon carbide/silicon (SiC/Si) substrate, a zircon (ZrSiO.sub.4) intermediate coating and an external environmental/thermal barrier coating.

  14. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  15. Experimental research results of solid particle erosion resistance of blade steel with protective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachalin, G. V.; Mednikov, A. F.; Tkhabisimov, A. B.; Seleznev, L. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the results of metallographic studies and solid particle erosion tests of uncoated blade steel 20kH13 samples and samples with a protective coating based on chromium carbide (Cr-CrC) at a flow (air) velocity CA = 180 m/s, flow temperature tA = 25 °C, attack angle α = 30° and consumption of solid abrasive particles GP = 5·10-4 kg/s. It was found that the coating has a granular structure, a thickness is about 11 μm, the microhardness of the surface is 1520 ± 50 HV0.05. Processing of the obtained data by statistical analysis methods showed that the protective coating based on Cr-CrC increases the solid particle erosion resistance of the blade steel 20kH13 by the incubation-transitional period duration more than 2.5 times.

  16. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  17. Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles Coated into the Graphene Wrapping N-Doped Porous Carbon Microspheres for Highly Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Both in Acidic and Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huifang; Xi, Qiaoya; Chen, Xi'an; Guo, Daying; Ding, Feng; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Shun; Li, Juan; Huang, Shaoming

    2018-03-01

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo 2 C) is recognized as an alternative electrocatalyst to noble metal for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Herein, a facile, low cost, and scalable method is provided for the fabrication of Mo 2 C-based eletrocatalyst (Mo 2 C/G-NCS) by a spray-drying, and followed by annealing. As-prepared Mo 2 C/G-NCS electrocatalyst displays that ultrafine Mo 2 C nanopartilces are uniformly embedded into graphene wrapping N-doped porous carbon microspheres derived from chitosan. Such designed structure offer several favorable features for hydrogen evolution application: 1) the ultrasmall size of Mo 2 C affords a large exposed active sites; 2) graphene-wrapping ensures great electrical conductivity; 3) porous structure increases the electrolyte-electrode contact points and lowers the charge transfer resistance; 4) N-dopant interacts with H + better than C atoms and favorably modifies the electronic structures of adjacent Mo and C atoms. As a result, the Mo 2 C/G-NCS demonstrates superior HER activity with a very low overpotential of 70 or 66 mV to achieve current density of 10 mA cm -2 , small Tafel slope of 39 or 37 mV dec -1 , respectively, in acidic and alkaline media, and high stability, indicating that it is a great potential candidate as HER electrocatalyst.

  18. The effect of grain boundary misorientation on the intergranular M 23C 6 carbide precipitation in thermally treated Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Cho, Hai Dong

    2004-10-01

    The precipitation characteristics of chromium carbides on various types of grain boundaries in Alloy 690 thermally treated at 720 °C for 10 h were studied through transmission electron microscopy. Precipitation of the intergranular chromium carbides, identified as Cr-rich M 23C 6, was retarded on the low angle grain boundaries, compared to that on the random high angle grain boundaries on which coarse and discrete ones were found. They were rarely found on the coherent twin boundaries, however, needle-like ones were evolved on the incoherent twin and twin related Σ9 boundaries. Precipitation of the chromium carbides was also suppressed on the nearly exact coincidence site lattice boundaries such as Σ11 and Σ15, for which the Brandon criterion was fulfilled. The results of the intergranular M 23C 6 carbide precipitation were explained in terms of the influence of the grain boundary energy.

  19. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  20. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  1. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  2. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  3. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  4. Corrosion and Wear Behaviors of Cr-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Mohan, L.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Kumar, V. Praveen; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anandan, C.

    2017-08-01

    A combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering techniques has been employed to deposit chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel, silicon and glass substrates. The concentrations of Cr in the coatings are varied by changing the parameters of the bipolar pulsed power supply and the argon/acetylene gas composition. The coatings have been studied for composition, morphology, surface nature, nanohardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance properties. The changes in I D / I G ratio with Cr concentrations have been obtained from Raman spectroscopy studies. Ratio decreases with an increase in Cr concentration, and it has been found to increase at higher Cr concentration, indicating the disorder in the coating. Carbide is formed in Cr-doped DLC coatings as observed from XPS studies. There is a decrease in sp 3/ sp 2 ratios with an increase in Cr concentration, and it increases again at higher Cr concentration. Nanohardness studies show no clear dependence of hardness on Cr concentration. DLC coatings with lower Cr contents have demonstrated better corrosion resistance with better passive behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution, and corrosion potential is observed to move toward nobler (more positive) values. A low coefficient of friction (0.15) at different loads is observed from reciprocating wear studies. Lower wear volume is found at all loads on the Cr-doped DLC coatings. Wear mechanism changes from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear on the coating.

  5. Method of making carbide/fluoride/silver composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor); Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A composition containing 30 to 70 percent chromium carbide, 5 to 20 percent soft noble metal, 5 to 20 percent metal fluorides, and 20 to 60 percent metal binder is used in a powdered metallurgy process for the production of self-lubricating components, such as bearings. The use of the material allows the self-lubricating bearing to maintain its low friction properties over an extended range of operating temperatures.

  6. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  7. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  8. Microwave sintering of boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

    1988-06-10

    A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

  9. Electroplating chromium on CVD SiC and SiCf-SiC advanced cladding via PyC compatibility coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Caen; Kemery, Craig; Katoh, Yutai

    2018-05-01

    Electroplating Cr on SiC using a pyrolytic carbon (PyC) bond coat is demonstrated as an innovative concept for coating of advanced fuel cladding. The quantification of coating stress, SEM morphology, XRD phase analysis, and debonding test of the coating on CVD SiC and SiCf-SiC is shown. The residual tensile stress (by ASTM B975) of electroplated Cr is > 1 GPa prior to stress relaxation by microcracking. The stress can remove the PyC/Cr layer from SiC. Surface etching of ∼20 μm and roughening to Ra > 2 μm (by SEM observation) was necessary for successful adhesion. The debonding strength (by ASTM D4541) of the coating on SiC slightly improved from 3.6 ± 1.4 MPa to 5.9 ± 0.8 MPa after surface etching or machining. However, this improvement is limited due to the absence of an interphase, and integrated CVI processing may be required for further advancement.

  10. Materials Coating Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    applications from decorative to utilitarian over significant segments of the engineering, chemical, nuclear , microelectronics, and related Industries. PVD...Thermal-control coating. Boron 2430 Cermet component, nuclear shielding and controlrod material; Carbide wear- and temperature-resistant. Calcium...Zirconium Oxide (Hafnia-Pree � Thermal-barrier coatings for nuclear applications. Lime Stabi!Aed) Zirconium 2563 Resistant to high-temperature

  11. Self-Lubricating Composite Containing Chromium Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A self lubricating. friction and wear reducing composite material useful over a wide temperature range of from cryogenic temperature up to about 900 C. contains 60 80 wt. % of particulate Cr2O3, dispersed in a metal binder of a metal alloy containing Cr and at least 50 wt. % of Ni, Cr or a mature of Ni and Cr. It also contains 5-20 wt. % of a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II or rare earth metal and. optionally, 5-20 wt. % of a low temperature lubricant metal, such as Ag. Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. This composite exhibits less oxidation instability and less abrasiveness than composites containing chromium carbide, is readily applied using plasma spray and can be ground and polished with a silicon carbide abrasive.

  12. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material formore » friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.« less

  13. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Cancer.gov

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  14. Impact-Resistant Ceramic Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.; Izu, Y. D.

    1986-01-01

    Refractory fibers more than double strength of coating. Impact strengths of ceramic coatings increase with increasing whisker content. Silicon carbide whiskers clearly produce largest increase, and improvement grows even more with high-temperature sintering. Coating also improves thermal and mechanical properties of electromagnetic components, mirrors, furnace linings, and ceramic parts of advanced internal-combustion engines.

  15. Biocompatibility and mechanical properties of diamond-like coatings on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum steel and titanium-aluminum-vanadium biomedical alloys.

    PubMed

    Hinüber, C; Kleemann, C; Friederichs, R J; Haubold, L; Scheibe, H J; Schuelke, T; Boehlert, C; Baumann, M J

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are favored for wear components because of diamond-like hardness, low friction, low wear, and high corrosion resistance (Schultz et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2004;35:924-928; Lappalainen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2003;66B:410-413; Tiainen, Diam Relat Mater 2001;10:153-160). Several studies have demonstrated their inertness, nontoxicity, and the biocompatibility, which has led to interest among manufacturers of surgical implants (Allen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2001;58:319-328; Uzumaki et al., Diam Relat Mater 2006;15:982-988; Hauert, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:583-589; Grill, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:166-170). In this study, hydrogen-free amorphous, tetrahedrally bonded DLC films (ta-C) were deposited at low temperatures by physical vapor deposition on medical grade Co28Cr6Mo steel and the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Scheibe et al., Surf Coat Tech 1996;85:209-214). The mechanical performance of the ta-C was characterized by measuring its surface roughness, contact angle, adhesion, and wear behavior, whereas the biocompatibility was assessed by osteoblast (OB) attachment and cell viability via Live/Dead assay. There was no statistical difference found in the wettability as measured by contact angle measurements for the ta-C coated and the uncoated samples of either Co28Cr6Mo or Ti6Al4V. Rockwell C indentation and dynamic scratch testing on 2-10 μm thick ta-C films on Co28Cr6Mo substrates showed excellent adhesion with HF1 grade and up to 48 N for the critical load L(C2) during scratch testing. The ta-C coating reduced the wear from 3.5 × 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm for an uncoated control sample (uncoated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) to 1.1 × 10(-7) mm(3)/Nm (coated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) in reciprocating pin-on-disk testing. The lowest wear factor of 3.9 × 10(-10) mm(3)/Nm was measured using a ta-C coated steel ball running against a ta-C coated and polished Co28Cr6Mo disk

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  17. Zirconium carbide as an electrocatalyst for the chromous-chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.; Reid, M. A.; Yang, C. Y. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is used as a catalyst in a REDOX cell for the oxidation of chromous ions to chromic ions and for the reduction of chromic ions to chromous ions. The zirconium carbide is coated on an inert electronically conductive electrode which is present in the anode fluid of the cell.

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Sacrificial Coatings on Grade 10.9 Fasteners for Multimetal Armor Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    hexavalent chromium , immersion, magniplate, trivalent chromium (TCP), bolts nonchromate, hexavalent chrome, grade 10.9 fasteners, bolt-on armor...for Testing and Materials (ASTM) B633 (4) electroplated zinc with hexavalent chromium conversion coating 2. Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP): ASTM...B633 (4) electroplated zinc with trivalent chromium conversion coating 3. AlumiPlate: Process details, entire surface electroplated with aluminum (Al

  19. Carbide fuels for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, R. B.; Blair, H. T.; Chidester, K. M.; Davidson, K. V.; Stark, W. E.; Storms, E. K.

    1991-09-01

    A renewed interest in manned exploration of space has revitalized interest in the potential for advancing nuclear rocket technology developed during the 1960's. Carbide fuel performance, melting point, stability, fabricability and compatibility are key technology issues for advanced Nuclear Thermal Propulsion reactors. The Rover fuels development ended with proven carbide fuel forms with demonstrated operating temperatures up to 2700 K for over 100 minutes. The next generation of nuclear rockets will start where the Rover technology ended, but with a more rigorous set of operating requirements including operating lifetime to 10 hours, operating temperatures greater that 3000 K, low fission product release, and compatibility. A brief overview of Rover/NERVA carbide fuel development is presented. A new fuel form with the highest potential combination of operating temperature and lifetime is proposed that consists of a coated uranium carbide fuel sphere with built-in porosity to contain fission products. The particles are dispersed in a fiber reinforced ZrC matrix to increase thermal shock resistance.

  20. Elemental speciation for chromium in chromium picolinate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Olson, Lisa K.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    1996-12-01

    Chromium picolinate products have been examined for different forms of chromium, using chromatographic separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection. The brands we evaluated contained no detectable amount of elemental chromium(VI), the toxic form. Since chromium picolinate might have other chromium forms as impurities, different products may contain different forms of chromium species. Compared with ion-exchange, reversed-phase chromatography showed excellent chromium recovery based on the amount stated on the product label.

  1. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  2. COATING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  3. Chromium ion plating studies for enhancement of bearing lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Six 440-C hardened stainless steel roller bearing test rods were ion plated with various chromium films of thicknesses from .2 microns to 7 microns. The thinner (approximately .2 microns) coating sample had 3 times the fatigue life of the unplated (standard) specimens. Contrastingly, the samples having thicker coatings (several microns) had short fatigue lives (about 3% of the unplated standard).

  4. SiC Design Guide: Manufacture of Silicon Carbide Products (Briefing charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-08

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at Mirror Technology Days, Boulder...coatings. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mirrors , structures, silicon carbide, design, inserts, coatings, pockets, ribs, bonding, threads 16. SECURITY...Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 purify protect transport SiC Design Guide Manufacture of Silicon Carbide Products Mirror Technology Days June 7 to 9, 2010

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency sputtered chromium bromide, molybdenum disilicide, and molybdenum disulfide coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of CRB2, MOSI2, and MOS2 were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of sputtering target history, deposition time, RF power level, and substrate bias on film composition were studied. Friction tests were run on RF sputtered surfaces of 440-C steel to correlate XPS data with lubricating properties. Significant deviations from stoichiometry and high oxide levels for all three compounds were related to target outgassing. The effect of biasing on these two factors depended on the compound. Improved stoichiometry correlated well with good friction and wear properties.

  6. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  7. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  8. Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, P.; DeVore, C.E.; Lackey, W.J.; Blanco, R.E.; Stinton, D.P.

    1982-03-19

    A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at 800 to 1050/sup 0/C when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

  9. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1997-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  10. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  11. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  12. COATED CARBON ELEMENT FOR USE IN NUCLEAR REACTORS AND THE PROCESS OF MAKING THE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Pyle, R.J.; Allen, G.L.

    1963-01-15

    S>This patent relates to a carbide-nitride-carbide coating for carbon bodies that are to be subjected to a high temperature nuclear reactor atmosphere, and a method of applying the same. This coating is a highly efficient diffusion barrier and protects the C body from corrosion and erosion by the reactor atmosphere. Preferably, the innermost coating is Zr carbide, the middle coatlng is Zr nitride, and the outermost coating is a mixture of Zr and Nb carbide. The nitride coating acts as a diffusion barrier, while the innermost carbide bonds the nitride to the C body and prevents deleterious reaction between the nitride and C body. The outermost carbide coating protects the nitride coating from the reactor atmosphere. (AEC)

  13. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  14. Silicon Carbide Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescoat, F.; Tanguy, F.; Durand, P.

    2016-05-01

    A study has been done to assess the feasibility of metallization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) in order to simplify design and mounting of one or more ground reference rail needed to provide an electrical reference for electronics mounted on an SiC structure.

  15. Electrodeposition of Tantalum and Tantalum-Chromium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Electrochem Soc, 112, 840 (1965). 7Ibid, 113,60 (1966). 8Ibid, 113.66 (1966). J. Wurm, "European Conference on the Development of Molten Salts Applica...Chem. 35, 161-3 (1887). 16. J. Wurm, "European Conference on the Development of Molten Salts Applica- tions," Extended Abstracts and Proceedings, pp...Metals Tantalum Tantalum-Chromium Alloys Chromium Coating Fused Salt Electrolyte Electrodeposition FLINAK 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse

  16. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  17. Chromium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and carbohydrates . It stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium also aids in insulin action and glucose metabolism.

  18. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  19. A study on the production of titanium carbide nano-powder in the nanostate and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, L. S.; Rudneva, S. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma synthesis of titanium carbide nano-powder in the conditions close to industrial was studied. Titanium carbide TiC is a wear- and corrosion-resistant, hard, chemically inert material, demanded in various fields for the production of hard alloys, metal- ceramic tools, heat-resistant products, protective metal coatings. New perspectives for application titanium carbide in the nanostate can be found in the field of alloys modification with different composition and destination.

  20. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  1. Effect of electroslag remelting on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electroslag remelting (ESR) on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel was experimentally studied. Phases precipitated from liquid steel during solidification were calculated using the Thermo-Calc software. The carbon segregation was analyzed by original position analysis (OPA), and the carbides were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that more uniform carbon distribution and less segregation were obtained in the case of samples subjected to the ESR process. After ESR, the amount of netty carbides decreased significantly, and the chromium and vanadium contents in the grain-boundary carbides was reduced. The total area and average size of carbides were obviously smaller after the ESR process. In the sample subjected to ESR, the morphology of carbides changed from lamellar and angular to globular or lump, whereas the types of carbides did not change; both M23C6 and M7C3 were present before and after the ESR process.

  2. Measurement of chromium VI and chromium III in stainless steel welding fumes with electrom spectroscopy for chemical analysis and neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lautner, G M; Carver, J C; Konzen, R B

    1978-08-01

    Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) was explored as a means of studying the oxidation state of chromium in SMAC (coated electrode) stainless steel welding fume collected on Nucleopore filters in the laboratory. Chromuim VI and III (as a percent of the total chromium) obtained from ESCA analysis was applied to results from Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) to yield an average of 69 microgram chromium VI per sample. Diphenylcarbazide/atomic absorption (DPC/AA) results are reported for samples submitted to an industrial laboratory. Possible chemical species and solubility of chromium VI in stainless steel fumes is discussed in light of analogy between the SMAC process and the manufacturing process for chromates.

  3. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  4. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  5. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  6. Chromium boron surfaced nickel-iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, James M. (Inventor); Friedrich, Leonard A. (Inventor); Freling, Melvin (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Chromium boron diffusion coatings on nickel iron alloys uniquely provide them with improvement in high cycle fatigue strength (up to 30%) and erosion resistance (up to 15 times), compared to uncoated alloy. The diffused chromium layer extends in two essential concentration zones to a total depth of about 40.times.10.sup.-6 m, while the succeeding boron layer is limited to 50-90% of the depth of the richest Cr layer nearest the surface. Both coatings are applied using conventional pack diffusion processes.

  7. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  8. A plasma-sprayed valve coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.; Olmore, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Need to reduce wear on nickel alloy seats and poppets for Space Shuttle main engine led to fused cobalt/tungsten carbide coating. Coating, which is dense, wear-resistant, and nonporous, can be applied in controlled amounts to various substrate configurations. Ease of application to parts with intricate shapes and contours should make coating useful in automotive and aircraft manufacturing.

  9. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Jasulaitienė, V.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers.

  10. Chromium carcinogenicity: California strategies.

    PubMed

    Alexeeff, G V; Satin, K; Painter, P; Zeise, L; Popejoy, C; Murchison, G

    1989-10-01

    Hexavalent chromium was identified by California as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in January 1986. The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) concurred with the findings of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the carcinogenicity of chromium in both animals and humans. CDHS did not find any compelling evidence demonstrating the existence of a threshold with respect to chromium carcinogenesis. Experimental data was judged inadequate to assess potential human reproductive risks from ambient exposures. Other health effects were not expected to occur at ambient levels. The theoretically increased lifetime carcinogenic risk from a continuous lifetime exposure to hexavalent chromium fell within the range 12-146 cancer cases per nanogram hexavalent chromium per cubic meter of air per million people exposed, depending on the potency estimate used. The primary sources found to contribute significantly to the risk of exposure were chrome platers, chromic acid anodizing facilities and cooling towers utilizing hexavalent chromium as a corrosion inhibitor. Evaluation of genotoxicity data, animal studies and epidemiological studies indicates that further consideration should be given to the potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium via the oral route.

  11. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  12. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  13. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    PubMed Central

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Present evidence indicates that the trivalent chromium compounds do not cause cancer although high concentrations in some in vitro systems have shown genetic toxicity. Hexavalent chromium compounds cause cancer in humans, in experimental animals and exert genetic toxicity in bacteria and in mammalian cells in vitro. Epidemiological evidence and animal experiments indicate that the slightly soluble hexavalent salts are the most potent carcinogens, but proper identification and characterization of exposure patterns in epidemiological work are lacking. Workers also tend to have mixed exposures. Soluble and slightly soluble salts are equally potent genotoxic agents in vitro. Further work for establishing dose estimates for risk evaluation in epidemiological work is important. In vitro systems should be applied for further identification of the mechanism of the carcinogenic effects, and animal experiments are urgent for comparison of the carcinogenic potency of the different hexavalent salts. Hexavalent chromium salts must be regarded as established carcinogens, and proper action should be taken in all industries with regard to such exposure. At present the carcinogenic risk to the general population caused by chromium compounds seems to be negligible, chromium in cigarettes, however, is an uncertainty in this respect. The amount of chromium and the type of chromium compounds inhaled from cigarettes is not known. PMID:7023928

  14. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  15. Silicon Carbide Integrated Circuit Chip

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-17

    A multilevel interconnect silicon carbide integrated circuit chip with co-fired ceramic package and circuit board recently developed at the NASA GRC Smart Sensors and Electronics Systems Branch for high temperature applications. High temperature silicon carbide electronics and compatible packaging technologies are elements of instrumentation for aerospace engine control and long term inner-solar planet explorations.

  16. Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings on AISI 4130 Structural Steel for Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana; Santhanakrishnan, S.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2012-06-01

    The current study focuses on synthesizing a novel functional coating for corrosion resistance applications, via laser surface alloying. The iron-based (Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B) amorphous precursor powder is used for laser surface alloying on AISI 4130 steel substrate, with a continuous wave ytterbium Nd-YAG fiber laser. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is evaluated for different processing conditions. The microstructural evolution and the response of the microstructure to the corrosive environment is studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural studies indicate the presence of face-centered cubic Fe-based dendrites intermixed within an amorphous matrix along with fine crystalline precipitates. The corrosion resistance of the coatings decrease with an increase in laser energy density, which is attributed to the precipitation and growth of chromium carbide. The enhanced corrosion resistance of the coatings processed with low energy density is attributed to the self-healing mechanism of this amorphous system.

  17. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1994-06-28

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400 C to 1000 C where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100 C to 1600 C to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process. 5 figures.

  18. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  19. Maintenance of stellite and tungsten carbide saw tips: respiratory health and exposure-response evaluations.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M; Marion, S; Lea, J; Teschke, K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study exposure to cobalt and chromium in saw maintenance rooms and test respiratory health among saw filers at lumber mills. Hard-metal lung disease is associated with cobalt in the manufacture of tungsten carbide tools; recently it has also been reported among tool maintenance workers. Lumber mills often use saws tipped with tungsten carbide or with a newer alloy, stellite (containing more cobalt, as well as chromium). METHODS--A cross sectional study of 118 saw filers at eight lumber mills was carried out that included a standardised questionnaire, spirometry, personal air sampling, and examination of tasks every 10 minutes (by observation). Comparison data were from a study of bus mechanics tested with similar methods. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--Cobalt exposure was associated with tungsten carbide grinding but not with stellite grinding. Chromium exposure was associated mainly with stellite welding. Saw filers had a twofold increase in phlegm and wheeze (P < 0.01) and a threefold increase in cough, phlegm, and wheeze related to work (P < 0.001), but no increase in breathlessness. Stellite welding was associated with a significant increase in nasal symptoms and cough related to work and a small decrease in airflow (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%), P < 0.05). Saw filers wet grinding with tungsten carbide had significant reductions in forced expiratory lung volumes (FEV1 and FVC, P < 0.05) and were significantly more likely to have FEV1 and FVC values in the abnormal range. Cobalt exposure (in wet grinding) and duration of work that involved tungsten carbide grinding were both associated with significant reductions in FEV1 and FVC. Average cobalt exposures in this study were about 5 micrograms/m3, well below the currently accepted permissible concentration, which suggests that the current workplace limit for cobalt may be too high. PMID:7735392

  20. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text... individual types of plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins, and surface coatings. (2...

  1. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text... individual types of plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins, and surface coatings. (2...

  2. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text... individual types of plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins, and surface coatings. (2...

  3. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  4. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  5. The Kinetics of Phase Transformations During Tempering in Laser Melted High Chromium Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. Y.; Wang, Y.; Han, B.

    2012-06-01

    The precipitation of secondary carbides in the laser melted high chromium cast steels during tempering at 300-650 °C for 2 h in air furnace was characterized and the present phases was identified, by using transmission electron microscopy. Laser melted high chromium cast steel consists of austenitic dendrites and interdendritic M23C6 carbides. The austenite has such a strong tempering stability that it remains unchanged at temperature below 400 °C and the secondary hardening phenomenon starts from 450 °C to the maximum value of 672 HV at 560 °C. After tempering at 450 °C fine M23C6 carbides precipitate from the supersaturated austenite preferentially. In addition, the dislocation lines and slip bands still exist inside the austenite. While tempering at temperature below 560 °C, the secondary hardening simultaneously results from the martensite phase transformation and the precipitation of carbides as well as dislocation strengthening within a refined microstructure. Moreover, the formation of the ferrite matrix and large quality of coarse lamellar M3C carbides when the samples were tempered at 650 °C contributes to the decrease of hardness.

  6. Nano-Disperse Borides and Carbides: Plasma Technology Production, Specific Properties, Economic Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevskii, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskii, S. G.; Tomas, K. I.; Zubkov, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The experience of production and study on properties of nano-disperse chromium and titanium borides and carbides, and silicon carbide has been generalized. The structure and special service aspects of utilized plasma-metallurgical complex equipped with a three-jet direct-flow reactor with a capacity of 150 kW have been outlined. Processing, heat engineering and service life characteristics of the reactor are specified. The synthesis parameters of borides and carbides, as well as their basic characteristics in nano-disperse condition and their production flow diagram are outlined. Engineering and economic performance of synthesizing borides in laboratory and industrial conditions is assessed, and the respective segment of the international market as well. The work is performed at State Siberian Industrial University as a project part of the State Order of Ministry of Science and Education of the Russian Federation No. 11.1531/2014/K.

  7. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOEpatents

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  8. Metal Immiscibility Route to Synthesis of Ultrathin Carbides, Borides, and Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixing; Kochat, Vidya; Pandey, Prafull; Kashyap, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Soham; Samanta, Atanu; Sarkar, Suman; Manimunda, Praveena; Zhang, Xiang; Asif, Syed; Singh, Abhisek K; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2017-08-01

    Ultrathin ceramic coatings are of high interest as protective coatings from aviation to biomedical applications. Here, a generic approach of making scalable ultrathin transition metal-carbide/boride/nitride using immiscibility of two metals is demonstrated. Ultrathin tantalum carbide, nitride, and boride are grown using chemical vapor deposition by heating a tantalum-copper bilayer with corresponding precursor (C 2 H 2 , B powder, and NH 3 ). The ultrathin crystals are found on the copper surface (opposite of the metal-metal junction). A detailed microscopy analysis followed by density functional theory based calculation demonstrates the migration mechanism, where Ta atoms prefer to stay in clusters in the Cu matrix. These ultrathin materials have good interface attachment with Cu, improving the scratch resistance and oxidation resistance of Cu. This metal-metal immiscibility system can be extended to other metals to synthesize metal carbide, boride, and nitride coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tribological performance of polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond films on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, E.; Malik, Abdul Sattar; Shah, Z. A.; Ahmad, Naseeb; Mehtab, Ujala; Raza, Rizwan

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond coatings have been made on unpolished side of Si (100) wafer by hot filament chemical vapor deposition process. Morphology of the coatings has been found to vary from (111) triangular-facetted to predominantly (111) square-faceted by increasing the concentration of tantalum carbide. The results have been compared to those of a diamond reference coating with no tantalum content. An increase in roughness has been observed with the increase of tantalum carbide (TaC) due to change in morphology of the diamond films. It is noticed that roughness of the coatings increases as grains become more square-faceted. It is found that diamond coatings involving tantalum carbide are not as resistant as diamond films with no TaC content and the coefficient of friction for such coatings with microcrystalline grains can be manipulated to 0·33 under high vacuum of 10-7 Torr. Such a low friction coefficient value enhances tribological behavior of unpolished Si substrates and can possibly be used in sliding applications.

  10. Stress Analysis of Silicon Carbide Microelectromechanical Systems Using Raman Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    conformally coated with SiC[2]...........................4 2.1: Silicon carbide grinding stones or “carborundum” [1...open up contact areas to SiC-2 (mask SiC2_SiC3_VIA). Then, a 1.5 µm- thick SiC “cap” layer (SiC-3) is deposited. Note that the SiC-3 conformally coats ...84 5.2: Surface profile across the teeth of a SiC3 comb drive...........................................85 xi

  11. Mineral of the month: chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papp, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium is one of the most indispensable industrial metals and it plays an essential but hidden role in daily life. Chromium is used in many consumer and building products, and it contributes to a clean, efficient and healthy environment.

  12. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matrices while preserving its oxidation state. Typical recoveries are 90 to 105% in samples spiked with both trivalent and hexavalent chromium. Determination of hexavalent chromium after extraction with sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solution, coupled with the determination of total chromium after nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide digestion, has been applied to the evaluation of chromium speciation in airborne particulates, sludges, and biological tissues. PMID:1935842

  13. Silicon Carbide Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide based semiconductor electronic devices and circuits are presently being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot adequately perform. Silicon carbide's ability to function under such extreme conditions is expected to enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from greatly improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric motor drives to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the particular area of power devices, theoretical appraisals have indicated that SiC power MOSFET's and diode rectifiers would operate over higher voltage and temperature ranges, have superior switching characteristics, and yet have die sizes nearly 20 times smaller than correspondingly rated silicon-based devices [8]. However, these tremendous theoretical advantages have yet to be widely realized in commercially available SiC devices, primarily owing to the fact that SiC's relatively immature crystal growth and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for reliable incorporation into most electronic systems. This chapter briefly surveys the SiC semiconductor electronics technology. In particular, the differences (both good and bad) between SiC electronics technology and the well-known silicon VLSI technology are highlighted. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are highlighted for several large-scale applications. Key crystal growth and device-fabrication issues that presently limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and high-power SiC electronics are identified.

  14. Crystallography of in-situ transformations of the M 7C3 carbide in the cast Fe-Cr-Ni alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraposhin, V. S.; Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Talis, A. L.; Anastasiadi, G. P.

    2017-03-01

    In the process of holding of the cast heat-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni (0.45C-25Cr-35Ni) alloy at 1150°C, the eutectic chromium carbide present in its structure undergoes a gradual transition M 7C3 → M 23C6. The gradual formation of domains of the M 23C6 carbide inside the particles of the M 7C3 carbide makes it possible to assume that the observed phase transition is the well-known carbide transformation of the in situ type. The mechanism of the in situ transformation of the crystal structure of the carbide from M 7C3 into M 23C6 with a change in the number of nearest metal neighbors of carbon atoms is explained within the previously developed combinatory model of polymorphic transitions in the metals.

  15. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  16. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  17. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Yáñez, A.; Amigó, V.; Candel, J. J.

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nominal values were defined. The effect of Cr content respect to the microstructure, susceptibility for cracking and the wear rate of the resulting coating will also be discussed.

  18. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.

    1983-01-01

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems by providing an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurring an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol.% elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  19. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbide Precipitation in 2.25 Cr-1 Mo Bainitic Steel: Effect of Heating and Isothermal Tempering Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dépinoy, Sylvain; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Urvoy, Stéphane; Roubaud, Justine; Marini, Bernard; Roch, François; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the tempering heat treatment, including heating prior to the isothermal step, on carbide precipitation has been determined in a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo bainitic steel for thick-walled applications. The carbides were identified using their amount of metallic elements, morphology, nucleation sites, and diffraction patterns. The evolution of carbide phase fraction, morphology, and composition was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, as well as thermodynamic calculations. Upon heating, retained austenite into the as-quenched material decomposes into ferrite and cementite. M7C3 carbides then nucleate at the interface between the cementite and the matrix, triggering the dissolution of cementite. M2C carbides precipitate separately within the bainitic laths during slow heating. M23C6 carbides precipitate at the interfaces (lath boundaries or prior austenite grain boundaries) and grow by attracting nearby chromium atoms, which results in the dissolution of M7C3 and, depending on the temperature, coarsening, or dissolution of M2C carbides, respectively.

  1. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of an environmentally stable coating for a very high strength, directionally solidified eutectic alloy designated NiTaC-13. Three duplex (two-layer) coatings survived 3,000 hours on a cyclic oxidation test (1,100 C to 90 C). These coatings were fabricated by first depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam heated source, followed by depositing an aluminizing overlayer. The alloy after exposure with these coatings was denuded of carbide fibers at the substrate/coating interface. It was demonstrated that TaC fiber denudation can be greatly retarded by applying a carbon-bearing coating. The coating was applied by thermal spraying followed by aluminization. Specimens coated with NiCrAlCY+Al survived over 2,000 hours in the cyclic oxidation test with essentially no TaC denudation. Coating ductility was studied for coated and heat-treated bars, and stress rupture life at 871 C and 1,100 C was determined for coated and cycled bars.

  2. Tantalum-based thin film coatings for wear resistant arthroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Balagna, C; Faga, M G; Spriano, S

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with high carbon content (HC-CoCrMo) are widely used as materials for arthroprosthesis, in particular in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. In spite of their good wear and corrosion resistance, production of metallic wear particles and metal ion release will occur on a large time-scale. An enhancement of the metal ion level in the patient's blood and urine is often reported in clinical data. Hypersensitivity, inflammatory response and cell necrosis can occur as consequence. So implants on young patients and women on childbearing age are not so widespread. The aim of this research is the realization of a thin film coating in order to improve the biocompatibility of Co-based alloys and to reduce debris production, ion release and citotoxicity. The innovative process consists of a thermal treatment in molten salts, in order to obtain a tantalum enriched thin film coating. Tantalum is chosen because it is considered a biocompatible metal with high corrosion resistance and low ion release. Three HC-CoCrMo alloys, produced by different manufacturing processes, are tested as substrates. The coating is a thin film of TaC or it can be composed by a multilayer of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum, depending on the temperature of the treatment and on the carbon content of the substrate. The thin films as well the substrates are characterized from the structural, chemical and morphological point of view. Moreover mechanical behaviour of treated and untreated materials is analyzed by means of nanohardness, scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests. The coating increases the mechanical and tribological properties of HC-CoCrMo.

  3. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  4. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  5. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  6. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  7. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  8. Chromium and aging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  9. Chromium(VI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM ( CAS No . 18540 - 29 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 1998 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S . Env

  10. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  11. Chromium - blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum chromium level normally is less than or equal to 1.4 micrograms/milliliter (µg/mL) or 26924.80 nanomoles/L (nmol/L). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test result.

  12. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chromium.

    PubMed

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R R

    1980-11-01

    Occupational exposure represents the main source of human contamination by chromium. For non-occupationally exposed people the major environmental exposure to chromium occurs as a consequence of its presence in food. Chromium must be considered as an essential element. Its deficiency impairs glucose metabolism. Trivalent chromium salts are poorly absorbed through the gastro-intestinal and respiratory tracts because they do not cross membranes easily. Hexavalent chromium can be absorbed by the oral and pulmonary routes and probably also through the skin. After its absorption, hexavalent chromium is rapidly reduced to the trivalent form which is probably the only form to be found in biological material. Epidemiological studies have shown that some chromium salts (mainly the slightly soluble hexavalent salts) are carcinogens. Lung cancers have, indeed, often been reported among workers in chromate-producing industry and, to a lesser extent, in workers from the chrome-pigment industry. The first attempts to produce cancers in experimental animals by inhalation or parenteral introduction gave negative or equivocal results but, from 1960, positive results have been obtained with various chromium compounds. As for the carcinogenic activity, the mutagenicity of chromium has mainly been found with hexavalent salts. In the majority of assay systems used, trivalent chromium appears inactive. It can be considered as evident, however, that the ultimate mutagen which binds to the genetic material is the trivalent form produced intracellularly from hexavalent chromium, the apparent lack of activity of the trivalent form being due to its poor cellular uptake.

  13. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6Al-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Lukaszewicz, Victor; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6Al-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is the possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'back-up', self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212-coated Ti6-4, and PS212-coated Ti6-4/PM212.

  14. Silicon carbide ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanmethanond, Varaporn

    This dissertation focuses on the preparation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic membranes on SiC substrates. An original technique of SiC porous substrate preparation using sintering methods was developed during the work for the completion of the dissertation. The resulting SiC substrates have demonstrated high porosity, high internal surface area, well interconnected surface pore network and, at the same time, good thermal, chemical and mechanical stability. In a further development, sol-gel techniques were used to deposit micro-porous SiC membranes on these SiC porous substrates. The SiC membranes were characterized by a variety of techniques: ideal gas selectivity (He and N2), XRD, BET, SEM, XPS, and AFM. The characterization results confirmed that the asymmetric sol-gel SiC membranes were of high quality, with no cracks or pinholes, and exhibiting high resistance to corrosion and high hydro-thermal stability. In conclusion, the SiC ceramic membrane work was successfully completed. Two publications in international peer reviewed journals resulted out of this work.

  15. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  16. Dynamic Modulus and Damping of Boron, Silicon Carbide, and Alumina Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide coated boron fibers were measured from-190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamics fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. Ths single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  17. Reaction diffusion in the nickel-chromium-aluminum and cobalt-chromium-aluminum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of MCrAl coating-substrate interdiffusion on oxidation life and the general mutliphase, multicomponent diffusion problem were examined. Semi-infinite diffusion couples that had sources representing coatings and sinks representing gas turbine alloys were annealed at 1,000, 1,095, 1,150, or 1,205 C for as long as 500 hours. The source and sink aluminum and chromium contents and the base metal (cobalt or nickel) determined the parabolic diffusion rate constants of the couples and predicted finite coating lives. The beta source strength concept provided a method (1) for correlating beta recession rate constants with composition; (2) for determining reliable average total, diffusion, and constitutional activation energies; and (3) for calculating interdiffusion coefficients.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  2. Friction and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered borides, silicides, and carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of several refractory compound coatings were examined. These compounds were applied to 440 C bearing steel surfaces by radiofrequency (RF) sputtering. The refractory compounds were the titanium and molybdenum borides, the titanium and molybdenum silicides, and the titanium, molybdenum, and boron carbides. Friction testing was done with a pin-on-disk wear apparatus at loads from 0.1 to 5.0 newtons. Generally, the best wear properties were obtained when the coatings were bias sputtered onto 440 C disks that had been preoxidized. Adherence was improved because of the better bonding of the coatings to the iron oxide formed during preoxidation. As a class the carbides provided wear protection to the highest loads. Titanium boride coatings provided low friction and good wear properties to moderate loads.

  3. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  4. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  5. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  6. Development of control system of coating of rod hydraulic cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizhambaeva, S. Zh; Maximova, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, requirements to materials of hydraulic cylinders and methods of eliminating the main factors affecting the quality of the applied coatings rod hydraulic cylinders. The chromium plating process - one of ways of increase of anti-friction properties of coatings rods, stability to the wear and corrosion. The article gives description of differences of the stand-speed chromium plating process from other types of chromium plating that determines a conclusion about cutting time of chromium plating process. Conducting the analysis of technological equipment suggested addressing the modernization of high-speed chromium plating processes by automation and mechanization. Control system developed by design of schematic block diagram of a modernized and stand-speed chromium plating process.

  7. Methods for producing silicon carbide architectural preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties for each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  8. Metallic impurities-silicon carbide interaction in HTGR fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Kashimura, Satoru; Fukuda, Kousaku; Shimizu, Michio; Tayama, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Ishio

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion of the coating layers of silicon carbide (SiC) by metallic impurities was observed in irradiated Triso-coated uranium dioxide particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors with an optical microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer. The SiC layers were attacked from the outside of the particles. The main element observed in the corroded areas was iron, but sometimes iron and nickel were found. These elements must have been contained as impurities in the graphite matrix in which the coated particles were dispersed. Since these elements are more stable thermodynamically in the presence of SiC than in the presence of graphite at irradiation temperatures, they were transferred to the SiC layer to form more stable silicides. During fuel manufacturing processes, intensive care should be taken to prevent the fuel from being contaminated with those elements which react with SiC.

  9. Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates and product

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, Peter; DeVore, Charles E.; Lackey, Walter J.; Blanco, Raymond E.; Stinton, David P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at about 800.degree. C. to 1050.degree. C. when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

  10. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  11. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  12. The role of niobium carbide in radiation induced segregation behaviour of type 347 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedabadi, Parag; Kain, Vivekanand; Gupta, Manu; Samajdar, I.; Sharma, S. C.; Bhagwat, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of niobium carbide precipitates on radiation induced segregation (RIS) behaviour in type 347 stainless steel was investigated. The material in the as-received condition was irradiated using double-loop 4.8 MeV protons at 300 °C for 0.43 dpa (displacement per atom). The RIS in the proton irradiated specimen was characterized using double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test followed by atomic force microscopic examination. The nature of variation of DL-EPR values with the depth matched with the variation of the calculated irradiation damage (dpa) with the depth. The attack on grain boundaries during EPR tests was negligible indicating absence of chromium depletion zones. The interface between niobium carbide and the matrix acts as a sink for point defects generated during irradiation and this had reduced point defect flux toward grain boundaries. The attack was noticed at a few large cluster of niobium carbide after the DL-EPR test at the depth of maximum attack for the irradiated specimen. Pit-like features were not observed within the matrix indicating the absence of chromium depletion regions within the matrix.

  13. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  14. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Glenn A.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    1996-01-01

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system (10) including a reaction chamber (14), a source of elemental carbon (17), a heating subassembly (20) and a source of reaction gases (23). Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon (17) and the reaction gases (23) are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part (12), evacuating the chamber (14) with a vacuum subassembly (18) and heating all of the components to the desired temperature.

  15. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  16. Microstructures of BN/SiC coatings on nicalon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. M.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The microstructures of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fibers and layered coatings of boron nitride (BN) followed by chemical vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (CVI-SiC) were characterized using optical and electron microscopy. Two different precursors and reactions were used to produce the BN layers while the deposition of CVI silicon carbide was nearly identical. Coated tows were examined in cross-section to characterize the chemistry and structures of the constituents and the interfaces. One BN precursor yielded three sublayers while the other gave a relatively homogeneous nanocrystalline layer.

  17. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  18. Work Environment Factors and Their Influence on Urinary Chromium Levels in Informal Electroplating Workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyaningsih, Yuliani; Husodo, Adi Heru; Astuti, Indwiani

    2018-02-01

    One of the informal sector which absorbs labor was electroplating business. This sector uses chromium as coating material because it was strong, corrosion resistant and strong. Nonetheless hexavalent chromium is highly toxic if inhaled, swallowed and contact with skin. Poor hygiene, the lack of work environment factors and sanitation conditions can increase the levels of chromium in the body. This aimed of this study was to analyze the association between work environment factors and levels of urinary chromium in informal electroplating worker. A Purposive study was conducted in Tegal Central Java. The research subjects were 66 male workers. Chi Square analysis was used to establish an association between work environment factors and level of urinary chromium. There is a relationship between heat stress and wind direction to the chromium levels in urine (p <0.05), but there is no relationship between humidity and levels of chromium in the urine (p> 0.05). This explains that work environment factors can increase chromium levels in the urine of informal electroplating workers.

  19. Elemental profiling of laser cladded multilayer coatings by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Filippov, M. N.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Filichkina, V. A.; Stavertiy, A. Ya.; Tretyakov, R. S.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer tungsten carbide wear resistant coatings were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Coaxial laser cladding technique was utilized to produce tungsten carbide coating deposited on low alloy steel substrate with additional inconel 625 interlayer. EDX and LIBS techniques were used for elemental profiling of major components (Ni, W, C, Fe, etc.) in the coating. A good correlation between EDX and LIBS data was observed while LIBS provided additional information on light element distribution (carbon). A non-uniform distribution of tungsten carbide grains along coating depth was detected by both LIBS and EDX. In contrast, horizontal elemental profiling showed a uniform tungsten carbide particles distribution. Depth elemental profiling by layer-by-layer LIBS analysis was demonstrated to be an effective method for studying tungsten carbide grains distribution in wear resistant coating without any sample preparation.

  20. Degradation of Silicon Carbide Reflective Surfaces in the LEO Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Sandro; Coluzzi, Plinio; Marchetti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Space mirrors in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) encounter a degradation problem caused by the impact of atomic oxygen (ATOX) in the space environment. This paper presents an experiment of the atomic oxygen impact degradation and UV synergic effects on ground simulation. The experiment was carried out in a dedicated ATOX simulation vacuum chamber. As target materials, a polished CVD Beta-silicon carbide (SiC) coating was investigated. The selection of silicon carbide is due to its high potential candidate as a mirror layer substrate material for its good reflectance at UV wavelengths and excellent thermal diffusivity. It has highly desirable mechanical and thermal properties and can achieve an excellent surface finish. The deposition of the coatings were on carbon-based material substrate; i.e., silicon impregnated carbon fiber composite (C/SiC). Mechanical and thermal properties of the coatings such as hardness and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) were achieved. Several atomic oxygen impact angles were studied tilting the target samples respect to the flux direction. The various impact angles permitted to analyze the different erosion rates and typologies which the mirrors would encounter in LEO environment. The degradation was analyzed in various aspects. Macroscopic mass loss per unit area, surface roughness and morphology change were basically analyzed. The exposed surfaces of the materials were observed through a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Secondly, optical diagnostic of the surfaces were performed in order to investigate their variation in optical properties as the evaluation of reflectance degradation. The presence of micro-cracks caused by shrinkage, grinding, polishing or thermal cycling and the porosity in the coatings, could have led to the undercutting phenomenon. Observation of uprising of undercutting was also conducted. Remarks are given regarding capabilities in short-term mission exposures to the LEO environment of this coating.

  1. Advanced Conversion Coatings for Magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibhanupudi, Syam; Manavbasi, Alp

    Magnesium and its alloys have excellent physical and mechanical properties due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and are ideal for various applications in automotive, aerospace and defense sectors. However, Mg alloys are also highly susceptible to corrosion under harsh environments. Owing to this carcinogenicity as well as environmental impact of hexavalent chromium fueled by stringent environmental regulations, an environmentally green alternative to the carcinogenic hexavalent chromium coatings on magnesium is due.

  2. Advanced Powder Coating Systems for Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    UVCPC • Conclusions • DoD spends billions of dollars annually on protective organic coatings – Hexavalent chrome primer use still widespread – Contains...Elimination of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) • Reduction/Elimination of ESOH Concerns – Elimination of hexavalent chromium – Elimination of free...production and release; hexavalent chromium; free isocyanates; up to 72 hrs “dry to fly” time Longer cure times than traditional primers and

  3. Implementing New Non-Chromate Coatings Systems (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    Initiate Cr6+ authorization process for continued Cr6+ use using the form, Authorization to Use Hexavalent Chromium. YES NO • Approval of...Aluminum and magnesium anodizing • Hard Chrome Plating • Type II conversion coating on aluminum alloys under chromated primer • Type II conversion coating...Elimination of Hexavalent Chromium 80% 5% 14% 1% Type II Type III Type IC Type IC Fatigue Critical 50% 50% Type II Type IC FRC-SE (JAX) Fully Integrated FRC

  4. Chromium in Postmortem Material.

    PubMed

    Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Lech, Teresa; Konopka, Tomasz; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2018-04-17

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the negative effects caused by the presence and constant increase in concentration of heavy metals in the environment, as well as to the determination of their content in human biological samples. In this paper, the concentration of chromium in samples of blood and internal organs collected at autopsy from 21 female and 39 male non-occupationally exposed subjects is presented. Elemental analysis was carried out by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Reference ranges of chromium in the blood, brain, stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and heart (wet weight) in the population of Southern Poland were found to be 0.11-16.4 ng/mL, 4.7-136 ng/g, 6.1-76.4 ng/g, 11-506 ng/g, 2.9-298 ng/g, 13-798 ng/g, and 3.6-320 ng/g, respectively.

  5. Hexavalent chromium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-04-12

    A monitor is provided for use in measuring the concentration of hexavalent chromium in a liquid, such as water. The monitor includes a sample cell, a light source, and a photodetector. The sample cell is in the form of a liquid-core waveguide, the sample cell defining an interior core and acting as a receiver for the liquid to be analyzed, the interior surface of the sample cell having a refractive index of less than 1.33. The light source is in communication with a first end of the sample cell for emitting radiation having a wavelength of about and between 350 to 390 nm into the interior core of the waveguide. The photodetector is in communication with a second end of the waveguide for measuring the absorption of the radiation emitted by the light source by the liquid in the sample cell. The monitor may also include a processor electronically coupled to the photodetector for receipt of an absorption signal to determine the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the liquid.

  6. Rolling contact fatigue life of chromium ion plated 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Davis, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test specimens of heat treated 440C bearing steel were chromium ion plated in thicknesses from 0.1 to 8.0 micron and tested in RCF tester using 700 ksi maximum Hertzian stress. Heavy coatings, greater than about 5 micron in thickness, peeled off or spalled readily, whereas thin coatings, less than 3 micron thick, were tenacious and did not come off. Furthermore, significant improvement in RCF life was obtained with thin chromium ion plated test specimens. The average increase in B10 life was 75% compared with unplated 440C. These preliminary results indicate that ion plating is a promising way to improve bearing life.

  7. Thermodynamic Analysis and Growth of Zirconium Carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sun; Hua, Hao Zheng; Xiang, Xiong

    Equilibrium calculations were used to optimize conditions for the chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide from zirconium halide + CxHy+H2+Ar system. The results show the CVD-ZrC phase diagram is divided into ZrC+C, ZrC and ZrC+Zr zones by C, Zr generating lines. For the same mole of ZrCl4 reactant, it needs higher concentration of CH4 to generate single ZrC phase than that of C3H6. Using these calculations as a guide, single-phase cubic zirconium carbide coatings were deposited onto graphite substrate.

  8. Crystallographic characterizations of eutectic and secondary carbides in a Fe-12Cr-2.5Mo-1.5W-3V-1.25C alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Feng, Yunli; Liu, Sha; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the morphology and structures of the eutectic and secondary carbides in a new high chromium Fe-12Cr-2.5Mo-1.5W-3V-1.25C designed for cold-rolling work roll were systematically studied. The precipitated carbides inside the grains and along the grain boundaries were investigated with optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction. Selected area diffraction patterns have been successfully used to identify the crystal formation and lattice constants of the carbides with different alloying elements. The results show that the eutectic carbides precipitated contain MC and M2C distributed along the grain boundaries with dendrite feature. The composition and crystal structure analysis shows that the eutectic MC carbides contain VC and WC with a cubic and hexagonal crystal lattice structures respectively, while the eutectic M2C carbides predominantly contain V2C and Mo2C with orthorhombic and hexagonal crystal lattices respectively. The secondary carbides contain MC, M2C, M7C3 formed along the grain boundaries and their sizes are much larger than the eutectic carbides ones. The secondary M23C6 is much small (0.3-0.5μm) and is distributed dispersively inside the grain. Similar to the eutectic carbides, the secondary carbides also contain VC, WC, V2C, and Mo2C. M7C3 is hexagonal (Fe,Cr)7C3, while M23C6 is indexed to be in a cubic crystal form.

  9. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  14. Electrochemical Removal of Chromium from Wastewater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-15

    chromium removal from a wastewater stream. In one process, electrodeposition of chromium on a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was proposed [5]. On a...reduction to metallic chromium more difficult [31. Removal of hexavalent chromium by adsorption on activated carbon is not suf- ficiently effective to be

  15. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  16. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  17. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  18. Strengthening silicon carbide by quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruver, R. M.; Platts, D. R.; Kirchner, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Quenching was used to form compressive surface layers in hot-pressed silicon carbide. The presence of the compressive stresses was verified by slotted rod tests. The slotted rod tip deflection was retained at temperatures to at least 1380 C, showing that the stresses are not relieved immediately at elevated temperatures. The flexural strength and impact resistance of specimens quenched from moderate temperatures (2000 C) were increased. Frequently, specimens quenched from higher temperatures were weakened by thermal shock damage.

  19. Hexavalent chromium exposures during full-aircraft corrosion control.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Gary N

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum alloys used in the construction of modern aircraft are subject to corrosion. The principal means of controlling this corrosion in the U.S. Air Force are organic coatings. The organic coating system consists of a chromate conversion coat, epoxy resin primer, and polyurethane enamel topcoat. Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) is present in the conversion coat in the form of chromic acid and in the primer in the form of strontium chromate. CrVI inhalation exposures can occur when workers spray conversion coat onto bare metal and apply primer to the treated metal surface. In addition, mechanical abrasion of aircraft surfaces can generate particulates that contain chromates from previously applied primers and conversion coats. This study measured CrVI exposures during these corrosion control procedures. Mean time-weighted average (TWA) exposure to chromic acid during conversion coat treatment was 0.48 microg/m(3), below the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV(R)) TWA of 50 microg/m(3) for water-soluble CrVI compounds. Mean TWA exposures to strontium chromate were 5.33 microg/m(3) during mechanical abrasion and 83.8 microg/m(3) during primer application. These levels are in excess of the current ACGIH TLV-TWA of 0.5 microg/m(3) for strontium chromate. In the absence of a change from chromated to nonchromated conversion coats and primers, additional control measures are needed to reduce these exposures.

  20. NAVAIR Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    NAVAIR  Hexavalent  Chromium Minimization Status  SERDP/ESTCP Symposium 2010 Cr6+ Session Bill C Nickerson AIR 4.3.4 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAVAIR Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Status 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...ANSI Std Z39-18 Minimizing Hexavalent Chromium Use in DoD Operations Technical Session No. 2B C-39 NAVAIR NON-CHROMATE MATERIALS STATUS MR

  1. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  2. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  3. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1997-09-23

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition. 6 figs.

  4. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  5. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  6. METHOD OF JOINING CARBIDES TO BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, N.H.; Farr, J.D.; Witteman, W.G.

    1962-02-13

    A method is described for joining a refractory metal carbide such as UC or ZrC to a refractory metal base such as Ta or Nb. The method comprises carburizing the surface of the metal base and then sintering the base and carbide at temperatures of about 2000 deg C in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, the base and carbide being held in contact during the sintering step. To reduce the sintering temperature and time, a sintering aid such as iron, nickel, or cobait is added to the carbide, not to exceed 5 wt%. (AEC)

  7. Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide (MXene) as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sarycheva, Asia; Makaryan, Taron; Maleski, Kathleen

    Here, noble metal (gold or silver) nanoparticles or patterned films are typically used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides (MXenes) exhibit unique electronic and optical properties, including metallic conductivity and plasmon resonance in the visible or near-infrared range, making them promising candidates for a wide variety of applications. Herein, we show that 2D titanium carbide, Ti 3C 2T x, enhances Raman signal from organic dyes on a substrate and in solution. As a proof of concept, MXene SERS substrates were manufactured by spray-coating and used to detect several common dyes, with calculated enhancement factorsmore » reaching ~10 6. Titanium carbide MXene demonstrates SERS effect in aqueous colloidal solutions, suggesting the potential for biomedical or environmental applications, where MXene can selectively enhance positively charged molecules.« less

  8. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  9. Eolian transport of geogenic hexavalent chromium to ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Clark, D.; Imes, J.L.; Councell, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual model of eolian transport is proposed to address the widely distributed, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) observed in ground water in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Concentrations (30 to more than 1000 μg/L Cr+6) extend over thousands of square kilometers of ground water systems. It is hypothesized that the Cr is derived from weathering of chromium-rich pyroxenes and olivines present in ophiolite sequence of the adjacent Oman (Hajar) Mountains. Cr+3 in the minerals is oxidized to Cr+6 by reduction of manganese and is subsequently sorbed on iron and manganese oxide coatings of particles. When the surfaces of these particles are abraded in this arid environment, they release fine, micrometer-sized, coated particles that are easily transported over large distances by wind and subsequently deposited on the surface. During ground water recharge events, the readily soluble Cr+6 is mobilized by rain water and transported by advective flow into the underlying aquifer. Chromium analyses of ground water, rain, dust, and surface (soil) deposits are consistent with this model, as are electron probe analyses of clasts derived from the eroding Oman ophiolite sequence. Ground water recharge flux is proposed to exercise some control over Cr+6 concentration in the aquifer.

  10. Changes in oxidation state of chromium during LDEF exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    The solar collector used for the McDonnell-Douglas Cascade Variable Heat Pipe, Experiment A0076 (Michael Grote - Principal Investigator) was finished with black chromium plating as a thermal control coating. The coating is metallic for low emittance, and is finely microcrystalline to a dimension which yields its high absorptivity. An underplate of nickel was applied to the aluminum absorber plate in order to achieve optimal absorptance characteristics from the black chromium plate surface. Experiment A0076 was located at tray position F9, receiving a projected 8.7 x 10 exp 21 atomic oxygen atoms/sq cm and 11,200 ESH solar radiation. During retrieval, it was observed that the aluminized kapton thermal blankets covering most of the tray were severely eroded by atomic oxygen, and that a 'flap' of aluminum foil was overlaying a roughly triangular shaped portion of the absorber panel. The aluminum foil 'flap' was lost sometime between the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) retrieval and deintegration. At deintegration, the black chromium was observed to have discolored where it had been covered by the foil 'flap'. A summary of the investigation into the cause of the discoloration is presented.

  11. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  12. Silicon Carbide in Heavy-Mineral Samples: Indicator of Diamond Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Wang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Since kimberlite Pipe 50 of Wafangdian, 120 km northeast of the port city Dalian in Liaoning Province, ceased production in 2002, exploration programs have been conducted along tributaries of the Fuzhou River south of Wafangdian. The heavy-mineral method is often based on finding deep red G10 pyrope garnets which can be identified accurately by means of microprobe analysis to confirm their particular range of composition: high chromium, low calcium. Garnets are prone to hydrothermal alteration during kimberlite eruption, oxidation on Earth's surface, or be broken during mass transport. Unlike garnet, silicon carbide (SiC) resists chemical and mechanical alterations, but it crystallized at similarly high temperatures as diamond in Earth's mantle, and has the same atomic structure as diamond. Thus, SiC seems to be an ideal diamond indicator, although it is one of the rarest minerals in nature. Because of its characteristic blue-green color and adamantine luster, it can be recognized easily, no matter how minute the grains may be. We decided to re-examine small samples of heavy minerals collected and previously studied by exploration geologists, respectively from 3 tributaries of the Fuzhou River (Laogugao, Saocentun, Pingiaying), and from 3 ravines in the vicinity of Wafangdian (Songiagao, Dlitun, Lidianzhun), among which Songiagao, flowing into Qingnian Reservoir, is apparently a pristine water system, unpolluted by human activities. We found one grain of SiC in all the samples. From Fuzhou River: (1) Blue-green, euhedral, hexagonal shape, water-clear, one edge slightly chipped. (2) Light green, slightly corroded edges. (3) Green, half of the crystal's surface is covered by a blister-like yellow overgrowth; this material protrudes out on one side like a thick tapering paint brush. From Wafandian Vicinity: (1) Blue-green, with patchy black edges. (2) Green, with deep green rims and one brown inclusion. (3) Pale green, subhedral with one beige inclusion. All the

  13. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Bird, Eugene L.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  14. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  15. Evaluation of aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing effluents in reference to chromium electroplating industries.

    PubMed

    Baral, A; Engelken, R; Stephens, W; Farris, J; Hannigan, R

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, and compared the aquatic environmental risks of hexavalent and trivalent chromium electroplating operations. Trivalent chromium electroplating has emerged as an acceptable alternative to hazardous hexavalent chromium electroplating. This process substitution has reduced the human health impact in the workplace and minimized the production of hazardous sludge regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The thrust behind this research was to investigate whether trivalent chromium electroplating operations have lower adverse impacts on standardized toxicity test organisms. Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas were used to investigate toxicities of trivalent chromium (Cr (III)), hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)), and industrial effluents. In agreement with previous studies, Cr (III) was found to be less toxic than Cr (VI). Despite having several organic and inorganic constituents in the effluents obtained from trivalent chromium plating baths, they exhibited less adverse effects to C. dubia than effluents obtained from hexavalent chromium electroplating baths. Thus, transition from hexavalent to trivalent chromium electroplating processes may be justified. However, because of the presence of organic constituents such as formate, oxalate, and triethylene glycol in effluents, trivalent chromium electroplating operations may face additional regulatory requirements for removal of total organic carbon.

  16. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  17. New Polymeric Precursors of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, M.; Kumar, K.

    1987-01-01

    Silicon carbide made by pyrolizing polymers. Method conceived for preparation of poly(decamethylcyclohexasilanes) as precursors for preparation of silicon carbide at high yield. Technical potential of polysilanes as precursors of SiC ceramics being explored. Potential limited by intractability of some polysilanes; formation of small, cyclic polycarbosilane fragments during pyrolysis; and overall low char yield and large shrinkage in conversion to ceramics.

  18. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  19. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  20. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexava-lent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text... individual types of plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins, and surface coatings. (2...

  1. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Compatibility of buffered uranium carbides with tungsten.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1971-01-01

    Results of compatibility tests between tungsten and hyperstoichiometric uranium carbide alloys run at 1800 C for 1000 and 2500 hours. These tests compared tungsten-buffered uranium carbide with tungsten-buffered uranium-zirconium carbide. The zirconium carbide addition appeared to widen the homogeneity range of the uranium carbide, making additional carbon available for reaction. Reaction layers could be formed by either of two diffusion paths, one producing UWC2, while the second resulted in the formation of W2C. UWC2 acts as a diffusion barrier for carbon and slows the growth of the reaction layer with time, while carbon diffusion is relatively rapid in W2C, allowing equilibrium to be reached in less than 2500 hours at a temperature of 1800 C.

  3. Diffusion of Chromium in Alpha Cobalt-Chromium Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeton, John W

    1951-01-01

    Diffusion of chromium in cobalt-chromium solid solutions was investigated in the range 0 to 40 atomic percent at temperatures of 1360 degrees, 1300 degrees, 1150 degrees, and 10000 degrees c. The diffusion coefficients were found to be relatively constant within the composition range covered by each specimen. The activation heat of diffusion was determined to be 63,000 calories per mole. This value agrees closely with the value of 63,400 calories per mole calculated by means of the Dushman-Langmuir equation.

  4. Article and method for making complex shaped preform and silicon carbide composite by melt infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corman, Gregory S. (Inventor); Steibel, James D. (Inventor); Schikner, Robert C. (Inventor); Szweda, Andrew (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Small diameter silicon carbide-containing fibers are provided in a bundle such as a fiber tow that can be formed into a structure where the radii of curvature is not limited to 10-20 inches. An aspect of this invention is directed to impregnating the bundles of fibers with the slurry composition to substantially coat the outside surface of an individual fiber within the bundle and to form a complex shaped preform with a mass of continuous fibers.

  5. Article and method for making complex shaped preform and silicon carbide composite by melt infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szweda, Andrew (Inventor); Corman, Gregory S. (Inventor); Steibel, James D. (Inventor); Schikner, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Small diameter silicon carbide-containing fibers are provided in a bundle such as a fiber tow that can be formed into a structure where the radii of curvature is not limited to 10-20 inches. An aspect of this invention is directed to impregnating the bundles of fibers with the slurry composition to substantially coat the outside surface of an individual fiber within the bundle and to form a complex shaped preform with a mass of continuous fibers.

  6. Avoiding chromium transport from stainless steel interconnects into contact layers and oxygen electrodes in intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Kim, Ji Woo; Brevet, Aude; Rado, Cyril; Couturier, Karine; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Lefebvre-Joud, Florence; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of (La0.8Sr0.2)(Mn0.5Co0.5)O3-δ (LSMC) and La(Ni0.6Fe0.4)O3-δ (LNF) contact coatings to avoid the transport of Cr from steel interconnects to solid oxide electrolysis electrodes, especially to the anode. The transport of chromium from commercial Crofer 22 APU (ThyssenKrupp) and K41X (AISI441, Aperam Isbergues) steels through LSMC and LNF contact coatings into adjacent (La0.8Sr0.2)MnO3-δ (LSM) oxygen electrodes was investigated in an oxygen atmosphere at 700 °C. Chromium concentrations of up to 4 atom% were detected in the contact coatings after thermal treatments for 3000 h, which also lead to the presence of chromium in adjacent LSM electrodes. Introduction of a dense (Co,Mn)3O4 coating between steel and contact coating was necessary to prevent the diffusion of chromium into contact coatings and electrodes and should lead to extended stack performance and lifetime.

  7. Nanoscale multilayer Me-graphite coatings grown by combined steered cathodic arc/unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Yin Nan

    Low friction, nanoscale multilayer carbon/chromium (C/Cr) coatings were successfully deposited by the combined steered cathodic arc/unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (also known as Arc Bond Sputtering or ABS) using a Hauzer HTC 1000-4 PVD coater. The work described in this thesis has been directed towards understanding the effect of ion irradiation on the composition, microstructure, and functional properties of C/Cr coatings. This has been achieved by varying the bias voltage, U[B], over a wide range between -65 V and -550 V. C/Cr coatings were deposited in three major steps: (i) Cr+ ion etching using a steered cathodic arc discharge at a substrate bias voltage of -1200 V, (ii) deposition of a 0.25 mum thick CrN base layer by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering to enhance the adhesion, and (iii) deposition of C/Cr coatings by unbalanced magnetron sputtering from three graphite targets and one chromium target at 260°C. The coatings were deposited at different bias voltages (U[B]) from -65 V to -550 V in a non-reactive Ar atmosphere.C/Cr coatings exhibit excellent adhesion (critical load, L[C] > 70 N), with hardness ranging from 6.8 to 25.1 GPa depending on the bias voltage. The friction coefficient of C/Cr coatings was found to reduce from 0.22 to 0.16 when the bias voltage was increased from U[B] = -65 to -95 V. The relevance of C/Cr coatings for actual practical applications was demonstrated using dry high-speed milling trials on automotive aluminium alloy (Al-Si8Cu3Fe). The results showed that C/Cr coated cemented carbide ball-nose end mills prepared at U[B] = -95 V (70 at.% C, 30 at.% Cr) enhance the tool performance and the tool life compared to the uncoated tools by a factor of two, suggesting the potential for use in dry high-speed machining of "sticky" alloys such as aluminum. Different film morphologies were observed in the investigated bias voltage range between U[B] = -65 and -550 V using XTEM. With increasing bias voltage from U[B] = -65

  8. High reflectance coatings for space applications in the EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A. M.; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Osantowski, John F.; Fleetwood, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency and made possible to consider more complex optical designs in the EUV. The importance of recent developments in chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC), SiC films and multilayer coatings is discussed in the context of EUV instrumentation design. The EUV performance of these coatings as well as some strengths and problem areas for their use in space will be addressed.

  9. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR COATING A CERAMIC BODY

    DOEpatents

    Blanchard, M.K.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for protecting a beryllium carbide-graphite body. The method consists in providing a ceramic coating which must contain at least one basic oxide component, such as CaO, at least one amphoteric oxide component, such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and at least one acidic oxide component, such as SiO/ sub 2/. Various specific formulations for this ceramic coating are given and the coating is applied by conventional ceramic techniques.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents the... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing...

  11. Chromium-induced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wedeen, R P; Qian, L F

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not yet been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent) (15 mg/kg body weight). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of beta 2-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome platers and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chronic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chronic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury. Rather, it must be recognized that no prospective cohort or case-control study of the delayed renal effects of low-level, long-term exposure to chromium has been published.

  12. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  13. Plasma Enabled Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Aramesh, Morteza; Rider, Amanda E.; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    Silicon carbide is one of the promising materials for the fabrication of various one- and two-dimensional nanostructures. In this chapter, we discuss experimental and theoretical studies of the plasma-enabled fabrication of silicon carbide quantum dots, nanowires, and nanorods. The discussed fabrication methods include plasma-assisted growth with and without anodic aluminium oxide membranes and with or without silane as a source of silicon. In the silane-free experiments, quartz was used as a source of silicon to synthesize the silicon carbide nanostructures in an environmentally friendly process. The mechanism of the formation of nanowires and nanorods is also discussed.

  14. Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  15. Tungsten carbide: Crystals by the ton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. N.

    1988-06-01

    A comparison is made of the conventional process of making tungsten carbide by carburizing tungsten powder and the Macro Process wherein the tungsten carbide is formed directly from the ore concentrate by an exothermic reaction of ingredients causing a simultaneous reduction and carburization. Tons of tungsten monocarbide crystals are formed in a very rapid reaction. The process is unique in that it is self regulating and produces a tungsten carbide compound with the correct stoichiometry. The high purity with respect to oxygen and nitrogen is achieved because the reactions occur beneath the molten metal. The morphology and hardness of these crystals has been studied by various investigators and reported in the listed references.

  16. LIQUID PHASE SINTERING OF METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, J.; Sease, J.D.

    1964-01-21

    An improved method is given for fabricating uranium carbide composites, The method comprises forming a homogeneous mixture of powdered uranium carbide, a uranium intermetallic compound which wets and forms a eutectic with said carbide and has a non-uranium component which has a relatively high vapor pressure at a temperature in the range 1200 to 1500 deg C, and an organic binder, pressing said mixture to a composite of desired green strength, and then vacuum sintering said composite at the eutectic forming temperature for a period sufficient to remove at least a portion of the non-uranium containing component of said eutectic. (AEC)

  17. Improved consolidation of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. R.; Millard, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha silicon carbide powder was consolidated by both dry and wet methods. Dry pressing in a double acting steel die yielded sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 235.6 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 100 micro m. An aqueous slurry pressing technique produced sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 440.8 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 25 micro m. Image analysis revealed a reduction in both pore area and pore size distribution in the slurry pressed sintered test bars. The improvements in the slurry pressed material properties are discussed in terms of reduced agglomeration and improved particle packing during consolidation.

  18. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, C.S.

    1981-10-05

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems in the following way: by providing an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurrying an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  19. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium. PMID:27502074

  20. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-08-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

  1. Modeling the rate-controlled sorption of hexavalent chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  2. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  3. Hard Chrome-Coated and Fullerene-Doped Metal Surfaces in Orthopedic Bearings.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Robert; Feige, Katja; Dos Santos, Claudia Beatriz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2017-12-20

    Metal-on-metal bearings for total hip replacements have been introduced as an alternative to polyethylene in young and more active patients. These have, however, been shown to be prone to implant malpositioning and have been limited by some specific design features. In that context, coatings present an option to increase wear resistance by keeping the high fracture strength of the metal substrate. A custom-made electroplating setup was designed for the coating of CoCr substrates using (a) an industrial standard chromium electrolyte; (b) a custom-made hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) electrolyte with a reduced chromium trioxide (CrO₃) content, both without solid additives and (c) with the addition of fullerene (C 60 ) nanoparticles; and (d) a trivalent chromium (Cr 3+ ) electrolyte with C 60 addition. All coatings showed an increase in microhardness compared with the metal substrate. Trivalent coatings were thinner (10 µm) than the hexavalent coatings (23-40 µm) and resulted in increased roughness and crack density. Wear was found to be reduced for the hexavalent chromium coatings by 70-84% compared with the CoCr-CoCr reference bearing while the trivalent chromium coating even increased wear by more than 300%. The addition of fullerenes to the electrolyte did not show any further tribological effect.

  4. Hard Chrome-Coated and Fullerene-Doped Metal Surfaces in Orthopedic Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Feige, Katja; dos Santos, Claudia Beatriz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings for total hip replacements have been introduced as an alternative to polyethylene in young and more active patients. These have, however, been shown to be prone to implant malpositioning and have been limited by some specific design features. In that context, coatings present an option to increase wear resistance by keeping the high fracture strength of the metal substrate. A custom-made electroplating setup was designed for the coating of CoCr substrates using (a) an industrial standard chromium electrolyte; (b) a custom-made hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) electrolyte with a reduced chromium trioxide (CrO3) content, both without solid additives and (c) with the addition of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles; and (d) a trivalent chromium (Cr3+) electrolyte with C60 addition. All coatings showed an increase in microhardness compared with the metal substrate. Trivalent coatings were thinner (10 µm) than the hexavalent coatings (23–40 µm) and resulted in increased roughness and crack density. Wear was found to be reduced for the hexavalent chromium coatings by 70–84% compared with the CoCr–CoCr reference bearing while the trivalent chromium coating even increased wear by more than 300%. The addition of fullerenes to the electrolyte did not show any further tribological effect. PMID:29261128

  5. Silicon carbide white light LEDs for solid-state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bet, Sachin; Quick, Nathaniel; Kar, Aravinda

    2007-02-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully fabricated for the first time in silicon carbide substrates (4H-SiC) using a novel laser doping technique. The donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination mechanism for luminescence has been used to tailor these LEDs. Chromium (Cr), which produces multiple acceptor sites per atom, and selenium which produces multiple donor sites per atom were successfully incorporated into SiC for the first time using laser doping. Aluminum (Al) and nitrogen (N) were also laser-doped into SiC. Green (521-575 nm) and blue (460-498 nm) wavelengths were observed due to radiative recombination transitions between donor-acceptors pairs of N-Cr and N-Al respectively, while a prominent violet (408 nm) wavelength was observed due to transitions from the nitrogen level to the valence band level. The red (698-738 nm) luminescence was mainly due to nitrogen excitons and other defect levels. This RGB combination produced a broadband white light spectrum extending from 380 to 900 nm. The color space tri-stimulus values were X = 0.3322, Y = 0.3320 and Z = 0.3358 as per 1931 CIE (International Commission on Illumination) for 4H-SiC corresponding to a color rendering index of 96.56; the color temperature of 5510 K is very close to average daylight (5500 K).

  6. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  7. Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.V.

    1982-06-18

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  8. Aluminum and chromium ion particle studies for enhancement of surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An experimental project was undertaken which produced ion plated coatings on steel substrates. About twenty tensile samples of 4340 steel were ion plated in the Denton system with aluminum using resistance heating evaporation boats. In the V.T.A. 7375 system, ten samples were chromium ion plated; four on 4340 steel disks and the other six onto 440-C stainless steel rods for roller bearing wear improvement testing. Each of the samples was plated on a separate run to correlate the film parameters with the run parameters. Some of the chromium literature was reviewed, and improvements to the vacuum system were made.

  9. Method for preparing boron-carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, S.T.; Masters, D.R.

    1975-10-21

    The invention is directed to the preparation of boron carbide articles of various configurations. A stoichiometric mixture of particulate boron and carbon is confined in a suitable mold, heated to a temperature in the range of about 1250 to 1500$sup 0$C for effecting a solid state diffusion reaction between the boron and carbon for forming the boron carbide (B$sub 4$C), and thereafter the resulting boron-carbide particles are hot-pressed at a temperature in the range of about 1800 to 2200$sup 0$C and a pressure in the range of about 1000 to 4000 psi for densifying and sintering the boron carbide into the desired article.

  10. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  11. Breaking the icosahedra in boron carbide

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Sato, Takanori; Breen, Andrew J.; Ringer, Simon P.; Goddard, William A.; Cairney, Julie M.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Findings of laser-assisted atom probe tomography experiments on boron carbide elucidate an approach for characterizing the atomic structure and interatomic bonding of molecules associated with extraordinary structural stability. The discovery of crystallographic planes in these boron carbide datasets substantiates that crystallinity is maintained to the point of field evaporation, and characterization of individual ionization events gives unexpected evidence of the destruction of individual icosahedra. Statistical analyses of the ions created during the field evaporation process have been used to deduce relative atomic bond strengths and show that the icosahedra in boron carbide are not as stable as anticipated. Combined with quantum mechanics simulations, this result provides insight into the structural instability and amorphization of boron carbide. The temporal, spatial, and compositional information provided by atom probe tomography makes it a unique platform for elucidating the relative stability and interactions of primary building blocks in hierarchically crystalline materials. PMID:27790982

  12. Dispersion-strengthened chromium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blocker, J. M., Jr.; Veigel, N. D.

    1972-01-01

    Finely divided powder mixture produced by vapor deposition of CR on small ThO2 particles was hot pressed or pressure bonded. Resulting alloy has lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature than pure chromium, and high strength and oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, both in as-rolled condition and after annealing.

  13. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  14. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  15. Treatment of chromium contaminated soil using bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanti, Ipung Fitri; Putri, Tesya Paramita; Kurniawan, Setyo Budi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium contamination in soil occurs due to the disposal of chromium industrial wastewater or sludge that excess the quality standard. Chromium concentration in soil is ranged between 1 to 300 mg/kg while the maximum health standard is 2.5 mg/kg. Bioremediation is one of technology that could be used for remediating heavy metal contamination in soil. Bacteria have an ability to remove heavy metal from soil. One bacteria species that capable to remove chromium from soil is Bacillus subtilis. The aim of this research was to know the chromium removal percentage in contaminated soil by Bacillus subtilis. Artificial chromium contaminated soil was used by mixing 425gram sand and chromium trichloride solution. Concentration of chromium added into the spiked soil were 50, 75, and 100 mg/L. During 14 days, pH, soil temperature and soil moisture were tested. Initial and final number of bacterial colony and chromium concentration analysed. The result showed that the highest percentage of chromium removal was 11% at a chromium concentration of 75 mg/L

  16. Black chrome solar selective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.; Sowell, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodeposited black chrome solar selective coatings have frequently experienced thermal stability problems when heated to temperatures above 250/sup 0/C (480/sup 0/F) in air. By reducing the trivalent chromium concentration in the standard black chrome plating bath, coatings on nickel substrates are obtained which are stable for thousands of hours at 350/sup 0/C (660/sup 0/F) and for hundreds of hours at 400/sup 0/C (750/sup 0/F). These results have been obtained consistently on a laboratory scale, but difficulty in reproducing the results has been encountered in a production environment. A current study of the effects of known plating variables on the opticalmore » properties and thermal stability of coatings is aimed at establishing an acceptable range for each plating parameter. A preliminary process specification for electroplating mild steel substrates with a stable black chrome coating is presented.« less

  17. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  18. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  19. Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Ren, J.; Zaghi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments in chemical-vapor deposition of silicon carbide by pyrolysis of dimethyldichlorosilane in hydrogen and argon carrier gases. Directed toward understanding chemical-kinetic and mass-transport phenomena affecting infiltration of reactants into, and deposition of SiC upon, fabrics. Part of continuing effort to develop method of efficient and more nearly uniform deposition of silicon carbide matrix throughout fabric piles to make improved fabric/SiC-matrix composite materials.

  20. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, R.L.; Herbst, R.J.; Johnson, K.W.R.

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and > 94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproductibility of chemical and phase composition.

  1. Hexavalent chromium emissions from aerospace operations: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Chaurushia, A.; Bajza, C.

    1994-12-31

    Northrop Aircraft Division (NAD) is subject to several air toxic regulations such as EPA SARA Title 3, California Assembly Bill 2588 (AB2588), and Proposition 65 and is a voluntary participant in air toxic emissions reduction programs such as the EPA 33/50 and MERIT Program. To quantify emissions, NAD initially followed regulatory guidelines which recommend that emission inventories of air toxics be based on engineering assumptions and conservative emission factors in absence of specific source test data. NAD was concerned that Chromium VI emissions from NAD`s spray coating and chemical tank line operations were not representative due to these techniques. Moremore » recently, NAD has relied upon information from its ongoing source testing program to determine emission rates of Chromium VI. Based on these source test results, NAD revised emission calculations for use in Chromium VI inventories, impact assessments and control strategies. NAD has been successful in demonstrating a significant difference between emissions calculated utilizing the source test results and emissions based on the traditional mass balance using agency suggested methods.« less

  2. Fate of chromium in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Prokisch, J.; Gyori, Z.; Kovacs, B.

    The chromium cycle in soil was studied with speciation of chromium. The aim was to look for the possibilities the mobilization of chromium(III) and to measure the rate of chromate reduction in nature and pot and field experiments in Hungarian soils. The authors developed a sensitive and simple method for chromium speciation with a microcolumn connected an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Detection limits are convenient to measure chromium forms in a 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} extract of a contaminated soil, but it is not enough to measure that of the uncontaminated soils. CR(VI) as chromate anion is notmore » adsorbed on pH dependent temporary charges of clays but in strongly acidic soil. Therefore CR(VI) can be leached out easily from the top layer of soil and can be transported into the ground water. Chromate ion can be reduced to CR(III) by organic matter of soil in acidic medium. CR(VI) is more stable at higher pH and lower humus content. Thus the reduction much quicker in the upper, weakly acidic top layer. CR(VI) oxidizes the organic matter of soil. The rate of this reaction depends on pH values, the humus content of the soil and temperature. CR(III) leaching in different uncontaminated soils was studied too. There are 3 pathways of mobilization of Cr(III). When pH decreases in soil the CR(III) becomes more soluble, similarly to the aluminium(III) ion. When the soil contains large quantity of water soluble organic ligands, Cr makes complexes with them and complexes formed can be leached out from the top layer. The third possibility is the oxidation of CR(III) to Cr(VI). It could happen on surface of manganese dioxide in the well-aired top layer.« less

  3. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  4. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  5. Evaluation of tribological wear and corrosion in coatings of diamalloy 4060NS deposited by thermal spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña R, S. M.; Moreno T, C. M.; Espinosa C, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Surface engineering seeks the development of new techniques to improve the performance and life of components of machines or industrial facilities, always looking for low costs and the least possible environmental damage. Thermal projection is one of the techniques that is based on the projection of particles of compounds and alloys on properly prepared and heated substrates, these particles are driven by a stream of air passing through an oxyacetylene flame which gives the energy to the process; These coatings give the possibility to improve the properties of the materials or the maintenance of components to maximize the availability of service. In order to reduce the damage caused by wear and corrosion of a low carbon AISI 1020 steel, they were coated with a metal based alloy, studying the effect of the cobalt-chromium-silicon-tungsten carbide alloy coating (DIAMALLLOY 4060 NS). The coating was deposited with two different pressures in the gases supplied to the torch, obtaining two flames and working three thicknesses of coating that oscillate between 100-500μm, according to the number of deposited layers, making use of a projection gun Castolin Eutectic. Powder and substrate characterization was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), spark emission spectroscopy and metallographic analysis. The results confirm the chemical nature and structure of the powder of the alloy and the substrate to be used, in addition, the thermal stability of the system was verified. The evaluation of the adhesion of the deposited layers was carried out by the implementation of pull-off tests according to ASTM D4541, in order to determine the type of failure that is presented. Mechanical wear was determined using a MT/60/NI microtest tribometer while electrochemical tests were performed using a suitable experimental unit for this purpose, confirming that the substrate exhibits lower wear levels when coated with

  6. Metal and Non-Metal Inorganic Coatings. Methods of Checking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-20

    base metal (15) Copper (16) Steel (17) Zinc alloy (18) Nickel (19) Copper and its alloys (20) Nickel (21) Chromium (22) Silver (23) Copper and its alloys... Silver (9) Copper-tine alloy (for solution #6)1 NOTE,. The value (H )is given for the ninc coatings from cyanide, sulfateo ammoniat4, and zincate...fluoborlc; silver from cyanide and thiocyanic acid; dull chromium - from sulfate; copper -from sulfate and cyanide electrolytes (for solution 06). -Q -gp

  7. Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, V.; Heon, M.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2011-02-09

    Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are a large family of carbon materials derived from carbide precursors that are transformed into pure carbon via physical (e.g., thermal decomposition) or chemical (e.g., halogenation) processes. Structurally, CDC ranges from amorphous carbon to graphite, carbon nanotubes or graphene. For halogenated carbides, a high level of control over the resulting amorphous porous carbon structure is possible by changing the synthesis conditions and carbide precursor. The large number of resulting carbon structures and their tunability enables a wide range of applications, from tribological coatings for ceramics, or selective sorbents, to gas and electrical energy storage. In particular, themore » application of CDC in supercapacitors has recently attracted much attention. This review paper summarizes key aspects of CDC synthesis, properties, and applications. It is shown that the CDC structure and properties are sensitive to changes of the synthesis parameters. Understanding of processing–structure–properties relationships facilitates tuning of the carbon material to the requirements of a certain application.« less

  8. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  9. Occurrences, uses, and properties of chromium.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, J

    1997-08-01

    Chromium is the 21st most abundant element in the Earth's crust with a mean concentration in United States soils of about 40 mg/kg. Although it exists in several oxidation states, the zero, trivalent, and hexavalent states are the most important in commercial products and the environment. Nearly all naturally occurring chromium is in the trivalent state, usually in combination with iron or other metal oxides. Although only about 15% of the chromium mined is used in the manufacture of chemicals, most applications of chromium utilize the chemistry of chromium. For instance, the "stainless" nature of stainless steel is due to the chemical properties of the chromium oxides which form on the surface of the alloy. Similarly, the protective properties of chrome plating of metals, chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treatment of wood, and chrome tanning of leather are all dependent on chromium chemistry. The key to these uses is that under typical environmental and biological conditions of pH and oxidation-reduction potential, the most stable form of chromium is the trivalent oxide. This form has very low solubility and low reactivity resulting in low mobility in the environment and low toxicity in living organisms. In this paper the chemical properties of chromium are discussed for the major commercial products in the context of the Eh-pH diagram for chromium. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  10. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  11. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  12. Feasibility of Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel/Silicon Carbide Fibers Composites over Nickel Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, E. P.; Abdul Karim, M. R.; Pavese, M.; Biamino, S.; Badini, C.; Fino, P.

    2017-05-01

    Nickel superalloys are typical materials used for the hot parts of engines in aircraft and space vehicles. They are very important in this field as they offer high-temperature mechanical strength together with a good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Due to high-temperature buckling phenomena, reinforcement of the nickel superalloy might be needed to increase stiffness. For this reason, it was thought to investigate the possibility of producing composite materials that might improve properties of the metal at high temperature. The composite material was produced by using electrochemical deposition method in which a composite with nickel matrix and long silicon carbide fibers was deposited over the nickel superalloy. The substrate was Inconel 718, and monofilament continuous silicon carbide fibers were chosen as reinforcement. Chemical compatibility was studied between Inconel 718 and the reinforcing fibers, with fibers both in an uncoated condition, and coated with carbon or carbon/titanium diboride. Both theoretical calculations and experiments were conducted, which suggested the use of a carbon coating over the fibers and a buffer layer of nickel to avoid unwanted reactions between the substrate and silicon carbide. Deposition was then performed, and this demonstrated the practical feasibility of the process. Yield strength was measured to detect the onset of interface debonding between the substrate and the composite layer.

  13. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savalani, M. M.; Ng, C. C.; Li, Q. H.; Man, H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  14. Graphene Nanoplatelet Reinforced Tantalum Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    testing showed an increase in thermal conductivity in GNP reinforced composites resulting in a reduction of peak sample surface temperature. This study...showed an increase in thermal conductivity in GNP reinforced composites resulting in a reduction of peak sample surface temperature. This study resulted...Wetting angle measurements are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PLC coating . Mechanical properties of the GrF-PLC hybrid are

  15. Selection criteria for wear resistant powder coatings under extreme erosive wear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulu, P.; Pihl, T.

    2002-12-01

    Wear-resistant thermal spray coatings for sliding wear are hard but brittle (such as carbide and oxide based coatings), which makes them useless under impact loading conditions and sensitive to fatigue. Under extreme conditions of erosive wear (impact loading, high hardness of abrasives, and high velocity of abradant particles), composite coatings ensure optimal properties of hardness and toughness. The article describes tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) systems and self-fluxing alloys, containing tungsten carbide based hardmetal particles [NiCrSiB-(WC-Co)] deposited by the detonation gun, continuous detonation spraying, and spray fusion processes. Different powder compositions and processes were studied, and the effect of the coating structure and wear parameters on the wear resistance of coatings are evaluated. The dependence of the wear resistance of sprayed and fused coatings on their hardness is discussed, and hardness criteria for coating selection are proposed. The so-called “double cemented” structure of WC-Co based hardmetal or metal matrix composite coatings, as compared with a simple cobalt matrix containing particles of WC, was found optimal. Structural criteria for coating selection are provided. To assist the end user in selecting an optimal deposition method and materials, coating selection diagrams of wear resistance versus hardness are given. This paper also discusses the cost-effectiveness of coatings in the application areas that are more sensitive to cost, and composite coatings based on recycled materials are offered.

  16. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  17. Aluminide coatings for nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, H. C.; Sieraski, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The metalliding process was used to aluminide IN-100 and TD NiCr. Aluminum was deposited over a broad range of deposition rates, with two types of coating structures resulting. Chromium, silicon, titanium and yttrium were also individually deposited simutaneously with aluminum on IN-100. None of these had a marked effect on the oxidation resistance of the aluminide coating. Porosity-free aluminide coatings with good oxidation resistance were formed on TD NiCr providing the aluminum concentration did not exceed 8 percent, the limit of solubility in the gamma phase.

  18. Formation of Superhard Chromium Carbide Crystal Microrods in Ni-Cr-C Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'chuk, V. P.; Zmienko, D. S.; Kolesov, V. V.; Chernozatonskii, L. A.

    2018-04-01

    Ni-Cr-C materials with a high hardness determined by the presence of regions consisting of Cr3C2 microrods with a record microhardness reaching 3200 kg/mm2 have been obtained. Their self-organization in a powder consisting of Ni, Cr, and carbon microparticles with a high weight percentage occurs in the process of its sintering at a temperature of 1300°C and the subsequent sharp cooling of the resulting alloy. A model has been proposed for the process of formation of such crystal microrods whose characteristics have been determined by hardness measurement, electron microscopy, and microchemical and X-ray diffraction analyses.

  19. A Directionally Solidified Iron-chromium-aluminum-tantalum Carbide Eutectic Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    A eutectic alloy, Fe-13.6CR-3.7Al+9TaC, was directionally solidified in a high gradient furnace, producing a microstructure of alined TaC fibers in an oxidation resistant alpha-iron matrix. Tensile and stress rupture properties, thermal cycling resistance, and microstructures were evaluated. The alloy displays at 1000 C an ultimate tensile strength of 58 MPa and a 100-hour rupture life at a stress of 21 MPa. Thermal cycling to 1100 C induces faceting in the TaC fibers.

  20. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  1. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction in the Aerospace Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    1 Hexavalent Chromium Reduction in the Aerospace Industry Unpublished work © 2010 Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc. Lisa Goldberg...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Reduction in the Aerospace Industry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT AIA and its members have a long history in minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in the manufacture of its products. Included in that history

  2. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  3. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Lean Direct Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust approaches for joining silicon carbide (SiC) to silicon carbide sub-elements have been developed for a micro-electro-mechanical systems lean direct injector (MEMS LDI) application. The objective is to join SiC sub-elements to form a leak-free injector that has complex internal passages for the flow and mixing of fuel and air. Previous bonding technology relied upon silicate glass interlayers that were not uniform or leak free. In a newly developed joining approach, titanium foils and physically vapor deposited titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC materials during hot pressing. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. Initial tests show that the bond strength is much higher than required for the component system. Benefits of the joining technology are fabrication of leak free joints with high temperature and mechanical capability.

  4. Study on drilling induced delamination of woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composite using carbide drills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaily, M.; Hassan, C. H. Che; Jaharah, A. G.; Azmi, H.; Afifah, M. A.; Khairusshima, M. K. Nor

    2018-04-01

    In this research study, it presents the influences of drilling parameters on the delamination factor during the drilling of woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates when using the carbide drill bits. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of drilling parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate and drill sizes on the delamination produced when drilling woven kenaf reinforced epoxy composite using the non-coated carbide drill bits. The damage generated on the woven kenaf reinforced epoxy composite laminates were observed both at the entrance and exit surface during the drilling operation. The experiments were conducted according to the Box Behnken experimental designs. The results indicated that the drill diameter has a significant influence on the delamination when drilling the woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composites.

  5. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  6. 64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS SHOWING CALCIUM CARBIDE IN COOLING CARS ON THE FLOOR. DECEMBER 26, 1918. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  7. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers - Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  8. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers: Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  9. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  10. Silicon Carbide Etching Using Chlorine Trifluoride Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Oda, Satoko; Fukai, Yasushi; Fukae, Katsuya; Takeuchi, Takashi; Aihara, Masahiko

    2005-03-01

    The etch rate, chemical reactions and etched surface of β-silicon carbide are studied in detail using chlorine trifluoride gas. The etch rate is greater than 10 μm min-1 at 723 K with a flow rate of 0.1 \\ell min-1 at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal reactor. The maximum etch rate at a substrate temperature of 773 K is 40 μm min-1 with a flow rate of 0.25 \\ell min-1. The step-like pattern that initially exists on the β-silicon carbide surface tends to be smoothed; the root-mean-square surface roughness decreases from its initial value of 5 μm to 1 μm within 15 min; this minimum value is maintained for more than 15 min. Therefore, chlorine trifluoride gas is considered to have a large etch rate for β-silicon carbide associated with making a rough surface smooth.

  11. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  12. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  13. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  14. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  15. Cryochemical and CVD processing of shperical carbide fuels for propulsion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, H. Thomas; Carroll, David W.; Matthews, R. Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Many of the nuclear propulsion reactor concepts proposed for a manned mission to Mars use a coated spherical particle fuel form similar to that used in the Rover and NERVA propulsion reactors. The formation of uranium dicarbide microspheres using a cryochemical process and the coating of the UC2 spheres with zirconium carbide using chemical vapor deposition are being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cryochemical process is described with a discussion of the variables affecting the sphere formation and carbothermic reduction to produce UC2 spheres from UO2. Emphasis is placed on minimizing the wastes produced by the process. The ability to coat particles with ZrC was recaptured, and improvements in the process and equipment were developed. Volatile organometallic precursors were investigated as alternatives to the original ZrCl4 precursor.

  16. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  17. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  18. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  19. Cobalt Doping of Semiconducting Boron Carbide Using Cobaltocene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    COBALT DOPING OF SEMICONDUCTING BORON CARBIDE USING COBALTOCENE THESIS Lonnie Carlson, Major...DOPING OF SEMICONDUCTING BORON CARBIDE USING COBALTOCENE THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics Graduate School...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GNE/ENP/07-01 COBALT DOPING OF SEMICONDUCTING BORON CARBIDE USING COBALTOCENE Lonnie

  20. The Structure and Properties of Plasma Sprayed Iron Oxide Doped Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for SOFC Metallic Interconnectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Jouni; Lagerbom, Juha; Hyvärinen, Leo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Himanen, Olli; Pihlatie, Mikko; Kiviaho, Jari; Vuoristo, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Manganese cobalt oxide spinel doped with Fe2O3 was studied as a protective coating on ferritic stainless steel interconnects. Chromium alloying causes problems at high operation temperatures in such oxidizing conditions where chromium compounds evaporate and poison the cathode active area, causing the degradation of the solid oxide fuel cell. In order to prevent chromium evaporation, these interconnectors need a protective coating to block the chromium evaporation and to maintain an adequate electrical conductivity. Thermal spraying is regarded as a promising way to produce dense and protective layers. In the present work, the ceramic Mn-Co-Fe oxide spinel coatings were produced by using the atmospheric plasma spray process. Coatings with low thickness and low amount of porosity were produced by optimizing deposition conditions. The original spinel structure decomposed because of the fast transformation of solid-liquid-solid states but was partially restored by using post-annealing treatment.

  1. Influence of adding strong-carbide-formation elements multiply on particle-reinforced Fe-matrix composite layer produced by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mingxing; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhang, Hongjun; Zhang, Weiming

    2005-01-01

    In the research hotspot of particle reinforced metal-matrix composite layer produced by laser cladding, in-situ reinforced particles obtained by adding strong-carbide-formation elements into cladding power have been attracting more attention for their unique advantage. The research has demonstrated that when adding strong-carbide-formation elements-Ti into the cladding powder of the Fe-C-Si-B separately, by optimizing the composition, better cladding coating with the characters of better strength and toughness, higher wear resistance and free of cracks. When the microstructure of cladding coating is hypoeutectic microstructure, its comprehensive performance is best. The research discovered that, compositely adding the strong-carbide-formation elements like Ti+V, Ti+Zr or V+Zr into the cladding coating is able to improve its comprehensive capability. All the cladding coatings obtained are hypoeutectic microstructure. The cladding coatings have a great deal of particulates, and its average microhardness reaches HV0.2700-1400. The research also discovered that the cladding coating obtained is of less cracking after adding the Ti+Zr.

  2. Survey of coatings for solar collectors. [ceramic enamels and chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Ceramic enamel is found to be more solar selective, (i.e., has high solar absorptance in combination with low infrared emittance) than organic enamel, but neither is as solar selective as black chrome, black copper, black zinc, or black nickel. Ceramic enamel is matched only by black chrome in durability and wide availability. Ceramic enamel and organic enamel have approximately the same cost, and both are currently slightly lower in cost than black chrome, black copper, or black zinc. Black nickel is relatively unavailable and, because of that, realistic cost comparisons are not possible.

  3. Reduction Expansion Synthesis of Chromium and Nickel Metal Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    to a supersonic speed [24]–[25]. To prevent undesired combustion, an inert gas is required for because the gas temperature increases to 100–500°C in...take place. The metal is added by mechanical means only. In the sputtering process, an inert gas (e.g., argon) is supplied to a vacuum chamber with...technique that uses metal powder and compressed gas to feed the powder to a converging-diverging nozzle [24], as shown in Figure 5. The converging

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall provide appropriate personal... clothing and equipment should be laundered or cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with... shall provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI...

  5. PREDICTING THE TOXICITY OF CHROMIUM IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromium exists in sediments in two oxidation states: Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble and nontoxic, and Cr(VI), which is much more soluble and toxic. Chromium(VI) is thermodynamically unstable in anoxic sediments, and acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) is formed only in anoxic se...

  6. Chromium Ions in Tetrahedral Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    octahedral sites-the inversion site and the mirror site.4 After energy level calculations were performed, it was found that chromium ions in octahedral sites...octahedral site with symmetry C, the other half at the mirror octahedral sites with symmetry Cs. Its structure projected on (100) plane is shown in Fig... mirror symmetry. I 181 !U 10O 0 0 Fig. 2.1 Unit cell of forsterite, Mg2SiO4. Small open and solid circles are Mg atoms, big circles are 0 atoms and

  7. Magnetism and high magnetic-field-induced stability of alloy carbides in Fe-based materials.

    PubMed

    Hou, T P; Wu, K M; Liu, W M; Peet, M J; Hulme-Smith, C N; Guo, L; Zhuang, L

    2018-02-14

    Understanding the nature of the magnetic-field-induced precipitation behaviors represents a major step forward towards unravelling the real nature of interesting phenomena in Fe-based alloys and especially towards solving the key materials problem for the development of fusion energy. Experimental results indicate that the applied high magnetic field effectively promotes the precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides. We build an integrated method, which breaks through the limitations of zero temperature and zero external field, to concentrate on the dependence of the stability induced by the magnetic effect, excluding the thermal effect. We investigate the intimate relationship between the external field and the origins of various magnetics structural characteristics, which are derived from the interactions among the various Wyckoff sites of iron atoms, antiparallel spin of chromium and Fe-C bond distances. The high-magnetic-field-induced exchange coupling increases with the strength of the external field, which then causes an increase in the parallel magnetic moment. The stability of the alloy carbide M 23 C 6 is more dependent on external field effects than thermal effects, whereas that of M 2 C, M 3 C and M 7 C 3 is mainly determined by thermal effects.

  8. Utilization of alum sludge as chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, Nazirul Mubin; Sidek, Lariyah Mohd; Zulkifli, Muhammad Azmeer Asyraf; Hua, Chua Kok; Jalil, Nurulhidayah Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The amount of alum sludge produced at water treatment plant has become a problem where it is highly costly in order to dispose them. Various research was conducted to find the most suitable and economic alternative to recycle and reused of alum sludge. In this study, alum sludge was retrieved from Waterworks where it was dewatered, dried, grounded and sieved to obtain smallest particle sizes of alum sludge. The synthetic water was prepared at the laboratory in as it was used to imitate the properties of real water contaminated with chromium. This study was conducted to determine the percentage reduction of chromium concentration in synthetic water by using alum sludge as absorbent. The percentage reduction of chromium was observed under the effect of initial concentration of chromium and the height of alum sludge. The result indicates that chromium concentration reduction was the highest at the lowest initial concentration and at the highest height of alum sludge and vice versa.

  9. Therapeutic review: is ascorbic acid of value in chromium poisoning and chromium dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Bradberry, S M; Vale, J A

    1999-01-01

    Repeated topical exposure to chromium(VI) may cause an allergic contact dermatitis or the formation of chrome ulcers. Systemic toxicity may occur following the ingestion of a chromium(VI) salt, from chromium(VI)-induced skin burns, or from inhalation of chromium(VI) occurring occupationally. Soluble chromium(VI) salts are usually absorbed more easily and cross cell membranes more readily than trivalent chromium salts, and, therefore chromium(VI) is more toxic than chromium(III). In experimental studies, endogenous ascorbic acid in rat lung, liver, and kidney and human plasma, effectively reduces chromium(VI) to chromium(III). The administration of exogenous ascorbic acid has been advocated therefore in the treatment of systemic chromium poisoning and chromium dermatitis to enhance the extracellular reduction of chromium(VI) to the less bioavailable chromium(III). In vitro experiments confirm that the addition of ascorbic acid to plasma containing chromium(VI) leads to a dose-dependent reduction of chromium(VI) to chromium(III). In animal studies, parenteral ascorbic acid 0.5-5 g/kg significantly reduced chromium-induced nephrotoxicity when administered 30 minutes before parenteral sodium dichromate and up to 1 hour after parenteral sodium chromate dosing. Parenteral ascorbic acid 0.5-5 g/kg also reduced mortality when given orally up to 2 hours after oral potassium dichromate dosing. However, the administration of parenteral ascorbic acid more than 2 hours after parenteral chromate in these experimental studies did not protect against renal damage, and parenteral ascorbic acid given 3 hours postparenteral chromate increased toxicity. In addition, there is no confirmed clinical evidence that the administration of ascorbic acid lessens morbidity or mortality in systemic chromium poisoning. A possible reason for the lack of benefit of ascorbic acid when administration is delayed, is that chromium(VI) cellular uptake has occurred prior to ascorbic acid administration

  10. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ghosh, C.

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction processmore » developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.« less

  11. Progress in silicon carbide semiconductor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Neudeck, P. G.; Matus, L. G.; Petit, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology has been advancing rapidly over the last several years. Advances have been made in boule growth, thin film growth, and device fabrication. This paper wi11 review reasons for the renewed interest in SiC, and will review recent developments in both crystal growth and device fabrication.

  12. Silicon Carbide Power Devices and Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Samsel, Isaak; LaBel, Ken; Chen, Yuan; Ikpe, Stanley; Wilcox, Ted; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Topper, Alyson

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the NASA NEPP Program Silicon Carbide Power Device subtask is given, including the current task roadmap, partnerships, and future plans. Included are the Agency-wide efforts to promote development of single-event effect hardened SiC power devices for space applications.

  13. Nanocrystalline ordered vanadium carbide: Superlattice and nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlov, A. S.; Gusev, A. I.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure, micro- and nanostructure of coarse- and nanocrystalline powders of ordered vanadium carbide V8C7 have been examined by X-ray and neutron diffraction and electron microscopy methods. The synthesized coarse-crystalline powder of ordered vanadium carbide has flower-like morphology. It was established that the real ordered phase has the composition V8C7-δ (δ ≅ 0.03) deviating from perfect stoichiometric composition V8C7. The vanadium atoms forming the octahedral environment □V6 of vacant sites in V8C7-δ are displaced towards the vacancy □. The presence of carbon onion-like structures was found in the vanadium carbide powders with a small content of free (uncombined) carbon. The nanopowders of V8C7-δ carbide with average particle size of 20-30 nm produced by high-energy milling of coarse-crystalline powder retain the crystal structure of the initial powder, but differ in the lattice deformation distortion anisotropy.

  14. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  15. Response of Cr and Cr-Al coatings on Zircaloy-2 to high temperature steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2018-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of chromium (Cr) and chromium-aluminum (CrAl) coatings with various compositions deposited on Zircaloy-2 to 700 °C high-temperature steam (HTS) exposure has been investigated. CrAl coatings with higher Al compositions demonstrate lower oxidation weight gain. A layer of γ-alumina developed on the CrAl coatings with Al composition over 43 at%, while Al2O3 and Cr2O3 developed on CrAl coatings with Al composition below 33 at%. Oxidation of Zircaloy-2 substrate was inhibited by the 1um coatings to 20 h HTS exposure. Coating constituent elements diffused into the substrate and formed intermetallic phases with the Zircaloy substrate. Thicker layers of intermetallic phases developed on the coatings with higher Al composition. The intermetallic phases included Fe and Ni, indicating the dissolution of second phase particles (SPPs) during HTS exposure.

  16. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Sic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide with a refractory oxide coating is potentially a very attractive ceramic system. It offers the desirable mechanical and physical properties of SiC and the environmental durability of a refractory oxide. The development of a thermal shock resistant plasma-sprayed mullite coating on SiC is discussed. The durability of the mullite/SiC in oxidizing, reducing, and molten salt environments is discussed. In general, this system exhibits better behavior than uncoated SiC. Areas for further developments are discussed.

  17. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  18. Pyrotechnic Smoke Compositions Containing Boron Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-10

    resulting smoke. The inhalation of zinc fumes is known to cause “metal fume fever” and the smoke also contains various chlorinated organic compounds...matches were used to ignite the slurried items. Bare pellets were ignited with electrically heated nickel- chromium wire (hot wire). Small HC smoke

  19. Effect of mechanical pre-loadings on corrosion resistance of chromium-electroplated steel rods in marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina Helbert, Varvara; Dhondt, Matthieu; Homette, Remi; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Calloch, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    Providing high hardness, low friction coefficient, as well as, relatively good corrosion resistance, chromium-plated coatings (∼20 μm) are widely used for steel cylinder rods in marine environment. However, the standardized corrosion test method (ISO 9227, NSS) used to evaluate efficiency of this type of coatings does not take into account in-service mechanical loadings on cylinder rods. Nevertheless, the uniform initial network of microcracks in chromium coating is changing under mechanical loadings. Propagation of these microcracks explains premature corrosion of the steel substrate. The aim of the study was to evaluate relationship between mechanical loadings, propagation of microcracks network and corrosion resistance of chromium coatings. After monotonic pre-loading tests, it was demonstrated by microscopic observations that the microcracks propagation started at stress levels higher than the substrate yield stress (520 MPa). The microcracks become effective, i.e. they have instantly undergone through the whole coating thickness to reach the steel substrate. The density of effective microcracks increases with the total macroscopic level, i.e. the intercrack distance goes from 60 ± 5 μm at 1% of total strain to approximately 27 ± 2 μm at 10%. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the higher the plastic strain level applied during mechanical loading, the more the corrosion potential of the sample decreased until reaching the steel substrate value of approximately ‑0.65 V/SCE after 2 h of immersion. The polarization curves have also highligthed an increase in the corrosion current density with the strain level. Therefore, electrochemical measurements could be used to realize quick and comprehensive assesment of the effect of monotonic pre-loadings on corrosion properties of the chromium coating.

  20. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.