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Sample records for chromosomal integration sites

  1. Method for detection and identification of multiple chromosomal integration sites in transgenic animals created with lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Bryda, Elizabeth C; Pearson, Michael; Agca, Yuksel; Bauer, Beth A

    2006-12-01

    Transgene delivery systems, particularly those involving retroviruses, often result in the integration of multiple copies of the transgene throughout the host genome. Since site-specific silencing of trangenes can occur; it becomes important to identify the number and chromosomal location of the multiple copies of the transgenes in order to correlate inheritance of the transgene at a particular chromosomal site with a specific and robust phenotype. Using a technique that combines restriction endonuclease digest and several rounds of PCR amplification followed by nucleotide sequencing, it is possible to identify multiple chromosomal integration sites in transgenic founder animals. By designing genotyping assays to detect each individual integration site in the offspring of these founders, the inheritance of transgenes integrated at specific chromosomal locations can be followed efficiently as the transgenes randomly segregate in subsequent generations. Phenotypic characteristics can then be correlated with inheritance of a transgene integrated at a particular chromosomal location to allow rational selection of breeding animals in order to establish the transgenic line.

  2. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S.

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  3. Site-specific integration of bacterial artificial chromosomes into human cells.

    PubMed

    McColl, Bradley; Howden, Sara; Vadolas, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of inherited diseases requires long-term maintenance of the corrective transgene. Stable integration of the introduced DNA molecule into one of the host cell chromosomes is the simplest strategy for achieving this. However, genotoxicity resulting from random insertion of the transgene raises serious safety concerns that must be addressed if gene therapy is to enter the clinical mainstream. The following method makes use of the Rep integrase of adeno-associated virus to insert a transgene into the human AAVS1 site, a known "safe harbor" region within the human genome. This approach has the potential for application to novel gene therapy strategies for improved safety. In addition, with this method it is also possible to create cell lines carrying BAC transgenes in the AAVS1 site.

  4. Multicopy integration of mini-Tn7 transposons into selected chromosomal sites of a Salmonella vaccine strain

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Karen; Werner, Esther; Loessner, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal integration of expression modules for transgenes is an important aspect for the development of novel Salmonella vectors. Mini-Tn7 transposons have been used for the insertion of one such module into the chromosomal site attTn7, present only once in most Gram-negative bacteria. However, integration of multiple mini-Tn7 copies might be suitable for expression of appropriate amounts of antigen or combination of different modules. Here we demonstrate that integration of a 9.6 kb mini-Tn7 harbouring the luciferase luxCDABE (lux) occurs at the natural attTn7 site and simultaneously other locations of the Salmonella chromosome, which were engineered using λ-Red recombinase to contain one or two additional artificial attTn7 sites (a-attTn7). Multicopy integration even at closely spaced attTn7 sites was unexpected in light of the previously reported distance-dependent Tn7 target immunity. Integration of multiple copies of a mini-Tn7 containing a gfp cassette resulted in increasing green fluorescence of bacteria. Stable consecutive integration of two mini-Tn7 encoding lacZ and lux was achieved by initial transposition of lacZ-mini-Tn7, subsequent chromosomal insertion of a-attTn7 and a second round of transposition with lux-mini-Tn7. Mini-Tn7 thus constitutes a versatile method for multicopy integration of expression cassettes into the chromosome of Salmonella and possibly other bacteria. PMID:25488129

  5. Integration of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) DNA at two chromosomal sites (Vk and gag-like) in a hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, M; Nakai, S; Ogasawara, N; Yoshikawa, H

    1991-04-01

    Integration of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) DNA into the liver DNA of a woodchuck infected by the virus was investigated. Clonal viral integration was not detected three months before the appearance of four hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Integration of the viral DNA was detected in all four HCCs, of which one was chosen to determine the structure of the viral integration completely in a single tumor. The integration occurred in two sites. One part contains the viral DNA from the middle of the gene encoding surface antigen to two-thirds of the way through the gene encoding X protein (X) with no structural changes. The coding frame of the truncated X gene continues into the chromosomal sequence to make a possible fusion protein. The integration seems to have occurred by recombination within two direct repeats of the viral genome in one junction and by homologous recombination between viral DNA and chromosomal DNA in the other junction. The viral DNA is integrated into a spacer of the immunoglobulin L-chain Vk (IgVk) region without any chromosomal rearrangement accompanying the integration. The viral DNA at the second site has a complex structural rearrangement: part of the preS gene is duplicated and attached to the terminus of the gene encoding core antigen in a head-to-tail fashion, followed by three small fragments derived from other parts of the viral DNA. The integrated preS gene has its own 5' regulatory element and a coding frame consisting of the truncated preS gene, the other parts of viral DNA and the chromosomal sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Location of the unique integration site on an Escherichia coli chromosome by bacteriophage lambda DNA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L.; Stavans, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The search for specific sequences on long genomes is a key process in many biological contexts. How can specific target sequences be located with high efficiency, within physiologically relevant times? We addressed this question for viral integration, a fundamental mechanism of horizontal gene transfer driving prokaryotic evolution, using the infection of Escherichia coli bacteria with bacteriophage λ and following the establishment of a lysogenic state. Following the targeting process in individual live E. coli cells in real time revealed that λ DNA remains confined near the entry point of a cell following infection. The encounter between the 15-bp-long target sequence on the chromosome and the recombination site on the viral genome is facilitated by the directed motion of bacterial DNA generated during chromosome replication, in conjunction with constrained diffusion of phage DNA. Moving the native bacterial integration site to different locations on the genome and measuring the integration frequency in these strains reveals that the frequencies of the native site and a site symmetric to it relative to the origin are similar, whereas both are significantly higher than when the integration site is moved near the terminus, consistent with the replication-driven mechanism we propose. This novel search mechanism is yet another example of the exquisite coevolution of λ with its host. PMID:24799672

  7. Interstitial telomeric sequences in human chromosomes cluster with common fragile sites, mutagen sensitive sites, viral integration sites, cancer breakpoints, proto-oncogenes and breakpoints involved in primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adekunle, S.S.A.; Wyandt, H.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Recently we mapped the telomeric repeat sequences to 111 interstitial sites in the human genome and to sites of gaps and breaks induced by aphidicolin and sister chromatid exchange sites detected by BrdU. Many of these sites correspond to conserved fragile sites in man, gorilla and chimpazee, to sites of conserved sister chromatid exchange in the mammalian X chromosome, to mutagenic sensitive sites, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes, breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and to breakpoints indicated as the sole anomaly in neoplasia. This observation prompted us to investigate if the interstitial telomeric sites cluster with these sites. An extensive literature search was carried out to find all the available published sites mentioned above. For comparison, we also carried out a statistical analysis of the clustering of the sites of the telomeric repeats with the gene locations where only nucleotide mutations have been observed as the only chromosomal abnormality. Our results indicate that the telomeric repeats cluster most with fragile sites, mutagenic sensitive sites and breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and least with cancer breakpoints, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes and other genes with nucleotide mutations.

  8. Acquisition of telomere repeat sequences by transfected DNA integrated at the site of a chromosome break

    SciTech Connect

    Murnane, J.P.; Lohchung Yu )

    1993-02-01

    Rearrangement of the human genome is an important element in both cancer biology and genetic disease. Rearrangements that have been observed include deletions, translocations, chromosome breakage or loss, and gene amplification. Transfection of the DNA into mammalian cells can created instability in the genome. The characterization of DNA rearrangement associated with transfected DNA may provide information about the general mechanisms involved in genomic instability. This genomic instability is an important aspect of tumor cell progression. This research examines chromosome breakage and rearrangement that results in interstitial telomere repeat sequences within the human genome. These sequences could promote genomic instability because short repeat sequences can be recombination hotspots. Also, DNA rearrangements involving telomere repeat sequences can be associated with chromosome breaks. The introduction of telomere repeat sequences at spontaneous or ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand breaks may therefore also be a mechanism of chromosome fragmentation. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Site-specific integration and constitutive expression of key genes into Escherichia coli chromosome increases shikimic acid yields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Lin, Jun; Hu, Haifeng; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Baoquan

    2016-01-01

    As the key starting material for the chemical synthesis of Oseltamivir, shikimic acid (SA) has captured worldwide attention. Many researchers have tried to improve SA production by metabolic engineering, yet expression plasmids were used generally. In recent years, site-specific integration of key genes into chromosome to increase the yield of metabolites showed considerable advantages. The genes could maintain stably and express constitutively without induction. Herein, crucial genes aroG, aroB, tktA, aroE (encoding 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase, dehydroquinate synthase, transketolase and shikimate dehydrogenase, respectively) of SA pathway and glk, galP (encoding glucokinase and galactose permease) were integrated into the locus of ptsHIcrr (phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system operon) in a shikimate kinase genetic defect strain Escherichia coli BW25113 (ΔaroL/aroK, DE3). Furthermore, another key gene ppsA (encoding phosphoenolpyruvate synthase) was integrated into tyrR (encoding Tyr regulator protein). As a result, SA production of the recombinant (SA5/pGBAE) reached to 4.14 g/L in shake flask and 27.41 g/L in a 5-L bioreactor. These data suggested that integration of key genes increased SA yields effectively. This strategy is environmentally friendly for no antibiotic is added, simple to handle without induction, and suitable for industrial production.

  10. Construction and utilization of carotenoid reporter systems: identification of chromosomal integration sites that support suitable expression of biosynthetic genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Pamela L; DiCosimo, Deana J

    2012-01-01

    In order to metabolically engineer microorganisms to produce compounds of interest, it is often desirable to integrate foreign genes into the chromosome of the host. However, the consequences of these genetic alterations are not always predictable. The use of a reporter system can often assist in determining chromosomal locations for optimal expression of foreign biosynthetic genes. The method described here involves the construction and utilization of promoterless carotenoid transposons, which provides a colorimetric screen for identifying the best chromosomal integration sites for the expression of the genes of interest. The transposons (pUTmTn5::392W and pUTmTn5::392) contain the carotenoid genes required for the production of canthaxanthin and astaxanthin, respectively. Thus, when promoterless transposons insert into the host's genome, the color of the colonies will vary based on their chromosomal location. There is a correlation between the color intensity of the colonies and the expression of the carotenoid transposon. The transposon insertion site can be determined via direct chromosomal sequencing. This sequence information is used to guide the site-specific integration of biosynthetic genes and pathways of interest.

  11. Integrating maps of chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D

    1992-06-01

    The past year has seen major progress in the construction of various types of maps of human chromosome 21. Perhaps more significantly, the chromosome 21 research community is making very significant progress on integration of these maps through the use of common resources and increased collaboration and communication.

  12. Improved recombinant antibody production by CHO cells using a production enhancer DNA element with repeated transgene integration at a predetermined chromosomal site.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Inao, Takanori; Komatsu, Shodai; Huang, Guan; Ito, Akira; Omasa, Takeshi; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2017-03-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are one of the most useful host cell lines for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Although a series of production processes have been refined to improve protein productivity and cost performance, establishing producer cells is still time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration into a predetermined chromosomal locus may enable predictable protein expression, reducing the laborious process of cell screening. We previously developed an accumulative site-specific gene integration system (AGIS) using Cre recombinase and mutated loxP sites for transgene integration and amplification in the CHO cell genome. Epigenetic modifier elements such as insulators are effective DNA cis-regulatory elements for stabilizing transgene expression. Here, we attempted to enhance transgene expression in recombinant CHO cells generated by AGIS using a production enhancer DNA element (PE) derived from the CHO genome. The PE was introduced into an expression unit for a recombinant scFv-Fc antibody. The effect on scFv-Fc productivity of PE position and orientation within the transgene was evaluated, while keeping the background chromosomal structure constant. For the optimal PE arrangement, scFv-Fc productivity was enhanced 2.6-fold compared with an expression unit without a PE. The enhancing effect of the PE on transgene expression was also observed when two or three PE-flanked expression units were inserted as tandem repeats. These results indicate that AGIS using the PE-flanked expression unit is a promising approach for establishing producer cell lines for biopharmaceutical protein production.

  13. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  14. Site-specific integration of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh into the Lactobacillus gasseri chromosome and molecular characterization of the phage (attP) and bacterial (attB) attachment sites.

    PubMed Central

    Raya, R R; Fremaux, C; De Antoni, G L; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    The temperate bacteriophage phi adh integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri ADH by a site-specific recombination process. Southern hybridization analysis of BclI-digested genomic DNA from six relysogenized derivatives of the prophage-cured strain NCK102 displayed phage-chromosomal junction fragments identical to those of the lysogenic parent. The phi adh attachment site sequence, attP, was located within a 365-bp EcoRI-HindIII fragment of phage phi adh. This fragment was cloned and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis revealed striking features common to the attachment sites of other site-specific recombination systems: five direct repeats of the sequence TGTCCCTTTT(C/T) and a 14-bp inverted repeat. Oligonucleotides derived from the sequence of the attP-containing fragment enabled us to amplify predicted junction fragment sequences and thus to identify attL, attR, and attB. The core region was defined as the 16-bp sequence TACACTTCTTAGGAGG. Phage-encoded functions essential for site-specific insertion of phage phi adh were located in a 4.5-kb BclI fragment. This fragment was cloned in plasmid pSA34 to generate the insertional vector pTRK182. Plasmid pTRK182 was introduced into L. gasseri NCK102 by electroporation. Hybridization analysis showed that a single copy of pTRK182 had integrated at the attB site of the NCK102 erythromycin-resistant transformants. This is the first site-specific recombination system described in lactobacilli, as well as the first attP-based site-specific integration vector constructed for L. gasseri ADH. Images PMID:1512192

  15. A Novel System for Simultaneous or Sequential Integration of Multiple Gene-Loading Vectors into a Defined Site of a Human Artificial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Teruhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Hara, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) are gene-delivery vectors suitable for introducing large DNA fragments into mammalian cells. Although a HAC theoretically incorporates multiple gene expression cassettes of unlimited DNA size, its application has been limited because the conventional gene-loading system accepts only one gene-loading vector (GLV) into a HAC. We report a novel method for the simultaneous or sequential integration of multiple GLVs into a HAC vector (designated as the SIM system) via combined usage of Cre, FLP, Bxb1, and φC31 recombinase/integrase. As a proof of principle, we first attempted simultaneous integration of three GLVs encoding EGFP, Venus, and TdTomato into a gene-loading site of a HAC in CHO cells. These cells successfully expressed all three fluorescent proteins. Furthermore, microcell-mediated transfer of HACs enabled the expression of those fluorescent proteins in recipient cells. We next demonstrated that GLVs could be introduced into a HAC one-by-one via reciprocal usage of recombinase/integrase. Lastly, we introduced a fourth GLV into a HAC after simultaneous integration of three GLVs by FLP-mediated DNA recombination. The SIM system expands the applicability of HAC vectors and is useful for various biomedical studies, including cell reprogramming. PMID:25303219

  16. Integrative selection of human chromosome-specific yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, W.J.; Reeves, R.G. )

    1991-09-01

    Human specific integrative selection vectors (ISVs) were designed to optimize integration of a yeast-selectable marker specifically into yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) derived from human but not mouse DNA. ISVs were transformed into a YAC genomic library constructed from DNA of a human-mouse somatic cell hybrid containing chromosome 21 (HSA21) as the only human chromosome. One percent of the yeast in the original library contained HSA21-derived YACs; between 45% and 54% of the yeast recovered after transformation with ISV vectors contained human YACs. Integrative selection provides a rapid means of obtaining a highly enriched population of human chromosome-specific YACs by eliminating the labor-intensive steps of isolating and screening primary transformants. The procedure is biased toward the selection of YACs that contain a large number of targets for homologous recombination; thus, libraries constructed by this procedure will be composed primarily of the largest YACs in the population.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    PubMed

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  18. B chromosomes: the troubles of integration.

    PubMed

    Granado, N; Rebollo, E; Sánchez, F J; Arana, P

    2004-01-01

    Starting with a spontaneous B-A centric fusion found in a natural population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, we have obtained different strains carrying the rearrangement in various conditions and doses. Using this material, we have analyzed the meiotic behavior of the translocated chromosome in living cultured spermatocytes, simulating the successive steps of a hypothetical process of integration of a B chromosome into the standard genome via B-A centric fusion. Remarkably, the behavior of fusion heterozygotes, the initial step of the integration process, is much more regular than that of any other configuration, including homozygotes. The reasons for the failure of B chromosome integration into the normal complement by translocation are discussed. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  20. Transcription termination maintains chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Robert S; Gottesman, Max E

    2011-01-11

    DNA replication fork movement is impeded by collisions with transcription elongation complexes (TEC). We propose that a critical function of transcription termination factors is to prevent TEC from blocking DNA replication and inducing replication fork arrest, one consequence of which is DNA double-strand breaks. We show that inhibition of Rho-dependent transcription termination by bicyclomycin in Escherichia coli induced double-strand breaks. Cells deleted for Rho-cofactors nusA and nusG were hypersensitive to bicyclomycin, and had extensive chromosome fragmentation even in the absence of the drug. An RNA polymerase mutation that destabilizes TEC (rpoB*35) increased bicyclomycin resistance >40-fold. Double-strand break formation depended on DNA replication, and can be explained by replication fork collapse. Deleting recombination genes required for replication fork repair (recB and ruvC) increased sensitivity to bicyclomycin, as did loss of the replication fork reloading helicases rep and priA. We propose that Rho responds to a translocating replisome by releasing obstructing TEC.

  1. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of the phylogenetic distribution and chromosomal insertion sites of five IS6110 elements in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: non-random integration in the dnaA-dnaN region.

    PubMed

    Kurepina, N E; Sreevatsan, S; Plikaytis, B B; Bifani, P J; Connell, N D; Donnelly, R J; van Sooligen, D; Musser, J M; Kreiswirth, B N

    1998-01-01

    Five IS6110 chromosomal insertion sites were characterized in the multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis 'W' strain. To use insertion site probes to study the phylogenetic distribution of IS6110 in the M. tuberculosis genome. A total of 722 M. tuberculosis isolates, previously genotyped using the standard IS6110 Southern blot hybridization methodology, were re-hybridized with the Region A insertion site probe and representative strains were further hybridized with the Region B and C probes. Strains were grouped on the basis of having IS6110 insertions in these different regions and their relatedness was further compared by sequencing the IS6110 insertion sites. The insertion site probes revealed that the collection of Chinese isolates previously grouped as the Beijing strain family shared IS6110 insertions in common with the W and other genotypic group 1 strains. Unexpectedly, we found that IS6110 integrated at least 10 independent times between the dnaA and dnaN genes encoding deoxyribonucleic acid replication proteins. IS6110 insertion site mapping is able to identify genetic relatedness among a collection of M. tuberculosis clinical strains representing the breadth of species diversity. The mapping data indicate that IS6110 insertion sites are not always random.

  3. Transgene integration and chromosome alterations in two transgenic lines of tritordeum.

    PubMed

    Barro, F; Martín, A; Cabrera, A

    2003-01-01

    Plants from two transgenic lines of tritordeum (an amphiploid between Triticum turgidum cv. durum and Hordeumn chilense) have been analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize the transgene integration sites and chromosome rearrangements. Transgenic lines were transformed in two different events with the genes encoding for the high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), 1Ax1 and/or 1Dx5. Three integration sites and four translocations were detected. All three integration sites were located on chromosome segments of Hordeum chilense translocated into wheat chromosomes. No translocations from wheat into H. chilense chromosomes were observed. Both HMW-GS transgenes were expressed at high levels in the endosperm of transgenic plants. The analysis by FISH of transgenic plants allowed the early detection of homozygous and heterozygous plants. The consequences and implications of translocations on breeding are discussed.

  4. Transcriptionally Active Regions Are the Preferred Targets for Chromosomal HPV Integration in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Schmitz, Martina; Dürst, Matthias; Hovig, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is regarded as a determining event in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanism for integration, and the role of integration in stimulating cancer progression, is not fully characterized. Although integration sites are reported to appear randomly distributed over all chromosomes, fragile sites, translocation break points and transcriptionally active regions have all been suggested as being preferred sites for integration. In addition, more recent studies have reported integration events occurring within or surrounding essential cancer-related genes, raising the question whether these may reflect key events in the molecular genesis of HPV induced carcinomas. In a search for possible common denominators of the integration sites, we utilized the chromosomal coordinates of 121 viral-cellular fusion transcripts, and examined for statistical overrepresentation of integration sites with various features of ENCODE chromatin information data, using the Genomic HyperBrowser. We find that integration sites coincide with DNA that is transcriptionally active in mucosal epithelium, as judged by the relationship of integration sites to DNase hypersensitivity and H3K4me3 methylation data. Finding an association between integration and transcription is highly informative with regard to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the integration process. These results suggest that integration is an early event in carcinogenesis, more than a late product of chromosomal instability. If the viral integrations were more likely to occur in destabilized regions of the DNA, a completely random distribution of the integration sites would be expected. As a by-product of integration in actively transcribing DNA, a tendency of integration in or close to genes is likely to be observed. This increases the possibility of viral signals to modulate the expression of these genes, potentially contributing to the progression towards

  5. Structural comparison of three types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec integrated in the chromosome in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Katayama, Y; Asada, K; Mori, N; Tsutsumimoto, K; Tiensasitorn, C; Hiramatsu, K

    2001-05-01

    The beta-lactam resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus is carried by a novel mobile genetic element, designated staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), identified in the chromosome of a Japanese methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain. We now report identification of two additional types of mecA-carrying genetic elements found in the MRSA strains isolated in other countries of the world. There were substantial differences in the size and nucleotide sequences between the elements and the SCCmec. However, new elements shared the chromosomal integration site with the SCCmec. Structural analysis of the new elements revealed that they possessed all of the salient features of the SCCmec: conserved terminal inverted repeats and direct repeats at the integration junction points, conserved genetic organization around the mecA gene, and the presence of cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) genes responsible for the movements of SCCmec. The elements, therefore, were considered to comprise the SCCmec family of staphylococcal mobile genetic elements together with the previously identified SCCmec. Among 38 epidemic MRSA strains isolated in 20 countries, 34 were shown to possess one of the three typical SCCmec elements on the chromosome. Our findings indicated that there are at least three distinct MRSA clones in the world with different types of SCCmec in their chromosome.

  6. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering mediated by IntA integrase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Tamayo, Rogelio; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Brom, Susana; Romero, David

    2016-06-29

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, stability, incompatibility, and copy number variance. The site-specific integrase IntA from Rhizobium etli CFN42 catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attA and attD (23 bp). This recombination is stable. The aim of this work was to develop a R. etli derivative that may be used as recipient for the integration of foreign DNA in the chromosome, adapting the IntA catalyzed site-specific recombination system. To fulfill our aim, we designed a Rhizobium etli CFN42 derivative, containing a "landing pad" (LP) integrated into the chromosome. The LP sector consists of a green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the lacZ promoter and a spectinomycin resistance gene. Between the lacZ promoter and the GFP gene we inserted an IntA attachment site, which does not affect transcription from the lac promoter. Also, a mobilizable donor vector was generated, containing an attA site and a kanamycin resistance gene; to facilitate insertion of foreign DNA, this vector also contains a multicloning site. There are no promoters flanking the multicloning site. A biparental mating protocol was used to transfer the donor vector into the landing pad strain; insertion of the donor vector into the landing pad sector via IntA-mediated attA X attA recombination thereby interrupted the expression of the green fluorescent protein, generating site-specific cointegrants. Cointegrants were easily recognized by screening for antibiotic sensitivity and lack of GFP expression, and were obtained with an efficiency of 6.18 %. Integration of foreign DNA in Rhizobium, lacking any similarity with the genome, can be easily achieved by IntA-mediated recombination. This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for creating and isolating integrants.

  7. Site-specific genetic engineering of the Anopheles gambiae Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Federica; Galizi, Roberto; Menichelli, Miriam; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Dritsou, Vicky; Marois, Eric; Crisanti, Andrea; Windbichler, Nikolai

    2014-05-27

    Despite its function in sex determination and its role in driving genome evolution, the Y chromosome remains poorly understood in most species. Y chromosomes are gene-poor, repeat-rich and largely heterochromatic and therefore represent a difficult target for genetic engineering. The Y chromosome of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae appears to be involved in sex determination although very little is known about both its structure and function. Here, we characterize a transgenic strain of this mosquito species, obtained by transposon-mediated integration of a transgene construct onto the Y chromosome. Using meganuclease-induced homologous repair we introduce a site-specific recombination signal onto the Y chromosome and show that the resulting docking line can be used for secondary integration. To demonstrate its utility, we study the activity of a germ-line-specific promoter when located on the Y chromosome. We also show that Y-linked fluorescent transgenes allow automated sex separation of this important vector species, providing the means to generate large single-sex populations. Our findings will aid studies of sex chromosome function and enable the development of male-exclusive genetic traits for vector control.

  8. Deciphering the Code for Retroviral Integration Target Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Federico Andrea; Hartley, Oliver; Luban, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Upon cell invasion, retroviruses generate a DNA copy of their RNA genome and integrate retroviral cDNA within host chromosomal DNA. Integration occurs throughout the host cell genome, but target site selection is not random. Each subgroup of retrovirus is distinguished from the others by attraction to particular features on chromosomes. Despite extensive efforts to identify host factors that interact with retrovirion components or chromosome features predictive of integration, little is known about how integration sites are selected. We attempted to identify markers predictive of retroviral integration by exploiting Precision-Recall methods for extracting information from highly skewed datasets to derive robust and discriminating measures of association. ChIPSeq datasets for more than 60 factors were compared with 14 retroviral integration datasets. When compared with MLV, PERV or XMRV integration sites, strong association was observed with STAT1, acetylation of H3 and H4 at several positions, and methylation of H2AZ, H3K4, and K9. By combining peaks from ChIPSeq datasets, a supermarker was identified that localized within 2 kB of 75% of MLV proviruses and detected differences in integration preferences among different cell types. The supermarker predicted the likelihood of integration within specific chromosomal regions in a cell-type specific manner, yielding probabilities for integration into proto-oncogene LMO2 identical to experimentally determined values. The supermarker thus identifies chromosomal features highly favored for retroviral integration, provides clues to the mechanism by which retrovirus integration sites are selected, and offers a tool for predicting cell-type specific proto-oncogene activation by retroviruses. PMID:21124862

  9. DNA Secondary Structure at Chromosomal Fragile Sites in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G; Lehman, Christine E; Pierce, Levi C. T; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures that can interfere with normal cellular processes, and many of these structures have been associated with neurological diseases and cancer. Secondary structure-forming sequences are often found at chromosomal fragile sites, which are hotspots for sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal translocations, and deletions. Structures formed at fragile sites can lead to instability by disrupting normal cellular processes such as DNA replication and transcription. The instability caused by disruption of replication and transcription can lead to DNA breakage, resulting in gene rearrangements and deletions that cause disease. In this review, we discuss the role of DNA secondary structure at fragile sites in human disease. PMID:25937814

  10. Structure of the chromosomal insertion site for pSAM2: functional analysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raynal, A; Tuphile, K; Gerbaud, C; Luther, T; Guérineau, M; Pernodet, J L

    1998-04-01

    The element pSAM2 from Streptomyces ambofaciens integrates into the chromosome through site-specific recombination between the element (attP) and the chromosomal (attB) sites. These regions share an identity segment of 58bp extending from the anti-codon loop through the 3' end of a tRNA(Pro) gene. To facilitate the study of the attB site, the int and xis genes, expressed from an inducible promoter, and attP from pSAM2 were cloned on plasmids in Escherichia coil. Compatible plasmids carrying the different attB regions to be tested were introduced in these E. coli strains. Under these conditions, Int alone could promote site-specific integration; Int and Xis were both required for site-specific excision. This experimental system was used to study the sequences required in attB for efficient site-specific recombination. A 26 bp sequence, centred on the anti-codon loop region and not completely included in the identity segment, retained all the functionality of attB; shorter sequences allowed integration with lower efficiencies. By comparing the 26-bp-long attB with attP, according to the Lambda model, we propose that B and B', C and C' core-type Int binding sites consist of 9 bp imperfect inverted repeats separated by a 5 bp overlap region.

  11. Epigenetic assembly of centromeric chromatin at ectopic alpha-satellite sites on human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Megumi; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the mechanism of chromatin assembly at human centromeres, we isolated cultured human cell lines in which a transfected alpha-satellite (alphoid) YAC was integrated ectopically into the terminal region of host chromosome 16, where it was stably maintained. Centromere activity of the alphoid YAC was suppressed at ectopic locations on the host chromosome, as indicated by the absent or reduced assembly of CENP-A and -C. However, long-term culture in selective medium, or short-term treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA), promoted the re-assembly of CENPA, -B and -C at the YAC site and the release of minichromosomes containing the YAC integration site. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses of the re-formed minichromosome and the alphoid YAC-based stable human artificial chromosome both indicated that CENP-A and CENP-B assembled only on the inserted alphoid array but not on the YAC arms. On the YAC arms at the alphoid YAC integration sites, TSA treatment increased both the acetylation level of histone H3 and the transcriptional level of a marker gene. An increase in the level of transcription was also observed after long-term culture in selective medium. These activities, which are associated with changes in chromatin structure, might reverse the suppressed chromatin state of the YAC at ectopic loci, and thus might be involved in the epigenetic change of silent centromeres on ectopic alphoid loci.

  12. Lambda Red recombinase-mediated integration of the high molecular weight DNA into the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-10-05

    Escherichia coli K-12 is a frequently used host for a number of synthetic biology and biotechnology applications and chassis for the development of the minimal cell factories. Novel approaches for integrating high molecular weight DNA into the E. coli chromosome would therefore greatly facilitate engineering efforts in this bacterium. We developed a reliable and flexible lambda Red recombinase-based system, which utilizes overlapping DNA fragments for integration of the high molecular weight DNA into the E. coli chromosome. Our chromosomal integration strategy can be used to integrate high molecular weight DNA of variable length into any non-essential locus in the E. coli chromosome. Using this approach we integrated 15 kb DNA encoding sucrose catabolism and lactose metabolism and transport operons into the fliK locus of the flagellar region 3b in the E. coli K12 MG1655 chromosome. Furthermore, with this system we integrated 50 kb of Bacillus subtilis 168 DNA into two target sites in the E. coli K12 MG1655 chromosome. The chromosomal integrations into the fliK locus occurred with high efficiency, inhibited motility, and did not have a negative effect on the growth of E. coli. In addition to the rational design of synthetic biology devices, our high molecular weight DNA chromosomal integration system will facilitate metabolic and genome-scale engineering of E. coli.

  13. Integrating risks at contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.; Habegger, L.; Nieves, L.; Schreiber, Z.; Travis, C.

    2000-02-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for a number of large sites across the country that were radioactively and chemically contaminated by past nuclear research, development, and production activities. Multiple risk assessments are being conducted for these sites to evaluate current conditions and determine what measures are needed to protect human health and the environment from today through the long term. Integrating the risks associated with multiple contaminants in different environmental media across extensive areas, over time periods that extend beyond 1,000 years, and for a number of different impact categories--from human health and ecological to social and economic--represents a considerable challenge. A central element of these integrated analyses is the ability to reflect key interrelationships among environmental resources and human communities that may be adversely affected by the actions or inactions being considered for a given site. Complicating the already difficult task of integrating many kinds of risk is the importance of reflecting the diverse values and preferences brought to bear by the multiple parties interested in the risk analysis process and outcome. An initial conceptual framework has been developed to provide an organized structure to this risk integration, with the aim of supporting effective environmental management decisions. This paper highlights key issues associated with comprehensive risk integration and offers suggestions developed from preliminary work at a complex DOE site.

  14. Analysis of chromosomal integration and deletions of yeast plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Philippsen, P; Davis, R W

    1977-01-01

    Plasmid DNAs from six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared. Three different plasmids were found, designated Scp 1, Scp 2 and Scp 3, with monomer lengths of 6.19, 6.06 and 5.97 kilobases as referenced to sequenced phiX174 DNA. DNA from each of the plasmids was inserted into a lambda vector DNA. Hybrid phage containing inserted DNA of the desired size were enriched by genetic selection and their DNAs analysed by rapid techniques. All three plasmids share the same organization, two unique sequences separated by two inverted repeats, and share basically the same DNA sequences. Scp 2 and Scp 3 differ from Scp 1 by missing a unique HpaI site and by having small overlapping deletions in the same region. The HpaI site in Scp 1 is, therefore, in a nonessential region and suitable for insertion of foreign DNA in the potential use of the yeast plasmid as a vector. Hybridization of labelled cloned plasmid DNA to restriction fragments of linear yeast DNA separated on agarose gels showed that the plasmid DNA was not stably integrated into the yeast chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:331256

  15. Chromosome engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using a site-specific recombination system of a yeast plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, H; Nakajima, R; Nishiyama, J; Araki, H; Oshima, Y

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an effective method to delete or invert a chromosomal segment and to create reciprocal recombination between two nonhomologous chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using the site-specific recombination system of pSR1, a circular cryptic DNA plasmid resembling 2 microns DNA of S. cerevisiae but originating from another yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. A 2.1-kilobase-pair DNA fragment bearing the specific recombination site on the inverted repeats of pSR1 was inserted at target sites on a single or two different chromosomes of S. cerevisiae by using integrative vectors. The cells were then transformed with a plasmid bearing the R gene of pSR1, which encodes the site-specific recombination enzyme and is placed downstream of the GAL1 promoter. When the transformants were cultivated in galactose medium, the recombination enzyme produced by expression of the R gene created the modified chromosome(s) by recombination between two specific recombination sites inserted on the chromosome(s). Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:2404945

  16. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  17. Chromosomal fragile site, FRA16A: Implications for fragile site genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.I.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Mangelsdorf, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile sites are chemically induced non-staining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. The fragile sites sequenced to date (FRAXA and FRAXE) are rare, folate sensitive sites located on the X chromosomes. They have similar DNA sequence composition of a p(CCG)n repeat adjacent to a methylatable CpG island. Individuals expressing the fragile site have an unstable expanded repeat and methylation of the adjacent CpG island. FRAXA is associated with the most common form of familial mental retardation, Fragile X Syndrome. In order to further understand the relationship between the DNA sequence composition, position in the genome, and the chemistry of induction of fragile sites, we have characterized the rare, folate sensitive fragile site on human chromosome 16 referred to as FRA16A. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)n repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile-site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting) which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis. We have analyzed the normal repeat copy numbers for the fragile site p(CCG)n repeats in European, Japanese and Indian populations. While the FRAXA and FRAXE repeats show similar distributions of copy numbers, the FRA16A p(CCG)n repeat in Europeans has a greater range and number of alleles (23.7% have n>25) than its Japanese and Indian counterparts. In conjunction with our previous data demonstrating linkage disequilibrium (founder chromosomes) at the FRAXA locus, these data suggest that certain p(CCG)n repeats are inherently unstable.

  18. Meiotic recombination cold spots in chromosomal cohesion sites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kugou, Kazuto; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Mura, Sachiko; Ikeda, Sho; Innan, Hideki; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Meiotic chromosome architecture called 'axis-loop structures' and histone modifications have been shown to regulate the Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger meiotic recombination. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses followed by deep sequencing, we compared the genome-wide distribution of the axis protein Rec8 (the kleisin subunit of meiotic cohesin) with that of oligomeric DNA covalently bound to Spo11, indicative of DSB sites. The frequency of DSB sites is overall constant between Rec8 binding sites. However, DSB cold spots are observed in regions spanning ±0.8 kb around Rec8 binding sites. The axis-associated cold spots are not due to the exclusion of Spo11 localization from the axis, because ChIP experiments showed that substantial Spo11 persists at Rec8 binding sites during DSB formation. Spo11 fused with Gal4 DNA binding domain (Gal4BD-Spo11) tethered in close proximity (≤0.8 kb) to Rec8 binding sites hardly forms meiotic DSBs, in contrast with other regions. In addition, H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) remarkably decreases at Rec8 binding sites. These results suggest that reduced histone H3K4me3 in combination with inactivation of Spo11 activity on the axis discourages DSB hot spot formation.

  19. Identification and Validation of Novel Chromosomal Integration and Expression Loci in Escherichia coli Flagellar Region 1

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a chassis for a number of Synthetic Biology applications. The lack of suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci is among the main hurdles of the E. coli engineering efforts. We identified and validated chromosomal integration and expression target sites within E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1. We analyzed five open reading frames of the flagellar region 1, flgA, flgF, flgG, flgI, and flgJ, that are well-conserved among commonly-used E. coli strains, such as MG1655, W3110, DH10B and BL21-DE3. The efficiency of the integration into the E. coli chromosome and the expression of the introduced genetic circuit at the investigated loci varied significantly. The integrations did not have a negative impact on growth; however, they completely abolished motility. From the investigated E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1, flgA and flgG are the most suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci. PMID:25816013

  20. Preferential Transposition of Drosophila P Elements to Nearby Chromosomal Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tower, J.; Karpen, G. H.; Craig, N.; Spradling, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Two different schemes were used to demonstrate that Drosophila P elements preferentially transpose into genomic regions close to their starting sites. A starting element with weak rosy(+) marker gene expression was mobilized from its location in the subtelomeric region of the 1,300-kb Dp1187 minichromosome. Among progeny lines with altered rosy(+) expression, a much higher than expected frequency contained new insertions on Dp1187. Terminal deficiencies were also recovered frequently. In a second screen, a rosy(+)-marked element causing a lethal mutation of the cactus gene was mobilized in male and female germlines, and viable revertant chromosomes were recovered that still contained a rosy(+) gene due to an intrachromosomal transposition. New transpositions recovered using both methods were mapped between 0 and 128 kb from the starting site. Our results suggested that some mechanism elevates the frequency 43-67-fold with which a P element inserts near its starting site. Local transposition is likely to be useful for enhancing the rate of insertional mutation within predetermined regions of the genome. PMID:8382177

  1. Dual roles for the telomeric repeats in chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6.

    PubMed

    Ohye, Tamae; Inagaki, Hidehito; Ihira, Masaru; Higashimoto, Yuki; Kato, Koji; Oikawa, Junko; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Niizuma, Takahiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2014-04-02

    Approximately 1 percent of healthy individuals carry human herpesvirus-6 within a host chromosome. This is referred to as chromosomally integrated herpesvirus-6 (CIHHV-6). In this study, we investigated the chromosomal integration site in six individuals harboring CIHHV-6B. Using FISH, we found that HHV-6B signals are consistently located at the telomeric region. The proximal endpoints of the integrated virus were mapped at one of two telomere-repeat-like sequences (TRSs) within the DR-R in all cases. In two cases, we isolated junction fragments between the viral TRS and human telomere repeats. The distal endpoints were mapped at the distal TRS in all cases. The size of the distal TRS was found to be ~5 kb which is sufficient to fulfill cellular telomeric functions. We conclude that the viral TRS in the DR regions fulfill dual functions for CIHHV-6: homology-mediated integration into the telomeric region of the chromosome and neo-telomere formation that is then stably transmitted.

  2. Integration of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) linkage and chromosomal maps.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, A; Vallejos, C E; Bachmair, A; Schweizer, D

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation of pooled, closely linked RFLP markers was used to integrate the genetic linkage map and the mitotic chromosome map of the common bean. Pooled RFLP probes showed clear and reproducible signals and allowed the assignment of all linkage groups to the chromosomes of two Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars, Saxa and Calima. Low extension values for signals originating from clustered RFLPs suggest that these clones are physically close to each other and that clusters in the genetic map are not a result of suppression of recombination due to the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements. For linkage group K, clustering of markers could be associated with proximity to centromeres. High variation in the number of 45S rDNA loci was observed among cultivars, suggesting that these terminal sites are highly recombinogenic in common bean.

  3. Genomic Structure and Evolution of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions on Other Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13–2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%–99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ∼100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: T. Newman, C. Harris, and J. Young.] PMID:12421751

  4. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.T.; Knight, S.J.L.; Peters, J.F.; Stayton, C.L.; Consalez, G.G.; Zhang, F. )

    1990-05-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT{sup {minus}}, G6PD{sup +} phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28.

  5. [Development of genetically stable recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using combinational chromosomal integration].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Qi; Zhao, Xinqing; Liu, Haijun; Hu, Shiyang; Ma, Zhongyi; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal integration enables stable phenotype and therefore has become an important strategy for breeding of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. pAUR135 is a plasmid that enables recycling use of antibiotic selection marker, and once attached with designated homologous sequences, integration vector for stable expression can be constructed. Development of S. cerevisiae strains by metabolic engineering normally demands overexpression of multiple genes, and employing pAUR135 plasmid, it is possible to construct S. cerevisiae strains by combinational integration of multiple genes in multiple sites, which results in different ratios of expressions of these genes. Xylose utilization pathway was taken as an example, with three pAUR135-based plasmids carrying three xylose assimilation genes constructed in this study. The three genes were sequentially integrated on the chromosome of S. cerevisiae by combinational integration. Xylose utilization rate was improved 24.4%-35.5% in the combinational integration strain comparing with that of the control strain with all the three genes integrated in one location. Strain improvement achieved by combinational integration is a novel method to manipulate multiple genes for genetic engineering of S. cerevisiae, and the recombinant strains are free of foreign sequences and selection markers. In addition, stable phenotype can be maintained, which is important for breeding of industrial strains. Therefore, combinational integration employing pAUR135 is a novel method for metabolic engineering of industrial S. cerevisiae strains.

  6. Integrating multi-omic features exploiting Chromosome Conformation Capture data.

    PubMed

    Merelli, Ivan; Tordini, Fabio; Drocco, Maurizio; Aldinucci, Marco; Liò, Pietro; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The representation, integration, and interpretation of omic data is a complex task, in particular considering the huge amount of information that is daily produced in molecular biology laboratories all around the world. The reason is that sequencing data regarding expression profiles, methylation patterns, and chromatin domains is difficult to harmonize in a systems biology view, since genome browsers only allow coordinate-based representations, discarding functional clusters created by the spatial conformation of the DNA in the nucleus. In this context, recent progresses in high throughput molecular biology techniques and bioinformatics have provided insights into chromatin interactions on a larger scale and offer a formidable support for the interpretation of multi-omic data. In particular, a novel sequencing technique called Chromosome Conformation Capture allows the analysis of the chromosome organization in the cell's natural state. While performed genome wide, this technique is usually called Hi-C. Inspired by service applications such as Google Maps, we developed NuChart, an R package that integrates Hi-C data to describe the chromosomal neighborhood starting from the information about gene positions, with the possibility of mapping on the achieved graphs genomic features such as methylation patterns and histone modifications, along with expression profiles. In this paper we show the importance of the NuChart application for the integration of multi-omic data in a systems biology fashion, with particular interest in cytogenetic applications of these techniques. Moreover, we demonstrate how the integration of multi-omic data can provide useful information in understanding why genes are in certain specific positions inside the nucleus and how epigenetic patterns correlate with their expression.

  7. A simple cytogenetic method to detect chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6.

    PubMed

    Ohye, Tamae; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Hidehito; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    Some healthy individuals carry human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) within a host chromosome, which is called inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6). Because iciHHV-6 is generally considered a non-pathogenic condition, it is important to distinguish iciHHV-6 from HHV-6 reactivation in immunocompromised hosts because both conditions manifest high copy numbers of the HHV-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a reliable method for the diagnosis of iciHHV-6, HHV-6-specific FISH probes are not commercially available. In our present study, we established a simple PCR-based method for producing FISH probes that can detect the chromosomal integration site of iciHHV-6 at high sensitivity. Using these probes, we confirmed that HHV-6 signals were consistently located at the telomeric region in all of the 13 iciHHV-6 individuals examined. Interestingly, in all seven Japanese iciHHV-6A patients, signals were detected exclusively on chromosome 22q. This method provides a simple and fast approach for iciHHV-6 diagnosis in the clinical laboratory.

  8. Insertion of transformation vector DNA into different chromosomal sites of Dictyostelium discoideum as determined by pulse field electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cole, R A; Williams, K L

    1988-06-10

    Chromosomes of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum were fractionated on three pulse field gel electrophoresis systems (pulse field, orthogonal field and C.H.E.F. (Contour-clamped Homogeneous Electric Fields] into a series of 13 bands ranging from 0.1 Mb to over 2 Mb in size. Since this organism has only seven chromosomes (estimated to be 1-10 Mb), and -90 copies of an 88-kilobase linear ribosomal DNA molecule (14% of genome), it was apparent that not all of these bands were whole chromosomes. However these bands were reproducibly obtained with the cell preparation used. They fell into three categories: i) four large poorly resolved DNA molecules (-2 Mb in size) which represent very large fragments or intact chromosomes, ii) eight faint bands ranging from 0.1 Mb to 2 Mb, iii) a prominent band in the apparent size range of about 0.15 Mb. Cloned Fragment V of an EcoR1 digest of the ribosomal DNA, hybridized to the 0.15 Mb band indicating it contained the linear ribosomal DNA. This chromosomal banding pattern was used to examine the stability and location of vector DNA in 16 transformed strains of D. discoideum. Each transformed strain was initially selected on the basis of G418 resistance with an integrating vector containing pBR322 sequences. Eleven transformants still carried pBR322 sequences after more than 60 generations of growth without selection on G418. All four strains transformed with constructs containing regions of the D. discoideum plasmid Ddp1 had lost their pBR322 insert, indicating that integration of Dictyostelium plasmid DNA into chromosomes leads to instability. Orthogonal field electrophoresis of the eleven strains still carrying pBR322 sequences revealed at least seven different integrating sites for the transforming DNA. We conclude that these vectors have many possible sites of integration in the D. discoideum genome.

  9. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  10. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-O; Brown, R A; Razonable, R R

    2012-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is unique among human herpesviruses because of its ability to integrate into chromosomes. This entity, termed chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (CIHHV-6), is often mistaken for active infection and treated unnecessarily. The clinical significance of CIHHV-6 in transplant recipients is not defined. Herein, the clinical characteristics of 7 liver transplant patients with CIHHV-6 from our recent study, together with 14 other published cases of CIHHV-6 were reviewed. Of the 21 cases, CIHHV-6B was reported most commonly among solid organ transplant recipients, while CIHHV-6A was mostly seen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients. None of the 21 patients developed clinical symptoms related to HHV-6 after transplantation. However, antiviral therapy was administered to 5 asymptomatic patients mistaken to have HHV-6 infection because of their very high HHV-6 DNA levels, 3 who developed symptomatic cytomegalovirus disease, and 1 with graft-versus-host disease that was mistaken for HHV-6 infection. In patients who received antiviral therapy, there was no apparent decline in HHV-6 DNA load, although change in viral kinetics is difficult to discern in the setting of high baseline HHV-6 DNA load. Clinicians should be aware of this entity of CIHHV-6 so that antiviral therapy can be considered in the proper clinical context.

  11. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J; Simard, Jacques; Velásquez-García, Héctor A; Spinelli, John J; Flamand, Louis

    2017-03-01

    Background: Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (iciHHV-6) is a condition observed in approximately 1% of the population. Whether such a genetic alteration predisposes to cancer development in currently unknown. Two studies were conducted to determine whether iciHHV-6 is associated with cancer development.Methods: First, a screen of 19,597 people from the province of Quebec (Canada) was conducted. A replication test, using data from a population-based case-control study of 1,090 women with incident breast cancer and 1,053 controls from British Columbia and Ontario (Canada) was conducted. DNA samples were analyzed by qPCR and droplet digital PCR to identify iciHHV-6(+) carriers.Results: In the initial study, a potential association between iciHHV-6 positivity and breast cancer was identified [OR = 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.95-7.44]. In the replication dataset, no association was found between iciHHV-6 positivity in women and breast cancer (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.35-2.15).Conclusions: We found no statistically significant associations between inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 and breast cancer in women.Impact: These results do not provide evidence to suggest that iciHHV-6 is a risk factor for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 425-7. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  13. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  14. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  15. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  16. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fuminori; Wu, Jianzhong; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Katagiri, Satoshi; Karasawa, Wataru; Kaneko, Satoko; Watanabe, Shota; Sakaguchi, Toyotaka; Hanawa, Yumiko; Fujisawa, Hiroko; Kurita, Kanako; Abe, Chikako; Iehisa, Julio C M; Ohno, Ryoko; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Mukai, Yoshiyuki; Hamada, Masao; Saito, Mika; Ishikawa, Goro; Katayose, Yuichi; Endo, Takashi R; Takumi, Shigeo; Nakamura, Toshiki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Ogihara, Yasunari; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Doležel, Jaroslav; Nasuda, Shuhei; Matsumoto, Takashi; Handa, Hirokazu

    2015-08-12

    A complete genome sequence is an essential tool for the genetic improvement of wheat. Because the wheat genome is large, highly repetitive and complex due to its allohexaploid nature, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) chose a strategy that involves constructing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical maps of individual chromosomes and performing BAC-by-BAC sequencing. Here, we report the construction of a physical map of chromosome 6B with the goal of revealing the structural features of the third largest chromosome in wheat. We assembled 689 informative BAC contigs (hereafter reffered to as contigs) representing 91% of the entire physical length of wheat chromosome 6B. The contigs were integrated into a radiation hybrid (RH) map of chromosome 6B, with one linkage group consisting of 448 loci with 653 markers. The order and direction of 480 contigs, corresponding to 87% of the total length of 6B, were determined. We also characterized the contigs that contained a part of the nucleolus organizer region or centromere based on their positions on the RH map and the assembled BAC clone sequences. Analysis of the virtual gene order along 6B using the information collected for the integrated map revealed the presence of several chromosomal rearrangements, indicating evolutionary events that occurred on chromosome 6B. We constructed a reliable physical map of chromosome 6B, enabling us to analyze its genomic structure and evolutionary progression. More importantly, the physical map should provide a high-quality and map-based reference sequence that will serve as a resource for wheat chromosome 6B.

  17. Chromatin Folding, Fragile Sites, and Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Low- and High- LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cox, Bradley; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated non-random distributions of breaks involved in chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation. To investigate the factors contributing to the break point distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome in separate colors. After the images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multimega base pair scale. Specific locations of the chromosome, in interphase, were also analyzed with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Both mBAND and BAC studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested association of interphase chromatin folding to the radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. We further investigated the distribution of genes, as well as the distribution of breaks found in tumor cells. Comparisons of these distributions to the radiation hotspots showed that some of the radiation hotspots coincide with the frequent breaks found in solid tumors and with the fragile sites for other environmental toxins. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including the chromatin structure and the gene distribution, can contribute to radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  18. Integrated microfluidics for chromosome engineering--preparation, transportation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Takahashi, Katsunori; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2002-12-01

    The design and fabrication process of microfluidics for chromosome transportation and manipulation are described. Micro-channels for fluid networks could be built on single-crystal silicon substrates by anisotropic wet etching. After injection of a chromosome-containing buffer solution into the channels by a mechanical pump, chromosome electrophoresis was carried out for its precise transportation. The behavior of chromosomes placed in direct (DC) and alternating (AC) electric fields is explained in detail. The frequency and size dependent amplitude of the chromosome observed in this study showed the existence of inertial hydrodynamic effects in an oscillatory motion. Using a rotating AC electric field, chromosomes could be rotated due to the induced polarization of surface charge and electric double layer of the chromosomes. This study thus shows the possibility of chromosome engineering on microchips, which is expected to enable the development of new devices for chromosome research.

  19. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, S T; Knight, S J; Peters, J F; Stayton, C L; Consalez, G G; Zhang, F P

    1990-01-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT-,G6PD+ phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28. These somatic cell hybrids, containing Xq27.3-qter as the sole human DNA, will aid the search for DNA associated with the fragile X site and will augment the high resolution genomic analysis of Xq28, including the identification of candidate genes for genetic-disease loci mapping to this region. Images PMID:2339126

  20. Hanford site integrated pest management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, R.F.

    1996-04-09

    The Hanford Site Integrated Pest Management Plan (HSIPMP) defines the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) decision process and subsequent strategies by which pest problems are to be solved at all Hanford Site properties per DOE-RL Site Infrastructure Division memo (WHC 9505090). The HSIPMP defines the roles that contractor organizations play in supporting the IPM process. In short the IPM process anticipates and prevents pest activity and infestation by combining several strategies to achieve long-term pest control solutions.

  1. Fragile sites, dysfunctional telomere and chromosome fusions: What is 5S rDNA role?

    PubMed

    Barros, Alain Victor; Wolski, Michele Andressa Vier; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2017-04-15

    Repetitive DNA regions are known as fragile chromosomal sites which present a high flexibility and low stability. Our focus was characterize fragile sites in 5S rDNA regions. The Ancistrus sp. species shows a diploid number of 50 and an indicative Robertsonian fusion at chromosomal pair 1. Two sequences of 5S rDNA were identified: 5S.1 rDNA and 5S.2 rDNA. The first sequence gathers the necessary structures to gene expression and shows a functional secondary structure prediction. Otherwise, the 5S.2 rDNA sequence does not contain the upstream sequences that are required to expression, furthermore its structure prediction reveals a nonfunctional ribosomal RNA. The chromosomal mapping revealed several 5S.1 and 5S.2 rDNA clusters. In addition, the 5S.2 rDNA clusters were found in acrocentric and metacentric chromosomes proximal regions. The pair 1 5S.2 rDNA cluster is co-located with interstitial telomeric sites (ITS). Our results indicate that its clusters are hotspots to chromosomal breaks. During the meiotic prophase bouquet arrangement, double strand breaks (DSBs) at proximal 5S.2 rDNA of acrocentric chromosomes could lead to homologous and non-homologous repair mechanisms as Robertsonian fusions. Still, ITS sites provides chromosomal instability, resulting in telomeric recombination via TRF2 shelterin protein and a series of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Our proposal is that 5S rDNA derived sequences, act as chromosomal fragile sites in association with some chromosomal rearrangements of Loricariidae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. FISH-Based Analysis of Clonally Derived CHO Cell Populations Reveals High Probability for Transgene Integration in a Terminal Region of Chromosome 1 (1q13)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwei; Gao, Xiaoping; Peng, Rui; Zhang, Sheng; Fu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A basic goal in the development of recombinant proteins is the generation of cell lines that express the desired protein stably over many generations. Here, we constructed engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO-S) with a pCHO-hVR1 vector that carried an extracellular domain of a VEGF receptor (VR) fusion gene. Forty-five clones with high hVR1 expression were selected for karyotype analysis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and G-banding, we found that pCHO-hVR1 was integrated into three chromosomes, including chromosomes 1, Z3 and Z4. Four clones were selected to evaluate their productivity under non-fed, non-optimized shake flask conditions. The results showed that clones 1 and 2 with integration sites on chromosome 1 revealed high levels of hVR1 products (shake flask of approximately 800 mg/L), whereas clones 3 and 4 with integration sites on chromosomes Z3 or Z4 had lower levels of hVR1 products. Furthermore, clones 1 and 2 maintained their productivity stabilities over a continuous period of 80 generations, and clones 3 and 4 showed significant declines in their productivities in the presence of selection pressure. Finally, pCHO-hVR1 localized to the same region at chromosome 1q13, the telomere region of normal chromosome 1. In this study, these results demonstrate that the integration of exogenous hVR1 gene on chromosome 1, band q13, may create a high protein-producing CHO-S cell line, suggesting that chromosome 1q13 may contain a useful target site for the high expression of exogenous protein. This study shows that the integration into the target site of chromosome 1q13 may avoid the problems of random integration that cause gene silencing or also overcome position effects, facilitating exogenous gene expression in CHO-S cells. PMID:27684722

  3. FISH-Based Analysis of Clonally Derived CHO Cell Populations Reveals High Probability for Transgene Integration in a Terminal Region of Chromosome 1 (1q13).

    PubMed

    Li, Shengwei; Gao, Xiaoping; Peng, Rui; Zhang, Sheng; Fu, Wei; Zou, Fangdong

    A basic goal in the development of recombinant proteins is the generation of cell lines that express the desired protein stably over many generations. Here, we constructed engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO-S) with a pCHO-hVR1 vector that carried an extracellular domain of a VEGF receptor (VR) fusion gene. Forty-five clones with high hVR1 expression were selected for karyotype analysis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and G-banding, we found that pCHO-hVR1 was integrated into three chromosomes, including chromosomes 1, Z3 and Z4. Four clones were selected to evaluate their productivity under non-fed, non-optimized shake flask conditions. The results showed that clones 1 and 2 with integration sites on chromosome 1 revealed high levels of hVR1 products (shake flask of approximately 800 mg/L), whereas clones 3 and 4 with integration sites on chromosomes Z3 or Z4 had lower levels of hVR1 products. Furthermore, clones 1 and 2 maintained their productivity stabilities over a continuous period of 80 generations, and clones 3 and 4 showed significant declines in their productivities in the presence of selection pressure. Finally, pCHO-hVR1 localized to the same region at chromosome 1q13, the telomere region of normal chromosome 1. In this study, these results demonstrate that the integration of exogenous hVR1 gene on chromosome 1, band q13, may create a high protein-producing CHO-S cell line, suggesting that chromosome 1q13 may contain a useful target site for the high expression of exogenous protein. This study shows that the integration into the target site of chromosome 1q13 may avoid the problems of random integration that cause gene silencing or also overcome position effects, facilitating exogenous gene expression in CHO-S cells.

  4. PionX sites mark the X chromosome for dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Raffaella; Schauer, Tamas; Smialowski, Pawel; Straub, Tobias; Becker, Peter B

    2016-09-08

    The rules defining which small fraction of related DNA sequences can be selectively bound by a transcription factor are poorly understood. One of the most challenging tasks in DNA recognition is posed by dosage compensation systems that require the distinction between sex chromosomes and autosomes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific lethal dosage compensation complex (MSL-DCC) doubles the level of transcription from the single male X chromosome, but the nature of this selectivity is not known. Previous efforts to identify X-chromosome-specific target sequences were unsuccessful as the identified MSL recognition elements lacked discriminative power. Therefore, additional determinants such as co-factors, chromatin features, RNA and chromosome conformation have been proposed to refine targeting further. Here, using an in vitro genome-wide DNA binding assay, we show that recognition of the X chromosome is an intrinsic feature of the MSL-DCC. MSL2, the male-specific organizer of the complex, uses two distinct DNA interaction surfaces-the CXC and proline/basic-residue-rich domains-to identify complex DNA elements on the X chromosome. Specificity is provided by the CXC domain, which binds a novel motif defined by DNA sequence and shape. This motif characterizes a subclass of MSL2-binding sites, which we name PionX (pioneering sites on the X) as they appeared early during the recent evolution of an X chromosome in D. miranda and are the first chromosomal sites to be bound during de novo MSL-DCC assembly. Our data provide the first, to our knowledge, documented molecular mechanism through which the dosage compensation machinery distinguishes the X chromosome from an autosome. They highlight fundamental principles in the recognition of complex DNA elements by protein that will have a strong impact on many aspects of chromosome biology.

  5. Beyond the Chromosome: The Prevalence of Unique Extra-Chromosomal Bacteriophages with Integrated Virulence Genes in Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R.; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  6. Distribution of 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of plants: Structural and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 45S rDNA sites are the most widely documented chromosomal regions in eukaryotes. The analysis of the distribution of these sites along the chromosome in several genera has suggested some bias in their distribution. In order to evaluate if these loci are in fact non-randomly distributed and what is the influence of some chromosomal and karyotypic features on the distribution of these sites, a database was built with the position and number of 45S rDNA sites obtained by FISH together with other karyotypic data from 846 plant species. Results In angiosperms the most frequent numbers of sites per diploid karyotype were two and four, suggesting that in spite of the wide dispersion capacity of these sequences the number of rDNA sites tends to be restricted. The sites showed a preferential distribution on the short arms, mainly in the terminal regions. Curiously, these sites were frequently found on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes where they usually occupy the whole arm. The trend to occupy the terminal region is especially evident in holokinetic chromosomes, where all of them were terminally located. In polyploids there is a trend towards reduction in the number of sites per monoploid complement. In gymnosperms, however, the distribution of rDNA sites varied strongly among the sampled families. Conclusions The location of 45S rDNA sites do not vary randomly, occurring preferentially on the short arm and in the terminal region of chromosomes in angiosperms. The meaning of this preferential location is not known, but some hypotheses are considered and the observed trends are discussed. PMID:23181612

  7. Chromosome damage in wild rodents inhabiting a site contaminated with Aroclor 1254

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw-Allen, P.L.; McBee, K. )

    1993-04-01

    An in situ investigation of structural chromosomal damage in wild rodents from a site contaminated with Aroclor 1254 was undertaken to compare effects observed in nature to those documented in previous laboratory studies. Laboratory assays indicate that Aroclor 1254 does not cause structural damage to chromosomes. However, the many variables at work in actual waste-site environments and receptor populations led the authors to question whether exposures under natural conditions could potentially lead to different results using the same assay systems. Individuals of three rodent species, Peromyscus leucopus, Sigmodon hispidus, and Reithrodontomys fulvescens, were collected from the contaminated site and three matched, pristine reference sites. Standard somatic metaphase chromosome preparations from bone marrow were examined for chromosomes lesions. Comparisons were made between conspecifics from the Aroclor-contaminated site and the reference sites. Significant increases in chromosome damage were not observed in animals from the Aroclor-contaminated site, indicating agreement between laboratory assays and an in situ application of this assay system.

  8. Enhanced integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mu-En; Yeh, I-Hsin; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Chao, Yun-Peng; Ng, I-Son; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic engineering often necessitates chromosomal integration of multiple genes but integration of large genes into Escherichia coli remains difficult. CRISPR/Cas9 is an RNA-guided system which enables site-specific induction of double strand break (DSB) and programmable genome editing. Here, we hypothesized that CRISPR/Cas9-triggered DSB could enhance homologous recombination and augment integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome. We demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system was able to trigger DSB in >98% of cells, leading to subsequent cell death, and identified that mutagenic SOS response played roles in the cell survival. By optimizing experimental conditions and combining the λ-Red proteins and linear dsDNA, CRISPR/Cas9-induced DSB enabled homologous recombination of the donor DNA and replacement of lacZ gene in the MG1655 strain at efficiencies up to 99%, and allowed high fidelity, scarless integration of 2.4, 3.9, 5.4, and 7.0 kb DNA at efficiencies approaching 91%, 92%, 71%, and 61%, respectively. The CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene integration also functioned in different E. coli strains including BL21 (DE3) and W albeit at different efficiencies. Taken together, our methodology facilitated precise integration of dsDNA as large as 7 kb into E. coli with efficiencies exceeding 60%, thus significantly ameliorating the editing efficiency and overcoming the size limit of integration using the commonly adopted recombineering approach. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 172-183. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  10. Chromosome Fragile Sites in Arabidopsis Harbor Matrix Attachment Regions That May Be Associated with Ancestral Chromosome Rearrangement Events

    PubMed Central

    dela Paz, Joelle S.; Stronghill, Patti E.; Douglas, Scott J.; Saravia, Sandy; Hasenkampf, Clare A.; Riggs, C. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana condition a pleiotropic phenotype featuring defects in internode elongation, the homeotic conversion of internode to node tissue, and downward pointing flowers and pedicels. We have characterized five mutant alleles of BP, generated by EMS, fast neutrons, x-rays, and aberrant T–DNA insertion events. Curiously, all of these mutagens resulted in large deletions that range from 140 kbp to over 900 kbp just south of the centromere of chromosome 4. The breakpoints of these mutants were identified by employing inverse PCR and DNA sequencing. The south breakpoints of all alleles cluster in BAC T12G13, while the north breakpoint locations are scattered. With the exception of a microhomology at the bp-5 breakpoint, there is no homology in the junction regions, suggesting that double-stranded breaks are repaired via non-homologous end joining. Southwestern blotting demonstrated the presence of nuclear matrix binding sites in the south breakpoint cluster (SBC), which is A/T rich and possesses a variety of repeat sequences. In situ hybridization on pachytene chromosome spreads complemented the molecular analyses and revealed heretofore unrecognized structural variation between the Columbia and Landsberg erecta genomes. Data mining was employed to localize other large deletions around the HY4 locus to the SBC region and to show that chromatin modifications in the region shift from a heterochromatic to euchromatic profile. Comparisons between the BP/HY4 regions of A. lyrata and A. thaliana revealed that several chromosome rearrangement events have occurred during the evolution of these two genomes. Collectively, the features of the region are strikingly similar to the features of characterized metazoan chromosome fragile sites, some of which are associated with karyotype evolution. PMID:23284301

  11. [Homologue pairing: initiation sites and effects on crossing over and chromosome disjunction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Chubykin, V L

    1996-01-01

    The role of homologue pairing and chromocentral association of chromosomes in recombination and segregation during cell division is discussed. Peculiarities of mitotic and meiotic chromosome pairing in Drosophila males and females are considered. On the basis of our own and published data, the presence and localization of sites of homologue pairing initiation in euchromatin are substantiated. The effects of transfer of initiation sites along a chromosome (exemplified by inversions) on chromosome pairing (asynapsis), crossing over (intrachromosomal, interchromosomal, and centromeric effects), and segregation are discussed. To record the effects of pairing sites on crossing over, a method of comparing crossing-over frequencies in an inverted region with those in a region of the same size and position with regard to the centromere on cytological maps was proposed. Chromosomes orient toward opposite division poles during paracentromeric heterochromatin pairing. This occurs after successful euchromatin pairing, during which the chromocentral circular structure is reorganized. If heterochromatin pairing is disrupted because of structural or locus mutations, nonexchange bivalents segregate randomly. In this case, chromosome coordination may occur due to proximal chiasmata or chromocentral associations between homologues.

  12. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6: questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Philip E; Ablashi, Dharam V; Ambros, Peter F; Agut, Henri; Caserta, Mary T; Descamps, Vincent; Flamand, Louis; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Hall, Caroline B; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kuehl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loomis, Kristin S; Luppi, Mario; Lusso, Paolo; Medveczky, Peter G; Montoya, Jose G; Mori, Yasuko; Ogata, Masao; Pritchett, Joshua C; Rogez, Sylvie; Seto, Edward; Ward, Katherine N; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Razonable, Raymund R

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) is a condition in which the complete HHV-6 genome is integrated into the host germ line genome and is vertically transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The condition is found in less than 1% of controls in the USA and UK, but has been found at a somewhat higher prevalence in transplant recipients and other patient populations in several small studies. HHV-6 levels in whole blood that exceed 5.5 log10 copies/ml are strongly suggestive of ciHHV-6. Monitoring DNA load in plasma and serum is unreliable, both for identifying and for monitoring subjects with ciHHV-6 due to cell lysis and release of cellular DNA. High HHV-6 DNA loads associated with ciHHV-6 can lead to erroneous diagnosis of active infection. Transplant recipients with ciHHV-6 may be at increased risk for bacterial infection and graft rejection. ciHHV-6 can be induced to a state of active viral replication in vitro. It is not known whether ciHHV-6 individuals are put at clinical risk by the use of drugs that have been associated with HHV-6 reactivation in vivo or in vitro. Nonetheless, we urge careful observation when use of such drugs is indicated in individuals known to have ciHHV-6. Little is known about whether individuals with ciHHV-6 develop immune tolerance for viral proteins. Further research is needed to determine the role of ciHHV-6 in disease.

  13. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6: questions and answers

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Philip E; Ablashi, Dharam V; Ambros, Peter F; Agut, Henri; Caserta, Mary T; Descamps, Vincent; Flamand, Louis; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Hall, Caroline B; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kuehl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loomis, Kristin S; Luppi, Mario; Lusso, Paolo; Medveczky, Peter G; Montoya, Jose G; Mori, Yasuko; Ogata, Masao; Pritchett, Joshua C; Rogez, Sylvie; Seto, Edward; Ward, Katherine N; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Razonable, Raymund R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) is a condition in which the complete HHV-6 genome is integrated into the host germ line genome and is vertically transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The condition is found in less than 1% of controls in the USA and UK, but has been found at a somewhat higher prevalence in transplant recipients and other patient populations in several small studies. HHV-6 levels in whole blood that exceed 5.5 log10 copies/ml are strongly suggestive of ciHHV-6. Monitoring DNA load in plasma and serum is unreliable, both for identifying and for monitoring subjects with ciHHV-6 due to cell lysis and release of cellular DNA. High HHV-6 DNA loads associated with ciHHV-6 can lead to erroneous diagnosis of active infection. Transplant recipients with ciHHV-6 may be at increased risk for bacterial infection and graft rejection. ciHHV-6 can be induced to a state of active viral replication in vitro. It is not known whether ciHHV-6 individuals are put at clinical risk by the use of drugs that have been associated with HHV-6 reactivation in vivo or in vitro. Nonetheless, we urge careful observation when use of such drugs is indicated in individuals known to have ciHHV-6. Little is known about whether individuals with ciHHV-6 develop immune tolerance for viral proteins. Further research is needed to determine the role of ciHHV-6 in disease. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22052666

  14. Integrating genetic linkage maps with pachytene chromosome structure in maize.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lorinda K; Salameh, Naser; Bass, Hank W; Harper, Lisa C; Cande, W Z; Weber, Gerd; Stack, Stephen M

    2004-04-01

    Genetic linkage maps reveal the order of markers based on the frequency of recombination between markers during meiosis. Because the rate of recombination varies along chromosomes, it has been difficult to relate linkage maps to chromosome structure. Here we use cytological maps of crossing over based on recombination nodules (RNs) to predict the physical position of genetic markers on each of the 10 chromosomes of maize. This is possible because (1). all 10 maize chromosomes can be individually identified from spreads of synaptonemal complexes, (2). each RN corresponds to one crossover, and (3). the frequency of RNs on defined chromosomal segments can be converted to centimorgan values. We tested our predictions for chromosome 9 using seven genetically mapped, single-copy markers that were independently mapped on pachytene chromosomes using in situ hybridization. The correlation between predicted and observed locations was very strong (r(2) = 0.996), indicating a virtual 1:1 correspondence. Thus, this new, high-resolution, cytogenetic map enables one to predict the chromosomal location of any genetically mapped marker in maize with a high degree of accuracy. This novel approach can be applied to other organisms as well.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of retroviral integration site selection

    PubMed Central

    Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Sharma, Amit; Larue, Ross C.; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through an obligate integrated DNA provirus, making retroviral vectors attractive vehicles for human gene-therapy. Though most of the host cell genome is available for integration, the process of integration site selection is not random. Retroviruses differ in their choice of chromatin-associated features and also prefer particular nucleotide sequences at the point of insertion. Lentiviruses including HIV-1 preferentially integrate within the bodies of active genes, whereas the prototypical gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) favors strong enhancers and active gene promoter regions. Integration is catalyzed by the viral integrase protein, and recent research has demonstrated that HIV-1 and MoMLV targeting preferences are in large part guided by integrase-interacting host factors (LEDGF/p75 for HIV-1 and BET proteins for MoMLV) that tether viral intasomes to chromatin. In each case, the selectivity of epigenetic marks on histones recognized by the protein tether helps to determine the integration distribution. In contrast, nucleotide preferences at integration sites seem to be governed by the ability for the integrase protein to locally bend the DNA duplex for pairwise insertion of the viral DNA ends. We discuss approaches to alter integration site selection that could potentially improve the safety of retroviral vectors in the clinic. PMID:25147212

  16. A genome-wide analysis of common fragile sites: What features determine chromosomal instability in the human genome?

    PubMed Central

    Fungtammasan, Arkarachai; Walsh, Erin; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Eckert, Kristin A.; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are unstable genomic regions that break under replication stress and are involved in structural variation. They frequently are sites of chromosomal rearrangements in cancer and of viral integration. However, CFSs are undercharacterized at the molecular level and thus difficult to predict computationally. Newly available genome-wide profiling studies provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to associate CFSs with features of their local genomic contexts. Here, we contrasted the genomic landscape of cytogenetically defined aphidicolin-induced CFSs (aCFSs) to that of nonfragile sites, using multiple logistic regression. We also analyzed aCFS breakage frequencies as a function of their genomic landscape, using standard multiple regression. We show that local genomic features are effective predictors both of regions harboring aCFSs (explaining ∼77% of the deviance in logistic regression models) and of aCFS breakage frequencies (explaining ∼45% of the variance in standard regression models). In our optimal models (having highest explanatory power), aCFSs are predominantly located in G-negative chromosomal bands and away from centromeres, are enriched in Alu repeats, and have high DNA flexibility. In alternative models, CpG island density, transcription start site density, H3K4me1 coverage, and mononucleotide microsatellite coverage are significant predictors. Also, aCFSs have high fragility when colocated with evolutionarily conserved chromosomal breakpoints. Our models are predictive of the fragility of aCFSs mapped at a higher resolution. Importantly, the genomic features we identified here as significant predictors of fragility allow us to draw valuable inferences on the molecular mechanisms underlying aCFSs. PMID:22456607

  17. An improved Tn7-lux reporter for broad host range, chromosomally-integrated promoter fusions in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Lewis, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    An improved vector for chromosomally-integrated promoter-lux fusions is described. The modified vector was tested in parallel with the unmodified vector using the well-characterized E. coli araBAD promoter in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa attTn7 site. The modified mini-Tn7 showed reduced background luminescence, and increased luminescence upon induction, giving >16-fold higher induction ratio. PMID:26341612

  18. An improved Tn7-lux reporter for broad host range, chromosomally-integrated promoter fusions in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Glassing, Angela; Lewis, Thomas A

    2015-11-01

    An improved vector for chromosomally-integrated promoter-lux fusions is described. The modified vector was tested in parallel with the unmodified vector using the well-characterized Escherichia coli araBAD promoter in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa attTn7 site. The modified mini-Tn7 showed reduced background luminescence, and increased luminescence upon induction, giving >16-fold higher induction ratio.

  19. Distribution of 5S and 45S rDNA sites in plants with holokinetic chromosomes and the "chromosome field" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sousa, A; Barros e Silva, A E; Cuadrado, A; Loarce, Y; Alves, M V; Guerra, M

    2011-08-01

    Secondary constrictions or 45S rDNA sites are commonly reported to be located mainly in the terminal regions of the chromosomes. This distribution has been assumed to be related to the existence of a "chromosome field" lying between the centromere and the telomere, an area in which certain cytogenetic events may predominantly occur. If this hypothesis is true this distribution should not be observed in holokinetic chromosomes, as they do not have a localized centromere. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, a comparative study was made of the distributions of 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization in representatives of the genera Eleocharis, Diplacrum, Fimbristylis, Kyllinga and Rhynchospora, all of which belong to the family Cyperaceae. The numbers of sites per diploid chromosome complement varied from 2 to ∼10 for 5S rDNA, and from 2 to ∼45 for 45S rDNA. All of the 11 species analyzed had terminally located 45S rDNA sites on the chromosomes whereas the 5S rDNA sites also generally had terminal distributions, except for the Rhynchospora species, where their position was almost always interstitial. These results, together with other previously published data, suggest that the variation in the number and position of the rDNA sites in species with holokinetic chromosomes is non-random and similar to that reported for species with monocentric chromosomes. Therefore, the predominant terminal position of the 45S rDNA sites does not appear to be influenced by the centromere-telomere polarization as suggested by the "chromosome field" hypothesis. Additionally, the hybridization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites provides interesting markers to distinguish several chromosomes on the rather symmetrical karyotypes of Cyperaceae.

  20. Chromosome sites play dual roles to establish homologous synapsisduring meiosis in C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Amy J.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Bhalla, Needhi; Weiser,Pinky; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    required for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomesduring meiosisin C. elegans. We find that these sites play two distinctroles that contribute to proper segregation. Chromosomes lacking PCsusually fail to synapse and also lack a synapsis-independentstabilization activity. The presence of a PC on justone copy of achromosome pair promotes synapsis but does not supportsynapsis-independent pairing stabilization, indicating that thesefunctions are separable. Once initiated, synapsis is highly processive,even between non homologous chromosomes of disparate lengths, elucidatinghow translocations suppress meiotic recombination in C. elegans. Thesefindings suggest a multistep pathway for chromosome synapsis in which PCsimpart selectivity and efficiency through a kinetic proofreadingmechanism. We speculate that concentration of these activities at oneregion per chromosome may have co-evolved with the loss of a pointcentromere to safeguard karyotype stability.

  1. Casposon integration shows strong target site preference and recapitulates protospacer integration by CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Béguin, Pierre; Charpin, Nicole; Koonin, Eugene V.; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-01-01

    Casposons are a recently discovered group of large DNA transposons present in diverse bacterial and archaeal genomes. For integration into the host chromosome, casposons employ an endonuclease that is homologous to the Cas1 protein involved in protospacer integration by the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune system. Here we describe the site-preference of integration by the Cas1 integrase (casposase) encoded by the casposon of the archaeon Aciduliprofundum boonei. Oligonucleotide duplexes derived from the terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of the A. boonei casposon as well as mini-casposons flanked by the TIR inserted preferentially at a site reconstituting the original A. boonei target site. As in the A. boonei genome, the insertion was accompanied by a 15-bp direct target site duplication (TSD). The minimal functional target consisted of the 15-bp TSD segment and the adjacent 18-bp sequence which comprises the 3′ end of the tRNA-Pro gene corresponding to the TΨC loop. The functional casposase target site bears clear resemblance to the leader sequence-repeat junction which is the target for protospacer integration catalyzed by the Cas1–Cas2 adaptation module of CRISPR-Cas. These findings reinforce the mechanistic similarities and evolutionary connection between the casposons and the adaptation module of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity systems. PMID:27655632

  2. Casposon integration shows strong target site preference and recapitulates protospacer integration by CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Pierre; Charpin, Nicole; Koonin, Eugene V; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-12-01

    Casposons are a recently discovered group of large DNA transposons present in diverse bacterial and archaeal genomes. For integration into the host chromosome, casposons employ an endonuclease that is homologous to the Cas1 protein involved in protospacer integration by the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune system. Here we describe the site-preference of integration by the Cas1 integrase (casposase) encoded by the casposon of the archaeon Aciduliprofundum boonei Oligonucleotide duplexes derived from the terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of the A. boonei casposon as well as mini-casposons flanked by the TIR inserted preferentially at a site reconstituting the original A. boonei target site. As in the A. boonei genome, the insertion was accompanied by a 15-bp direct target site duplication (TSD). The minimal functional target consisted of the 15-bp TSD segment and the adjacent 18-bp sequence which comprises the 3' end of the tRNA-Pro gene corresponding to the TΨC loop. The functional casposase target site bears clear resemblance to the leader sequence-repeat junction which is the target for protospacer integration catalyzed by the Cas1-Cas2 adaptation module of CRISPR-Cas. These findings reinforce the mechanistic similarities and evolutionary connection between the casposons and the adaptation module of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity systems.

  3. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  4. An integrated molecular cytogenetic map of Cucumis sativus L. chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integration of molecular, genetic and cytological maps is still a challenge for most plant species. Recent progress in molecular and cytogenetic studies created a basis for developing integrated maps in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Results In this study, eleven fosmid clones and three plasmids containing 45S rDNA, the centromeric satellite repeat Type III and the pericentriomeric repeat CsRP1 sequences respectively were hybridized to cucumber metaphase chromosomes to assign their cytological location on chromosome 2. Moreover, an integrated molecular cytogenetic map of cucumber chromosomes 2 was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of 11 fosmid clones together with the cucumber centromere-specific Type III sequence on meiotic pachytene chromosomes. The cytogenetic map was fully integrated with genetic linkage map since each fosmid clone was anchored by a genetically mapped simple sequence repeat marker (SSR). The relationship between the genetic and physical distances along chromosome was analyzed. Conclusions Recombination was not evenly distributed along the physical length of chromosome 2. Suppression of recombination was found in centromeric and pericentromeric regions. Our results also indicated that the molecular markers composing the linkage map for chromosome 2 provided excellent coverage of the chromosome. PMID:21272311

  5. Progesterone receptor gene maps to human chromosome band 11q13, the site of the mammary oncogene int-2

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.L.; Kao, F.T.; Wei, Q.; Hartz, J.A.; Greene, G.L.; Zarucki-Schulz, T.; Conneely, O.M.; Jones, C.; Puck, T.T.; O'Malley, B.W.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-05-01

    Progesterone is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers, and progesterone receptors (PR) are important markers of hormone dependence and disease prognosis. The authors have used a human PR cDNA probe, genomic DNA blotting of a series of Chinese hamster-human cell hybrids, and in situ hybridization to map the human PR gene to chromosome 11, band q13. This band also contains the human homolog of the mouse mammary tumor virus integration site, int-2, which surrounds a protooncogene thought to be involved in the development of murine mammary cancers. That these two genes share the same chromosomal location raises important questions about their possible linkage and about the relationship between the mammary-specific oncogene and the steroid hormone in the development, growth, and hormone dependence of human breast cancers.

  6. Fragile Sites of 'Valencia' Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in 'Valencia' C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of 'Valencia' C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid 'Valencia' C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in 'Valencia' sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in 'Valencia' sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites.

  7. Zinc-finger nuclease-driven targeted integration into mammalian genomes using donors with limited chromosomal homology

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Salvatore J.; Santiago, Yolanda; DeKelver, Russell C.; Freyvert, Yevgeniy; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Moehle, Erica A.; Choi, Vivian M.; Gopalan, Sunita M.; Lou, Jacqueline F.; Li, James; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Cost, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated high-frequency, targeted DNA addition mediated by the homology-directed DNA repair pathway. This method uses a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) to create a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) that facilitates copying of genetic information into the chromosome from an exogenous donor molecule. Such donors typically contain two ∼750 bp regions of chromosomal sequence required for homology-directed DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that easily-generated linear donors with extremely short (50 bp) homology regions drive transgene integration into 5–10% of chromosomes. Moreover, we measure the overhangs produced by ZFN cleavage and find that oligonucleotide donors with single-stranded 5′ overhangs complementary to those made by ZFNs are efficiently ligated in vivo to the DSB. Greater than 10% of all chromosomes directly incorporate this exogenous DNA via a process that is dependent upon and guided by complementary 5′ overhangs on the donor DNA. Finally, we extend this non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)-based technique by directly inserting donor DNA comprising recombinase sites into large deletions created by the simultaneous action of two separate ZFN pairs. Up to 50% of deletions contained a donor insertion. Targeted DNA addition via NHEJ complements our homology-directed targeted integration approaches, adding versatility to the manipulation of mammalian genomes. PMID:20530528

  8. Correction of chromosomal mutation and random integration in embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Fumi; Balamotis, Michael A; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Aizawa, Emi; Diaz, Arturo; Hasty, Paul; Graham, Frank L; Caskey, C Thomas; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2005-09-20

    For gene therapy of inherited diseases, targeted integration/gene repair through homologous recombination (HR) between exogenous and chromosomal DNA would be an ideal strategy to avoid potentially serious problems of random integration such as cellular transformation and gene silencing. Efficient sequence-specific modification of chromosomes by HR would also advance both biological studies and therapeutic applications of a variety of stem cells. Toward these goals, we developed an improved strategy of adenoviral vector (AdV)-mediated HR and examined its ability to correct an insertional mutation in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) locus in male mouse ES cells. The efficiency of HR was compared between four types of AdVs that contained various lengths of homologies at the Hprt locus and with various multiplicities of infections. The frequency of HR with helper-dependent AdVs (HD AdVs) with an 18.6-kb homology reached 0.2% per transduced cell at a multiplicity of infection of 10 genomes per cell. Detection of random integration at DNA levels by PCR revealed extremely high efficiency of 5% per cell. We also isolated and characterized chromosomal sites where HD AdVs integrated in a random manner. In contrast to retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, which tend to integrate into genes, the integration sites of AdV was distributed randomly inside and outside genes. These findings suggest that HR mediated by HD AdVs is efficient and relatively safe and might be a new viable option for ex vivo gene therapy as well as a tool for chromosomal manipulation of a variety of stem cells.

  9. Precise cloning and tandem integration of large polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster using Streptomyces artificial chromosome system.

    PubMed

    Nah, Hee-Ju; Woo, Min-Woo; Choi, Si-Sun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2015-09-16

    Direct cloning combined with heterologous expression of a secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene cluster has become a useful strategy for production improvement and pathway modification of potentially valuable natural products present at minute quantities in original isolates of actinomycetes. However, precise cloning and efficient overexpression of an entire biosynthetic gene cluster remains challenging due to the ineffectiveness of current genetic systems in manipulating large-sized gene clusters for heterologous as well as homologous expression. A versatile Escherichia coli-Streptomyces shuttle bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) conjugation vector, pSBAC, was used along with a cluster tandem integration approach to carry out homologous and heterologous overexpression of a large 80-kb polyketide biosynthetic pathway gene cluster of tautomycetin (TMC), which is a protein phosphatase PP1/PP2A inhibitor and T cell-specific immunosuppressant. Unique XbaI restriction sites were precisely inserted at both border regions of the TMC biosynthetic gene cluster within the chromosome of TMC-producing Streptomyces sp. CK4412, followed by site-specific recombination of pSBAC into the flanking region of the TMC gene cluster. The entire TMC gene cluster was then rescued as a single giant recombinant pSBAC by XbaI digestion of the chromosomal DNA as well as subsequent self-ligation. Next, the recombinant pSBAC construct containing the entire TMC cluster in E. coli was directly conjugated into model Streptomyces strains, resulting in rapid and enhanced TMC production. Moreover, introduction of the TMC cluster-containing pSBAC into wild-type Streptomyces sp. CK4412 as well as a recombinant S. coelicolor strain resulted in a chromosomal tandem repeat of the entire TMC cluster with 14-fold and 5.4-fold enhanced TMC productivities, respectively. The 80-kb TMC biosynthetic gene cluster was isolated in a single integration vector, pSBAC. Introduction of TMC biosynthetic gene cluster

  10. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  11. Characterization of CpG sites that escape methylation on the inactive human X-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Moen, Erika L; Litwin, Edward; Arnovitz, Stephen; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Wei; Dolan, M Eileen; Godley, Lucy A

    2015-01-01

    In many whole genome studies of gene expression or modified cytosines, data from probes localized to the X-chromosome are removed from analyses due to gender bias. Previously, we observed population differences in cytosine modifications between Caucasian and African lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) on the autosomes using whole genome arrays to measure modified cytosines. DNA methylation plays a critical role in establishment and maintenance of X-chromosome inactivation in females. Therefore, we reasoned that by investigating cytosine modification patterns specifically on the X-chromosome, we could obtain valuable information about a chromosome that is often disregarded in genome-wide analyses. We investigated population differences in cytosine modification patterns along the X-chromosome between Caucasian and African LCLs and identified novel sites that escape methylation on the inactive X-chromosome (Xi) in females. We characterized the chromatin state of these loci by incorporating the extensive histone modification ChIP-seq data generated by ENCODE. To explore the relationship between DNA and histone modifications further, we hypothesized that BRD4, a protein that binds acetylated histones, could be preventing some sites from becoming de novo methylated. To test this, we treated 4 female LCLs with JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of BRD4, but found that JQ1 treatment induced minor changes in cytosine modification levels, and the majority of sites escaping methylation on the Xi remained unmethylated. This suggests that other epigenetic mechanisms or transcription factors are likely playing a larger role in protecting these sites from de novo methylation on the Xi.

  12. Cre recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination between plant chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Qin, M; Bayley, C; Stockton, T; Ow, D W

    1994-01-01

    We report the use of the bacteriophage P1 Cre-lox system for generating conservative site-specific recombination between tobacco chromosomes. Two constructs, one containing a promoterless hygromycin-resistance gene preceded by a lox site (lox-hpt) and the other containing a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter linked to a lox sequence and the cre coding region (35S-lox-cre), were introduced separately into tobacco plants. Crosses between plants harboring either construct produced plants with the two constructs situated on different chromosomes. Plants with recombination events were identified by selecting for hygromycin resistance, a phenotype expressed upon recombination. Molecular analysis showed that these recombination events occurred specifically at the lox sites and resulted in the reciprocal exchange of flanking host DNA. Progenies of these plants showed 67-100% cotransmission of the new transgenes, 35S-lox-hpt and lox-cre, consistent with the preferential cosegregation of translocated chromosomes. These results illustrate that site-specific recombination systems can be useful tools for the large-scale manipulation of eukaryotic chromosomes in vivo. Images PMID:8127869

  13. Initiation of DNA replication from non-canonical sites on an origin-depleted chromosome.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Naomi L; Rodriguez, Jairo; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple sites on each chromosome called replication origins (origins). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, origins are defined at discrete sites. Regular spacing and diverse firing characteristics of origins are thought to be required for efficient completion of replication, especially in the presence of replication stress. However, a S. cerevisiae chromosome III harboring multiple origin deletions has been reported to replicate relatively normally, and yet how an origin-deficient chromosome could accomplish successful replication remains unknown. To address this issue, we deleted seven well-characterized origins from chromosome VI, and found that these deletions do not cause gross growth defects even in the presence of replication inhibitors. We demonstrated that the origin deletions do cause a strong decrease in the binding of the origin recognition complex. Unexpectedly, replication profiling of this chromosome showed that DNA replication initiates from non-canonical loci around deleted origins in yeast. These results suggest that replication initiation can be unexpectedly flexible in this organism.

  14. Comprehensive, integrated, remote sensing at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.G.; Burson, Z.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy has established a program called Comprehensive, Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS). The overall objective is to provide a state-of-the-art data base of remotely sensed data for all users of such information at large DOE sites. The primary types of remote sensing provided consist of the following: (1) large format aerial photography; (2) video from aerial platforms; (3) multispectral scanning; and (4) airborne nuclear radiometric surveys. Implementation of the CIRS Program began with field operations at the Savannah River Plant in 1982 and is continuing at that DOE site at a level of effort of about $1.5 m per year. Integrated remote sensing studies were subsequently extended to the West Valley Demonstration Project in the summer and fall of 1984. It is expected that the Program will eventually be extended to cover all large DOE sites on a continuing basis. 2 figures.

  15. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    PubMed

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  16. Retroviral integration: Site matters: Mechanisms and consequences of retroviral integration site selection.

    PubMed

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2015-11-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co-opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine-grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. © 2015 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Progress towards integrated physical and genetic maps of chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, C.J.; Barnoski, B.; Budarf, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Our immediate objective is to identify and characterize a set of overlapping YAC clones spanning the long arm of chromosome 22 by STS content mapping of the CEPH YAC libraries. STSs are assigned to bins defined by a 25 interval hybrid mapping panel and the YAC libraries are screened by amplification of hierarchical pools of yeast DNAs. Thus far, 382 probes and STSs have been assigned to bins and 251 probes and STSs have been used to identify a total 659 YACs, which is nearly 5X coverage of the chromosome. We have assembled more than twenty putative contigs using simulated annealing, split and merge, and backtracking optimization algorithms. The largest contig contains 82 STSs linked with 250 YACs, connects bin 12 to 15, and contains approximately one third of the long arm. The proximal region also contains two large contigs in bins 1-2 and bin 9, between them containing 26 STSs and 62 YACs. The DiGeorge (DGCR) region, encompassing bins 3-5, is currently 80% covered in a contig of cosmids. The distal portion (bins 17-22) is the least represented in YACs, due to a paucity of markers and a lower hit-rate of YACs per STS. We are targeting this region with new STSs from inter-Alu PCR plasmid libraries derived from radiation hybrid cell lines that retain relevant portions of the chromosome. A concurrent objective of the center is to construct a robust multi-point linkage map of the chromosome. STRPs (simple tandem repeat polymorphisms) were assembled into a 20-point skeletal map and a 29-point framework map; 15 of the markers in the skeletal map have been unequivocally assigned to single intervals in the hybrid panel with identical linkage and bin orders. This genetic map, combined with markers ordered by pulsed field gel maps covering large portions of the chromosome, provides a robust framework for ordering YACs within contigs and ordering contigs along the chromosome.

  18. Twenty-one polymorphic markers from human chromosome 12 for integration of genetic and physical maps

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc-Straceski, J.M.; Kissel, H.; Murtaugh, L.; Kucherlapati, R.; Montogmery, K.T.; Krauter, K.S. ); Tsai, P.; Ward, D.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Twenty-one physically mapped, polymorphic markers have been developed from a chromosome 12-specific cosmid library. The markers consist of CA repeat-containing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) derived from cosmid clones mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Three methods for determining the sequence flanking CA microsatellites were used, including one using degenerate primer sets for direct sequence analysis. Oligonucleotide primer pairs suitable for use in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were selected from the sequences flanking the CA microsatellite and were tested for their ability to generate unique PCR products. The informativeness of these STSs as genetic markers was determined by typing 10 unrelated individuals who are part of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine (EPH) pedigrees. Eleven of the 21 FISH-mapped, polymorphic STSs are heterozygous in 7 or more of the individuals tested. Since these markers are derived from physically mapped cosmids, genetic linkage analysis with them will facilitate the integration of the developing physical and genetic maps of chromosome 12. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A standard vector for the chromosomal integration and characterization of BioBrick™ parts in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chromosomal integration of biological parts in the host genome enables the engineering of plasmid-free stable strains with single-copy insertions of the desired gene networks. Although different integrative vectors were proposed, no standard pre-assembled genetic tool is available to carry out this task. Synthetic biology concepts can contribute to the development of standardized and user friendly solutions to easily produce engineered strains and to rapidly characterize the desired genetic parts in single-copy context. Results In this work we report the design of a novel integrative vector that allows the genomic integration of biological parts compatible with the RFC10, RFC23 and RFC12 BioBrick™ standards in Escherichia coli. It can also be specialized by using BioBrick™ parts to target the desired integration site in the host genome. The usefulness of this vector has been demonstrated by integrating a set of BioBrick™ devices in two different loci of the E. coli chromosome and by characterizing their activity in single-copy. Construct stability has also been evaluated and compared with plasmid-borne solutions. Conclusions Physical modularity of biological parts has been successfully applied to construct a ready-to-engineer BioBrick™ vector, suitable for a stable chromosomal insertion of standard parts via the desired recombination method, i.e. the bacteriophage integration mechanism or homologous recombination. In contrast with previously proposed solutions, it is a pre-assembled vector containing properly-placed restriction sites for the direct transfer of various formats of BioBrick™ parts. This vector can facilitate the characterization of parts avoiding copy number artefacts and the construction of antibiotic resistance-free engineered microbes, suitable for industrial use. PMID:23663425

  20. Implications of FRA 16A structure for the mechanism of chromosomal fragile site genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nancarrow, J.K.; Kremer, E.; Holman, K.; Eyre, H.; Callen, D.F.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. ); Doggett, N.A. ); Paslier, D.Le )

    1994-06-24

    Fragile sites are chemically induced nonstaining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. DNA sequences encompassing and including the rare, autosomal, folate-sensitive fragile site, FRA16A, were isolated by positional cloning. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)[sub n] repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting), which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis.

  1. Launch site integration of Liquid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Leland P.; Dickinson, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The impacts of introducing Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) into the STS/KSC launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Pre-launch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated.

  2. Bovine leukemia virus integration site selection in cattle that develop leukemia.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hironobu; Yamada, Takahito; Suzuki, Miho; Nakahara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    It is essential for efficient replication of retroviruses that the viral genome is integrated into the host genome after reverse transcription. Some retroviruses are preferentially integrated into certain genomic regions that may differ depending on the disease. In this study, we analyzed the integration site of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in leukemic cells and 55 integration sites were determined. Although the integration sites were not located in a particular chromosome, the BLV provirus was integrated into transcription units at a frequency of 43.6% (24/55) and the transcriptional direction of the provirus was in accordance with that of the integrated host genes in 62.5% (15/24). The integration sites were located in introns of the host gene, excluding only one site, which was located in downstream from a stop codon. BLV provirus was never found in a protein coding sequence (CDS) in this study. Moreover, the BLV provirus did not favor integration near transcription start sites and CpG islands, or repetitive sequences such as transposons. Therefore, the possibility that the integration of the BLV provirus disrupts the host gene is very low. Although a hot spot was not found in the BLV provirus integration sites, the provirus favored the integration into regions disadvantageous for viral gene expression since no integration site was preferentially located into/near CDS, transcription start site or CpG island. It is suggested that the integration site of the BLV provirus in leukemic cells is related to the suppression of viral gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Random transposon vectors pUTTns for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into gram-negative eubacteria chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Wang, Guangli; Shen, Bin; Wang, Rong; Song, Yao; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2009-11-01

    A set of random transposon vectors pUTTns that facilitates the markerless integration of new functions into the chromosome of gram-negative bacteria has been developed. The vectors, which are derived from mini-Tn5 transposons, are located on a R6K-based suicide delivery plasmid that provides the IS50(R) transposase tnp gene in cis, but they are external to the mobile element. The vectors' conjugal transfer to recipients is mediated by RP4 mobilization functions in the donor. Internal to the mini-Tn5 element is a cassette that contains a selectable antibiotic resistance marker (kanamycin, chloramphenicol, or tetracycline resistance gene), a counter-selectable marker (sacB), a 430-bp repeat of the sacB gene 3' end acted as the directly-repeated (DR) sequence, and modified multiple cloning sites (MCS). After two total rounds of transposon integration and recombination between the two DRs, only the exogenous DNA inserted into the MCS (passenger genes) and a single 430-bp scar sacBDR fragment remained in the chromosome after excision. The utility of these vectors was demonstrated by integrating the organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (mpd) into the chromosome of Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Paracoccus species. Sequential integration of another organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (oph) into the previously engineered bacteria, without bringing any selectable markers, was also successful. These engineered bacteria were relatively stable. Cell viability and original degrading characteristics were not affected compared with the original recipients. This shows that the developed system is very useful for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into the chromosome of gram-negative eubacteria.

  4. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  5. Chromosome Segregation Impacts on Cell Growth and Division Site Selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids. PMID:23405112

  6. A database system for constructing, integrating, and displaying physical maps of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T.; Wagner, M.; Yeh, Mimi; Ashworth, L.; Nelson, D.; Ow, D.; Branscomb, E.; Carrano, A.

    1994-06-01

    Efforts are underway at numerous sites around the world to construct physical maps of all human chromosomes. These maps will enable researchers to locate, characterize, and eventually understand the genes that control human structure and function. Accomplishing this goal will require a staggering amount of innovation and advancement of biological technology. The volume and complexity of the data already generated requires a sophisticated array of computational support to collect, store, analyze, integrate, and display it in biologically meaningful ways. The Human Genome Center at Livermore has spent the last 6 years constructing a database system to support its physical mapping efforts on human chromosome 19. Our computational support team is composed of experienced computer professionals who share a common pragmatic primary goal of rapidly supplying tools that meet the ever-changing needs of the biologists. Most papers describing computational support of genome research concentrate on mathematical details of key algorithms. However, in this paper we would like to concentrate on the design issues, tradeoffs, and consequences from the point of view of building a complex database system to support leading-edge genomic research. We introduce the topic of physical mapping, discuss the key design issues involved in our databases, and discuss the use of this data by our major tools (DNA fingerprint analysis and overlap computation, contig assembly, map integration, and database browsing.) Given the advantage of hindsight, we discuss what worked, what didn`t, and how we will evolve from here. As early pioneers in this field we hope that our experience may prove useful to others who are now beginning to design and construct similar systems.

  7. Comprehensive mapping of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration sites in cervical carcinomas by HPV capture technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Zheming; Xu, Ruiping; Ke, Yang

    2016-02-02

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into the host genome can be a driver mutation in cervical carcinoma. Identification of HPV integration at base resolution has been a longstanding technical challenge, largely due to sensitivity masking by HPV in episomes or concatenated forms. The aim was to enhance the understanding of the precise localization of HPV integration sites using an innovative strategy. Using HPV capture technology combined with next generation sequencing, HPV prevalence and the exact integration sites of the HPV DNA in 47 primary cervical cancer samples and 2 cell lines were investigated. A total of 117 unique HPV integration sites were identified, including HPV16 (n = 101), HPV18 (n = 7), and HPV58 (n = 9). We observed that the HPV16 integration sites were broadly located across the whole viral genome. In addition, either single or multiple integration events could occur frequently for HPV16, ranging from 1 to 19 per sample. The viral integration sites were distributed across almost all the chromosomes, except chromosome 22. All the cervical cancer cases harboring more than four HPV16 integration sites showed clinical diagnosis of stage III carcinoma. A significant enrichment of overlapping nucleotides shared between the human genome and HPV genome at integration breakpoints was observed, indicating that it may play an important role in the HPV integration process. The results expand on knowledge from previous findings on HPV16 and HPV18 integration sites and allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  8. Comprehensive mapping of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integration sites in cervical carcinomas by HPV capture technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruiping; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into the host genome can be a driver mutation in cervical carcinoma. Identification of HPV integration at base resolution has been a longstanding technical challenge, largely due to sensitivity masking by HPV in episomes or concatenated forms. The aim was to enhance the understanding of the precise localization of HPV integration sites using an innovative strategy. Using HPV capture technology combined with next generation sequencing, HPV prevalence and the exact integration sites of the HPV DNA in 47 primary cervical cancer samples and 2 cell lines were investigated. A total of 117 unique HPV integration sites were identified, including HPV16 (n = 101), HPV18 (n = 7), and HPV58 (n = 9). We observed that the HPV16 integration sites were broadly located across the whole viral genome. In addition, either single or multiple integration events could occur frequently for HPV16, ranging from 1 to 19 per sample. The viral integration sites were distributed across almost all the chromosomes, except chromosome 22. All the cervical cancer cases harboring more than four HPV16 integration sites showed clinical diagnosis of stage III carcinoma. A significant enrichment of overlapping nucleotides shared between the human genome and HPV genome at integration breakpoints was observed, indicating that it may play an important role in the HPV integration process. The results expand on knowledge from previous findings on HPV16 and HPV18 integration sites and allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26735580

  9. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Robinson, Terence J

    2007-01-01

    Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria). Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorganize in Afrotheria, and by analyzing the expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in three afrotherian species, whether these are coincidental with recognized evolutionary breakpoints. Results We described 29 fragile sites in the aardvark (OAF) genome, 27 in the golden mole (CAS), and 35 in the elephant-shrew (EED) genome. We show that fragile sites are conserved among afrotherian species and these are correlated with evolutionary breakpoints when compared to the human (HSA) genome. Inddition, by computationally scanning the newly released opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and chicken sequence assemblies for use as outgroups to Placentalia, we validate the HSA 3/21/5 chromosomal synteny as a rare genomic change that defines the monophyly of this ancient African clade of mammals. On the other hand, support for HSA 1/19p, which is also thought to underpin Afrotheria, is currently ambiguous. Conclusion We provide evidence that (i) the evolutionary breakpoints that characterise human syntenies detected in the basal Afrotheria correspond at the chromosomal band level with fragile sites, (ii) that HSA 3p/21 was in the amniote ancestor (i.e., common to turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians, birds and mammals) and was subsequently disrupted in the lineage leading to marsupials. Its expansion to include HSA 5 in Afrotheria is unique and (iii) that its fragmentation to HSA 3p/21 + HSA 5/21 in elephant and manatee was due to a fission within HSA 21 that is probably shared by all

  10. Cooperation between a hierarchical set of recruitment sites targets the X chromosome for dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Winterkorn, Lara Heermans; Street, Lena Annika; Ercan, Sevinc

    2017-01-01

    In many organisms, it remains unclear how X chromosomes are specified for dosage compensation, since DNA sequence motifs shown to be important for dosage compensation complex (DCC) recruitment are themselves not X-specific. Here, we addressed this problem in C. elegans. We found that the DCC recruiter, SDC-2, is required to maintain open chromatin at a small number of primary DCC recruitment sites, whose sequence and genomic context are X-specific. Along the X, primary recruitment sites are interspersed with secondary sites, whose function is X-dependent. A secondary site can ectopically recruit the DCC when additional recruitment sites are inserted either in tandem or at a distance (>30 kb). Deletion of a recruitment site on the X results in reduced DCC binding across several megabases surrounded by topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries. Our work elucidates that hierarchy and long-distance cooperativity between gene-regulatory elements target a single chromosome for regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23645.001 PMID:28562241

  11. Fragile Sites of ‘Valencia’ Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites. PMID:26977938

  12. Bacteriophage P1 pac sites inserted into the chromosome greatly increase packaging and transduction of Escherichia coli genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haomin; Masters, Millicent

    2014-11-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage P1 packages host chromosome separately from phage DNA, and transfers it to recipient cells at low frequency in a process called generalized transduction. Phage genomes are packaged from concatemers beginning at a specific site, pac. To increase transduction rate, we have inserted pac into the chromosome at up to five equally spaced positions; at least this many are fully tolerated in the absence of P1 infection. A single chromosomal pac greatly increases transduction of downstream markers without decreasing phage yields; 3.5 × as much total chromosomal DNA is packaged. Additional insertions decrease phage yield by > 90% and also decrease phage DNA synthesis, although less dramatically. Packaging of chromosomal markers near to and downstream of each inserted pac site is, at the same time, increased by greater than 10 fold. Transduction of markers near an inserted pac site can be increased by over 1000-fold, potentially allowing identification of such transductants by screening.

  13. Site-specific integration of mycobacteriophage L5: integration-proficient vectors for Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and bacille Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M H; Pascopella, L; Jacobs, W R; Hatfull, G F

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteriophage L5, a temperate phage of mycobacteria, integrates site-specifically into the Mycobacterium smegmatis chromosome. We have identified the int gene and attP site of L5, characterized the chromosomal attachment site (attB), and constructed plasmid vectors that efficiently transform M. smegmatis through stable site-specific integration of the plasmid into the bacterial genome. These integration-proficient plasmids also efficiently transform slow-growing mycobacteria such as the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the vaccine strain bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). The ability to easily generate stable recombinants in these slow-growing mycobacteria without the requirement for continual selection is of particular importance for the construction of recombinant BCG vaccines and for the isolation and characterization of mycobacterial pathogenic determinants in animal model systems. Integration vectors of this type should be of general use in a number of additional bacterial systems where temperate phages have been identified. Images PMID:1901654

  14. A physical map of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Cosmid contigs and sequence tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Madueno, E.; Modolell, J.; Papagiannakis, G.

    1995-04-01

    A physical map of the euchromatic X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster has been constructed by assembling contiguous arrays of cosmids that were selected by screening a library with DNA isolated from microamplified chromosomal divisions. This map, consisting of 893 cosmids, covers {approximately}64% of the euchromatic part of the chromosome. In addition, 568 sequence tagged sites (STS), in aggregate representing 120 kb of sequenced DNA, were derived from selected cosmids. Most of these STSs, spaced at an average distance of {approximately} 35 kb along the euchromatic region of the chromosome, represent DNA tags that can be used as entry points to the fruitfly genome. Furthermore, 42 genes have been placed on the physical map, either through the hybridization of specific probes to the cosmids or through the fact that they were represented among the STSs. These provide a link between the physical and the genetic maps of D. melanogaster. Nine novel genes have been tentatively identified in Drosophila on the basis of matches between STS sequences and sequences from other species. 32 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A Physical Map of the X Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster: Cosmid Contigs and Sequence Tagged Sites

    PubMed Central

    Madueno, E.; Papagiannakis, G.; Rimmington, G.; Saunders, RDC.; Savakis, C.; Siden-Kiamos, I.; Skavdis, G.; Spanos, L.; Trenear, J.; Adam, P.; Ashburner, M.; Benos, P.; Bolshakov, V. N.; Coulson, D.; Glover, D. M.; Herrmann, S.; Kafatos, F. C.; Louis, C.; Majerus, T.; Modolell, J.

    1995-01-01

    A physical map of the euchromatic X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster has been constructed by assembling contiguous arrays of cosmids that were selected by screening a library with DNA isolated from microamplified chromosomal divisions. This map, consisting of 893 cosmids, covers ~64% of the euchromatic part of the chromosome. In addition, 568 sequence tagged sites (STS), in aggregate representing 120 kb of sequenced DNA, were derived from selected cosmids. Most of these STSs, spaced at an average distance of ~35 kb along the euchromatic region of the chromosome, represent DNA tags that can be used as entry points to the fruitfly genome. Furthermore, 42 genes have been placed on the physical map, either through the hybridization of specific probes to the cosmids or through the fact that they were represented among the STSs. These provide a link between the physical and the genetic maps of D. melanogaster. Nine novel genes have been tentatively identified in Drosophila on the basis of matches between STS sequences and sequences from other species. PMID:7789765

  16. Detection and chromosomal assignment of SV40-DNA integration in Chinese hamster cell lines by chromosome sorting and dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hutter, K J; Klefenz, H; Goerttler, K

    1990-01-01

    A combination of cytometric (chromosome sorting), molecular (dot blot hybridization using radio-active and/or biotinylated DNA probes) and cytogenetic (G-banding) evaluation is described which allows the rapid identification of single copy and repetitive viral integrates and their assignment to chromosome groups or even individual chromosomes. In the case of Chinese hamster cell line CO 631 it could be demonstrated that SV40 DNA was solely integrated into a submetacentric marker chromosome. Such a cytometric/molecular/cytogenetic "identogram" may prove to be a useful tool in many areas of cell and tumor biology. Furthermore, amounts of chromosomes sufficient for analysis as well as subsequent cloning experiments can be accumulated.

  17. Dgcr8 and Dicer are essential for sex chromosome integrity during meiosis in males.

    PubMed

    Modzelewski, Andrew J; Hilz, Stephanie; Crate, Elizabeth A; Schweidenback, Caterina T H; Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Grenier, Jennifer K; Freire, Raimundo; Cohen, Paula E; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Small RNAs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression during mammalian meiosis. To investigate the function of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) during meiosis in males, we generated germ-cell-specific conditional deletions of Dgcr8 and Dicer in mice. Analysis of spermatocytes from both conditional knockout lines revealed that there were frequent chromosomal fusions during meiosis, always involving one or both sex chromosomes. RNA sequencing indicates upregulation of Atm in spermatocytes from miRNA-deficient mice, and immunofluorescence imaging demonstrates an increased abundance of activated ATM kinase and mislocalization of phosphorylated MDC1, an ATM phosphorylation substrate. The Atm 3'UTR contains many potential microRNA target sites, and, notably, target sites for several miRNAs depleted in both conditional knockout mice were highly effective at promoting repression. RNF8, a telomere-associated protein whose localization is controlled by the MDC1-ATM kinase cascade, normally associates with the sex chromosomes during pachytene, but in both conditional knockouts redistributed to the autosomes. Taken together, these results suggest that Atm dysregulation in microRNA-deficient germ lines contributes to the redistribution of proteins involved in chromosomal stability from the sex chromosomes to the autosomes, resulting in sex chromosome fusions during meiotic prophase I.

  18. Dgcr8 and Dicer are essential for sex chromosome integrity during meiosis in males

    PubMed Central

    Modzelewski, Andrew J.; Hilz, Stephanie; Crate, Elizabeth A.; Schweidenback, Caterina T. H.; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Freire, Raimundo; Cohen, Paula E.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small RNAs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression during mammalian meiosis. To investigate the function of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) during meiosis in males, we generated germ-cell-specific conditional deletions of Dgcr8 and Dicer in mice. Analysis of spermatocytes from both conditional knockout lines revealed that there were frequent chromosomal fusions during meiosis, always involving one or both sex chromosomes. RNA sequencing indicates upregulation of Atm in spermatocytes from miRNA-deficient mice, and immunofluorescence imaging demonstrates an increased abundance of activated ATM kinase and mislocalization of phosphorylated MDC1, an ATM phosphorylation substrate. The Atm 3′UTR contains many potential microRNA target sites, and, notably, target sites for several miRNAs depleted in both conditional knockout mice were highly effective at promoting repression. RNF8, a telomere-associated protein whose localization is controlled by the MDC1–ATM kinase cascade, normally associates with the sex chromosomes during pachytene, but in both conditional knockouts redistributed to the autosomes. Taken together, these results suggest that Atm dysregulation in microRNA-deficient germ lines contributes to the redistribution of proteins involved in chromosomal stability from the sex chromosomes to the autosomes, resulting in sex chromosome fusions during meiotic prophase I. PMID:25934699

  19. Comparative fitness assessment of Anopheles stephensi transgenic lines receptive to site-specific integration.

    PubMed

    Amenya, D A; Bonizzoni, M; Isaacs, A T; Jasinskiene, N; Chen, H; Marinotti, O; Yan, G; James, A A

    2010-04-01

    Genetically modified mosquitoes that are unable to transmit pathogens offer opportunities for controlling vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. Site-specific gene recombination technologies are advantageous in the development of these insects because antipathogen effector genes can be inserted at integration sites in the genome that cause the least alteration in mosquito fitness. Here we describe Anopheles stephensi transgenic lines containing phi C31 attP'docking' sites linked to a fluorescent marker gene. Chromosomal insertion sites were determined and life-table parameters were assessed for transgenic mosquitoes of each line. No significant differences in fitness between the transgenic and nontransgenic mosquitoes were detected in this study. These transgenic lines are suitable for future site-specific integrations of antiparasite transgenes into the attP sites.

  20. Identification of missing proteins in the neXtProt database and unregistered phosphopeptides in the PhosphoSitePlus database as part of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Shiromizu, Takashi; Adachi, Jun; Watanabe, Shio; Murakami, Tatsuo; Kuga, Takahisa; Muraoka, Satoshi; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2013-06-07

    The Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is an international effort for creating an annotated proteomic catalog for each chromosome. The first step of the C-HPP project is to find evidence of expression of all proteins encoded on each chromosome. C-HPP also prioritizes particular protein subsets, such as those with post-translational modifications (PTMs) and those found in low abundance. As participants in C-HPP, we integrated proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis results from chromosome-independent biomarker discovery research to create a chromosome-based list of proteins and phosphorylation sites. Data were integrated from five independent colorectal cancer (CRC) samples (three types of clinical tissue and two types of cell lines) and lead to the identification of 11,278 proteins, including 8,305 phosphoproteins and 28,205 phosphorylation sites; all of these were categorized on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis. In total, 3,033 "missing proteins", i.e., proteins that currently lack evidence by mass spectrometry, in the neXtProt database and 12,852 unknown phosphorylation sites not registered in the PhosphoSitePlus database were identified. Our in-depth phosphoproteomic study represents a significant contribution to C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD000089.

  1. TG1 integrase-based system for site-specific gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Tetsurou; Kokuzawa, Takaaki; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    Serine-type phage integrases catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites, attP and attB, in the phage and host bacterial genomes, respectively; these integrases and DNA target sites function efficiently when transferred into heterologous cells. We previously developed an in vivo site-specific genomic integration system based on actinophage TG1 integrase that introduces ∼2-kbp DNA into an att site inserted into a heterologous Escherichia coli genome. Here, we analyzed the TG1 integrase-mediated integrations of att site-containing ∼10-kbp DNA into the corresponding att site pre-inserted into various genomic locations; moreover, we developed a system that introduces ∼10-kbp DNA into the genome with an efficiency of ∼10(4) transformants/μg DNA. Integrations of attB-containing DNA into an attP-containing genome were more efficient than integrations of attP-containing DNA into an attB-containing genome, and integrations targeting attP inserted near the replication origin, oriC, and the E. coli "centromere" analogue, migS, were more efficient than those targeting attP within other regions of the genome. Because the genomic region proximal to the oriC and migS sites is located at the extreme poles of the cell during chromosomal segregation, the oriC-migS region may be more exposed to the cytosol than are other regions of the E. coli chromosome. Thus, accessibility of pre-inserted attP to attB-containing incoming DNA may be crucial for the integration efficiency by serine-type integrases in heterologous cells. These results may be beneficial to the development of serine-type integrases-based genomic integration systems for various bacterial species.

  2. Influence of chromosomal integration on glucocorticoid-regulated transcription of growth-stimulating papillomavirus genes E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Von Knebel Doeberitz, M.; Bauknecht, T.; Bartsch, D.; Zur Hausen, H. )

    1991-02-15

    In most cervical carcinoma cells the E6 and E7 genes of specific human papillomaviruses are transcribed from viral sequences integrated into host cell chromosomes. Glucocorticoids activate the promoter elements of various human papillomaviruses in transient-expression assays. The authors have analyzed the effect of dexamethasone on the transcription rate of human papillomaviruses 18 E6 and E7 genes integrated at different chromosomal sites in four cervical cancer cell lines. Dexamethasone led to an increase in the transcription rate of the integrated E6-E7 sequences in C4-1 and C4-2 cells but led to a decrease in SW 756 cells and did not affect the transcription rate in HeLa cells. It thus appears that dominant regulatory mechanisms presumably depending on the chromosomal integration site are able to override the response of the viral promoter to steroid hormones. The growth rate of all dexamethasone-treated cell lines correlated consistently with the expression of the papillomavirus E6 and E7 genes, supporting their role in the maintenance of the proliferative phenotype of cervical carcinoma cells. Since human papillomaviruses are integrated into the host cell genome at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci, regulatory mechanisms that influence viral gene expression, and hence cell growth, may differ among cancers of independent clonal origin.

  3. Identification of specific DNA methylation sites on the Y-chromosome as biomarker in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fengxia; Zhu, Yasheng; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Chenyu; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Liu, Huixian; Wang, Dong; Meng, Hao; Chang, Shuang; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yinghao; Sun, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    As a diagnostic biomarker, prostate special antigen (PSA) tests always generate false positive results and lead to unnecessary and/or repeat biopsies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing more sensitive, specific diagnostic biomarkers. We epigenotyped methylated sites in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from 66 patients. In comparation with normal adjacent tissues, we observed that there were 6 aberrant methylation sites in prostate cancer tissues on the Y-chromosome. We further performed pyrosequencing using urine of PCa patients and we identified one methylated site (cg05163709) as a potential biomarker. We evaluated the predictive capacity of the aberrant methylated sites using the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The ROC analysis showed a higher AUC for cg05163709 (0.915) than prostate-specific antigen (PSA, 0.769). These results indicated that aberrant DNA methylation of cg05163709 on the Y-chromosome could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26485765

  4. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  5. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  6. Clonal expansion of Escherichia coli ST38 carrying a chromosomally integrated OXA-48 carbapenemase gene.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Doumith, Michel; Hopkins, Katie L; Perry, Claire; Meunier, Daniele; Woodford, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Many isolates of Escherichia coli carrying blaOXA-48 referred to Public Health England's national reference laboratory during 2014 and 2015 shared similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles, despite coming from patients in multiple different hospitals and regions. Whole genome sequencing on an Illumina platform revealed that these belonged to sequence type (ST) 38. The OXA-48 gene is usually carried on a 62 kb IncL/M plasmid (pOXA48a), but those belonging to this ST appeared either to lack plasmid elements or to have only a partial complement. Two isolates, one belonging to a main cluster sharing identical PFGE profiles and the other having a distinct profile, were further sequenced on a minION. The long reads provided by the nanopore sequencing technology facilitated assembly of a much larger contig around the blaOXA-48 region, showing that both isolates shared a similar arrangement, with a plasmid fragment containing blaOXA-48 flanked by IS1R elements integrated into the chromosome, although the length of the plasmid fragment and the insertion site differed between the two isolates. That belonging to the main cluster contained a 21.9 kb Tn6237 insert, as previously described in E. coli EC-15 from Lebanon, but in a different insertion site. PCR mapping indicated that a further 14/31 representatives of this cluster also contained this insert in the same insertion site, with most of the remainder differing only by having additional E. coli sequence on one side of the insertion. This sub-cluster of ST38 was found from 25 different hospital laboratories, suggesting widespread distribution of a successful type.

  7. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Protein Bacteroides Host Factor A Participates in Integration of the Integrative Conjugative Element CTnDOT into the Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CTnDOT is a conjugative transposon found in Bacteroides species. It encodes multiple antibiotic resistances and is stimulated to transfer by exposure to tetracycline. CTnDOT integration into the host chromosome requires IntDOT and a previously unknown host factor. We have identified a protein, designated BHFa (Bacteroides host factor A), that participates in integrative recombination. BHFa is the first host factor identified for a site-specific recombination reaction in the CTnDOT family of integrative and conjugative elements. Based on the amino acid sequence of BHFa, the ability to bind specifically to 4 sites in the attDOT DNA, and its activity in the integration reaction, BHFa is a member of the IHF/HU family of nucleoid-associated proteins. Other DNA bending proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically can substitute for BHFa in the integration reaction. IMPORTANCE Bacteroides species are normal members of the human colonic microbiota. These species can harbor and spread self-transmissible genetic elements (integrative conjugative elements [ICEs]) that contain antibiotic resistance genes. This work describes the role of a protein, BHFa, and its importance in the integration reaction required for the element CTnDOT to persist in Bacteroides host cells. PMID:25645562

  8. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron protein Bacteroides host factor A participates in integration of the integrative conjugative element CTnDOT into the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    CTnDOT is a conjugative transposon found in Bacteroides species. It encodes multiple antibiotic resistances and is stimulated to transfer by exposure to tetracycline. CTnDOT integration into the host chromosome requires IntDOT and a previously unknown host factor. We have identified a protein, designated BHFa (Bacteroides host factor A), that participates in integrative recombination. BHFa is the first host factor identified for a site-specific recombination reaction in the CTnDOT family of integrative and conjugative elements. Based on the amino acid sequence of BHFa, the ability to bind specifically to 4 sites in the attDOT DNA, and its activity in the integration reaction, BHFa is a member of the IHF/HU family of nucleoid-associated proteins. Other DNA bending proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically can substitute for BHFa in the integration reaction. Bacteroides species are normal members of the human colonic microbiota. These species can harbor and spread self-transmissible genetic elements (integrative conjugative elements [ICEs]) that contain antibiotic resistance genes. This work describes the role of a protein, BHFa, and its importance in the integration reaction required for the element CTnDOT to persist in Bacteroides host cells. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Type I bipolar disorder associated with a fragile site on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Turecki, G.; Mari, J.J.; M. de Smith, A.C.

    1995-06-19

    The objective of this paper is to study the association between chromosomal fragile sites and type I bipolar disorder. This case-control study compares bipolar patients with normal controls. Ten cases of type I bipolar disorder diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) were selected from the Escola Paulista affective disorders outpatient clinic and 10 healthy controls (CIDI negative for psychiatric diagnoses) matched for sex and age were drawn from the otorhinolaryngologic outpatient clinic of the same hospital. The cytogenetic analysis was carried out with blood lymphocytes, which were cultured in a folic acid-free medium. A total of 100 mitoses per subject were blindly analyzed to the psychiatric diagnostic assignment, and fragile sites were identified according to a minimum expected frequency of events per band in conformity with a Poisson distribution. A higher frequency of chromosomal lesions for cases than controls was found for the following bands: 1q32, 5q31, and 11q23, the 1q32 being considered a fragile site. Although no evident neuropsychiatric etiological component has been mapped to the 1q32 region so far, this finding may lead to further investigation of a possible linkage between genetic markers of this region and bipolar disorder. 40 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Induction of Chromosomal Translocations in Mouse and Human Cells Using Site-Specific Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, David M.; Brunet, Erika; Jasin, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations are early and essential events in the malignant transformation of several tumor types, yet the precise mechanisms that mediate translocation formation are poorly understood. We review here the development of approaches to induce and recover translocations between two targeted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian chromosomes. Using mouse cells, we find that nonhomologous end-joining readily mediates translocation formation between two DSBs generated by site-specific endonucleases. Translocations occur much less frequently, however, than intrachromosomal repair of a single DSB. Translocation junctions obtained with this approach have similar end modifications to translocation junctions found in human tumors, including deletions, insertions, and repair at short stretches of homology. These modifications are more extensive than repair junctions at a single DSB, suggesting that different factors may be involved in translocation formation and repair of a single DSB. Finally, we describe a novel approach to induce translocations in human cells. Translocation model systems provide an opportunity to study the involvement of mammalian DNA repair and signaling factors in the etiology of chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:18647997

  11. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  12. Detection of Turner syndrome using X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Xiaohong; Tian, Tian; Wang, Teng; Li, Qiaoli; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yun; Xing, Qinghe; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of Turner syndrome (TS) may improve preventive measures and treatment. X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites (XIDMSs) that are high methylated in inactive X chromosomes (Xi) and unmethylated in active X chromosomes (Xa) may be potential makers for TS detection. The candidate XIDMSs were screened from 9 male and 12 female DNA samples with normal karyotypes using the Illumina 450k array and validated by bisulfite sequencing PCR and pyrosequencing assay. X chromosome dosage was calculated according to the methylation level of multiple XIDMSs. Overall, 108 candidate XIDMSs were screened by the 450k array. Validations indicated that XIDMSs gathered and formed the X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated regions (XIDMRs). Using 3 XIDMRs at SAT1, UXT and UTP14A loci, 36 TS, 22 normal female and 6 male samples were analyzed. Methylation levels of the 20 XIDMSs in the XIDMRs could distinguish between TS and normal female DNA samples, the X chromosome dosage was consistent with karyotyping data. Analyzing samples of 2 triple X syndrome and 3 Klinefelter syndrome patients suggested that this method could be used to detect X chromosome aneuploids other than TS. XIDMSs are widely spread along the X chromosome and might be effective markers for detection of TS and other X chromosome aneuploids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of an integrated computerized scheme for metaphase chromosome image analysis: a robustness experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Wood, Marc C.; Yuan, Chaowei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Our integrated computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme includes three basic modules. The first module detects whether a microscopic digital image depicts a metaphase chromosome cell. If a cell is detected, the scheme will justify whether it is analyzable with a decision tree. Once an analyzable cell is detected, the second module is applied to segment individual chromosomes and to compute two important features. Specifically, the scheme utilizes a modified thinning algorithm to identify the medial axis of a chromosome. By tracking perpendicular lines along the medial axis, the scheme computes four feature profiles, identifies centromeres, and assigns polarities of chromosomes based on a set of pre-optimized rules. The third module is followed to classify chromosomes into 24 types. In this module, each chromosome is initially represented by a vector of 31 features. A two-layer classifier with 8 artificial neural networks (ANN) is optimized by a genetic algorithm. A testing chromosome is first classified into one of the seven groups by the ANN in the first layer. Another ANN is then automatically selected from the seven ANNs in the second layer (one for each group) to further classify this chromosome into one of 24 types. To test the performance and robustness of this CAD scheme, we randomly selected and assembled an independent testing dataset. The dataset contains 100 microscopic digital images including 50 analyzable and 50 un-analyzable metphase cells identified by the experts. The centromere location, the corresponding polarity, and karyotype for each individual chromosome were recorded in the "truth" file. The performance of the CAD scheme applied to this image dataset is analyzed and compared with the results in the true file. The assessment accuracies are 93% for the first module, 90.8% for centromere identification and 93.2% for polarity assignment in the second module, over 96% for six chromosome groups and 81.8% for one group in the third module

  14. Integrated mapping analysis of the Werner syndrome region of chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Oshima, J; Yu, C E; Boehnke, M; Weber, J L; Edelhoff, S; Wagner, M J; Wells, D E; Wood, S; Disteche, C M; Martin, G M

    1994-09-01

    The Werner syndrome locus (WRN) is located at 8p11-p12. To facilitate eventual cloning of the WRN gene, a 10,000-rad radiation-reduced hybrid (RH) cell panel was generated to map genetic markers, sequence-tagged sites (STSs), and genes in this region. A hamster cell line carrying an intact human chromosome 8 was fused with another hamster cell line. Two sets of hybrid cell panels from 2 separate fusions were generated; each panel consisted of 50 independent clones; 33 and 34 cell lines from the 2 fusions retained human chromsome material as determined by inter-Alu PCR. The combined panel was genotyped for 52 markers spanning the entire chromosome, including 10 genes, 29 anonymous polymorphic loci, and 13 STSs. Seventeen of these markers have not been previously described. Markers near the centromere were retained at a higher frequency than more distal markers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was also used to localize and order a subset of the markers. A RH map of the WRN region was constructed using a maximum likelihood method, giving the following most likely order: D8S131-D8S339 (GSR)-D8S124-D8S278-D8S259-(D8S71)-D8S283- D8S87-D8S105-D8S135 (FGFR1)-D8S135PB-D8S255-ANK1. A genetic map of 15 short tandem repeat polymorphic loci in the WRN region was also constructed. The marker orders from the genetic and RH maps were consistent. In addition, an integrated map of 24 loci in the WRN region was generated using information from both genetic and RH mapping methods. A 1000:1 framework map for 6 loci (LPL-D8S136-D8S137-D8S87-FGFR1-ANK1) was determined by genetic mapping, and the resulting locus order was fixed during analysis of the RH genotype data. The resulting integrated map contained more markers than could confidently be ordered by either genetic or RH mapping alone.

  15. Integration Preferences of Wildtype AAV-2 for Consensus Rep-Binding Sites at Numerous Loci in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hüser, Daniela; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Lutter, Timo; Weger, Stefan; Winter, Kerstin; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Cathomen, Toni; Reinert, Knut; Heilbronn, Regine

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to establish latency by preferential integration in human chromosome 19q13.42. The AAV non-structural protein Rep appears to target a site called AAVS1 by simultaneously binding to Rep-binding sites (RBS) present on the AAV genome and within AAVS1. In the absence of Rep, as is the case with AAV vectors, chromosomal integration is rare and random. For a genome-wide survey of wildtype AAV integration a linker-selection-mediated (LSM)-PCR strategy was designed to retrieve AAV-chromosomal junctions. DNA sequence determination revealed wildtype AAV integration sites scattered over the entire human genome. The bioinformatic analysis of these integration sites compared to those of rep-deficient AAV vectors revealed a highly significant overrepresentation of integration events near to consensus RBS. Integration hotspots included AAVS1 with 10% of total events. Novel hotspots near consensus RBS were identified on chromosome 5p13.3 denoted AAVS2 and on chromsome 3p24.3 denoted AAVS3. AAVS2 displayed seven independent junctions clustered within only 14 bp of a consensus RBS which proved to bind Rep in vitro similar to the RBS in AAVS3. Expression of Rep in the presence of rep-deficient AAV vectors shifted targeting preferences from random integration back to the neighbourhood of consensus RBS at hotspots and numerous additional sites in the human genome. In summary, targeted AAV integration is not as specific for AAVS1 as previously assumed. Rather, Rep targets AAV to integrate into open chromatin regions in the reach of various, consensus RBS homologues in the human genome. PMID:20628575

  16. Integration preferences of wildtype AAV-2 for consensus rep-binding sites at numerous loci in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Hüser, Daniela; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Lutter, Timo; Weger, Stefan; Winter, Kerstin; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Cathomen, Toni; Reinert, Knut; Heilbronn, Regine

    2010-07-08

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to establish latency by preferential integration in human chromosome 19q13.42. The AAV non-structural protein Rep appears to target a site called AAVS1 by simultaneously binding to Rep-binding sites (RBS) present on the AAV genome and within AAVS1. In the absence of Rep, as is the case with AAV vectors, chromosomal integration is rare and random. For a genome-wide survey of wildtype AAV integration a linker-selection-mediated (LSM)-PCR strategy was designed to retrieve AAV-chromosomal junctions. DNA sequence determination revealed wildtype AAV integration sites scattered over the entire human genome. The bioinformatic analysis of these integration sites compared to those of rep-deficient AAV vectors revealed a highly significant overrepresentation of integration events near to consensus RBS. Integration hotspots included AAVS1 with 10% of total events. Novel hotspots near consensus RBS were identified on chromosome 5p13.3 denoted AAVS2 and on chromsome 3p24.3 denoted AAVS3. AAVS2 displayed seven independent junctions clustered within only 14 bp of a consensus RBS which proved to bind Rep in vitro similar to the RBS in AAVS3. Expression of Rep in the presence of rep-deficient AAV vectors shifted targeting preferences from random integration back to the neighbourhood of consensus RBS at hotspots and numerous additional sites in the human genome. In summary, targeted AAV integration is not as specific for AAVS1 as previously assumed. Rather, Rep targets AAV to integrate into open chromatin regions in the reach of various, consensus RBS homologues in the human genome.

  17. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D B; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M; Ajioka, James W

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site.

  18. Escherichia coli Flagellar Genes as Target Sites for Integration and Expression of Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D. B.; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W.; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M.; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  19. Chromosomal integration of hyaluronic acid synthesis (has) genes enhances the molecular weight of hyaluronan produced in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hmar, Rothangmawi Victoria; Prasad, Shashi Bala; Jayaraman, Guhan; Ramachandran, Kadathur B

    2014-12-01

    Microbial production of hyaluronic acid (HA) is an attractive substitute for extraction of this biopolymer from animal tissues. Natural producers such as Streptococcus zooepidemicus are potential pathogens; therefore, production of HA by recombinant bacteria that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) organisms is a viable alternative that is being extensively explored. However, plasmid-based expression systems for HA production by recombinant bacteria have the inherent disadvantage of reduced productivity because of plasmid instability. To overcome this problem, the HA synthesis genes (hasA-hasB and hasA-hasB-hasC) from has-operon of S. zooepidemicus were integrated into the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis by site-directed, double-homologous recombination developing strains VRJ2AB and VRJ3ABC. The chromosomal integration stabilized the genes and obviated the instability observed in plasmid-expressed recombinant strains. The genome-integrated strains produced higher molecular weight (3.5-4 million Dalton [MDa]) HA compared to the plasmid-expressed strains (2 MDa). High molecular weight HA was produced when the intracellular concentration of uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and uridine diphosphate-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA) was almost equal and hasA to hasB ratio was low. This work suggests an optimal approach to obtain high molecular weight HA in recombinant strains.

  20. Chromosome-Specific Single-Locus FISH Probes Allow Anchorage of an 1800-Marker Integrated Radiation-Hybrid/Linkage Map of the Domestic Dog Genome to All Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Matthew; Jouquand, Sophie; Renier, Corinne; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Hitte, Christophe; Holmes, Nigel G.; Chéron, Angélique; Suter, Nicola; Vignaux, Françoise; Bristow, Anna E.; Priat, Catherine; McCann, E.; André, Catherine; Boundy, Sam; Gitsham, Paul; Thomas, Rachael; Bridge, Wendy L.; Spriggs, Helen F.; Ryder, Ed J.; Curson, Alistair; Sampson, Jeff; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Binns, Matthew M.; Galibert, Francis

    2001-01-01

    We present here the first fully integrated, comprehensive map of the canine genome, incorporating detailed cytogenetic, radiation hybrid (RH), and meiotic information. We have mapped a collection of 266 chromosome-specific cosmid clones, each containing a microsatellite marker, to all 38 canine autosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A 1500-marker RH map, comprising 1078 microsatellites, 320 dog gene markers, and 102 chromosome-specific markers, has been constructed using the RHDF5000-2 whole-genome radiation hybrid panel. Meiotic linkage analysis was performed, with at least one microsatellite marker from each dog autosome on a panel of reference families, allowing one meiotic linkage group to be anchored to all 38 dog autosomes. We present a karyotype in which each chromosome is identified by one meiotic linkage group and one or more RH groups. This updated integrated map, containing a total of 1800 markers, covers >90% of the dog genome. Positional selection of anchor clones enabled us, for the first time, to orientate nearly all of the integrated groups on each chromosome and to evaluate the extent of individual chromosome coverage in the integrated genome map. Finally, the inclusion of 320 dog genes into this integrated map enhances existing comparative mapping data between human and dog, and the 1000 mapped microsatellite markers constitute an invaluable tool with which to perform genome scanning studies on pedigrees of interest. PMID:11591656

  1. Retrovirus Integration Database (RID): a public database for retroviral insertion sites into host genomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Shan, Jigui; Kearney, Mary F; Wu, Xiaolin; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Luke, Brian; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H

    2016-07-04

    The NCI Retrovirus Integration Database is a MySql-based relational database created for storing and retrieving comprehensive information about retroviral integration sites, primarily, but not exclusively, HIV-1. The database is accessible to the public for submission or extraction of data originating from experiments aimed at collecting information related to retroviral integration sites including: the site of integration into the host genome, the virus family and subtype, the origin of the sample, gene exons/introns associated with integration, and proviral orientation. Information about the references from which the data were collected is also stored in the database. Tools are built into the website that can be used to map the integration sites to UCSC genome browser, to plot the integration site patterns on a chromosome, and to display provirus LTRs in their inserted genome sequence. The website is robust, user friendly, and allows users to query the database and analyze the data dynamically. https://rid.ncifcrf.gov ; or http://home.ncifcrf.gov/hivdrp/resources.htm .

  2. Improvement of Fibrinolytic Activity of Bacillus subtilis 168 by Integration of a Fibrinolytic Gene into the Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seon-Ju; Park, Ji Yeong; Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Kang Wook; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Gyoung Min; Shin, Jung-Hye; Kim, Jong-Sang; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Fibrinolytic enzyme genes (aprE2, aprE176, and aprE179) were introduced into the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome without any antibiotic resistance gene. An integration vector, pDG1662, was used to deliver the genes into the amyE site of B. subtilis 168. Integrants, SJ3-5nc, SJ176nc, and SJ179nc, were obtained after two successive homologous recombinations. The integration of each fibrinolytic gene into the middle of the amyE site was confirmed by phenotypes (Amy(-), Spec(S)) and colony PCR results for these strains. The fibrinolytic activities of the integrants were higher than that of B. subtilis 168 by at least 3.2-fold when grown in LB broth. Cheonggukjang was prepared by inoculating each of B. subtilis 168, SJ3-5nc, SJ176nc, and SJ179nc, and the fibrinolytic activity of cheonggukjang was 4.6 ± 0.7, 10.8 ± 0.9, 7.0 ± 0.6, and 8.0 ± 0.2 (U/g of cheonggukjang), respectively at 72 h. These results showed that construction of B. subtilis strains with enhanced fibrinolytic activities is possible by integration of a strong fibrinolytic gene via a marker-free manner.

  3. Chromosome-encoded beta-lactamases of Citrobacter diversus. Interaction with beta-iodopenicillanate and labelling of the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Amicosante, G; Oratore, A; Joris, B; Galleni, M; Frère, J M; Van Beeumen, J

    1988-01-01

    Both forms of the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Citrobacter diversus react with beta-iodopenicillanate at a rate characteristic of class A beta-lactamases. The active site of form I was labelled with the same reagent. The sequence of the peptide obtained after trypsin hydrolysis is identical with that of a peptide obtained in a similar manner from the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:2848500

  4. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure. PMID:27734896

  5. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bhupesh K; Krohne, George; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle) formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR). Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  6. B-A interchanges are an unlikely pathway for B chromosome integration into the standard genome.

    PubMed

    Bakkali, M; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J P M

    2003-01-01

    One of the conceivable evolutionary pathways of a parasitic B chromosome is its integration into the host genome through translocation to an A chromosome. To investigate this possibility, we analyze here the nature, meiotic behavior and genetic effects of a spontaneous interchange between a medium-sized autosome and a B chromosome, found in one male caught in a Moroccan population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans and the offspring of controlled crosses with six different females. Most metaphase I cells analyzed (115 out of 118) showed a trivalent with chiasmata in both the interstitial and pairing segments, which predicted about half of genetically unbalanced spermatozoa. The analysis of 234 embryos sired by this male on six females showed the lethality of some meiotic products paralleled to a decrease in egg fertility (0.541 +/- 0.051, compared to the 0.879 +/- 0.017 shown by females mated to standard males). These results suggest that the cost of the B-A interchange on host fitness, in terms of gametic inviability, highly diminishes the possibility of frequency increase for the interchange to reach a polymorphic status, which is the first and indispensable step to reach fixation and thus integration of the B chromosome DNA into the host genome.

  7. Stabilization of Telomere G-Quadruplexes Interferes with Human Herpesvirus 6A Chromosomal Integration.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Gravel, Annie; Artusi, Sara; Richter, Sara N; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes using a mechanism that remains poorly understood. To achieve a better understanding of the HHV-6A/B integration mechanism, we made use of BRACO-19, a compound that stabilizes G-quadruplex secondary structures and prevents telomere elongation by the telomerase complex. First, we analyzed the folding of telomeric sequences into G-quadruplex structures and their binding to BRACO-19 using G-quadruplex-specific antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. Circular dichroism studies indicate that BRACO-19 modifies the conformation and greatly stabilizes the G-quadruplexes formed in G-rich telomeric DNA. Subsequently we assessed the effects of BRACO-19 on the HHV-6A initial phase of infection. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 does not affect entry of HHV-6A DNA into cells. We next investigated if stabilization of G-quadruplexes by BRACO-19 affected HHV-6A's ability to integrate its genome into host chromosomes. Incubation of telomerase-expressing cells with BRACO-19, such as HeLa and MCF-7, caused a significant reduction in the HHV-6A integration frequency (P < 0.002); in contrast, BRACO-19 had no effect on HHV-6 integration frequency in U2OS cells that lack telomerase activity and elongate their telomeres through alternative lengthening mechanisms. Our data suggest that the fluidity of telomeres is important for efficient chromosomal integration of HHV-6A and that interference with telomerase activity negatively affects the generation of cellular clones containing integrated HHV-6A.IMPORTANCE HHV-6A/B can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of infected cells. Telomeres consist of repeated hexanucleotides (TTAGGG) of various lengths (up to several kilobases) and end with a single-stranded 3' extension. To avoid recognition and induce a DNA damage response, the single-stranded overhang folds back on itself and forms a telomeric loop (T-loop) or adopts a

  8. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes for Methanosarcina species

    DOE PAGES

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; ...

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA into Methanosarcina spp. was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from the Streptomyces phage φC31. Host strains expressing the φC31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressed M. barkeri P mcrB promoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline inmore » strains that express the tetR gene. The hybrid promoters can be used in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains with tetR -regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion.« less

  9. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  10. Module-based construction of plasmids for chromosomal integration of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Sunaga, Tomonari; Arai, Kunio; Dodgson, James; Ji, Liang; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Carazo-Salas, Rafael; Sato, Masamitsu

    2015-06-01

    Integration of an external gene into a fission yeast chromosome is useful to investigate the effect of the gene product. An easy way to knock-in a gene construct is use of an integration plasmid, which can be targeted and inserted to a chromosome through homologous recombination. Despite the advantage of integration, construction of integration plasmids is energy- and time-consuming, because there is no systematic library of integration plasmids with various promoters, fluorescent protein tags, terminators and selection markers; therefore, researchers are often forced to make appropriate ones through multiple rounds of cloning procedures. Here, we establish materials and methods to easily construct integration plasmids. We introduce a convenient cloning system based on Golden Gate DNA shuffling, which enables the connection of multiple DNA fragments at once: any kind of promoters and terminators, the gene of interest, in combination with any fluorescent protein tag genes and any selection markers. Each of those DNA fragments, called a 'module', can be tandemly ligated in the order we desire in a single reaction, which yields a circular plasmid in a one-step manner. The resulting plasmids can be integrated through standard methods for transformation. Thus, these materials and methods help easy construction of knock-in strains, and this will further increase the value of fission yeast as a model organism.

  11. Module-based construction of plasmids for chromosomal integration of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Sunaga, Tomonari; Arai, Kunio; Dodgson, James; Ji, Liang; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Carazo-Salas, Rafael; Sato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Integration of an external gene into a fission yeast chromosome is useful to investigate the effect of the gene product. An easy way to knock-in a gene construct is use of an integration plasmid, which can be targeted and inserted to a chromosome through homologous recombination. Despite the advantage of integration, construction of integration plasmids is energy- and time-consuming, because there is no systematic library of integration plasmids with various promoters, fluorescent protein tags, terminators and selection markers; therefore, researchers are often forced to make appropriate ones through multiple rounds of cloning procedures. Here, we establish materials and methods to easily construct integration plasmids. We introduce a convenient cloning system based on Golden Gate DNA shuffling, which enables the connection of multiple DNA fragments at once: any kind of promoters and terminators, the gene of interest, in combination with any fluorescent protein tag genes and any selection markers. Each of those DNA fragments, called a ‘module’, can be tandemly ligated in the order we desire in a single reaction, which yields a circular plasmid in a one-step manner. The resulting plasmids can be integrated through standard methods for transformation. Thus, these materials and methods help easy construction of knock-in strains, and this will further increase the value of fission yeast as a model organism. PMID:26108218

  12. An Integrated Physical Map for the Short Arm of Human Chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Ellen T.; Sutherland, Robert; Robinson, Donna L.; Chasteen, Leslie; Gersh, Meryl; Overhauser, Joan; Deaven, Larry L.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Grady, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    The short arm of human chromosome 5 contains ∼48 Mb of DNA and comprises 1.5% of the genome. We have constructed a mega-YAC/ STS map of this region that includes 436 YACs anchored by 216 STSs. By combining and integrating our map with the 5p maps of other groups using the same recombinant DNA library, a comprehensive map was constructed that includes 552 YACs and 504 markers. The YAC map covers >94% of 5p in four YAC contigs, bridges the centromere, and includes an additional 5 Mb of 5q DNA. The average marker density is 95 kb. This integrated 5p map will serve as a resource for the continuing localization of genes on the short arm of human chromosome 5 and as a framework for both generating and aligning the DNA sequence of this region. PMID:10613848

  13. Stable chromosomal integration of the entire nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Klebsiella pneumoniae in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, A; Maina, C V; Fink, G R; Szalay, A A

    1981-01-01

    A bacterial plasmid containing the entire nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster (consisting of at least 15 genes) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was used in conjunction with an Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle plasmid containing the yeast his4 gene cluster to cotransform a his4- recipient strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of 87 histidine-independent clones screened, 2 contained nif DNA. Restriction and hybridization analyses showed that two copies of the nif plasmid (46 kilobases each) are integrated in tandem in the recipient chromosome by recombination between homologous regions in the transforming plasmids. Chromosomal integration was also verified by tetrad analysis, showing that the nif DNA behaved in meiosis like a Mendelian element. During mitotic growth, one of the two copies of the nif region is frequently lost. The remaining copy of nif is stable, even after 40 generations in nonselective medium. Images PMID:6267596

  14. Toward a bacterial genome technology: integration of the Escherichia coli prophage lambda genome into the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome.

    PubMed

    Itaya, M

    1995-07-22

    A novel approach to the cloning large DNAs in the Bacillus subtilis chromosome was examined. An Escherichia coli prophage lambda DNA (48.5 kb) was assembled in the chromosome of B. subtilis. The lambda DNA was first subcloned in four segments, having partially overlapping regions. Assembly of the complete prophage was achieved by successive transformation using three discrete DNA integration modes: overlap-elongation, Campbell-type integration, and gap-filling. In the B. subtilis chromosome, DNA was elongated, using contiguous DNA segments, via overlap-elongation. Jumping from one end of a contiguous DNA stretch to another segment was achieved by Campbell-type integration. The remaining gap was sealed by gap-filling. The incorporated lambda DNA thus assembled was stably replicated as part of the 4188 kb B. subtilis chromosome under non-selective conditions. The present method can be used to accommodate larger DNAs in the B. subtilis chromosome and possible applications of this technique are discussed.

  15. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of chromosome site-specific repetitive sequences in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum, Petromyzontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nunome, Mitsuo; Nishida, Chizuko; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract All extant lamprey karyotypes are characterized by almost all dot-shaped microchromosomes. To understand the molecular basis of chromosome structure in lampreys, we performed chromosome C-banding and silver staining and chromosome mapping of the 18S–28S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and telomeric TTAGGG repeats in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum). In addition, we cloned chromosome site-specific repetitive DNA sequences and characterized them by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. Three types of repetitive sequences were detected; a 200-bp AT-rich repetitive sequence, LCA-EcoRIa that co-localized with the 18S–28S rRNA gene clusters of 3 chromosomal pairs; a 364-bp AT-rich LCA-EcoRIb sequence that showed homology to the EcoRI sequence family from the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which contains short repeats as centromeric motifs; and a GC-rich 702-bp LCA-ApaI sequence that was distributed on nearly all chromosomes and showed significant homology with the integrase-coding region of a Ty3/Gypsy family long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. All three repetitive sequences are highly conserved within the Petromyzontidae or within Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of these site-specific repeats showed that they may be correlated with programed genome rearrangement (LCA-EcoRIa), centromere structure and function (LCA-EcoRIb), and site-specific amplification of LTR retroelements through homogenization between non-homologous chromosomes (LCA-ApaI). PMID:28025319

  16. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of chromosome site-specific repetitive sequences in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum, Petromyzontidae).

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nunome, Mitsuo; Nishida, Chizuko; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    All extant lamprey karyotypes are characterized by almost all dot-shaped microchromosomes. To understand the molecular basis of chromosome structure in lampreys, we performed chromosome C-banding and silver staining and chromosome mapping of the 18S-28S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and telomeric TTAGGG repeats in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum). In addition, we cloned chromosome site-specific repetitive DNA sequences and characterized them by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. Three types of repetitive sequences were detected; a 200-bp AT-rich repetitive sequence, LCA-EcoRIa that co-localized with the 18S-28S rRNA gene clusters of 3 chromosomal pairs; a 364-bp AT-rich LCA-EcoRIb sequence that showed homology to the EcoRI sequence family from the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which contains short repeats as centromeric motifs; and a GC-rich 702-bp LCA-ApaI sequence that was distributed on nearly all chromosomes and showed significant homology with the integrase-coding region of a Ty3/Gypsy family long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. All three repetitive sequences are highly conserved within the Petromyzontidae or within Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of these site-specific repeats showed that they may be correlated with programed genome rearrangement (LCA-EcoRIa), centromere structure and function (LCA-EcoRIb), and site-specific amplification of LTR retroelements through homogenization between non-homologous chromosomes (LCA-ApaI). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  17. Nonrandom distribution of methotrexate-induced aberrations on human chromosomes. Detection of further folic acid sensitive fragile sites.

    PubMed

    Barbi, G; Steinbach, P; Vogel, W

    1984-01-01

    Eleven folic acid sensitive fragile sites (3p14, 7p13, 7q31.1, 7q32, 9q32, 11p13, 14q23, 15q22, 16q23, Xp22.2, Xq22) were detected in one individual, eight of them previously unknown. These sites seem to bear each its specific sensitivity to folic acid deficiency. Six of the sites were observed simultaneously on both homologous chromosomes in at least one cell. Each of these 11 sites was also found in at least one among 12 individuals further examined. Some of these individuals showed six of these 11 sites. The fragile site 3p14 was detected in all individuals examined. The homologous sites 3p14 of one individual differed from each other in their frequency of lesions induced by methotrexate as well as fluorodeoxyuridine. This observation suggests that folic acid sensitivity is a property inherent in the chromatin of an individual chromosome at the site involved in fragility. This property seems to be responsible for the nonrandom fragility at that site and also for the individual sensitivity of each chromosomal site.

  18. Virological analysis of inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 in three hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Kawamura, Y; Kudo, K; Ihira, M; Ohye, T; Kurahashi, H; Kawashima, N; Miyamura, K; Yoshida, N; Kato, K; Takahashi, Y; Kojima, S; Yoshikawa, T

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed 3 hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients with inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (inherited CIHHV-6). Cases 1 (inherited CIHHV-6A) and 2 (inherited CIHHV-6B) were inherited CIHHV-6 recipients. Case 3 received bone marrow from a donor with inherited CIHHV-6B. Following HSCT, HHV-6B was isolated from Case 1. HHV-6A and -6B messenger RNAs were detected in Cases 1 and 3.

  19. Homologous chromosomes make contact at the sites of double-strand breaks in genes in somatic G0/G1-phase human cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Manoj; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; T.Cuenco, Karen; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Kelly, Lindsey M.; Stringer, James R.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2012-01-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) are continuously induced in cells by endogenously generated free radicals and exogenous genotoxic agents such as ionizing radiation. DSBs activate the kinase activity in sensor proteins such as ATM and DNA-PK, initiating a complex DNA damage response that coordinates various DNA repair pathways to restore genomic integrity. In this study, we report the unexpected finding that homologous chromosomes contact each other at the sites of DSBs induced by either radiation or the endonuclease I-PpoI in human somatic cells. Contact involves short segments of homologous chromosomes and is centered on a DSB in active genes but does not occur at I-PpoI sites in intergenic DNA. I-PpoI-induced contact between homologous genes is abrogated by the transcriptional inhibitors actinomycin D and α-amanitin and requires the kinase activity of ATM but not DNA-PK. Our findings provide documentation of a common transcription-related and ATM kinase-dependent mechanism that induces contact between allelic regions of homologous chromosomes at sites of DSBs in human somatic cells. PMID:22645362

  20. Chromosomal Integration of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Gene, blaKPC, in Klebsiella Species Is Elusive but Not Rare.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Amy J; Stoesser, Nicole; Chai, Weidong; Carroll, Joanne; Barry, Katie; Cherunvanky, Anita; Sebra, Robert; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peto, Tim E; Walker, A Sarah; Sifri, Costi D; Crook, Derrick W; Sheppard, Anna E

    2017-03-01

    Carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae are mostly described as being plasmid associated. However, the genetic context of carbapenemase genes is not always confirmed in epidemiological surveys, and the frequency of their chromosomal integration therefore is unknown. A previously sequenced collection of blaKPC-positive Enterobacteriaceae from a single U.S. institution (2007 to 2012; n = 281 isolates from 182 patients) was analyzed to identify chromosomal insertions of Tn4401, the transposon most frequently harboring blaKPC Using a combination of short- and long-read sequencing, we confirmed five independent chromosomal integration events from 6/182 (3%) patients, corresponding to 15/281 (5%) isolates. Three patients had isolates identified by perirectal screening, and three had infections which were all successfully treated. When a single copy of blaKPC was in the chromosome, one or both of the phenotypic carbapenemase tests were negative. All chromosomally integrated blaKPC genes were from Klebsiella spp., predominantly K. pneumoniae clonal group 258 (CG258), even though these represented only a small proportion of the isolates. Integration occurred via IS15-ΔI-mediated transposition of a larger, composite region encompassing Tn4401 at one locus of chromosomal integration, seen in the same strain (K. pneumoniae ST340) in two patients. In summary, we identified five independent chromosomal integrations of blaKPC in a large outbreak, demonstrating that this is not a rare event. blaKPC was more frequently integrated into the chromosome of epidemic CG258 K. pneumoniae lineages (ST11, ST258, and ST340) and was more difficult to detect by routine phenotypic methods in this context. The presence of chromosomally integrated blaKPC within successful, globally disseminated K. pneumoniae strains therefore is likely underestimated.

  1. Chromosomal Integration of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Gene, blaKPC, in Klebsiella Species Is Elusive but Not Rare

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Weidong; Carroll, Joanne; Barry, Katie; Cherunvanky, Anita; Sebra, Robert; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peto, Tim E.; Walker, A. Sarah; Sifri, Costi D.; Crook, Derrick W.; Sheppard, Anna E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae are mostly described as being plasmid associated. However, the genetic context of carbapenemase genes is not always confirmed in epidemiological surveys, and the frequency of their chromosomal integration therefore is unknown. A previously sequenced collection of blaKPC-positive Enterobacteriaceae from a single U.S. institution (2007 to 2012; n = 281 isolates from 182 patients) was analyzed to identify chromosomal insertions of Tn4401, the transposon most frequently harboring blaKPC. Using a combination of short- and long-read sequencing, we confirmed five independent chromosomal integration events from 6/182 (3%) patients, corresponding to 15/281 (5%) isolates. Three patients had isolates identified by perirectal screening, and three had infections which were all successfully treated. When a single copy of blaKPC was in the chromosome, one or both of the phenotypic carbapenemase tests were negative. All chromosomally integrated blaKPC genes were from Klebsiella spp., predominantly K. pneumoniae clonal group 258 (CG258), even though these represented only a small proportion of the isolates. Integration occurred via IS15-ΔI-mediated transposition of a larger, composite region encompassing Tn4401 at one locus of chromosomal integration, seen in the same strain (K. pneumoniae ST340) in two patients. In summary, we identified five independent chromosomal integrations of blaKPC in a large outbreak, demonstrating that this is not a rare event. blaKPC was more frequently integrated into the chromosome of epidemic CG258 K. pneumoniae lineages (ST11, ST258, and ST340) and was more difficult to detect by routine phenotypic methods in this context. The presence of chromosomally integrated blaKPC within successful, globally disseminated K. pneumoniae strains therefore is likely underestimated. PMID:28031204

  2. PBO Integrated Real-Time Observing Sites at Volcanic Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Borsa, A.; Feaux, K.; Smith, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory, an element of NSF's EarthScope program, has six integrated observatories in Yellowstone and four on Mt St Helens. These observatories consist of some combination of borehole strainmeters, borehole seismometers, GPS, tiltmeters, pore pressure, thermal measurements and meteorological data. Data from all these instruments have highly variable data rates and formats, all synchronized to GPS time which can cause significant congestion of precious communication resources. PBO has been experimenting with integrating these data streams to both maximize efficiency and minimize latency through the use of software that combines the streams, like Antelope, and VPN technologies.

  3. The use of HIV-1 integration site analysis information in clinical studies aiming at HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kiselinova, Maja; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms for the establishment and the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir remain to be completely defined. HIV-1 infection is characterised by the integration of the reverse transcribed proviral DNA into the host's genome. This integrated proviral DNA can remain replication silent, but a small part of it is fully competent to restart viral replication when treatment is interrupted. Hence, this replication-competent provirus is the cause of viral rebound and is called the viral reservoir. The exact site of proviral integration within the host's cellular chromosome may affect the transcriptional activity of HIV. Thanks to recent technological advances, HIV-1 integration site analysis has been used to assess HIV-1 reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals. Analysis of HIV-1 integration sites in infected individuals undergoing suppressive ART led to identification of expanded clonal cell populations, indicating that clonal proliferation of the proviral reservoir may contribute to the long-term persistence of viral reservoirs. Here we describe the findings of several clinical studies, where a comprehensive HIV-1 integration site analysis was performed.

  4. Individual chromosome identification, chromosomal collinearity and genetic-physical integrated map in Gossypium darwinii and four D genome cotton species revealed by BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yimei; Liu, Fang; Peng, Renhai; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted on the individual chromosome identification in Gossypium darwinii (A(d)D(d)), G. klotzschianum (D(3k)), G. davidsonii (D(3d)), G. armourianum (D(2-1)) and G. aridum (D(4)) using a multi-probe fluorescence of in situ hybridization (FISH) system. Comparative analysis on their genetic maps with that of physical maps was made as well. The FISH probes used contained two sets of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones [one is specific to 26 individual chromosomes from A and D subgenomes of G. hirsutum (A(h) and D(h)) while the other is a D genome centromere-specific BAC clone 150D24], 45S and 5S rDNA clones. The results showed that all A(d) chromosomes were marked with the 13 A(h) chromosome-specific BAC clones, whilst all D(d), D(3k), D(3d), D(2-1) and D(4) chromosomes and chromosomal arms were identified with the 13 D(h) chromosome-specific BAC clones and the D genome centromere-specific BAC. According to the homology within D subgenomes which are between A (D) genome and A (D) subgenome, the systematic nomenclature for individual chromosome in the five species was established. The chromosomes of A (D) subgenomes in G. darwinii were named as A(d)01-A(d)13 (D(d)01-D(d)13). The chromosomes in D(3k), D(3d), D(2-1) and D(4) were named as D(3k)01-D(3k)13, D(3d)01-D(3d)13, D(2-1)01-D(2-1)13 and D(4)01-D(4)13, respectively. Based on the successful identification for individual chromosomes, 45S and 5S rDNA were located to the special chromosomes and chromosomal arms for all five species. And there appeared chromosomal collinearity from the BAC clones among different species by comparing BACs positions, which suggested that the majority of chromosome segment homology may exist between D genomes and D subgenome. Moreover, as the genetic map and physical map were integrated, the orientations of genetic maps for D(d) and D genomes of diploid cotton were established. The orientations of some of chromosomes in genetic maps (D(d)03, D(d)04, D(d)06, D(d)09

  5. Integration of Biomass Harvesting and Site Preparation

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; William F. Watson

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the costs of various site preparation methods with various levels of harvesting Site impacts, soil compaction and disturbance were examined. Three hawesting methods rare evaluated in pine pulpwood plantation and pine sawtimber stands. The harvesting methods tested were (1) conventional - harvesting all roundwood. (2) two-pass - first...

  6. Fragile sites, telomeric DNA sequences, B chromosomes, and DNA content in raccoon dogs, Nyctereutes procyonoides, with comparative notes on foxes, coyote, wolf, and raccoon.

    PubMed

    Wurster-Hill, D H; Ward, O G; Davis, B H; Park, J P; Moyzis, R K; Meyne, J

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies of the genus Nyctereutes disclosed two subspecies of differing chromosome numbers accompanied by B chromosomes. To further define the relationship of these subspecies to each other, and to other carnivores, and to learn more about the structure and function of their chromosomes, we characterized and compared the genomes in terms of DNA content by flow cytometry, fragile sites induced by aphidicolin, and telomere sequences using biotinylated DNA probes detected with fluorescence. We also characterized the B chromosomes of these two subspecies.

  7. Distribution and characteristics of bovine leukemia virus integration sites in the host genome at three different clinical stages of infection.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, T; Oguma, K; Sentsui, H

    2015-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is an oncogenic retrovirus closely related to human T-cell lymphotropic virus. BLV-infected cattle are categorized as asymptomatic carriers or as having persistent lymphocytosis or enzootic bovine leukemia, depending on the clinical stage. We investigated the BLV integration site distribution at three BLV clinical stages and examined genome sequence features around the integration sites. In all, 264 BLV integration sites, at various locations on each chromosome, were identified in 28 cattle by inverse PCR and BLAST searches. Approximately one-third of BLV proviruses were independently integrated within transcriptional units, and approximately 10 % were integrated near transcription start sites. Moreover, less than 7 % of BLV integration sites were located near CpG islands. BLV did not preferentially integrate into transcriptionally active regions during any of the clinical stages. At the nucleotide level, regions around BLV integration points were significantly A/T rich with weak sequence consensus. BLV preferentially integrated within long interspersed nuclear repeat elements. Although BLV integration sites may not be associated with disease progression, integration is selective at the nucleotide level.

  8. Spo11-accessory proteins link double-strand break sites to the chromosome axis in early meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Silvia; Mendoza, Marco A; Berlinger, Marc; Huang, Lingzhi; Nicolas, Alain; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Klein, Franz

    2011-08-05

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes initiates via programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), generated by complexes comprising Spo11 transesterase plus accessory proteins. DSBs arise concomitantly with the development of axial chromosome structures, where the coalescence of axis sites produces linear arrays of chromatin loops. Recombining DNA sequences map to loops, but are ultimately tethered to the underlying axis. How and when such tethering occurs is currently unclear. Using ChIPchip in yeast, we show that Spo11-accessory proteins Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 stably interact with chromosome axis sequences, upon phosphorylation of Mer2 by S phase Cdk. This axis tethering requires meiotic axis components (Red1/Hop1) and is modulated in a domain-specific fashion by cohesin. Loss of Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 binding correlates with loss of DSBs. Our results strongly suggest that hotspot sequences become tethered to axis sites by the DSB machinery prior to DSB formation.

  9. Characterization of joining sites of a viral histone H4 on host insect chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Jung, Jin-Kyo

    2017-01-01

    A viral histone H4 (CpBV-H4) is encoded in a polydnavirus, Cotesia plutellae bracovirus (CpBV). It plays a crucial role in parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, C. plutellae, against diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, by altering host gene expression in an epigenetic mode by its N-terminal tail after joining host nucleosomes. Comparative transcriptomic analysis between parasitized and nonparasitized P. xylostella by RNA-Seq indicated that 1,858 genes were altered at more than two folds in expression levels at late parasitic stage, including 877 up-regulated genes and 981 down-regulated genes. Among parasitic factors altering host gene expression, CpBV-H4 alone explained 16.3% of these expressional changes. To characterize the joining sites of CpBV-H4 on host chromosomes, ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing) was applied to chromatins extracted from parasitized larvae. It identified specific 538 ChIP targets. Joining sites were rich (60.2%) in AT sequence. Almost 40% of ChIP targets included short nucleotide repeat sequences presumably recognizable by transcriptional factors and chromatin remodeling factors. To further validate these CpBV-H4 targets, CpBV-H4 was transiently expressed in nonparasitized host at late larval stage and subjected to ChIP-Seq. Two kinds of ChIP-Seqs shared 51 core joining sites. Common targets were close (within 1 kb) to genes regulated at expression levels by CpBV-H4. However, other host genes not close to CpBV-H4 joining sites were also regulated by CpBV-H4. These results indicate that CpBV-H4 joins specific chromatin regions of P. xylostella and controls about one sixth of the total host genes that were regulated by C. plutellae parasitism in an epigenetic mode. PMID:28486493

  10. Gene Content and Function of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in Human Chromosome 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxin; Newman, Tera; Linardopoulou, Elena; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Various portions of the region surrounding the site where two ancestral chromosomes fused to form human chromosome 2 are duplicated elsewhere in the human genome, primarily in subtelomeric and pericentromeric locations. At least 24 potentially functional genes and 16 pseudogenes reside in the 614-kb of sequence surrounding the fusion site and paralogous segments on other chromosomes. By comparing the sequences of genomic copies and transcripts, we show that at least 18 of the genes in these paralogous regions are transcriptionally active. Among these genes are new members of the cobalamin synthetase W domain (CBWD) and forkhead domain FOXD4 gene families. Copies of RPL23A and SNRPA1 on chromosome 2 are retrotransposed-processed pseudogenes that were included in segmental duplications; we find 53 RPL23A pseudogenes in the human genome and map the functional copy of SNRPA1 to 15qter. The draft sequence of the human genome also provides new information on the location and intron–exon structure of functional copies of other 2q-fusion genes (PGM5, retina-specific F379, helicase CHLR1, and acrosin). This study illustrates that the duplication and rearrangement of subtelomeric and pericentromeric regions have functional relevance to human biology; these processes can change gene dosage and/or generate genes with new functions. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. Sequence data reported in this paper have been deposited in GenBank and assigned the following accession nos.: AF452722, AF452723, and AF452724.] PMID:12421752

  11. Hypervariability of ribosomal DNA at multiple chromosomal sites in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, L; Reed, K M; Phillips, R B

    1995-06-01

    Variation in the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was examined. Digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes showed that almost every individual had a unique combination of length variants with most of this variation occurring within rather than between populations. Sequence analysis of a 2.3 kilobase (kb) EcoRI-DraI fragment spanning the 3' end of the 28S coding region and approximately 1.8 kb of the IGS revealed two blocks of repetitive DNA. Putative transcriptional termination sites were found approximately 220 bases (b) downstream from the end of the 28S coding region. Comparison of the 2.3-kb fragments with two longer (3.1 kb) fragments showed that the major difference in length resulted from variation in the number of short (89 b) repeats located 3' to the putative terminator. Repeat units within a single nucleolus organizer region (NOR) appeared relatively homogeneous and genetic analysis found variants to be stably inherited. A comparison of the number of spacer-length variants with the number of NORs found that the number of length variants per individual was always less than the number of NORs. Examination of spacer variants in five populations showed that populations with more NORs had more spacer variants, indicating that variants are present at different rDNA sites on nonhomologous chromosomes.

  12. Integration of DNA into bacterial chromosomes from plasmids without a counter-selection marker

    PubMed Central

    Heap, John T.; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Cooksley, Clare M.; Ng, Yen-Kuan; Cartman, Stephen T.; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P.

    2012-01-01

    Most bacteria can only be transformed with circular plasmids, so robust DNA integration methods for these rely upon selection of single-crossover clones followed by counter-selection of double-crossover clones. To overcome the limited availability of heterologous counter-selection markers, here we explore novel DNA integration strategies that do not employ them, and instead exploit (i) activation or inactivation of genes leading to a selectable phenotype, and (ii) asymmetrical regions of homology to control the order of recombination events. We focus here on the industrial biofuel-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, which previously lacked robust integration tools, but the approach we have developed is broadly applicable. Large sequences can be delivered in a series of steps, as we demonstrate by inserting the chromosome of phage lambda (minus a region apparently unstable in Escherichia coli in our cloning context) into the chromosome of C. acetobutylicum in three steps. This work should open the way to reliable integration of DNA including large synthetic constructs in diverse microorganisms. PMID:22259038

  13. A rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Fan; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Direct optimization of the metabolic pathways on the chromosome requires tools that can fine tune the overexpression of a desired gene or optimize the combination of multiple genes. Although plasmid-dependent overexpression has been used for this task, fundamental issues concerning its genetic stability and operational repeatability have not been addressed. Here, we describe a rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies (CIGMC), which uses the flippase from the yeast 2-μm plasmid. Using green fluorescence protein as a model, we verified that the fluorescent intensity was in accordance with the integration copy number of the target gene. When a narrow-host-range replicon, R6K, was used in the integrative plasmid, the maximum integrated copy number of Escherichia coli reached 15. Applying the CIGMC method to optimize the overexpression of single or multiple genes in amino acid biosynthesis, we successfully improved the product yield and stability of the production. As a flexible strategy, CIGMC can be used in various microorganisms other than E. coli. PMID:25851494

  14. Chromosomal location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites in Triportheus fish species (Characiformes, Characidae)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites was determined in eight species and populations of the fish genus Triportheus by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The males and females of all species had 2n = 52 chromosomes and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A single 18S rDNA site that was roughly equivalent to an Ag-NOR was detected on the short arms of a submetacentric pair in nearly all species, and up to two additional sites were also observed in some species. In addition, another 18S rDNA cluster was identified in a distal region on the long arms of the W chromosome; this finding corroborated previous evidence that this cluster would be a shared feature amongst Triportheus species. In T. angulatus, a heterozygotic paracentric inversion involving the short arms of one homolog of a metacentric pair was associated with NORs. The 5S rDNA sites were located on the short arms of a single submetacentric chromosomal pair, close to the centromeres, except in T. auritus, which had up to ten 5S rDNA sites. The 18S and 5S rDNA sites were co-localized and adjacent on the short arms of a chromosomal pair in two populations of T. nematurus. Although all Triportheus species have a similar karyotypic macrostructure, the results of this work show that in some species ribosomal genes may serve as species-specific markers when used in conjunction with other putatively synapomorphic features. PMID:21637644

  15. Chromosomal Distribution of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Melanogaster: Test of the Ectopic Recombination Model for Maintenance of Insertion Site Number

    PubMed Central

    Hoogland, C.; Biemont, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data of insertion site localization and site occupancy frequency of P, hobo, I, copia, mdg1, mdg3, 412, 297, and roo transposable elements (TEs) on the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster were extracted from the literature. We show that TE insertion site number per chromosomal division was significantly correlated with the amount of DNA. The insertion site number weighted by DNA content was not correlated with recombination rate for all TEs except hobo, for which a positive correlation was detected. No global tendency emerged in the relationship between TE site occupancy frequency, weighted by DNA content, and recombination rate; a strong negative correlation was, however, found for the 3L arm. A possible dominant deleterious effect of chromosomal rearrangements due to recombination between TE insertions is thus not the main factor explaining the dynamics of TEs, since this hypothesis implies a negative relationship between recombination rate and both TE insertion site number and site occupancy frequency. The alternative hypothesis of selection against deleterious effects of insertional mutations is discussed. PMID:8878685

  16. A phage integrase directs efficient site-specific integration in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Amy C.; Olivares, Eric C.; Thyagarajan, Bhaskar; Calos, Michele P.

    2000-01-01

    The integrase from the Streptomyces phage φC31 carries out efficient recombination between the attP site in the phage genome and the attB site in the host bacterial chromosome. In this paper, we show that the enzyme also functions in human cells. A plasmid assay system was constructed that measured intramolecular integration of attP into attB. This assay was used to demonstrate that in the presence of the φC31 integrase, precise unidirectional integration occurs with an efficiency of 100% in Escherichia coli and >50% in human cells. This assay system was also used to define the minimal sizes of attB and attP at 34 bp and 39 bp, respectively. Furthermore, precise and efficient intermolecular integration of an incoming plasmid bearing attP into an established Epstein–Barr virus plasmid bearing attB was documented in human cells. This work is a demonstration of efficient, site-specific, unidirectional integration in mammalian cells. These observations form the basis for site-specific integration strategies potentially useful in a broad range of genetic engineering applications. PMID:10801973

  17. A highly efficient single-step, markerless strategy for multi-copy chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Liang, Youyun; Zhang, Mingzi M; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in genome editing capabilities for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways for stable industrial production remains challenging. In this work, we developed a simple platform for high-efficiency, single-step, markerless, multi-copy chromosomal integration of full biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this Di-CRISPR (delta integration CRISPR-Cas) platform based on the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated systems (Cas), we specifically designed guide RNA sequences to target multiple delta sites in the yeast genome. The generation of double stranded breaks at the delta sites allowed simultaneous integration of multiple copies of linearized donor DNA containing large biochemical pathways. With our newly developed Di-CRISPR platform, we were able to attain highly efficient and markerless integration of large biochemical pathways and achieve an unprecedented 18-copy genomic integration of a 24 kb combined xylose utilization and (R,R)-2,3-butanediol (BDO) production pathway in a single step, thus generating a strain that was able to produce BDO directly from xylose. The simplicity and high efficiency of the Di-CRISPR platform could provide a superior alternative to high copy plasmids and would render this platform an invaluable tool for genome editing and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-06

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules".

  19. Construction of Reference Chromosome-Scale Pseudomolecules for Potato: Integrating the Potato Genome with Genetic and Physical Maps

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D’Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S.; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A.; Hamilton, John P.; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J.; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E.; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E.; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M. E.; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker−based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal “pseudomolecules”. PMID:24062527

  20. Integrated Propulsion Data System Public Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    The Integrated Propulsion Data System's (IPDS) focus is to provide technologically-advanced philosophies of doing business at SSC that will enhance the existing operations, engineering and management strategies and provide insight and metrics to assess their daily impacts, especially as related to the Propulsion Test Directorate testing scenarios for the 21st Century.

  1. Site-specific integration by the adeno-associated virus rep protein.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Alessandra; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2011-10-01

    Inserting genetic information at precise locations into the human genome has been the goal of gene transfer technology for almost two decades. The spectacular progress of mammalian genetics has led to the development of technology for genome editing and homologous recombination in human somatic cells that is finally approaching efficiency compatible with clinical application. Site-specific integration, or the insertion of genes at known locations by enzymes with target recognition capacity, has progressed slowly but steadily in recent years, and could very well be the basis of the next generation of gene transfer technology. This review focuses on the use of Rep, the replicase/integrase of the adeno-associated virus (AAV), to insert genes at the natural AAV integration site on human chromosome 19. This region (AAVS1) has characteristics that make it an ideal target for somatic transgenesis.

  2. An immunocompetent child with chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6B accidentally identified during the care of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Junko; Tanaka, Junko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hishiki, Haruka; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ohye, Tamae; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Kohno, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is the only virus known to integrate into human chromosomes and be transmitted from parents to offspring. Less than 1% of the population carries integrated HHV-6 in their genomes. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old Japanese girl with an extraordinarily high copy number of HHV-6B in her genome. The integrated virus genome was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal fluid and serum during the treatment of meningoencephalitis and pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Furthermore, the HHV-6B genome was detected in hair follicle, plasma, and whole blood in the patient and her mother, but not in the patient's father. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the viral genome was integrated into chromosome 22. Therefore, these results emphasize the importance of screening for chromosomally integrated HHV-6 prior to starting unnecessary antiviral therapies, particularly for patients harboring HHV-6 with a high copy number.

  3. Retrovirus DNA termini bound by integrase communicate in trans for full-site integration in vitro.

    PubMed

    McCord, M; Chiu, R; Vora, A C; Grandgenett, D P

    1999-07-05

    Integration of linear retrovirus DNA involves the concerted insertion of the viral termini (full-site integration) into the host chromosome. We investigated the interactions that occur between long terminal repeat (LTR) termini bound by avian retrovirus integrase (IN) for full-site integration in vitro. Wild-type (wt) or mutant LTR donors that possess gain-of-function ("G") or loss-of-function ("L") for full-site integration activity were used. G LTR termini are characterized as having significantly higher strand transfer activity than the wt and the L LTR termini. L LTR mutations are classified as partially or extremely defective for strand transfer activity. The L mutations were further classified by their ability to either permit or block the assembly of G or wt LTR termini into nucleoprotein complexes capable of full-site strand transfer. We demonstrated that avian myeloblastosis virus IN bound to G LTR termini increased the incorporation of partially defective L LTR termini into nucleoprotein complexes that were capable of full-site integration. The observed full-site integration activity of these assembled nucleoprotein complexes appeared to be influenced by each individual IN-LTR complex in trans. In contrast, extremely defective L LTR termini exhibited the ability to effectively block the assembly of wt LTR termini into nucleoprotein complexes capable of full-site strand transfer. Data from nonspecific DNA competition experiments suggested that IN had an apparent higher affinity for G LTR donor termini than for partially defective L LTR donor termini as measured by full-site integration activity. However, assembled nucleoprotein complexes containing either two G or two L LTR donors were stable, having a similar half-life of approximately 2 h on ice. The results suggest that LTR termini bound by IN exhibit an allosteric effect to modulate full-site integration in vitro. Similar regulatory controls also appear to exist in vivo between the wt U3 and wt U5 LTR

  4. The human chromosomal fragile sites more often involved in constitutional deletions and duplications - A genetic and statistical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Dora Prata; Sequeira, Inês J.; Figueiredo, Carlos; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2016-12-01

    Human chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) are heritable loci or regions of the human chromosomes prone to exhibit gaps, breaks and rearrangements. Determining the frequency of deletions and duplications in CFSs may contribute to explain the occurrence of human disease due to those rearrangements. In this study we analyzed the frequency of deletions and duplications in each human CFS. Statistical methods, namely data display, descriptive statistics and linear regression analysis were applied to analyze this dataset. We found that FRA15C, FRA16A and FRAXB are the most frequently involved CFSs in deletions and duplications occurring in the human genome.

  5. Safe genetic modification of cardiac stem cells using a site-specific integration technique.

    PubMed

    Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Narsinh, Kazim H; Hu, Shijun; Han, Leng; Lee, Andrew S; Karow, Marisa; Nguyen, Patricia K; Nag, Divya; Calos, Michele P; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-09-11

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative repair after myocardial infarction. Exploitation of their full therapeutic potential may require stable genetic modification of the cells ex vivo. Safe genetic engineering of stem cells, using facile methods for site-specific integration of transgenes into known genomic contexts, would significantly enhance the overall safety and efficacy of cellular therapy in a variety of clinical contexts. We used the phiC31 site-specific recombinase to achieve targeted integration of a triple fusion reporter gene into a known chromosomal context in hCPCs and human endothelial cells. Stable expression of the reporter gene from its unique chromosomal integration site resulted in no discernible genomic instability or adverse changes in cell phenotype. Namely, phiC31-modified hCPCs were unchanged in their differentiation propensity, cellular proliferative rate, and global gene expression profile when compared with unaltered control hCPCs. Expression of the triple fusion reporter gene enabled multimodal assessment of cell fate in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography. Intramyocardial transplantation of genetically modified hCPCs resulted in significant improvement in myocardial function 2 weeks after cell delivery, as assessed by echocardiography (P=0.002) and MRI (P=0.001). We also demonstrated the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of genetically modifying differentiated human endothelial cells, which enhanced hind limb perfusion (P<0.05 at day 7 and 14 after transplantation) on laser Doppler imaging. The phiC31 integrase genomic modification system is a safe, efficient tool to enable site-specific integration of reporter transgenes in progenitor and differentiated cell types.

  6. Safe Genetic Modification of Cardiac Stem Cells Using a Site-Specific Integration Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Narsinh, Kazim H.; Hu, Shijun; Han, Leng; Lee, Andrew S.; Karow, Marisa; Nguyen, Patricia K.; Nag, Divya; Calos, Michele P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative repair after myocardial infarction. Exploitation of their full therapeutic potential may require stable genetic modification of the cells ex vivo. Safe genetic engineering of stem cells, using facile methods for site-specific integration of transgenes into known genomic contexts, would significantly enhance the overall safety and efficacy of cellular therapy in a variety of clinical contexts. Methods and Results We employed the phiC31 site-specific recombinase to achieve targeted integration of a triple fusion reporter gene into a known chromosomal context in hCPCs and human endothelial cells (hECs). Stable expression of the reporter gene from its unique chromosomal integration site resulted in no discernible genomic instability or adverse changes in cell phenotype. Namely, phiC31-modified hCPCs were unchanged in their differentiation propensity, cellular proliferative rate, and global gene expression profile when compared to unaltered control hCPCs. Expression of the triple fusion reporter gene enabled multimodal assessment of cell fate in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Intramyocardial transplantation of genetically modified hCPCs resulted in significant improvement in myocardial function two weeks after cell delivery, as assessed by echocardiography (P = 0.002) and magnetic resonance imaging (P = 0.001). We also demonstrated the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of genetically modifying differentiated hECs, which enhanced hindlimb perfusion (P<0.05 at day 7 and 14 after transplantation) on laser Doppler imaging. Conclusions The phiC31 integrase genomic modification system is a safe, efficient tool to enable site-specific integration of reporter transgenes in progenitor and differentiated cell types. PMID:22965984

  7. Exclusion of the retinoblastoma gene and chromosome 13q as the site of a primary lesion for human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Hall, J M; Hebert, J M; King, M C

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome 13q has been suggested as the site of a gene predisposing to human breast cancer, because loss of heterozygosity of alleles on this chromosome has been observed in some ductal breast tumors and because two breast cancer lines are altered at the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) at 13q14. To test this possibility, linkage of breast cancer susceptibility to 14 loci on chromosome 13q loci was assessed in extended families in which breast cancer is apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. RB1 was excluded as the site of a breast cancer gene by a lod score of Z = -7.60 at close linkage for 13 families. Multipoint analysis yielded negative lod scores throughout the region between 13q12 and 13q34; over most of this distance, Z less than -2.0. Therefore, chromosome 13q appears to be excluded as the site of primary lesion for breast cancer in these families. In addition, comparison of tumor versus normal tissues of nonfamilial breast cancer patients revealed an alteration at the 5' end of RB1 in a mucoid carcinoma but no alterations of RB1 in five informative ductal adenocarcinomas. Linkage data and comparisons of tumor and normal tissues suggest that changes in the RBI locus either are secondary alterations associated with progression of some tumors or occur by chance. Images Figure 2 PMID:2294744

  8. Fertilizability and chromosomal integrity of frozen-thawed Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) spermatozoa intracytoplasmically injected into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Tateno, H; Kusakabe, H; Matsuoka, T; Kamiguchi, Y; Fujise, Y; Ishikawa, H; Ohsumi, S; Fukui, Y

    2007-02-01

    Prior to attempting the in vitro production of embryos in the Bryde's whale (Balaenoputera edeni), we investigated whether spermatozoa can retain the capacity for oocyte activation and pronucleus formation as well as chromosomal integrity under cryopreservation by using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) into mouse oocytes. Regardless of motility and viability, whale spermatozoa efficiently led to the activation of mouse oocytes (90.3-97.4%), and sperm nuclei successfully transformed into male pronucleus within activated ooplasm (87.2-93.6%). Chromosome analysis at the first cleavage metaphase (M) of the hybrid zygotes revealed that a majority (95.2%) of motile spermatozoa had the normal chromosome complement, while the percentage of chromosomal normality was significantly reduced to 63.5% in immotile spermatozoa and 50.0% in dead spermatozoa due to the increase in structural chromosome aberrations. This is the first report showing that motile Bryde's whale spermatozoa are competent to support embryonic development.

  9. Chromosomal damage in two species of aquatic turtles (Emys orbicularis and Mauremys caspica) inhabiting contaminated sites in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Matson, Cole W; Palatnikov, Grigoriy; Islamzadeh, Arif; McDonald, Thomas J; Autenrieth, Robin L; Donnelly, K C; Bickham, John W

    2005-07-01

    The Caspian region and specifically the Apsheron peninsula of Azerbaijan are known to be polluted with a variety of environmental contaminants. These complex mixtures of contaminants make risk assessment difficult. We used the flow cytometry method (FCM) and the micronucleus assay (MN) to assess chromosomal damage in aquatic turtles (Emys orbicularis, the European pond turtle; and Mauremys caspica, the Caspian turtle) inhabiting contaminated wetlands in Azerbaijan. Evidence of genetic damage was found for two sites, Neftchala and Sumgayit, relative to a reference site, Ali Bairamly. Sediment samples from each site were analyzed for PAHs and mercury to evaluate potential contaminant associations with genetic damage. A significant positive correlation was documented between three-ring PAH sediment concentrations and FCM estimates of chromosomal damage in E. orbicularis. These data combine to show that the contaminated wetlands in Sumgayit and Neftchala are genotoxic and that three-ring PAHs are likely a significant influence on observed genotoxicity.

  10. Chromosome Mapping of 18S Ribosomal RNA Genes in Eleven Hypostomus Species (Siluriformes, Loricariidae): Diversity Analysis of the Sites.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Marceléia; da Rosa, Renata; Zawadzki, Claudio H; Mariotto, Sandra; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the chromosomal distribution of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in different populations of 11 species of Hypostomus collected in important Brazilian basins, namely South Atlantic, Upper Paraná, and Paraguay applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Hypostomus cochliodon, Hypostomus commersoni, Hypostomus hermanni, Hypostomus regani, Hypostomus albopunctatus, Hypostomus paulinus, Hypostomus aff. paulinus, Hypostomus iheringii, and Hypostomus mutucae presented multiple 18S rDNA sites while Hypostomus strigaticeps and Hypostomus nigromaculatus exhibited a single pair of chromosomes with 18S rDNA sites. The studied species presented variations in the number and position of these sites. The results accomplished were similar to those obtained by the analysis of AgNORs, revealing the same interspecific variability. Each species exhibited distinctive patterns of AgNOR and 18S rDNA distribution, which can be considered cytogenetic markers in each species of the genus and help improve the discussions on the phylogeny of the group.

  11. Ku Binding on Telomeres Occurs at Sites Distal from the Physical Chromosome Ends

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Emeline

    2016-01-01

    The Ku complex binds non-specifically to DNA breaks and ensures repair via NHEJ. However, Ku is also known to bind directly to telomeric DNA ends and its presence there is associated with telomere capping, but avoiding NHEJ. How the complex discriminates between a DNA break and a telomeric extremity remains unknown. Our results using a tagged Ku complex, or a chromosome end capturing method, in budding yeast show that yKu association with telomeres can occur at sites distant from the physical end, on sub-telomeric elements, as well as on interstitial telomeric repeats. Consistent with previous studies, our results also show that yKu associates with telomeres in two distinct and independent ways: either via protein-protein interactions between Yku80 and Sir4 or via direct DNA binding. Importantly, yKu associates with the new sites reported here via both modes. Therefore, in sir4Δ cells, telomere bound yKu molecules must have loaded from a DNA-end near the transition of non-telomeric to telomeric repeat sequences. Such ends may have been one sided DNA breaks that occur as a consequence of stalled replication forks on or near telomeric repeat DNA. Altogether, the results predict a new model for yKu function at telomeres that involves yKu binding at one-sided DNA breaks caused by replication stalling. On telomere proximal chromatin, this binding is not followed by initiation of non-homologous end-joining, but rather by break-induced replication or repeat elongation by telomerase. After repair, the yKu-distal portion of telomeres is bound by Rap1, which in turn reduces the potential for yKu to mediate NHEJ. These results thus propose a solution to a long-standing conundrum, namely how to accommodate the apparently conflicting functions of Ku on telomeres. PMID:27930670

  12. Decondensation of chromosomal 45S rDNA sites in Lolium and Festuca genotypes does not result in karyotype instability.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laiane Corsini; Jankowska, Maja; Fuchs, Joerg; Mittelmann, Andréa; Techio, Vânia Helena; Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Fragile sites (FSs) in plants have been described for species like Lolium and other grasses. Whereas in humans FSs were shown to be involved in genome instabilities; the consequences of FSs expression in plants are not known yet. To evaluate whether FSs cause karyotype instabilities, we assessed the frequency of micronuclei and lagging chromosomes in meristematic cells, the stability of the DNA content, and the occurrence of neocentromeres in the presumed chromosomal fragments of Lolium perenne, Lolium multiflorum, Festuca arrundinacea, and two Festulolium hybrids. The cell cycle analysis along with flow cytometric genome size measurements showed high stability in all genomes evaluated. Neocentromeric activity was neither observed in the presumed fragments nor in any other chromosomal region, then this is not the mechanism responsible by the stability. However, Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probe in combination with YOYO staining of metaphasic chromosomes showed that many extended nucleolus organizing region (NOR) form very thin YOYO-positive chromatin fibers connecting the acentric 'fragment' with the centromere-containing chromosome region. The obtained data indicate that the expression of FSs does not result in genome instabilities or neocentromere formation. The FS-containing 45S rDNA carrying chromatin fibers undergo a cell cycle and gene activity-dependent dynamic decondensation process.

  13. Transformation of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea occurs by DNA integration into single or multiple chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Judelson, H S; Coffey, M D; Arredondo, F R; Tyler, B M

    1993-03-01

    A procedure for stable transformation was developed for Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea, an oomycete pathogen of soybean. Transformants were obtained using a bacterial hygromycin resistance gene fused to a promoter and terminator from the ham34 gene of another oomycete, Bremia lactucae. Vector DNA, alone or complexed to cationic liposomes, was introduced into protoplasts using polyethylene glycol and CaCl2. DNA and RNA hybridization, and phosphotransferase assays, confirmed the presence and expression of vector DNA in the transformants. Hybridization to electrophoretically separated chromosomes of P. m. glycinea showed that vector DNA had integrated into only one chromosome in four transformants, and into multiple chromosomes in one transformant.

  14. Human genes for U2 small nuclear RNA map to a major adenovirus 12 modification site on chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, V; Ares, M; Weiner, A M; Francke, U

    U2 RNA is one of the abundant, highly conserved species of small nuclear RNA (snRNA) molecules implicated in RNA processing. As is typical of mammalian snRNAs, human U1 and U2 are each encoded by a multigene family. In the human genome, defective copies of the genes (pseudogenes) far outnumber the authentic genes. The majority or all of the 35 to 100 bona fide U1 genes have at least 20 kilobases (kb) of nearly perfect 5' and 3' flanking homology in common with each other; these U1 genes are clustered loosely in chromosome band 1p36 (refs 5, 7) with intergenic distances exceeding 44 kb. In contrast, the 10 to 20 U2 genes are clustered tightly in a virtually perfect tandem array which has a strict 6-kb repeating unit. We report here the assignment, by in situ hybridization, of the U2 gene cluster to chromosome 17, bands q21-q22. Surprisingly, this region is one of three major adenovirus 12 modification sites which undergo chromosome decondensation ('uncoiling') in permissive human cells infected by highly oncogenic strains of adenovirus. The two other major modification sites, 1p36 and 1q21, coincide with the locations of U1 genes and class I U1 pseudogenes, respectively. We suggest that snRNA genes are the major targets of viral chromosome modification.

  15. Dynamics of 45S rDNA sites in the cell cycle: fragile sites and chromosomal stability in Lolium and Festuca.

    PubMed

    Rocha, L C; Silva, G A; Bustamante, F O; Silveira, R A D; Mittlemann, A; Techio, V H

    2017-01-23

    Analyses carried out with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in C-metaphases of the Lolium-Festuca complex have shown the occurrence of spontaneous fragile sites (FSs) in 45S rDNA regions. FSs are expressed as gaps but they do not result in breaks or chromosomal fragments in these species. These gaps have high DNA condensation observed as thin chromatin fibers that connect the apparent segments of the fragile chromosome, allowing for genomic stability. Assessing the behavior of these regions in the cell cycle of Lolium and Festuca species may lead to a better understanding of the dynamics that preserve stability during cell division. Furthermore, it is interesting to track the dynamics of chromosomes bearing 45S rDNA sites in the cell cycle as well as to observe the expression of FSs with no effect of the mitotic block. We observed variation in both the number and size of 45S FISH signals from the S/G2 phases of interphase and from prophase to anaphase where gaps in 45S rDNA sites also were observed. The change in the degree of condensation of the 45S site begins in the S/G2 phase and appears to be related to the transcriptional demand. Taking into account that the number of 45S rDNA sites tends to be re-established when cells reach telophase, we suggest that the chromatin fiber goes back to the normal condensation level to the anaphase (after segregation), allowing for the approximation of chromosome segments and ensuring dynamics that favor the genomic stability of these species.

  16. High-Resolution Mapping of the Drosophila Fourth Chromosome Using Site-Directed Terminal Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Lukacsovich, Tamas; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko; Locke, John; Podemski, Lynn; Marsh, J. Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    For more than 80 years, the euchromatic right arm of the Drosophila fourth chromosome (101F-102F) has been one of the least genetically accessible regions of the fly genome despite the fact that many important genes reside there. To improve the mapping of genes on the fourth chromosome, we describe a strategy to generate targeted deficiencies and we describe 13 deficiencies that subdivide the 300 kb between the cytological coordinates 102A6 and 102C1 into five discrete regions plus a 200-kb region from 102C1 to 102D6. Together these deficiencies substantially improve the mapping capabilities for mutant loci on the fourth chromosome. PMID:15466427

  17. Genetic characterization of site-specific integration functions of phi AAU2 infecting "Arthrobacter aureus" C70.

    PubMed Central

    Le Marrec, C; Moreau, S; Loury, S; Blanco, C; Trautwetter, A

    1996-01-01

    All the essential genetic determinants for site-specific integration of corynephage phi AAU2 are contained within a 1,756-bp DNA fragment, carried on the integrative plasmid p5510, and are shown to be functional in Escherichia coli. One open reading frame, ORF4, encoding a protein of 266 amino acids was shown to represent the phi AAU2 integrase. The nucleotide sequence of the phi AAU2 attachment site, attP, and the attB, attL, and attR sequences in the host "Arthrobacter aureus" C70 were determined. Identical nucleotide sequences were shown to be responsible for the integration of p5510 in the chromosomes of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Brevibacterium divaricatum, and B. lactofermentum, and a sequence almost identical to attB was found to be present in these three strains. In contrast to other phage site-specific recombination systems, a plasmid encompassing only int-attP failed to integrate into the host chromosome. This led to the identification of an 800-bp noncoding region, immediately upstream of int, absolutely required for site-specific integration of p5510. PMID:8606175

  18. Genetic characterization of site-specific integration functions of phi AAU2 infecting "Arthrobacter aureus" C70.

    PubMed

    Le Marrec, C; Moreau, S; Loury, S; Blanco, C; Trautwetter, A

    1996-04-01

    All the essential genetic determinants for site-specific integration of corynephage phi AAU2 are contained within a 1,756-bp DNA fragment, carried on the integrative plasmid p5510, and are shown to be functional in Escherichia coli. One open reading frame, ORF4, encoding a protein of 266 amino acids was shown to represent the phi AAU2 integrase. The nucleotide sequence of the phi AAU2 attachment site, attP, and the attB, attL, and attR sequences in the host "Arthrobacter aureus" C70 were determined. Identical nucleotide sequences were shown to be responsible for the integration of p5510 in the chromosomes of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Brevibacterium divaricatum, and B. lactofermentum, and a sequence almost identical to attB was found to be present in these three strains. In contrast to other phage site-specific recombination systems, a plasmid encompassing only int-attP failed to integrate into the host chromosome. This led to the identification of an 800-bp noncoding region, immediately upstream of int, absolutely required for site-specific integration of p5510.

  19. NOR sites detected by Ag-dAPI staining of an unusual autosome chromosome of Bradysia hygida (Diptera:Sciaridae) colocalize with C-banded heterochromatic region.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Vanessa Pinatto; Borges, Alex Rodrigues; Fernandez, Maria Aparecida

    2002-01-01

    The study of chromosomes in insects is a good tool in mitotic process analysis, zoographic localization and evolution investigation. Among them, the Sciaridae offers a karyotype with a small number of chromosomes, where the heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer region, NOR, are easily analyzed in metaphase chromosomes obtained from cerebral ganglia squashes. In this work, the heterochromatic regions on Bradysia hygida mitotic chromosomes, revealed by C-banding, were identified as centromeric blocks on A and C chromosomes and as dark interstitial region in B and X chromosomes. By Ag-DAPI staining, active nucleolus organizer region, NOR, was revealed associated to the constitutive heterochromatin in the end of the C autosome chromosome. The C-band regions and the unusual ribosomal site localization are discussed.

  20. Drosophila enhancer of Zeste/ESC complexes have a histone H3 methyltransferase activity that marks chromosomal Polycomb sites.

    PubMed

    Czermin, Birgit; Melfi, Raffaella; McCabe, Donna; Seitz, Volker; Imhof, Axel; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2002-10-18

    Enhancer of Zeste is a Polycomb Group protein essential for the establishment and maintenance of repression of homeotic and other genes. In the early embryo it is found in a complex that includes ESC and is recruited to Polycomb Response Elements. We show that this complex contains a methyltransferase activity that methylates lysine 9 and lysine 27 of histone H3, but the activity is lost when the E(Z) SET domain is mutated. The lysine 9 position is trimethylated and this mark is closely associated with Polycomb binding sites on polytene chromosomes but is also found in centric heterochromatin, chromosome 4, and telomeric sites. Histone H3 methylated in vitro by the E(Z)/ESC complex binds specifically to Polycomb protein.

  1. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. Results A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous ‘arms’ target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. Conclusions The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal

  2. Non-Random Distribution of 5S rDNA Sites and Its Association with 45S rDNA in Plant Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Roa, Fernando; Guerra, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    5S and 45S rDNA sites are the best mapped chromosome regions in eukaryotic chromosomes. In this work, a database was built gathering information about the position and number of 5S rDNA sites in 784 plant species, aiming to identify patterns of distribution along the chromosomes and its correlation with the position of 45S rDNA sites. Data revealed that in most karyotypes (54.5%, including polyploids) two 5S rDNA sites (a single pair) are present, with 58.7% of all sites occurring in the short arm, mainly in the proximal region. In karyotypes of angiosperms with only 1 pair of sites (single sites) they are mostly found in the proximal region (52.0%), whereas in karyotypes with multiple sites the location varies according to the average chromosome size. Karyotypes with multiple sites and small chromosomes (<3 µm) often display proximal sites, while medium-sized (between 3 and 6 µm) and large chromosomes (>6 µm) more commonly show terminal or interstitial sites. In species with holokinetic chromosomes, the modal value of sites per karyotype was also 2, but they were found mainly in a terminal position. Adjacent 5S and 45S rDNA sites were often found in the short arm, reflecting the preferential distribution of both sites in this arm. The high frequency of genera with at least 1 species with adjacent 5S and 45S sites reveals that this association appeared several times during angiosperm evolution, but it has been maintained only rarely as the dominant array in plant genera. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The two Cis-acting sites, parS1 and oriC1, contribute to the longitudinal organisation of Vibrio cholerae chromosome I.

    PubMed

    David, Ariane; Demarre, Gaëlle; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, François-Xavier; Possoz, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    The segregation of bacterial chromosomes follows a precise choreography of spatial organisation. It is initiated by the bipolar migration of the sister copies of the replication origin (ori). Most bacterial chromosomes contain a partition system (Par) with parS sites in close proximity to ori that contribute to the active mobilisation of the ori region towards the old pole. This is thought to result in a longitudinal chromosomal arrangement within the cell. In this study, we followed the duplication frequency and the cellular position of 19 Vibrio cholerae genome loci as a function of cell length. The genome of V. cholerae is divided between two chromosomes, chromosome I and II, which both contain a Par system. The ori region of chromosome I (oriI) is tethered to the old pole, whereas the ori region of chromosome II is found at midcell. Nevertheless, we found that both chromosomes adopted a longitudinal organisation. Chromosome I extended over the entire cell while chromosome II extended over the younger cell half. We further demonstrate that displacing parS sites away from the oriI region rotates the bulk of chromosome I. The only exception was the region where replication terminates, which still localised to the septum. However, the longitudinal arrangement of chromosome I persisted in Par mutants and, as was reported earlier, the ori region still localised towards the old pole. Finally, we show that the Par-independent longitudinal organisation and oriI polarity were perturbed by the introduction of a second origin. Taken together, these results suggest that the Par system is the major contributor to the longitudinal organisation of chromosome I but that the replication program also influences the arrangement of bacterial chromosomes.

  4. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-strand break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-02-28

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-strand break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-strand break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosome 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Integration Site Choice of a Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yubin; Moressi, Christopher J.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Xie, Litao; Tran, Diane Thi; Casavant, Thomas L.; Ak, Prashanth; Benham, Craig J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; McCray, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped 226 unique integration sites in human hepatoma cells following gene transfer with a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentivirus vector. FIV integrated across the entire length of the transcriptional units. Microarray data indicated that FIV integration favored actively transcribed genes. Approximately 21% of FIV integrations within transcriptional units occurred in genes regulated by the LEDGF/p75 transcriptional coactivator. DNA in regions of FIV insertion sites exhibited a “bendable” structure and a pattern of duplex destabilization favoring strand separation. FIV integration preferences are more similar to those of primate lentiviruses and distinct from those of Moloney murine leukemia virus, avian sarcoma leukosis virus, and foamy virus. PMID:16912328

  6. Integration of HIV in the Human Genome: Which Sites Are Preferential? A Genetic and Statistical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Juliana; Moreira, Elsa; Sequeira, Inês J.; Rodrigues, António S.; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal fragile sites (FSs) are loci where gaps and breaks may occur and are preferential integration targets for some viruses, for example, Hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, HPV16, HPV18, and MLV vectors. However, the integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Giemsa bands and in FSs is not yet completely clear. This study aimed to assess the integration preferences of HIV in FSs and in Giemsa bands using an in silico study. HIV integration positions from Jurkat cells were used and two nonparametric tests were applied to compare HIV integration in dark versus light bands and in FS versus non-FS (NFSs). The results show that light bands are preferential targets for integration of HIV-1 in Jurkat cells and also that it integrates with equal intensity in FSs and in NFSs. The data indicates that HIV displays different preferences for FSs compared to other viruses. The aim was to develop and apply an approach to predict the conditions and constraints of HIV insertion in the human genome which seems to adequately complement empirical data. PMID:27294106

  7. The Spartan ortholog maternal haploid is required for paternal chromosome integrity in the Drosophila zygote.

    PubMed

    Delabaere, Laetitia; Orsi, Guillermo A; Sapey-Triomphe, Laure; Horard, Béatrice; Couble, Pierre; Loppin, Benjamin

    2014-10-06

    The animal sperm nucleus is characterized by an extremely compacted organization of its DNA after the global replacement of histones with sperm-specific nuclear basic proteins, such as protamines. In the absence of DNA repair activity in the mature gamete, the integrity of the paternal genome is potentially challenged by the unique topological constraints exerted on sperm DNA. In addition, the maintenance of paternal DNA integrity during the rapid remodeling of sperm chromatin at fertilization has long been regarded as a maternal trait. However, little is known about the nature of the egg proteins involved in this essential aspect of zygote formation. We had previously characterized the unique phenotype of the classical Drosophila maternal effect mutant maternal haploid (mh), which specifically affects the integration of paternal chromosomes in the zygote. Here we show that MH is the fly ortholog of the recently identified human DVC1/Spartan protein, a conserved regulator of DNA damage tolerance. Like Spartan, MH protein is involved in the resistance to UV radiation and recruits the p97/TER94 segregase to stalled DNA replication forks in somatic cells. In the zygote, we found that the mh phenotype is consistent with perturbed or incomplete paternal DNA replication. Remarkably, however, the specific accumulation of MH in the male pronucleus before the first S phase suggests that this maternal protein is required to maintain paternal DNA integrity during nuclear decondensation or to set the paternal chromatin landscape in preparation of the first zygotic cycle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The actinophage RP3 DNA integrates site-specifically into the putative tRNA(Arg)(AGG) gene of Streptomyces rimosus.

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, K; Schmid, H; Schmidt, U; Rausch, H

    1995-01-01

    The temperate actinophage RP3 integrates site-specifically into the chromosome of Streptomyces rimosus R6-554. The phage attachment site attP and the hybrid attachment sites of the integrated prophage--attL and attR--were cloned and sequenced. The 54nt core sequence, common to all RP3 related attachment sites, comprises the 3' terminal end of a putative tRNA(Arg)(AGG) gene. AttB bears the complete tRNA gene which is restored in attL after integration. A 7.5kb HindIII fragment, bearing attP, was used to construct an integrative plasmid to simulate the integration process in vivo and to localize the phage genes necessary for site specific integration. The int and xis genes were sequenced and compared to other recombination genes. PMID:7870591

  9. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1).

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Wikramasinghe, Priyankara; Norseen, Julie; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Showe, Louise; Davuluri, Ramana V; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-10-07

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites. PMID

  11. Converting Maturing Nuclear Sites to Integrated Power Production Islands

    DOE PAGES

    Solbrig, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear islands, which are integrated power production sites, could effectively sequester and safeguard the US stockpile of plutonium. A nuclear island, an evolution of the integral fast reactor, utilizes all the Transuranics (Pu plus minor actinides) produced in power production, and it eliminates all spent fuel shipments to and from the site. This latter attribute requires that fuel reprocessing occur on each site and that fast reactors be built on-site to utilize the TRU. All commercial spent fuel shipments could be eliminated by converting all LWR nuclear power sites to nuclear islands. Existing LWR sites have the added advantage ofmore » already possessing a license to produce nuclear power. Each could contribute to an increase in the nuclear power production by adding one or more fast reactors. Both the TRU and the depleted uranium obtained in reprocessing would be used on-site for fast fuel manufacture. Only fission products would be shipped to a repository for storage. The nuclear island concept could be used to alleviate the strain of LWR plant sites currently approaching or exceeding their spent fuel pool storage capacity. Fast reactor breeding ratio could be designed to convert existing sites to all fast reactors, or keep the majority thermal.« less

  12. Targeted induction of meiotic double-strand breaks reveals chromosomal domain-dependent regulation of Spo11 and interactions among potential sites of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kugou, Kazuto; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation mediated by Spo11. DSBs occur with frequency in chromosomal regions called hot domains but are seldom seen in cold domains. To obtain insights into the determinants of the distribution of meiotic DSBs, we examined the effects of inducing targeted DSBs during yeast meiosis using a UAS-directed form of Spo11 (Gal4BD-Spo11) and a meiosis-specific endonuclease, VDE (PI-SceI). Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaved its target sequence (UAS) integrated in hot domains but rarely in cold domains. However, Gal4BD-Spo11 did bind to UAS and VDE efficiently cleaved its recognition sequence in either context, suggesting that a cold domain is not a region of inaccessible or uncleavable chromosome structure. Importantly, self-association of Spo11 occurred at UAS in a hot domain but not in a cold domain, raising the possibility that Spo11 remains in an inactive intermediate state in cold domains. Integration of UAS adjacent to known DSB hotspots allowed us to detect competitive interactions among hotspots for activation. Moreover, the presence of VDE-introduced DSB repressed proximal hotspot activity, implicating DSBs themselves in interactions among hotspots. Thus, potential sites for Spo11-mediated DSB are subject to domain-specific and local competitive regulations during and after DSB formation.

  13. Characterization of the attP site of the integrative element pSAM2 from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Alain; Friedmann, Annick; Tuphile, Karine; Guerineau, Michel; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    pSAM2 is integrated into the Streptomyces ambofaciens chromosome through site-specific recombination between the element (attP) and the chromosomal (attB) site. The 43 kDa integrase protein encoded by pSAM2 catalyses this recombination event. Tools have been developed to study site-specific recombination in Escherichia coli. In vivo studies showed that a 360 bp fragment of attP is required for efficient site-specific recombination and that int can be provided in trans. pSAM2 integrase was purified and overexpressed in E. coli and Int binding at the attP site was studied. DNaseI footprinting revealed two sites that bind integrase strongly and appear to be symmetrical with regard to the core site. These two P1/P2 arm-type sites both contain a 17 bp motif that is identical except at one position, GTCACGCAG(A/T)TAGACAC. P1 and P2 are essential for site-specific recombination.

  14. Homology of pCS1 Plasmid Sequences with Chromosomal DNA in Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum: Evidence for the Presence of a Repeated Sequence and Plasmid Integration

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Bradley D.; Oleson, Arland E.

    1987-01-01

    Restriction fragments of pCS1, a 50.6-kilobase (kb) plasmid present in many strains of Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (“Corynebacterium sepedonicum”), have been cloned in an M13mp11 phage vector. Radiolabeled forms of these cloned fragments have been used as Southern hybridization probes for the presence of plasmid sequences in chromosomal DNA of this organism. These studies have shown that all tested strains lacking the covalently closed circular form of pCS1 contain the plasmid in integrated form. In each case the site of integration exists on a single plasmid restriction fragment with a size of 5.1 kb. Southern hybridizations with these probes have also revealed the existence of a major repeated sequence in C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. Hybridizations of chromosomal DNA with deletion subclones of a 2.9-kb plasmid fragment containing the repeated sequence indicate that the size of the repeated sequence is approximately 1.3 kb. One of the copies of the repeated sequence is on the plasmid fragment containing the site of integration. Images PMID:16347464

  15. Identification of Host-Chromosome Binding Sites and Candidate Gene Targets for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus LANA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Tsai, Kevin; Chen, Horng-Shen; Wikramasinghe, Priyankara; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Showe, Louise; Domsic, John; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    LANA is essential for tethering the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome to metaphase chromosomes and for modulating host-cell gene expression, but the binding sites in the host-chromosome remain unknown. Here, we use LANA-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to identify LANA binding sites in the viral and host-cell genomes of a latently infected pleural effusion lymphoma cell line BCBL1. LANA bound with high occupancy to the KSHV genome terminal repeats (TR) and to a few minor binding sites in the KSHV genome, including the LANA promoter region. We identified 256 putative LANA binding site peaks with P < 0.01 and overlap in two independent ChIP-Seq experiments. We validated several of the high-occupancy binding sites by conventional ChIP assays and quantitative PCR. Candidate cellular LANA binding motifs were identified and assayed for binding to purified recombinant LANA protein in vitro but bound with low affinity compared to the viral TR binding site. More than half of the LANA binding sites (170/256) could be mapped to within 2.5 kb of a cellular gene transcript. Pathways and Gene Ontogeny (GO) analysis revealed that LANA binds to genes within the p53 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) regulatory network. Further analysis revealed partial overlap of LANA and STAT1 binding sites in several gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-regulated genes. We show that ectopic expression of LANA can downmodulate IFN-γ-mediated activation of a subset of genes, including the TAP1 peptide transporter and proteasome subunit beta type 9 (PSMB9), both of which are required for class I antigen presentation. Our data provide a potential mechanism through which LANA may regulate several host cell pathways by direct binding to gene regulatory elements. PMID:22419807

  16. Structural analysis of loci involved in pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-01-01

    pSAM2 is an 11-kb plasmid integrated in the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and ATCC15154 genomes and found additionally as a free replicon in an uv derivative. After transfer into S. ambofaciens DSM40697 (devoid of pSAM2) or into Streptomyces lividans, specific integration of pSAM2 occurred very efficiently. A 58-bp sequence (att) present in both pSAM2 (attP) and S. ambofaciens strain DSM40697 (attB) attachment regions is found at the boundaries (attL and attR) of integrated pSAM2 in S. ambofaciens strain ATCC23877. The S. lividans chromosomal integration zone contained an imperfectly conserved att sequence (attB), and the integration event of pSAM2 was located within a 49-bp sequence of attB. Only one primary functional attB sequence was present in the S. lividans or S. ambofaciens DSM40697 total DNA. The integration zone of S. lividans hybridized with the integration zone of S. ambofaciens DSM40697. The two integration zones were homologous only to the right side of the att sequence. The conserved region contained an open reading frame (ORF A) with a stop codon located 99 bp from the attB sequence in both strains. S. ambofaciens DSM40697 contained DNA sequences related to pSAM2 on the left side of the att site. The att sequence was included in a region conserved in Streptomyces antibioticus, Streptomyces actuosus, Streptomyces bikiniensis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces glaucescens, and Streptomyces parvulus. Site-specific integration of a pSAM2 derivative was characterized in another unrelated strain, Streptomyces griseofuscus. This strain contained an imperfectly conserved 58-bp attB sequence, and the integration event took place within a 45-bp sequence of attB. Site-specific integration of pSAM2 in three nonrelated Streptomyces strains suggests the wide host range of pSAM2 integration in Streptomyces.

  17. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  18. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  19. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michael L.; Royle, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease. PMID:28704957

  20. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION FOR CONTAMINATED SITE REMEDIATION: CLEANUP GOALS & PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop and field-test integrated remediation technologies that operate in a synergistic manner for cost-effective treatment of contaminated sites to achieve risk-based and rational endpoints. Aggressive technologies designed for rapid source-zone remediation m...

  1. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION FOR CONTAMINATED SITE REMEDIATION: CLEANUP GOALS & PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop and field-test integrated remediation technologies that operate in a synergistic manner for cost-effective treatment of contaminated sites to achieve risk-based and rational endpoints. Aggressive technologies designed for rapid source-zone remediation m...

  2. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  3. Site-specific recombinases as tools for heterologous gene integration.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Nobutaka; Muroi, Tetsurou; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Site-specific recombinases are the enzymes that catalyze site-specific recombination between two specific DNA sequences to mediate DNA integration, excision, resolution, or inversion and that play a pivotal role in the life cycles of many microorganisms including bacteria and bacteriophages. These enzymes are classified as tyrosine-type or serine-type recombinases based on whether a tyrosine or serine residue mediates catalysis. All known tyrosine-type recombinases catalyze the formation of a Holliday junction intermediate, whereas the catalytic mechanism of all known serine-type recombinases includes the 180° rotation and rejoining of cleaved substrate DNAs. Both recombinase families are further subdivided into two families; the tyrosine-type recombinases are subdivided by the recombination directionality, and the serine-type recombinases are subdivided by the protein size. Over more than two decades, many different site-specific recombinases have been applied to in vivo genome engineering, and some of them have been used successfully to mediate integration, deletion, or inversion in a wide variety of heterologous genomes, including those from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Here, we review the recombination mechanisms of the best characterized recombinases in each site-specific recombinase family and recent advances in the application of these recombinases to genomic manipulation, especially manipulations involving site-specific gene integration into heterologous genomes.

  4. Marker-free site-specific gene integration in plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vibha; Ow, David W

    2004-12-01

    For nearly 15 years, the use of site-specific recombination systems in plants has focused on the deletion or integration of DNA. Each of these applications offers practical solutions to two problems in biotechnology: the presence of unneeded DNA in the transgene locus and variation in the locus structure among independent transgenic lines. Given that each of these separate applications is becoming more practical for commercial use, it is time to consider combining them into an integrated technology. Here we propose a strategy for a "combined step" method that makes use of two site-specific recombination systems: one for integrating the DNA and a second for removing sequences that are not needed after DNA transfer. This strategy is based on published data and exemplifies the use of the Cre-lox, FLP-FRT and R-RS inducible systems.

  5. Modification site localization scoring integrated into a search engine.

    PubMed

    Baker, Peter R; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Chalkley, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Large proteomic data sets identifying hundreds or thousands of modified peptides are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Several methods for assessing the reliability of peptide identifications both at the individual peptide or data set level have become established. However, tools for measuring the confidence of modification site assignments are sparse and are not often employed. A few tools for estimating phosphorylation site assignment reliabilities have been developed, but these are not integral to a search engine, so require a particular search engine output for a second step of processing. They may also require use of a particular fragmentation method and are mostly only applicable for phosphorylation analysis, rather than post-translational modifications analysis in general. In this study, we present the performance of site assignment scoring that is directly integrated into the search engine Protein Prospector, which allows site assignment reliability to be automatically reported for all modifications present in an identified peptide. It clearly indicates when a site assignment is ambiguous (and if so, between which residues), and reports an assignment score that can be translated into a reliability measure for individual site assignments.

  6. Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    1999-02-24

    In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

  7. WWOX, the chromosomal fragile site FRA16D spanning gene: Its role in metabolism and contribution to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Amanda; Lee, Cheng Shoou; Dayan, Sonia; O’Keefe, Louise

    2015-01-01

    The WWOX gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D that is located within a massive (780 kb) intron. The WWOX gene is very long, at 1.1 Mb, which may contribute to the very low abundance of the full-length 1.4 kb mRNA. Alternative splicing also accounts for a variety of aberrant transcripts, most of which are devoid of C-terminal sequences required for WWOX to act as an oxidoreductase. The mouse WWOX gene also spans a chromosomal fragile site implying some sort of functional relationship that confers a selective advantage. The encoded protein domains of WWOX are conserved through evolution (between humans and Drosophila melanogaster) and include WW domains, an NAD -binding site, short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme and nuclear compartmentalization signals. This homology has enabled functional analyses in D. melanogaster that demonstrate roles for WWOX in reactive oxygen species regulation and metabolism. Indeed the human WWOX gene is also responsive to altered metabolism. Cancer cells typically exhibit altered metabolism (Warburg effect). Many cancers exhibit FRA16D DNA instability that results in aberrant WWOX expression and is associated with poor prognosis for these cancers. It is therefore thought that aberrant WWOX expression contributes to the altered metabolism in cancer. In addition, others have found that a specific (low-expression) allele of WWOX genotype contributes to cancer predisposition. PMID:25595186

  8. Development of a Site-Directed Integration Plasmid for Heterologous Gene Expression in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Indikova, Ivana; Szostak, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the molecular basis of the interactions between the parasite Mycoplasma gallisepticum and its avian hosts suffers from the lack of genetic tools available for the pathogen. In the absence of well established methods for targeted disruption of relevant M. gallisepticum genes, we started to develop suicide vectors and equipped them with a short fragment of M. gallisepticum origin or replication (oriCMG). We failed to create a disruption vector, although by adding a further short fragment of the M. gallisepticum tufB upstream region we created a “Trojan horse” plasmid. This is fully integrated into the genomic DNA of M. gallisepticum, always at the same site, oriCMG, and is able to carry and express any gene of interest in the genetic background of M. gallisepticum. Successful expression of a heterologous gene was shown with the lacZ gene of E. coli. When used for gene complementation or expression of hybrid genes in M. gallisepticum, a site-specific combined integration/expression vector constitutes an improvement on randomly integrating transposons, which might have unexpected effects on the expression of chromosomal genes. PMID:24278444

  9. Integrated grassland observation sites and integrated cropland observation sites at El Reno, Oklahoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the financial support from the National Science Foundation and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, a team of researchers from the University of Oklahoma and the USDA ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory have worked together and established two Integrated Grassland Observation s...

  10. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the pseudoautosomal region and isolation of 25 new sequence-tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Slim, R. Laboratoire de Cytogenetique et Genetique Oncologiques, Villejuif ); Le Paslier, D.; Ougen, P.; Billault, A.; Cohen, D. ); Compain, S.; Levilliers, J.; Mintz, L.; Weissenbach, J.; Petit, C. )

    1993-06-01

    Thirty-one yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the human pseudoautosomal region were identified by a combination of sequence-tagged site (STS) screenings and colony hybridizations, using a subtelomeric interspersed repetitive element mapping predominantly to the pseudoautosomal region. Twenty-five new pseudoautosomal STSs were generated, of which 4 detected restriction fragment length polymorphisms. A total of 33 STSs were used to assemble the 31 YACs into a single contiguous set of overlapping DNA fragments spanning at least 2.3 megabases of the pseudoautosomal region. In addition, four pseudoautosomal genes including hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase have been positioned on this set of fragments. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  12. The MaoP/maoS Site-Specific System Organizes the Ori Region of the E. coli Chromosome into a Macrodomain

    PubMed Central

    Valens, Michèle; Thiel, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The Ori region of bacterial genomes is segregated early in the replication cycle of bacterial chromosomes. Consequently, Ori region positioning plays a pivotal role in chromosome dynamics. The Ori region of the E. coli chromosome is organized as a macrodomain with specific properties concerning DNA mobility, segregation of loci and long distance DNA interactions. Here, by using strains with chromosome rearrangements and DNA mobility as a read-out, we have identified the MaoP/maoS system responsible for constraining DNA mobility in the Ori region and limiting long distance DNA interactions with other regions of the chromosome. MaoP belongs to a group of proteins conserved in the Enterobacteria that coevolved with Dam methylase including SeqA, MukBEF and MatP that are all involved in the control of chromosome conformation and segregation. Analysis of DNA rings excised from the chromosome demonstrated that the single maoS site is required in cis on the chromosome to exert its effect while MaoP can act both in cis and in trans. The position of markers in the Ori region was affected by inactivating maoP. However, the MaoP/maoS system was not sufficient for positioning the Ori region at the ¼–¾ regions of the cell. We also demonstrate that the replication and the resulting expansion of bulk DNA are localized centrally in the cell. Implications of these results for chromosome positioning and segregation in E. coli are discussed. PMID:27627105

  13. Analyses of germline, chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6A and B genomes indicate emergent infection and new inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Tweedy, J; Spyrou, M A; Hubacek, P; Kuhl, U; Lassner, D; Gompels, U A

    2015-02-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A) is rarer than HHV-6B in many infant populations. However, they are similarly prevalent as germline, chromosomally integrated genomes (ciHHV-6A/B). This integrated form affects 0.1-1 % of the human population, where potentially virus gene expression could be in every cell, although virus relationships and health effects are not clear. In a Czech/German patient cohort ciHHV-6A was more common and diverse than ciHHV-6B. Quantitative PCR, nucleotide sequencing and telomeric integration site amplification characterized ciHHV-6 in 44 German myocarditis/cardiomyopathy and Czech malignancy/inflammatory disease (MI) patients plus donors. Comparisons were made to sequences from global virus reference strains, and blood DNA from childhood-infections from Zambia (HHV-6A mainly) and Japan (HHV-6B). The MI cohort were 86 % (18/21) ciHHV-6A, the cardiac cohort 65 % (13/20) ciHHV-6B, suggesting different disease links. Reactivation was supported by findings of 1) recombination between ciHHV-6A and HHV-6B genes in 20 % (4/21) of the MI cohort; 2) expression in a patient subset, of early/late transcripts from the inflammatory mediator genes chemokine receptor U51 and chemokine U83, both identical to ciHHV-6A DNA sequences; and 3) superinfection shown by deep sequencing identifying minor virus-variants only in ciHHV-6A, which expressed transcripts, indicating virus infection reactivates latent ciHHV-6A. Half the MI cohort had more than two copies per cell, median 5.2, indicative of reactivation. Remarkably, the integrated genomes encoded the secreted-active form of virus chemokines, rare in virus from childhood-infections. This shows integrated virus genomes can contribute new human genes with links to inflammatory pathology and supports ciHHV-6A reactivation as a source for emergent infection.

  14. Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, David; Griffith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large federal installation hosting diverse missions and multiple organizations with competing regulatory needs. Accordingly, there was a need to integrate environmental compliance strategies to ensure the consistent flow of information between Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR), the regulatory agencies and other interested parties. In order to meet this objective, DOE and major SRS contractors and tenants have committed to a strategy of collaboratively working together to ensure that a consistent, integrated, and fully coordinated approach to environmental compliance and regulator relationships is maintained. DOE-SR and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the SRS management and operations contractor, have established an environmental compliance integration process that provides for the consistent flow down of requirements to projects, facilities, SRS contractors, and subcontractors as well as the upward flow of information to assist in the early identification and resolution of environmental regulatory issues and enhancement of compliance opportunities. In addition, this process strongly fosters teamwork to collaboratively resolve complex regulatory challenges, promote pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities to advance site missions in a manner that balances near-term actions with the long-term site vision, while being protective of human health and the environment. Communication tools are being utilized, some with enhancements, to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. SRS internal regulatory integration is accomplished through a variety of informational exchange forums (e.g., Challenges, Opportunities and Resolution (COR) Team, DOE's Joint Site Regulatory Integration Team, and the Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC)). SRS communications and problem-solving with the regulatory agencies have been enhanced through formation of an

  15. Additional Copies of the Proteolipid Protein Gene Causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Arise by Separate Integration into the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hodes, M. E.; Woodward, Karen; Spinner, Nancy B.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Enrico-Simon, Agnes; Kamholz, John; Stambolian, Dwight; Zackai, Elaine H.; Pratt, Victoria M.; Thomas, I. T.; Crandall, Kerry; Dlouhy, Stephen R.; Malcolm, Sue

    2000-01-01

    The proteolipid protein gene (PLP) is normally present at chromosome Xq22. Mutations and duplications of this gene are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). Here we describe two new families in which males affected with PMD were found to have a copy of PLP on the short arm of the X chromosome, in addition to a normal copy on Xq22. In the first family, the extra copy was first detected by the presence of heterozygosity of the AhaII dimorphism within the PLP gene. The results of FISH analysis showed an additional copy of PLP in Xp22.1, although no chromosomal rearrangements could be detected by standard karyotype analysis. Another three affected males from the family had similar findings. In a second unrelated family with signs of PMD, cytogenetic analysis showed a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome. In the inv(X) carried by several affected family members, FISH showed PLP signals at Xp11.4 and Xq22. A third family has previously been reported, in which affected members had an extra copy of the PLP gene detected at Xq26 in a chromosome with an otherwise normal banding pattern. The identification of three separate families in which PLP is duplicated at a noncontiguous site suggests that such duplications could be a relatively common but previously undetected cause of genetic disorders. PMID:10827108

  16. Additional copies of the proteolipid protein gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease arise by separate integration into the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Woodward, K; Spinner, N B; Emanuel, B S; Enrico-Simon, A; Kamholz, J; Stambolian, D; Zackai, E H; Pratt, V M; Thomas, I T; Crandall, K; Dlouhy, S R; Malcolm, S

    2000-07-01

    The proteolipid protein gene (PLP) is normally present at chromosome Xq22. Mutations and duplications of this gene are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). Here we describe two new families in which males affected with PMD were found to have a copy of PLP on the short arm of the X chromosome, in addition to a normal copy on Xq22. In the first family, the extra copy was first detected by the presence of heterozygosity of the AhaII dimorphism within the PLP gene. The results of FISH analysis showed an additional copy of PLP in Xp22.1, although no chromosomal rearrangements could be detected by standard karyotype analysis. Another three affected males from the family had similar findings. In a second unrelated family with signs of PMD, cytogenetic analysis showed a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome. In the inv(X) carried by several affected family members, FISH showed PLP signals at Xp11.4 and Xq22. A third family has previously been reported, in which affected members had an extra copy of the PLP gene detected at Xq26 in a chromosome with an otherwise normal banding pattern. The identification of three separate families in which PLP is duplicated at a noncontiguous site suggests that such duplications could be a relatively common but previously undetected cause of genetic disorders.

  17. Stringent and reproducible tetracycline-regulated transgene expression by site-specific insertion at chromosomal loci with pre-characterised induction characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Papanastasiou, Antigoni M; Porter, Andrew CG

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability to regulate transgene expression has many applications, mostly concerning the analysis of gene function. Desirable induction characteristics, such as low un-induced expression, high induced expression and limited cellular heterogeneity, can be seriously impaired by chromosomal position effects at the site of transgene integration. Many clones may therefore need to be screened before one with optimal induction characteristics is identified. Furthermore, such screens must be repeated for each new transgene investigated, and comparisons between clones with different transgenes is complicated by their different integration sites. Results To circumvent these problems we have developed a "screen and insert" strategy in which clones carrying a transgene for a fluorescent reporter are first screened for those with optimal induction characteristics. Site-specific recombination (SSR) is then be used repeatedly to insert any new transgene at the reporter transgene locus of such clones so that optimal induction characteristics are conferred upon it. Here we have tested in a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080) two of many possible implementations of this approach. Clones (e.g. Rht14-10) in which a GFP reporter gene is very stringently regulated by the tetracycline (tet) transactivator (tTA) protein were first identified flow-cytometrically. Transgenes encoding luciferase, I-SceI endonuclease or Rad52 were then inserted by SSR at a LoxP site adjacent to the GFP gene resulting stringent tet-regulated transgene expression. In clone Rht14-10, increases in expression from essentially background levels (+tet) to more than 104-fold above background (-tet) were reproducibly detected after Cre-mediated insertion of either the luciferase or the I-SceI transgenes. Conclusion Although previous methods have made use of SSR to integrate transgenes at defined sites, none has effectively combined this with a pre-selection step to identify integration sites that support

  18. An integrated cytogenetic and physical map reveals unevenly distributed recombination spots along the papaya sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wai, Ching Man; Moore, Paul H; Paull, Robert E; Ming, Ray; Yu, Qingyi

    2012-08-01

    Papaya is a model system for the study of sex chromosome evolution in plants. However, the cytological structures of the papaya chromosomes remain largely unknown and chromosomal features have not been linked with any genetic or genomic data. We constructed a cytogenetic map of the papaya sex chromosome (chromosome 1) by hybridizing 16 microsatellite markers and 2 cytological feature-associated markers on pachytene chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Except for three markers, the order of the markers was concordant to that of marker loci along the linkage map. This discrepancy was likely caused by skewed segregation in the highly heterochromatic or centromeric regions. The papaya sex chromosome is largely euchromatic, its heterochromatin spans about 15 % of the Y chromosome and is mostly restricted to the centromeric and pericentromeric regions. Analysis of the recombination frequency along the papaya sex chromosome revealed a complete suppression of recombination in the centromere and pericentromere region and 60 % higher recombination rate in the long arm than in the short arm. The uneven distribution of recombination events might be caused by differences in sequence composition. Sequence analysis of 18 scaffolds in total length of 15 Mb revealed higher gene density towards the telomeres and lower gene density towards the centromere, and a relatively higher gene density in the long arm than in the short arm. In an opposite trend, the centromeric and pericentromeric region contained the highest repetitive sequences and the long arm showed the lowest repetitive sequences. This cytogenetic map provides essential information for evolutionary study of sex chromosomes in Caricaceae and will facilitate the analysis of papaya sex chromosomes.

  19. Vertical integration of cosmid and YAC resources for interval mapping on the X-chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.; Coffey, A.J.; Giannelli, F.; Bentley, D.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The vertical integration of cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resources is of particular importance in the development of high-resolution maps of selected regions of the human genome. A resource of approximately 95,000 cosmids constructed using DNA from primary fibroblasts of karyotype 49,XXXXX was validated by detailed characterization of a 200-kb cosmid contig spanning exons 8-20 of the dystrophin gene. This resource was used to construct contigs in 0.65 Mb of Xq26 by hybridization of gel-purified YAC DNA to high-density gridded arrays of the cosmid library; positive cosmids were overlapped by fingerprinting. Contigs were oriented and ordered relative to existing YACs in the region using cross-hybridization. The overlaps between a representative set of cosmids define 54 intervals of 5-20 kb and were used to construct a high-resolution cosmid interval map of the region, locating markers, dinucleotide repeats, and candidate CpG islands. This approach can be applied rapidly to large regions of the genome and without recourse to subcloning of individual YACs. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Fermentation of crystalline cellulose to ethanol by Klebsiella oxytoca containing chromosomally integrated zymomonas mobilis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.B.; Ingram, L.O.

    1993-09-01

    Complete enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose is generally required for efficient fermentation to ethanol. This hydrolysis requires endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and cellobiase. The Gram-negative bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca, contains the native ability to transport and metabolize cellobiose, minimizing the need for extracellular cellobiase. Strain P2 is a recombinant derivative in which the Zymomonas mobilis pdc and adhB genes have been integrated into the chromosome and expressed, directing the metabolism of pyruvate to ethanol. This organism has been evaluated in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) experiments to determine optimal conditions and limits of performance. The temperature was varied between 32 and 40{degree}C over a pH range of 5.0-5.8 with 100 g/L crystalline cellulose (Sigmacell 50, Sigma Chemical Company, St. Louis, MO) as the substrate and commercial cellulase (Spezyme CE, South San Francisco, CA). A broad optimum for SSF was observed, with a pH of 5.2-5.5 and temperatures of 32-35{degree}C, which allowed the production of over 44 g of ethanol/L (81-86% of the maximum theoretical yield). Although the rate of ethanol production increased with cellulase, diminishing improvements were observed at enzyme loadings above 10 filter paper units/g of cellulose. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Fully efficient chromosome dimer resolution in Escherichia coli cells lacking the integral membrane domain of FtsK

    PubMed Central

    Dubarry, Nelly; Barre, François-Xavier

    2010-01-01

    In bacteria, septum formation frequently initiates before the last steps of chromosome segregation. This is notably the case when chromosome dimers are formed by homologous recombination. Chromosome segregation then requires the activity of a double-stranded DNA transporter anchored at the septum by an integral membrane domain, FtsK. It was proposed that the transmembrane segments of proteins of the FtsK family form pores across lipid bilayers for the transport of DNA. Here, we show that truncated Escherichia coli FtsK proteins lacking all of the FtsK transmembrane segments allow for the efficient resolution of chromosome dimers if they are connected to a septal targeting peptide through a sufficiently long linker. These results indicate that FtsK does not need to transport DNA through a pore formed by its integral membrane domain. We propose therefore that FtsK transports DNA before membrane fusion, at a time when there is still an opening in the constricted septum. PMID:20033058

  2. Identification of the SlmA active site responsible for blocking bacterial cytokinetic ring assembly over the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongbaek; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cells use chromosome-associated division inhibitors to help coordinate the processes of DNA replication and segregation with cytokinesis. SlmA from Escherichia coli, a member of the tetracycline repressor (TetR)-like protein family, is one example of this class of regulator. It blocks the assembly of the bacterial cytokinetic ring by interfering with the polymerization of the tubulin-like FtsZ protein in a manner that is dramatically stimulated upon specific DNA binding. Here we used a combination of molecular genetics and biochemistry to identify the active site of SlmA responsible for disrupting FtsZ polymerization. Interestingly, this site maps to a region of SlmA that in the published DNA-free structure is partially occluded by the DNA-binding domains. In this conformation, the SlmA structure resembles the drug/inducer-bound conformers of other TetR-like proteins, which in the absence of inducer require an inward rotation of their DNA-binding domains to bind successive major grooves on operator DNA. Our results are therefore consistent with a model in which DNA-binding activates SlmA by promoting a rotational movement of the DNA-binding domains that fully exposes the FtsZ-binding sites. SlmA may thus represent a special subclass of TetR-like proteins that have adapted conformational changes normally associated with inducer sensing in order to modulate an interaction with a partner protein. In this case, the adaptation ensures that SlmA only blocks cytokinesis in regions of the cell occupied by the origin-proximal portion of the chromosome where SlmA-binding sites are enriched.

  3. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves.

  4. Comparing DNA integration site clusters with scan statistics

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Charles C.; Ocwieja, Karen E.; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Gene therapy with retroviral vectors can induce adverse effects when those vectors integrate in sensitive genomic regions. Retroviral vectors are preferred that target sensitive regions less frequently, motivating the search for localized clusters of integration sites and comparison of the clusters formed by integration of different vectors. Scan statistics allow the discovery of spatial differences in clustering and calculation of false discovery rates providing statistical methods for comparing retroviral vectors. Results: A scan statistic for comparing two vectors using multiple window widths is proposed with software to detect clustering differentials and compute false discovery rates. Application to several sets of experimentally determined HIV integration sites demonstrates the software. Simulated datasets of various sizes and signal strengths are used to determine the power to discover clusters and evaluate a convenient lower bound. This provides a toolkit for planning evaluations of new gene therapy vectors. Availability and implementation: The geneRxCluster R package containing a simple tutorial and usage hints is available from http://www.bioconductor.org. Contact: ccberry@ucsd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24489369

  5. Jumping translocation in acute monocytic leukemia (M5b) with alternative breakpoint sites in the long arm of donor chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    McGrattan, Peter; Logan, Amy; Humphreys, Mervyn; Bowers, Margaret

    2010-09-01

    An 86-year-old man presented with acute hepatic failure, worsening thrombocytopenia, and anemia having been diagnosed and managed expectantly with cytogenetically normal RAEB-1. After 20 months a diagnosis of disease transformation to acute monocytic leukemia (M5b) was made. Conventional G-banded analysis of unstimulated bone marrow cultures demonstrated a jumping translocation (JT) involving proximal and distal breakpoints on donor chromosome 3 at bands 3q1?2 and 3q21, respectively. Recipient chromosomes included the long-arm telomeric regions of chromosomes 5, 10, 14, 16, and 19. A low-level trisomy 8 clone was also found in association with both proximal and distal JT clones. Conventional G-banded analysis of unstimulated peripheral blood cultures detected the proximal 3q1?2 JT clone involving recipient chromosome 10 several weeks after transformation to acute monocytic leukemia. Interestingly, JTs involving recipient chromosomes 5, 14, 16, and 19 were not detected in this peripheral blood sample. Palliative care was administered until his demise 2.2 months after disease transformation. There have been fewer than 70 cases of acquired JTs reported in the literature, including one myeloproliferative neoplasm and five acute myeloid leukemias involving a single breakpoint site on donor chromosome 3. Our case is unique as it is the first acquired case to demonstrate a JT involving alternative pericentromeric breakpoint sites on a single donor chromosome consisting of a proximal breakpoint at 3q1?2 and a more distal breakpoint at 3q21.

  6. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; Bell, Adam J; Jarrett, Ruth F; Wilkie, Gavin S; Davison, Andrew J; Nacheva, Ellie P; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2016-03-07

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers.

  7. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E.; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; J. Bell, Adam; F. Jarrett, Ruth; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Davison, Andrew J.; P. Nacheva, Ellie; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J.; Royle, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers. PMID:26947392

  8. [The effect of heavy metal ions and peptide bioregulators on the expression of chromosome fragile sites in the individuals of different age groups and breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Ganozishvili, M N; Lezhava, T A

    2008-09-01

    Expression rates of chromosome fragile sites in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been studied in clinically healthy individuals of different age groups (20-38 yrs and 75-86 yrs) and breast cancer patients (8 cases). In individuals with a normal check-up of different age groups the heavy metal (nickel, zinc and cobalt) ions were also examined on their influence on the expression of the fragile sites and the peptide bioregulators (Livagen and Epithalon) were tested on their ability to correct the pattern of expression. Short-term lymphocyte cultures were used as tested material. The analysis showed that the chromosomes of people from young and old age groups differ from each other by the expression pattern of fragile sites - the chromosomes of young individuals were found to be more active by spontaneous formation of fragile sites. They were also sensitive to their induction by heavy metals. Both tested bioregulators lessen heavy metals effect that was statistically reliable only for the young people group. As for the patients with breast cancer general elevated fragility of chromosomes and specific distribution of the fragile sites along the chromosomes were revealed.

  9. Fidelity of Target Site Duplication and Sequence Preference during Integration of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanggu; Rusmevichientong, Alice; Dong, Beihua; Remenyi, Roland; Silverman, Robert H.; Chow, Samson A.

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) is a new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The causal relationship of XMRV infection to human disease and the mechanism of pathogenicity have not been established. During retrovirus replication, integration of the cDNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cell chromosome is an essential step and involves coordinated joining of the two ends of the linear viral DNA into staggered sites on target DNA. Correct integration produces proviruses that are flanked by a short direct repeat, which varies from 4 to 6 bp among the retroviruses but is invariant for each particular retrovirus. Uncoordinated joining of the two viral DNA ends into target DNA can cause insertions, deletions, or other genomic alterations at the integration site. To determine the fidelity of XMRV integration, cells infected with XMRV were clonally expanded and DNA sequences at the viral-host DNA junctions were determined and analyzed. We found that a majority of the provirus ends were correctly processed and flanked by a 4-bp direct repeat of host DNA. A weak consensus sequence was also detected at the XMRV integration sites. We conclude that integration of XMRV DNA involves a coordinated joining of two viral DNA ends that are spaced 4 bp apart on the target DNA and proceeds with high fidelity. PMID:20421928

  10. Differentially Expressed Genes Distributed Over Chromosomes and Implicated in Certain Biological Processes for Site Insertion Genetically Modified Rice Kemingdao

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yunhe; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Xiuping; Jian, Guiliang; Peng, Yufa; Qi, Fangjun

    2012-01-01

    Release of genetically modified (GM) plants has sparked off intensive debates worldwide partly because of concerns about potential adverse unintended effects of GM plants to the agro system and the safety of foods. In this study, with the aim of revealing the molecular basis for unintended effects of a single site insertion GM Kemingdao (KMD) rice transformed with a synthetic cry1Ab gene, and bridging unintended effects of KMD rice through clues of differentially expressed genes, comparative transcriptome analyses were performed for GM KMD rice and its parent rice of Xiushui11 (XS11). The results showed that 680 differentially expressed transcripts were identified from 30-day old seedlings of GM KMD rice. The absolute majority of these changed expression transcripts dispersed and located over all rice chromosomes, and existed physical distance on chromosome from the insertion site, while only two transcripts were found to be differentially expressed within the 21 genes located within 100 kb up and down-stream of the insertion site. Pathway and biology function analyses further revealed that differentially expressed transcripts of KMD rice were involved in certain biological processes, and mainly implicated in two types of pathways. One type was pathways implicated in plant stress/defense responses, which were considerably in coordination with the reported unintended effects of KMD rice, which were more susceptible to rice diseases compared to its parent rice XS11; the other type was pathways associated with amino acids metabolism. With this clue, new unintended effects for changes in amino acids synthesis of KMD rice leaves were successfully revealed. Such that an actual case was firstly provided for identification of unintended effects in GM plants by comparative transciptome analysis. PMID:22811617

  11. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate complex formation between AAV DNA and its integration site in human DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Kyöstiö, S R; Kotin, R M; Owens, R A

    1994-01-01

    AAV is unique among eukaryotic viruses in the ability of its DNA to integrate preferentially into a specific region of the human genome. Understanding AAV integration may aid in developing gene therapy systems with predictable integration sites. Using a gel mobility-shift assay, we have identified a DNA sequence within the AAV integration locus on human chromosome 19 which is specifically bound by the AAV Rep78 and Rep68 proteins. This Rep recognition sequence is a GCTC repeating motif very similar to sequences within the inverted terminal repeats of the AAV genome which are also bound by Rep78 and Rep68. Cloned oligonucleotides containing the recognition sequence can direct specific binding by Rep proteins. Binding assays with mutant Rep proteins show that the amino-terminal portion of Rep78 and Rep68 can direct binding to either the AAV terminal repeat hairpin DNA or chromosome 19. This human genomic DNA can be complexed with AAV DNA by Rep proteins as demonstrated by a dual-label (32P/biotin) assay. These results suggest a role for Rep in targeting viral integration. Images PMID:8016070

  12. H-NS Facilitates Sequence Diversification of Horizontally Transferred DNAs during Their Integration in Host Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Koichi; Tobe, Toru; Kanai, Akinori; Uyar, Ebru; Ishikawa, Shu; Suzuki, Yutaka; Ogasawara, Naotake; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can acquire new traits through horizontal gene transfer. Inappropriate expression of transferred genes, however, can disrupt the physiology of the host bacteria. To reduce this risk, Escherichia coli expresses the nucleoid-associated protein, H-NS, which preferentially binds to horizontally transferred genes to control their expression. Once expression is optimized, the horizontally transferred genes may actually contribute to E. coli survival in new habitats. Therefore, we investigated whether and how H-NS contributes to this optimization process. A comparison of H-NS binding profiles on common chromosomal segments of three E. coli strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups indicated that the positions of H-NS-bound regions have been conserved in E. coli strains. The sequences of the H-NS-bound regions appear to have diverged more so than H-NS-unbound regions only when H-NS-bound regions are located upstream or in coding regions of genes. Because these regions generally contain regulatory elements for gene expression, sequence divergence in these regions may be associated with alteration of gene expression. Indeed, nucleotide substitutions in H-NS-bound regions of the ybdO promoter and coding regions have diversified the potential for H-NS-independent negative regulation among E. coli strains. The ybdO expression in these strains was still negatively regulated by H-NS, which reduced the effect of H-NS-independent regulation under normal growth conditions. Hence, we propose that, during E. coli evolution, the conservation of H-NS binding sites resulted in the diversification of the regulation of horizontally transferred genes, which may have facilitated E. coli adaptation to new ecological niches. PMID:26789284

  13. H-NS Facilitates Sequence Diversification of Horizontally Transferred DNAs during Their Integration in Host Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Koichi; Tobe, Toru; Kanai, Akinori; Uyar, Ebru; Ishikawa, Shu; Suzuki, Yutaka; Ogasawara, Naotake; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can acquire new traits through horizontal gene transfer. Inappropriate expression of transferred genes, however, can disrupt the physiology of the host bacteria. To reduce this risk, Escherichia coli expresses the nucleoid-associated protein, H-NS, which preferentially binds to horizontally transferred genes to control their expression. Once expression is optimized, the horizontally transferred genes may actually contribute to E. coli survival in new habitats. Therefore, we investigated whether and how H-NS contributes to this optimization process. A comparison of H-NS binding profiles on common chromosomal segments of three E. coli strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups indicated that the positions of H-NS-bound regions have been conserved in E. coli strains. The sequences of the H-NS-bound regions appear to have diverged more so than H-NS-unbound regions only when H-NS-bound regions are located upstream or in coding regions of genes. Because these regions generally contain regulatory elements for gene expression, sequence divergence in these regions may be associated with alteration of gene expression. Indeed, nucleotide substitutions in H-NS-bound regions of the ybdO promoter and coding regions have diversified the potential for H-NS-independent negative regulation among E. coli strains. The ybdO expression in these strains was still negatively regulated by H-NS, which reduced the effect of H-NS-independent regulation under normal growth conditions. Hence, we propose that, during E. coli evolution, the conservation of H-NS binding sites resulted in the diversification of the regulation of horizontally transferred genes, which may have facilitated E. coli adaptation to new ecological niches.

  14. Marek's disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marla C; Cheng, Hans H; Delany, Mary E

    2016-11-04

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotropic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unvaccinated host birds. The causative pathogen, MD virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres. MD occurrence is controlled across the globe by biosecurity, selective breeding for enhanced MD genetic resistance, and widespread vaccination of flocks using attenuated serotype 1 MDV or other serotypes. Despite over 40 years of usage, the specific mechanism(s) of MD vaccine-related immunity and anti-tumor effects are not known. Here we investigated the cytogenetic interactions of commonly used MD vaccine strains of all three serotypes (HVT, SB-1, and Rispens) with the host to determine if all were equally capable of host genome integration. We also studied the dynamic profiles of chromosomal association and integration of the three vaccine strains, a first for MD vaccine research. Our cytogenetic data provide evidence that all three MD vaccine strains tested integrate in the chicken host genome as early as 1 day after vaccination similar to oncogenic strains. However, a specific, transformation-associated virus-host phenotype observed for oncogenic viruses is not established. Our results collectively provide an updated model of MD vaccine-host genome interaction and an improved understanding of the possible mechanisms of vaccinal immunity. Physical integration of the oncogenic MDV genome into host chromosomes along with cessation of viral replication appears to have joint signification in MDV's ability to induce oncogenic transformation. Whereas for MD vaccine serotypes, a sustained viral replication stage and lack of the chromosome-integrated only stage were shared traits during early infection.

  15. EVALUATION OF CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE AND DNA INTEGRITY IN SPERM: AN INVESTIGATION OF REMOTE SEMEN COLLECTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home collection of ejaculated semen would facilitate participation rates and geographic diversity in reproductive epidemiology studies. Our study addressed concerns that home collection and overnight mail return might induce chromosome/DNA damage. We collected semen from 10 hea...

  16. EVALUATION OF CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE AND DNA INTEGRITY IN SPERM: AN INVESTIGATION OF REMOTE SEMEN COLLECTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home collection of ejaculated semen would facilitate participation rates and geographic diversity in reproductive epidemiology studies. Our study addressed concerns that home collection and overnight mail return might induce chromosome/DNA damage. We collected semen from 10 hea...

  17. Introgression maintains the genetic integrity of the mating-type determining chromosome of the fungus Neurospora tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Pádraic; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, David J.; Sun, Yu; Ni, Peixiang; Lascoux, Martin; Johannesson, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Genome evolution is driven by a complex interplay of factors, including selection, recombination, and introgression. The regions determining sexual identity are particularly dynamic parts of eukaryotic genomes that are prone to molecular degeneration associated with suppressed recombination. In the fungus Neurospora tetrasperma, it has been proposed that this molecular degeneration is counteracted by the introgression of nondegenerated DNA from closely related species. In this study, we used comparative and population genomic analyses of 92 genomes from eight phylogenetically and reproductively isolated lineages of N. tetrasperma, and its three closest relatives, to investigate the factors shaping the evolutionary history of the genomes. We found that suppressed recombination extends across at least 6 Mbp (∼63%) of the mating-type (mat) chromosome in N. tetrasperma and is associated with decreased genetic diversity, which is likely the result primarily of selection at linked sites. Furthermore, analyses of molecular evolution revealed an increased mutational load in this region, relative to recombining regions. However, comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the mat chromosomes are temporarily regenerated via introgression from sister species; six of eight lineages show introgression into one of their mat chromosomes, with multiple Neurospora species acting as donors. The introgressed tracts have been fixed within lineages, suggesting that they confer an adaptive advantage in natural populations, and our analyses support the presence of selective sweeps in at least one lineage. Thus, these data strongly support the previously hypothesized role of introgression as a mechanism for the maintenance of mating-type determining chromosomal regions. PMID:26893460

  18. Opportunities for Launch Site Integrated System Health Engineering and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, Robert D.; Langwost, Patricia E.; Waterman, Susan J.

    2005-01-01

    The launch site processing flow involves operations such as functional verification, preflight servicing and launch. These operations often include hazards that must be controlled to protect human life and critical space hardware assets. Existing command and control capabilities are limited to simple limit checking durig automated monitoring. Contingency actions are highly dependent on human recognition, decision making, and execution. Many opportunities for Integrated System Health Engineering and Management (ISHEM) exist throughout the processing flow. This paper will present the current human-centered approach to health management as performed today for the shuttle and space station programs. In addition, it will address some of the more critical ISHEM needs, and provide recommendations for future implementation of ISHEM at the launch site.

  19. Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, D.L.

    1990-04-30

    The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

  1. The site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene in human cells transformed by an HSV-1 DNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Hazen, M; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Trkula, D; Dubbs, D R

    1981-12-01

    To analyze the site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I) thymidine kinase (TK) gene in biochemically transformed human cells, TK-HeLa-(BU25) cells were transformed to the TK+ phenotype by a cloned, 2 kbp Pvull fragment of HSV-I DNA. The transformed cells [HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3] were fused with mouse LM(TK-) cells, and human-mouse somatic cell hybrid clones (LH PP3 clones 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6) were isolated in HATG-ouabain selective medium. The HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 cells and the LH PP3 hybrid clones expressed HSV-I specific TK activity and a herpesvirus-associated nuclear antigen, and contained herpesvirus nucleotide sequences. Molecular hybridization experiments were carried out to map the HSV-I and flanking cellular nucleotide sequences in the biochemically transformed cells. These experiments demonstrated that the HSV-I nucleotide sequences were integrated at a single site, and that the same cellular nucleotide sequences flanked the viral DNA in transformed HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 and LH PP3 clone 5 cells. TK- revertant subclones isolated by growing the LH PP3 clone 5 cells in BrdUrd (and diphtheria toxin) failed to form colonies in HATG medium, but retained HSV-I nucleotide sequences. Isozyme analyses on 21 gene-enzyme systems representing 21 human chromosomes revealed that all of the LH PP3 clonal lines expressed human hexosaminidase B, which has been assigned to chromosome 5, and all were sensitive to diphtheria toxin, which is also a marker for chromosome 5. Chromosome analyses showed that chromosome 5 was the nly human chromosome present in mitoses of LH PP3 clone 5 cells and that human chromosome 5 was present in most of the mitoses of LH PP3 clone 1, 2, 3, and 6 cells. The latter clones also contained 1 or 2 additional human chromosomes in some of the cells. As expected from the molecular hybridization analyses, TK- revertants of LH PP3 clone 5 cells retained portions of chromosome 5 and expressed human hexosaminidase B. The results

  2. Genome-organizing factors Top2 and Hmo1 prevent chromosome fragility at sites of S phase transcription.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Rodrigo; Capra, Thelma; Gonzalez-Huici, Victor; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cocito, Andrea; Natoli, Gioacchino; Katou, Yuki; Mori, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Ken; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Foiani, Marco

    2009-09-04

    Specialized topoisomerases solve the topological constraints arising when replication forks encounter transcription. We have investigated the contribution of Top2 in S phase transcription. Specifically in S phase, Top2 binds intergenic regions close to transcribed genes. The Top2-bound loci exhibit low nucleosome density and accumulate gammaH2A when Top2 is defective. These intergenic loci associate with the HMG protein Hmo1 throughout the cell cycle and are refractory to the histone variant Htz1. In top2 mutants, Hmo1 is deleterious and accumulates at pericentromeric regions in G2/M. Our data indicate that Top2 is dispensable for transcription and that Hmo1 and Top2 bind in the proximity of genes transcribed in S phase suppressing chromosome fragility at the M-G1 transition. We propose that an Hmo1-dependent epigenetic signature together with Top2 mediate an S phase architectural pathway to preserve genome integrity.

  3. Rapid establishment of a HEK 293 cell line expressing FVIII-BDD using AAV site-specific integration plasmids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomei; Ping, Han; Zhang, Chun

    2014-09-10

    Stable human cell lines have gradually become the preferred system for large scale production of recombinant proteins for clinical applications because of their capacity of proper protein post-translational modification and low immunogenicity. However, human cell line development technologies are commonly based on random genome integration of protein expressing genes. It is required to screen large numbers of cell clones to identify stable high producer cell clones and the cell line development process usually takes 6 to 12 months. Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) Rep protein is known to induce rAAV DNA integration into a specific site (AAVS1) of the human chromosome 19 and integrated transgenes can stably express proteins. We take advantage of this AAV unique feature to develop a rapid protocol to clone a stable recombinant protein expression human cell line. We have constructed two plasmids. One plasmid, pSVAV2, contains the AAV rep gene for the synthesis of integrase; the second plasmid, pTRP5GFPFVIII-BDD, contains B-domain-deleted factor VIII (FVIII-BDD) and GFP gene flanked by AAV ITRs. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were co-transfected with the two plasmids and the cells were screened by green fluorescence to establish the recombinant FVIII-BDD cell line. PCR analysis showed that the FVIII-BDD gene has been integrated into the AAVS1 site of human chromosome 19. The FVIII-BDD protein secreted into the extracellular media exhibited coagulant activity. We developed a method of rapid establishment of human HEK 293 cell line expressing recombinant FVIII-BDD protein with AAV site-specific integration plasmids.

  4. Site-Specific Integration of Foreign DNA into Minimal Bacterial and Human Target Sequences Mediated by a Conjugative Relaxase

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, Leticia; González-Prieto, Coral; Machón, Cristina; Llosa, Matxalen

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial conjugation is a mechanism for horizontal DNA transfer between bacteria which requires cell to cell contact, usually mediated by self-transmissible plasmids. A protein known as relaxase is responsible for the processing of DNA during bacterial conjugation. TrwC, the relaxase of conjugative plasmid R388, is also able to catalyze site-specific integration of the transferred DNA into a copy of its target, the origin of transfer (oriT), present in a recipient plasmid. This reaction confers TrwC a high biotechnological potential as a tool for genomic engineering. Methodology/Principal Findings We have characterized this reaction by conjugal mobilization of a suicide plasmid to a recipient cell with an oriT-containing plasmid, selecting for the cointegrates. Proteins TrwA and IHF enhanced integration frequency. TrwC could also catalyze integration when it is expressed from the recipient cell. Both Y18 and Y26 catalytic tyrosil residues were essential to perform the reaction, while TrwC DNA helicase activity was dispensable. The target DNA could be reduced to 17 bp encompassing TrwC nicking and binding sites. Two human genomic sequences resembling the 17 bp segment were accepted as targets for TrwC-mediated site-specific integration. TrwC could also integrate the incoming DNA molecule into an oriT copy present in the recipient chromosome. Conclusions/Significance The results support a model for TrwC-mediated site-specific integration. This reaction may allow R388 to integrate into the genome of non-permissive hosts upon conjugative transfer. Also, the ability to act on target sequences present in the human genome underscores the biotechnological potential of conjugative relaxase TrwC as a site-specific integrase for genomic modification of human cells. PMID:22292089

  5. Homologous chromosomes move and rapidly initiate contact at the sites of double-strand breaks in genes in G₀-phase human cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Manoj; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Cuenco, Karen T.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that homologous chromosomes make contact at the sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and the restriction endonuclease I-PpoI in G₀/G₁-phase somatic human cells. The contact involves short segments of homologous chromosomes and is centered on a DSB that occurs in a gene; contact does not occur at a DSB in intergenic DNA. Contact between homologous chromosomes is abrogated by inhibition of transcription and requires the kinase activity of ATM, but not DNA-PK. Here, we report additional insights into the mechanism underlying this novel phenomenon. We identify four patterns of homologous chromosome contact, and show that contact between homologous arms, but not centrosomes, is induced by IR. Significantly, we demonstrate that contact is induced by IR in non-proliferating, G₀-phase human cells derived from tissue explants. Finally, we show that contact between homologous chromosomes is detectable as early as 5 min after IR. These results point to the existence of a mechanism that rapidly localizes homologous chromosome arms at sites of DSBs in genes in G₀-phase human cells. PMID:23370393

  6. Homologous chromosomes move and rapidly initiate contact at the sites of double-strand breaks in genes in G₀-phase human cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Manoj; Evdokimova, Viktoria N; Cuenco, Karen T; Bakkenist, Christopher J; Nikiforov, Yuri E

    2013-02-15

    We recently reported that homologous chromosomes make contact at the sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and the restriction endonuclease I-PpoI in G₀/G₁-phase somatic human cells. The contact involves short segments of homologous chromosomes and is centered on a DSB that occurs in a gene; contact does not occur at a DSB in intergenic DNA. Contact between homologous chromosomes is abrogated by inhibition of transcription and requires the kinase activity of ATM, but not DNA-PK. Here, we report additional insights into the mechanism underlying this novel phenomenon. We identify four patterns of homologous chromosome contact, and show that contact between homologous arms, but not centrosomes, is induced by IR. Significantly, we demonstrate that contact is induced by IR in non-proliferating, G₀-phase human cells derived from tissue explants. Finally, we show that contact between homologous chromosomes is detectable as early as 5 min after IR. These results point to the existence of a mechanism that rapidly localizes homologous chromosome arms at sites of DSBs in genes in G₀-phase human cells.

  7. Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15

    Abstract only. The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as part of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single­ shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: DST space utilization, optimization, and closure; Waste Feed Qualification; and, Cementitious Waste Forms. Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be

  8. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Coupled with PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 Binding Sites Flank Coordinately Expressed Domains in Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fedoseeva, Daria M.; Sosin, Dmitri V.; Grachev, Sergei A.; Serebraykova, Marina V.; Romanenko, Svetlana A.; Vorobieva, Nadezhda V.; Kravatsky, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    Genome instability plays a key role in multiple biological processes and diseases, including cancer. Genome-wide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is important for understanding both chromosomal architecture and specific chromosomal regions at DSBs. We developed a method for precise genome-wide mapping of blunt-ended DSBs in human chromosomes, and observed non-random fragmentation and DSB hot spots. These hot spots are scattered along chromosomes and delimit protected 50–250 kb DNA domains. We found that about 30% of the domains (denoted forum domains) possess coordinately expressed genes and that PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 specifically bind DNA sequences at the forum domain termini. Thus, our data suggest a novel type of gene regulation: a coordinated transcription or silencing of gene clusters delimited by DSB hot spots as well as PARP1 and HNRNPa2B1 binding sites. PMID:23593027

  9. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the Primula vulgaris S locus and localization by chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Webster, Margaret A; Wright, Jonathan; Cocker, Jonathan M; Smith, Matthew C; Badakshi, Farah; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Heteromorphic flower development in Primula is controlled by the S locus. The S locus genes, which control anther position, pistil length and pollen size in pin and thrum flowers, have not yet been characterized. We have integrated S-linked genes, marker sequences and mutant phenotypes to create a map of the P. vulgaris S locus region that will facilitate the identification of key S locus genes. We have generated, sequenced and annotated BAC sequences spanning the S locus, and identified its chromosomal location. We have employed a combination of classical genetics and three-point crosses with molecular genetic analysis of recombinants to generate the map. We have characterized this region by Illumina sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, together with chromosome in situ hybridization. We present an integrated genetic and physical map across the P. vulgaris S locus flanked by phenotypic and DNA sequence markers. BAC contigs encompass a 1.5-Mb genomic region with 1 Mb of sequence containing 82 S-linked genes anchored to overlapping BACs. The S locus is located close to the centromere of the largest metacentric chromosome pair. These data will facilitate the identification of the genes that orchestrate heterostyly in Primula and enable evolutionary analyses of the S locus.

  10. Research at Hanford's 300 Area Integrated Field Challenge Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, J.; Rockhold, M.; Fredrickson, J.; Vermeul, V.; Ward, A.; Liu, C.; McKinley, J.; Bjornstad, B.; Freshley, M.; Haggerty, R.; Kent, D.; Lichtner, P.; Rubin, Y.; Versteeg, R.; Zheng, C.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is supporting an Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) Site at Hanford's 300 Area. This site, immediately adjacent to the Columbia R., is the location of a groundwater uranium plume that resulted from past discharges of liquid effluent to unlined disposal ponds and trenches. Plume concentrations have persisted above the drinking water standard in spite of the cessation of all liquid discharges more than 15 years ago and significant efforts to excavate and remove contaminated sediments. The persistence of the uranium plume is postulated to be a result of a complex interplay between hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological processes, and rate-limited mass transfer in the highly heterogeneous sediments. An IFC research site has been established in the area of one of the former disposal ponds to provide the infrastructure for developing improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the uranium plume persistence, with an ultimate goal of providing a robust, scientific basis for future remediation decisions. Thirty-five wells were installed at the site in FY08 for subsurface characterization and monitoring of field experiments. Detailed characterization studies have been performed or are currently underway using a variety of hydrological, geophysical, geochemical, and microbiological methods. In addition to field experiments, a series of column and bench-scale transport experiments are being performed to measure process interactions at smaller scales under well-controlled laboratory conditions, and to parameterize mechanistically-based model representations of these processes. This presentation gives an overview of guiding hypotheses for the 300 Area IFC Site, the well layout and instrumentation, initial characterization results, and ongoing or planned experiments and modeling activities.

  11. Integrated fate and toxicity assessment for site contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, Margaret; Peterson, John; Finster, Molly; Douglas, R.

    2007-07-01

    Understanding the fate and toxicity of environmental contaminants is essential to framing practical management decisions. Forms and bioavailable concentrations often change over time due to natural physical, chemical, and biological processes. For some sites, hundreds of contaminants may be of initial interest, and even small projects can involve a substantial number of contaminants. With multiple assessments common, attention to effectiveness and efficiency is important, and integrating fate and toxicity information provides a valuable way to focus the analyses. Fate assessments help identify what forms may be present where and when, while toxicity information indicates what health effects could result if people were exposed. The integration process is illustrated by an application for the Hanford site, to support long-term management decisions for the cesium and strontium capsules. Fate data, health-based benchmarks, and related toxicity information were effectively combined to indicate performance targets for chemicals and radionuclides identified for capsule leachate that could migrate to groundwater. More than 50 relevant benchmarks and toxicity context were identified for 15 of the 17 study contaminants; values for chronic drinking water exposure provided the common basis for selected indicators. For two chemicals, toxicity information was identified from the scientific literature to guide the performance targets. (authors)

  12. Engineering of chromosomal wax ester synthase integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants for improved biosynthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Valle-Rodríguez, Juan Octavio; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made to engineer robust microbes for overproducing biochemical products from renewable resources. These accomplishments have to a large extend been based on plasmid based methods. However, plasmid maintenance may cause a metabolic burden on the host cell and plasmid-based overexpression of genes can result in genetically unstable strains, which contributes to loss in productivity. Here, a chromosome engineering method based on delta integration was applied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), which can be directly used as biodiesel and would be a possible substitute for conventional petroleum-based diesel. An integration construct was designed and integrated into chromosomal delta sequences by repetitive transformation, which resulted in 1-6 copies of the integration construct per genome. The corresponding FAEE production increased up to 34 mg/L, which is an about sixfold increase compared to the equivalent plasmid-based producer. The integrated cassette in the yeast genome was stably maintained in nonselective medium after deletion of RAD52 which is essential for efficient homologous recombination. To obtain a further increase of FAEE production, genes encoding endogenous acyl-CoA binding protein (ACB1) and a bacterial NADP(+)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapN) were overexpressed in the final integration strain, which resulted in another 40% percent increase in FAEE production. Our integration strategy enables easy engineering of strains with adjustable gene copy numbers integrated into the genome and this allows for an easy evaluation of the effect of the gene copy number on pathway flux. It therefore represents a valuable tool for introducing and expressing a heterologous pathway in yeast.

  13. Tetrahymena Pot2 Is a Developmentally Regulated Paralog of Pot1 That Localizes to Chromosome Breakage Sites but Not to Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Cranert, Stacey; Heyse, Serena; Linger, Benjamin R.; Lescasse, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahymena telomeres are protected by a protein complex composed of Pot1, Tpt1, Pat1, and Pat2. Pot1 binds the 3′ overhang and serves multiple roles in telomere maintenance. Here we describe Pot2, a paralog of Pot1 which has evolved a novel function during Tetrahymena sexual reproduction. Pot2 is unnecessary for telomere maintenance during vegetative growth, as the telomere structure is unaffected by POT2 macronuclear gene disruption. Pot2 is expressed only in mated cells, where it accumulates in developing macronuclei around the time of two chromosome processing events: internal eliminated sequence (IES) excision and chromosome breakage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated Pot2 localization to regions of chromosome breakage but not to telomeres or IESs. Pot2 association with chromosome breakage sites (CBSs) occurs slightly before chromosome breakage. Pot2 did not bind CBSs or telomeric DNA in vitro, suggesting that it is recruited to CBSs by another factor. The telomere proteins Pot1, Pat1, and Tpt1 and the IES binding factor Pdd1 fail to colocalize with Pot2. Thus, Pot2 is the first protein found to associate specifically with CBSs. The selective association of Pot2 versus Pdd1 with CBSs or IESs indicates a mechanistic difference between the chromosome processing events at these two sites. Moreover, ChIP revealed that histone marks characteristic of IES processing, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, are absent from CBSs. Thus, the mechanisms of chromosome breakage and IES excision must be fundamentally different. Our results lead to a model where Pot2 directs chromosome breakage by recruiting telomerase and/or the endonuclease responsible for DNA cleavage to CBSs. PMID:25303953

  14. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  15. Integrated Geophysical Analysis at a Legacy Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Mellors, R. J.; Sweeney, J. J.; Sussman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We integrate magnetic, electromagnetic (EM), gravity, and seismic data to develop a unified and consistent model of the subsurface at the U20ak site on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada National Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). The 1985 test, conducted in tuff at a depth of approximately 600 m did not collapse to the surface or produce a crater. The purpose of the geophysical measurements is to characterize the subsurface above and around the presumed explosion cavity. The magnetic data are used to locate steel borehole casings and pipes and are correlated with surface observations. The EM data show variation in lithology at depth and clear signatures from borehole casings and surface cables. The gravity survey detects a clear gravity low in the area of the explosion. The seismic data indicates shallow low velocity zone and indications of a deeper low velocity zones. In this study, we conduct 2D inversion of EM data for better characterization of site geology and use a common 3D density model to jointly interpret both the seismic and gravity data along with constraints on lithology boundaries from the EM. The integration of disparate geophysical datasets allows improved understanding of the non-prompt physical signatures of an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). LLNL Release Number: LLNL-ABS-675677. The authors express their gratitude to the National Nuclear Security Administration, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development, and the Comprehensive Inspection Technologies and UNESE working group, a multi-institutional and interdisciplinary group of scientists and engineers. This work was performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory under award number DE-AC52-06NA25946.

  16. Commercial integration and partnering at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.R.; Babione, R.A.; Shikashio, L.A.; Wacaster, A.J.; Paterson, A.D.

    1994-06-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS), particularly the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the experience from the first successful Integrated Technology Demonstration, can provide an excellent foundation for meeting DOE-EM`s objectives with the new DOE-EM five focus area approach. With this in mind, SRTC established an activity to pursue full commercialization of environmental technologies. This report is an assessment of the status of commercialization at SRS and provides recommendations for enhancement as well as some tools critical to implementation. A review was made of the current situation at SRS with regards to taking technology development to commercial fruition. This was done from the perspective of comparing it to known commercialization models and processes. It was found that SRTC already works through many of the steps in these processes. With integration and action-oriented efforts of the inclusion of business and market factors, SRTC could become an aggressive, successful developer of commercialized technologies. Commercial success criteria tools were developed with regards to integrating them with SRTC selection criteria to ensure that all critical factors are covered in technology commercialization project evaluations. Private investors are very clear that their interest lies in funding commercial enterprises, not merely technologies. Mobilizing private capital is critical to real job growth and long-term economic development. Also, potential industry partners were identified that are willing to be involved with SRS` technology applications and regional development efforts. As another important component to success, regional support organizations were reviewed and evaluated.

  17. Demonstration of Eastman Christensen horizontal drilling system -- Integrated Demonstration Site, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    An innovative horizontal drilling system was used to install two horizontal wells as part of an integrated demonstration project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The SRS is located in south-central South Carolina in the upper Coastal Plain physiographic province. The demonstration site is located near the A/M Area, and is currently known as the Integated Demonstration Site. The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in soils and groundwater at the SRS in 1989. The overall goal of the program is to demonstrate, at a single location, multiple technologies in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program.

  18. Demonstration of Eastman Christensen horizontal drilling system -- Integrated Demonstration Site, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    An innovative horizontal drilling system was used to install two horizontal wells as part of an integrated demonstration project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The SRS is located in south-central South Carolina in the upper Coastal Plain physiographic province. The demonstration site is located near the A/M Area, and is currently known as the Integated Demonstration Site. The Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in soils and groundwater at the SRS in 1989. The overall goal of the program is to demonstrate, at a single location, multiple technologies in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program.

  19. Stepwise Activation of the ATR Signaling Pathway upon Increasing Replication Stress Impacts Fragile Site Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Koundrioukoff, Stéphane; Carignon, Sandra; Técher, Hervé; Letessier, Anne; Brison, Olivier; Debatisse, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Breaks at common fragile sites (CFS) are a recognized source of genome instability in pre-neoplastic lesions, but how such checkpoint-proficient cells escape surveillance and continue cycling is unknown. Here we show, in lymphocytes and fibroblasts, that moderate replication stresses like those inducing breaks at CFSs trigger chromatin loading of sensors and mediators of the ATR pathway but fail to activate Chk1 or p53. Consistently, we found that cells depleted of ATR, but not of Chk1, accumulate single-stranded DNA upon Mre11-dependent resection of collapsed forks. Partial activation of the pathway under moderate stress thus takes steps against fork disassembly but tolerates S-phase progression and mitotic onset. We show that fork protection by ATR is crucial to CFS integrity, specifically in the cell type where a given site displays paucity in backup replication origins. Tolerance to mitotic entry with under-replicated CFSs therefore results in chromosome breaks, providing a pool of cells committed to further instability. PMID:23874235

  20. Overview of the Ridge 2000 Integrated Studies Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C.

    2005-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 program is in its fourth year and fieldwork at each of the Integrated Studies Sites (ISS) is in full swing. Multidisciplinary monitoring continues at the EPR ISS with seismic, temperature, and current data being continuously recorded. Long-term fluid sampling programs aimed at furthering our understanding of temporal variations in the chemistry of high-temperature hydrothermal vents are continuing. In situ fluid chemistry monitors have been deployed for weeks, and longer deployments are planned as the technology matures. Nested within these monitoring studies are experiments addressing larval dispersal and changes in microbial and macrobiological communities. In early 2006, geodetic monitoring will begin, with an array of pressure gauges as well as a detailed compliance study. By early 2007, a 3-D multichannel seismic survey will have provided unprecedented details of the crustal structure at 9°50'N. Together these studies provide a strong framework for an interdisciplinary understanding of the links between the forces that produce a mid-ocean ridge spreading center and their manifestation on the seafloor. Fieldwork on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge in 2005 also included a balance of monitoring, experimental, and sampling programs across a wide range of disciplines. Four interdisciplinary field programs were conducted to maintain and expand ongoing Ridge 2000 and proto-NEPTUNE experiments. These research programs continued development and testing in situ chemical and microbial sensors, conducted co-registered sampling of fluids, fauna, and chimney material, and recovered moorings that measured heat and chemical fluxes at the segment scale. High-resolution mapping was also completed at this site, which has been chosen for one of the two initial NEPTUNE Canada nodes to prepare the way for the collaborative, cabled observatory projects. The mapping cruise included 5 secondary school teachers as part of the REVEL outreach and education

  1. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qunfeng; He, Yuhua; Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber.

  2. Systems Thinking Versus Population Thinking: Genotype Integration and Chromosomal Organization 1930s-1950s.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Ehud

    2015-11-01

    This article describes how empirical discoveries in the 1930s-1950s regarding population variation for chromosomal inversions affected Theodosius Dobzhansky and Richard Goldschmidt. A significant fraction of the empirical work I discuss was done by Dobzhansky and his coworkers; Goldschmidt was an astute interpreter, with strong and unusual commitments. I argue that both belong to a mechanistic tradition in genetics, concerned with the effects of chromosomal organization and systems on the inheritance patterns of species. Their different trajectories illustrate how scientists' commitments affect how they interpret new evidence and adjust to it. Dobzhansky was moved to revised views about selection, while Goldschmidt moved his attention to different genetic phenomena. However different, there are significant connections between the two that enrich our understanding of their views. I focus on two: the role of developmental considerations in Dobzhansky's thought and the role of neutrality and drift in Goldschmidt's evolutionary account. Dobzhansky's struggle with chromosomal variation is not solely about competing schools of thought within the selectionist camp, as insightfully articulated by John Beatty, but also a story of competition between selectionist thinking and developmental perspectives. In contraposition, Goldschmidt emphasized the role of low penetrance mutations that spread neutrally and pointed out that drift could result from developmental canalization. This account adds to the dominant story about Goldschmidt's resistance to the splitting of development from genetics, as told by Garland Allen and Michael Dietrich. The story I tell illustrates how developmental thinking and genetic thinking conflicted and influenced researchers with different convictions about the significance of chromosomal organization.

  3. Chromosomal polymorphism in two species of Hypancistrus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): an integrative approach for understanding their biodiversity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maelin; Ribeiro, Emanuell D; Matoso, Daniele A; Sousa, Leandro M; Hrbek, Tomas; Py-Daniel, Lucia Rapp; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-04-01

    Structural chromosome changes are widely described in different vertebrate groups and generate genetic, phenotypic and behavioral diversity. During the evolution of loricariids, several rearrangements (fissions, fusions, inversions) seem to have occurred. Hypancistrus, tribe Ancistrini, are highly demanded for fishkeeping around the world. In this tribe, the diploid chromosome number 2n = 52 is considered a synapomorphy, and paracentric-type inversions appear to be involved in the chromosomal evolution of the tribe. The present study investigated the karyotypes of H. zebra and H. cf. debilittera using cytogenetic, classical and molecular tools, as well as DNA barcoding. Data reveal that, although diploid number in both species corroborates the proposed synapomorphy for the tribe, there is a complex karyotype dynamics, reflected in the intense chromosomal polymorphism, resulting from rearrangements involving ribosomal regions (5S and 18S rDNA), which are suggested to be paracentric inversions. Besides, DNA barcode confirms reciprocal monophyletism between the species, validating the existence of two species, only. This scenario, coupled with genomic instability caused by exogenous sequences such as Rex-3 retrotransposons and the species' sedentary lifestyle, which helps the fast polymorphism fixation, may reflect different phenotypic color patterns in natural populations, as observed in H. cf. debilittera.

  4. High-affinity sites form an interaction network to facilitate spreading of the MSL complex across the X chromosome in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Fidel; Lingg, Thomas; Toscano, Sarah; Lam, Kin Chung; Georgiev, Plamen; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Lajoie, Bryan; de Wit, Elzo; Zhan, Ye; de Laat, Wouter; Dekker, Job; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dosage compensation mechanisms provide a paradigm to study the contribution of chromosomal conformation towards targeting and spreading of epigenetic regulators over a specific chromosome. By using Hi-C and 4C analyses we show that high-affinity sites (HAS), landing platforms of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, are enriched around topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries on the X chromosome and harbor more long-range contacts in a sex-independent manner. Ectopically expressed roX1 and roX2 RNA target HAS on the X chromosome in trans and, via spatial proximity, induce spreading of the MSL complex in cis, leading to increased expression of neighboring autosomal genes. We show that the MSL complex regulates nucleosome positioning at HAS, thus acting locally rather than influencing the overall chromosomal architecture. We propose that sex-independent three-dimensional conformation of the X chromosome poises it for exploitation by the MSL complex, thereby facilitating spreading in males. PMID:26431028

  5. A potentially critical Hpa II site of the X chromosome-linked PGK1 gene is unmethylated prior to the onset of meiosis of human oogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singer-Sam, J.; Dai, A.; Riggs, A.D. ); Goldstein, L.; Gartler, S.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Hpa II site H8 is in the CpG-rich 5{prime} untranslated region of the human X chromosome-linked gene for phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1). It is the only Hpa II site in the CpG island' whose methylation pattern is perfectly correlated with transcriptional silence of this gene. The authors measured DNA methylation at site H8 in fetal oogonia and oocytes and found, using a quantitative assay based on the polymerase chain reaction, that purified germ cells isolated by micromanipulation were unmethylated in 47-day to 110-day fetuses, whereas ovaries depleted of germ cells and non-ovary tissues were methylated. They conclude that site H8 is the unmethylated in germ cells prior to the onset of meiosis and reactivation of the X chromosome.

  6. Novel method to rescue a lethal phenotype through integration of target gene onto the X-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Kazuya; Araki, Kimi; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Nishina, Takashi; Komazawa-Sakon, Sachiko; Murai, Shin; Lee, Grace E.; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Suzuki, Chigure; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Notohara, Kenji; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Baba, Hideo; Ohmuraya, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The loss-of-function mutations of serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene are associated with human chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported that mice lacking Spink3, the murine homologue of human SPINK1, die perinatally due to massive pancreatic acinar cell death, precluding investigation of the effects of SPINK1 deficiency. To circumvent perinatal lethality, we have developed a novel method to integrate human SPINK1 gene on the X chromosome using Cre-loxP technology and thus generated transgenic mice termed “X-SPINK1“. Consistent with the fact that one of the two X chromosomes is randomly inactivated, X-SPINK1 mice exhibit mosaic pattern of SPINK1 expression. Crossing of X-SPINK1 mice with Spink3+/− mice rescued perinatal lethality, but the resulting Spink3−/−;XXSPINK1 mice developed spontaneous pancreatitis characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis. The results show that mice lacking a gene essential for cell survival can be rescued by expressing this gene on the X chromosome. The Spink3−/−;XXSPINK1 mice, in which this method has been applied to partially restore SPINK1 function, present a novel genetic model of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27845447

  7. MLL5 maintains genomic integrity by regulating the stability of the chromosomal passenger complex through a functional interaction with Borealin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Fei; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) is a versatile nuclear protein associated with many cellular events. We have shown previously that phosphorylation of MLL5 by Cdk1 is required for mitotic entry. In this paper, the function of MLL5 in mitotic regulation is further explored. SiRNA-mediated downregulation of MLL5 caused improper chromosome alignment at metaphase and resulted in failure of DNA segregation and cytokinesis. Mechanistic studies revealed that the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which plays a key role in chromosomal bi-orientation, was delocalized from the inner centromere region because of proteasome-mediated degradation in MLL5-depleted cells. Biochemical analyses further demonstrated that the central domain of MLL5 interacted with the C-terminus of Borealin, and the interaction is essential to maintain the stability of Borealin. Moreover, the mitotic defects in MLL5-depleted cells were rescued by overexpression of FLAG-MLL5, but not by a FLAG-MLL5 mutant that did not contain the central domain. Collectively, our results suggest that MLL5 functionally interacts with Borealin, facilitates the expression of CPC, and hence contributes to mitotic fidelity and genomic integrity.

  8. Modification of some biological properties of HeLa cells containing adeno-associated virus DNA integrated into chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, C; Schlehofer, J R

    1992-01-01

    Parvoviruses are known to interfere with cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Since infecting adeno-associated virus (AAV) frequently integrates its DNA into the cellular genome, we analyzed whether this integration influences the transformed phenotype of the human tumor cell line HeLa. Analysis of three independent HeLa cell clones with integrated AAV DNA (HA-3x, HA-16, and HA-28) revealed the following phenotypic changes of these cells: (i) reduced growth rate, (ii) increased serum requirement, (iii) reduced capacity for colony formation in soft agar, (iv) reduced cloning efficiency on plastic, (v) elevated sensitivity to genotoxic agents (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, human tumor necrosis factor alpha, UV irradiation [256 nm], and heat [42 degrees C]), and (vi) reduced sensitivity to the cytolytic effect of parvovirus H-1. Reduced growth rate and enhanced sensitivity to gamma irradiation were also observed in vivo when tumors from AAV DNA-containing HeLa cells were transplanted into nude mice. This alteration of the biological properties of HeLa cells was independent of the number of AAV genomes integrated, the physical structure of integrated AAV DNA, and the transcription of AAV genes. Integration of AAV DNA was found to occur preferentially on the long arm of chromosome 17 in the three HeLa cell clones analyzed. These findings demonstrate that genomic integration of AAV DNA can alter the biological properties of human tumor cells. Images PMID:1313913

  9. Prevalence of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in patients with human herpesvirus 6-central nervous system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joshua A; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Zerr, Danielle M; Huang, Meei-Li; Yeung, Cecilia; Myerson, David; Jerome, Keith R; Boeckh, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    We identified 37 hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) central nervous system dysfunction and tested donor-recipient pairs for chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). One patient had ciHHV-6A with possible HHV-6A reactivation and encephalitis. There was no ciHHV-6 enrichment in this group, but larger studies are needed to determine if patients with ciHHV-6 are at increased risk for HHV-6-associated diseases or other complications.

  10. The piggyBac Transposon Displays Local and Distant Reintegration Preferences and Can Cause Mutations at Noncanonical Integration Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng Amy; Pettitt, Stephen J.; Eckert, Sabine; Ning, Zemin; Rice, Stephen; Cadiñanos, Juan; Yusa, Kosuke; Conte, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is widely used as a tool in mammalian experimental systems for transgenesis, mutagenesis, and genome engineering. We have characterized genome-wide insertion site preferences of piggyBac by sequencing a large set of integration sites arising from transposition from two separate genomic loci and a plasmid donor in mouse embryonic stem cells. We found that piggyBac preferentially integrates locally to the excision site when mobilized from a chromosomal location and identified other nonlocal regions of the genome with elevated insertion frequencies. piggyBac insertions were associated with expressed genes and markers of open chromatin structure and were excluded from heterochromatin. At the nucleotide level, piggyBac prefers to insert into TA-rich regions within a broader GC-rich context. We also found that piggyBac can insert into sites other than its known TTAA insertion site at a low frequency (2%). Such insertions introduce mismatches that are repaired with signatures of host cell repair pathways. Transposons could be mobilized from plasmids with the observed noncanonical flanking regions, indicating that piggyBac could generate point mutations in the genome. PMID:23358416

  11. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    PubMed

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Integrated Groundwater Sampling Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Marutzky, Sam; Farnham, Irene

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan) is to provide a comprehensive, integrated approach for collecting and analyzing groundwater samples to meet the needs and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity. Implementation of this Plan will provide high-quality data required by the UGTA Activity for ensuring public protection in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Plan is designed to ensure compliance with the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). The Plan’s scope comprises sample collection and analysis requirements relevant to assessing the extent of groundwater contamination from underground nuclear testing. This Plan identifies locations to be sampled by corrective action unit (CAU) and location type, sampling frequencies, sample collection methodologies, and the constituents to be analyzed. In addition, the Plan defines data collection criteria such as well-purging requirements, detection levels, and accuracy requirements; identifies reporting and data management requirements; and provides a process to ensure coordination between NNSS groundwater sampling programs for sampling of interest to UGTA. This Plan does not address compliance with requirements for wells that supply the NNSS public water system or wells involved in a permitted activity.

  13. Non integrative strategy decreases chromosome instability and improves endogenous pluripotency genes reactivation in porcine induced pluripotent-like stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Congras, Annabelle; Barasc, Harmonie; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Delcros, Chantal; Feraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Hadadi, Eva; Griscelli, Franck; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Turhan, Ali; Afanassieff, Marielle; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Acloque, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The pig is an emerging animal model, complementary to rodents for basic research and for biomedical and agronomical purposes. However despite the progress made on mouse and rat models to produce genuine pluripotent cells, it remains impossible to produce porcine pluripotent cell lines with germline transmission. Reprogramming of pig somatic cells using conventional integrative strategies remains also unsatisfactory. In the present study, we compared the outcome of both integrative and non-integrative reprogramming strategies on pluripotency and chromosome stability during pig somatic cell reprogramming. The porcine cell lines produced with integrative strategies express several pluripotency genes but they do not silence the integrated exogenes and present a high genomic instability upon passaging. In contrast, pig induced pluripotent-like stem cells produced with non-integrative reprogramming system (NI-iPSLCs) exhibit a normal karyotype after more than 12 months in culture and reactivate endogenous pluripotency markers. Despite the persistent expression of exogenous OCT4 and MYC, these cells can differentiate into derivatives expressing markers of the three embryonic germ layers and we propose that these NI-iPSLCs can be used as a model to bring new insights into the molecular factors controlling and maintaining pluripotency in the pig and other non-rodent mammalians. PMID:27245508

  14. Participation of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases in the maintenance of chromosome integrity in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kochenova, O V; Soshkina, J V; Stepchenkova, E I; Inge-Vechtomov, S G; Shcherbakova, P V

    2011-01-01

    We employed a genetic assay based on illegitimate hybridization of heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (the α-test) to analyze the consequences for genome stability of inactivating translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases. The α-test is the only assay that measures the frequency of different types of mutational changes (point mutations, recombination, chromosome or chromosome arm loss) and temporary changes in genetic material simultaneously. All these events are manifested as illegitimate hybridization and can be distinguished by genetic analysis of the hybrids and cytoductants. We studied the effect of Polζ, Polη, and Rev1 deficiency on the genome stability in the absence of genotoxic treatment and in UV-irradiated cells. We show that, in spite of the increased percent of accurately repaired primary lesions, chromosome fragility, rearrangements, and loss occur in the absence of Polζ and Polη. Our findings contribute to further refinement of the current models of translesion synthesis and the organization of eukaryotic replication fork.

  15. Malignant placental site trophoblastic tumor: a cytogenetic study using comparative genomic hybridization and chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Cheng; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Shen, Dan-Hua; Khoo, Ui-Soon; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2002-04-15

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT) is a rare form of gestational trophoblastic neoplasm composed predominantly of intermediate trophoblast. Most showed benign behavior whereas 10-15% of PSTTs were clinically malignant with later recurrence and metastasis. Currently, there are no reliable means to predict clinical outcome, and cytogenetic information is scanty. The clinicopathologic features of two cases of malignant PSTT were analyzed. Cytogenetic analysis was performed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome in situ hybridization (CISH) using frozen tissue and paraffin embedded sections, respectively. Both patients were 32 years old at time of diagnosis. One patient with PSTT presented with menorrhagia, and the other presented with symptoms of missed abortion. Elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was detected in both patients. Histologic examination showed the typical features of PSTT with high mitotic count (> 5/10 high-power fields). Ovarian and lung metastasis occurred in both patients. Immunohistochemical staining revealed an equal distribution of HCG and human placental lactogen. Cytogenetic studies by CISH showed that karyotypes of these two malignant PSTTs were diploid. Analysis of the tumor tissue by CGH did not show any changes in DNA copy numbers. The authors' study indicated that the two metastasizing PSTTs had balanced diploid karyotype. The malignant behavior of PSTTs may be not related to the DNA copy number changes. Such cytogenetic study may be useful in distinguishing metastatic PSTT from choriocarcinoma. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.

  16. An A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction method for chromosome walking without restriction site cloning bias.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Xu, Wentao; Shi, Hui; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-06-01

    A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was modified and employed for the isolation of genomic fragments adjacent to a known DNA sequence. The improvements in the method focus on two points. The first is the modification of the PO(4) and NH(2) groups in the adapter to inhibit the self-ligation of the adapter or the generation of nonspecific products. The second improvement is the use of the capacity of rTaq DNA polymerase to add an adenosine overhang at the 3' ends of digested DNA to suppress self-ligation in the digested DNA and simultaneously resolve restriction site clone bias. The combination of modifications in the adapter and in the digested DNA leads to T/A-specific ligation, which enhances the flexibility of this method and makes it feasible to use many different restriction enzymes with a single adapter. This novel A-T linker adapter PCR overcomes the inherent limitations of the original ligation-mediated PCR method such as low specificity and a lack of restriction enzyme choice. Moreover, this method also offers higher amplification efficiency, greater flexibility, and easier manipulation compared with other PCR methods for chromosome walking. Experimental results from 143 Arabidopsis mutants illustrate that this method is reliable and efficient in high-throughput experiments.

  17. Human expressed tagged sites on the X chromosome: A mapping resource for heritable sex-linked chorioretinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, I.M.; Nesslinger, N.; Wong, P.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a bank of human X-specific genomic clones which harbor chorioretinal expressed sequences using library to library cross-screening. The steps included (1) the creation of a {lambda}gt-10 library of human chorioretinal cDNA, (2) the creation of a human X-specific EMBL-3 genomic library from a somatic cell hybrid (82082a) containing the X chromosome as its only human component and lacking the hamster X, and (3) a PCR-based cross-screen to identify 78 clones expressed in choroid and retina. The characterization of one human X-specific EMBL-3 clone (XEH.8; DXS542) has provided a clear illustration of the feasibility of this approach. FISH mapping confirms the regional localization of XEH.8 to Xp11. Localization of additional clones, XEH.1, XEH.34, XEH.41, and XEH.52 will be presented along with partial sequencing and characterization. Our approach has focused on the search for expressed sequences which can serve as expressed tagged sites (ESTs) in mapping or candidate genes for heritable eye disorders.

  18. Viral load, gene expression and mapping of viral integration sites in HPV16-associated HNSCC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Nadine C.; Huebbers, Christian U.; Kolligs, Jutta; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C.S.; Cornet, Iris; van Lent-Albrechts, Josefa A.; Stegmann, Sander P.A.; Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Carey, Thomas E.; Walline, Heather M.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; de Winter, Johan; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Speel, Ernst-Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    HPV-related HNSCC generally have a better prognosis than HPV-negative HNSCC. However, a subgroup of HPV-positive tumors with poor prognosis has been recognized, particularly related to smoking, EGFR overexpression and chromosomal instability. Viral integration into the host genome might contribute to carcinogenesis, as is shown for cervical carcinomas. Therefore, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines currently available have been carefully analysed for viral and host genome parameters. The viral integration status, viral load, viral gene expression and the presence of aneusomies was evaluated in the cell lines UD-SCC-2, UM-SCC-047, UM-SCC-104, UPCI:SCC090, UPCI:SCC152, UPCI:SCC154 and 93VU147T. HPV integration was examined using FISH, APOT-PCR and DIPS-PCR. Viral load and the expression of the viral genes E2, E6 and E7 were determined via quantitative PCR. All cell lines showed integration-specific staining patterns and signals indicating transcriptional activity using FISH. APOT- and DIPS-PCR identified integration-derived fusion products in six cell lines, and only episomal products for UM-SCC-104. Despite the observed differences in viral load and the number of viral integration sites, this did not relate to the identified viral oncogene expression. Furthermore, cell lines exhibited EGFR expression, and aneusomy (except UPCI:SCC154). In conclusion, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines showed integrated and/or episomal viral DNA that is transcriptionally active, although viral oncogene expression was independent of viral copy number and the number of viral integration sites. Because these cell lines also contain EGFR expression and aneusomy, which are parameters of poor prognosis, they should be considered suitable model systems for the development of new antiviral therapies. PMID:25082736

  19. Viral load, gene expression and mapping of viral integration sites in HPV16-associated HNSCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Olthof, Nadine C; Huebbers, Christian U; Kolligs, Jutta; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Cornet, Iris; van Lent-Albrechts, Josefa A; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Carey, Thomas E; Walline, Heather M; Gollin, Susanne M; Hoffmann, Thomas K; de Winter, Johan; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens P; Speel, Ernst-Jan M

    2015-03-01

    HPV-related HNSCC generally have a better prognosis than HPV-negative HNSCC. However, a subgroup of HPV-positive tumors with poor prognosis has been recognized, particularly related to smoking, EGFR overexpression and chromosomal instability. Viral integration into the host genome might contribute to carcinogenesis, as is shown for cervical carcinomas. Therefore, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines currently available have been carefully analyzed for viral and host genome parameters. The viral integration status, viral load, viral gene expression and the presence of aneusomies was evaluated in the cell lines UD-SCC-2, UM-SCC-047, UM-SCC-104, UPCI:SCC090, UPCI:SCC152, UPCI:SCC154 and 93VU147T. HPV integration was examined using FISH, APOT-PCR and DIPS-PCR. Viral load and the expression of the viral genes E2, E6 and E7 were determined via quantitative PCR. All cell lines showed integration-specific staining patterns and signals indicating transcriptional activity using FISH. APOT- and DIPS-PCR identified integration-derived fusion products in six cell lines and only episomal products for UM-SCC-104. Despite the observed differences in viral load and the number of viral integration sites, this did not relate to the identified viral oncogene expression. Furthermore, cell lines exhibited EGFR expression and aneusomy (except UPCI:SCC154). In conclusion, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines showed integrated and/or episomal viral DNA that is transcriptionally active, although viral oncogene expression was independent of viral copy number and the number of viral integration sites. Because these cell lines also contain EGFR expression and aneusomy, which are parameters of poor prognosis, they should be considered suitable model systems for the development of new antiviral therapies.

  20. Multiple recurrent mutations at four human Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphism sites in a 37 bp sequence tract on the ARSDP1 pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Niederstätter, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Erhart, Daniel; Willuweit, Sascha; Geppert, Maria; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Parson, Walther; Roewer, Lutz

    2013-12-01

    The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is passed down clonally from father to son and mutation is the single driving force for Y-chromosomal diversification. The geographical distribution of MSY variation is non-random. Therefore, Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) are of forensic interest, as they can be utilized, e.g. for deducing the bio-geographical origin of biological evidence. This extra information can complement short tandem repeat data in criminal investigations. For forensic applications, however, any targeted marker has to be unequivocally interpretable. Here, we report findings for 17 samples from a population study comprising specimens from ∼3700 men living in Tyrol (Austria), indicating apparent homoplasic mutations at four Y-SNP loci on haplogroup R-M412/L51/S167, R-U152/S28, and L-M20 Y chromosomes. The affected Y-SNPs P41, P37, L202, and L203 mapped to a 37bp region on Yq11.21. Observing in multiple phylogenetic contexts up to four homoplasic mutations within such a short sequence tract is unlikely to result from a series of independent parallel mutations. Hence, we rather propose X-to-Y gene conversion as a more likely scenario. Practical implications arising from markers exhibiting paralogues on the Y chromosome or sites with a high propensity to recurrent mutation for database searches are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Siggers, Trevor; Boor, Sonia; Bliss, Jacob; Liu, Wei; Jogl, Gerwald; Rohs, Remo; Singh, Nadia D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Larschan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression. PMID:27414415

  2. Identification of the human/mouse syntenic common fragile site FRA7K/Fra12C1--relation of FRA7K and other human common fragile sites on chromosome 7 to evolutionary breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Helmrich, Anne; Stout-Weider, Karen; Matthaei, Anja; Hermann, Klaus; Heiden, Thomas; Schrock, Evelin

    2007-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are expressed as chromosome gaps in cells of different species including human and mouse as a result of the inhibition of DNA replication. They may serve as hot spots for DNA breakage in processes such as tumorigenesis and chromosome evolution. Using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping, the authors describe here human CFS FRA7K on chromosome band 7q31.1 and its murine homolog Fra12C1. Within the syntenic FRA7K/Fra12C1 region lies the IMMP2L/Immp2l gene with a size of 899/983 kb. The authors further mapped 2 amplification breakpoints of the breast cancer cell line SKBR3 to the CFSs FRA7G and FRA7H. The 5 molecularly defined CFSs on chromosome 7 do not preferentially colocalize with synteny breaks between the human and mouse genomes and with intragenomic duplications that have occurred during chromosome evolution. In addition, in contrast to all currently reported data, CFSs in chromosome band 7q31 do not show increased DNA helix flexibility in comparison with control regions without CFS expression.

  3. Characterization of genetic elements required for site-specific integration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus bacteriophage mv4 and construction of an integration-proficient vector for Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, L; Boizet-Bonhoure, B; Coddeville, M; Auvray, F; Ritzenthaler, P

    1995-01-01

    Temperate phage mv4 integrates its DNA into the chromosome of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains via site-specific recombination. Nucleotide sequencing of a 2.2-kb attP-containing phage fragment revealed the presence of four open reading frames. The larger open reading frame, close to the attP site, encoded a 427-amino-acid polypeptide with similarity in its C-terminal domain to site-specific recombinases of the integrase family. Comparison of the sequences of attP, bacterial attachment site attB, and host-phage junctions attL and attR identified a 17-bp common core sequence, where strand exchange occurs during recombination. Analysis of the attB sequence indicated that the core region overlaps the 3' end of a tRNA(Ser) gene. Phage mv4 DNA integration into the tRNA(Ser) gene preserved an intact tRNA(Ser) gene at the attL site. An integration vector based on the mv4 attP site and int gene was constructed. This vector transforms a heterologous host, L. plantarum, through site-specific integration into the tRNA(Ser) gene of the genome and will be useful for development of an efficient integration system for a number of additional bacterial species in which an identical tRNA gene is present. PMID:7836291

  4. BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF STREAMS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNITS, 1996 TO 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M; Susan Dyer, S

    2004-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been divided into six Integrator Operable Units (IOUs) that correspond to the watersheds of the five major streams on the SRS (Upper Three Runs, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs) and the portions of the Savannah River and Savannah River Swamp associated with the SRS. The streams are the primary integrators within each IOU because they potentially receive, through surface or subsurface drainage, soluble contaminants from all waste sites within their watersheds. If these contaminants reach biologically significant levels, they would be expected to effect the numbers, types, and health of stream organisms. In this study, biological sampling was conducted within each IOU as a measure of the cumulative ecological effects of the waste sites within the IOUs. The use of information from biological sampling to assess environmental quality is often termed bioassessment. The IOU bioassessment program included 38 sites in SRS streams and nine sites in the Savannah River. Sampling was conducted in 1996 to 1998, 2000, and 2003. Four bioassessment methods were used to evaluate ecological conditions in the IOU streams: the Index of Biotic Integrity, the Fish Health Assessment Index, measurement of fish tissue contaminant levels, and two benthic macroinvertebrate indices. The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is an EPA supported method based on comparison of ecologically important and sensitive fish assemblage variables between potentially disturbed and reference (i.e., undisturbed) sites. It is designed to assess the ability of a stream to support a self-sustaining biological community and ecological processes typical of undisturbed, natural conditions. Since many types of contaminants can bioaccumulate, fish tissue contaminant data were used to determine the types of chemicals fish were exposed to and their relative magnitudes among IOUs. The Fish Health Assessment Index (HAI) is an EPA supported method for assessing

  5. Repeat Hydrography at the Endeavour Integrated Study Site, 2004 - 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.; Thomson, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.

    2006-12-01

    Significant differences exist between hydrographic transects made in the summers from 2004 to 2006 at the Endeavour Segment Integrated Study Site on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Along and across axis sections describe the hydrographic conditions above the segment in three dimensions. The resulting sections allow for rapid evaluation of the characteristics of the neutrally buoyant plume over each of the vent fields and its location relative to the ridge axis. Results indicate heat content over the northern vent fields, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch, significantly increased between the summers of 2004 and 2005. In 2004, the plumes over these vent fields were barely discernable while in 2005 prominent plumes existed with potential temperature anomalies over 0.1°C. At the time of a rapid response cruise in March 2005, no significant change in the heat content of the water column was detected. By July 2005, dramatic changes had occurred in the overlying water column structure. The potential temperature anomaly section from 2005 is indicative of a thicker (about 75 m) neutrally buoyant plume with and substantially more heat at the north end of the valley. In 2004, the shallowest plume depth was 1900 m contrasted with 1830 m in 2005. Vent data being obtained by other RIDGE 2000 and UW Keck investigators will help constrain the underlying causes of these changes. New hydrography will be collected in August September 2006.

  6. Repeat Hydrography at the Endeavour Integrated Study Site, 2004 - 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.; Thomson, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.

    2005-12-01

    Significant differences exist between hydrographic transects made in 2004 and 2005 at the Endeavour Segment Integrated Study Site on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sections that describe the conditions above the segment utilize twenty-one nearly uniformly spaced hydrographic stations from south of Mothra to north of the Sasquatch hydrothermal vent fields. Criteria used in choosing station locations included depth, ~500 m spacing from other stations, and being centrally located in the valley. The resulting sections allow for rapid evaluation of the characteristics of the neutrally buoyant plume over each of the vent fields. Preliminary results indicate heat content over the northern vent fields, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch, significantly increased between the summers of 2004 and 2005. In 2004, the plumes over these vent fields were barely discernable while in 2005 prominent plumes existed with potential temperature anomalies over 0.1°C. Vent data being obtained by other RIDGE 2000 and UW Keck investigators will help constrain the underlying causes of these changes. Isopycnals in the 2005 sections are also elevated along the entire length of the transect by approximately 50 m or more. The potential temperature anomaly section from 2005 is indicative of a thicker (about 75 m) neutrally buoyant plume and substantially more heat at the north end of the valley. In 2004, the shallowest plume depth was 1900 m contrasted with 1830 m in 2005.

  7. Human Herpesvirus 6 DNA Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid Due to Primary Infection Differ from Those Due to Chromosomal Viral Integration and Have Implications for Diagnosis of Encephalitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Katherine N.; Leong, Hoe Nam; Thiruchelvam, Anton D.; Atkinson, Claire E.; Clark, Duncan A.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence and concentration of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the immunocompetent in primary infection was compared with that in viral chromosomal integration. Samples from 510 individuals with suspected encephalitis, 200 young children and 310 older children and/or adults, and 12 other patients were tested. HHV-6 DNA concentration (log10 copies/ml) was measured in CSF, serum, and whole blood using PCR. Serum HHV-6 immunoglobulin G antibody was measured by indirect immunofluorescence. Primary infection was defined by antibody seroconversion and/or a low concentration of HHV-6 DNA (<3.0 log10 copies/ml) in a seronegative serum. Chromosomal integration was defined by a high concentration of viral DNA in serum (≥3.5 log10 copies/ml) or whole blood (≥6.0 log10 copies/ml). The prevalences of CSF HHV-6 DNA in primary infection and chromosomal integration were 2.5% and 2.0%, respectively, in the young children (<2 years) and 0% and 1.3%, respectively, in the older children and/or adults. The mean concentration of CSF HHV-6 DNA in 9 children with primary infection (2.4 log10 copies/ml) was significantly lower than that of 21 patients with viral chromosomal integration (4.0 log10 copies/ml). Only HHV-6B DNA was found in primary infection, whereas in viral integration, 4 patients had HHV-6A and 17 patients HHV-6B. Apart from primary infection, chromosomal integration is the most likely cause of HHV-6 DNA in the CSF of the immunocompetent. Our results show that any diagnosis of HHV-6 encephalitis or other type of active central nervous system infection should not be made without first excluding chromosomal HHV-6 integration by measuring DNA load in CSF, serum, and/or whole blood. PMID:17229866

  8. Identification of a novel common proviral integration site, flit-1, in feline leukemia virus induced thymic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Liao, Chun-Peng; Zhao, Yan Shi; Pan, Judong; Mathes, Lawrence E; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    2009-03-30

    A new proviral integration site for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), termed flit-1, was identified from feline thymic lymphoma. Among 35 FeLV-related tumors examined, 5 of 25 thymic lymphomas demonstrated proviral insertion within flit-1 locus whereas none of four alimentary and five multicentric lymphomas and one T-lymphoid leukemia examined had rearrangement in this region. Extensive sequence analysis has shown that flit-1, which is noncoding, is conserved on human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15. The human and murine homologs of flit-1 are positioned approximately 30-kb upstream to activin-A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) gene. Expression of ACVRL1 mRNA was examined in two of five lymphomas with flit-1 rearrangement and detected in both of the two whereas normal thymuses and seven lymphoid tumors without flit-1 rearrangement had no detectable expression. Therefore, flit-1 appears to represent a novel FeLV proviral common integration domain that may influence lymphomagenesis as insertional mutagenesis.

  9. Karyotype characterization reveals active 45S rDNA sites located on chromosome termini in Smilax rufescens (Smilacaceae).

    PubMed

    Pizzaia, D; Oliveira, V M; Martins, A R; Appezzato-da-Glória, B; Forni-Martins, E; Aguiar-Perecin, M L R

    2013-04-25

    The genus Smilax (Smilacaceae) includes species of medicinal interest; consequently, their identification is important for the control of raw material used in the manufacture of phytotherapeutic products. We investigated the karyotype of Smilax rufescens in order to look for patterns that would be useful for comparative studies of this genus. To accomplish this, we developed procedures to grow plants and optimize root pretreatment with mitotic fuse inhibitors to obtain metaphase spreads showing clear chromosome morphology. The karyotype, analyzed in Feulgen-stained preparations, was asymmetric, with N = 16 chromosomes gradually decreasing in size; the larger ones were subtelocentric and the smaller chromosomes were submetacentric or metacentric. Nearly terminal secondary constrictions were visualized on the short arm of chromosome pairs 7, 11, and 14, but they were clearly detected only in one of the homologues of each pair. The nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were mapped by silver staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization of 45S rDNA probes. Silver signals (Ag-NORs) colocalized with rDNA loci were detected at the termini of the short arm of 6 chromosomes. The secondary constriction heteromorphism observed in Feulgen-stained metaphases suggests that differential rRNA gene expression between homologous rDNA loci can occur, resulting in different degrees of chromatin decondensation. In addition, a heteromorphic chromosome pair was identified and was interpreted as being a sex chromosome pair in this dioecious species.

  10. ANKRD53 interacts with DDA3 and regulates chromosome integrity during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seul; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-02-12

    Spindle dynamics drives chromosome movement and mitotic progression during mitosis. Microtubule (MT)-associated proteins (MAPs) regulate MT stabilization/destabilization and MT polymerization/depolymerization for congression of sister chromatids at the mitotic equator and subsequent segregation toward the spindle poles. Here, we identified ANKRD53 as a novel DDA3-interacting protein through proteomic analysis. Based on expression profiles, ANKRD53 is phosphorylated by mitotic kinases during mitosis. In ANKRD53-depleted HeLa cells, the progression of mitosis was delayed and the number of unaligned chromosomes increased substantially. In addition, spindle MT polymerization decreased and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) was concomitantly activated by the decreased spindle dynamics in ANKRD53-depleted cells. Although ANKRD53 is recruited to the mitotic spindle by DDA3, it counteracts the activity of DDA3 for spindle MT polymerization. Furthermore, ANKRD53 depletion increased the number of bi-nuclei and polylobed nuclei. Thus, ANKRD53 is recruited to the mitotic spindle by DDA3 and acts as a regulator of spindle dynamics and cytokinesis.

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence of a new filamentous phage, Xf109, which integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Xanthomonas oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ting Y

    2017-02-01

    Unlike Ff-like coliphages, certain filamentous Inoviridae phages integrate their genomes into the host chromosome and enter a prophage state in their infectious cycle. This lysogenic life cycle was first reported for Xanthomonas citri Cf phage. However, except for the X. citri phages Cf and XacF1, complete genome sequence information about lysogenic Xanthomonas phages is not available to date. A proviral sequence of Xf109 phage was identified in the genome of Xanthomonas oryzae, the rice bacterial blight pathogen, and revived as infectious virions to lysogenize its host de novo. The genome of Xf109 phage is 7190 nucleotides in size and contains 12 predicted open reading frames in an organization similar to that of the Cf phage genome. Seven of the Xf109 proteins show significant sequence similarity to Cf and XacF1 phage proteins, while its ORF4 shares 92 % identity with the major coat protein of X. phage oryzae Xf. Integration of Xf109 phage DNA into the host genome is site-specific, and the attP/attB sequence contains the dif core sequence 5'-TATACATTATGCGAA-3', which is identical to that of Cf, XacF1, and Xanthomonas campestris phage ϕLf. To my knowledge, this is the first complete genome sequence of a filamentous bacteriophage that infects X. oryzae.

  12. Tn4351 transposes in Bacteroides spp. and mediates the integration of plasmid R751 into the Bacteroides chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, N.B.; Getty, C.; Gardner, J.F.; Salyers, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The gene for resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, which is carried on the conjugative Bacteroides plasmid, pBF4, has been shown previously to be part of an element (Tn4351) that transposes in Escherichia coli. The authors have now introduced Tn4351 into Bacteroides uniformis 0061 on the following two suicide vectors: (i) the broad-host-range IncP plasmid R751 (R751::Tn4351) and (ii) pSS-2, a chimeric plasmid which contains 33 kilobases of pBF4 (including Tn4351) cloned into the IncQ plasmid RSF1010 and which is mobilized by R751. When E. coli HB101, carrying either R751::Tn4351 or R751 and pSS-2, was mated with B. uniformis under aerobic conditions, Em/sup r/ transconjugants were detected at a frequency of 10 /sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ (R751::Tn4351) or 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -6/ (R751 and pSS-2). In matings involving pSS-2, all Em/sup r/ transconjugants contained simple insertions of Tn4351 in the chromosome, whereas in matings involving R751::Tn4351, about half of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome. Of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants, 13% were auxotrophs. Bacteroides spp. which had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome did not transfer R751 or Tn4351 to E. coli HB101 or to isogenic B. uniformis, nor did the integrated R751 mobilize pE5-2, an E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle vector that contains a transfer origin that is recognized by R751.

  13. Repetitive telomeric sequences in chromosomal translocations involving chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Dallaire, L.; Fetni, R.

    1994-09-01

    Telomeres perform key functions in maintaining chromosome integrity. In some structural rearrangements the structure and polymorphism in human telomeres may play a significant role. However, of all the telomeric and subtelomeric sequences, only the terminal TTAGGG repeats are believed essential for telomere function. During the course of a study on the role of telomere structure and polymorphism in chromosomal rearrangements observed in families referred for prenatal diagnosis, we studied three cases in which chromosome 21 was involved. Repetitive TTAGGG sequences for all human chromosomes were used as probes (Oncor). Case 1, a de novo cryptic translocation (2;21) was initially identified as monosomy 21 in a child with psychomotor delay and mild dysmorphism. Using a cosmid probe specific for region 21q22.3 and whole chromosome 21 specific painting probe, the long arm of 21 was found on the short arm of chromosome 2 with an interstitial telomere at the breakpoint junction. All the cells were monosomic for 21pter{yields}q21. Case 2 is a familial (19;21) translocation. GTG-banding and FISH with a satellite probe showed no apparent loss of material at the end of either 19q or 21q, with an interstitial telomere at the fusion site of the two intact chromosomes. In case 3, a four generation reciprocal (20;21) translocation, there was no interstitial telomere. The persistence of an interstitial telomere is a relatively rare event which can now be observed with in situ hybridization. Its study may lead to a better understanding of the dynamics of translocations and of chromosome imbalance.

  14. Current Research at the Endeavour Ridge 2000 Integrated Studies Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Ridge 2000 Community, R.

    2004-12-01

    Integrated geophysical, geological, chemical, and biological studies are being conducted on the Endeavour segment with primary support from NSF, the W.M. Keck Foundation, and NSERC (Canada). The research includes a seismic network, physical and chemical sensors, high-precision mapping and time-series sampling. Several research expeditions have taken place at the Endeavour ISS in the past year. In June 2003, an NSF-sponsored cruise with R.V. al T.G.Thompson/ROV al Jason2 installed microbial incubators in drill-holes in the sides of active sulfide chimneys and sampled rocks, fluids, and microbes in the Mothra and Main Endeavour Field (MEF). In July 2003, with al Thompson/Jason2, an NSF-LEXEN project at Baby Bare on Endeavour east flank conducted sampling through seafloor-penetrating probes, plus time-series sampling of fluids, microbes, and rocks at the MEF. In September 2003, with al Thompson/ROV al ROPOS, the Keck Proto-Neptune project installed a seismic network consisting of 1 broadband and 7 short-period seismometers, installation of chemical/physical sensors and time-series samplers for chemistry and microbiology in the MEF and Clam Bed sites, collection of rocks, fluids, animals, and microbes. In May/June 2004, an NSF-sponsored al Atlantis/Alvin cruise recovered sulfide incubators installed in 2003, redeployed a sulfide incubator, mapped MEF and Mothra vent fields with high-resolution Imagenix sonar, sampled fluids from MEF, Mothra, and Clam Bed, recovered year-long time-series fluid and microbial samplers from MEF and Clam Bed, recovered and installed hot vent temperature-resistivity monitors, cleaned up the MEF and deployed new markers at major sulfide structures. In August 2004, there were two MBARI/Keck-sponsored cruises with R.V. al Western Flyer/ROV al Tiburon. The first cruise completed the seismic network with addition of two more broadband seismometers and serviced all 7 short-period seismometers. al Tiburon then performed microbial and chemical

  15. Cloning of Frankia species putative tRNA(Pro) genes and their efficacy for pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Alegre, M T; Cournoyer, B; Mesas, J M; Guérineau, M; Normand, P; Pernodet, J L

    1994-12-01

    pSAM2 is a conjugative Streptomyces ambofaciens mobile genetic element that can transfer and integrate site specifically in the genome. The chromosomal attachment site (attB) for pSAM2 site-specific recombination for two Frankia species was analyzed. It overlaps putative proline tRNA genes having a 3'-terminal CCA sequence, an uncommon feature among actinomycetes. pSAM2 is able to integrate into a cloned Frankia attB site harbored in Streptomyces lividans. The integration event removes the 3'-terminal CCA sequence and introduces a single nucleotide difference in the T psi C loop of the putative Frankia tRNA(Pro) gene. Major differences between the attP sequence from pSAM2 and the Frankia attB sequence restrict the identity segment to a 43-bp-long region. Only one mismatch is found between these well-conserved att segments. This nucleotide substitution makes a BstBI recognition site in Frankia attB and was used to localize the recombination site in a 25-bp region going from the anticodon to the T psi C loop of the tRNA(Pro) sequence. Integration of pSAM2 into the Frankia attB site is the first step toward introduction of pSAM2 derivatives into Frankia spp.

  16. Cloning of Frankia species putative tRNA(Pro) genes and their efficacy for pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, M T; Cournoyer, B; Mesas, J M; Guérineau, M; Normand, P; Pernodet, J L

    1994-01-01

    pSAM2 is a conjugative Streptomyces ambofaciens mobile genetic element that can transfer and integrate site specifically in the genome. The chromosomal attachment site (attB) for pSAM2 site-specific recombination for two Frankia species was analyzed. It overlaps putative proline tRNA genes having a 3'-terminal CCA sequence, an uncommon feature among actinomycetes. pSAM2 is able to integrate into a cloned Frankia attB site harbored in Streptomyces lividans. The integration event removes the 3'-terminal CCA sequence and introduces a single nucleotide difference in the T psi C loop of the putative Frankia tRNA(Pro) gene. Major differences between the attP sequence from pSAM2 and the Frankia attB sequence restrict the identity segment to a 43-bp-long region. Only one mismatch is found between these well-conserved att segments. This nucleotide substitution makes a BstBI recognition site in Frankia attB and was used to localize the recombination site in a 25-bp region going from the anticodon to the T psi C loop of the tRNA(Pro) sequence. Integration of pSAM2 into the Frankia attB site is the first step toward introduction of pSAM2 derivatives into Frankia spp. PMID:7811067

  17. A new generation of retroviral producer cells: predictable and stable virus production by Flp-mediated site-specific integration of retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schucht, R; Coroadinha, A S; Zanta-Boussif, M A; Verhoeyen, E; Carrondo, M J T; Hauser, H; Wirth, Dagmar

    2006-08-01

    We developed a new strategy that provides well-defined high-titer producer cells for recombinant retroviruses in a minimum amount of time. The strategy involves the targeted integration of the retroviral vector into a chromosomal locus with favorable properties. For proof of concept we established a novel HEK293-based retroviral producer cell line, called Flp293A, with a single-copy retroviral vector integrated at a selected chromosomal locus. The vector was flanked by noninteracting Flp-recombinase recognition sites and was exchanged for different retroviral vectors via Flp-mediated cassette exchange. All analyzed cell clones showed correct integration and identical titers for each of the vectors, confirming that the expression characteristics from the parental cell were preserved. Titers up to 2.5 x 10(7) infectious particles/10(6) cells were obtained. Also, high-titer producer cells for a therapeutic vector that encodes the 8.9-kb collagen VII cDNA in a marker-free cassette were obtained within 3 weeks without screening. Thus, we provide evidence that the precise integration of viral vectors into a favorable chromosomal locus leads to high and predictable virus production. This method is compatible with other retroviral vectors, including self-inactivating vectors and marker-free vectors. Further, it provides a tool for evaluation of different retroviral vector designs.

  18. Development of pachytene FISH maps for six maize chromosomes and their integration with other maize maps for insights into genome structure variation.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Bass, Hank W

    2012-05-01

    Integrated cytogenetic pachytene fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) maps were developed for chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 of maize using restriction fragment length polymorphism marker-selected Sorghum propinquum bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) for 19 core bin markers and 4 additional genetic framework loci. Using transgenomic BAC FISH mapping on maize chromosome addition lines of oats, we found that the relative locus position along the pachytene chromosome did not change as a function of total arm length, indicative of uniform axial contraction along the fibers during mid-prophase for tested loci on chromosomes 4 and 5. Additionally, we cytogenetically FISH mapped six loci from chromosome 9 onto their duplicated syntenic regions on chromosomes 1 and 6, which have varying amounts of sequence divergence, using sorghum BACs homologous to the chromosome 9 loci. We found that successful FISH mapping was possible even when the chromosome 9 selective marker had no counterpart in the syntenic block. In total, these 29 FISH-mapped loci were used to create the most extensive pachytene FISH maps to date for these six maize chromosomes. The FISH-mapped loci were then merged into one composite karyotype for direct comparative analysis with the recombination nodule-predicted cytogenetic, genetic linkage, and genomic physical maps using the relative marker positions of the loci on all the maps. Marker colinearity was observed between all pair-wise map comparisons, although marker distribution patterns varied widely in some cases. As expected, we found that the recombination nodule-based predictions most closely resembled the cytogenetic map positions overall. Cytogenetic and linkage map comparisons agreed with previous studies showing a decrease in marker spacing in the peri-centromeric heterochromatin region on the genetic linkage maps. In fact, there was a general trend with most loci mapping closer towards the telomere on the linkage maps than on the

  19. Human MLH1 suppresses the insertion of telomeric sequences at intra-chromosomal sites in telomerase-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Zou, Ying; Her, Chengtao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) promotes genome instabilities. However, it is unclear how aberrant ITS formation is suppressed in human cells. Here, we report that MLH1, a key protein involved in mismatch repair (MMR), suppresses telomeric sequence insertion (TSI) at intra-chromosomal regions. The frequency of TSI can be elevated by double-strand break (DSB) inducer and abolished by ATM/ATR inhibition. Suppression of TSI requires MLH1 recruitment to DSBs, indicating that MLH1's role in DSB response/repair is important for suppressing TSI. Moreover, TSI requires telomerase activity but is independent of the functional status of p53 and Rb. Lastly, we show that TSI is associated with chromosome instabilities including chromosome loss, micronuclei formation and chromosome breakage that are further elevated by replication stress. Our studies uncover a novel link between MLH1, telomerase, telomere and genome stability. PMID:28180301

  20. Human MLH1 suppresses the insertion of telomeric sequences at intra-chromosomal sites in telomerase-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Zou, Ying; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2016-11-29

    Aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) promotes genome instabilities. However, it is unclear how aberrant ITS formation is suppressed in human cells. Here, we report that MLH1, a key protein involved in mismatch repair (MMR), suppresses telomeric sequence insertion (TSI) at intra-chromosomal regions. The frequency of TSI can be elevated by double-strand break (DSB) inducer and abolished by ATM/ATR inhibition. Suppression of TSI requires MLH1 recruitment to DSBs, indicating that MLH1's role in DSB response/repair is important for suppressing TSI. Moreover, TSI requires telomerase activity but is independent of the functional status of p53 and Rb. Lastly, we show that TSI is associated with chromosome instabilities including chromosome loss, micronuclei formation and chromosome breakage that are further elevated by replication stress. Our studies uncover a novel link between MLH1, telomerase, telomere and genome stability.

  1. A system for multi-locus chromosomal integration and transformation-free selection marker rescue

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Michael S.; Choksi, Atri; Smolke, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast integrating plasmids (YIPs) are a versatile tool for stable integration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, current YIP systems necessitate time- and labor-intensive methods for cloning and selection marker rescue. Here we describe the design, construction, and validation of a new YIP system capable of accelerating the stable integration of multiple expression constructs into different loci in the yeast S. cerevisiae. These “directed pop-out” plasmids enable a simple, two-step integration protocol that results in a scarless integration alongside a complete rescue of the selection marker. These plasmids combine three key features: a dedicated “YIPout” fragment directs a recombination event that rescues the selection marker while avoiding undesired excision of the target DNA sequence, a multi-fragment modular DNA assembly system simplifies cloning, and a new set of counterselectable markers enables serial integration followed by a transformation-free marker rescue event. We constructed and tested directed pop-out YIPs for integration of fluorescent reporter genes into four yeast loci. We validated our new YIP design by integrating three reporter genes into three different loci with transformation-free rescue of selection markers. These new YIP designs will facilitate the construction of yeast strains that express complex heterologous metabolic pathways. PMID:25226817

  2. migS, a cis-acting site that affects bipolar positioning of oriC on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Niki, Hironori

    2004-01-01

    During replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome, the replicated Ori domains migrate towards opposite cell poles, suggesting that a cis-acting site for bipolar migration is located in this region. To identify this cis-acting site, a series of mutants was constructed by splitting subchromosomes from the original chromosome. One mutant, containing a 720 kb subchromosome, was found to be defective in the bipolar positioning of oriC. The creation of deletion mutants allowed the identification of migS, a 25 bp sequence, as the cis-acting site for the bipolar positioning of oriC. When migS was located at the replication terminus, the chromosomal segment showed bipolar positioning. migS was able to rescue bipolar migration of plasmid DNA containing a mutation in the SopABC partitioning system. Interestingly, multiple copies of the migS sequence on a plasmid in trans inhibited the bipolar positioning of oriC. Taken together, these findings indicate that migS plays a crucial role in the bipolar positioning of oriC. In addition, real-time analysis of the dynamic morphological changes of nucleoids in wild-type and migS mutants suggests that bipolar positioning of the replicated oriC contributes to nucleoid organization. PMID:14685268

  3. Retrovirus-like vectors for Saccharomyces cerevisiae: integration of foreign genes controlled by efficient promoters into yeast chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, E; Dewerchin, M; Boeke, J D

    1988-07-30

    Using modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 elements located on a 2 mu plasmid, reverse-transcriptase-mediated transposition into yeast chromosomes of expression cassettes containing a foreign gene can be induced. These expression cassettes consist of the yeast ARG3 and CUP1 promoter sequences fused to the Escherichia coli galK structural gene. Expression cassettes as large as 2 kb can be inserted into Ty elements and transposed efficiently to various sites in the yeast genome. A third yeast promoter (from the yeast CAR1 gene) seems to be unsuitable for use in the expression cassette. This may be because it does not allow the transcription run-through necessary for Ty1 transposition. Ways of improving this vector system are discussed, as are its advantages over episomal vector systems.

  4. Effect of pH value of freeze-drying solution on the chromosome integrity and developmental ability of mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Whittingham, David G; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo

    2003-01-01

    The nuclei of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa are able to retain their chromosome integrity and developmental potential. To optimize the conditions of freeze-drying, we examined whether pH values of the freeze-drying solution affect the chromosome integrity and developmental potential of sperm nuclei. The sperm freeze-drying solution we used contained a high concentration (50 mM) of calcium-chelating EGTA. Sperm chromosomes were examined at the metaphase of the first mitosis after injection of freeze-dried spermatozoa into matured oocytes. The developmental potential of sperm nuclei was assessed by examining the development of fetuses in midgestation. The results showed that both sperm chromosomes and sperm developmental potential are maintained better when the freeze-drying solution was slightly alkaline (pH 8.0) rather than near neutral or acidic (pH 7.4-6.0). The data indicated that the chromosome integrity and developmental ability of mouse spermatozoa are affected by the pH value of freeze-drying solution.

  5. Insertional inactivation of the Staphylococcus aureus beta-toxin by bacteriophage phi 13 occurs by site- and orientation-specific integration of the phi 13 genome.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D; Knights, J; Russell, R; Shanley, D; Birkbeck, T H; Dougan, G; Charles, I

    1991-04-01

    Lysogenization of Staphylococcus aureus by the serotype F converting bacteriophage phi 13 results in loss of beta-toxin expression. Sequence analysis of the S. aureus beta-toxin gene (hlb), the attachment site (attP)-containing region of phi 13 DNA and the chromosome/bacteriophage DNA junctions of a phi 13 lysogen, revealed that the molecular mechanism of loss of beta-toxin expression was due to insertion of the phi 13 genome into the 5' end of hlb. The insertion site (attB) within hlb contained a 14 base pair core sequence in common with attP and both ends of the integrated linear prophage genome of a phi 13 lysogen. These findings indicate that integration of the phi 13 genome into hlb is site- and orientation-specific.

  6. AnaLysis of Expression on human chromosome 21, ALE-HSA21: a pilot integrated web resource

    PubMed Central

    Scarpato, Margherita; Esposito, Roberta; Evangelista, Daniela; Aprile, Marianna; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Angelini, Claudia; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Costa, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome studies have shown the pervasive nature of transcription, demonstrating almost all the genes undergo alternative splicing. Accurately annotating all transcripts of a gene is crucial. It is needed to understand the impact of mutations on phenotypes, to shed light on genetic and epigenetic regulation of mRNAs and more generally to widen our knowledge about cell functionality and tissue diversity. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the other applications of the next-generation sequencing, provides precious data to improve annotations' accuracy, simultaneously creating issues related to the variety, complexity and the size of produced data. In this ‘scenario’, the lack of user-friendly resources, easily accessible to researchers with low skills in bioinformatics, makes difficult to retrieve complete information about one or few genes without browsing a jungle of databases. Concordantly, the increasing amount of data from ‘omics’ technologies imposes to develop integrated databases merging different data formats coming from distinct but complementary sources. In light of these considerations, and given the wide interest in studying Down syndrome—a genetic condition due to the trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21)—we developed an integrated relational database and a web interface, named ALE-HSA21 (AnaLysis of Expression on HSA21), accessible at http://bioinfo.na.iac.cnr.it/ALE-HSA21. This comprehensive and user-friendly web resource integrates—for all coding and noncoding transcripts of chromosome 21—existing gene annotations and transcripts identified de novo through RNA-Seq analysis with predictive computational analysis of regulatory sequences. Given the role of noncoding RNAs and untranslated regions of coding genes in key regulatory mechanisms, ALE-HSA21 is also an interesting web-based platform to investigate such processes. The ‘transcript-centric’ and easily-accessible nature of ALE-HSA21 makes this resource a valuable tool to

  7. Short Synthetic Terminators for Assembly of Transcription Units in Vitro and Stable Chromosomal Integration in Yeast S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Murray; Saka, Yasushi

    2017-01-20

    Assembly of synthetic genetic circuits is central to synthetic biology. Yeast S. cerevisiae, in particular, has proven to be an ideal chassis for synthetic genome assemblies by exploiting its efficient homologous recombination. However, this property of efficient homologous recombination poses a problem for multigene assemblies in yeast, since repeated usage of standard parts, such as transcriptional terminators, can lead to rearrangements of the repeats in assembled DNA constructs in vivo. To address this issue in developing a library of orthogonal genetic components for yeast, we designed a set of short synthetic terminators based on a consensus sequence with random linkers to avoid repetitive sequences. We constructed a series of expression vectors with these synthetic terminators for efficient assembly of synthetic genes using Gateway recombination reactions. We also constructed two BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors for assembling multiple transcription units with the synthetic terminators in vitro and their integration in the yeast genome. The tandem array of synthetic genes integrated in the genome by this method is highly stable because there are few homologous segments in the synthetic constructs. Using this system of assembly and genomic integration of transcription units, we tested the synthetic terminators and their influence on the proximal transcription units. Although all the synthetic terminators have the common consensus with the identical length, they showed different activities and impacts on the neighboring transcription units.

  8. Chromosomal Integration and Expression of Two Bacterial α-Acetolactate Decarboxylase Genes in Brewer's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, K.; Suihko, M.-L.; Knowles, J.; Penttilä, M.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial gene encoding α-acetolactate decarboxylase, isolated from Klebsiella terrigena or Enterobacter aerogenes, was expressed in brewer's yeast. The genes were expressed under either the yeast phosphoglycerokinase (PGK1) or the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) promoter and were integrated by gene replacement by using cotransformation into the PGK1 or ADH1 locus, respectively, of a brewer's yeast. The expression level of the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene of the PGK1 integrant strains was higher than that of the ADH1 integrants. Under pilot-scale brewing conditions, the α-acetolactate decarboxylase activity of the PGK1 integrant strains was sufficient to reduce the formation of diacetyl below the taste threshold value, and no lagering was needed. The brewing properties of the recombinant yeast strains were otherwise unaltered, and the quality (most importantly, the flavor) of the trial beers produced was as good as that of the control beer. Images PMID:16348559

  9. [Integration of plasmid pPL 7065 into chromosome of Bac. pumilis].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A M; Koz'mipa, L M; Abromova, M A; Lukin, A A

    1980-01-01

    Hybridization of tritium-labelled plasmid 7065 with total DNA of several Bac. pumilis strains differing in the degree of spore-formation showed that strain 7065-k contains the plasmid in an integral state.

  10. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR (FPNI-PCR): a new high-efficiency strategy for rapid chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The advent of genomics-based technologies has revolutionized many fields of biological enquiry. However, chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning is still a necessary and important procedure to determining gene structure. Such methods are used to identify T-DNA insertion sites and so are especially relevant for organisms where large T-DNA insertion libraries have been created, such as rice and Arabidopsis. The currently available methods for flanking sequence cloning, including the popular TAIL-PCR technique, are relatively laborious and slow. Results Here, we report a simple and effective fusion primer and nested integrated PCR method (FPNI-PCR) for the identification and cloning of unknown genomic regions flanked known sequences. In brief, a set of universal primers was designed that consisted of various 15-16 base arbitrary degenerate oligonucleotides. These arbitrary degenerate primers were fused to the 3' end of an adaptor oligonucleotide which provided a known sequence without degenerate nucleotides, thereby forming the fusion primers (FPs). These fusion primers are employed in the first step of an integrated nested PCR strategy which defines the overall FPNI-PCR protocol. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel strategy, we have successfully used it to isolate multiple genomic sequences namely, 21 orthologs of genes in various species of Rosaceace, 4 MYB genes of Rosa rugosa, 3 promoters of transcription factors of Petunia hybrida, and 4 flanking sequences of T-DNA insertion sites in transgenic tobacco lines and 6 specific genes from sequenced genome of rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusions The successful amplification of target products through FPNI-PCR verified that this novel strategy is an effective, low cost and simple procedure. Furthermore, FPNI-PCR represents a more sensitive, rapid and accurate technique than the established TAIL-PCR and hiTAIL-PCR procedures. PMID:22093809

  11. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-02-24

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome.

  12. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome. PMID:26907467

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli chromosome near oriC: identification and characterization of asnC, a regulatory element in E. coli asparagine metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    de Wind, N; de Jong, M; Meijer, M; Stuitje, A R

    1985-01-01

    We developed a new method for the specific mutagenization of the E. coli chromosome. This method takes advantage of the fact that a pBR322 plasmid containing chromosomal sequences is mobilizable during an Hfr-mediated conjugational transfer, due to an homologous recombination between the E. coli Hfr chromosome and the pBR322 derivative. Transconjugants are screened with a simple selection procedure for integration of mutant sequences in the chromosome and loss of pBR322 sequences. Using this method we specifically inactivated several genes near the E. coli replication origin oriC. We found that a gene coding for asparagine synthetase A. This regulatory mechanism was investigated in detail by determining in vivo regulation of asnA promoter activity by the 17kD protein under different growth conditions. Results obtained also suggest a general regulatory role of the 17kD protein in E. coli asparagine metabolism. Therefore the 17kD gene is proposed to be renamed asnC. Images PMID:3909107

  14. Chromosomal localization of 5S and 18S-5.8S-25S ribosomal DNA sites in five Asian pines using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-L; Zhang, D; Hong, D-Y; Wang, X-R

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on mitotic metaphase chromosome preparations of five Asian Pinus species: Pinus tabuliformis, Pinus yunnanensis, Pinus densata, Pinus massoniana and Pinus merkusii, using simultaneously DNA probes of the 18S rRNA gene and the 5S rRNA gene including the non-transcribed spacer sequences. The number and location of 18S rDNA sites varied markedly (5-10 pairs of strong signals) among the five pines. A maximum of 20 major 18S rDNA sites was observed in the diploid genome (2n = 24) of P. massoniana. The 5S rDNA FISH pattern was less variable, with one major site and one minor site commonly observed in each species. The differentiation of rDNA sites on chromosomes among the five pines correlates well with their phylogenic positions in Pinus as reconstructed from other molecular data. P. densata, a species of hybrid origin, resembles its parents ( P. tabuliformis and P. yunnanensis), including some components characteristic of each parent in its pattern. However, the species is unique, showing new features resulting possibly from recombination and genome reorganization.

  15. Localization of preferential sites of rearrangement within the BCR gene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, C.T.; Shah, N.P.; Ogden, S.; Willman, C.; McConnell, T.; Crist, W.; Carroll, A.; Witte, O.N. )

    1989-06-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been linked to a hybrid BCR/ABL protein product that differs from that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This implies that the molecular structures of the two chromosomal translocations also differ. Localization of translocation breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL has been impeded due to the only partial characterization of the BCR locus. The authors have isolated the entire 130-kilobase BCR genomic locus from a human cosmid library. They have demonstrated that these breakpoints are all located at the 3{prime} end of the intron around an unusual restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by deletion of a 1-kilobase fragment containing Alu family reiterated sequences. This clustering is unexpected in light of previous theories of rearrangement in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia that would have predicted a random dispersion of breakpoints in the first intron in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The proximity of the translocation breakpoints to this constitutive deletion may indicate shared mechanisms of rearrangement or that such polymorphisms mark areas of the genome prone to recombination.

  16. Maintaining Site Integrity for Breeding Least Bell's Vireos

    Treesearch

    James M. Greaves

    1989-01-01

    Least Bell's vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus) exhibit a high degree of between-year fidelity to breeding area. Use of many sites in an isolated population in Santa Barbara, California, spans at least 10 years. Males and females show different types and degrees of tenacity to territories, as well as to some nest-sites. More than 60 percent male and...

  17. Integrated bird conservation web site in the United States

    Treesearch

    Roxanne Bogart; Chris Eberly; Elizabeth Martin

    2005-01-01

    In working towards a vision of integrated bird conservation, scientists, conservationists, land managers, and administrators are faced with a variety of scientific, managerial, administrative, and logistical challenges and complexities. The broad scope of integrated bird conservation requires organizations to work together to conserve birds across taxonomic groups,...

  18. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  19. Wolbachia genome integrated in an insect chromosome: Evolution and fate of laterally transferred endosymbiont genes

    PubMed Central

    Nikoh, Naruo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Kondo, Natsuko; Hizume, Masahiro; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2008-01-01

    Recent accumulation of microbial genome data has demonstrated that lateral gene transfers constitute an important and universal evolutionary process in prokaryotes, while those in multicellular eukaryotes are still regarded as unusual, except for endosymbiotic gene transfers from mitochondria and plastids. Here we thoroughly investigated the bacterial genes derived from a Wolbachia endosymbiont on the nuclear genome of the beetle Callosobruchus chinensis. Exhaustive PCR detection and Southern blot analysis suggested that ∼30% of Wolbachia genes, in terms of the gene repertoire of wMel, are present on the insect nuclear genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization located the transferred genes on the proximal region of the basal short arm of the X chromosome. Molecular evolutionary and other lines of evidence indicated that the transferred genes are probably derived from a single lateral transfer event. The transferred genes were, for the length examined, structurally disrupted, freed from functional constraints, and transcriptionally inactive. Hence, most, if not all, of the transferred genes have been pseudogenized. Notwithstanding this, the transferred genes were ubiquitously detected from Japanese and Taiwanese populations of C. chinensis, while the number of the transferred genes detected differed between the populations. The transferred genes were not detected from congenic beetle species, indicating that the transfer event occurred after speciation of C. chinensis, which was estimated to be one or several million years ago. These features of the laterally transferred endosymbiont genes are compared with the evolutionary patterns of mitochondrial and plastid genome fragments acquired by nuclear genomes through recent endosymbiotic gene transfers. PMID:18073380

  20. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress. PMID:26765540

  1. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2009-3118 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical...VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0054: Opportune Landing Site (OLS) Critical Experiment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-00

  2. Molecular and virological evidence of viral activation from chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6A in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Ken; Ohye, Tamae; Suzuki, Kyoko; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Norio; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Katano, Harutaka; Inoue, Naoki; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2014-08-15

    It has been unclear whether chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) can be activated with pathogenic effects on the human body. We present molecular and virological evidence of ciHHV-6A activation in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. These findings have significant implications for the management of patients with ciHHV-6.

  3. Site-specific gene integration in rice genome mediated by the FLP-FRT recombination system.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Soumen; Srivastava, Vibha

    2011-08-01

    Plant transformation based on random integration of foreign DNA often generates complex integration structures. Precision in the integration process is necessary to ensure the formation of full-length, single-copy integration. Site-specific recombination systems are versatile tools for precise genomic manipulations such as DNA excision, inversion or integration. The yeast FLP-FRT recombination system has been widely used for DNA excision in higher plants. Here, we report the use of FLP-FRT system for efficient targeting of foreign gene into the engineered genomic site in rice. The transgene vector containing a pair of directly oriented FRT sites was introduced by particle bombardment into the cells containing the target locus. FLP activity generated by the co-bombarded FLP gene efficiently separated the transgene construct from the vector-backbone and integrated the backbone-free construct into the target site. Strong FLP activity, derived from the enhanced FLP protein, FLPe, was important for the successful site-specific integration (SSI). The majority of the transgenic events contained a precise integration and expressed the transgene. Interestingly, each transgenic event lacked the co-bombarded FLPe gene, suggesting reversion of the integration structure in the presence of the constitutive FLPe expression. Progeny of the precise transgenic lines inherited the stable SSI locus and expressed the transgene. This work demonstrates the application of FLP-FRT system for site-specific gene integration in plants using rice as a model.

  4. NGS-based approach to determine the presence of HPV and their sites of integration in human cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Chandrani, P; Kulkarni, V; Iyer, P; Upadhyay, P; Chaubal, R; Das, P; Mulherkar, R; Singh, R; Dutt, A

    2015-06-09

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) accounts for the most common cause of all virus-associated human cancers. Here, we describe the first graphic user interface (GUI)-based automated tool 'HPVDetector', for non-computational biologists, exclusively for detection and annotation of the HPV genome based on next-generation sequencing data sets. We developed a custom-made reference genome that comprises of human chromosomes along with annotated genome of 143 HPV types as pseudochromosomes. The tool runs on a dual mode as defined by the user: a 'quick mode' to identify presence of HPV types and an 'integration mode' to determine genomic location for the site of integration. The input data can be a paired-end whole-exome, whole-genome or whole-transcriptome data set. The HPVDetector is available in public domain for download: http://www.actrec.gov.in/pi-webpages/AmitDutt/HPVdetector/HPVDetector.html. On the basis of our evaluation of 116 whole-exome, 23 whole-transcriptome and 2 whole-genome data, we were able to identify presence of HPV in 20 exomes and 4 transcriptomes of cervical and head and neck cancer tumour samples. Using the inbuilt annotation module of HPVDetector, we found predominant integration of viral gene E7, a known oncogene, at known 17q21, 3q27, 7q35, Xq28 and novel sites of integration in the human genome. Furthermore, co-infection with high-risk HPVs such as 16 and 31 were found to be mutually exclusive compared with low-risk HPV71. HPVDetector is a simple yet precise and robust tool for detecting HPV from tumour samples using variety of next-generation sequencing platforms including whole genome, whole exome and transcriptome. Two different modes (quick detection and integration mode) along with a GUI widen the usability of HPVDetector for biologists and clinicians with minimal computational knowledge.

  5. Tyramide-FISH mapping of single genes for development of an integrated recombination and cytogenetic map of chromosome 5 of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Dmitry; Divashuk, Mikhail; Havey, Michael J; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-03-01

    Chromosome 5 of onion carries major quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control dry-matter content, pungency and storability of bulbs, amounts and types of epicuticular waxes, and resistances to abiotic factors, all of which are of interest to breeders. SNPs, SSRs, and RFLPs in expressed regions of the onion genome have been genetically mapped, and we used these clones and sequences from the NCBI database to develop DNA probes for in situ hybridization to integrate the genetic and physical maps of onion chromosome 5. We produced genomic amplicons from expressed regions of the onion genome that carried both exons and introns in order to increase the hybridization specificity of the probes and to enlarge the target DNA sizes. Tyramide-FISH technique was used to increase the detection sensitivity of relatively short target DNA regions, which range from 950 to 2100 bp. Through the integration of genetic and chromosomal maps, we were able to estimate the distribution of recombination events along onion chromosome 5. We demonstrated the efficiency of chromosomal in situ mapping of exon-intron genomic clones for the extremely large genome of onion.

  6. Estimating Diversity of Black Flies in the Simulium ignescens and Simulium tunja Complexes in Colombia: Chromosomal Rearrangements as the Core of Integrative Taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Colorado-Garzón, Fredy A; Adler, Peter H; García, Luis F; Muñoz de Hoyos, Paulina; Bueno, Marta L; Matta, Nubia E

    2017-01-01

    Black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) are distributed throughout the world, with more than 2200 formally described species. The family is renowned for its high frequency of cryptic species, offering an opportunity for integrative taxonomy, based on morphological, chromosomal, and molecular approaches. The biodiversity within Simulium (Psilopelmia) ignescens and S. (Psilopelmia) tunja in Colombia was estimated from the larval stage; 10 morphoforms were recognized based on 7 structural characters. This remarkable morphological variation was evaluated through 23 markers on the polytene chromosomes. We established 1 new cytoform in each nominal species. The congruence of the morphological and chromosomal assignments was evaluated using the mitochondrial marker Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I (COI) for each morphoform. The molecular data supported the chromosomal recognition of cytoforms (i.e., cryptic species). We also established the suitability of the COI marker for linking the pupal stage with each cytoform. Our results reveal the presence of hidden biodiversity in S. ignescens and S. tunja and demonstrate the power of polytene chromosomes as a tool for evaluating simuliid diversity, while illustrating the importance of integrated analyses in modern taxonomy. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effects of a Balanced Translocation between Chromosomes 1 and 11 Disrupting the DISC1 Locus on White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Heather C.; Dimitrova, Rali; Sprooten, Emma; Dauvermann, Maria R.; Romaniuk, Liana; Duff, Barbara; Watson, Andrew R.; Moorhead, Bill; Bastin, Mark; Semple, Scott I.; Giles, Stephen; Hall, Jeremy; Thomson, Pippa; Roberts, Neil; Hughes, Zoe A.; Brandon, Nick J.; Dunlop, John; Whitcher, Brandon; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Lawrie, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Individuals carrying rare, but biologically informative genetic variants provide a unique opportunity to model major mental illness and inform understanding of disease mechanisms. The rarity of such variations means that their study involves small group numbers, however they are amongst the strongest known genetic risk factors for major mental illness and are likely to have large neural effects. DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1) is a gene containing one such risk variant, identified in a single Scottish family through its disruption by a balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 11; t(1;11) (q42.1;q14.3). Method Within the original pedigree, we examined the effects of the t(1;11) translocation on white matter integrity, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA). This included family members with (n = 7) and without (n = 13) the translocation, along with a clinical control sample of patients with psychosis (n = 34), and a group of healthy controls (n = 33). Results We report decreased white matter integrity in five clusters in the genu of the corpus callosum, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, acoustic radiation and fornix. Analysis of the mixed psychosis group also demonstrated decreased white matter integrity in the above regions. FA values within the corpus callosum correlated significantly with positive psychotic symptom severity. Conclusions We demonstrate that the t(1;11) translocation is associated with reduced white matter integrity in frontal commissural and association fibre tracts. These findings overlap with those shown in affected patients with psychosis and in DISC1 animal models and highlight the value of rare but biologically informative mutations in modeling psychosis. PMID:26102360

  8. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  9. Metabolic pathway engineering for fatty acid ethyl ester production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using stable chromosomal integration.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Bouke Wim; Shi, Shuobo; Valle-Rodríguez, Juan Octavio; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Fatty acid ethyl esters are fatty acid derived molecules similar to first generation biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters; FAMEs) which can be produced in a microbial cell factory. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a suitable candidate for microbial large scale and long term cultivations, which is the typical industrial production setting for biofuels. It is crucial to conserve the metabolic design of the cell factory during industrial cultivation conditions that require extensive propagation. Genetic modifications therefore have to be introduced in a stable manner. Here, several metabolic engineering strategies for improved production of fatty acid ethyl esters in S. cerevisiae were combined and the genes were stably expressed from the organisms' chromosomes. A wax ester synthase (ws2) was expressed in different yeast strains with an engineered acetyl-CoA and fatty acid metabolism. Thus, we compared expression of ws2 with and without overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2), acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD6) and acetyl-CoA synthetase (acs SE (L641P) ) and further evaluated additional overexpression of a mutant version of acetyl-CoA decarboxylase (ACC1 (S1157A,S659A) ) and the acyl-CoA binding protein (ACB1). The combined engineering efforts of the implementation of ws2, ADH2, ALD6 and acs SE (L641P) , ACC1 (S1157A,S659A) and ACB1 in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking storage lipid formation (are1Δ, are2Δ, dga1Δ and lro1Δ) and β-oxidation (pox1Δ) resulted in a 4.1-fold improvement compared with sole expression of ws2 in S. cerevisiae.

  10. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  11. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed.

  12. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  13. A novel series of vectors for chromosomal integration in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihisa Shirai, Atsuko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2008-09-19

    A series of fission yeast targeting vectors that can be used for wild-type strains having no selectable markers have been designed. The functions of one of three marker genes, lys1{sup +}, arg1{sup +}, and his3{sup +}, involved in amino acid synthesis, are impaired by integration of the fragments generated by restriction enzyme digestion of the plasmids. Successful integration of the fragments into the targeted loci can be readily verified by their requirement for amino acids, or by the PCR diagnostic analysis. Since these selection markers are not used commonly in fission yeast, these plasmids are likely to facilitate studies that require the co-expression of genes such as co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, by employing them in combination with most of the previously reported markers.

  14. Discovery of genes involved in mitosis, cell division, cell wall integrity and chromosome segregation through construction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Song; Beckley, Janel R.; Ren, Liping; Feoktistova, Anna; Jensen, Michael A.; Rhind, Nick; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The fission yeast model system Schizosaccharomyces pombe is used to study fundamental biological processes. To continue to fill gaps in the S. pombe gene deletion collection, we constructed a set of 90 haploid gene deletion strains covering many previously uncharacterized genes. To begin to understand the function of these genes, we exposed this collection of strains to a battery of stress conditions. Using this information in combination with microscopy, proteomics and mini-chromosome loss assays, we identified genes involved in cell wall integrity, cytokinesis, chromosome segregation and DNA metabolism. This subset of nonessential gene deletions will add to the toolkits available for the study of biological processes in S. pombe. PMID:27168121

  15. Structural Insights into the Assembly of the Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Rep68 Protein on the Integration Site AAVS1*

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bishop, Clayton; Burgner, John W.; Escalante, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only eukaryotic virus with the property of establishing latency by integrating site-specifically into the human genome. The integration site known as AAVS1 is located in chromosome 19 and contains multiple GCTC repeats that are recognized by the AAV non-structural Rep proteins. These proteins are multifunctional, with an N-terminal origin-binding domain (OBD) and a helicase domain joined together by a short linker. As a first step to understand the process of site-specific integration, we proceeded to characterize the recognition and assembly of Rep68 onto the AAVS1 site. We first determined the x-ray structure of AAV-2 Rep68 OBD in complex with the AAVS1 DNA site. Specificity is achieved through the interaction of a glycine-rich loop that binds the major groove and an α-helix that interacts with a downstream minor groove on the same face of the DNA. Although the structure shows a complex with three OBD molecules bound to the AAVS1 site, we show by using analytical centrifugation and electron microscopy that the full-length Rep68 forms a heptameric complex. Moreover, we determined that a minimum of two direct repeats is required to form a stable complex and to melt DNA. Finally, we show that although the individual domains bind DNA poorly, complex assembly requires oligomerization and cooperation between its OBD, helicase, and the linker domains. PMID:26370092

  16. Structural Insights into the Assembly of the Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Rep68 Protein on the Integration Site AAVS1.

    PubMed

    Musayev, Faik N; Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bishop, Clayton; Burgner, John W; Escalante, Carlos R

    2015-11-13

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only eukaryotic virus with the property of establishing latency by integrating site-specifically into the human genome. The integration site known as AAVS1 is located in chromosome 19 and contains multiple GCTC repeats that are recognized by the AAV non-structural Rep proteins. These proteins are multifunctional, with an N-terminal origin-binding domain (OBD) and a helicase domain joined together by a short linker. As a first step to understand the process of site-specific integration, we proceeded to characterize the recognition and assembly of Rep68 onto the AAVS1 site. We first determined the x-ray structure of AAV-2 Rep68 OBD in complex with the AAVS1 DNA site. Specificity is achieved through the interaction of a glycine-rich loop that binds the major groove and an α-helix that interacts with a downstream minor groove on the same face of the DNA. Although the structure shows a complex with three OBD molecules bound to the AAVS1 site, we show by using analytical centrifugation and electron microscopy that the full-length Rep68 forms a heptameric complex. Moreover, we determined that a minimum of two direct repeats is required to form a stable complex and to melt DNA. Finally, we show that although the individual domains bind DNA poorly, complex assembly requires oligomerization and cooperation between its OBD, helicase, and the linker domains.

  17. Human telomeres that carry an integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 are often short and unstable, facilitating release of the viral genome from the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Wig, Gunjan; Medina-Calzada, Zahara; Neumann, Rita; Jeffreys, Alec J; Winney, Bruce; Wilson, James F; Clark, Duncan A; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Linear chromosomes are stabilized by telomeres, but the presence of short dysfunctional telomeres triggers cellular senescence in human somatic tissues, thus contributing to ageing. Approximately 1% of the population inherits a chromosomally integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 (CI-HHV-6), but the consequences of integration for the virus and for the telomere with the insertion are unknown. Here we show that the telomere on the distal end of the integrated virus is frequently the shortest measured in somatic cells but not the germline. The telomere carrying the CI-HHV-6 is also prone to truncations that result in the formation of a short telomere at a novel location within the viral genome. We detected extra-chromosomal circular HHV-6 molecules, some surprisingly comprising the entire viral genome with a single fully reconstituted direct repeat region (DR) with both terminal cleavage and packaging elements (PAC1 and PAC2). Truncated CI-HHV-6 and extra-chromosomal circular molecules are likely reciprocal products that arise through excision of a telomere-loop (t-loop) formed within the CI-HHV-6 genome. In summary, we show that the CI-HHV-6 genome disrupts stability of the associated telomere and this facilitates the release of viral sequences as circular molecules, some of which have the potential to become fully functioning viruses.

  18. Report of the Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, G.A.; Overhauser, J.; Gerken, S.; Aburomia, R.; O'Connell, P.; Krauter, K.S.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Yoshikawa, T.; Collins, A.R.; Geurts van Kessel, A.

    1996-12-04

    The fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping was held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA on October 7-9, 1996. The workshop was attended by 34 participants from 7 countries. The goals of the workshop were to (1) generate integrated genetic and physical maps, (2) update the transcriptional map, (3) assess the syntenic relationships between human chromosome 18 and the mouse genome, and (4) establish a chromosome 18 web site.

  19. VISPA: a computational pipeline for the identification and analysis of genomic vector integration sites.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Andrea; Leo, Simone; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Cesana, Daniela; Spinozzi, Giulio; Orsini, Massimilano; Merella, Stefania; Stupka, Elia; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the genomic distribution of viral vector genomic integration sites is a key step in hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy applications, allowing to assess both the safety and the efficacy of the treatment and to study the basic aspects of hematopoiesis and stem cell biology. Identifying vector integration sites requires ad-hoc bioinformatics tools with stringent requirements in terms of computational efficiency, flexibility, and usability. We developed VISPA (Vector Integration Site Parallel Analysis), a pipeline for automated integration site identification and annotation based on a distributed environment with a simple Galaxy web interface. VISPA was successfully used for the bioinformatics analysis of the follow-up of two lentiviral vector-based hematopoietic stem-cell gene therapy clinical trials. Our pipeline provides a reliable and efficient tool to assess the safety and efficacy of integrating vectors in clinical settings.

  20. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H; Jerome, Keith R; Flamand, Louis

    2015-06-30

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6- subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73-6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23-7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6- without angina, iciHHV-6- with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina.

  1. Origin and evolution of B chromosomes in the cichlid fish Astatotilapia latifasciata based on integrated genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Valente, Guilherme T; Conte, Matthew A; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Carvalho, Robson F; Vicari, Marcelo R; Kocher, Thomas D; Martins, Cesar

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 15% of eukaryotes contain supernumerary B chromosomes. When present, B chromosomes frequently represent as much as 5% of the genome. Despite thousands of reports describing the distribution of supernumeraries in various taxa, a comprehensive theory for the origin, maintenance, and evolution of B chromosomes has not emerged. Here, we sequence the complete genomes of individual cichlid fish (Astatotilapia latifasciata) with and without B chromosomes, as well as microdissected B chromosomes, to identify DNA sequences on the B. B sequences were further analyzed through quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. We find that the B chromosome contains thousands of sequences duplicated from essentially every chromosome in the ancestral karyotype. Although most genes on the B chromosome are fragmented, a few are largely intact, and we detect evidence that at least three of them are transcriptionally active. We propose a model in which the B chromosome originated early in the evolutionary history of Lake Victoria cichlids from a small fragment of one autosome. DNA sequences originating from several autosomes, including protein-coding genes and transposable elements, subsequently inserted into this proto-B. We propose that intact B chromosome genes involved with microtubule organization, kinetochore structure, recombination and progression through the cell cycle may play a role in driving the transmission of the B chromosome. Furthermore, our work suggests that karyotyping is an essential step prior to genome sequencing to avoid problems in genome assembly and analytical biases created by the presence of high copy number sequences on the B chromosome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines: evidence of ongoing replication.

    PubMed

    Symons, Jori; Chopra, Abha; Malatinkova, Eva; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Abana, Chike O; Rhodes, Ajantha; Rezaei, Simin D; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Mallal, Simon; Lewin, Sharon R; Cameron, Paul U

    2017-01-13

    Assessing the location and frequency of HIV integration sites in latently infected cells can potentially inform our understanding of how HIV persists during combination antiretroviral therapy. We developed a novel high throughput sequencing method to evaluate HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines to determine whether there was virus replication or clonal expansion in these cell lines observed as multiple integration events at the same position. We modified a previously reported method using random DNA shearing and PCR to allow for high throughput robotic processing to identify the site and frequency of HIV integration in latently infected cell lines. Latently infected cell lines infected with intact virus demonstrated multiple distinct HIV integration sites (28 different sites in U1, 110 in ACH-2 and 117 in J1.1 per 150,000 cells). In contrast, cell lines infected with replication-incompetent viruses (J-Lat cells) demonstrated single integration sites. Following in vitro passaging of the ACH-2 cell line, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of unique HIV integration sites and there were multiple mutations and large deletions in the proviral DNA. When the ACH-2 cell line was cultured with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir, there was a significant decrease in the number of unique HIV integration sites and a transient increase in the frequency of 2-LTR circles consistent with virus replication in these cells. Cell lines latently infected with intact HIV demonstrated multiple unique HIV integration sites indicating that these cell lines are not clonal and in the ACH-2 cell line there was evidence of low level virus replication. These findings have implications for the use of latently infected cell lines as models of HIV latency and for the use of these cells as standards.

  3. vanG Element Insertions within a Conserved Chromosomal Site Conferring Vancomycin Resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Knipe, Kristen M.; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; McGee, Lesley; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Glennen, Anita; Nichols, Megin; Harris, Carol; Brimmage, Mary; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Park, Connie J.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Frace, Michael A.; Sammons, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three vancomycin-resistant streptococcal strains carrying vanG elements (two invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates [GBS-NY and GBS-NM, both serotype II and multilocus sequence type 22] and one Streptococcus anginosus [Sa]) were examined. The 45,585-bp elements found within Sa and GBS-NY were nearly identical (together designated vanG-1) and shared near-identity over an ~15-kb overlap with a previously described vanG element from Enterococcus faecalis. Unexpectedly, vanG-1 shared much less homology with the 49,321-bp vanG-2 element from GBS-NM, with widely different levels (50% to 99%) of sequence identity shared among 44 related open reading frames. Immediately adjacent to both vanG-1 and vanG-2 were 44,670-bp and 44,680-bp integrative conjugative element (ICE)-like sequences, designated ICE-r, that were nearly identical in the two group B streptococcal (GBS) strains. The dual vanG and ICE-r elements from both GBS strains were inserted at the same position, between bases 1328 and 1329, within the identical RNA methyltransferase (rumA) genes. A GenBank search revealed that although most GBS strains contained insertions within this specific site, only sequence type 22 (ST22) GBS strains contained highly related ICE-r derivatives. The vanG-1 element in Sa was also inserted within this position corresponding to its rumA homolog adjacent to an ICE-r derivative. vanG-1 insertions were previously reported within the same relative position in the E. faecalis rumA homolog. An ICE-r sequence perfectly conserved with respect to its counterpart in GBS-NY was apparent within the same site of the rumA homolog of a Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain. Additionally, homologous vanG-like elements within the conserved rumA target site were evident in Roseburia intestinalis. PMID:25053786

  4. Viral Determinants of Integration Site Preferences of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Monse, Hella; Laufs, Stephanie; Kuate, Seraphin; Zeller, W. Jens; Fruehauf, Stefan; Überla, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Preferential integration into transcriptionally active regions of genomes has been observed for retroviral vectors based on gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses. However, differences in the integration site preferences were detected, which might be explained by differences in viral components of the preintegration complexes. Viral determinants of integration site preferences have not been defined. Therefore, integration sites of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-based vectors produced in the absence of accessory genes or lacking promoter and enhancer elements were compared. Similar integration patterns for the different SIV vectors indicate that vif, vpr, vpx, nef, env, and promoter or enhancer elements are not required for preferential integration of SIV into transcriptionally active regions of genomes. PMID:16873270

  5. Highly diverse chromoviruses of Beta vulgaris are classified by chromodomains and chromosomal integration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromoviruses are one of the three genera of Ty3-gypsy long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, and are present in high copy numbers in plant genomes. They are widely distributed within the plant kingdom, with representatives even in lower plants such as green and red algae. Their hallmark is the presence of a chromodomain at the C-terminus of the integrase. The chromodomain exhibits structural characteristics similar to proteins of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family, which mediate the binding of each chromovirus type to specific histone variants. A specific integration via the chromodomain has been shown for only a few chromoviruses. However, a detailed study of different chromoviral clades populating a single plant genome has not yet been carried out. Results We conducted a comprehensive survey of chromoviruses within the Beta vulgaris (sugar beet) genome, and found a highly diverse chromovirus population, with significant differences in element size, primarily caused by their flanking LTRs. In total, we identified and annotated full-length members of 16 families belonging to the four plant chromoviral clades: CRM, Tekay, Reina, and Galadriel. The families within each clade are structurally highly conserved; in particular, the position of the chromodomain coding region relative to the polypurine tract is clade-specific. Two distinct groups of chromodomains were identified. The group II chromodomain was present in three chromoviral clades, whereas families of the CRM clade contained a more divergent motif. Physical mapping using representatives of all four clades identified a clade-specific integration pattern. For some chromoviral families, we detected the presence of expressed sequence tags, indicating transcriptional activity. Conclusions We present a detailed study of chromoviruses, belonging to the four major clades, which populate a single plant genome. Our results illustrate the diversity and family structure of B. vulgaris

  6. Pseudo attP sites in favor of transgene integration and expression in cultured porcine cells identified by streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phage PhiC31 integrase integrates attB-containing plasmid into pseudo attP site in eukaryotic genomes in a unidirectional site-specific manner and maintains robust transgene expression. Few studies, however, explore its potential in livestock. This study aims to discover the molecular basis of PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in pig cells. We show that PhiC31 integrase can mediate site-specific transgene integration into the genome of pig kidney PK15 cells. Intramolecular recombination in pig PK15 cell line occurred at maximum frequency of 82% with transiently transfected attB- and attP-containing plasmids. An optimal molar ratio of pCMV-Int to pEGFP-N1-attB at 5:1 was observed for maximum number of cell clones under drug selection. Four candidate pseudo attP sites were identified by TAIL-PCR from those cell clones with single-copy transgene integration. Two of them gave rise to higher integration frequency occurred at 33%. 5′ and 3′ junction PCR showed that transgene integration mediated by PhiC31 integrase was mono-allelic. Micro- deletion and insertion were observed by sequencing the integration border, indicating that double strand break was induced by the recombination. We then constructed rescue reporter plasmids by ABI-REC cloning of the four pseudo attP sites into pBCPB + plasmid. Transfection of these rescue plasmids and pCMV-Int resulted in expected intramolecular recombination between attB and pseudo attP sites. This proved that the endogenous pseudo attP sites were functional substrates for PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination. Two pseudo attP sites maintained robust extracellular and intracellular EGFP expression. Alamar blue assay showed that transgene integration into these specific sites had little effect on cell proliferation. This is the first report to document the potential use of PhiC31 integrase to mediate site-specific recombination in pig cells. Our work established an ideal model to study the

  7. Integrated Remote Sensing Modalities for Classification at a Legacy Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. J.; Anderson, D.; Craven, J.

    2016-12-01

    Detecting, locating, and characterizing suspected underground nuclear test sites is of interest to the worldwide nonproliferation monitoring community. Remote sensing provides both cultural and surface geological information over a large search area in a non-intrusive manner. We have characterized a legacy nuclear test site at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) using an aerial system based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging. We integrate these different remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks on the test site. These tasks include detecting cultural artifacts and exotic materials. We evaluate if the integration of different remote sensing modalities improves classification performance.

  8. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  9. Structural analysis of a hepatitis B virus genome integrated into chromosome 17p of a human hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.Z.; Slagle, B.L.; Donehower, L.A.; van Tuinen, P.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Butel, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is clearly a factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but its mechanism of action remains obscure. One possibility is that the HBV integration event alters the expression of a nearby growth-regulatory cellular gene. A 9-kilobase (kb) DNA fragment containing an HBV insert plus flanking cellular sequences was cloned from a hepatoma specimen from Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Restriction mapping of the insert revealed a large inverted repeat structure consisting of both viral sequences (encompassing all of the core and pre-S regions and portions of the X and S genes) and at least 3 kb of unique cellular sequences. The virus-cell junction mapped 11 nucleotides from the DRI region, in a position within the HBV X gene and included in the cohesive overlap region. A probe generated from 1.0 kb of the flanking cellular DNA mapped the viral insert to chromosome 17 in the region designated 17p11.2-17p12, which is near the human proto-oncogene p53. Sequence data from a portion of the flanking cellular DNA revealed a stretch of approximately 70 base pairs that showed highly significant homology with a conserved region of a number of functional mammalian DNA, including the human autonomously replicating sequence 1 (ASRI).

  10. Enhancing plant disease suppression by Burkholderia vietnamiensis through chromosomal integration of Bacillus subtilis chitinase gene chi113.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjian; Huang, Yujie; Harvey, Paul R; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Guangzhi; Zhou, Hongzi; Yang, Hetong

    2012-02-01

    Burkholderia vietnamiensis P418 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. A chitinase gene from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and stably integrated into the chromosome of using the transposon delivery vector, pUTkm1. Chitinase activity was detected in recombinant P418-37 but not in wild type P418. Recombinant P418-37 retained the in vitro growth rate, N(2)-fixation and phosphate and potassium-solubilizing characteristics of the wild type. P418-37 significantly (P < 0.05) increased in vitro inhibition of the plant pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum, Rhizoctonia cerealis, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Verticillium dahliae and Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici compared with P418. In planta disease suppression assays indicated that P418-37 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced suppression of wheat sheath blight (R. cerealis), cotton Fusarium wilt (F. oxysporium f.sp. vasinfectum) and tomato gray mould (Botrytis cinerea), relative to the wild type.

  11. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G.; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M. Julia; Hossain, M. Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M.; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H.; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A.; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)–based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function—mitotic chromosome condensation—and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  12. Collaborating sites for community-oriented integrated care and health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul

    2017-01-01

    London Journal of Primary Care wishes to develop a network of collaborating sites to better understand how to achieve community-oriented integrated care and health promotion in different contexts. A collaborating site can do more than submit papers. It can develop its own domain on the LJPC website, contribute to the development of LJPC policy, and stimulate discussions with other collaborating sites. At any time a collaborating site can opt out. In addition to securing papers for publication, a site might nurture a network of supporters, teach people to use multiple research and quality improvement methods, develop a system of governance for locally led inquiries, develop case studies of community-oriented integrated care and health promotion and facilitate within-site and between-site learning and change. PMID:28356918

  13. Site-specific in situ amplification of the integrated polyomavirus genome: a case for a context-specific over-replication model of gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Syu, L J; Fluck, M M

    1997-08-08

    The fate of the genome of the polyoma (Py) tumor virus following integration in the chromosomes of transformed rat FR3T3 cells was re-examined. The viral sequences were integrated at a single transformant-specific chromosomal site in each of 22 transformants tested. In situ amplification of the viral sequences was observed in 24 of 34 transformants analyzed. Large T antigen, the unique viral function involved in initiating DNA replication from the viral origin, was essential for the amplification process. There was an absolute requirement for a reiteration of viral sequences and the extent of the reiteration affected the degree of amplification. The reiteration may be important for homologous recombination-mediated resolution of in situ amplified sequences. Among 11 transformants harboring a 1 to 2 kb repeat, the degree of amplification was transformant-specific and varied over a wide range. At the high end of the spectrum, the genome copy number increased 1300-fold at steady state, while at the low end, amplification was below twofold. Some aspect of the host chromatin at the site integration that affected viral gene expression, also directly or indirectly modulated the amplification. Use of high-resolution electrophoresis for the analysis of the integrated amplified sequences revealed a recurring novel pattern, consisting of a ladder with numerous bands separated by a constant distance approximately the size of the Py genome. We suggest that this pattern was generated by conversion of the amplified viral genomes to head to tail linear arrays with cell to cell variations in the number of genome repeats at single, transformant-specific, chromosomal sites. In light of the known "out of schedule" firing of the Py origin, we propose an "onion skin" structure intermediate and present a homologous recombination model for the conversion from onion skins to linear arrays. The relevance of the in situ amplification of the Py genome to cellular gene amplification is

  14. Selection against Robertsonian fusions involving housekeeping genes in the house mouse: integrating data from gene expression arrays and chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Farré, Marta; Ponsà, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J

    2010-11-01

    Monobrachial homology resulting from Robertsonian (Rb) fusions is thought to contribute to chromosomal speciation through underdominance. Given the karyotypic diversity characterizing wild house mouse populations [Mus musculus domesticus, (MMU)], variation that results almost exclusively from Rb fusions (diploid numbers range from 22 to 40) and possibly whole arm reciprocal translocations (WARTs), this organism represents an excellent model for testing hypotheses of chromosomal evolution. Previous studies of chromosome size and recombination rates have failed to explain the bias for certain chromosomes to be involved more frequently than others in these rearrangements. Here, we show that the pericentromeric region of one such chromosome, MMU19, which is infrequently encountered as a fusion partner in wild populations, is significantly enriched for housekeeping genes when compared to other chromosomes in the genome. These data suggest that there is selection against breakpoints in the pericentromeric region and provide new insights into factors that constrain chromosomal reorganizations in house mice. Given the anticipated increase in vertebrate whole genome sequences, the examination of gene content and expression profiles of the pericentromeric regions of other mammalian lineages characterized by Rb fusions (i.e., other rodents, bats, and bovids, among others) is both achievable and crucial to developing broadly applicable models of chromosome evolution.

  15. Refined physical map of the human PAX2/HOX11/NFKB2 cancer gene region at 10q24 and relocalization of the HPV6AI1 viral integration site to 14q13.3-q21.1

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Sheryl M; McDonald, Margaret; Chen, Xiao-Ning; Korenberg, Julie R; Neri, Antonino; Kahn, Tomas; Eccles, Michael R; Morris, Christine M

    2003-01-01

    Background Chromosome band 10q24 is a gene-rich domain and host to a number of cancer, developmental, and neurological genes. Recurring translocations, deletions and mutations involving this chromosome band have been observed in different human cancers and other disease conditions, but the precise identification of breakpoint sites, and detailed characterization of the genetic basis and mechanisms which underlie many of these rearrangements has yet to be resolved. Towards this end it is vital to establish a definitive genetic map of this region, which to date has shown considerable volatility through time in published works of scientific journals, within different builds of the same international genomic database, and across the differently constructed databases. Results Using a combination of chromosome and interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), BAC end-sequencing and genomic database analysis we present a physical map showing that the order and chromosomal orientation of selected genes within 10q24 is CEN-CYP2C9-PAX2-HOX11-NFKB2-TEL. Our analysis has resolved the orientation of an otherwise dynamically evolving assembly of larger contigs upstream of this region, and in so doing verifies the order and orientation of a further 9 cancer-related genes and GOT1. This study further shows that the previously reported human papillomavirus type 6a DNA integration site HPV6AI1 does not map to 10q24, but that it maps at the interface of chromosome bands 14q13.3-q21.1. Conclusions This revised map will allow more precise localization of chromosome rearrangements involving chromosome band 10q24, and will serve as a useful baseline to better understand the molecular aetiology of chromosomal instability in this region. In particular, the relocation of HPV6AI1 is important to report because this HPV6a integration site, originally isolated from a tonsillar carcinoma, was shown to be rearranged in other HPV6a-related malignancies, including 2 of 25 genital condylomas

  16. Prolonged Integration Site Selection of a Lentiviral Vector in the Genome of Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei; Wang, Yong; Li, Rui-fu; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Jing; Peng, Dai-zhi

    2017-01-01

    Background Lentiviral vectors have been successfully used for human skin cell gene transfer studies. Defining the selection of integration sites for retroviral vectors in the host genome is crucial in risk assessment analysis of gene therapy. However, genome-wide analyses of lentiviral integration sites in human keratinocytes, especially after prolonged growth, are poorly understood. Material/Methods In this study, 874 unique lentiviral vector integration sites in human HaCaT keratinocytes after long-term culture were identified and analyzed with the online tool GTSG-QuickMap and SPSS software. Results The data indicated that lentiviral vectors showed integration site preferences for genes and gene-rich regions. Conclusions This study will likely assist in determining the relative risks of the lentiviral vector system and in the design of a safe lentiviral vector system in the gene therapy of skin diseases. PMID:28255155

  17. Chromosomal aberrations in resident small mammals at a petrochemical waste dump site: a natural model for analysis of environmental mutagenesis. [Peromyscus leucopus; Sigmodon hispidus

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, K.

    1985-01-01

    Small mammals of two species (Peromyscus leucopus and Sigmodon hispidus) were trapped at a locality polluted with a complex mixture of petrochemical waste products, heavy metals, and PCB's, and from two matched, uncontaminated localities. Three cytogenetic techniques were employed to evaluate the use of these resident small mammals as indicators of environmental mutagenesis. Each technique also was assessed for its power of resolution in characterizing the action of environmental mutagens. Standard karyological analysis of flow cytometric analysis clearly indicated significant differences in chromosomal aberrancy between animals collected at the polluted site and the uncontaminated sites. Examination of flow DNA histograms of Peromyscus from the polluted site revealed broadened and flattened G/sub 1/ peaks and increases in CVs (coefficients of variation) for DNA content. CVs in animals from the polluted site consistently fell outside confidence limits set around values from animals collected at the uncontaminated site. These patterns are characteristically seen in laboratory animals challenged with powerful clastogens which suggests that individuals at the polluted site may be experiencing similar clastogenic events. This study demonstrates that small mammals are a feasible test model for evaluating environmental mutagenesis. Evaluation of different cytogenetic techniques suggests that a battery of several assays will provide the most accurate characterization of the action of environmental mutagenesis.

  18. Sites of retroviral DNA integration: From basic research to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review, we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency.

  19. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  20. An integrated remote sensing approach for identifying ecological range sites. [parker mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaynes, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    A model approach for identifying ecological range sites was applied to high elevation sagebrush-dominated rangelands on Parker Mountain, in south-central Utah. The approach utilizes map information derived from both high altitude color infrared photography and LANDSAT digital data, integrated with soils, geological, and precipitation maps. Identification of the ecological range site for a given area requires an evaluation of all relevant environmental factors which combine to give that site the potential to produce characteristic types and amounts of vegetation. A table is presented which allows the user to determine ecological range site based upon an integrated use of the maps which were prepared. The advantages of identifying ecological range sites through an integrated photo interpretation/LANDSAT analysis are discussed.

  1. The diversity of the structure and genomic integration sites of HTLV-1 provirus in MT-2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hashikura, Yuuki; Umeki, Kazumi; Umekita, Kunihiko; Nomura, Hajime; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Okayama, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    A human T-lymphotropic virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) positive cell line, MT-2, derived from human cord leukocytes co-culturing with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells is commonly used in HTLV-1 research; however, the details of provirus integrated in MT-2 genome have not yet been characterized. In this study, five types of HTLV-1 proviral sequences were detected in 11 different sites of the genome in a reference MT-2 cell line. The five types of HTLV-1 proviral sequences were one complete proviral genome, two types of proviruses with deletion of large internal viral sequences (5.3 and 3.9 kB), one provirus with a large deletion (6.2 kB) from 5'LTR to position 6257, and one provirus of LTR only. The provirus with identical deletion of large internal viral sequence (5.3 kB) was found to be integrated into six different sites (chromosomes). A complete provirus and three of four types of defective provirus were consistently detected in two other MT-2 cell lines cultured in different laboratories. Not only Tax/Rex RNA and HBZ RNA, but also the transcriptional product for a specific defective provirus, were detectable in all three MT-2 cell lines. Because it has been reported that defective provirus is frequently detected in ATL cells, these results may be important in understanding the mechanism of HTLV-1 proviral polymorphism, which may be related to leukemogenesis. In addition, the large variation in integrated HTLV-1 proviruses makes it important for researchers to exercise caution in their assessment and interpretation of results using MT-2 cell lines.

  2. Genomic characterization of viral integration sites in HPV-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Bodelon, Clara; Untereiner, Michael E; Machiela, Mitchell J; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Persistent infection with carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) causes the majority of anogenital cancers and a subset of head and neck cancers. The HPV genome is frequently found integrated into the host genome of invasive cancers. The mechanisms of how it may promote disease progression are not well understood. Thoroughly characterizing integration events can provide insights into HPV carcinogenesis. Individual studies have reported limited number of integration sites in cell lines and human samples. We performed a systematic review of published integration sites in HPV-related cancers and conducted a pooled analysis to formally test for integration hotspots and genomic features enriched in integration events using data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). Over 1,500 integration sites were reported in the literature, of which 90.8% (N = 1,407) were in human tissues. We found 10 cytobands enriched for integration events, three previously reported ones (3q28, 8q24.21 and 13q22.1) and seven additional ones (2q22.3, 3p14.2, 8q24.22, 14q24.1, 17p11.1, 17q23.1 and 17q23.2). Cervical infections with HPV18 were more likely to have breakpoints in 8q24.21 (p = 7.68 × 10(-4) ) than those with HPV16. Overall, integration sites were more likely to be in gene regions than expected by chance (p = 6.93 × 10(-9) ). They were also significantly closer to CpG regions, fragile sites, transcriptionally active regions and enhancers. Few integration events occurred within 50 Kb of known cervical cancer driver genes. This suggests that HPV integrates in accessible regions of the genome, preferentially genes and enhancers, which may affect the expression of target genes.

  3. Genomic structure of the EWS gene and its relationship to EWSR1, a site of tumor-associated chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Plougastel, B.; Zucman, J.; Peter, M.; Thomas, G.; Delattre, O. )

    1993-12-01

    The EWS gene has been identified based on its location at the chromosome 22 breakpoint of the t(11;22)(q24;q12) translocation that characterizes Ewing sarcoma and related neuroectodermal tumors. The EWS gene spans about 40 kb of DNA and is encoded by 17 exons. The nucleotide sequence of the exons is identical to that of the previously described cDNA. The first 7 exons encode the N-terminal domain of EWS, which consists of a repeated degenerated polypeptide of 7 to 12 residues rich in tyrosine, serine, threonine, glycine, and glutamine. Exons 11, 12, and 13 encode the putative RNA binding domain. The three glycine- and arginine-rich motifs of the gene are mainly encoded by exons 8-9, 14, and 16. The DNA sequence in the 5[prime] region of the gene has features of a CpG-rich island and lacks canonical promoter elements, such as TATA and CCAAT consensus sequences. Positions of the chromosome 22 breakpoints were determined for 19 Ewing tumors. They were localized in introns 7 or 8 in 18 cases and in intron 10 in 1 case. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Construction of Escherichia coli strains with chromosomally integrated expression cassettes for the synthesis of 2′-fucosyllactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The trisaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) is one of the most abundant oligosaccharides found in human milk. Due to its prebiotic and anti-infective properties, 2′-FL is discussed as nutritional additive for infant formula. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from human milk, 2′-FL can be produced enzymatically in vitro and in vivo. The most promising approach for a large-scale formation of 2′-FL is the whole cell biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by intracellular synthesis of GDP-L-fucose and subsequent fucosylation of lactose with an appropriate α1,2-fucosyltransferase. Even though whole cell approaches have been demonstrated for the synthesis of 2′-FL, further improvements of the engineered E. coli host are required to increase product yields. Furthermore, an antibiotic-free method of whole cell synthesis of 2′-FL is desirable to simplify product purification and to avoid traces of antibiotics in a product with nutritional purpose. Results Here we report the construction of the first selection marker-free E. coli strain that produces 2′-FL from lactose and glycerol. To construct this strain, recombinant genes of the de novo synthesis pathway for GDP-L-fucose as well as the gene for the H. pylori fucosyltransferase futC were integrated into the chromosome of E. coli JM109 by using the λ-Red recombineering technique. Strains carrying additional copies of the futC gene and/or the gene fkp (from Bacteroides fragilis) for an additional salvage pathway for GDP-L-fucose production were used and shown to further improve production of 2′-FL in shake flask experiments. An increase of the intracellular GDP-L-fucose concentration by expression of fkp gene as well as an additional copy of the futC gene lead to an enhanced formation of 2′-FL. Using an improved production strain, feasibility of large scale 2′-FL production was demonstrated in an antibiotic-free fed-batch fermentation (13 l) with a final 2′-FL concentration of 20.28

  5. Integration of geophysics within the Argonne expedited site characterization Program at a site in the southern High Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, B.; Hildebrandt, G.; Meyer, T.; Saunders, W.; Burton, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    An Argonne National Laboratory Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) program was carried out at a site in the central United States. The Argonne ESC process emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach in which all available information is integrated to produce as complete a picture as possible of the geologic and hydrologic controls on contaminant distribution and transport. As part of this process, all pertinent data that have been collected from previous investigations are thoroughly analyzed before a decision is made to collect additional information. A seismic reflection program recently concluded at the site had produced inconclusive results. Before we decided whether another acquisition program was warranted, we examined the existing data set to evaluate the quality of the raw data, the appropriateness of the processing sequence, and the integrity of the interpretation. We decided that the field data were of sufficient quality to warrant reprocessing and reinterpretation. The main thrust of the reprocessing effort was to enhance the continuity of a shallow, low-frequency reflection identified as a perching horizon within the Ogallala formation. The reinterpreted seismic data were used to locate the boundaries of the perched aquifer, which helped to guide the Argonne ESC drilling and sampling program. In addition, digitized geophysical well log data from previous drilling programs were reinterpreted and integrated into the geologic and hydrogeologic model.

  6. CRISPR-PCS: a powerful new approach to inducing multiple chromosome splitting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sasano, Yu; Nagasawa, Koki; Kaboli, Saeed; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    PCR-mediated chromosome splitting (PCS) was developed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is based on homologous recombination and enables division of a chromosome at any point to form two derived and functional chromosomes. However, because of low homologous recombination activity, PCS is limited to a single site at a time, which makes the splitting of multiple loci laborious and time-consuming. Here we have developed a highly efficient and versatile chromosome engineering technology named CRISPR-PCS that integrates PCS with the novel genome editing CRISPR/Cas9 system. This integration allows PCS to utilize induced double strand breaks to activate homologous recombination. CRISPR-PCS enhances the efficiency of chromosome splitting approximately 200-fold and enables generation of simultaneous multiple chromosome splits. We propose that CRISPR-PCS will be a powerful tool for breeding novel yeast strains with desirable traits for specific industrial applications and for investigating genome function. PMID:27530680

  7. Assignment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) linkage groups to specific chromosomes: conservation of large syntenic blocks corresponding to whole chromosome arms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ruth B; Keatley, Kimberly A; Morasch, Matthew R; Ventura, Abigail B; Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Koop, Ben F; Danzmann, Roy G; Davidson, William S

    2009-08-18

    Most teleost species, especially freshwater groups such as the Esocidae which are the closest relatives of salmonids, have a karyotype comprising 25 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and 48-52 chromosome arms. After the common ancestor of salmonids underwent a whole genome duplication, its karyotype would have 100 chromosome arms, and this is reflected in the modal range of 96-104 seen in extant salmonids (e.g., rainbow trout). The Atlantic salmon is an exception among the salmonids as it has 72-74 chromosome arms and its karyotype includes 12 pairs of large acrocentric chromosomes, which appear to be the result of tandem fusions. The purpose of this study was to integrate the Atlantic salmon's linkage map and karyotype and to compare the chromosome map with that of rainbow trout. The Atlantic salmon genetic linkage groups were assigned to specific chromosomes in the European subspecies using fluorescence in situ hybridization with BAC probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group. The genetic linkage groups were larger for metacentric chromosomes compared to acrocentric chromosomes of similar size. Comparison of the Atlantic salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout. It had been suggested that some of the large acrocentric chromosomes in Atlantic salmon are the result of tandem fusions, and that the small blocks of repetitive DNA in the middle of the arms represent the sites of chromosome fusions. The finding that the chromosomal regions on either side of the blocks of repetitive DNA within the larger acrocentric chromosomes correspond to different rainbow trout chromosome arms provides support for this hypothesis.

  8. Marker chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  9. Integration Site Selection by the Bacteroides Conjugative Transposon CTnBST▿

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bo; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2007-01-01

    A newly discovered Bacteroides conjugative transposon (CTn), CTnBST, integrates more site specifically than two other well-studied CTns, the Bacteroides CTn CTnDOT and the enterococcal CTn Tn916. Moreover, the integrase of CTnBST, IntBST, had the C-terminal 6-amino-acid signature that is associated with the catalytic regions of members of the tyrosine recombinase family, most of which integrate site specifically. Also, in most of these integrases, all of the conserved amino acids are required for integration. In the case of IntBST, however, we found that changing three of the six conserved amino acids in the signature, one of which was the presumed catalytic tyrosine, resulted in a 1,000-fold decrease in integration frequency. Changes in the other amino acids had little or no effect. Thus, although the CTnBST integrase still seems to be a member of the tyrosine recombinase family, it clearly differs to some extent from other members of the family in its catalytic site. We also determined the sequence requirements for CTnBST integration in the 18-bp region where the crossover occurs preferentially during integration. We found that CTnBST integrates in this preferred site about one-half of the time but can also use other sites. A consensus sequence was tentatively derived by comparison of a few secondary sites: AATCTGNNAAAT. We report here that within the consensus region, no single base change affected the frequency of integration. However, 3 bp at one end of the consensus sequence (CTG) proved to be essential for integration into the preferred site. This sequence appeared to be at one end of a 7-bp crossover region, CTGNNAA. The other bases could vary without affecting either integration frequency or specificity. Thus, in contrast to well-studied site-specific recombinases which require homology throughout the crossover region, integration of CTnBST requires homology at one end of the crossover region but not at the other end. PMID:17616597

  10. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  11. Drosophila orthologue of WWOX, the chromosomal fragile site FRA16D tumour suppressor gene, functions in aerobic metabolism and regulates reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    O'Keefe, Louise V.; Colella, Alex; Dayan, Sonia; Chen, Qingwen; Choo, Amanda; Jacob, Reuben; Price, Gareth; Venter, Deon; Richards, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Common chromosomal fragile sites FRA3B and FRA16D are frequent sites of DNA instability in cancer, but their contribution to cancer cell biology is not yet understood. Genes that span these sites (FHIT and WWOX, respectively) are often perturbed (either increased or decreased) in cancer cells and both are able to suppress tumour growth. While WWOX has some tumour suppressor characteristics, its normal role and functional contribution to cancer has not been fully determined. We find that a significant proportion of Drosophila Wwox interactors identified by proteomics and microarray analyses have roles in aerobic metabolism. Functional relationships between Wwox and either CG6439/isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idh) or Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) were confirmed by genetic interactions. In addition, altered levels of Wwox resulted in altered levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Wwox (like FHIT) contributes to pathways involving aerobic metabolism and oxidative stress, providing an explanation for the ‘non-classical tumour suppressor’ behaviour of WWOX. Fragile sites, and the genes that span them, are therefore part of a protective response mechanism to oxidative stress and likely contributors to the differences seen in aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in cancer cells. PMID:21075834

  12. HIV promoter integration site primarily modulates transcriptional burst size rather than frequency.

    PubMed

    Skupsky, Ron; Burnett, John C; Foley, Jonathan E; Schaffer, David V; Arkin, Adam P

    2010-09-30

    Mammalian gene expression patterns, and their variability across populations of cells, are regulated by factors specific to each gene in concert with its surrounding cellular and genomic environment. Lentiviruses such as HIV integrate their genomes into semi-random genomic locations in the cells they infect, and the resulting viral gene expression provides a natural system to dissect the contributions of genomic environment to transcriptional regulation. Previously, we showed that expression heterogeneity and its modulation by specific host factors at HIV integration sites are key determinants of infected-cell fate and a possible source of latent infections. Here, we assess the integration context dependence of expression heterogeneity from diverse single integrations of a HIV-promoter/GFP-reporter cassette in Jurkat T-cells. Systematically fitting a stochastic model of gene expression to our data reveals an underlying transcriptional dynamic, by which multiple transcripts are produced during short, infrequent bursts, that quantitatively accounts for the wide, highly skewed protein expression distributions observed in each of our clonal cell populations. Interestingly, we find that the size of transcriptional bursts is the primary systematic covariate over integration sites, varying from a few to tens of transcripts across integration sites, and correlating well with mean expression. In contrast, burst frequencies are scattered about a typical value of several per cell-division time and demonstrate little correlation with the clonal means. This pattern of modulation generates consistently noisy distributions over the sampled integration positions, with large expression variability relative to the mean maintained even for the most productive integrations, and could contribute to specifying heterogeneous, integration-site-dependent viral production patterns in HIV-infected cells. Genomic environment thus emerges as a significant control parameter for gene expression

  13. The Drosophila Ash1 Gene Product, Which Is Localized at Specific Sites on Polytene Chromosomes, Contains a Set Domain and a Phd Finger

    PubMed Central

    Tripoulas, N.; LaJeunesse, D.; Gildea, J.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    The determined state of Drosophila imaginal discs depends on stable patterns of homeotic gene expression. The stability of these patterns requires the function of the ash1 gene, a member of the trithorax group. The primary translation product of the 7.5-kb ash1 transcript is predicted to be a basic protein of 2144 amino acids. The ASH1 protein contains a SET domain and a PHD finger. Both of these motifs are found in the products of some trithorax group and Polycomb group genes. We have determined the nucleotide sequence alterations in 10 ash1 mutant alleles and have examined their mutant phenotype. The best candidate for a null allele is ash1(22). The truncated protein product of this mutant allele is predicted to contain only 47 amino acids. The ASH1 protein is localized on polytene chromosomes of larval salivary glands at >100 sites. The chromosomal localization of ASH1 implies that it functions at the transcriptional level to maintain the expression pattern of homeotic selector genes. PMID:8725238

  14. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE`s Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP is being further developed to include complex-wide requirements for research and development and a long-range facility requirements section. The planned additions to the baseline IPP are being developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrates facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focuses on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and to provide a basis for formulating planned additions to the IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs will be periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations.

  15. Common Viral Integration Sites Identified in Avian Leukosis Virus-Induced B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Justice, James F.; Morgan, Robin W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces B-cell lymphoma and other neoplasms in chickens by integrating within or near cancer genes and perturbing their expression. Four genes—MYC, MYB, Mir-155, and TERT—have previously been identified as common integration sites in these virus-induced lymphomas and are thought to play a causal role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we employ high-throughput sequencing to identify additional genes driving tumorigenesis in ALV-induced B-cell lymphomas. In addition to the four genes implicated previously, we identify other genes as common integration sites, including TNFRSF1A, MEF2C, CTDSPL, TAB2, RUNX1, MLL5, CXorf57, and BACH2. We also analyze the genome-wide ALV integration landscape in vivo and find increased frequency of ALV integration near transcriptional start sites and within transcripts. Previous work has shown ALV prefers a weak consensus sequence for integration in cultured human cells. We confirm this consensus sequence for ALV integration in vivo in the chicken genome. PMID:26670384

  16. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  17. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  18. Engineered chromosomes in transgenics.

    PubMed

    Blazso, Peter; Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer or simply transgenic technology has evolved much since 1980. Gene delivery strategies, systems, and equipments have become more and more precise and efficient. It has also been shown that even chromosomes can be used besides traditional plasmid and viral vectors for zygote or embryonic stem cell transformation. Artificial chromosomes and their loadable variants have brought their advantages over traditional genetic information carriers into the field of transgenesis. Engineered chromosomes are appealing vectors for gene transfer since they have large transgene carrying capacity, they are non-integrating, and stably expressing in eukaryotic cells. Embryonic stem cell lines can be established that carry engineered chromosomes and ultimately used in transgenic mouse chimera creation. The demonstrated protocol describes all the steps necessary for the successful production of transgenic mouse chimeras with engineered chromosome bearer embryonic stem cells.

  19. Mice expressing an error-prone DNA polymerase in mitochondria display elevated replication pausing and chromosomal breakage at fragile sites of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Laura J.; Cluett, Tricia J.; Reyes, Aurelio; Prolla, Tom A.; Poulton, Joanna; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Holt, Ian J.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of a proof-reading deficient form of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ, POLG, causes early death accompanied by features of premature ageing in mouse. However, the mechanism of cellular senescence remains unresolved. In addition to high levels of point mutations of mtDNA, the POLG mutator mouse harbours linear mtDNAs. Using one- and two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that the linear mtDNAs derive from replication intermediates and are indicative of replication pausing and chromosomal breakage at the accompanying fragile sites. Replication fork arrest is not random but occurs at specific sites close to two cis-elements known as OH and OL. Pausing at these sites may be enhanced in the case of exonuclease-deficient POLG owing to delayed resumption of DNA replication, or replisome instability. In either case, the mtDNA replication cycle is perturbed and this might explain the progeroid features of the POLG mutator mouse. PMID:19244310

  20. Archaeological site protection: An integral component of the Exxon Valdez shoreline cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Wooley, C.B.; Haggarty, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A major cultural site identification and protection program in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska was conducted as part of the Exxon Valdez spill response. In cooperation with state and federal agencies and Native corporations with historic preservation mandates, the four-year program was designed to identify archaeological sites in the area of the spill, determine the effect of planned cleanup on them, and mitigate impacts to sites during cleanup. Archaeological site protection constraints, augmented by an extensive cultural resource training program, were an integral part of each shoreline-specific cleanup plan. As a result, impacts attributable to the cleanup were limited to minor disturbances and two vandalism incidents. Impacts from oiling were minimal largely because most intertidal cultural sites had lost their fragile constituents and contextual integrity as a result of prespill erosion. State and federal studies confirmed the efficacy of the site identification and protection program, finding negligible impacts attributable to either direct oiling or the cleanup at intact sites. The Cultural Resource Program also developed innovative management strategies with implications for future emergency responses involving complex land management and site protection issues. The program greatly enhanced the knowledge of the area`s history by collecting and synthesizing considerable new archaeological information. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Demonstration of innovative monitoring technologies at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an Integrated Demonstration Program at the Savannah River Site in 1989. The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate innovative technologies that can improve present-day environmental restoration methods. The Integrated Demonstration Program at SRS is entitled ``Cleanup of Organics in Soils and Groundwater at Non-Arid Sites.`` New technologies in the areas of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation are being demonstrated and evaluated for their technical performance and cost effectiveness in comparison with baseline technologies. Present site characterization and monitoring methods are costly, time-consuming, overly invasive, and often imprecise. Better technologies are required to accurately describe the subsurface geophysical and geochemical features of a site and the nature and extent of contamination. More efficient, nonintrusive characterization and monitoring techniques are necessary for understanding and predicting subsurface transport. More reliable procedures are also needed for interpreting monitoring and characterization data. Site characterization and monitoring are key elements in preventing, identifying, and restoring contaminated sites. The remediation of a site cannot be determined without characterization data, and monitoring may be required for 30 years after site closure.

  2. AGU Launches Web Site for New Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Randy

    2013-03-01

    AGU's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics policy, approved by the AGU Board of Directors and Council in December 2012, is now available online on a new Web site, http://ethics.agu.org. As the Web site states, the policy embodies a "set of guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics for the actions of the members and the governance of the Union in its internal activities; in its public persona; and most importantly, in the research and peer review processes of its scientific publications, its communications and outreach, and its scientific meetings."

  3. New ΦBT1 site-specific integrative vectors with neutral phenotype in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quiñonez, Nathaly; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Rioseras, Beatriz; Pisciotta, Annalisa; Alduina, Rosa; Manteca, Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Integrative plasmids are one of the best options to introduce genes in low copy and in a stable form into bacteria. The ΦC31-derived plasmids constitute the most common integrative vectors used in Streptomyces. They integrate at different positions (attB and pseudo-attB sites) generating different mutations. The less common ΦBT1-derived vectors integrate at the unique attB site localized in the SCO4848 gene (S. coelicolor genome) or their orthologues in other streptomycetes. This work demonstrates that disruption of SCO4848 generates a delay in spore germination. SCO4848 is co-transcribed with SCO4849, and the spore germination phenotype is complemented by SCO4849. Plasmids pNG1-4 were created by modifying the ΦBT1 integrative vector pMS82 by introducing a copy of SCO4849 under the control of the promoter region of SCO4848. pNG2 and pNG4 also included a copy of the P ermE * in order to facilitate gene overexpression. pNG3 and pNG4 harboured a copy of the bla gene (ampicillin resistance) to facilitate selection in E. coli. pNG1-4 are the only integrative vectors designed to produce a neutral phenotype when they are integrated into the Streptomyces genome. The experimental approach developed in this work can be applied to create phenotypically neutral integrative plasmids in other bacteria.

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7, ectopic virus integration site-1 overexpression and central diabetes insipidus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongbing; Yang, Jing; Xiang, Bing; Jia, Yongqian

    2015-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), typically occurring in patients with abnormalities of chromosomes 3 or 7. The association between AML with monosomy 7 and DI has been described in a number of studies; however, DI has been rarely reported in cases of ectopic virus integration site-1 (EVI1)-positive AML with monosomy 7. The current study reports a case of AML with monosomy 7 and EVI1 overexpression, with central DI as the initial symptom. The patient was an 18-year-old female who presented with polyuria and polydipsia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed 83.5% myeloperoxidase-positive blasts without trilineage myelodysplasia. The karyotype was 45,XX,-7, and the patient presented monosomy 7 and EVI1 overexpression (-7/EVI1(+)) without 3q aberration. Treatment with induction therapy was unsuccessful. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of DI-AML with -7/EVI1(+) and without a 3q aberration. The possible mechanisms associated with EVI1, monosomy 7 and DI were investigated.

  5. Using the Choquet integral for screening geological CO2 storage sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-01

    For geological CO{sub 2} storage site selection, it is desirable to reduce the number of candidate sites through a screening process before detailed site characterization is performed. Screening generally involves defining a number of criteria which then need to be evaluated for each site. The importance of each criterion to the final evaluation will generally be different. Weights reflecting the relative importance of these criteria can be provided by experts. To evaluate a site, each criterion must be evaluated and scored, and then aggregated, taking into account the importance of the criteria. We propose the use of the Choquet integral for aggregating the scores. The Choquet integral considers the interactions among criteria, i.e. whether they are independent, complementary to each other, or partially repetitive. We also evaluate the Shapley index, which demonstrates how the importance of a given piece of information may change if it is considered by itself or together with other available information. An illustrative example demonstrates how the Choquet integral properly accounts for the presence of redundancy in two site-evaluation criteria, making the screening process more defensible than the standard weighted-average approach.

  6. Comparison of DNA binding and integration half-site selection by avian myeloblastosis virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, D P; Inman, R B; Vora, A C; Fitzgerald, M L

    1993-01-01

    Insertion of the linear retrovirus DNA genome into the host DNA by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) is essential for efficient replication. We devised an efficient virus-like DNA plasmid integration assay which mimics the standard oligonucleotide assay for integration. It permitted us to study, by electron microscopy and sequence analysis, insertion of a single long terminal repeat terminus (LTR half-site) of one plasmid into another linearized plasmid. The reaction was catalyzed by purified avian myeloblastosis virus IN in the presence of Mg2+. The recombinant molecules were easily visualized and quantitated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Agarose gel-purified recombinants could be genetically selected by transformation of ligated recombinants into Escherichia coli HB101 cells. Electron microscopy also permitted the identification and localization of IN-DNA complexes on the virus-like substrate in the absence of the joining reaction. Intramolecular and intermolecular DNA looping by IN was visualized. Although IN preferentially bound to AT-rich regions in the absence of the joining reaction, there was a bias towards GC-rich regions for the joining reaction. Alignment of 70 target site sequences 5' of the LTR half-site insertions with 68 target sites previously identified for the concerted insertion of both LTR termini (LTR full-site reaction) indicated similar GC inflection patterns with both insertional events. Comparison of the data suggested that IN recognized only half of the target sequences necessary for integration with the LTR half-site reaction. Images PMID:8474165

  7. Chromosomal imbalances exclusively detected in invasive front area are associated with poor outcome in laryngeal carcinomas from different anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Eliane Papa; Silveira, Cássia Gisele Terrassani; Drigo, Sandra Aparecida; Sacomano, Vivian de Souza; Molck, Miriam Coelho; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2013-10-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a malignant neoplasm exhibiting aggressive phenotype, high recurrence rate, and risk of developing second primary tumors. Current evidence suggests that cells in the invasive front of carcinomas have different molecular profiles compared to those in superficial areas. This study aimed to identify candidate genes in the invasive front and superficial cells from laryngeal carcinomas that would be useful as molecular markers. Invasive front and tumor surface cells of 32 LSCC were evaluated by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization. Both CCND1 copy number gains and cyclin D1 protein expression were evaluated to confirm gains of 11q13.3. Losses of 3q26.2-q29 and 18q23 were confirmed by loss of heterozygosity analysis. The most frequent chromosomal alterations observed only in invasive front cells involved gains of 1p, 4q, and 9p and losses of 3p, 11p, 12p, 13q, 17q, 18p, 19q, 20q, 21q, and Xp. Gains of 11q13 were detected in both components from glottis and supraglottis but only in invasive front cells from transglottic tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed gains of CCND1/CPE11 in a subset of cases. In supraglottic tumors, cyclin D1 positivity was associated with distant metastasis (P = 0.0018) and with decreased disease-free survival (P = 0.042). Loss of heterozygosity at 3q26.2 and 18q23 were associated with lymph node involvement (P = 0.055) and worsened prognosis, respectively. In conclusion, this study revealed regions that could be targeted in the search for molecular markers in LSCC. Cyclin D1 may be useful as a prognostic marker in supraglottic tumors.

  8. A 4. 5-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig from human chromosome 13q14. 3 ordering 9 polymorphic microsatellites (22 sequence-tagged sites) tightly linked to the Wilson disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Barnes, R. ); Stewart, E.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. ); Le Paslier, D. ); Weissenbach, J. ); Farrer, L. ); Bowcock, A. Eugene McDermott Center of Human Growth and Development, Dallas, TX )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have previously performed a genetic analysis of multiply affected families to map a locus responsible for Wilson disease (WND) to a 0.3-centimorgan (cM) region within chromosome 13q14.3, between D12S31 and D13S59. Here they describe the construction of a contig of [approx]4.5 Mb, which spans this region and extends from D13S25 to D13S59. This contig consists of 28 genomic yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. Five critical crossover events have been defined in this interval in two unaffected (Centre d'Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain) and three WND families. The combination of sequence tagged site content mapping of YACs with both polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers and recombination breakpoint mapping resulted in the following order of polymorphic markers: centromere-RB1-D13S25-AFM205vh2-D13S31-D13S227-D13S228-AFM238vc3-D13S133-AFM084xc5-D13S137-D13S169, D13S155-D13S59-telomere. The recombination/physical distance ratio varies from [approx] 3000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S25 to 6000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S59. Three WND families exhibiting recombination between the disease locus and D13S31 or D13S59 were genotyped for additional markers in this region and further refined the location of the WND gene to between D13S155 and D13S133. Nine of the markers in this region of <1 cM are polymorphic microsatellites (seven have observed heterozygosities of 70% or above) that will be extremely useful in prenatal and preclinical diagnosis of this disease. This physical map is an essential step in the isolation of the WND gene and is a framework for the identification of candidate genes.

  9. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  10. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The arsenic resistance listeria genomic island LGI2 exhibits sequence and integration site diversity and propensity for three Listeria monocytogenes clones with enhanced virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmi; Ward, Todd J; Jima, Dereje D; Parsons, Cameron; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-08-25

    In the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, arsenic resistance is primarily encountered in serotype 4b clones considered to have enhanced virulence, and is associated with an arsenic resistance gene cluster within a 35 kb chromosomal region, Listeria genomic island 2 (LGI2). LGI2 was first identified in strain Scott A and includes genes putatively involved in arsenic and cadmium resistance, DNA integration, conjugation and pathogenicity. However, genomic localization and sequence content of LGI2 remain poorly characterized. Here we investigated 85 arsenic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains, mostly of serotype 4b. All but one of the 70 serotype 4b strains belonged to clonal complexes CC1, CC2 and CC4, three major clones associated with enhanced virulence. PCR analysis suggested that 53 strains (62.4%) harbored an island highly similar to LGI2 of Scott A, frequently (42/53) in the same location as Scott A (LMOf2365_2257 homolog). Random-primed PCR and whole genome sequencing revealed seven novel insertion sites, mostly internal to chromosomal coding sequences, among strains harboring LGI2 outside the LMOf2365_2257 homolog. Interestingly, many CC1 strains harbored a noticeably diversified LGI2 (LGI2-1) in a unique location (LMOf2365_0902 homolog), and with a novel additional gene. With few exceptions, the tested LGI2 genes were not detected in arsenic-resistant strains of serogroup 1/2, which instead often harbored a Tn554-associated arsenic resistance determinant not encountered in serotype 4b. These findings indicate that in L. monocytogenes LGI2 has a propensity for certain serotype 4b clones, exhibits content diversity and is highly promiscuous, suggesting ability to mobilize various accessory genes into diverse chromosomal loci.IMPORTANCEListeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the environment and causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease with high mortality and morbidity. Arsenic and other heavy metals can powerfully shape the populations of human

  12. HTLV-1 proviral integration sites differ between asymptomatic carriers and patients with HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Heather A; Laydon, Daniel J; Melamed, Anat; Elemans, Marjet; Asquith, Becca; Matsuoka, Masao; Bangham, Charles R M

    2014-09-30

    HTLV-1 causes proliferation of clonal populations of infected T cells in vivo, each clone defined by a unique proviral integration site in the host genome. The proviral load is strongly correlated with odds of the inflammatory disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). There is evidence that asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) have a more effective CD8 + T cell response, including a higher frequency of HLA class I alleles able to present peptides from a regulatory protein of HTLV-1, HBZ. We have previously shown that specific features of the host genome flanking the proviral integration site favour clone survival and spontaneous expression of the viral transactivator protein Tax in naturally infected PBMCs ex vivo. However, the previous studies were not designed or powered to detect differences in integration site characteristics between ACs and HAM/TSP patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the genomic environment of the provirus differs systematically between ACs and HAM/TSP patients, and between individuals with strong or weak HBZ presentation. We used our recently described high-throughput protocol to map and quantify integration sites in 95 HAM/TSP patients and 68 ACs from Kagoshima, Japan, and 75 ACs from Kumamoto, Japan. Individuals with 2 or more HLA class I alleles predicted to bind HBZ peptides were classified 'strong' HBZ binders; the remainder were classified 'weak binders'. The abundance of HTLV-1-infected T cell clones in vivo was correlated with proviral integration in genes and in areas with epigenetic marks associated with active regulatory elements. In clones of equivalent abundance, integration sites in genes and active regions were significantly more frequent in ACs than patients with HAM/TSP, irrespective of HBZ binding and proviral load. Integration sites in genes were also more frequent in strong HBZ binders than weak HBZ binders. Clonal abundance is correlated with integration in a

  13. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment.

    PubMed

    Zenzes, Maria Teresa; Bielecki, Ryszard

    2004-09-15

    We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II). Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV) stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II). The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M); 16 h nicotine (16N); 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N). Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M), or for 16 h (16N), resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%). Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%). A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N) resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%). Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  14. Integrating Risk Analyses and Tools at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R. W.; Yasek, R. M.; Morse, J. G.; Buck, J. W.; Henderson, C. C.; Sams, T. L.; Bunn, A. L.; Vaughn, P.

    2002-02-26

    Risk assessment and environmental impact analysis at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State has made significant progress in refining the strategy for using risk analysis to support closing of several hundred waste sites plus 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. A Single-Shell Tank System Closure Work Plan outlines the current basis for closing the single-shell tank systems. An analogous site approach has been developed to address closure of aggregated groups of similar waste sites. Because of the complexity, decision time frames, proximity of non-tank farm waste sites to tank farms, scale, and regulatory considerations, various projects are providing integrated assessments to support risk analyses and decision-making. This paper will describe the approach for using risk assessment to support waste site and tank closure decisions, the tools being developed, and how integration of these risk assessments and analyses are being performed to ad dress near-term and longterm decisions.

  15. Chromosomal Integration of Retinoic Acid Response Elements Prevents Cooperative Transcriptional Activation by Retinoic Acid Receptor and Retinoid X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Brand, Céline; Lefebvre, Philippe; Ozato, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and 9-cis-retinoic acid receptors (RXR) are nuclear receptors known to cooperatively activate transcription from retinoid-regulated promoters. By comparing the transactivating properties of RAR and RXR in P19 cells using either plasmid or chromosomal reporter genes containing the mRARβ2 gene promoter, we found contrasting patterns of transcriptional regulation in each setting. Cooperativity between RXR and RAR occurred at all times with transiently introduced promoters, but was restricted to a very early stage (<3 h) for chromosomal promoters. This time-dependent loss of cooperativity was specific for chromosomal templates containing two copies of a retinoid-responsive element (RARE) and was not influenced by the spacing between the two RAREs. This loss of cooperativity suggested a delayed acquisition of RAR full transcriptional competence because (i) cooperativity was maintained at RAR ligand subsaturating concentrations, (ii) overexpression of SRC-1 led to loss of cooperativity and even to strong repression of chromosomal templates activity, and (iii) loss of cooperativity was observed when additional cis-acting response elements were activated. Surprisingly, histone deacetylase inhibitors counteracted this loss of cooperativity by repressing partially RAR-mediated activation of chromosomal promoters. Loss of cooperativity was not correlated to local histone hyperacetylation or to alteration of constitutive RNA polymerase II (RNAP) loading at the promoter region. Unexpectedly, RNAP binding to transcribed regions was correlated to the RAR activation state as well as to acetylation levels of histones H3 and H4, suggesting that RAR acts at the mRARβ promoter by triggering the switch from an RNA elongation-incompetent RNAP form towards an RNA elongation-competent RNAP. PMID:11839811

  16. Biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur at the Howland Integrated Forest Study site, Howland, Maine

    Treesearch

    James W. McLaughlin; Ivan J. Fernandez; Stewart M. Goltz; Lindsey E. Rustad; Larry Zibilske

    1996-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of C, N, and S was studied for six years at the Howland Integrated Forest Study (HIFS) site by measuring those constituents in major above- and below-ground pools and fluxes. Leaching losses of C from the solum were much less than CO2 efflux, with a mean annual leaching rate of 31.2 kg ha-1 yr

  17. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION FOR CONTAMINATED SITE REMEDIATION: CLEANUP GOALS AND PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop and field-test integrated remediation technologies that operate in a synergistic manner for cost-effective treatment of contaminated sites to achieve risk-based and rational endpoints. Aggressive technologies designed for rapid source-zone remediation m...

  18. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2). [on site integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of material, cell components, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems. Internal resistance and contact resistance were improved. Dissolved gases (O2, N2, and CO2) were found to have no effect on the electrochemical corrosion of phenolic composites. Stack performance was increased by 100 mV over the average 1979 level.

  19. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION FOR CONTAMINATED SITE REMEDIATION: CLEANUP GOALS AND PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop and field-test integrated remediation technologies that operate in a synergistic manner for cost-effective treatment of contaminated sites to achieve risk-based and rational endpoints. Aggressive technologies designed for rapid source-zone remediation m...

  20. Integrated decision support, sensor networks and adaptive control for wireless site-specific sprinkler irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of site-specific sprinkler irrigation water management systems will be a major factor in future efforts to improve the various efficiencies of water-use and to support a sustainable irrigated environment. The challenge is to develop fully integrated management systems with supporting...

  1. Integrated Decision Support, Sensor Networks and Adaptive Control for Wireless Site-specific Sprinkler Irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of site-specific sprinkler irrigation water management systems will be a major factor in future efforts to improve the various efficiencies of water-use and to support a sustainable irrigated environment. The challenge is to develop fully integrated management systems with supporting...

  2. How Do I Do That? Integrating Web Sites into the Gifted Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besnoy, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to provide teachers of the gifted with a reference for adopting IT pedagogical standards, strategies, and tools, specifically Web sites, into the gifted education curriculum; and (2) to show gifted educators the need for research-based standards regarding the integration of websites into the gifted…

  3. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  4. Development of the integrated programme for the cleanup of the Sellafield (site)

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, P.

    2007-07-01

    The Sellafield site in the United Kingdom is highly complex and integrated site. It has two operating reprocessing plants, a fuel fabrication facility and significant processing facilities for the conditioning of high level, intermediate level and low level wastes. It plays a major role in supporting the UK nuclear generation and dealing with the legacy from the early nuclear programmes. Sellafield also supports a number of international nuclear programmes. The UK nuclear industry is undergoing an intense programme of change with many nuclear facilities coming to the end of their lives, new reactors being discussed and a different organisational structure for running the UK nuclear programme. Common to all of this is increased determination to decommission and cleanup historic nuclear wastes. The challenge for the site has been how to put together a cleanup programme for the site whilst recognising the ongoing international strategic value of many of the facilities on the site. The work to produce an integrated plan for Sellafield is now complete and extends from the detailed consideration of facilities and processes through to socio economic impact on the local community. Extensive use has been made of operational research tools and strategic models that cover costs, resources and technical aspects for over 300 active facilities, and over 1000 waste streams. Key strategic decisions facing the site have been analysed and decision calendars produced. These illustrate the options available for each strategic decision and the latest date by which decisions can be taken. Many of the most significant decisions affecting the site need to be progressed within the next few years. The paper describes the process by which the integrated plan for Sellafield has been produced, some of the tools and techniques used in analysing them and the key decisions facing the site. (authors)

  5. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R C; Zoghbi, H Y; Moseley, A B; Rosenblatt, H M; Belmont, J W

    1992-01-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. We have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 bp away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27 beta probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, we examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1281384

  6. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  7. Definitive functional evidence for a tumor suppressor gene on human chromosome 7q31.1 neighboring the Fra7G site.

    PubMed

    Zenklusen, J C; Hodges, L C; LaCava, M; Green, E D; Conti, C J

    2000-03-23

    We have previously shown that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on human chromosome (hchr) 7 at q31.1 is common in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin. Frequent LOH of a specific chromosomal marker is indicative of a closely linked tumor suppressor gene (TSG). However, recent reports have also indicated that such a high frequency of LOH could be due to the presence in this region of the second most common aphidicolin-inducible fragile site in the human genome (Fra7G). To address this controversy, we introduced single copies of hchr7 or hchr12 into a highly aggressive human prostate carcinoma cell line (PC3) by microcell-mediated transfer. The tumorigenicity of six clones of PC3/hchr7 hybrids and three clones of PCRhchr12 hybrids, obtained in four separate fusion experiments, were studied in BALB/c nude mice. All but one of the PC3/hchr7 hybrids increased tumor latency by at least twofold, whereas none of the PC3/hchr12 hybrids delayed tumor onset. No differences in the in vitro growth rate were observed among any of the cell lines assayed (parental and hybrids) suggesting that the observed tumor suppression was due to factors other than cell cycle regulation. Deletion mapping of the PC3/hchr7 tumors obtained after reversion to the malignant phenotype revealed a common region of loss centred around 7q31.1, supporting the TSG hypothesis. The smallest commonly deleted region was approximately 1.5 Mb in size and flanked by the markers D7S486 and D7S655.

  8. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) is being developed in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). Volume 1 of the SISMP identifies the technical scope and costs associated with Hanford Site plans to resolve concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. Volume 2 of the SISMP provides the Resource Loaded Integrated Schedules for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project and Plutonium Finishing Plant activities identified in Volume 1 of the SISMP. Appendix A provides the schedules and progress curves related to spent nuclear fuel management. Appendix B provides the schedules and progress curves related to plutoniumbearing material management. Appendix C provides programmatic logic diagrams that were referenced in Volume 1 of the SISMP.

  9. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) was developed in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). Volume 1 of the SISMP identifies the technical scope and costs associated with Hanford Site plans to resolve concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. Volume 2 of the SISMP provides the Resource Loaded Integrated Schedules for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project and Plutonium Finishing Plant activities identified in Volume 1 of the SISMP. Appendix A provides the schedules and progress curves related to spent nuclear fuel management. Appendix B provides the schedules and progress curves related to plutonium-bearing material management. Appendix C provides programmatic logic diagrams that were referenced in Volume 1 of the SISMP.

  10. An integrated CRISPR Bombyx mori genome editing system with improved efficiency and expanded target sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sanyuan; Liu, Yue; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chang, Jiasong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xiaogang; Shi, Run; Lu, Wei; Xia, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-09

    Genome editing enabled unprecedented new opportunities for targeted genomic engineering of a wide variety of organisms ranging from microbes, plants, animals and even human embryos. The serial establishing and rapid applications of genome editing tools significantly accelerated Bombyx mori (B. mori) research during the past years. However, the only CRISPR system in B. mori was the commonly used SpCas9, which only recognize target sites containing NGG PAM sequence. In the present study, we first improve the efficiency of our previous established SpCas9 system by 3.5 folds. The improved high efficiency was also observed at several loci in both BmNs cells and B. mori embryos. Then to expand the target sites, we showed that two newly discovered CRISPR system, SaCas9 and AsCpf1, could also induce highly efficient site-specific genome editing in BmNs cells, and constructed an integrated CRISPR system. Genome-wide analysis of targetable sites was further conducted and showed that the integrated system cover 69,144,399 sites in B. mori genome, and one site could be found in every 6.5 bp. The efficiency and resolution of this CRISPR platform will probably accelerate both fundamental researches and applicable studies in B. mori, and perhaps other insects.

  11. Chromosome-wide mechanisms to decouple gene expression from gene dose during sex-chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Bayly S; Anderson, Erika; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Bian, Qian; Jorgensen, Erik; Meyer, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Changes in chromosome number impair fitness by disrupting the balance of gene expression. Here we analyze mechanisms to compensate for changes in gene dose that accompanied the evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes. Using single-copy transgenes integrated throughout the Caenorhabditis elegans genome, we show that expression of all X-linked transgenes is balanced between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. However, proximity of a dosage compensation complex (DCC) binding site (rex site) is neither necessary to repress X-linked transgenes nor sufficient to repress transgenes on autosomes. Thus, X is broadly permissive for dosage compensation, and the DCC acts via a chromosome-wide mechanism to balance transcription between sexes. In contrast, no analogous X-chromosome-wide mechanism balances transcription between X and autosomes: expression of compensated hermaphrodite X-linked transgenes is half that of autosomal transgenes. Furthermore, our results argue against an X-chromosome dosage compensation model contingent upon rex-directed positioning of X relative to the nuclear periphery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17365.001 PMID:27572259

  12. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  13. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-07-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  14. An integrated YAC clone contig for the WAGR region on human chromosome 11p13-p14.1

    SciTech Connect

    Gawin, B.; Klamt, B.; Koenig, A.; Thaete, C.

    1995-11-01

    The WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genito-urinary anomalies, and mental retardation) deletion region on chromosome 11p13 has been extensively characterized by deletion analysis and long-range restriction mapping. A dense probe set is available for this genomic region, which harbors a number of disease gene loci, some of which still are not cloned. The identification of candidates for these genes would be greatly facilitated by a complete gene map for this chromosomal segment. As an initial step toward this goal, we have isolated the entire region in 58 overlapping YAC clones. The contig spanning 8 Mb from RAG1 to KCNA4 has been assembled by STS and probe content mapping for 76 loci with an average spacing of about 100 kb. A subset of clones has been analyzed by PFG analysis to position these within the known physical map. Common microsatellite markers permit an alignment of the YAC contig with the genetic and radiation hybrid maps of chromosome 11. Ten known genes, some with much more refined map positions, are placed in the contig. The severalfold coverage of 11p13-p14.1 provides a reliable resource for the future development of a complete gene map of this region. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 5. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Manchester, UK on November 9--10, 1996 and was hosted by the University of Manchester. The major goals of the workshop were: (1) to collate the various genetic, cytogenetic and physical maps of human chromosome 5; (2) to integrate these maps and identify/correct discrepancies between them wherever possible; (3) to catalogue the sequence-ready contigs of the chromosome; (4) to co-ordinate the various sequencing efforts to avoid future duplication; (5) to establish the first (to the author`s knowledge) web site for the human chromosome 5 community which contains the above information in a readily accessible form.

  16. Synchronization of chromosome dynamics and cell division in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cells have evolved a variety of regulatory circuits that tightly synchronize their chromosome replication and cell division cycles, thereby ensuring faithful transmission of genetic information to their offspring. Complex multicomponent signaling cascades are used to monitor the progress of cytokinesis and couple replication initiation to the separation of the two daughter cells. Moreover, the cell-division apparatus actively participates in chromosome partitioning and, particularly, in the resolution of topological problems that impede the segregation process, thus coordinating chromosome dynamics with cell constriction. Finally, bacteria have developed mechanisms that harness the cell-cycle-dependent positioning of individual chromosomal loci or the nucleoid to define the cell-division site and control the timing of divisome assembly. Each of these systems manages to integrate a complex set of spatial and temporal cues to regulate and execute critical steps in the bacterial cell cycle.

  17. A dynamic multimedia fuzzy-stochastic integrated environmental risk assessment approach for contaminated sites management.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Wen, Jing-Ya; Li, Xiao-Li; Wang, Da-Zhou; Li, Yu

    2013-10-15

    A dynamic multimedia fuzzy-stochastic integrated environmental risk assessment approach was developed for contaminated sites management. The contaminant concentrations were simulated by a validated interval dynamic multimedia fugacity model, and different guideline values for the same contaminant were represented as a fuzzy environmental guideline. Then, the probability of violating environmental guideline (Pv) can be determined by comparison between the modeled concentrations and the fuzzy environmental guideline, and the constructed relationship between the Pvs and environmental risk levels was used to assess the environmental risk level. The developed approach was applied to assess the integrated environmental risk at a case study site in China, simulated from 1985 to 2020. Four scenarios were analyzed, including "residential land" and "industrial land" environmental guidelines under "strict" and "loose" strictness. It was found that PAH concentrations will increase steadily over time, with soil found to be the dominant sink. Source emission in soil was the leading input and atmospheric sedimentation was the dominant transfer process. The integrated environmental risks primarily resulted from petroleum spills and coke ovens, while the soil environmental risks came from coal combustion. The developed approach offers an effective tool for quantifying variability and uncertainty in the dynamic multimedia integrated environmental risk assessment and the contaminated site management.

  18. Hice1, a Novel Microtubule-Associated Protein Required for Maintenance of Spindle Integrity and Chromosomal Stability in Human Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guikai; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wei, Randy; Chen, Yumay; Shan, Zhiyin; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Spindle integrity is critical for efficient mitotic progression and accurate chromosome segregation. Deregulation of spindles often leads to structural and functional aberrations, ultimately promoting segregation errors and aneuploidy, a hallmark of most human cancers. Here we report the characterization of a previously identified human sarcoma antigen (gene located at 19p13.11), Hice1, an evolutionarily nonconserved 46-kDa coiled-coil protein. Hice1 shows distinct cytoplasmic localization and associates with interphase centrosomes and mitotic spindles, preferentially at the spindle pole vicinity. Depletion of Hice1 by RNA interference resulted in abnormal and unstable spindle configurations, mitotic delay at prometaphase and metaphase, and elevated aneuploidy. Conversely, loss of Hice1 had minimal effects on interphase centrosome duplication. We also found that both full-length Hice1 and Hice1-N1, which is composed of 149 amino acids of the N-terminal region, but not the mutant lacking the N-terminal region, exhibited activities of microtubule bundling and stabilization at a near-physiological concentration. Consistently, overexpression of Hice1 rendered microtubule bundles in cells resistant to nocodazole- or cold-treatment-induced depolymerization. These results demonstrate that Hice1 is a novel microtubule-associated protein important for maintaining spindle integrity and chromosomal stability, in part by virtue of its ability to bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules. PMID:18362163

  19. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring blaNMC-A or blaIMI-type class A carbapenemase genes on novel chromosomal integrative elements and plasmids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Mataseje, Laura F; Davidson, Ross; Delport, Johannes A; Fuller, Jeff; Hoang, Linda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Levett, Paul; Roscoe, Diane L; Willey, Barbara M; Mulvey, Michael R

    2017-02-21

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates submitted to a reference laboratory from 2010 to 2015 were screened by PCR for seven common carbapenemase gene groups, namely, KPC, NDM, OXA-48, VIM, IMP, GES, and NMC-A/IMI. Nineteen of the submitted isolates (1.7%) were found to harbor Ambler class A blaNMC-A or blaIMI-type carbapenemases. All 19 isolates were resistant to at least one carbapenem but susceptible to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, and ciprofloxacin. Most isolates (17/19) gave positive results with the Carba-NP test for phenotypic carbapenemase detection. Isolates were genetically diverse by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing, and hsp60 gene analysis. The genes were found in various Enterobacter cloacae complex species, however blaNMC-A was highly associated with Enterobacter ludwiggii Whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis revealed that all NMC-A (n=10), IMI-1 (n=5), and IMI-9 (n=2) producers harbored the carbapenemase gene on EludIMEX-1-like integrative mobile elements, EcloIMEXs, located in the identical chromosomal locus. Two novel genes, blaIMI-5 and blaIMI-6, were harbored on different IncFII-type plasmids. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring blaNMC-A/IMI-type carbapenemases are relatively rare in Canada. Though mostly found integrated into the chromosome, some variants are located on plasmids that may enhance their mobility potential.

  20. Characterization of a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE marker for investigation of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O91:H21 shedding in cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yingying; Mathew, Alan G.

    2011-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O91:H21 has been recognized as a potential life-threatening foodborne pathogen and is commonly involved in human infections in European countries. Fecal shedding of the organism by cattle is considered to be the ultimate source for contaminations. Studies examining STEC shedding patterns often include inoculation of strains carrying antibiotic resistance makers for identifiable recovery. However, indigenous intestinal microflora exhibiting similar antibiotic resistance patterns can confound such studies. Such was the case in a study by our group when attempting to characterize shedding patterns of O91:H21 in calves. A chromosomally integrated bioluminescence marker using a luxCDABE cassette from Photorhabdus luminescens was developed in O91:H21 to overcome such shortcomings of antibiotic resistance markers during animal challenge experiment. The marker was validated in various aspects and was shown to have no impact on metabolic reactions, isotype virulence gene patterns, cost to growth, and additionally demonstrated high in vitro stability. Together, the results indicated that a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE based marker may be a superior system for the study of STEC colonization and shedding in cattle.

  1. Recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, David J; Søballe, Britta; Barre, François-Xavier; Filipe, Sergio; Lau, Ivy; Massey, Thomas; Yates, James

    2004-01-01

    The duplication of DNA and faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes at cell division is frequently dependent on recombinational processes. The rebuilding of broken or stalled replication forks is universally dependent on homologous recombination proteins. In bacteria with circular chromosomes, crossing over by homologous recombination can generate dimeric chromosomes, which cannot be segregated to daughter cells unless they are converted to monomers before cell division by the conserved Xer site-specific recombination system. Dimer resolution also requires FtsK, a division septum-located protein, which coordinates chromosome segregation with cell division, and uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to activate the dimer resolution reaction. FtsK can also translocate DNA, facilitate synapsis of sister chromosomes and minimize entanglement and catenation of newly replicated sister chromosomes. The visualization of the replication/recombination-associated proteins, RecQ and RarA, and specific genes within living Escherichia coli cells, reveals further aspects of the processes that link replication with recombination, chromosome segregation and cell division, and provides new insight into how these may be coordinated. PMID:15065657

  2. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pin; Löber, Ulrike; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Hartman, Stefanie; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  3. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    PubMed Central

    Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Ishida, Yasuko; Courtiol, Alexandre; Timms, Peter; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Lenz, Dorina; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Hartman, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW) koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small. PMID:27069793

  4. Erace--an integrated system for treating organic-contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Caley, S.M.; Heath, W.O.; Bergsman, T.M.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pillay, C.; Moss, R.W.; Shah, R.R.; Goheen, S.C.; Camiaoni, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a suite of electrical technologies for treating sites contaminated with hazardous organic compounds. These include: (1) Six-Phase Soil Heating (SPSH) to remove volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds from soils; (2) In Situ Corona (ISC) to decompose nonvolatile and bound organic contaminants in soils; (3) High-Energy Corona (HEC) to treat contaminated off-gases; and (4) Liquid Corona (LC) to treat contaminated liquids. These four technologies comprise ERACE (Electrical Remediation at Contaminated Environments), an integrated system for accomplishing site remediation with little or no secondary wastes produced that would require off-site treatment or disposal. Each ERACE technology can be employed individually as a stand-alone treatment process, or combined as a system for total site remediation. For example, an ERACE system for treating sites contaminated with volatile organics would integrate SPSH to remove the contaminants from the soil, LC to continuously treat an aqueous stream condensed out of the soil off-gas, and HEC to treat non-condensibles remaining in the off-gas, before atmospheric release.

  5. Sal-Site: integrating new and existing ambystomatid salamander research and informational resources.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Walker, John A; Kump, D Kevin; Samuels, Amy K; Monaghan, James R; Weisrock, David W; Staben, Chuck; Voss, S Randal

    2005-12-16

    Salamanders of the genus Ambystoma are a unique model organism system because they enable natural history and biomedical research in the laboratory or field. We developed Sal-Site to integrate new and existing ambystomatid salamander research resources in support of this model system. Sal-Site hosts six important resources: 1) Salamander Genome Project: an information-based web-site describing progress in genome resource development, 2) Ambystoma EST Database: a database of manually edited and analyzed contigs assembled from ESTs that were collected from A. tigrinum tigrinum and A. mexicanum, 3) Ambystoma Gene Collection: a database containing full-length protein-coding sequences, 4) Ambystoma Map and Marker Collection: an image and database resource that shows the location of mapped markers on linkage groups, provides information about markers, and provides integrating links to Ambystoma EST Database and Ambystoma Gene Collection databases, 5) Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center: a website and collection of databases that describe an NSF funded salamander rearing facility that generates and distributes biological materials to researchers and educators throughout the world, and 6) Ambystoma Research Coordination Network: a web-site detailing current research projects and activities involving an international group of researchers. Sal-Site is accessible at http://www.ambystoma.org.

  6. Sal-Site: Integrating new and existing ambystomatid salamander research and informational resources

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Walker, John A; Kump, D Kevin; Samuels, Amy K; Monaghan, James R; Weisrock, David W; Staben, Chuck; Voss, S Randal

    2005-01-01

    Salamanders of the genus Ambystoma are a unique model organism system because they enable natural history and biomedical research in the laboratory or field. We developed Sal-Site to integrate new and existing ambystomatid salamander research resources in support of this model system. Sal-Site hosts six important resources: 1) Salamander Genome Project: an information-based web-site describing progress in genome resource development, 2) Ambystoma EST Database: a database of manually edited and analyzed contigs assembled from ESTs that were collected from A. tigrinum tigrinum and A. mexicanum, 3) Ambystoma Gene Collection: a database containing full-length protein-coding sequences, 4) Ambystoma Map and Marker Collection: an image and database resource that shows the location of mapped markers on linkage groups, provides information about markers, and provides integrating links to Ambystoma EST Database and Ambystoma Gene Collection databases, 5) Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center: a website and collection of databases that describe an NSF funded salamander rearing facility that generates and distributes biological materials to researchers and educators throughout the world, and 6) Ambystoma Research Coordination Network: a web-site detailing current research projects and activities involving an international group of researchers. Sal-Site is accessible at . PMID:16359543

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Management & Integration Perspective Subcontractors as Partners in Site Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, A.; Eidam, G.

    2002-02-26

    In 1997, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of their Oak Ridge Operations facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC). This paper will focus on the success and challenges of several of the M&I projects at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The initial goals for BJC were to transition up to 93% of their staff to the subcontract community as they moved away from operations to ''integration.'' The perspectives of BJC and one of their Remedial Action/Decontamination & Decommissioning (RADD) subcontractors will be combined in this paper to share with others how ''partnering'' together was essential for success. Projects completed by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) under their RADD subcontract will be used to illustrate the process and the challenges/successes to completion. These projects will include pond remediation, tank remediation, and building cleanup for reuse. All these projects were ''fixed price'' with defined milestones keyed into award fee for BJC and regulatory milestones for DOE. By working together to form integrated teams focused on site remediation without sacrificing safety, all milestones were met. This paper will discuss the following items associated with the M&I environmental restoration projects at ORNL: overview of the M&I Contract; challenges in transitioning from ''operations'' to ''integration''; subcontracting strategies; subcontractor pre-qualification process; overview of ORNL Projects; and integrated team effort required to achieve site restoration goals.

  8. Integrative Analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 Target Sites in the Human HBB Gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Zhu, Detu; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Y