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Sample records for chromosome 1q juvenile

  1. Mapping of a gene for autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 1 q

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.E.; Lichter, P.R.; Torrez, D.; Wong, D.; Johnson, A.T.; Boehnke, M.; Uro, J.L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    A large Caucasian family is presented, in which a juvenile-onset form of open-angle glaucoma is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Sixteen affected family members were identified from 31 at-risk individuals descended from the affected founder. Affected patients developed high intraocular pressures (sometimes >40 mm Hg) within the first 2 decades of life. Linkage analysis between the disease phenotype and 12 microsatellite repeat markers located on chromosome 1 q gave a maximum lod score of 8.38 at a recombination fraction of zero for marker D1S210. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggests a total inclusion region of about 14 cM between markers D1S194 and D1S218 at 1q21-q31. This represents the second juvenile-glaucoma family, in which the disease has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 1. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  3. Linkage analysis of primary open-angle glaucoma excludes the juvenile glaucoma region on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Acott, T.S.; Samples, J.R. |

    1994-09-01

    The gene for one form of juvenile glaucoma has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. This raises the possibility of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) also mapping to this region if the same defective gene causes both diseases. To ask this question linkage analysis was performed on a large POAG kindred. Blood samples or skin biopsies were obtained from 40 members of this family. Individuals were diagnosed as having POAG if they met two or more of the following criteria: (1) Visual field defects compatible with glaucoma on automated perimetry; (2) Optic nerve head and/or nerve fiber layer analysis compatible with glaucomatous damage; (3) high intraocular pressures (> 20 mm Hg). Patients were considered glaucoma suspects if they only met one criterion. These individuals were excluded from the analysis. Of the 40 members, seven were diagnosed with POAG; four were termed suspects. The earliest age of onset was 38 years old, while the average age of onset was 65 years old. We performed two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, using five markers which encompass the region 1q21-q31; specifically, D1S194, D1S210, D1S212, D1S191 and LAMB2. Two-point lod scores excluded tight linkage with all markers except D1S212 (maximum lod score of 1.07 at theta = 0.0). In the multipoint analysis, including D1S210-D1S212-LAMB2 and POAG, the entire 11 cM region spanned by these markers was excluded for linkage with POAG; that is, lod scores were < -2.0. In conclusion, POAG in this family does not map to chromosome 1q21-q31 and, thus, they carry a gene that is distinct from the juvenile glaucoma gene.

  4. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Exclusion of one pedigree affected by adult onset primary open angle glaucoma from linkage to the juvenile glaucoma locus on chromosome 1q21-q31.

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, D; Kitsos, G; Economou-Petersen, E; Grigoriadou, M; Vassilopoulos, D; Papageorgiou, C; Psilas, K; Petersen, M B

    1996-01-01

    A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) was recently assigned to chromosome region 1q21-q31. In the present study, a large Greek family with autosomal dominant adult onset POAG was investigated using microsatellite markers. Exclusion of linkage of the adult onset POAG gene to the region D1S194-D1S191 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, the data provide evidence that juvenile and adult onset POAG are genetically distinct disease entities. PMID:9004141

  6. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  7. A single gene for juvenile and middle-age onset open-angle glaucomas confined within a small interval on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, V.; Dumont, M.; Plante, M.

    1994-09-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) encompasses a complex of ocular disease entities characterized by an optic neuropathy causing progressive loss of the visual fields and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. POAG can be subdivided into two groups according to age of onset: (1) the more prevalent middle to late-age onset chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after age 40 and (2) the less common form, juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG), which occurs between 3 years of age and early adulthood. Susceptibility to either COAG or JOAG has been found to be inherited. We studied 141 members of a huge multigeneration French Canadian family affected with an autosomal dominant form of POAG. Both JOAG and COAG were diagnosed in 43 patients. To first position the disease gene, AFM microsatellites markers specific to chromosome 1q21-q31 were selected since linkage of JOAG to this region was recently demonstrated in two Caucasian families. Tight linkage was observed between the JOAG/COAG phenotype and 7 microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 at {theta}=0 was obtained with AFM278ye5. Using a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect, a characteristic JOAG/COAG haplotype spanning 12 cM was next recognized between loci D1S196 and D1S212. Two key recombination events in affected patients further confined the disease locus within a 5 cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S452/D1S210. These results are the first to demonstrate that JOAG and one adult form of POAG map at a single locus on chromosome 1q23-q25. They also provide members of this family with a new diagnostic tool to identify the at-risk individuals.

  8. C1q rs292001 polymorphism and C1q antibodies in juvenile lupus and their relation to lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mosaad, Y M; Hammad, A; Fawzy, Z; El-Refaaey, A; Tawhid, Z; Hammad, E M; Youssef, L F; ElAttar, E A A; Radwan, D F; Fawzy, I M

    2015-01-01

    C1q deficiency is related strongly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but very few and inconsistent studies explored the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the C1q gene in relation to juvenile SLE (jSLE) and lupus nephritis (LN). The objective of this study was to analyse whether C1q rs 292001 polymorphism is associated with SLE and disease phenotype, especially nephritis, and to investigate the relation between this polymorphism and clinical data, treatment outcome, serum level of C1q protein and antibodies. Typing of C1q rs292001 polymorphism using restriction fragment length polymorphism and measuring serum levels of C1q protein and antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed for 130 children with SLE and 208 healthy controls. The A allele of C1q rs292001 was associated with jSLE and LN (P = 0·005 and 0·013, respectively) and the AA genotype was associated with jSLE (P = 0·036). Low serum levels of C1q protein were found in jSLE and LN (P < 0·001 and 0·009, respectively), and these levels were increased after treatment in patients with LN (P = 0·009) and active renal disease (P = 0·027). Higher titres of C1q antibodies were found in patients with LN (P = 0·015) and correlated negatively with C1q protein level (P < 0·001) and patient age (P = 0·04). The A allele and AA genotype of C1q rs292001 can be considered a susceptibility risk factor and the GG genotype could be considered protective for jSLE and LN in the studied cohort of Egyptian children. Decreased serum levels of C1q protein and increased titres of C1q antibodies may be involved in the pathogenesis of jSLE, especially LN. PMID:26095468

  9. Evaluation of chromosome 1q gain in intracranial ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Rajeshwari, Madhu; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Kakkar, Aanchal; Nambirajan, Aruna; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Singh, Manmohan; Saran, Ravindra Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are relatively uncommon gliomas with poor prognosis despite recent advances in neurooncology. Molecular pathogenesis of ependymomas is not extensively studied. Lack of correlation of histological grade with patient outcome has directed attention towards identification of molecular alterations as novel prognostic markers. Recently, 1q gain has emerged as a potential prognostic marker, associated with decreased survival, especially in posterior fossa, high grade tumors. Cases of intracranial ependymomas were retrieved. Tumors were graded using objective criteria to supplement WHO grading. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for 1q gain was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded sections. Eighty-one intracranial ependymomas were analyzed. Pediatric (76%) and infratentorial (70%) ependymomas constituted the majority. 1q gain was seen in 27 cases (33%), was equally frequent in children (34%) and adults (32%), supratentorial (37%) and infratentorial (32%) location, grade II (33%) and III (25%) tumors. Recurrence was noted in 24 cases and death in 7 cases with 5-year progression-free and overall-survival rates of 37% and 80%, respectively. Grade II tumors had a better survival than grade III tumors; histopathological grade was the only prognostically significant marker. 1q gain had no prognostic significance. 1q gain is frequent in ependymomas in Indian patients, seen across all ages, sites and grades, and thus is likely an early event in pathogenesis. The prognostic value of 1q gain, remains uncertain, and multicentric pooling of data is required. A histopathological grading system using objective criteria correlates well with patient outcome and can serve as an economical option for prognostication of ependymomas. PMID:26725097

  10. Exclusion of chromosome 1q21-q31 from linkage to three pedigrees affected by the pigment-dispersion syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Paglinauan, C.; Haines, J.L.; Del Bono, E.A.; Schuman, J.; Stawski, S.; Wiggs, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    The pigment-dispersion syndrome is a form of open-angle glaucoma that usually affects individuals in the first 3 decades of life. In addition to the typical optic-nerve degeneration seen in all types of glaucoma, the pigment-dispersion syndrome is characterized by distinctive clinical features including the deposition of pigment granules from the iris epithelium on a variety of ocular structures including the trabecular meshwork. Frequently this disorder affects young myopic individuals. In the early stages of the disease, affected individuals may have clinical evidence of dispersed pigment without an associated elevation of intraocular pressure and optic-nerve degeneration. However, as the disease process progresses, many affected individuals ({approximately}50%) will develop elevated intraocular pressure and degeneration of the optic nerve, causing a permanent loss of sight. The pigment-dispersion syndrome shares several clinical features with the form of autosomal dominant juvenile open-angle glaucoma that recently has been mapped to the 1q21-q31 region of chromosome 1. Our results indicate that the pigment-dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that may also affect the juvenile population, is genetically unrelated to the autosomal dominant form of juvenile glaucoma caused by a defect in a gene located in the 1q21-q31 region of chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Polymorphisms in the phosducin (PDC) gene on chromosome 1q25-32

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, P.; Mansergh, F.C.; Farrar, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    Phosducin (33 kDa protein or MEKA) is a principal water-soluble phosphoprotein in the rod and cone photoreceptor cells and pinealocytes. This protein modulates the phototransduction cascade by binding to the beta and gamma subunit complexes of transducin. The PDC gene has been mapped to 1q25-32, the region of linkage of two hereditary retinal degenerative disorders; autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma and one form of autosomal recessive RP. Using previously published sequence data, PCR primers were designed to amplify the coding and 5{prime} flanking regions of the PDC gene. Direct sequencing revealed three polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region, two of which were in regions highly homologous between humans and mice. Analysis of the polymorphisms was then extended to larger population samples using SSCPE and denaturing gel analysis. The first polymorphism PDC1 resulted from an insertion of a G residue at position -653/4. Allele frequencies were determined to be 0.51 (insG) and 0.49 (normal) giving a PIC value of 0.50. A deletion of a T residue at position -488 was the basis of the PDC2 polymorphism with allele frequencies of 0.88 (normal) and 0.12 (delT) and a PIC value of 0.21. Interestingly, the allele with an inserted G residue in PDC1 always segregrated with the deleted T allele in PDC2. The third polymorphism PDC3 was caused by a T or G residue at position -1083. Allele frequencies of 0.26 (G residue) and 0.74 (T residue) were determined from an analysis of 80 individuals with an overall PIC value of 0.39. The identification of these three polymorphisms in the PDC gene will be useful for future genetic linkage studies of chromosome 1q in inherited retinopathies.

  12. Physical analysis of the terminal 270 kb of DNA from human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Negorev, D.G.; Macina, R.A.; Spais, C.

    1994-08-01

    DNA from three 1q44-derived human telomeric yeast artificial chromosome clones was analyzed using physical mapping methods. The smallest clone, yRM2004 (65 kb), corresponded exactly to the distal end of the largest clone, yRM2123 (270 kb). The third clone, yRM2192, overlapped with the proximal end of yRM2123 but not the distal end, suggesting that it is most likely a deletion artifact of a clone originally derived from a 1q telomere fragment. Data from fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, restriction mapping, and RecA-assisted restriction enzyme cleavage experiments indicate that the molecular clone yRM2123 contains low-copy subtelomeric and subterminal repeats at its distal end, single-copy DNA more centromerically, and a CG-rich region with homology to mouse DNA. Markers derived from this clone will allow telomeric closure of the physical and genetic linkage maps of human chromosome 1q. 35 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Physical mapping of a functional cluster of epidermal differentiation genes on chromosome 1q21

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, A.; Ziegler, A.; Mischke, D. ); Korge, B.P.; Compton, J.G.; Steinert, P.M. )

    1993-10-01

    Genes of three protein families, which are in part specifically expressed in the course of terminal differentiation of human epidermis, have previously been mapped to chromosome 1q21. Here, the authors show that these genes are physically linked within 2.05 Mb of DNA. The order is calpactin I light chain, trichohyalin, profilaggrin, involucrin/small proline-rich protein, loricrin, and calcyclin. The colocalization in the 1q21 region together with their functional interdependence during epidermal differentiation raises the question whether these genes share regulatory elements which control their transcriptional activities. As several of them are potential candidate genes for dyskeratotic skin diseases, this physical map should be of great value for genetic linkage analyses. 55 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility associated with the UCK2 locus on chromosome 1q23.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Wang, Zhaoming; Skotheim, Rolf I; Koster, Roelof; Chung, Charles C; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kratz, Christian P; Bakken, Anne C; Bishop, D Timothy; Cook, Michael B; Erickson, R Loren; Fosså, Sophie D; Greene, Mark H; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kanetsky, Peter A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Loud, Jennifer T; Korde, Larissa A; Le Marchand, Loic; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Pike, Malcolm C; Rahman, Nazneen; Rubertone, Mark V; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Skinner, Eila C; Turnbull, Clare; Van Den Berg, David J; Wu, Xifeng; Yeager, Meredith; Nathanson, Katherine L; Chanock, Stephen J; Cortessis, Victoria K; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2013-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). A previous GWAS reported a possible TGCT susceptibility locus on chromosome 1q23 in the UCK2 gene, but failed to reach genome-wide significance following replication. We interrogated this region by conducting a meta-analysis of two independent GWASs including a total of 940 TGCT cases and 1559 controls for 122 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 1q23 and followed up the most significant SNPs in an additional 2202 TGCT cases and 2386 controls from four case-control studies. We observed genome-wide significant associations for several UCK2 markers, the most significant of which was for rs3790665 (PCombined = 6.0 × 10(-9)). Additional support is provided from an independent familial study of TGCT where a significant over-transmission for rs3790665 with TGCT risk was observed (PFBAT = 2.3 × 10(-3)). Here, we provide substantial evidence for the association between UCK2 genetic variation and TGCT risk. PMID:23462292

  15. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Fine mapping of the human pentraxin gene region on chromosome 1q23

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.T.; Whitehead, A.S.; Divane, A.

    1996-12-31

    The 1q21 to 25 region of human chromosome 1 contains genes which encode proteins with immune- and inflammation-associated functions. These include the pentraxin genes, for C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P(SAP) protein (APCS), and a CRP pseudogene (CRPP1). The region of chromosome 1 containing this cluster is syntenic with distal mouse chromosome 1. We constructed an approximately 1.4 megabase yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with the pentraxin genes at its core. This four-YAC contig includes other genes with immune functions including the FCER1A gene, which encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the IgE high-affinity Fc receptor and the 1F1-16 gene, an interferon-{gamma}-induced gene. In addition, it contains the histone H3F2 and H4F2 genes and the gene for erythroid {alpha}-spectrin (SPTA1). The gene order is cen.-SPTA1-H4F2-H3F2-1F1-16-CRP-CRPP1-APCS-FCERIA-tel. The contig thus consists of a cluster of genes whose products either have immunological importance, bind DNA, or both. 68 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Autozygosity Mapping of a Seckel Syndrome Locus to Chromosome 3q22.1-q24

    PubMed Central

    Goodship, Judith; Gill, Harinder; Carter, Joan; Jackson, Andrew; Splitt, Miranda; Wright, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Seckel syndrome (MIM 210600) is an autosomal recessive disorder of low birth weight, severe microcephaly, and dysmorphic facial appearance with receding forehead, prominent nose, and micrognathia. We have performed a genomic screen in two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin and found that the disorder segregates with markers between loci D3S1316 and D3S3710, which map to chromosome 3q22.1-q24. Analysis using HOMOZ/MAPMAKER gave a maximum LOD score of 8.72. All five affected individuals were homozygous for the same allele, for two adjacent polymorphic markers within the region segregating with the disease, narrowing the region to 12 cM. PMID:10889046

  18. Genetic variants on chromosome 1q41 influence ocular axial length and high myopia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Meguro, Akira; Nakata, Isao; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Goh, Liang-Kee; Li, Yi-Ju; Lim, Wan'e; Ho, Candice E H; Hawthorne, Felicia; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chua, Daniel; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Vithana, Eranga; Seielstad, Mark; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Beuerman, Roger W; Tai, E-Shyong; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2012-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL). Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = -0.16 mm per minor allele, P(meta) =2.69 × 10(-10)). The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR) =0.75, 95% CI: 0.68-0.84, P(meta) =4.38 × 10(-7)) in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia.

  19. Fine Mapping of the Body Fat QTL on Human Chromosome 1q43

    PubMed Central

    Aissani, Brahim; Wiener, Howard W.; Zhang, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence for linkage and association of obesity-related quantitative traits to chromosome 1q43 has been reported in the Quebec Family Study (QFS) and in populations of Caribbean Hispanic ancestries yet no specific candidate locus has been replicated to date. Methods Using a set of 1,902 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 525 African American (AA) and 391 European American (EA) women enrolled in the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS), we generated a fine association map for the body mass index (BMI) across a 2.3 megabase-long interval delimited by RGS7 (regulator of G-protein signaling 7) and PLD5 (Phospholipase D, member 5). Multivariable-adjusted linear regression models were fitted to the data to evaluate the association in race-stratified analyses and meta-analysis. Results The strongest associations were observed in a recessive genetic model and peaked in the 3’ end of RGS7 at intronic rs261802 variant in the AA group (p = 1.0 x 10−4) and in meta-analysis of AA and EA samples (p = 9.0 x 10−5). In the EA group, moderate associations peaked at rs6429264 (p = 2.0 x 10−3) in the 2 Kb upstream sequence of RGS7. In the reference populations for the European ancestry in the 1,000 genomes project, rs6429264 occurs in strong linkage disequilibrium (D’ = 0.94) with rs1341467, the strongest candidate SNP for total body fat in QFS that failed genotyping in the present study. Additionally we report moderate associations at the 3’ end of PLD5 in meta-analysis (3.2 x 10−4 ≤ p ≤ 5.8 x 10−4). Conclusion We report replication data suggesting that RGS7, a gene abundantly expressed in the brain, might be a putative body fat QTL on human chromosome 1q43. Future genetic and functional studies are required to substantiate our observations and to potentially link them to the neurobehavioral phenotypes associated with the RGS7 region. PMID:27111224

  20. Directed isolation and mapping of microsatellites from swine Chromosome 1q telomeric region through microdissection and RH mapping.

    PubMed

    Sarker, N; Hawken, R J; Takahashi, S; Alexander, L J; Awata, T; Schook, L B; Yasue, H

    2001-07-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) (vertebrate number, birth weight, age at puberty, growth rate, gestation length, and backfat depth) have been independently mapped to the distal region of swine Chromosome (SSC) 1q in several resource populations. In order to improve the map resolution and refine these QTLs more precisely on SSC1q, we have isolated and mapped additional microsatellites (ms), using chromosome microdissection and radiation hybrid (RH) mapping. Five copies of the telomeric region of SSC1q were microdissected from metaphase spreads and pooled. The chromosomal fragment DNA was randomly amplified by using degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR), enriched for ms, and subcloned into a PCR vector. Screening of subsequent clones with ms probes identified 23 unique ms sequences. Fifteen of these (65%) were subjected to radiation hybrid (RH) mapping by using the INRA-University of Minnesota porcine RH panel (IMpRH); and the remaining eight were not suited for the RH mapping. Twelve microsatellites were assigned to SSC1q telomeric region of IMpRH map (LOD >6), and three remain unlinked (LOD <6). Out of the 15 microsatellite markers, 9 were polymorphic in NIAI reference population based on the Meishan and Göttingen miniature pig. In summary, we have used microdissection and radiation hybrid mapping to clone and map 12 new microsatellites to the swine gene map to increase the resolution of SSC1q in the region of known QTLs.

  1. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M.; Mohapatra, G.; Betensky, R.A.; Keohane, C.; Louis, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas. PMID:21988727

  2. Structure and expression of Strabismus 1 gene on human chromosome 1q21-q23.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-06-01

    Xenopus Strabismus (Stbm) is a negative regulator of the WNT - beta-catenin signaling pathway. Strabismus 1 (STB1/VangL2) and Strabismus 2 (STB2/Vangl1) are human homologues of Xenopus Stbm and Drosophila Stbm/ Van Gogh (Vang) STB1 and STB2 are four-transmembrane-type proteins with Dishevelled-binding motif. STB2 and CASQ2 genes are located on human chromosome 1p13.3-p11 with an interval less than 5 kb. Here, STB1 gene and CASQ1 gene were found to be located on human chromosome 1q21-q23 with an interval of about 210 kb including Nicastrin, COPA, PXF, H326 and PEA15 genes. Exon-intron structure was well conserved between STB1 and STB2 genes. STB1-CASQ1 gene cluster and STB2-CASQ2 gene cluster might be generated due to duplication of ancestral gene cluster, and several genes might be inserted into the STB1-CASQ1 intergenic region during or after gene-cluster duplication. STB1 mRNA was relatively highly expressed in prostate, trachea, thymus, lymph node, placenta, fetal kidney, fetal brain, and fetal lung. In adult brain, STB1 mRNA was more highly expressed in cerebellum, corpus callosum, amygdala, and medulla oblongata. STB1 mRNA was moderately expressed in K-562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia), G-361 (melanoma), and MKN7 (gastric cancer). On the other hand, STB1 mRNA was almost undetectable in several human cancer cell lines, and was down-regulated in 4 out of 14 cases of primary kidney tumors, and in 2 out of 3 cases of primary lung cancer. Loss-of-function mutation of STB1 gene might lead to carcinogenesis through activation of the WNT - beta-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Genetic Linkage of the Muckle-Wells Syndrome to Chromosome 1q44

    PubMed Central

    Cuisset, Laurence; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Meyrier, Alain; Vaudour, Gérard; Watts, Richard A.; Scott, David G. I.; Nicholls, Anne; Pavek, Sylvana; Vasseur, Christian; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Delpech, Marc; Grateau, Gilles

    1999-01-01

    Summary The Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is a hereditary inflammatory disorder characterized by acute febrile inflammatory episodes comprising abdominal pain, arthritis, and urticaria. Progressive nerve deafness develops subsequently, and, after several years, the disease is complicated by multiorgan AA-type amyloidosis (i.e., amyloidosis derived from the inflammatory serum amyloid–associated protein) (MIM 191900) with renal involvement and end-stage renal failure. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant, but some sporadic cases have also been described. No specific laboratory findings have been reported. The genetic basis of MWS is unknown. Using a genomewide search strategy in three families, we identified the locus responsible for MWS, at chromosome 1q44. Our results indicate that the gene is located within a 13.9-cM region between markers D1S2811 and D1S2882, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.66 (recombination fraction .00) at D1S2836 when full penetrance is assumed. Further identification of the specific gene that is responsible for MWS will therefore provide the first biological element for characterizing MWS, other than doing so on the basis of its variable clinical expression. PMID:10486324

  4. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Common variable immunodeficiency associated with microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-q42.3 and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate kinase B (ITPKB) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika G; Yel, Leman; Cao, Jia N; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogenous disorder characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and impaired specific antibody response and increased susceptibility to infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. A number of gene mutations, including ICOS, TACI and BAFF-R, and CD19, CD20, CD21, CD81, MSH5 and LRBA have been described; however, they account for approximately 20–25% of total cases of CVID. In this study, we report a patient with CVID with an intrinsic microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-42.3, where gene for inositol 1,3,4, trisphosphate kinase β (ITPKB) is localized. ITPKB has an important role in the development, survival and function of B cells. In this subject, the expression of ITPKB mRNA as well as ITKPB protein was significantly reduced. The sequencing of ITPKB gene revealed three variants, two of them were missense variants and third was a synonymous variant; the significance of each of them in relation to CVID is discussed. This case suggests that a deficiency of ITPKB may have a role in CVID. PMID:26900472

  6. A 11.7-Mb Paracentric Inversion in Chromosome 1q Detected in Prenatal Diagnosis Associated with Familial Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Rigola, Maria A; Baena, Neus; Català, Vicenç; Lozano, Iris; Gabau, Elisabet; Guitart, Miriam; Fuster, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Most apparent balanced chromosomal inversions are usually clinically asymptomatic; however, infertility, miscarriages, and mental retardation have been reported in inversion carriers. We present a small family with a paracentric inversion 1q42.13q43 detected in routine prenatal diagnosis. Molecular cytogenetic methods defined the size of the inversion as 11.7 Mb and excluded other unbalanced chromosomal alterations in the patients. Our findings suggest that intellectual disability is caused by dysfunction, disruption, or position effects of genes located at or near the breakpoints involved in this inversion.

  7. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The genes for nicein/kalinin 125- and 100-kDa subunits, candidates for junctional epidermiolysis bullosa, map to chromosomes 1q32 and 1q25-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Vailly, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Meneguzzi, G.; Szepetowski, P.; Pedeutour, F. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Burgeson, R. )

    1994-05-01

    Expression of nicein is specifically hampered in the severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive genodermatosis characterized by blister formation of integument believed to be due to defects in hemidesmosomes. Nicein genes are therefore the prime candidates for involvement in JEB. To map the gene encoding the 125-kDa subunit of nicein, the authors used the cDNA Kal5.5C coding for the amino-terminal domain of the protein. In situ hybridization was carried out on chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. In 100 metaphases examined, 153 silver grains were found associated with chromosomes; 45 (29%) of these were located on chromosome 1, and 33 (73%) of these 45 grains mapped to region 1q32.1-q41 with a maximum in band 1q32. To confirm the regional localization of the genes for nicein subunits of 100 and 125 kDa, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on normal lymphocytes from two unrelated normal males and fibroblast cell lines GM00257 (karyotype 46,XX, t(1;2)(1q32;2p23)) and GM004088 (46,XY,t(1;4)(q32;p16)). It was thus confirmed that the genes for nicein 125- and 100-kDa subunits are localized at 1q32 and 1q25-q31, respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Delineation of a deletion region critical for corpus callosal abnormalities in chromosome 1q43–q44

    PubMed Central

    Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Erez, Ayelet; Bay, Carolyn; Pettigrew, Anjana; Lalani, Seema R; Herman, Kristin; Graham, Brett H; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata JM; Proud, Monica; Craigen, William J; Hopkins, Bobbi; Kozel, Beth; Plunkett, Katie; Hixson, Patricia; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2012-01-01

    Submicroscopic deletions involving chromosome 1q43–q44 result in cognitive impairment, microcephaly, growth restriction, dysmorphic features, and variable involvement of other organ systems. A consistently observed feature in patients with this deletion are the corpus callosal abnormalities (CCAs), ranging from thinning and hypoplasia to complete agenesis. Previous studies attempting to delineate the critical region for CCAs have yielded inconsistent results. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with deletions of chromosome 1q43–q44. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. Four patients had CCAs, and shared the smallest region of overlap that contains only three protein coding genes, CEP170, SDCCAG8, and ZNF238. One patient with a small deletion involving SDCCAG8 and AKT3, and another patient with an intragenic deletion of AKT3 did not have any CCA, implying that the loss of these two genes is unlikely to be the cause of CCA. CEP170 is expressed extensively in the brain, and encodes for a protein that is a component of the centrosomal complex. ZNF238 is involved in control of neuronal progenitor cells and survival of cortical neurons. Our results rule out the involvement of AKT3, and implicate CEP170 and/or ZNF238 as novel genes causative for CCA in patients with a terminal 1q deletion. PMID:21934713

  10. Linkage of morbid obesity with polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q31 in a three-generation Canadian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.D.; Bulman, D.E.; Ebers, G.C. |

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder affecting Western societies. An estimated 3.7 million Canadians are considered to be overweight, a condition associated with hypertension, accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes and a host of other medical problems. We have identified a 3 generation kindred in which morbid obesity appears to segregate in an autosomal dominant manner. All individuals were examined. Mass (kg) and heights (m) were measured in order to determine a body mass index (BMI) for each individual. Those individuals with BMI of greater than or equal to 30.0 were designated as affected. In the pedigree studied 25 individuals met this criteria and 12 of these were morbidly obese (BMI greater or equal to 40.0). A search of candidate genes proved unfruitful. A linkage study was initiated. All individuals in the pedigree were genotyped for microsatellite markers which were spaced every 20 centimorgans (cM). Positive evidence of linkage was detected with markers which map to 1q31-32 (lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05). Notably, strong effects for fatness in pigs have been found on pig chromosome 4 which has synteny with human chromosome 1q21-32. We are currently attempting to refine the position of this gene using linkage analysis with other microsatellite markers from this region of the genome. In addition we are screening other families in which obesity segregates for linkage to 1q31.

  11. Pre- and Postnatal Analysis of Chromosome 1q44 Deletion in Agenesis of Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mitesh; Srikanth, Ambika; Kadandale, Jayarama; Hegde, Sridevi

    2015-01-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the common brain abnormalities and also a common finding in children with mental disability. ACC is heterogeneous and can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a syndrome. ACC can be accurately identified by the absence of the cavum septum pallucidum and tear drop effect of the lateral ventricle after 18 weeks of pregnancy in an ultrasound scan. Genetic causes have been attributed to 30-45% of cases with ACC. Submicroscopic deletions of 1q43q44 have been reported in several cases of ACC. The AKT3 gene, mapped to 1q44, is required for the development of the callosum and brain size. It is considered to be a candidate gene for ACC. We studied a total of 22 cases with ACC, in pre- and postnatal samples using FISH probes. None of the samples showed a deletion in 1q44, implying that the AKT3 gene may not be associated with ACC. PMID:26648835

  12. Genetic and physical mapping of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome on chromosome 1q42-43.

    PubMed

    Barrat, F J; Auloge, L; Pastural, E; Lagelouse, R D; Vilmer, E; Cant, A J; Weissenbach, J; Le Paslier, D; Fischer, A; de Saint Basile, G

    1996-09-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a severe autosomal recessive condition, features of which are partial oculocutaneous albinism, increased susceptibility to infections, deficient natural killer cell activity, and the presence of large intracytoplasmic granulations in various cell types. Similar genetic disorders have been described in other species, including the beige mouse. On the basis of the hypothesis that the murine chromosome 13 region containing the beige locus was homologous to human chromosome 1, we have mapped the CHS locus to a 5-cM interval in chromosome segment 1q42.1-q42.2. The highest LOD score was obtained with the marker D1S235 (Zmax = 5.38; theta = 0). Haplo-type analysis enabled us to establish D1S2680 and D1S163, respectively, as the telomeric and the centromeric flanking markers. Multipoint linkage analysis confirms the localization of the CHS locus in this interval. Three YAC clones were found to cover the entire region in a conting established by YAC end-sequence characterization and sequence-tagged site mapping. The YAC contig contains all genetic markers that are nonrecombinant for the disease in the nine CHS families studied. This mapping confirms the previous hypothesis that the same gene defect causes CHS in human and beige pheno-type in mice and provides a genetic framework for the identification of candidate genes.

  13. Genetic and physical mapping of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome on chromosome 1q42-43.

    PubMed Central

    Barrat, F. J.; Auloge, L.; Pastural, E.; Lagelouse, R. D.; Vilmer, E.; Cant, A. J.; Weissenbach, J.; Le Paslier, D.; Fischer, A.; de Saint Basile, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a severe autosomal recessive condition, features of which are partial oculocutaneous albinism, increased susceptibility to infections, deficient natural killer cell activity, and the presence of large intracytoplasmic granulations in various cell types. Similar genetic disorders have been described in other species, including the beige mouse. On the basis of the hypothesis that the murine chromosome 13 region containing the beige locus was homologous to human chromosome 1, we have mapped the CHS locus to a 5-cM interval in chromosome segment 1q42.1-q42.2. The highest LOD score was obtained with the marker D1S235 (Zmax = 5.38; theta = 0). Haplo-type analysis enabled us to establish D1S2680 and D1S163, respectively, as the telomeric and the centromeric flanking markers. Multipoint linkage analysis confirms the localization of the CHS locus in this interval. Three YAC clones were found to cover the entire region in a conting established by YAC end-sequence characterization and sequence-tagged site mapping. The YAC contig contains all genetic markers that are nonrecombinant for the disease in the nine CHS families studied. This mapping confirms the previous hypothesis that the same gene defect causes CHS in human and beige pheno-type in mice and provides a genetic framework for the identification of candidate genes. PMID:8751864

  14. Genetic and physical mapping of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome on chromosome 1q42-43

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, F.J.; Auloge, L.; Pastural, E.

    1996-09-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a severe autosomal recessive condition, features of which are partial oculocutaneous albinism, increased susceptibility to infections, deficient natural killer cell activity, and the presence of large intracytoplasmic granulations in various cell types. Similar genetic disorders have been described in other species, including the beige mouse. On the basis of the hypothesis that the murine chromosome 13 region containing the beige locus was homologous to human chromosome 1, we have mapped the CHS locus to a 5-cM interval in chromosome segment 1q42.1-q42.2. The highest LOD score was obtained with the marker D1S235 (Z{sub max} = 5.38; {theta} = 0). Haplotype analysis enabled us to establish D1S2680 and D1S163, respectively, as the telomeric and the centromeric flanking markers. Multipoint linkage analysis confirms the localization of the CHS locus in this interval. Three YAC clones were found to cover the entire region in a contig established by YAC end-sequence characterization and sequence-tagged site mapping. The YAC contig contains all genetic markers that are nonrecombinant for the disease in the nine CHS families studied. This mapping confirms the previous hypothesis that the same gene defect causes CHS in human and beige phenotype in mice and provides a genetic framework for the identification of candidate genes. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Evidence of the presence of both oncogene and tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 1q in primary breast cancer, together with a genic dosage effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bieche, I.; Champeme, M.H.; Lidereau, R.

    1994-09-01

    Alterations of the long arm of chromosome 1 are the most consistent cytogenetic abnormalities found in human breast carcinoma. We examined genetic alterations on chromosome 1q in 124 human breast tumors, using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers mapping to the long (thirteen markers) and the short arm (four markers). Imbalance of heterozygosity at one or more loci on the long arm was observed in 80 (65%) of the 124 tumors. Among these 80 tumor DNAs, 38 showed a gain of heterozygosity (GOH), 16 a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and one both GOH and LOH, at each locus on the long arm, indicating that 55 tumor DNAs had a gain and/or loss of the entire long arm of chromosome 1. Detailed alteration mapping of the other 25 tumors showing partial alterations of chromosome 1q identified two distinct altered regions: a smallest common deleted region at 1q21-31 and a smallest common overrepresented region at 1q41-q44. The results suggest that both oncogene(s) and tumor suppressor gene(s) are present on chromosome 1q and are associated with breast carcinomas. Moreover, the frequent loss or gain of a whole copy of chromosome 1q suggests that involvement a genic dosage effect in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  16. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Linkage localization of TGFB2 and the human homeobox gene GLX1 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.Y.; Murray, J.C. ); Purchio, A.F. )

    1993-02-01

    We have identified genetic variation within two human genes, transforming growth factor-[beta]2 (TGFB2) and the homeobox gene HB24 (HLX1). Reported here are four human RFLPs and SSCPs for TGFB2 in humans and gorillas. In addition, we describe an RFLP and a SSCP for HLX1. We propose that HLX1 is the human homologue of the mouse homeobox gene Hlx based on extensive sequence homology between the genes and the close proximity of both genes to TGFB2 in their respective species. We also report the chromosomal localization of HLX1 to the long arm of human chromosome 1. Finally, utilizing the polymorphisms described for TGFB2 and HLX1, we have been able to localize these genes within a framework map of the distal long arm of chromosome 1 and to study the linkage relationship between these two genes. Pairwise linkage analysis shows that these two genes are linked, with a recombination fraction of 3.1% and a lod score of 14.49. 27 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. A gene involved in control of human cellular senescence on human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, P.J.; Pereira-Smith, O.M. ); Annab, L.A.; Barrett, J.C. )

    1994-04-01

    Normal cells in culture exhibit limited division potential and have been used as a model for cellular senescence. In contrast, tumor-derived or carcinogen- or virus-transformed cells are capable of indefinite division. Fusion of normal human diploid fibroblasts with immortal human cells yielded hybrids having limited life spans, indicating that cellular senescence was dominant. Fusions of various immortal human cell lines with each other led to the identification of four complementation groups for indefinite division. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human chromosome 1 could complement the recessive immortal defect of human cell lines assigned to one of the four complementation groups. Using microcell fusion, the authors introduced a single normal human chromosome 1 into immortal human cell lines representing the complementation groups and determined that it caused loss of proliferative potential of an osteosarcoma-derived cell line (TE85), a cytomegalovirus-transformed lung fibroblast cell line (CMV-Mj-HEL-1), and a Ki-ras[sup +]-transformed derivative of TE85 (143B TK[sup [minus

  19. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Role of SV40 Integration Site at Chromosomal Interval 1q21.1 in Immortalized CRL2504 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Kaur, Gurpreet; Zhawar, Vikramjit K.; Zimonjic, Drazen B.; Popescu, Nicholas C.; Kandpal, Raj P.; Athwal, Raghbir S.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied a functional gene transfer strategy to demonstrate the importance of viral integration site in cellular immortalization. The large tumor antigen of SV40 is capable of extending the cellular life span by sequestering tumor suppressor proteins pRB and p53 in virus-transformed human cells. Although SV40-LT is essential, it is not sufficient for cellular immortalization, suggesting that additional alterations in cellular genes are required to attain infinite proliferation. We demonstrate here that the disruption of human chromosomal interval at 1q21.1, by SV40 integration, can be an essential step for cellular immortalization. The transfer of a 150Kb bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone, RP364B14, corresponding to viral integration site in CRL2504 cells, reverted their immortal phenotype. Interestingly, the BAC transfer clones of CRL-2504 cells displayed characteristics of either senescence as shown by β-galactosidase activity or apoptosis as revealed by positive staining with M30 cytoDeath antibody. The SV40 integration at 1q21.1, in the vicinity of epidermal differentiation complex genes, resulted in the down-regulation of the filaggrin (FLG) gene that is part of the epidermal differentiation complex. FLG gene expression was restored to its normal levels in BAC transfer senescent and apoptotic clones. Our results suggest that the disruption of native genomic sequence by SV40 may alter expression of genes involved in senescence and apoptosis by modulating chromatin structure. These studies imply that identification of genes located in the vicinity of viral integration sites in human cancers may be helpful in developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19789346

  1. Identification of a Linkage Disequilibrium Block in Chromosome 1q Associated With BMD in Premenopausal White Women

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Koller, Daniel L; Curry, Leah R; Lai, Dongbing; Xuei, Xiaoling; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Doheny, Kimberly F; Edenberg, Howard J; Hui, Siu L; Foroud, Tatiana; Peacock, Munro; Econs, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. A major determinant of osteoporotic fractures is peak BMD obtained during young adulthood. We previously reported linkage of chromosome 1q (LOD = 4.3) with variation in spinal areal BMD in healthy premenopausal white women. In this study, we used a two-stage genotyping approach to identify genes in the linked region that contributed to the variation of femoral neck and lumbar spine areal BMD. In the first stage, 654 SNPs across the linked region were genotyped in a sample of 1309 premenopausal white women. The most significant evidence of association for lumbar spine (p = 1.3 × 10−6) was found with rs1127091 in the GATAD2B gene. In the second stage, 52 SNPs around this candidate gene were genotyped in an expanded sample of 1692 white women. Significant evidence of association with spinal BMD (p < 10−5), and to a lesser extent with femoral neck BMD, was observed with eight SNPs within a single 230-kb linkage disequilibrium (LD) block. The most significant SNP (p = 3.4 × 10−7) accounted for >2.5% of the variation in spinal BMD in these women. The 230-kb LD block contains 11 genes, but because of the extensive LD, the specific gene(s) contributing to the variation in BMD could not be determined. In conclusion, the significant association between spinal BMD and SNPs in the 230-kb LD block in chromosome 1q indicates that genetic factor(s) in this block plays an important role in peak spinal BMD in healthy premenopausal white women. PMID:18505370

  2. Identification of a linkage disequilibrium block in chromosome 1q associated with BMD in premenopausal white women.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Koller, Daniel L; Curry, Leah R; Lai, Dongbing; Xuei, Xiaoling; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Doheny, Kimberly F; Edenberg, Howard J; Hui, Siu L; Foroud, Tatiana; Peacock, Munro; Econs, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. A major determinant of osteoporotic fractures is peak BMD obtained during young adulthood. We previously reported linkage of chromosome 1q (LOD = 4.3) with variation in spinal areal BMD in healthy premenopausal white women. In this study, we used a two-stage genotyping approach to identify genes in the linked region that contributed to the variation of femoral neck and lumbar spine areal BMD. In the first stage, 654 SNPs across the linked region were genotyped in a sample of 1309 premenopausal white women. The most significant evidence of association for lumbar spine (p = 1.3 x 10(-6)) was found with rs1127091 in the GATAD2B gene. In the second stage, 52 SNPs around this candidate gene were genotyped in an expanded sample of 1692 white women. Significant evidence of association with spinal BMD (p < 10(-5)), and to a lesser extent with femoral neck BMD, was observed with eight SNPs within a single 230-kb linkage disequilibrium (LD) block. The most significant SNP (p = 3.4 x 10(-7)) accounted for >2.5% of the variation in spinal BMD in these women. The 230-kb LD block contains 11 genes, but because of the extensive LD, the specific gene(s) contributing to the variation in BMD could not be determined. In conclusion, the significant association between spinal BMD and SNPs in the 230-kb LD block in chromosome 1q indicates that genetic factor(s) in this block plays an important role in peak spinal BMD in healthy premenopausal white women. PMID:18505370

  3. Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q 25-32). Clinical and endocrine features with a long term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Maggio, M C; Iachininoto, R; Arena, V; Liotta, A

    2003-02-01

    Deletion of long arm of chromosome 1 (1q-) is a rare condition with malformations of many organs (central nervous system, heart, kidney, etc.). Authors describe a young girl characterised by 1q 25-32 deletion, with severe intra- and extrauterine growth retardation, facial dismorphisms, multiple organ malformations. The patient is followed for a long-term clinical and endocrine evaluation, with evidence of hypoplastic hypophysis and multiple endocrine deficiency.

  4. Chromosomal anomalies at 1q, 3, 16q, and mutations of SIX1 and DROSHA genes underlie Wilms tumor recurrences.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Filippo; Ciceri, Sara; Gamba, Beatrice; Torri, Federica; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Macciardi, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Perotti, Daniela

    2016-02-23

    Approximately half of children suffering from recurrent Wilms tumor (WT) develop resistance to salvage therapies. Hence the importance to disclose events driving tumor progression/recurrence. Future therapeutic trials, conducted in the setting of relapsing patients, will need to prioritize targets present in the recurrent lesions. Different studies identified primary tumor-specific signatures associated with poor prognosis. However, given the difficulty in recruiting specimens from recurrent WTs, little work has been done to compare the molecular profile of paired primary/recurrent diseases. We studied the genomic profile of a cohort of eight pairs of primary/recurrent WTs through whole-genome SNP arrays, and investigated known WT-associated genes, including SIX1, SIX2 and micro RNA processor genes, whose mutations have been recently proposed as associated with worse outcome. Through this approach, we sought to uncover anomalies characterizing tumor recurrence, either acquired de novo or already present in the primary disease, and to investigate whether they overlapped with known molecular prognostic signatures. Among the aberrations that we disclosed as potentially acquired de novo in recurrences, some had been already recognized in primary tumors as associated with a higher risk of relapse. These included allelic imbalances of chromosome 1q and of chromosome 3, and CN losses on chromosome 16q. In addition, we found that SIX1 and DROSHA mutations can be heterogeneous events (both spatially and temporally) within primary tumors, and that their co-occurrence might be positively selected in the progression to recurrent disease. Overall, these results provide new insights into genomic and genetic events underlying WT progression/recurrence. PMID:26802027

  5. Chromosomal anomalies at 1q, 3, 16q, and mutations of SIX1 and DROSHA genes underlie Wilms tumor recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Beatrice; Torri, Federica; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Macciardi, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Perotti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of children suffering from recurrent Wilms tumor (WT) develop resistance to salvage therapies. Hence the importance to disclose events driving tumor progression/recurrence. Future therapeutic trials, conducted in the setting of relapsing patients, will need to prioritize targets present in the recurrent lesions. Different studies identified primary tumor-specific signatures associated with poor prognosis. However, given the difficulty in recruiting specimens from recurrent WTs, little work has been done to compare the molecular profile of paired primary/recurrent diseases. We studied the genomic profile of a cohort of eight pairs of primary/recurrent WTs through whole-genome SNP arrays, and investigated known WT-associated genes, including SIX1, SIX2 and micro RNA processor genes, whose mutations have been recently proposed as associated with worse outcome. Through this approach, we sought to uncover anomalies characterizing tumor recurrence, either acquired de novo or already present in the primary disease, and to investigate whether they overlapped with known molecular prognostic signatures. Among the aberrations that we disclosed as potentially acquired de novo in recurrences, some had been already recognized in primary tumors as associated with a higher risk of relapse. These included allelic imbalances of chromosome 1q and of chromosome 3, and CN losses on chromosome 16q. In addition, we found that SIX1 and DROSHA mutations can be heterogeneous events (both spatially and temporally) within primary tumors, and that their co-occurrence might be positively selected in the progression to recurrent disease. Overall, these results provide new insights into genomic and genetic events underlying WT progression/recurrence. PMID:26802027

  6. A prenatally ascertained de novo terminal deletion of chromosomal bands 1q43q44 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a female fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, Carolina; Christopoulou, Georgia; Alexandrou, Angelos; Evangelidou, Paola; Donoghue, Jacqueline; Konstantinidou, Anastasia E; Velissariou, Voula

    2015-01-01

    Terminal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 1 result in a postnatally recognizable disorder described as 1q43q44 deletion syndrome. The size of the deletions and the resulting phenotype varies among patients. However, some features are common among patients as the chromosomal regions included in the deletions. In the present case, ultrasonography at 22 weeks of gestation revealed choroid plexus cysts (CPCs) and a single umbilical artery (SUA) and therefore amniocentesis was performed. Chromosomal analysis revealed a possible terminal deletion in 1q and high resolution array CGH confirmed the terminal 1q43q44 deletion and estimated the size to be approximately 8 Mb. Following termination of pregnancy, performance of fetopsy allowed further clinical characterization. We report here a prenatal case with the smallest pure terminal 1q43q44 deletion, that has been molecularly and phenotypically characterized. In addition, to our knowledge this is the first prenatal case reported with 1q13q44 terminal deletion and Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS). Our findings combined with review data from the literature show the complexity of the genetic basis of the associated syndrome.

  7. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3′ non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3′ non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis. PMID:26017655

  8. FISH-Based Analysis of Clonally Derived CHO Cell Populations Reveals High Probability for Transgene Integration in a Terminal Region of Chromosome 1 (1q13)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwei; Gao, Xiaoping; Peng, Rui; Zhang, Sheng; Fu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A basic goal in the development of recombinant proteins is the generation of cell lines that express the desired protein stably over many generations. Here, we constructed engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO-S) with a pCHO-hVR1 vector that carried an extracellular domain of a VEGF receptor (VR) fusion gene. Forty-five clones with high hVR1 expression were selected for karyotype analysis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and G-banding, we found that pCHO-hVR1 was integrated into three chromosomes, including chromosomes 1, Z3 and Z4. Four clones were selected to evaluate their productivity under non-fed, non-optimized shake flask conditions. The results showed that clones 1 and 2 with integration sites on chromosome 1 revealed high levels of hVR1 products (shake flask of approximately 800 mg/L), whereas clones 3 and 4 with integration sites on chromosomes Z3 or Z4 had lower levels of hVR1 products. Furthermore, clones 1 and 2 maintained their productivity stabilities over a continuous period of 80 generations, and clones 3 and 4 showed significant declines in their productivities in the presence of selection pressure. Finally, pCHO-hVR1 localized to the same region at chromosome 1q13, the telomere region of normal chromosome 1. In this study, these results demonstrate that the integration of exogenous hVR1 gene on chromosome 1, band q13, may create a high protein-producing CHO-S cell line, suggesting that chromosome 1q13 may contain a useful target site for the high expression of exogenous protein. This study shows that the integration into the target site of chromosome 1q13 may avoid the problems of random integration that cause gene silencing or also overcome position effects, facilitating exogenous gene expression in CHO-S cells. PMID:27684722

  9. Chromosome 1q gain and tenascin-C expression are candidate markers to define different risk groups in pediatric posterior fossa ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Araki, Asuka; Chocholous, Monika; Gojo, Johannes; Dorfer, Christian; Czech, Thomas; Heinzl, Harald; Dieckmann, Karin; Ambros, Inge M; Ambros, Peter F; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial classic (WHO grade II) and anaplastic (WHO grade III) ependymomas are among the most common tumors in pediatric patients and have due to frequent recurrences and late relapses a relatively poor outcome. The impact of histopathological grading on patient outcome is controversial and therefore, molecular prognostic and predictive markers are needed to improve patient outcome. To date, the most promising candidate marker is chromosome 1q gain, which has been associated in independent studies with adverse outcome. Furthermore, gene expression and methylation profiles revealed distinct molecular subgroups in the supratentorial and posterior fossa (PF) compartment and Laminin alpha-2 (LAMA2) and Neural Epidermal Growth Factor Like-2 (NELL2) were suggested as surrogate markers for the two PF subgroups PF-EPN-A and PF-EPN-B. PF-EPN-A tumors were also characterized by tenascin-C (TNC) expression and tenascin-C has been suggested as candidate gene on 9q, involved in tumor progression. Therefore, we have analyzed the status of chromosome 1q, TNC, LAMA2, and NELL2 expression in a series of pediatric PF ependymomas in terms of their frequency, associations among themselves, and clinical parameters, as well as their prognostic impact. We confirm the negative prognostic impact of 1q gain and TNC expression and could classify PF ependymomas by these two markers into three molecular subgroups. Tumors with combined 1q gain and TNC expression had the poorest, tumors without 1q gain and TNC expression had a favorable and TNC positive 1q non-gained cases had an intermediate outcome. We found also differences in age and tumor grade in the three subgroups and thus, provide evidence that PF pediatric ependymomas can be divided by chromosome 1q status and TNC expression in three molecular subgroups with distinct clinico-pathological features. These analyses require only few amounts of tumor tissue, are broadly available in the routine clinical neuropathological setting and

  10. Association between Variants on Chromosome 4q25, 16q22 and 1q21 and Atrial Fibrillation in the Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Marek; Franaszczyk, Maria; Kozluk, Edward; Lodzinski, Piotr; Piatkowska, Agnieszka; Broda, Grażyna; Ploski, Rafal; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide studies have shown that polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25, 16q22 and 1q21 correlate with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the distribution of these polymorphisms differs significantly among populations. Objective To test the polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25, 16q22 and 1q21 in a group of patients (pts) that underwent catheter ablation of AF. Methods Four hundred and ten patients with AF that underwent pulmonary vein isolation were included in the study. Control group (n = 550) was taken from healthy population, matched for age, sex and presence of hypertension. All participants were genotyped for the presence of the rs2200733, rs10033464, rs17570669, rs3853445, rs6838973 (4q25), rs7193343 (16q22) and rs13376333 (1q21) polymorphisms. Results All the polymorphisms tested (except rs17570669) correlated significantly with AF in univariate analysis (p values between 0.039 for rs7193343 and 2.7e-27 for rs2200733), with the odds ratio (OR) 0.572 and 0.617 for rs3853445 and rs6838973, respectively (protective role) and OR 1.268 to 3.52 for the other polymorphisms. All 4q25 SNPs tested but rs3853445 were independently linked with AF in multivariate logistic regression analysis. In haplotype analysis six out of nine 4q25 haplotypes were significantly linked with AF. The T allele of rs2200733 favoured increased number of episodes of AF per month (p = 0.045) and larger pulmonary vein diameter (recessive model, p = 0.032). Conclusions Patients qualified for catheter ablation of AF have a significantly higher frequency of 4q25, 16q22 and 1q21 variants than the control group. The T allele of rs2200733 favours larger pulmonary veins and increased number of episodes of AF. PMID:21760908

  11. Physical mapping of the chromosome 7 breakpoint region in an SLOS patient with t(7;20)X(q32.1;q13.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, T.L.; Wallace, M.R.; Scherer, S.W.

    1997-01-31

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. SLOS has an associated defect in cholesterol biosynthesis, but the molecular genetic basis of this condition has not yet been elucidated. Previously our group reported a patient with a de novo balanced translocation [t(7;20)(q32.1;q13.2)] fitting the clinical and biochemical profile of SLOS. Employing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), a 1.8 Mb chromosome 7-specific yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was identified which spanned the translocation breakpoint in the reported patient. The following is an update of the on-going pursuit to physically and genetically map the region further, as well as the establishment of candidate genes in the 7q32.1 breakpoint region. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Novel Association of Odontogenic Myxoma with Constitutional Chromosomal 1q21 Microduplication: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Best-Rocha, Alejandro; Patel, Kalyani; Hicks, John; Edmonds, Joseph L; Paldino, Michael J; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare, benign, and locally aggressive tumor. It tends to occur in the posterior maxilla and mandible and is often associated with root resorption and perforation of cortex. Histopathologically, there is a proliferation of spindle, bipolar, and stellate cells, with bland nuclei within a myxoid to infrequently fibromyxoid extracellular matrix. Long, thin residual bony trabeculae are often seen floating within the spindle cell proliferation because of the infiltrating nature of this tumor, and these trabeculae impart a "soap bubble" or "tennis-racket" radiologic appearance. No syndromic association of OM has been reported. Although similar histopathologic features are shared with cardiac myxoma and soft tissue myxoma, mutations in the GNAS gene have not been identified in OM to date, and only 2 of 17 OMs showed mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. In this report, we describe a case of OM in a patient with constitutional 1q21 microduplication, a locus that harbors genes encoding certain proteins in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, including G-protein-coupled receptors and 1 phosphodiesterase interacting protein. Review of the literature describes the key clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of 1q21 microduplication, as well as highlighting the role of PKA signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of myxomas in general. PMID:26230961

  13. A genome-wide association study of venous thromboembolism identifies risk variants in chromosomes 1q24.2 and 9q

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Petterson, Tanya M.; de Andrade, Mariza

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease-susceptibility genes. Patients/Methods We performed in silico genome wide association (GWAS) analyses using genotype data imputed to ~2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from adults with objectively-diagnosed VTE (n=1503), and controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n=1459; discovery population). SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance were replicated in a separate population (VTE cases, n=1407; controls, n=1418). Genes associated with VTE were resequenced. Results Seven SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10-8); four on chromosome 1q24.2 (F5 rs6025 [Factor V Leiden], BLZF1 rs7538157, NME7 rs16861990 and SLC19A2 rs2038024) and three on chromosome 9q34.2 (ABO rs2519093 [ABO intron 1], rs495828, rs8176719 [ABO blood type O allele]). The replication study confirmed a significant association of F5, NME7, and ABO with VTE. However, F5 was the main signal on 1q24.2 as only ABO SNPs remained significantly associated with VTE after adjusting for F5 rs6025. This 1q24.2 region was shown to be inherited as a haplotype block. ABO resequencing identified 15 novel single nucleotide variations (SNV) in ABO intron 6 and the ABO 3’ UTR that were strongly associated with VTE (P < 10-4) and belonged to three distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks; none were in LD with ABO rs8176719 or rs2519093. Our sample size provided 80% power to detect odds ratios=2.0 and 1.51 for minor allele frequencies=0.05 and 0.5, respectively (α=1 × 10-8; 1% VTE prevalence). Conclusions Aside from F5 rs6025, ABO rs8176719 and rs2519093, and F2 rs1799963, additional common and high VTE-risk SNPs among whites are unlikely. PMID:22672568

  14. Frequent gain of chromosome band 1q21 in plasma-cell dyscrasias detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: incidence increases from MGUS to relapsed myeloma and is related to prognosis and disease progression following tandem stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hanamura, Ichiro; Stewart, James P; Huang, Yongsheng; Zhan, Fenghuang; Santra, Madhumita; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Hollmig, Klaus; Zangarri, Maurizio; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; van Rhee, Frits; Cavallo, Federica; Burington, Bart; Crowley, John; Tricot, Guido; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2006-09-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization we investigated amplification of chromosome band 1q21 (Amp1q21) in more than 500 untreated patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS; n = 14), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM; n = 31), and newly diagnosed MM (n = 479) as well as 45 with relapsed MM. The frequency of Amp1q21 was 0% in MGUS, 45% in SMM, 43% in newly diagnosed MM, and 72% in relapsed MM (newly diagnosed versus relapsed MM, P < .001). Amp1q21 was detected in 10 of 12 patients whose disease evolved to active MM compared with 4 of 19 who remained with SMM (P < .001). Patients with newly diagnosed MM with Amp1q21 had inferior 5-year event-free/overall survival compared with those lacking Amp1q21 (38%/52% versus 62%/78%, both P < .001). Thalidomide improved 5-year EFS in patients lacking Amp1q21 but not in those with Amp1q21 (P = .004). Multivariate analysis including other major predictors revealed that Amp1q21 was an independent poor prognostic factor. Relapsed patients who had Amp1q21 at relapse had inferior 5-year postrelapse survival compared with those lacking Amp1q21 at relapse (15% versus 53%, P = .027). The proportion of cells with Amp1q21 and the copy number of 1q21 tended to increase at relapse compared with diagnosis. Our data suggest that Amp1q21 is associated with both disease progression and poor prognosis. PMID:16705089

  15. Chromosomal localization of the human V3 pituitary vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR3) to 1q32

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau-Merck, M.F.; Derre, J.; Berger, R.

    1995-11-20

    Vasopressin exerts its physiological effects on liver metabolism, fluid osmolarity, and corticotrophic response to stress through a set of at least three receptors, V1a, V2, and V3 (also called V1b), respectively. These receptors constitute a distinct group of the superfamily of G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. When bound to vasopressin, they couple to G proteins activating phospholipase C for the V1a and V3 types and adenylate cyclase for the V2. The vasopressin receptor subfamily also includes the receptor for oxytocin, a structurally related hormone that signals through the activation of phospholipase C. The chromosomal position of the V2 receptor gene has been assigned to Xq28-qter by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrids, whereas the oxytocin receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 3q26.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The chromosomal location of the V1a gene is currently unknown. We recently cloned the cDNA and the gene coding for the human pituitary-specific V3 receptor (HGMW-approved symbol AVPR3). We report here the chromosomal localization of this gene by two distinct in situ hybridization techniques using radioactive and fluorescent probes. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Recombinational and physical mapping of the locus for primary open-angle glaucoma (GLC1A) on chromosome 1q23-q25

    SciTech Connect

    Belmouden, A.; Adam, M.F.; De Dinechin, S.D. |

    1997-02-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized countries. A locus for juvenile-onset POAG, GLC1A, has been mapped to 1q21-q31 in a 9-cM interval. With recombinant haplotypes, we have now reduced the GLC1A interval to a maximum of 3 cM, between the D1S452/NGA1/D1S210 and NGA5 loci. These loci are 2.8 Mb apart on a 4.7-Mb contig that we have completed between the D1S2851 and D1S218 loci and that includes 96 YAC clones and 48 STSs. The new GLC1A interval itself is now covered by 25 YACs, 30 STSs, and 16 restriction enzyme site landmarks. The lack of a NotI site suggests that the region has few CpG islands and a low gene content. This is compatible with its predominant cytogenetic location on the 1q24 G-band. Finally, we have excluded important candidate genes, including genes coding for three ATPases (AMB1, ATP2B4, ATPlA2), an ion channel (VDAC4), antithrombine III (AT3), and prostaglandin synthase (PTGS2). Our results provide a basis to identify the GLC1A gene. 59 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Analysis of chromosome 1q42.2-43 in 152 families with high risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M; Chakrabarti, L; Stanford, J L; Goode, E L; Kolb, S; Schuster, E F; Buckley, V A; Shook, M; Hood, L; Jarvik, G P; Ostrander, E A

    1999-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two families with prostate cancer were analyzed for linkage to markers spanning a 20-cM region of 1q42.2-43, the location of a putative prostate cancer-susceptibility locus (PCAP). No significant evidence for linkage was found, by use of both parametric and nonparametric tests, in our total data set, which included 522 genotyped affected men. Rejection of linkage may reflect locus heterogeneity or the confounding effects of sporadic disease in older-onset cases; therefore, pedigrees were stratified into homogeneous subsets based on mean age at diagnosis of prostate cancer and number of affected men. Analyses of these subsets also detected no significant evidence for linkage, although LOD scores were positive at higher recombination fractions, which is consistent with the presence of a small proportion of families with linkage. The most suggestive evidence of linkage was in families with at least five affected men (nonparametric linkage score of 1.2; P=.1). If heterogeneity is assumed, an estimated 4%-9% of these 152 families may show linkage in this region. We conclude that the putative PCAP locus does not account for a large proportion of these families with prostate cancer, although the linkage of a small subset is compatible with these data. PMID:10090894

  18. Studies of TBX4 and chromosome 17q23.1q23.2: an uncommon cause of nonsyndromic clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    Lu, W.; Bacino, C. A.; Richards, B.S.; Alvarez, C.; VanderMeer, J.E.; Vella, M.; Ahituv, N.; Sikka, N.; Dietz, F.R.; Blanton, S.H.; Hecht, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Clubfoot is a common birth defect characterized by inward posturing and rigid downward displacement of one or both feet. The etiology of syndromic forms of clubfoot is varied and the causes of isolated clubfoot are not well understood. A microduplication of 2.2 Mb on chromosome 17q23.1q23.2 which includes T-box 4 (TBX4), a hindlimb-specific gene, and 16 other genes was recently identified in 3 of 66 families reported as nonsyndromic clubfoot, but additional non-foot malformations place them in the syndromic clubfoot category. Our study assesses whether variation in or around TBX4 contributes to nonsyndromic clubfoot. To determine whether this microduplication was a common cause of nonsyndromic clubfoot, 605 probands (from 148 multiplex and 457 simplex families) with nonsyndromic clubfoot were evaluated by copy number and oligonucleotide array CGH testing modalities. Only one multiplex family (0.68%) that had 16 with clubfoot and 9 with other foot anomalies, had a 350kb microduplication, which included the complete duplication of TBX4 and NACA2 and partial duplication of BRIP1. The microduplication was transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern and all with the microduplication had a range of phenotypes from short wide feet and toes to bilateral clubfoot. Minimal evidence was found for an association between TBX4 and clubfoot and no pathogenic sequence variants were identified in the two known TBX4 hindlimb enhancer elements. Altogether, these results demonstrate that variation in and around the TBX4 gene and the 17q23.1q23.2 microduplication are not a frequent cause of this common orthopedic birth defect and narrows the 17q23.1q23.2 nonsyndromic clubfoot-associated region. PMID:22678995

  19. Human cardiac troponin T: Identification of fetal isoforms and assignment of the TNNT2 locus to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, P.J.; Farza, H.; Yacoub, M.H.; Barton, P.J.R. ); MacGeoch, C.; Spurr, N.K. ); Wade, R. ); Gahlmann, R. )

    1994-05-15

    The troponin complex is located on the thin filament of striated muscle and is composed of three component polypeptides: Troponin T, troponin I, and troponin C. Three troponin T genes have been described on the basis of molecular cloning in humans and other vertebrates. These are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and encode the troponin T isoforms expressed in cardiac muscle, slow skeletal muscle, and fast skeletal muscle, respectively. Each of these genes is subject to alternative splicing, resulting in the production of multiple tissue-specific isoforms. The authors have cloned cDNAs encoding human cardiac troponin T from adult heart and have used these to demonstrate that multiple cardiac troponin T mRNAs are present in the human fetal heart, resulting from alternative splicing in the 5[prime] coding region of the gene. Hybridization of the cloned cDNAs to genomic DNA identifies a single-copy gene, and using somatic cell hybrid analysis, the authors have mapped the corresponding gene locus (designated TNNT2) to the long arm of chromosome 1 (1cen-qter). 52 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Inversa acne (hidradenitis suppurativa): a case report and identification of the locus at chromosome 1p21.1-1q25.3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Wang, Pei-Guang; Cui, Yong; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Yu-Hui; Lin, Da; Zhang, Kai-Yue; Liang, Yan-Hua; Sun, Liang-Dan; Yan, Kai-Lin; Xiao, Feng-Li; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2006-06-01

    Acne inversa (hidradenitis suppurativa) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease characterized by recurrent draining sinuses and abscesses, predominantly in skin folds that carry terminal hairs and apocrine glands. The genetic basis for this disease is unknown. In this study, we performed a genome-wide scan in a four-generation Chinese family to map the chromosome location of the responsible gene. We first identified a locus at chromosome 1p21.1-1q25.3 with the maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 3.26 at the marker D1S2624 (at recombination fraction=0.00). The other two-point LOD scores >/=3 were observed at markers D1S2695, D1S2726, D1S252, and D1S2777. Haplotype analysis localized this locus to a 76 Mb region flanked by D1S248 and D1S2711. This is the first locus for the inversa acne and will be a starting point towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  1. Frequent chromosomal gains in recurrent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Brieger, Jürgen; Gosepath, Jan; Wierzbicka, Magorzata; Sokolov, Maxim; Roth, Yehudah; Szyfter, Witold; Bittinger, Fernando; Mann, Wolf J

    2007-06-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor, mostly affecting adolescent males. Some patients develop recurrences after surgery independently of completeness of removal. Only very limited data concerning underlying chromosomal changes are available. We therefore analyzed samples of 22 JNAs, including six recurrences, with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Additionally, quantitative image cytometry was used for measurement of DNA aneuploidy in representative samples. Of the 13 primary JNAs without later recurrence, DNA gains were identified on autosomes in only two samples. Four patients with one or two recurrences were included in the study; for one of these, no material of the primary tumor was available for analysis. Looking at autosomes, two of the three available primaries displayed multiple gains; in one of those, two additional losses were observed. Multiple gains were detected in two of the four first recurrences, but none in the two second recurrences. Across all 22 samples, gains occurred in more than one sample on chromosomes arms 1p, 9q, 10q, 12q, 16p, 16q, 17q, 19p, 19q, 20q, and 22q. Losses were found in a single case exclusively on chromosome 4. Sex chromosomes were frequently affected in both primary tumors and recurrences. There was no correlation among tumor staging, age, and DNA amplification. No DNA aneuploidy was detected, a finding in accordance with the generally benign characteristics of JNAs. Our observations suggest that in JNA the activation of oncogenes is more likely than the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Autosomal gains in the primary tumor should be further evaluated as markers for a potentially increased risk of recurrence after surgical removal in this entity.

  2. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into chromosome 15 is associated with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a boy with a t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2) translocation.

    PubMed

    Sakazume, Satoru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Yuki; Harada, Naoki; Nakanishi, Katsumi; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Endoh, Kazushi; Sohma, Ryoichi; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro; Kubota, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an essential mechanism in females that compensates for the genome imbalance between females and males. It is known that XCI can spread into an autosome of patients with X;autosome translocations. The subject was a 5-year-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-like features including hypotonia, hypo-genitalism, hypo-pigmentation, and developmental delay. G-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization, BrdU-incorporated replication, human androgen receptor gene locus assay, SNP microarrays, ChIP-on-chip assay, bisulfite sequencing, and real-time RT-PCR were performed. Cytogenetic analyses revealed that the karyotype was 46,XY,der(X)t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2),-15. In the derivative chromosome, the X and half of the chromosome 15 segments showed late replication. The X segment was maternal, and the chromosome 15 region was paternal, indicating its post-zygotic origin. The two chromosome 15s had a biparental origin. The DNA methylation level was relatively high in the region proximal from the breakpoint, and the level decreased toward the middle of the chromosome 15 region; however, scattered areas of hypermethylation were found in the distal region. The promoter regions of the imprinted SNRPN and the non-imprinted OCA2 genes were completely and half methylated, respectively. However, no methylation was found in the adjacent imprinted gene UBE3A, which contained a lower density of LINE1 repeats. Our findings suggest that XCI spread into the paternal chromosome 15 led to the aberrant hypermethylation of SNRPN and OCA2 and their decreased expression, which contributes to the PWS-like features and hypo-pigmentation of the patient. To our knowledge, this is the first chromosome-wide methylation study in which the DNA methylation level is demonstrated in an autosome subject to XCI.

  3. Partial 1q Duplications and Associated Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Marcos L.M.; Baroneza, José E.; Teixeira, Patricia; Medina, Cristina T.N.; Cordoba, Mara S.; Versiani, Beatriz R.; Roese, Liege L.; Freitas, Erika L.; Fonseca, Ana C.S.; dos Santos, Maria C.G.; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Rosenberg, Carla; Oliveira, Silviene F.; Ferrari, Iris; Mazzeu, Juliana F.

    2016-01-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 1 are rare. Distal duplications are the most common and have been reported as either pure trisomy or unbalanced translocations. The paucity of cases with pure distal 1q duplications has made it difficult to delineate a partial distal trisomy 1q syndrome. Here, we report 2 patients with overlapping 1q duplications detected by G-banding. Array CGH and FISH were performed to characterize the duplicated segments, exclude the involvement of other chromosomes and determine the orientation of the duplication. Patient 1 presents with a mild phenotype and carries a 22.5-Mb 1q41q43 duplication. Patient 2 presents with a pure 1q42.13qter inverted duplication of 21.5 Mb, one of the smallest distal 1q duplications ever described and one of the few cases characterized by array CGH, thus contributing to a better characterization of distal 1q duplication syndrome. PMID:27022331

  4. Partial 1q Duplications and Associated Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marcos L M; Baroneza, José E; Teixeira, Patricia; Medina, Cristina T N; Cordoba, Mara S; Versiani, Beatriz R; Roese, Liege L; Freitas, Erika L; Fonseca, Ana C S; Dos Santos, Maria C G; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Rosenberg, Carla; Oliveira, Silviene F; Ferrari, Iris; Mazzeu, Juliana F

    2016-02-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 1 are rare. Distal duplications are the most common and have been reported as either pure trisomy or unbalanced translocations. The paucity of cases with pure distal 1q duplications has made it difficult to delineate a partial distal trisomy 1q syndrome. Here, we report 2 patients with overlapping 1q duplications detected by G-banding. Array CGH and FISH were performed to characterize the duplicated segments, exclude the involvement of other chromosomes and determine the orientation of the duplication. Patient 1 presents with a mild phenotype and carries a 22.5-Mb 1q41q43 duplication. Patient 2 presents with a pure 1q42.13qter inverted duplication of 21.5 Mb, one of the smallest distal 1q duplications ever described and one of the few cases characterized by array CGH, thus contributing to a better characterization of distal 1q duplication syndrome. PMID:27022331

  5. Gene mapping of Usher syndrome type IIa: Localization of the gene to a 2.1-cM segment on chromosome 1q41

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberling, W.J.; Weston, M.D.; Ing, P.S.; Connolly, C.; Sumegi, J.; Moeller, C.; Aarem, A. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Martini, A.; Milani, M.

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II is associated with hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa but not with any vestibular problems. It is known to be genetically heterogeneous, and one locus (termed USH2A) has been linked to chromosome 1q41. In an effort to refine the localization of USH2A, the genetic map of the region between and adjacent to the marker loci previously recognized as flanking USH2A (D1S70 and PPOL) is updated. Analysis of marker data on 68 Usher II families places the USH2A gene into a 2.1-cM region between the markers D1S237 and D1S229. The gene for transforming growth factor {beta}2 (TGFB2) and the gene for the homeodomain box (HLX1) are both eliminated as candidates for USH2A, by virtue of their localization outside these flanking markers. The earlier finding of genetic heterogeneity was confirmed in six new families, and the proportion of unlinked Usher II families is estimated at 12.5%. The placement of the USH2A gene into this region will aid in the physical mapping and isolation of the gene itself. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Fine mapping of juvenile primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) on 1q21-q31 and exculsion of adult-POAG from the respective region

    SciTech Connect

    Child, A.; Sarfarazi, M.; Crick, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile POAG is an autosomal dominant eye disorder which has recently been mapped to 1q21-q24, in a region of 14-23 cM. We report here linkage analysis of 9 microsatellite repeat markers spanning this region in families from England, Scotland and Sardinia. We have observed no recombinants with D1S433 (Z=2.86) and obtained looser linkage with D1S196 ({theta}=0.03; Z=6.38), D1S431 ({theta}=0.14; Z=2.74), D1S210 ({theta}=0.06; Z=1.32), D1S452 ({theta}=0.18; Z=0.729) and D1S242 ({theta}=0.08; Z=2.29). In one family, a critical recombinant in an affected individual localizes the J-POAG locus between D1S452 and D1S242 in a 3 cM region. However, other recombinants in two normal individuals from different families suggests that J-POAG may be localized in a 1 cM distance between D1S433 and D1S431. These unaffected individuals have well passed the age-of-onset in their respective pedigrees. This result suggests that either these two recombinant individuals are gene carriers (i.e., non-penetrants) or there are more than one gene in this region causing the same disease. The possibility of the latter is less likely, since in addition to a total of 4 non-penetrant individuals in our panel, other such cases have also been reported previously. This in turn suggests that the precentage of non-penetrant cases in J-POAG may be considerably higher than it was previously appreciated. Study of 14 families with adult-onset POAG revealed no segregation with the above-mentioned linked microsatellite markers. Our findings confirm, for the first time, that adult-POAG is genetically distinct from the J-POAG. Genetic linkage study of adult families with additional STRPs is currently in progress.

  7. Systems biology analysis of hepatitis C virus infection reveals the role of copy number increases in regions of chromosome 1q in hepatocellular carcinoma metabolism.

    PubMed

    Elsemman, Ibrahim E; Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Soliman, Taysir H; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide healthcare problem; however, traditional treatment methods have failed to cure all patients, and HCV has developed resistance to new drugs. Systems biology-based analyses could play an important role in the holistic analysis of the impact of HCV on hepatocellular metabolism. Here, we integrated HCV assembly reactions with a genome-scale hepatocyte metabolic model to identify metabolic targets for HCV assembly and metabolic alterations that occur between different HCV progression states (cirrhosis, dysplastic nodule, and early and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)) and healthy liver tissue. We found that diacylglycerolipids were essential for HCV assembly. In addition, the metabolism of keratan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate was significantly changed in the cirrhosis stage, whereas the metabolism of acyl-carnitine was significantly changed in the dysplastic nodule and early HCC stages. Our results explained the role of the upregulated expression of BCAT1, PLOD3 and six other methyltransferase genes involved in carnitine biosynthesis and S-adenosylmethionine metabolism in the early and advanced HCC stages. Moreover, GNPAT and BCAP31 expression was upregulated in the early and advanced HCC stages and could lead to increased acyl-CoA consumption. By integrating our results with copy number variation analyses, we observed that GNPAT, PPOX and five of the methyltransferase genes (ASH1L, METTL13, SMYD2, TARBP1 and SMYD3), which are all located on chromosome 1q, had increased copy numbers in the cancer samples relative to the normal samples. Finally, we confirmed our predictions with the results of metabolomics studies and proposed that inhibiting the identified targets has the potential to provide an effective treatment strategy for HCV-associated liver disorders. PMID:27040643

  8. Regional chromosomal assignments for four members of the myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2 (MEF2) gene family to human chromosomes 15q, 19q, 5q, and 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, G.M.; Funanage, V.L.; Krahe, R.

    1994-09-01

    MEF2 genes belong to the MADS box family of transcription factors and encode proteins that bind as homo- and heterodimers to a consensus CTA(T/A){sub 4}TAG/A sequence present in the regulatory regions of numerous muscle-specific and growth inducible genes. Sequence analysis of human MEF2 cDNA clones suggested that they arose from alternatively spliced transcripts of four different genes, termed MEF2A-D. We have mapped the MEF2 genes to human chromosomal regions by identifying unique sequences in the 5{prime} or 3{prime} untranslated regions of each clone and using these sequences as PCR primers on the DNA of a human-rodent hybrid clone panel informative for different regions of the human genome. The localization of MEF2A to chromosome 15q, MEF2B to 19q, MEF2C to 5q, and MEF2D to 1q verifies the existence of at least four distinct loci for members of this gene family. The same PCR primers were used to identify individual YAC clones for each gene. Such isolated clones are now being used for fluorescence in situ hybridization for high resolution chromosomal regional assignment.

  9. Homozygosity mapping of the gene for Chediak-Higashi syndrome to chromosome 1q42-q44 in a segment of conserved synteny that includes the mouse beige locus (bg)

    SciTech Connect

    Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Oh, Jangsuk; Karim, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypopigmentation or oculocutaneous albinism and severe immunologic deficiency with neutropenia and lack of natural killer (NK) cell function. Most patients die in childhood from pyogenic infections or an unusual lymphoma-like condition. A hallmark of the disorder is giant inclusion bodies seen in all granule-containing cells, including granulocytes, lymphocytes, melanocytes, mast cells, and neurons. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities occur in the beige mouse, which thus has been suggested to be homologous to human CHS. High-resolution genetic mapping has indicated that the bg gene region of mouse chromosome 13 is likely homologous to the distal portion of human chromosome 1q. Accordingly, we carried out homozygosity mapping using markers derived from distal human chromosome 1q in four inbred families or probands with CHS. Our results indicate that the human CHS gene maps to an 18.8-cM interval in chromosome segment 1q42-q44 and that human CHS therefore is very likely homologous to mouse bg. 43 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Relatives with opposite chromosome constitutions, rec(10)dup(10p)inv(10)(p15.1q26.12) and rec(10)dup(10q)inv(10)(p15.1q26.12), due to a familial pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Ciuladaite, Zivile; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Utkus, Algirdas; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2014-01-01

    Large pericentric inversions in chromosome 10 are rare chromosomal aberrations with only few cases of familial inheritance. Such chromosomal rearrangements may lead to production of unbalanced gametes. As a result of a recombination event in the inversion loop, 2 recombinants with duplicated and deficient chromosome segments, including the regions distal to the inversion, may be produced. We report on 2 relatives in a family with opposite terminal chromosomal rearrangements of chromosome 10, i.e. rec(10)dup(10p)inv(10) and rec(10)dup(10q)inv(10), due to familial pericentric inversion inv(10)(p15.1q26.12). Based on array-CGH results, we characterized the exact genomic regions involved and compared the clinical features of both patients with previous reports on similar pericentric inversions and regional differences within 10p and 10q. The fact that both products of recombination are viable indicates a potentially high recurrence risk of unbalanced offspring. This report of unbalanced rearrangements in chromosome 10 in 2 generations confirms the importance of screening for terminal imbalances in patients with idiopathic intellectual disability by molecular cytogenetic techniques such as FISH, MLPA or microarrays. It also underlines the necessity for FISH to define structural characteristics of such cryptic intrachromosomal rearrangements and the underlying cytogenetic mechanisms.

  11. Allelic expression imbalance screening of genes in chromosome 1q21–24 region to identify functional variants for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ashis K.; Sharma, Neeraj K.; Elbein, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated SNPs are more likely to be expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). The allelic expression imbalance (AEI) analysis is the measure of relative expression between two allelic transcripts and is the most sensitive measurement to detect cis-regulatory effects. We performed AEI screening to detect cis-regulators for genes expressed in transformed lymphocytes of 190 Caucasian (CA) and African American (AA) subjects to identify functional variants for T2D susceptibility in the chromosome 1q21–24 region of linkage. Among transcribed SNPs studied in 115 genes, significant AEI (P < 0.001) occurred in 28 and 30 genes in CA and AA subjects, respectively. Analysis of the effect of selected AEI-SNPs (≥10% mean AEI) on total gene expression further established the cis-eQTLs in thioesterase superfamily member-4 (THEM4) (rs13320, P = 0.027), and IGSF8 (rs1131891, P = 0.02). Examination of published genome-wide association data identified significant associations (P < 0.01) of three AEI-SNPs with T2D in the DIAGRAM-v3 dataset. Six AEI single nucleotide polymorphisms, including rs13320 (P = 1.35E-04) in THEM4, were associated with glucose homeostasis traits in the MAGIC dataset. Evaluation of AEI-SNPs for association with glucose homeostasis traits in 611 nondiabetic subjects showed lower AIRG (P = 0.005) in those with TT/TC genotype for rs13320. THEM4 expression in adipose was higher (P = 0.005) in subjects carrying the T allele; in vitro analysis with luciferase construct confirmed the higher expression of the T allele. Resequencing of THEM4 exons in 192 CA subjects revealed four coding nonsynonymous variants, but did not explain transmission of T2D in 718 subjects from 67 Caucasian pedigrees. Our study indicates the role of a cis-regulatory SNP in THEM4 that may influence T2D predisposition by modulating glucose homeostasis. PMID:23673729

  12. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  13. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 1q21.1 microduplication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions 1q21.1 microduplication 1q21.1 microduplication Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 1q21.1 microduplication is a chromosomal change in which a ...

  15. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; Muraldharan, K.; Pettay, D.

    1994-09-01

    Failure to establish the left-right embryonic axis results in abnormalities of laterality; situs solitus is replaced by situs inversus totalis or various degrees of heterotaxy involving the heart, great vessels, lungs, liver, spleen, and/or bowel. Laterality syndromes are likely to be genetically heterogeneous although specific human genes have not been identified. Families with dominant, recessive, and X-linked laterality syndromes have been reported as well as individuals with situs abnormalities and chromosome rearrangements. The latter offer the possibility of narrowing the gene search to specific chromosome regions. A recent report described an infant with polysplenia syndrome and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 11 [46,XX,inv(11)(q13q25)pat]. We report the second case of a child with laterality abnormalities and a chromosome rearrangement involving a similar breakpoint on chromosome 11. The proband is a 6 y/o female with mental retardation, dysmorphic features, pulmonic stenosis, asplenia, Hirschsprung disease, and a balanced, reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13,1;q13.13)pat]. Using DNA probes we have excluded uniparental disomy for chromosomes 11 and 20. If a gene for determination of laterality lies in the 11q13 region, the proband`s abnormalities could be the result of her receiving an allele disrupted by the paternal translocation as well as a mutant allele from her mother. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the segregation of maternal chromosome 11 markers in the proband and her balanced carrier and non-carrier siblings.

  16. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a balanced reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; May, K.M.; Blackston, R.D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1996-02-02

    We present a 6-year-old girl with a balanced 11;20 translocation [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)pat], asplenia, pulmonic stenosis, Hirschsprung disease, minor anomalies, and mental retardation. This case represents the second report of an individual with situs abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement involving a breakpoint at 11q13. Segregation analysis of markers in the 11q13 region in the proposita and her phenotypically normal carrier sibs did not show a unique combination of maternal and paternal alleles in the patient. We discuss several possible explanations for the simultaneous occurrence of situs abnormalities and a balanced 11;20 translocation. These include (1) chance, (2) a further chromosome rearrangement in the patient, (3) gene disruption and random situs determination, and (4) gene disruption plus transmission of a recessive or imprinted allele from the mother. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Preliminary evidence for linkage to chromosome 1q31-32, 10q23.3, and 16p13.3 in a South African cohort with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan; Cupido, Cinda-Lee; Ramesar, Raj Kumar

    2007-04-01

    Although the genetic variants predisposing to the development of bipolar disorder (BPD) have yet to be conclusively identified, replicated reports of linkage to particular chromosomal regions have been encouraging. Here we carried out a non-parametric linkage analysis of nine of these candidate loci in a unique South African sample of 47 BPD pedigrees (N = 350). Three polymorphic markers per region of interest (3 x 9) were typed in a Caucasian cohort of Afrikaner and British origin. Statistically significant evidence for linkage was obtained at 1q31-32, 10q23.3, and 16p13.3 with maximum NPL scores of 2.52, 2.01, and 1.84, respectively. Our results add to the growing evidence that these chromosomal regions harbor genetic variants that play a role in the development of bipolar spectrum illness. Negative results were obtained for the remaining six candidate loci, possibly due to limited statistical power.

  18. Isolation of region-specific cosmids by hybridization with microdissection clones from human chromosome 10q11. 1-q21. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Karakawa, Katsu; Takami, Koji; Fujita, Shoichi Osaka Univ. Medical School, Fukushima-ku, Osaka ); Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takai, Shin-ichiro; Nishisho, Isamu ); Jones, C. ); Ohta, Tohru; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio )

    1993-08-01

    A region-specific plasmid library composed of 20,000 recombinants was constructed by microdissection of human chromosome 10 (10q11.2-q21.1) and subsequent amplification with the primer-linker method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hybridization with total human DNA showed that 32 of 217 microclones studied contained highly repetitive sequences. Further analysis of the remaining 185 microclones proved that 43 microclones, each having an insert longer than 200 bp, contained unique sequences of human chromosome 10 origin. Twenty-five microclones randomly selected from the 43 were used directly as probes to isolate corresponding cosmid clones, resulting in 32 cosmids corresponding to 14 microclones. Of the 25 cosmids that could be mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization, 24 proved to originate from the microdissected or adjacent region (10p11.2-q22.3)and 1 from a rather distal region (10q24.3-q25.1). In addition, 15 of the 32 cosmids revealed restriction fragment length polymorphisms, including 1 with a variable number of tandem repeats marker. The microdissection library and the obtained cosmids are valuable resources for constructing high-resolution physical and linkage maps of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10, where the gene predisposing to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) has been mapped. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Assignment of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP12) to chromosome 1q31-q32.1 in an inbred and genetically heterogeneous disease population

    SciTech Connect

    Van Soest, S.; Ingeborgh Van Den Born, L.; Bergen, A.A.B.

    1994-08-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a large family segregating for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), originating from a genetically isolated population in The Netherlands. Within the family, clinical heterogeneity was observed, with a major section of the family segregating arRP with characteristic para-arteriolar preservation of the retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE). In the remainder of the arRP patients no PPRPE was found. Initially, all branches of the family were analyzed jointly, and linkage was found between the marker F13B, located at 1q31-q32.1, and RP12 ({Zeta}{sub max} = 4.99 at 8% recombination). Analysis of linkage heterogeneity between five branches of the family yielded significant evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity within this family, coinciding with the observed clinical differences. Multipoint analysis, carried out in the branches that showed linkage, favored the locus order 1cen-D1S158-(F13B, RP12)-D1S53-1qter ({Zeta}{sub max} = 9.17). The finding of a single founder allele associated with the disease phenotype supports this localization. This study reveals that even in a large family, apparently segregating for a single disease entity, genetic heterogeneity can be detected and resolved successfully. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Homozygosity and linkage-disequilibrium mapping of the syndrome of congenital hypoparathyroidism, growth and mental retardation, and dysmorphism to a 1-cM interval on chromosome 1q42-43.

    PubMed Central

    Parvari, R; Hershkovitz, E; Kanis, A; Gorodischer, R; Shalitin, S; Sheffield, V C; Carmi, R

    1998-01-01

    The syndrome of hypoparathyroidism associated with growth retardation, developmental delay, and dysmorphism (HRD) is a newly described, autosomal recessive, congenital disorder with severe, often fatal consequences. Since the syndrome is very rare, with all parents of affected individuals being consanguineous, it is presumed to be caused by homozygous inheritance of a single recessive mutation from a common ancestor. To localize the HRD gene, we performed a genomewide screen using DNA pooling and homozygosity mapping for apparently unlinked kindreds. Analysis of a panel of 359 highly polymorphic markers revealed linkage to D1S235. The maximum LOD score obtained was 4.11 at a recombination fraction of 0. Analysis of three additional markers-GGAA6F06, D1S2678, and D1S179-in a 2-cM interval around D1S235 resulted in LOD scores >3. Analysis of additional chromosome 1 markers revealed evidence of genetic linkage disequilibrium and place the HRD locus within an approximately 1-cM interval defined by D1S1540 and D1S2678 on chromosome 1q42-43. PMID:9634513

  1. Six S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21: Identification of two genes coding for the two previously unreported calcium-binding proteins S100D and S100E

    SciTech Connect

    Engelkamp, D.; Schaefer, B.W.; Heizmann, C.W. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Erne, P. )

    1993-07-15

    The human genome contains large regions that are highly structured. Sequence-related members of multigene families are often found in a clustered organization. Here the authors describe a previously unrecognized gene cluster composed of genes coding for calcium-binding proteins of the S100 family. The linkage of six S100 genes was established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and a contiguous DNA sequence of 15 kilobases containing the full coding region of four different S100 genes was characterized. This is the tightest mammalian gene cluster discovered so far to the authors' knowledge. Two additional S100 genes are located within the cluster, both of which exhibit unique structural features when compared with other S100 genes. The product of S100E is cysteine-rich, whereas that of S100D contains a long hydrophobic N-terminal tail. The gene cluster was assigned to chromosome 1q21, one of the bands showing rearrangements in neoplasms at high frequency. The deregulated expression of some S100 genes in the cluster during tumor progression suggests that chromosomal abnormalities may influence the expression of S100 genes in late stages of cancer, particularly in association with the formation of metastases. 43 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C.

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Genome-wide study of familial juvenile hyperuricaemic (gouty) nephropathy (FJHN) indicates a new locus, FJHN3, linked to chromosome 2p22.1-p21.

    PubMed

    Piret, Sian E; Danoy, Patrick; Dahan, Karin; Reed, Anita A C; Pryce, Karena; Wong, William; Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G; Müller, Thomas; Kotanko, Peter; Lhotta, Karl; Devuyst, Olivier; Brown, Matthew A; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2011-01-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricaemic (gouty) nephropathy (FJHN), is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a reduced fractional excretion of urate, and progressive renal failure. FJHN is genetically heterogeneous and due to mutations of three genes: uromodulin (UMOD), renin (REN) and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1β) on chromosomes 16p12, 1q32.1, and 17q12, respectively. However, UMOD, REN or HNF-1β mutations are found in only approximately 45% of FJHN probands, indicating the involvement of other genetic loci in approximately 55% of probands. To identify other FJHN loci, we performed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome-wide linkage analysis, in six FJHN families in whom UMOD, HNF-1β and REN mutations had been excluded. Parametric linkage analysis using a 'rare dominant' model established linkage in five of the six FJHN families, with a LOD score >+3, at 0% recombination, between FJHN and SNPs at chromosome 2p22.1-p21. Analysis of individual recombinants in two unrelated affected individuals defined a approximately 5.5 Mbp interval, flanked telomerically by SNP RS372139 and centromerically by RS896986 that contained the locus, designated FJHN3. The interval contains 28 genes, and DNA sequence analysis of the most likely candidate, solute carrier family 8 member 1 (SLC8A1), did not identify any abnormalities in the FJHN3 probands. FJHN3 is likely located within a approximately 5.5 Mbp interval on chromosome 2p22.1-p21, and identifying the genetic abnormality will help to further elucidate mechanisms predisposing to gout and renal failure.

  5. Juvenile polyposis of infancy associated with paracentric inversion and deletion of chromosome 10 in a Hispanic patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vargas-González, Roberto; de la Torre-Mondragón, Luis; Aparicio-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Paniagua-Morgan, Froylan; López-Hernández, Gerardo; Garrido-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Nuñez-Barrera, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis of infancy is a rare genetic disorder, involving multiple hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract, which usually has a very aggressive clinical course and is often fatal. It is characterized by early onset (during the 1st months of life) and by diffuse juvenile polyposis with anemia, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, diarrhea, rectal prolapse, intussusception, protein-losing enteropathy, starvation, and malnutrition. There is a hypothesis that mutation of the tumor-suppressor genes BMPR1A and PTEN, located on the long arm of chromosome 10, is associated with the development of this disease. Medical treatment for this disorder is challenging and should be conservative whenever possible. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with juvenile polyposis of infancy who eventually died from mesenteric artery thrombosis during surgical colectomy. Karyotype of the patient showed a paracentric inversion in 10q and a deletion in 10p. We will briefly comment on some genetic considerations of this disease.

  6. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in chromosome 6p12-p11: Locus heterogeneity and recombinations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.; Serratosa, J.M.

    1996-06-14

    We recently analyzed under homogeneity a large pedigree from Belize with classic juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). After a genome-wide search with 146 microsatellites, we obtained significant linkage between chromosome 6p markers, D6S257 and D6S272, and both convulsive and EEG traits of JME. Recombinations in two affected members defined a 40 cM JME region flanked by D6S313 and D6S258. In the present communication, we explored if the same chromosome 6p11 microsatellites also have a role in JME mixed with pyknoleptic absences. We allowed for heterogeneity during linkage analyses. We tested for heterogeneity by the admixture test and looked for more recombinations. D6S272, D6S466, D6S294, and D6S257 were significantly linked (Z{sub max} > 3.5) to the clinical and EEG traits of 22 families, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 70% penetrance. Pairwise Z{sub max} were 4.230 for D6S294 ({theta}{sub m=f} at 0.133) and 4.442 for D6S466 ({theta}{sub m=f} at 0.111). Admixture test (H{sub 2} vs. H{sub 1}) was significant (P = 0.0234 for D6S294 and 0.0128 for D6S272) supporting the hypotheses of linkage with heterogeneity. Estimated proportion of linked families, {alpha}, was 0.50 (95% confidence interval 0.05-0.99) for D6S294 and D6S272. Multipoint analyses and recombinations in three new families narrowed the JME locus to a 7 cM interval flanked by D6S272 and D6S257. 44 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Chromosome 16 microdeletion in a patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Taschner, P.E.M.; Vos, N. de; Thompson, A.D.; Callen, D.F.; Doggett, N.; Mole, S.E.; Dooley, T.P.; Barth, P.G.; Breuning, M.H. |

    1995-03-01

    The gene that is involved in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), or Batten disease - CLN3 - has been localized to 16p12, and the mutation shows a strong association with alleles of microsatellite markers D16S298, D16S299, and D16S288. Recently, haplotype analysis of a Batten patient from a consanguineous relationship indicated homozygosity for a D16S298 null allele. PCR analysis with different primers on DNA from the patient and his family suggests the presence of a cytogenetically undetectable deletion, which was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The microdeletion is embedded in a region containing chromosome 16-specific repeated sequences. However, putative candidates for CLN3, members of the highly homologous sulfotransferase gene family, which are also present in this region in several copies, were not deleted in the patient. If the microdeletion in this patient is responsible for Batten disease, then we conclude that the sulfotransferase genes are probably not involved in JNCL. By use of markers and probes flanking D15S298, the maximum size of the microdeletion was determined to be {approximately}29 kb. The microdeletion may affect the CLN3 gene, which is expected to be in close proximity to D16S298. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Association of the IL-10 Gene Family Locus on Chromosome 1 with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoui, Raja; Bryant, Annette; Hinks, Anne; Ursu, Simona; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Thomson, Wendy; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Woo, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background The cytokine IL-10 and its family members have been implicated in autoimmune diseases and we have previously reported that genetic variants in IL-10 were associated with a rare group of diseases called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to fine map genetic variants within the IL-10 cytokine family cluster on chromosome 1 using linkage disequilibrium (LD)-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) approach with imputation and conditional analysis to test for disease associations. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three tSNPs were tested for association between Caucasian paediatric cohorts [219 systemic JIA (sJIA), 187 persistent oligoarticular JIA (pOJIA), and 139 extended OJIA (eOJIA) patients], and controls (Wellcome Trust control cohort, WTCCC2). Significant association with sJIA was detected at rs1400986 in the promoter of IL-20 (odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.21–1.93; p = 0.0004), but in no other subtypes. Imputation analysis identified additional associated SNPs for pOJIA at IL-20 and IL-24, including a rare, functional, missense variant at IL-24 with a p = 0.0002. Penalised logistic regression analysis with HyperLasso and conditional analysis identified several further associations with JIA subtypes. In particular, haplotype analysis refined the sJIA association, with a joint effect at rs1400986 and rs4129024 in intron 1 of MAPKAPK2 (p = 3.2E−5). For pOJIA, a 3-SNP haplotype including rs1878672 in intron 3 of IL-10 showed evidence for association (p = 0.0018). In eOJIA, rs10863962 (3′UTR of FCAMR) and rs12409577 (intron of IL-19) haplotype showed some evidence of association (p = 0.0003). Conclusions This study supports previous association of IL-20 with sJIA. Haplotype analyses provided stronger association signals than single point analyses, while a penalised logistic regression approach also suggested multiple independent association signals. Replication studies are required to confirm or

  9. Duplication of C7orf58, WNT16 and FAM3C in an Obese Female with a t(7;22)(q32.1;q11.2) Chromosomal Translocation and Clinical Features Resembling Coffin-Siris Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Qiu, Jun; Magrane, Gregg; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Zanko, Andrea; Golabi, Mahin; Chehab, Farid F.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the t(7;22)(q32;q11.2) chromosomal translocation in an obese female with coarse features, short stature, developmental delay and a hypoplastic fifth digit. While these clinical features suggest Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS), we excluded a CSS diagnosis by exome sequencing based on the absence of deleterious mutations in six chromatin-remodeling genes recently shown to cause CSS. Thus, molecular characterization of her translocation could delineate genes that underlie other syndromes resembling CSS. Comparative genomic hybridization microarrays revealed on chromosome 7 the duplication of a 434,682 bp region that included the tail end of an uncharacterized gene termed C7orf58 (also called CPED1) and spanned the entire WNT16 and FAM3C genes. Because the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 22 did not disrupt any apparent gene, her disorder was deemed to result from the rearrangement on chromosome 7. Mapping of yeast and bacterial artificial chromosome clones by fluorescent in situ hybridization on chromosome spreads from this patient showed that the duplicated region and all three genes within it were located on both derivative chromosomes 7 and 22. Furthermore, DNA sequencing of exons and splice junctional regions from C7orf58, WNT16 and FAM3C revealed the presence of potential splice site and promoter mutations, thereby augmenting the detrimental effect of the duplicated genes. Hence, dysregulation and/or disruptions of C7orf58, WNT16 and FAM3C underlie the phenotype of this patient, serve as candidate genes for other individuals with similar clinical features and could provide insights into the physiological role of the novel gene C7orf58. PMID:23300646

  10. Overlap of Juvenile polyposis syndrome and Cowden syndrome due to de novo chromosome 10 deletion involving BMPR1A and PTEN: implications for treatment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Adebisi; Weeth-Feinstein, Lauren A; Stettner, Amy; Caldera, Freddy; Weiss, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a patient with a severe juvenile polyposis phenotype, due to a de novo deletion of chromosome 10q22.3-q24.1. He was initially diagnosed with Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) at age four after presenting with hematochezia due to multiple colonic juvenile polyps. He then re-presented at 23 years with recurrent hematochezia from juvenile polyps in his ileoanal pouch. He is one of the earliest reported cases of JPS associated with a large deletion of chromosome 10. Since his initial diagnosis of JPS further studies have confirmed an association between JPS and mutations in BMPR1A in chromosome band 10q23.2, which is in close proximity to PTEN. Mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome (CS) and other PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Due to the chromosome 10 deletion involving contiguous portions of BMPR1A and PTEN in our patient, he may be at risk for CS associated cancers and features, in addition to the polyps associated with JPS. This case presents new challenges in developing appropriate surveillance algorithms to account for the risks associated with each syndrome and highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and transitional care between pediatric and adult gastroenterology for patients with hereditary polyposis syndromes.

  11. Deletion (11)(q14.1q21)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Lazarus, K.H.; Ritchie, E.J.L.; Bell, A.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors report on a 4-year-old girl with moderate development delay, horseshoe kidney, bilateral duplication of the ureters with right upper pole obstruction, hydronephrosis and nonfunction, and subsequent Wilms tumor of the right lower pole. She had an interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 involving the region 11(q14.1q21). 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Chromosome loci vary by juvenile myoclonic epilepsy subsyndromes: linkage and haplotype analysis applied to epilepsy and EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves.

    PubMed

    Wight, Jenny E; Nguyen, Viet-Huong; Medina, Marco T; Patterson, Christopher; Durón, Reyna M; Molina, Yolly; Lin, Yu-Chen; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Ochoa, Adriana; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Tanaka, Miyabi; Bai, Dongsheng; Aftab, Sumaya; Bailey, Julia N; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), the most common genetic epilepsy, remains enigmatic because it is considered one disease instead of several diseases. We ascertained three large multigenerational/multiplex JME pedigrees from Honduras with differing JME subsyndromes, including Childhood Absence Epilepsy evolving to JME (CAE/JME; pedigree 1), JME with adolescent onset pyknoleptic absence (JME/pA; pedigree 2), and classic JME (cJME; pedigree 3). All phenotypes were validated, including symptomatic persons with various epilepsies, asymptomatic persons with EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves, and asymptomatic persons with normal EEGs. Two-point parametric linkage analyses were performed with 5185 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on individual pedigrees and pooled pedigrees using four diagnostic models based on epilepsy/EEG diagnoses. Haplotype analyses of the entire genome were also performed for each individual. In pedigree 1, haplotyping identified a 34 cM region in 2q21.2-q31.1 cosegregating with all affected members, an area close to 2q14.3 identified by linkage (Z max = 1.77; pedigree 1). In pedigree 2, linkage and haplotyping identified a 44 cM cosegregating region in 13q13.3-q31.2 (Z max = 3.50 at 13q31.1; pooled pedigrees). In pedigree 3, haplotyping identified a 6 cM cosegregating region in 17q12. Possible cosegregation was also identified in 13q14.2 and 1q32 in pedigree 3, although this could not be definitively confirmed due to the presence of uninformative markers in key individuals. Differing chromosome regions identified in specific JME subsyndromes may contain separate JME disease-causing genes, favoring the concept of JME as several distinct diseases. Whole-exome sequencing will likely identify a CAE/JME gene in 2q21.2-2q31.1, a JME/pA gene in 13q13.3-q31.2, and a cJME gene in 17q12. PMID:27066514

  13. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  14. Localization of cofilin gene to 1q25

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, W.Y.; Deng, H.X.; Hentati, H.A.

    1994-09-01

    Cofilin is a 21 kD actin-binding protein which has recently been identified as an important intracellular messenger that activates resting T-lymphocytes for clonal growth and expression of their functional repertoires. To determine the chromosomal location of the cofilin gene, a cDNA fragment, 276 bp downstream from initial codon to poly A tail, was used as a probe to screen a human genomic DNA lamda phage library. Four positive phage clones were isolated from 400,000 phage plaques. The size of the genomic inserts ranged from 14 kb to 20 kb. The DNA from these phage clones were labeled with digoxigenin and hybridized to metaphase chromosome preparations. The hybridization signals were detected with sheep anti-digoxigenin and FITC-conjugated rabbit anti-sheep antibodies. Fluorescence signal was amplified once with FITC-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibody. The results indicate that cofilin gene is located at chromosome 1q25.

  15. Evidence of an epigenetic origin for high-risk 1q21 copy number aberrations in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Erming; Heuck, Christoph J.; Johann, Donald J.; Epstein, Joshua; Swanson, Charles M.; Lukacs, Janet L.; Binz, Regina Lichti; Johnson, Marian; Sammartino, Gael; Zangari, Maurizio; Davies, Faith E.; van Rhee, Frits; Morgan, Gareth J.; Barlogie, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a B-cell malignancy stratified in part by cytogenetic abnormalities, including the high-risk copy number aberrations (CNAs) of +1q21 and 17p−. To investigate the relationship between 1q21 CNAs and DNA hypomethylation of the 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin, we treated in vitro peripheral blood cultures of 5 patients with balanced constitutional rearrangements of 1q12 and 5 controls with the hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Using G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and spectral karyotyping, we identified structural aberrations and copy number gains of 1q21 in the treated cells similar to those found in patients with cytogenetically defined high-risk disease. Aberrations included 1q12 triradials, amplifications of regions juxtaposed to 1q12, and jumping translocations 1q12. Strikingly, all 5 patients with constitutional 1q12 rearrangements showed amplifications on the derivative chromosomes distal to the inverted or translocated 1q12 region, including MYCN in 1 case. At the same time, no amplification of the 1q21 region was found when the 1q12 region was inverted or absent. These findings provide evidence that the hypomethylation of the 1q12 region can potentially amplify any genomic region juxtaposed to it and mimic CNAs found in the bone marrow of patients with high-risk disease. PMID:25943786

  16. Evidence of an epigenetic origin for high-risk 1q21 copy number aberrations in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Tian, Erming; Heuck, Christoph J; Johann, Donald J; Epstein, Joshua; Swanson, Charles M; Lukacs, Janet L; Binz, Regina Lichti; Johnson, Marian; Sammartino, Gael; Zangari, Maurizio; Davies, Faith E; van Rhee, Frits; Morgan, Gareth J; Barlogie, Bart

    2015-06-11

    Multiple myeloma is a B-cell malignancy stratified in part by cytogenetic abnormalities, including the high-risk copy number aberrations (CNAs) of +1q21 and 17p(-). To investigate the relationship between 1q21 CNAs and DNA hypomethylation of the 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin, we treated in vitro peripheral blood cultures of 5 patients with balanced constitutional rearrangements of 1q12 and 5 controls with the hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Using G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and spectral karyotyping, we identified structural aberrations and copy number gains of 1q21 in the treated cells similar to those found in patients with cytogenetically defined high-risk disease. Aberrations included 1q12 triradials, amplifications of regions juxtaposed to 1q12, and jumping translocations 1q12. Strikingly, all 5 patients with constitutional 1q12 rearrangements showed amplifications on the derivative chromosomes distal to the inverted or translocated 1q12 region, including MYCN in 1 case. At the same time, no amplification of the 1q21 region was found when the 1q12 region was inverted or absent. These findings provide evidence that the hypomethylation of the 1q12 region can potentially amplify any genomic region juxtaposed to it and mimic CNAs found in the bone marrow of patients with high-risk disease. PMID:25943786

  17. Mapping of a gene for familial juvenile nephronophthisis: Refining the map and defining flanking markers on chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, F.; Singh-Sawhney, I.; Schnieders, B.; Centofante, L.; Omran, H.; Pohlmann, A.; Schmaltz, C.; Wedekind, H.; Schubotz, D.; Brandis, M. ); Antignac, C. ); Weber, J.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Familial juvenile nephronophthisis (NPH) is an autosomal recessive kidney disease that leads to end-stage renal failure in adolescence and is associated with the formation of cysts at the cortico-medullary junction of the kidneys. NPH is responsible for about 15% of end-stage renal disease in children, as shown by Kleinknecht and Habib. NPH in combination with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa is known as the Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS) and exhibits renal pathology that is identical to NPH. The authors had excluded 40% of the human genome from linkage with a disease locus for NH or SLS when Antignac et al. first demonstrated linkage for an NPH locus on chromosome 2. The authors present confirmation of linkage of an NPH locus to microsatellite markers on chromosome 2 in nine families with NPH. By linkage analysis with marker AFM262xb5 at locus D2S176, a maximum lod score of 5.05 at a [theta][sub max] = .03 was obtained. In a large NPH family that yielded at D2S176 a maximum lod score of 2.66 at [theta][sub max] = .0, markers AFM172xc3 and AFM016yc5, representing loci D2S135 and D2S110, respectively, were identified as flanking markers, thereby defining the interval for an NPH locus to a region of approximately 15 cM. Furthermore, the cytogenetic assignment of the NPH region was specified to 2p12-(2q13 or adjacent bands) by calculation of linkage between these flanking markers and markers with known unique cytogenic assignment. The refined map may serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Localization of a gene for an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism to chromosome 6q25.2-27

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumine, Hiroto; Shimoda-Matsubayashi, Satoe; Nakagawa-Hattori, Yuko

    1997-03-01

    An autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) (MIM 600116) is a levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism whose pathological finding is a highly selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. By linkage analysis of diallelic polymorphism of the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2), we found a family with AR-JP showing perfect segregation of the disease with the SOD2 locus. By extending the linkage analysis to 13 families with AR-JP, we discovered strong evidence for the localization of the AR-JP gene at chromosome 6q25.2-27, including the SOD2 locus, with the maximal cumulative pairwise LOD scores of 7.26 and 7.71 at D6S305 ({theta} = .03) and D6S253 ({theta} = .02), respectively. Observation of obligate recombination events, as well as multipoint linkage analysis, placed the AR-JP gene in a 17-cM interval between D6S437 and D6S264. Delineation of the AR-JP gene will be an important step toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selective degeneration of the nigral neurons. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Linkage disequilibrium between the juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis gene and marker loci on chromosome 16p12. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; MacCormack, K.; Gleitsman, J.; Schlumpf, K.; Breakefield, X.O.; Gusella, J.F.; Haines, J.L. )

    1994-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; Batten disease) are a collection of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by the accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigments in the neurons and other cell types. Clinically, these disorders are characterized by progressive encephalopathy, loss of vision, and seizures. CLN3, the gene responsible for juvenile NCL, has been mapped to a 15-cM region flanked by the marker loci D16S148 and D16S150 on human chromosome 16. CLN2, the gene causing the late-infantile form of NCL (LNCL), is not yet mapped. The authors have used highly informative dinucleoide repeat markers mapping between D16S148 and D16S150 to refine the localization of CLN3 and to test for linkage to CLN2. The authors find significant linkage disequilibrium between CLN3 and the dinucleotide repeat marker loci D16S288 (X[sup 2](7) = 46.5, P < .005), D16S298 (X[sup 2](6) = 36.6, P < .005), and D16S299 (X[sup 2](7) = 73.8, P < .005), and also a novel RFLP marker at the D16S272 locus (X[sup 2](1) = 5.7, P = .02). These markers all map to 16p12.1. The D16S298/D16S299 haplotype [open quotes]5/4[close quotes] is highly overrepresented, accounting for 54% of CLN3 chromosomes as compared with 8% of control chromosomes (X[sup 2] = 117, df = 1, P < .001). Examination of the haplotypes suggests that the CLN3 locus can be narrowed to the region immediately surrounding these markers in 16p12.1. Analysis of D16S299 in LNCL pedigrees supports the previous finding that CLN3 and CLN2 are different genetic loci. This study also indicates that dinucleotide repeat markers play a valuable role in disequilibrium studies. 23 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy locus in chromosome 6p21.2-p11: Linkage to convulsions and electroencephalography trait

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.; Serratosa, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    Despite affecting 4 million Americans and 100-200 million persons worldwide, the precise molecular mechanisms of human epilepsies remain unknown. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is the most frequent and, hence, most important form of hereditary grand mal epilepsy. In this epilepsy, electroencephalographic (EEG) 15-30 Hz multispikes produce myoclonic and tonic-clonic convulsions beginning at 8-20 years of age. Moreover, EEG 3.5-6 Hz multispike wave complexes appear in clinically asymptomatic family members. We first studied 38 members of a four-generation LA-Belize family with classical JME but with no pyknoleptic absences. Five living members had JME; four clinically asymptomatic members had EEG multispike wave complexes. Pairwise analysis tightly linked microsatellites centromeric to HLA, namely D6S272 (peak lod score [Z{sub max}]=3.564-3.560 at male-female recombination [{theta}{sub m=f}]=0-0.001) and D6S257 (Z{sub max}=3.672-3.6667 at {theta}{sub m=f}=0-0.001), spanning 7 cM, to convulsive seizures and EEG multispike wave complexes. A recombination between D6S276 and D6S273 in one affected member placed the JME locus within or below HLA. Pairwise, multipoint, and recombination analyses in this large family independently proved that a JME gene is located in chromsome 6p, centromeric to HLA. We next screened, with the same chromosome 6p21.2-p11 short tandem-repeat polymorphic markers, seven multiplex pedigrees with classic JME. When lod scores for small multiplex families are added to lod scores of the LA-Belize pedigree, Z{sub max} values for D6S294 and D6S257 are >7 ({theta}{sub m=f}=0.000). Our results prove that in chromosome 6p21.2-p11 an epilepsy locus exists whose phenotype consists of classic JME with convulsions and/or EEG rapid multispike wave complexes. 31 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Localization of a locus for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy on chromosome 6p11-21.2 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V. |; Alonso, V.M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common form of primary idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by myoclonias, tonic-clonic or clonic tonic-clonic convulsions and absences. Ictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) show high amplitude multispikes folowed by slow waves and interictal EEGs manifest 3.5-6 Hz diffuse multispike wave complexes. JME affected about 7-10% of patients with epilepsies and its onset peaks between 13-15 years of age. We recently mapped a JME locus on chromosome 6p21.1-6p11 by linkage analysis of one relatively large JME family from Los Angeles and Belize. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 70% penetrance, pairwise analyses tightly linked JME to D6S257 (Z = 3.67), D6S428 (Z = 3.08) and D6S272 (Z = 3.56) at {theta} = 0, m = f. Recombination and multipoints linkage analysis also suggested a locus is between markers D6S257 and D6S272. We then screened three relatively larger Mexican JME pedigrees with D6S257, D6S272, D6S282, TNF, D6S276, D6S273, D6S105 and F13A1 on chromosome 6p. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance, linkage to chromosome 6p DNA markers are excluded. Our findings underline the genetic heterogeneity of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

  2. Detection of a de novo duplication of 1q32-qter by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in a boy with multiple malformations: further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duba, H C; Erdel, M; Löffler, J; Bereuther, L; Fischer, H; Utermann, B; Utermann, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a dysmorphic boy with a de novo partial trisomy 1q. The boy has microcephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate, low set and dysmorphic ears, brain anomalies, pulmonary stenosis, duodenal obstruction, dysplastic kidneys, and bifid thumbs. The trisomic segment 1q32-qter is duplicated with an inverted insertion at 1p36.3. The aberration was initially detected at amniocentesis and confirmed and defined by GTG banding, chromosome microdissection, and FISH on postnatal blood samples. The parents had normal karyotypes. De novo partial duplications of chromosome 1q have rarely been reported. Comparison of our patient with other published pure trisomy 1q cases showed similarities which allowed the further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome. Images PMID:9138155

  3. Partial trisomy 1(q42-->qter): a new case with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Concolino, D; Cinti, R; Ferraro, L; Moricca, M T; Strisciuglio, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a female patient with a 46,XX,der(8)t(1;8)(q42.1;p23.3) karyotype who had a mild phenotype characterised by a few subtle dysmorphic features and mild developmental retardation, probably resulting from trisomy 1q42-->qter. The deletion on the short arm of the chromosome 8 appeared to be confined to the distal chromosomal segment. Images PMID:9475102

  4. Proximal microdeletions and microduplications of 1q21.1 contribute to variable abnormal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Schaefer, G Bradley; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Ballif, Blake C; Klopocki, Eva; Mundlos, Stefan; Shaffer, Lisa G; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2012-07-01

    Chromosomal band 1q21.1 can be divided into two distinct regions, proximal and distal, based on segmental duplications that mediate recurrent rearrangements. Microdeletions and microduplications of the distal region within 1q21.1, which are susceptibility factors for a variety of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, have been more extensively studied than proximal microdeletions and microduplications. Proximal microdeletions are known as a susceptibility factor for thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome, but it is unclear if these proximal microdeletions have other phenotypic consequences. Therefore, to elucidate the clinical significance of rearrangements of the proximal 1q21.1 region, we evaluated the phenotypes in patients identified with 1q21.1 rearrangements after referral for clinical microarray testing. We report clinical information for 55 probands with copy number variations (CNVs) involving proximal 1q21.1: 22 microdeletions and 20 reciprocal microduplications limited to proximal 1q21.1 and 13 microdeletions that include both the proximal and distal regions. Six individuals with proximal microdeletions have TAR syndrome. Three individuals with proximal microdeletions and two individuals with larger microdeletions of proximal and distal 1q21.1 have a 'partial' TAR phenotype. Furthermore, one subject with TAR syndrome has a smaller, atypical deletion, narrowing the critical deletion region for the syndrome. Otherwise, phenotypic features varied among individuals with these microdeletions and microduplications. The recurrent, proximal 1q21.1 microduplications are enriched in our population undergoing genetic testing compared with control populations. Therefore, CNVs in proximal 1q21.1 can be a contributing factor for the development of abnormal phenotypes in some carriers.

  5. Proximal microdeletions and microduplications of 1q21.1 contribute to variable abnormal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Schaefer, G Bradley; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Ballif, Blake C; Klopocki, Eva; Mundlos, Stefan; Shaffer, Lisa G; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal band 1q21.1 can be divided into two distinct regions, proximal and distal, based on segmental duplications that mediate recurrent rearrangements. Microdeletions and microduplications of the distal region within 1q21.1, which are susceptibility factors for a variety of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, have been more extensively studied than proximal microdeletions and microduplications. Proximal microdeletions are known as a susceptibility factor for thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome, but it is unclear if these proximal microdeletions have other phenotypic consequences. Therefore, to elucidate the clinical significance of rearrangements of the proximal 1q21.1 region, we evaluated the phenotypes in patients identified with 1q21.1 rearrangements after referral for clinical microarray testing. We report clinical information for 55 probands with copy number variations (CNVs) involving proximal 1q21.1: 22 microdeletions and 20 reciprocal microduplications limited to proximal 1q21.1 and 13 microdeletions that include both the proximal and distal regions. Six individuals with proximal microdeletions have TAR syndrome. Three individuals with proximal microdeletions and two individuals with larger microdeletions of proximal and distal 1q21.1 have a ‘partial' TAR phenotype. Furthermore, one subject with TAR syndrome has a smaller, atypical deletion, narrowing the critical deletion region for the syndrome. Otherwise, phenotypic features varied among individuals with these microdeletions and microduplications. The recurrent, proximal 1q21.1 microduplications are enriched in our population undergoing genetic testing compared with control populations. Therefore, CNVs in proximal 1q21.1 can be a contributing factor for the development of abnormal phenotypes in some carriers. PMID:22317977

  6. AF1q is a novel TCF7 co-factor which activates CD44 and promotes breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jino; Schlederer, Michaela; Schreiber, Martin; Ice, Ryan; Merkel, Olaf; Bilban, Martin; Hofbauer, Sebastian; Kim, Soojin; Addison, Joseph; Zou, Jie; Ji, Chunyan; Bunting, Silvia T.; Wang, Zhengqi; Shoham, Menachem; Huang, Gang; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Gibson, Laura F.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Remick, Scot; Ivanov, Alexey; Pugacheva, Elena; Bunting, Kevin D.; Moriggl, Richard

    2015-01-01

    AF1q is an MLL fusion partner that was identified from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with t (1; 11) (q21; q23) chromosomal abnormality. The function of AF1q is not yet fully known, however, elevated AF1q expression is associated with poor clinical outcomes in various malignancies. Here, we show that AF1q specifically binds to T-cell-factor-7 (TCF7) in the Wnt signaling pathway and results in transcriptional activation of CD44 as well as multiple downstream targets of the TCF7/LEF1. In addition, enhanced AF1q expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, mammosphere formation, and chemo-resistance. In xenograft models, enforced AF1q expression in breast cancer cells also promotes liver metastasis and lung colonization. In a cohort of 63 breast cancer patients, higher percentages of AF1q-positive cancer cells in primary sites were associated with significantly poorer overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and brain metastasis-free survival (b-MFS). Using paired primary/metastatic samples from the same patients, we demonstrate that AF1q-positive breast cancer cells become dynamically dominant in the metastatic sites compared to the primary sites. Our findings indicate that breast cancer cells with a hyperactive AF1q/TCF7/CD44 regulatory axis in the primary sites may represent “metastatic founder cells” which have invasive properties. PMID:26079538

  7. Molecular cytogenetic determination of a deletion/duplication of 1q that results in a trisomy 18 syndrome-like phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.; Davee, M.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-08-15

    We report on an infant who presented at birth with some characteristics of trisomy 18 syndrome, including low birth weight, facial abnormalities, overlapping fingers, and congenital heart defects. On chromosome analysis, no additional chromosome 18 was observed and both chromosome 18 homologues appeared normal. However, a small piece of chromosomal material of unknown origin was detected at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome 18 painting probes disclosed no additional hybridization at the telomere of 1q, suggesting that the material was derived from another chromosome. Further chromosome painting experiments suggested that the telomeric addition was of chromosome 1 origin. To identify subchromosomal regions involved in the rearrangement, additional FISH analyses were performed using single copy and repetitive DNA probes mapping different portions of chromosome 1. The analyses showed that probes mapping to 1q34-43 were duplicated in the derivative chromosome 1. In addition, a DNA probe mapping to 1q44 was found to be deleted from the derivative chromosome 1. Our composite analysis suggests that a deletion and a duplication of chromosome 1q can result in some of the clinical findings usually associated with trisomy 16 syndrome. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FISH analysis when karyotype analysis is not consistent with the clinical description. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Proximal trisomy 1q in a girl with developmental delay and minor anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Furforo, L. |; Rittler, M.; Slavutsky, I.R.

    1996-09-06

    We report on a girl with developmental delay, macrocephaly, facial asymmetry, small downturned palpebral fissures, high and narrow palate, micrognathia, short neck, a heart defect, and unilateral renal agenesis. Cytogenetic analysis showed a proximal tandem duplication of the long arm of chromosome one (1q12{r_arrow}q21.3). This abnormality was suggested by G-and C-banding but it was specifically characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clinical findings in our patient are compared with those of the literature in an attempt to delineate the phenotype in patients with proximal 1q duplication. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  10. Characterization of complement 1q binding protein of tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and its C1q binding activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lishi; Liu, Xianjun; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Xiaolan; Qiu, Lihua; Huang, Jianhua; Jiang, Shigui

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for the globular heads of C1q, C1qBP/gC1qR/p33, is a multicompartmental, multifunctional cellular protein with an important role in infection and in inflammation. In the present study, we identified and characterized the complement component 1q subcomponent binding protein (C1qBP) from the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (designated as PmC1qBP). The open reading frame of PmC1qBP encodes 262 amino acid residues with a conserved MAM33 domain, an arginine-glycine-aspartate cell adhesion motif, and a mitochondrial targeting sequence in the first 53 amino acids. PmC1qBP shares 32%-81% similarity with known C1qBPs and clusters with lobster gC1qR under phylogenetic analysis. The temporal PmC1qBP mRNA expression in the hepatopancreas was significantly enhanced at 9 h after Vibrio vulnificus challenge. The native PmC1qBP was expressed in the gills, hepatopancreas, ovaries, and intestines as a precursor (38 kDa) and the active peptide (35 kDa). The recombinant PmC1qBP protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose. A complement 1q binding assay indicated that the rC1qBP protein competitively binds to C1q in mouse serum. The data reveal that PmC1qBP is not only involved in shrimp immune responses to pathogenic infections, but also cross-binding to the mouse C1q.

  11. Deletion 1q43 encompassing only CHRM3 in a patient with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrea Klunder; Ahmad, Ausaf; Shafiq, Mustafa; Brown-Kipphut, Brigette; Fong, Chin-To; Anwar Iqbal, M

    2013-02-01

    Deletions on the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 1 result in complex and highly variable clinical phenotypes which include intellectual disability, autism, seizures, microcephaly/craniofacial dysmorphology, corpus callosal agenesis/hypogenesis, cardiac and genital anomalies, hand and foot abnormalities and short stature. Genotype-phenotype correlation reported a minimum region of 2 Mb at 1q43-q44. We report on a 3 ½ year old male patient diagnosed with autistic disorder who has social withdrawal, eating problems, repetitive stereotypic behaviors including self-injurious head banging and hair pulling, and no seizures, anxiety, or mood swings. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) showed an interstitial deletion of 473 kb at 1q43 region (239,412,391-239,885,394; NCBI build37/hg19) harboring only CHRM3 (Acetylcholine Receptor, Muscarinic, 3; OMIM: 118494). Recently, another case with a de novo interstitial deletion of 911 kb at 1q43 encompassing three genes including CHRM3 was reported. The M3 muscarinic receptor influences a multitude of central and peripheral nervous system processes via its interaction with acetylcholine and may be an important modulator of behavior, learning and memory. We propose CHRM3 as a candidate gene responsible for our patient's specific phenotype as well as the overlapping phenotypic features of other patients with 1q43 or 1q43-q44 deletions.

  12. Low molecular weight C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Hannema, A J; Swaak, T J; Paardekooper, J; Hack, C E

    1985-07-01

    In sera of patients suffering from an exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), increased amounts of abnormal C1q were detected, contrasting with decreased or even undetectable levels of normal C1q in these sera. When analyzed immunochemically by double immunodiffusion, this low m.w. C1q (LMW-C1q) appeared to be identical with the defective C1q in serum of individuals with an inherited, homozygous inability to produce functional plasma C1q. These persons show a tendency to develop SLE-like syndromes. Like the genetically defective C1q, the abnormal C1q molecule in SLE sera was hemolytically inactive, did not incorporate in C1, was found in the supernatant of euglobulin-precipitated serum, and appeared in the break-through fraction of a cation-exchange column. Sucrose gradients and gel filtration analyses supported the putative identity of the molecules. SDS-PAGE and immunoblots revealed the presence of subunits that reacted with antibodies against C1q and confirmed the C1q-like nature of LMW-C1q. Low levels of LMW-C1q were also detected in serum and plasma of normal individuals. A radial immunodiffusion technique was used to measure LMW-C1q in the serum of 54 patients. Although these patients were not selected for parameters of disease activity, their levels of LMW-C1q were significantly higher than those of normal individuals and children with decreased C3 levels due to acute glomerulonephritis.

  13. Evidence for a novel mechanism for gene amplification in multiple myeloma: 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates breakage-fusion-bridge cycles of a 1q12 approximately 23 amplicon.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Tian, Erming; Thomas, Edward; Koller, Mark; Stangeby, Colin; Sammartino, Gael; Goosen, Linda; Swanson, Charles; Binz, Regina L; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John

    2009-11-01

    Gene amplification is defined as a copy number (CN) increase in a restricted region of a chromosome arm, and is a mechanism for acquired drug resistance and oncogene activation. In multiple myeloma (MM), high CNs of genes in a 1q12 approximately 23 amplicon have been associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. To investigate the mechanisms for gene amplification in this region in MM, we performed a comprehensive metaphase analysis combining G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and spectral karyotyping in 67 patients with gain of 1q. In six patients (9%), evidence for at least one breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle was found. In three patients (4%), extended ladders of 1q12 approximately 23 amplicons were identified. Several key structures that are predicted intermediates in BFB cycles were observed, including: equal-spaced organization of amplicons, inverted repeat organization of amplicons along the same chromosome arm, and deletion of sequences distal to the amplified region. The 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin region served as both a recurrent breakpoint as well as a fusion point for sister chromatids, and ultimately bracketed both the proximal and distal boundaries of the amplicon. Our findings provide evidence for a novel BFB mechanism involving 1q12 pericentromeric breakage in the amplification of a large number of genes within a 1q12 approximately 23 amplicon.

  14. A new case of interstitial 1q 25.3-32.1 deletion: cytogenetic analysis molecular characterization and ultrasound findings

    PubMed Central

    Libotte, Francesco; Bizzoco, Domenico; Gabrielli, Ivan; Tamburrino, Caterina; Ernandez, Cristina; Carpineto, Lorena; D’Aleo, Maria Pia; Cima, Antonella; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Cignini, Pietro; Aloisi, Alessia; Angioli, Roberto; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction deletion of long arm of chromosome 1(1q-) is a rare condition. Clinical features include Dwarfism, severe mental retardation, microcephaly and short neck delineating the “intermediate 1q deletion syndrome”. Case Report we report a new case of interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1, diagnosed in a 22+3 weeks gestation fetus in which cytogenetic analysis localized a loss of genetic materials of 18Mb in the 1q25.3-32.1. Fetal ultrasound showed neurodegenerative defects resembling Dandy-Walker’s syndrome and bilateral clubfoot. Conclusions clinical characteristics of our case are markedly mild. This suggests that the type and the extension of the mutation obtained through cytogenetic studies, CGH array and ultrasound evaluation should be taken into account for prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:26918092

  15. Genome-wide association analysis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis identifies a new susceptibility locus at chromosomal region 3q13

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Susan D.; Marion, Miranda C.; Sudman, Marc; Ryan, Mary; Tsoras, Monica; Howard, Timothy D.; Barnes, Michael G.; Ramos, Paula S.; Thomson, Wendy; Hinks, Anne; Haas, Johannes P.; Prahalad, Sampath; Bohnsack, John F.; Wise, Carol A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Rosé, Carlos D.; Pajewski, Nicholas M.; Spigarelli, Michael; Keddache, Mehdi; Wagner, Michael; Langefeld, Carl D.; Glass, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We have conducted a GWAS in a Caucasian cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and have previously published findings limited to autoimmune loci shared with other diseases. The goal of this study was to identify novel JIA predisposing loci using genome-wide approaches. Methods The Discovery cohort consisted of Caucasian JIA cases (814) and local controls (658) genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array along with 2400 out-of-study controls. A replication study consisted of 10 SNPs genotyped in 1744 cases and 7010 controls from the US and Europe. Results Analysis within the Discovery cohort provided evidence of associations at 3q13 within C3orf1 and near CD80 (rs4688011, OR=1.37, P=1.88×10−6), and 10q21 near the gene JMJD1C [rs6479891, odds ratio (OR) =1.59, P=6.1×10−8; rs12411988, OR=1.57, P=1.16×10−7 and rs10995450, OR = 1.31, P=6.74×10−5]. Meta-analysis continued to provide evidence for association for these 4 SNPs (rs4688011, P=3.6×10−7, rs6479891, P=4.33×10−5; rs12411988, P=2.71×10−5; and rs10995450, 5.39×10−5;). Gene expression data from 68 JIA cases and 23 local controls showed cis eQTL associations for C3orf1 SNP rs4688011 (P=0.024 or P=0.034, depending on probe set) and the JMJD1C SNPs rs6479891 and rs12411988 (P=0.01 and P=0.008, respectively). A variance component liability model estimated that common SNP variation accounts for ~1/3 of JIA susceptibility. Conclusions Genetic association results and correlated gene expression findings provide evidence of association at 3q13 and 10q21 for JIA and offer novel genes as plausible candidates in disease pathology. PMID:22354554

  16. Juvenile angiofibroma

    MedlinePlus

    Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains ...

  17. Three novel C1q domain containing proteins from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus: Genomic organization and analysis of the transcriptional changes in response to bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Jayasinghe, J D H E; Godahewa, G I; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2016-09-01

    The globular C1q (gC1q) domain containing proteins, commonly referred as C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins, are an essential family of proteins involved in various innate immune responses. In this study, three novel C1qDC proteins were identified from the disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) transcriptome database and designated as AbC1qDC1, AbC1qDC2, and AbC1qDC3. The cDNA sequences of AbC1qDC1, AbC1qDC2, and AbC1qDC3 consisted of 807, 1305, and 660 bp open reading frames (ORFs) encoding 269, 435, and 220 amino acids (aa), respectively. Putative signal peptides and the N-terminal gC1q domain were identified in all three AbC1qDC proteins. An additional predicted motif region, known as the coiled coil region (CCR), was identified next to the signal sequence of AbC1qDC2. The genomic organization of the AbC1qDCs was determined using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. It was found that the CDS of AbC1qDC1 was distributed among three exons, while the CDSs of AbC1qDC2 and AbC1qDC3 were distributed between two exons. Sequence analysis indicated that the AbC1qDC proteins shared <40% identity with other counterparts from different species. According to the neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree, the proteins were grouped within an invertebrate group with high evolutionary distances, which suggests that they are new members of the C1qDC family. Higher expression of AbC1qDC1 and AbC1qDC2 was detected in hepatopancreas, muscle, and mantle tissues compare to the other tissues analyzed, using reverse transcription, followed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using SYBR Green, whereas AbC1qDC3 was predominantly expressed in gill tissues, followed by muscles and the hepatopancreas. The temporal expression of AbC1qDC transcripts in gills after bacterial (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and lipopolysaccharide stimulation indicated that AbC1qDCs can be strongly induced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial species with different

  18. Three novel C1q domain containing proteins from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus: Genomic organization and analysis of the transcriptional changes in response to bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Jayasinghe, J D H E; Godahewa, G I; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2016-09-01

    The globular C1q (gC1q) domain containing proteins, commonly referred as C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins, are an essential family of proteins involved in various innate immune responses. In this study, three novel C1qDC proteins were identified from the disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) transcriptome database and designated as AbC1qDC1, AbC1qDC2, and AbC1qDC3. The cDNA sequences of AbC1qDC1, AbC1qDC2, and AbC1qDC3 consisted of 807, 1305, and 660 bp open reading frames (ORFs) encoding 269, 435, and 220 amino acids (aa), respectively. Putative signal peptides and the N-terminal gC1q domain were identified in all three AbC1qDC proteins. An additional predicted motif region, known as the coiled coil region (CCR), was identified next to the signal sequence of AbC1qDC2. The genomic organization of the AbC1qDCs was determined using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. It was found that the CDS of AbC1qDC1 was distributed among three exons, while the CDSs of AbC1qDC2 and AbC1qDC3 were distributed between two exons. Sequence analysis indicated that the AbC1qDC proteins shared <40% identity with other counterparts from different species. According to the neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree, the proteins were grouped within an invertebrate group with high evolutionary distances, which suggests that they are new members of the C1qDC family. Higher expression of AbC1qDC1 and AbC1qDC2 was detected in hepatopancreas, muscle, and mantle tissues compare to the other tissues analyzed, using reverse transcription, followed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using SYBR Green, whereas AbC1qDC3 was predominantly expressed in gill tissues, followed by muscles and the hepatopancreas. The temporal expression of AbC1qDC transcripts in gills after bacterial (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and lipopolysaccharide stimulation indicated that AbC1qDCs can be strongly induced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial species with different

  19. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  20. Linkage analysis suggests a locus of ichthyosis vulgaris on 1q22.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Cui, Bin; Zhang, Yizhi; Jiang, Haisong; Wei, Shengcai; Bu, Lei; Zhao, Guoping; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2003-01-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) is an inherited scaling skin disorder with a prevalence estimated at 2.29% in China. The gene responsible for this disorder has not been elucidated. To find the disease gene, we ascertained two Chinese IV families. Linkage analysis identified an IV locus on chromosome 1q22 with a maximum two-point Lod score of 2.47 at D1S1653 (theta=0.00). Haplotype analysis placed the critical region in a 7-cM interval defined by D1S1653 and D1S2675. These results provide the basis for further identifying the gene responsible for IV disorder.

  1. [Interaction of Arenicin-1 with C1q Protein].

    PubMed

    Berlov, M N; Umnyakova, E S; Leonova, T S; Milman, B L; Krasnodembskaya, A D; Ovchinnikova, T V; Kokryakov, V N

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between arenicin-1, that is an antimicrobial peptide from polychaeta Arenicola marina, and human complement system protein C1q was studied using enzyme-linked receptor sorbent assay and ELISA. We revealed that arenicin-1 and C1q form complex that is stable in high ionic strength condition 0.5 M NaCl. The ability of C1q to interact with arenicin-1 is comparable with the binding activity of C1q towards another antimicrobial peptide, porcine cathelicidin protegrin-1, which has a similar spatial arrangement with arenicin-1. Namely, both arenicin-1 and protegrin-1 form cystine-stabilized antiparallel β-hairpin structure. PMID:27125019

  2. Genetics Home Reference: 1q21.1 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 region may also be risk factors for schizophrenia. Some people with a 1q21.1 microdeletion do ... D, Stefansson K. Large recurrent microdeletions associated with schizophrenia. Nature. 2008 Sep 11;455(7210):232-6. ...

  3. A rare der(Y)t(Y;1)(q12;q12) in a patient with post-polycythemic myelofibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Masahiro; Takeda, Osami; Okita, Junya; Takakuwa, Teruhito; Harada, Naonori; Nakano, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Shuichiro; Aoyama, Yasutaka; Kumura, Takeo; Ohta, Tadanobu; Furukawa, Yoshio; Mugitani, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of post-polycythemic myelofibrosis harboring der(Y)t(Y;1)(q12;q12). The patient was a 69-year-old man and was initially diagnosed with polycythemia vera. During the clinical course of his condition, the polycythemia developed into myelofibrosis. Chromosome analysis detected der(Y)t(Y;1)(q12;q12). We discuss the association between der(Y)t(Y;1)(q11~12;q12~21) and tumorigenesis along with a review of literature. PMID:23675569

  4. Recurrent reciprocal 1q21.1 deletions and duplications associated with microcephaly or macrocephaly and developmental and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Berg, Jonathan S; Scaglia, Fernando; Belmont, John; Bacino, Carlos A; Sahoo, Trilochan; Lalani, Seema R; Graham, Brett; Lee, Brendan; Shinawi, Marwan; Shen, Joseph; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber; Lotze, Timothy; Kennedy, Gail; Lansky-Shafer, Susan; Weaver, Christine; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Grebe, Theresa A; Arnold, Georgianne L; Hutchison, Terry; Reimschisel, Tyler; Amato, Stephen; Geragthy, Michael T; Innis, Jeffrey W; Obersztyn, Ewa; Nowakowska, Beata; Rosengren, Sally S; Bader, Patricia I; Grange, Dorothy K; Naqvi, Sayed; Garnica, Adolfo D; Bernes, Saunder M; Fong, Chin-To; Summers, Anne; Walters, W David; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita

    2008-12-01

    Chromosome region 1q21.1 contains extensive and complex low-copy repeats, and copy number variants (CNVs) in this region have recently been reported in association with congenital heart defects, developmental delay, schizophrenia and related psychoses. We describe 21 probands with the 1q21.1 microdeletion and 15 probands with the 1q21.1 microduplication. These CNVs were inherited in most of the cases in which parental studies were available. Consistent and statistically significant features of microcephaly and macrocephaly were found in individuals with microdeletion and microduplication, respectively. Notably, a paralog of the HYDIN gene located on 16q22.2 and implicated in autosomal recessive hydrocephalus was inserted into the 1q21.1 region during the evolution of Homo sapiens; we found this locus to be deleted or duplicated in the individuals we studied, making it a probable candidate for the head size abnormalities observed. We propose that recurrent reciprocal microdeletions and microduplications within 1q21.1 represent previously unknown genomic disorders characterized by abnormal head size along with a spectrum of developmental delay, neuropsychiatric abnormalities, dysmorphic features and congenital anomalies. These phenotypes are subject to incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity.

  5. Recurrent reciprocal 1q21.1 deletions and duplications associated with microcephaly or macrocephaly and developmental and behavioral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Berg, Jonathan S; Scaglia, Fernando; Belmont, John; Bacino, Carlos A; Sahoo, Trilochan; Lalani, Seema R; Graham, Brett; Lee, Brendan; Shinawi, Marwan; Shen, Joseph; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber; Lotze, Timothy; Kennedy, Gail; Lansky-Shafer, Susan; Weaver, Christine; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Grebe, Theresa A; Arnold, Georgianne L; Hutchison, Terry; Reimschisel, Tyler; Amato, Stephen; Geragthy, Michael T; Innis, Jeffrey W; Obersztyn, Ewa; Nowakowska, Beata; Rosengren, Sally S; Bader, Patricia I; Grange, Dorothy K; Naqvi, Sayed; Garnica, Adolfo D; Bernes, Saunder M; Fong, Chin-To; Summers, Anne; Walters, W David; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome region 1q21.1 contains extensive and complex low-copy repeats, and copy number variants (CNVs) in this region have recently been reported in association with congenital heart defects1, developmental delay2,3, schizophrenia and related psychoses4,5. We describe 21 probands with the 1q21.1 microdeletion and 15 probands with the 1q21.1 microduplication. These CNVs were inherited in most of the cases in which parental studies were available. Consistent and statistically significant features of microcephaly and macrocephaly were found in individuals with micro-deletion and microduplication, respectively. Notably, a paralog of the HYDIN gene located on 16q22.2 and implicated in autosomal recessive hydrocephalus6 was inserted into the 1q21.1 region during the evolution of Homo sapiens7; we found this locus to be deleted or duplicated in the individuals we studied, making it a probable candidate for the head size abnormalities observed. We propose that recurrent reciprocal microdeletions and microduplications within 1q21.1 represent previously unknown genomic disorders characterized by abnormal head size along with a spectrum of developmental delay, neuropsychiatric abnormalities, dysmorphic features and congenital anomalies. These phenotypes are subject to incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. PMID:19029900

  6. Emerging and Novel Functions of Complement Protein C1q

    PubMed Central

    Kouser, Lubna; Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Shastri, Abhishek; Saraon, Anuvinder; Ferluga, Janez; Al-Mozaini, Maha; Kishore, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Complement protein C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, performs a diverse range of complement and non-complement functions. It can bind various ligands derived from self, non-self, and altered self and modulate the functions of immune and non-immune cells including dendritic cells and microglia. C1q involvement in the clearance of apoptotic cells and subsequent B cell tolerance is more established now. Recent evidence appears to suggest that C1q plays an important role in pregnancy where its deficiency and dysregulation can have adverse effects, leading to preeclampsia, missed abortion, miscarriage or spontaneous loss, and various infections. C1q is also produced locally in the central nervous system, and has a protective role against pathogens and possible inflammatory functions while interacting with aggregated proteins leading to neurodegenerative diseases. C1q role in synaptic pruning, and thus CNS development, its anti-cancer effects as an immune surveillance molecule, and possibly in aging are currently areas of extensive research. PMID:26175731

  7. A patient with constitutional ring 1 chromosome characterized by SNP array CGH.

    PubMed

    Saliganan, Sheila; Lee, Joanna; Wei, Sainan

    2016-04-01

    We present a male patient with constitutional ring 1 chromosome and subsequent 6 Mb deletion at 1q43q44. The patient displays overlapping clinical features with reported patients with ring 1 chromosome and 1q43q44 microdeletion syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with ring 1 chromosome characterized by comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:27099748

  8. De novo interstitial direct duplication of Xq21.1q25 associated with skewed X-inactivation pattern.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, G; Aboura, A; Benkhalifa, M; Creveaux, I; Foix-Hélias, L; Gadisseux, J F; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Mohammed, M; Labrune, P

    2004-12-15

    Genotype-phenotype correlation in women with an abnormal phenotype associated with a duplication of the long arm of the X chromosome remains unclear. We report on prenatal diagnosis and follow-up of a girl with an Xq duplication and dysmorphic features. The abnormal phenotype included growth retardation, hypotonia, and nystagmus. In order to improve the resolution of the cytogenetic analysis, we used both conventional and array-based comparative genomic hybridization to perform a global molecular cytogenetic analysis of the genome. These molecular cytogenetic analyses showed a direct duplication Xq21.1 --> q25 without other chromosomal abnormalities. This duplication was originating from the paternal X chromosome. Moreover, a skewed X-inactivation pattern was observed leading to a partial functional disomy of the chromosomal region Xq21.1q25. This report and review of the literature suggest that functional disomy for chromosome X could explain the abnormal phenotype. In prenatal diagnosis, this can have implication for patient management and genetic counseling.

  9. Polyethylene glycol enhances the binding of C1q to circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Hannema, A J; Out, T A; Aalberse, R C

    1981-01-01

    By radioimmunoassay we measured the amount of endogenous C1q that was precipitated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) under the conditions of the 125I-C1q-binding test (C1q-BT). We found a linear correlation between the percentage endogenous C1q that was precipitated and the 125I-C1q-binding activity (C1q-BA). We concluded that the 125I-C1q behaves like the endogenous C1q. To detect circulating immune complexes (CIC) which had already bound C1q, human sera were added to tubes coated with anti-C1q. Under the conditions used, no C1q-bearing CIC were detected. In addition, 7 sera from patients with high C1q-BA were analyzed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation. No C1q was found in the fast sedimenting fractions, although C1q-BA was detected in these fractions. With IgG-coated tubes we observed that PEG enhanced the binding of 125I-C1q as well as endogenous C1q to aggregated and monomeric IgG. PEG also enhanced the binding of CIC to C1q-coated tubes. The results suggest that CIC detected by the C1q-BT do not bear C1q in significant amounts in the circulation and that these CIC become detectable only in the presence of PEG.

  10. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  11. Attenuation (1/Q) estimation in reflection seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, Wasiu; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Despite its numerous potential applications, the lack of a reliable method for determining attenuation (1/Q) in seismic data is an issue when utilizing attenuation for hydrocarbon exploration. In this paper, a new method for measuring attenuation in reflection seismic data is presented. The inversion process involves two key stages: computation of the centroid frequency for the individual signal using a variable window length and fast Fourier transform; and estimation of the difference in the centroid frequency and travel time for paired incident and transmitted signals. The new method introduces a shape factor and a constant which allows several spectral shapes to be used to represent a real seismic signal without altering the mathematical model. Application of the new method to synthetic data shows that it can provide reliable estimates of Q using any of the spectral shapes commonly assumed for real seismic signals. Tested against two published methods of Q measurement, the new method shows less sensitivity to interference from noise and change of frequency bandwidth. The method is also applied to a 3D data set from the Gullfaks field, North Sea, Norway. The trace length is divided into four intervals: AB, BC, CD, and DE. Results show that interval AB has the lowest 1/Q value, and that interval BC has the highest 1/Q value. The values of 1/Q measured in the CDP stack using the new method are consistent with those measured using the classical spectral ratio method.

  12. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity

    PubMed Central

    Devasahayam, Joe; Erode-Singaravelu, Gowrishankar; Bhat, Zeenat; Oliver, Tony; Chandran, Arul; Zeng, Xu; Dakshinesh, Paramesh; Pillai, Unni

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy. PMID:26640759

  13. A 54 Mb 11qter duplication and 0.9 Mb 1q44 deletion in a child with laryngomalacia and agenesis of corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome (or Duplication 11q) has defined clinical features and is documented as a rare syndrome by National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD). Deletion 1q44 (or Monosomy 1q44) is a well-defined syndrome, but there is controversy about the genes lying in 1q44 region, responsible for agenesis of the corpus callosum. We report a female child with the rare Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome and Deletion 1q44 syndrome. The genomic imbalance in the proband was used for molecular characterization of the critical genes in 1q44 region for agenesis of corpus callosum. Some genes in 11q14q25 may be responsible for laryngomalacia. Results We report a female child with dysmorphic features, microcephaly, growth retardation, seizures, acyanotic heart disease, and hand and foot deformities. She had agenesis of corpus callosum, laryngomalacia, anterior ectopic anus, esophageal reflux and respiratory distress. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1. Her karyotype was 46,XX,der(1)t(1;11)(q44;q14)pat. The mother had a normal karyotype and the karyotype of the father was 46,XY,t(1;11)(q44;q14). SNP array analysis showed that the proband had a 54 Mb duplication of 11q14q25 and a 0.9 Mb deletion of the submicroscopic subtelomeric 1q44 region. Fluorescence Insitu Hybridisation confirmed the duplication of 11qter and deletion of 1qter. Conclusion Laryngomalacia or obstruction of the upper airway is the outcome of increased dosage of some genes due to Partial Trisomy 11q Syndrome. In association with other phenotypic features, agenesis of corpus callosum appears to be a landmark phenotype for Deletion 1q44 syndrome, the critical genes lying proximal to SMYD3 in 1q44 region. PMID:21936942

  14. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant progressive supranuclear palsy to 1q31.1.

    PubMed

    Ros, Raquel; Gómez Garre, Pilar; Hirano, Michio; Tai, Yen F; Ampuero, Israel; Vidal, Lídice; Rojo, Ana; Fontan, Aurora; Vazquez, Ana; Fanjul, Samira; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Hoenicka, Janet; Jones, Alison; Ahsan, R Laila; Pavese, Nicola; Piccini, Paola; Brooks, David J; Perez-Tur, Jordi; Nyggard, Torbjorn; de Yébenes, Justo G

    2005-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Familial clusters of PSP have been reported related to mutations of protein tau. We report the linkage of a large Spanish family with typical autosomal dominant PSP to a new locus in chromosome 1. Four members of this family had typical PSP, confirmed by neuropathology in one case. At least five ancestors had similar disease. Other members of the family have incomplete phenotypes. The power of the linkage analysis was increased by detecting presymptomatic individuals with 18F-fluoro-dopa and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We screened the human genome with 340 polymorphic markers and we enriched the areas of interest with additional markers. The disease status was defined according to the clinical and positron emission tomography data. We excluded linkage to the tau gene in chromosome 17. PSP was linked, in this family, to one area of 3.4 cM in chromosome 1q31.1, with a maximal multipoint < OD score of +3.53. This area contains at least three genes, whose relevance in PSP is unknown. We expect to further define the gene responsible for PSP, which could help to understand the pathogenesis of this disease and to design effective treatment.

  15. Immune complex processing in C1q-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nash, J T; Taylor, P R; Botto, M; Norsworthy, P J; Davies, K A; Walport, M J

    2001-02-01

    Complement and Fcgamma receptors are known to mediate the processing of immune complexes (IC), and abnormalities in these mechanisms may predispose to the development of lupus. We explored the processing of IC in mice deficient in complement component C1q. 125I-labelled IC comprising Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)/human anti-HBsAg (HBsAg/Ab) were injected intravenously and the sites of IC clearance determined by direct counting of organ uptake at various time points. The liver and spleen were the main sites of IC uptake in all mice. The splenic uptake of IC was significantly reduced in the C1q-deficient mice compared with the control mice. C1q-deficient mice also exhibited an initial accelerated hepatic uptake of IC similar to that seen in human subjects with hypocomplementaemia. The hepatic localization of IC at later time points was similar in both groups of mice. These data in mice are consistent with previous observations in humans that confirm that the classical pathway of complement plays an important role in the appropriate processing of IC in vivo.

  16. Rieger syndrome with de Novo reciprocal translocation t(1;4) (q23.1;q25)

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Yoshio; Masuno, Mitsuo; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi

    1995-05-22

    We report on a boy with Rieger syndrome, who had an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 4. The clinical manifestations of this patient were characterized by irregular shaped pupils with a prominent Schwalbe line and an umbilical hernia. On cytogenetic studies, he was found to have a de novo reciprocal translocation 46,XY,t(1;4) (q23.1;q25), without visible deletion. His parents had normal chromosomes. A review of both cytogenetic and genetic linkage analyses with Rieger syndrome showed that chromosome 4q was involved. This and other previous reports suggested that the gene for Rieger syndrome is mapped to the 4q25{r_arrow}4q26 segment adjoining the breakpoint. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  20. Significance of low molecular weight C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Swaak, A J; Brouwer, M C; van Rooijen, A; Nieuwenhuys, E J; Hack, C E

    1990-09-01

    The significance of high serum concentrations of low molecular weight C1q (LMW-C1q) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was studied. Concentrations of LMW-C1q were increased in SLE, but not in rheumatoid arthritis or acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Concentrations of LMW-C1q in SLE serum samples correlated with titres of anti-dsDNA and were inversely related to concentrations of normal C1q and C3. Serial studies in six patients, who had rising anti-dsDNA titres and who developed a major exacerbation requiring admission to hospital, showed that LMW-C1q increased in parallel with anti-dsDNA, reaching peak values of more than 2000% of normal just before or at the time of clinical relapse and decreasing during convalescence. Most marked increases in LMW-C1q were noted in the three patients in whom C1q concentrations remained normal, whereas increases were less in the three patients who had strongly depressed concentrations of normal C1q. A study of C1q biosynthesis by macrophages cultured from patients with SLE and high serum concentrations of LMW-C1q did not show impaired secretion of normal C1q in favour of LMW-C1q, but indicated that serum concentrations of LMW-C1q may reflect the synthetic rate of C1q in vivo. The results show that increased serum concentrations of LMW-C1q may be helpful in diagnosing SLE and suggest that serial determination of LMW-C1q in serum may have predictive value in monitoring patients with SLE.

  1. Crystal structure of zebrafish complement 1qA globular domain.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongyu; Chen, Rong; Tariq, Mansoor; Liu, Yanjie; Sun, Yaping; Xia, Chun

    2016-10-01

    C1q contains three globular domains (C1qgD) that are the key functional component of the classical complement system. C1qgD can interact with important immune molecules, including IgG and C-reactive protein (CRP) to form defense systems to protect animals. Here, the first non-mammalian structure, zebrafish C1qA globular domain (Dare-C1qAgD) was solved. Although the overall architecture of Dare-C1qAgD is similar to human C1qA, residues involved in C1qBgD, C1qCgD, and CRP binding are somewhat different while residues involved in IgG binding are not present in zebrafish. The structure gives insight into how human and fish C1qA evolved from an ancestral protein. PMID:27391278

  2. [C1Q NEPHROPATHY: CASE REPORTS AND LITERATURE REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Galešić, Krešimir; Horvatić, Ivica; Batinić, Danica; Milošević, Danko; Saraga, Marijan; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Ljubanović, Danica Galešić

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is considered a form of glomerulonephritis, defined by histological findings of dominant Clq immune deposits in renal biopsy. It is a rare disease, most often manifested in children and young adults. The most common clinical manifestation of the disease is nephrotic syndrome, but other renal syndromes could also be found. The cause of the disease is not known, but the immune pathogenesis could be assumed. Often, resistance to glucocorticoid or other immunosuppressive therapy is present, potentially leading to chronic renal insufficiency. We present ten patients with renal biopsy and clinical findings of Clq nephropathy. None of the patients had clinical or serological manifestations of systemic lupus. All patients had normal findings of C3 and C4 components of complement, as well as normal ANF, anti-dsD-NA and ANCA antibodies. PMID:26749950

  3. Influence of ionic strength, EDTA concentration, endogenous C1q and polyanions on the 125I-C1q-binding test.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Huijbregts, C C; Paardekooper, J

    1984-08-01

    Several parameters of the 125I-C1q-binding test were investigated: ionic strength, pH, concentration of EDTA, influence of serum C1q and the possibility of interference by polyanions. Lowering the ionic strength of the borate buffer resulted in increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum. This increase was dependent on the presence of serum proteins, probably immunoglobulins. When the concentration of the EDTA was decreased, increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum was also observed. This was prevented by adding NaCl to the EDTA solution. However at very low concentrations of EDTA (too low to chelate all calcium ions in the serum), increased precipitation of 125I-C1q in normal human serum was observed even in the presence of added NaCl. Addition of purified C1q to sera from patients with very low C1q levels had varying effects on the results of the C1q-binding test: (a) it decreased the C1q-binding activity of some sera, probably by competition with 125I-C1q for binding sites on the immune complexes; (b) it increased the C1q-binding activity of other sera, probably by enhancing the precipitation of immune complexes as a consequence of the cross-linking effect of C1q; or (c) it had no influence, possibly due to the opposite effects of (a) and (b). The addition of dextran sulphate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the 125I-C1q-binding activity of normal human serum. This effect was dependent on the interaction of dextran sulphate with either C1q or low-density lipoproteins and was prevented by addition of polybrene to the assay. However, addition of polybrene to sera with a high C1q-binding activity scarcely influenced binding activity.

  4. Prenatal detection of mosaic trisomy 1q due to an unbalanced translocation in one fetus of a twin pregnancy following in vitro fertilization: a postzygotic error.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shemin; Patil, Shivanand R; Yankowitz, Jerome

    2003-08-01

    Complete or mosaic trisomy for all of chromosome 1q has been seen rarely in a recognized pregnancy. A patient presented with twins following in vitro fertilization (IVF). Ultrasound showed twin A to have a diaphragmatic hernia, thick nuchal fold, and subtle intracranial abnormalities. Twin B appeared normal and a thick dividing membrane was seen. Amniocentesis of twin A showed a male karyotype with mosaic trisomy 1q in 57% of cells resulting from a translocation between chromosomes Yq12 and 1q12. Parental karyotypes were normal. The twins were delivered at 33 weeks. Twin A died at 1 hr of life. Autopsy confirmed the left diaphragmatic hernia and hypoplastic lungs. Autopsy also revealed a partial cleft palate, syndactyly of the second and third toes bilaterally, external deviation of the left 5th toe, and contractures of the index fingers bilaterally. A recent report documented formation of a chimera resulting from embryo amalgamation after IVF. Given the rarity of the cytogenetic findings in our case, we sought to determine if the mosaicism was a result of chimera formation related to the IVF. Thirteen polymorphic loci throughout the genome, in addition to four on 1q and four on 1p, were amplified by PCR. Only two alleles were observed at each of these loci in twin A, one paternal and the other maternal. We present further clinical findings of this case with a rare cytogenetic abnormality that appears to have originated from a postzygotic mitotic error and not embryo amalgamation.

  5. Studies on the haemolytic activity of circulating C1q-C3/C4 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Brouwer, Mieke C; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2008-04-01

    During classical complement pathway activation, the internal thio-ester of both C3 and C4 becomes exposed which enables C3 and C4 to bind covalently to nearby molecules. Recently, we described that C3 and C4 bind to C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, upon activation of this pathway. Covalently linked complexes between C1q and activated C4 (C1q-C4 complexes) are specific markers for classical complement pathway activation. In the present study we further investigated the molecular characteristics of complexes between C1q and activated C3 or C4 that occur in vivo. In human serum only complexes of C1q with C3d or C4d fragments were detected but not those with the larger C3b/bi or C4b/bi fragments. We identified that C1q-C4 complexes circulate as part of the intact C1 complex instead of as free C1q. Finally, we investigated whether deposited C3d or C4d affect C1 haemolytic activity. We observed that both C1q-C3 and C1q-C4 complexes are significantly (P<0.05) less active in a C1q-haemolytic assay than non-complexed C1q. Thus, the dominant types of C1q complexes that circulate in vivo are C1q-C3d and C1q-C4d complexes. These complexes are still able to interact with C1r and C1s to form a C1 complex, but seem to have a reduced activity as compared to C1q not carrying C3- or C4-fragments.

  6. Biochemical and functional characterization of the interaction between pentraxin 3 and C1q.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Kishore, Uday; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Tzima, Sotiria; Vivanco, Fernando; Egido, Jesús; Tijsma, Odette; Hack, Erik C; Daha, Mohamed R; Roos, Anja

    2003-02-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a recently characterized member of the pentraxin family of acute-phase proteins produced during inflammation. Classical short pentraxins, C-reactive protein, and serum amyloid P component can bind to C1q and thereby activate the classical complement pathway. Since PTX3 can also bind C1q, the present study was designed to define the interaction between PTX3 and C1q and to examine the functional consequences of this interaction. A dose-dependent binding of both C1q and the C1 complex to PTX3 was observed. Experiments with recombinant globular head domains of human C1q A, B, and C chains indicated that C1q interacts with PTX3 via its globular head region. Binding of C1q to immobilized PTX3 induced activation of the classical complement pathway as assessed by C4 deposition. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced C1q binding and complement activation on apoptotic cells. However, in the fluid-phase, pre-incubation of PTX3 with C1q resulted in inhibition of complement activation by blocking the interaction of C1q with immunoglobulins. These results indicate that PTX3 can both inhibit and activate the classical complement pathway by binding C1q, depending on the way it is presented. PTX3 may therefore be involved in the regulation of the innate immune response.

  7. A MOLECULARLY CHARACTERIZED INTERSTITIAL DELETION ENCOMPASSING THE 11q14.1-q23.3 REGION IN A CASE WITH MULTIPLE CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Altiok-Clark, O; Yakut, S; Guzel-Nur, B; Mihci, E; Berker-Karauzum, S

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 long arm is a rare event. In most of the interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome 11 both the position and the size of these deletions are heterogeneous making a precise karyotype-phenotype correlation. In only a few of the reported cases has the deletion been molecularly characterized. Our patient was a 13-year-old male presented; mental motor retardation, strabismus, myopia, retinopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, a long and triangular face, a broad forehead, hypotelorism, nasal septal deviation, a beaked nose, hypoplastic ala nasie, bilateral low-set ears, a high arched palate, crowded teeth, retrognathia, thin lips, a long neck, and sloping shoulders, hyperactive behavior, pulmonary stenosis and lumbar scoliosis. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q14.1-q23.3) karyotype in the patient. Array-CGH analysis of the patient's DNA revealed an interstitial deletion encompassing 33.2 Mb in the 11q14.1-q23.3 genomic region (chr11: 83,161,443-116,401,751 ; Hg19). In this report, we present a patient with an interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 11 that encompassed the 11q14.1-q23.3 region; and, using array-CGH analysis, we molecularly characterized the deleted region.

  8. A MOLECULARLY CHARACTERIZED INTERSTITIAL DELETION ENCOMPASSING THE 11q14.1-q23.3 REGION IN A CASE WITH MULTIPLE CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Altiok-Clark, O; Yakut, S; Guzel-Nur, B; Mihci, E; Berker-Karauzum, S

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 long arm is a rare event. In most of the interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome 11 both the position and the size of these deletions are heterogeneous making a precise karyotype-phenotype correlation. In only a few of the reported cases has the deletion been molecularly characterized. Our patient was a 13-year-old male presented; mental motor retardation, strabismus, myopia, retinopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, a long and triangular face, a broad forehead, hypotelorism, nasal septal deviation, a beaked nose, hypoplastic ala nasie, bilateral low-set ears, a high arched palate, crowded teeth, retrognathia, thin lips, a long neck, and sloping shoulders, hyperactive behavior, pulmonary stenosis and lumbar scoliosis. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q14.1-q23.3) karyotype in the patient. Array-CGH analysis of the patient's DNA revealed an interstitial deletion encompassing 33.2 Mb in the 11q14.1-q23.3 genomic region (chr11: 83,161,443-116,401,751 ; Hg19). In this report, we present a patient with an interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 11 that encompassed the 11q14.1-q23.3 region; and, using array-CGH analysis, we molecularly characterized the deleted region. PMID:27192892

  9. Biosynthesis of normal and low-molecular-mass complement component C1q by cultured human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Brouwer, M C; de Graeff-Meeder, E R; van Helden, H P; Hack, C E

    1989-01-15

    High levels of low-molecular-mass complement component C1q (LMM-C1q), a haemolytically inactive form of C1q, are found in serum of individuals with inherited complete (functional) C1q deficiency and in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, whereas lower levels are present in normal serum [Hoekzema, Hannema, Swaak, Paardekooper & Hack (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 265-271]. To investigate whether LMM-C1q is a (by-)product of C1q synthesis or the result of degradation of C1q, cultures of blood monocytes and of alveolar macrophages, which secrete functional C1q, were studied. A considerable portion of C1q-like protein secreted by these cells was found to be LMM-C1q. In contrast with the C1q fragments that resulted from degradation of normal C1q during phagocytosis, culture-derived LMM-C1q appeared to be identical with LMM-C1q found in serum, as judged by sedimentation behaviour, subunit structure and recognition by poly- and mono-clonal antibodies raised against C1q. The presence of LMM-C1q in cytoplasmic organelles compatible with the Golgi apparatus and the inability to generate LMM-C1q by impeding hydroxylation and triple-helix formation of C1q further argues against degradation as its source. Monocyte cultures of homozygous probands from two families with complete functional C1q deficiency reflected the abnormalities in serum, i.e. absence of functional C1q, but increased levels of LMM-C1q. By contrast, secretion of C1q and LMM-C1q by cells from healthy individuals was clearly co-ordinate, indicating that LMM-C1q in serum may provide a unique marker of C1q synthesis in vivo.

  10. A novel Asp380Ala mutation in the GLC1A/myocilin gene in a family with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kennan, A M; Mansergh, F C; Fingert, J H; Clark, T; Ayuso, C; Kenna, P F; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1998-01-01

    Glaucoma describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in optic neuropathy and progressive loss of visual fields. A gene for juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma JOAG) has recently been mapped to 1q21-31. Mutations in the trabecular meshwork induced glucocorticoid response gene (TIGR, also known as myocilin or the GLC1A locus) have been found to cause both juvenile and later onset primary open angle glaucoma. Family TCD-POAG1 is a Spanish kindred, which segregates JOAG in an autosomal dominant fashion. This family was found to be linked to the previously identified GLC1A locus on chromosome 1q. Direct sequencing of the TIGR/myocilin gene showed a heterozygous A to C transition in codon 380, resulting in the substitution of alanine for aspartic acid (Asp380Ala). This substitution created a StyI restriction site, which segregated with the JOAG phenotype and permitted rapid screening of all members of the family. This restriction site was not present in 60 controls. Images PMID:9832047

  11. Gonococcal infection in a nonhuman host is determined by human complement C1q.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, S; Martens, M G; Nowicki, B J

    1995-12-01

    Human C1q displayed a dose-dependent protection of gonococcal cells (GC) from the bactericidal effect of newborn rat serum. All rat pups injected with C1q-preincubated GC developed bacteremia, while none of the animals injected with GC only were infected. After clearance of bacteremia at day 6, live GC could still be recovered from tested organs, including the liver. Preincubation of GC with higher concentrations of C1q was associated with increased morbidity. In contrast to human serum as a source of C1q, rat, rabbit, and mouse sera did not increase the in vivo virulence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. C1q-deficient human serum, heat-inactivated C1q or human serum, type IV collagen, and complement C3 were inefficient in inducing infection. Experimental infection by C1q-preincubated GC was inhibited by anti-C1q antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating a causal effect of C1q function. This report demonstrates the novel finding that human C1q, a component of the human immune system with a general function for elimination of infection, may increase GC virulence and result in the development of disseminated infection in a nonhuman host.

  12. Gonococcal infection in a nonhuman host is determined by human complement C1q.

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, S; Martens, M G; Nowicki, B J

    1995-01-01

    Human C1q displayed a dose-dependent protection of gonococcal cells (GC) from the bactericidal effect of newborn rat serum. All rat pups injected with C1q-preincubated GC developed bacteremia, while none of the animals injected with GC only were infected. After clearance of bacteremia at day 6, live GC could still be recovered from tested organs, including the liver. Preincubation of GC with higher concentrations of C1q was associated with increased morbidity. In contrast to human serum as a source of C1q, rat, rabbit, and mouse sera did not increase the in vivo virulence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. C1q-deficient human serum, heat-inactivated C1q or human serum, type IV collagen, and complement C3 were inefficient in inducing infection. Experimental infection by C1q-preincubated GC was inhibited by anti-C1q antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating a causal effect of C1q function. This report demonstrates the novel finding that human C1q, a component of the human immune system with a general function for elimination of infection, may increase GC virulence and result in the development of disseminated infection in a nonhuman host. PMID:7591137

  13. Breast Tumors with Elevated Expression of 1q Candidate Genes Confer Poor Clinical Outcome and Sensitivity to Ras/PI3K Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Viveka Thangaraj, Soundara; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Bhaskar Rao, Divya; Barnabas, Georgina D.; Raghavan, Swetha; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2013-01-01

    Genomic aberrations are common in cancers and the long arm of chromosome 1 is known for its frequent amplifications in breast cancer. However, the key candidate genes of 1q, and their contribution in breast cancer pathogenesis remain unexplored. We have analyzed the gene expression profiles of 1635 breast tumor samples using meta-analysis based approach and identified clinically significant candidates from chromosome 1q. Seven candidate genes including exonuclease 1 (EXO1) are consistently over expressed in breast tumors, specifically in high grade and aggressive breast tumors with poor clinical outcome. We derived a EXO1 co-expression module from the mRNA profiles of breast tumors which comprises 1q candidate genes and their co-expressed genes. By integrative functional genomics investigation, we identified the involvement of EGFR, RAS, PI3K / AKT, MYC, E2F signaling in the regulation of these selected 1q genes in breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Expression of EXO1 module was found as indicative of elevated cell proliferation, genomic instability, activated RAS/AKT/MYC/E2F1 signaling pathways and loss of p53 activity in breast tumors. mRNA–drug connectivity analysis indicates inhibition of RAS/PI3K as a possible targeted therapeutic approach for the patients with activated EXO1 module in breast tumors. Thus, we identified seven 1q candidate genes strongly associated with the poor survival of breast cancer patients and identified the possibility of targeting them with EGFR/RAS/PI3K inhibitors. PMID:24147022

  14. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-06-01

    We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate. PMID:26185640

  15. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain

    PubMed Central

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate. PMID:26185640

  16. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis of pediatric ependymomas identifies novel candidate genes including TPR at 1q25 and CHIBBY at 22q12-q13.

    PubMed

    Karakoula, Katherine; Suarez-Merino, Blanca; Ward, Samantha; Phipps, Kim P; Harkness, William; Hayward, Richard; Thompson, Dominic; Jacques, Thomas S; Harding, Brian; Beck, John; Thomas, David G T; Warr, Tracy J

    2008-11-01

    Loss of chromosome 22 and gain of 1q are the most frequent genomic aberrations in ependymomas, indicating that genes mapping to these regions are critical in their pathogenesis. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured relative copy numbers of 10 genes mapping to 22q12.3-q13.33 and 10 genes at 1q21-32 in a series of 47 pediatric intracranial ependymomas. Loss of one or more of the genes on 22 was detected in 81% of cases, with RAC2 and C22ORF2 at 22q12-q13.1 being deleted most frequently in 38% and 32% of ependymoma samples, respectively. Combined analysis of quantitative-PCR with methylation-specific PCR and bisulphite sequencing revealed a high rate (>60% ependymoma) of transcriptional inactivation of C22ORF2, indicating its potential importance in the development of pediatric ependymomas. Increase of relative copy numbers of at least one gene on 1q were detected in 61% of cases, with TPR at 1q25 displaying relative copy number gains in 38% of cases. Patient age was identified as a significant adverse prognostic factor, as a significantly shorter overall survival time (P = 0.0056) was observed in patients <2 years of age compared with patients who were >2 years of age. Loss of RAC2 at 22q13 or amplification of TPR at 1q25 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in these younger patients (P = 0.0492 and P = < 0.0001, respectively). This study identifies candidate target genes within 1q and 22q that are potentially important in the pathogenesis of intracranial pediatric ependymomas.

  17. Juvenile Firesetting.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters. PMID:26593122

  18. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant primary open angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q in a Greek pedigree.

    PubMed

    Kitsos, G; Eiberg, H; Economou-Petersen, E; Wirtz, M K; Kramer, P L; Aspiotis, M; Tommerup, N; Petersen, M B; Psilas, K

    2001-06-01

    A locus for juvenile onset open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been assigned to chromosome 1q in families with autosomal dominant inheritance (GLC1A), due to mutations in the TIGR/MYOC gene. For adult onset OAG, called primary open angle glaucoma or POAG, five loci have so far been mapped to different chromosomes (GLC1B-GLC1F). Except for the GLC1B locus, the other POAG loci have so far been reported only in single large pedigrees. We studied a large family identified in Epirus, Greece, segregating POAG in an autosomal dominant fashion. Clinical findings included increased cup to disc ratio (mean 0.7), characteristic glaucomatous changes in the visual field, and intraocular pressure before treatment more than 21 mmHg (mean 31 mmHg), with age at diagnosis 33 years and older. Linkage analysis was performed between the disease phenotype and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms. Linkage was established with a group of DNA markers located on chromosome 3q, where the GLC1C locus has previously been described in one large Oregon pedigree. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.88 was obtained at marker D3S1763 (penetrance 80%). This represents the second POAG family linked to the GLC1C locus on chromosome 3q, and haplotype analysis in the two families suggests an independent origin of the genetic defect.

  19. Four C1q domain-containing proteins involved in the innate immune response in Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Jin, Min; Li, Xin-Cang; Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng

    2016-08-01

    C1q is a key subcomponent of the complement C1 complex. This subcomponent contains a globular C1q (gC1q) domain with remarkable ligand binding properties. C1q domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins are composed of all proteins with a gC1q domain. C1qDC proteins exist in many invertebrates and recognize non-self-ligands. In our study, four C1qDC genes, namely, HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4, were identified from Hyriopsis cumingii. HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4 encode a protein of 224, 204, 305, and 332 amino acids, respectively. All C1qDC proteins consist of a gC1q domain at the C terminal. In addition to the gC1q domain, a coiled-coil region is found in HcC1qDC4. Multiple alignments and phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the C1qDC proteins highly differ from one another. Tissue distribution analysis demonstrated that HcC1qDC1-HcC1qDC4 are widely distributed in hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, mantle, and foot. These C1qDC genes are regulated by bacteria to varying degrees. These recombinant HcC1qDC proteins exhibit a binding activity against different bacterial species. Our results may suggest the roles of HcC1qDC genes in anti-bacterial immune defense. PMID:27288256

  20. Juvenile Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  1. Functional C1q is present in the skin mucus of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xuguang; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    The skin mucus of fish acts as the first line of self-protection against pathogens in the aquatic environment and comprises a number of innate immune components. However, the presence of the critical classical complement component C1q, which links the innate and adaptive immune systems of mammalians, has not been explored in a primitive actinopterygian fish. In this study, we report that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). The skin mucus was able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli. The bacteriostatic activity of the skin mucus was reduced by heating and by pre-incubation with EDTA or mouse anti-human C1q antibody. We also detected C1q protein in skin mucus using the western blot procedure and isolated a cDNA that encodes the Siberian sturgeon C1qC, which had 44.7-51.4% identity with C1qCs in teleosts and tetrapods. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Siberian sturgeon C1qC lies at the root of the actinopterygian branch and is separate from the tetrapod branch. The C1qC transcript was expressed in many tissues as well as in skin. Our data indicate that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon to protect against water-borne bacteria, and the C1qC found in the sturgeon may represent the primitive form of teleost and tetrapod C1qCs.

  2. Exclusion of linkage between hypokalemic periodic paralysis and a candidate region in 1q31-32 suggests genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sillen, A.; Wadelius, C.; Gustabson, K.H.

    1994-09-01

    Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant disease with attacks of paralysis of varying severity. The attacks occur at intervals of days to years in otherwise healthy people combined with hypokalemia during attacks. The paralysis attacks are precipitated by a number of different factors, like carbohydrate-rich meals, cold, exercise and mental stress. Recently linkage for HOKPP was shown for chromosome 1q31-32 and the disease was mapped between D1S413 and D1S249. The gene for the calcium channel alfa1-subunit (CACNL 1A3) maps to this interval and in two families no recombination was found between a polymorphism in the CACNL 1A3 gene and the disease. This gene is therefore considered to be a candidate for HOKPP. The analysis of a large Danish family excludes linkage to this region and to the CACNL 1A3 gene. In each direction from D1S413, 18.8 cM could be excluded and for D1S249, 14.9 cM. The present study clearly excludes the possibility that the gene causing HOKPP in a large Danish family is located in the region 1q31-32. This result shows that HOKPP is a heterogenous disease, with only one mapped gene so far.

  3. A new mosaic der(18)t(1;18)(q32.1;q21.3) with developmental delay and facial dysmorphism

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Jin; Shin, Eunsim; Jo, Tae Sik; Lee, Se-Min; Kim, Joo-Hwa; Oh, Jae-Won; Kim, Chang-Ryul; Seol, In Joon

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 22-month-old boy with a new mosaic partial unbalanced translocation of 1q and 18q. The patient was referred to our Pediatric Department for developmental delay. He showed mild facial dysmorphism, physical growth retardation, a hearing disability, and had a history of patent ductus arteriosus. White matter abnormality on brain magnetic resonance images was also noted. His initial routine chromosomal analysis revealed a normal 46,XY karyotype. In a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, subtle copy number changes in 1q32.1–q44 (copy gain) and 18q21.33–18q23 (copy loss) suggested an unbalanced translocation of t(1;18). Repeated chromosomal analysis revealed a low-level mosaic translocation karyotype of 46,XY,der(18)t(1;18)(q32.1;q21.3)[12]/46,XY[152]. Because his parents had normal karyotypes, his translocation was considered to be de novo. The abnormalities observed in aCGH were confirmed by metaphase fluorescent in situ hybridization. We report this patient as a new karyotype presenting developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, cerebral dysmyelination, and other abnormalities. PMID:26958068

  4. Direct binding of C1q to apoptotic cells and cell blebs induces complement activation.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Trouw, Leendert A; Daha, Mohamed R; Tijsma, Odette; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Mantovani, Alberto; Hack, Erik C; Roos, Anja

    2002-06-01

    Deficiency of early components of the classical pathway of complement, particularly C1q, predisposes to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Several studies have suggested an association between the classical complement pathway and the clearance of apoptotic cells. Mice with a targeted deletion of the C1q gene develop a lupus-like renal disease, which is associated with the presence of multiple apoptotic bodies in the kidney. In the present study we demonstrate that highly purified C1q binds to apoptotic cells and isolated blebs derived from these apoptotic cells. Binding of C1q to apoptotic cells occurs via the globular heads of C1q and induces activation of the classical complement pathway, as shown by the deposition of C4 and C3 on the surface of these cells and on cell-derived blebs. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate that surface-bound C1q is present on a subpopulation of microparticles isolated from human plasma. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that C1q binds directly to apoptotic cells and blebs derived therefrom and support a role for C1q, possibly in concert with C4 and C3, in the clearance of apoptotic cells and blebs by the phagocytic system.

  5. SLE like syndrome and functional deficiency of C1q in members of a large family.

    PubMed

    Hannema, A J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Mallée, C; van Helden, H P

    1984-01-01

    Two sisters and a brother from one family are described whose sera were deficient in haemolytic complement function. This defect was restored by addition of purified C1q. In their sera, C1q like material was found, whereas C1r and C1s were normal or increased in concentration, as were the other complement components tested. All three had suffered from glomerulonephritis during childhood. A renal biopsy in the brother recently disclosed a membranous glomerulopathy stage 1; otherwise, he is apparently healthy. In both sisters, a systemic lupus erythematosus like disease became manifest at the age of 20 and 23, respectively, resulting in the death of one of them. In the serum of these three family members, the C1q like material was antigenically deficient compared with normal C1q and had, on sucrose gradient analysis, a molecular weight of approximately 65,000 daltons. It did not bind to C1r and C1s. Binding of the dysfunctional C1q to aggregated human gammaglobulin could be demonstrated. On double immunodiffusion analysis, the abnormal C1q was identical with reduced and alkylated C1q. The possible structure of the abnormal C1q molecule is discussed.

  6. Anti-DNA antibodies cross-react with C1q.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Giovanni; Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Zhang, Jie; Diamond, Betty

    2013-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder that involves multiple organ systems and typically presents as a chronic inflammatory disease. Antibodies to double-stranded (ds) DNA are present in approximately 70% of patients and form nucleic acid containing immune complexes which activate dendritic cells through engagement of toll-like receptors, leading to a pro-inflammatory, pro-immunogenic milieu. In addition, anti-dsDNA antibodies deposit in kidneys to initiate glomerulonephritis. Antibodies to C1q have also been implicated in lupus nephritis and are found in 30-50% of patients. C1q is a known suppressor of immune activation and C1q deficiency is the strongest risk factor for SLE. We previously identified a subset of anti-DNA antibodies that binds the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. We now show that both mouse and human anti-DNA antibodies with this specificity bind C1q. These antibodies bind to Clq in glomeruli and exhibit decreased glomerular deposition in the absence of C1q. We propose that this subset of anti-DNA antibodies participates in lupus pathogenesis through direct targeting of C1q on glomeruli and also through removal of soluble C1q thereby limiting the ability of C1q to mediate immune homeostasis.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 1q22 as a susceptibility locus for intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Woo, Daniel; Falcone, Guido J; Devan, William J; Brown, W Mark; Biffi, Alessandro; Howard, Timothy D; Anderson, Christopher D; Brouwers, H Bart; Valant, Valerie; Battey, Thomas W K; Radmanesh, Farid; Raffeld, Miriam R; Baedorf-Kassis, Sylvia; Deka, Ranjan; Woo, Jessica G; Martin, Lisa J; Haverbusch, Mary; Moomaw, Charles J; Sun, Guangyun; Broderick, Joseph P; Flaherty, Matthew L; Martini, Sharyl R; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Kissela, Brett; Comeau, Mary E; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M; Schmidt, Helena; Freudenberger, Paul; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Hansen, Björn M; Norrving, Bo; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; Roquer, Jaume; Kraft, Peter; Ayres, Alison M; Schwab, Kristin; McCauley, Jacob L; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Rost, Natalia S; Goldstein, Joshua N; Viswanathan, Anand; Stögerer, Eva-Maria; Tirschwell, David L; Selim, Magdy; Brown, Devin L; Silliman, Scott L; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Malik, Rainer; Dichgans, Martin; Greenberg, Steven M; Rothwell, Peter M; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosand, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the stroke subtype with the worst prognosis and has no established acute treatment. ICH is classified as lobar or nonlobar based on the location of ruptured blood vessels within the brain. These different locations also signal different underlying vascular pathologies. Heritability estimates indicate a substantial genetic contribution to risk of ICH in both locations. We report a genome-wide association study of this condition that meta-analyzed data from six studies that enrolled individuals of European ancestry. Case subjects were ascertained by neurologists blinded to genotype data and classified as lobar or nonlobar based on brain computed tomography. ICH-free control subjects were sampled from ambulatory clinics or random digit dialing. Replication of signals identified in the discovery cohort with p < 1 × 10(-6) was pursued in an independent multiethnic sample utilizing both direct and genome-wide genotyping. The discovery phase included a case cohort of 1,545 individuals (664 lobar and 881 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 1,481 individuals and identified two susceptibility loci: for lobar ICH, chromosomal region 12q21.1 (rs11179580, odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, p = 7.0 × 10(-8)); and for nonlobar ICH, chromosomal region 1q22 (rs2984613, OR = 1.44, p = 1.6 × 10(-8)). The replication included a case cohort of 1,681 individuals (484 lobar and 1,194 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 2,261 individuals and corroborated the association for 1q22 (p = 6.5 × 10(-4); meta-analysis p = 2.2 × 10(-10)) but not for 12q21.1 (p = 0.55; meta-analysis p = 2.6 × 10(-5)). These results demonstrate biological heterogeneity across ICH subtypes and highlight the importance of ascertaining ICH cases accordingly. PMID:24656865

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in juvenile NCL

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Y.M.; Andermann, E.; Mitchison, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of related lysosomal storage diseases classified according to the age of onset, clinical syndrome, and pathology. The clinical syndromes include myoclonus, visual failure, progressive dementia, ataxia and generalized tonic clonic seizures in varying combinations depending on the age of onset and pathology. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive in most cases, except for several families with the adult form (Kufs` disease) which have autosomal dominant inheritance. Linkage for the infantile (Halatia-Santavuori) form (CLN1), characterized ultrastructurally by lysosomal granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD), has been demonstrated with markers on chromosome lp, while the gene for the typical juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt) form (CLN3), characterized by fingerprint-profile inclusions, has been linked to chromosome 16p. The gene locations of the late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) and adult (Kufs` disease) forms are unknown, although it has recently been shown that the late infantile form does not link to chromosome 16p. We describe three siblings, including a pair of monozygotic twins, with juvenile onset NCL with GROD in whom linkage to the CLN3 region of chromsome 16p has been excluded. This would suggest that there is genetic heterogeneity not only among the different clinical syndromes, but also among identical clinical syndromes with different ultrastructural characteristics. Preliminary studies of linkage to chromosome 1p employing the microsatellite marker HY-TM1 have been uninformative. Further studies with other chromosome 1 markers are underway.

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  10. Molecular characterization of a novel amplicon at 1q21-q22 frequently observed in human sarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Forus, A.; Berner, J. M.; Meza-Zepeda, L. A.; Saeter, G.; Mischke, D.; Fodstad, O.; Myklebost, O.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) study of a panel of sarcomas, we detected recurrent amplification of 1q21-q22 in soft tissue and bone tumours. Amplification of this region had not previously been associated with sarcoma development, but occasional amplification of CACY/S100A6 and MUC1 in 1q21 had been reported for melanoma and breast carcinoma respectively. Initial screening by Southern blot analysis showed amplification of S100A6, FLG and SPRR3 in several sarcomas and, in a first attempt to characterize the 1q21-q22 amplicon in more detail, we have now investigated the amplification status of these and 11 other markers in the region in 35 sarcoma samples. FLG was the most frequently amplified gene, and the markers located in the same 4.5-Mb region as FLG showed a higher incidence of amplification than the more distal ones. However, for most of the 14 markers, amplification levels were low, and only APOA2 and the anonymous marker D1S3620 showed high-level amplifications (> tenfold increases) in one sample each. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the amplification patterns of two overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) covering the region between D1S3620 and FLG (789f2 and 764a1), as well as two more distally located YACs in nine selected samples. Six samples had amplification of the YAC containing D1S3620 and, in three, 764a1 was also included. Five of these tumours showed normal copies of the more distal YACs; thus, it seems likely that an important gene may be located within 789f2, or very close. Two samples had high copy numbers of the most distal YACs. Taken together, FISH and molecular analyses indicate complex amplification patterns in 1q21-q22 with at least two amplicons: one located near D1S3620/789f2 and one more distal. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716033

  11. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  12. Transcriptional response of four C1q domain containing protein (C1qDC) genes from Venerupis philippinarum exposed to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linbao; Sun, Wei; Cai, Wengui; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Haigang; Ma, Shengwei; Jia, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    As pattern recognitionreceptors, the C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins play an important role in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, four novel C1q domain containing proteins (designated as VpC1qDC1, VpC1qDC2, VpC1qDC3 and VpC1qDC4) were cloned and characterized from clam Venerupis philippinarum. The four VpC1qDCs all possessed the conserved features critical for the fundamental structure and function of the C1q family. The four VpC1qDCs genes showed differential response profiles after exposure to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil (WSFD). More notably, VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were more sensitive to low concentration of WSFD, as their mRNA level changed by higher magnitudes. In addition, VpC1qDC2 and VpC1qDC4 displayed notable increases with larger amplitude to high concentration of WSFD. All these results suggested that the transcriptional response of VpC1qDCs genes were probably a protective mechanism of the cell to oils pollution. The diverse expression patterns of VpC1qDCs demonstrated that VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were sensitive responders to environmental stress in V. philippinarum. PMID:27261881

  13. Transcriptional response of four C1q domain containing protein (C1qDC) genes from Venerupis philippinarum exposed to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linbao; Sun, Wei; Cai, Wengui; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Haigang; Ma, Shengwei; Jia, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    As pattern recognitionreceptors, the C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins play an important role in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, four novel C1q domain containing proteins (designated as VpC1qDC1, VpC1qDC2, VpC1qDC3 and VpC1qDC4) were cloned and characterized from clam Venerupis philippinarum. The four VpC1qDCs all possessed the conserved features critical for the fundamental structure and function of the C1q family. The four VpC1qDCs genes showed differential response profiles after exposure to the water soluble fraction of No.0 diesel oil (WSFD). More notably, VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were more sensitive to low concentration of WSFD, as their mRNA level changed by higher magnitudes. In addition, VpC1qDC2 and VpC1qDC4 displayed notable increases with larger amplitude to high concentration of WSFD. All these results suggested that the transcriptional response of VpC1qDCs genes were probably a protective mechanism of the cell to oils pollution. The diverse expression patterns of VpC1qDCs demonstrated that VpC1qDC1 and VpC1qDC3 were sensitive responders to environmental stress in V. philippinarum.

  14. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  15. The C1q Family of Proteins: Insights into the Emerging Non-Traditional Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage-modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders – including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia, and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh et al. (2011) showing that pregnant C1q−/− mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q−/− mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al. (2009) which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1) and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand, enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNF-α-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the tumor necrosis factor family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral “cytokine-like” activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions. PMID:22536204

  16. Interaction between complement subcomponent C1q and the Klebsiella pneumoniae porin OmpK36.

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, S; Marqués, G; Hernández-Allés, S; Rubires, X; Tomás, J M; Vivanco, F; Benedí, V J

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between C1q, a subcomponent of the complement classical pathway component C1, and OmpK36, a porin protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae, was studied in a solid-phase direct-binding assay, inhibition assays with the purified globular and collagen-like regions of C1q, and cross-linking experiments. We have shown that the binding of C1q to the OmpK36 porin of the serum-sensitive strain K. pneumoniae KT707 occurs in an in vivo situation and that this binding leads to activation of the complement classical pathway and the subsequent deposition of complement components C3b and C5b-9 on the OmpK36 porin. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [125I]C1q to the OmpK36 porin showed two binding sites with dissociation constants of 1.5 and 75 nM. The decrease of [125I]C1q binding to the OmpK36 porin in buffer with increasing salt concentrations and the pIs of the C1q subcomponent (10.3) and OmpK36 porin (4.5) suggest that charged amino acids are involved in the binding phenomenon. In inhibition assays, only the globular regions of C1q inhibited the interaction between C1q and OmpK36 porin, demonstrating that C1q binds to porin through its globular region and not through the collagen-like stalks. PMID:8890231

  17. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gmuca, Sabrina; Weiss, Pamela F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a comprehensive update of the pathogenesis, diagnostic imaging, treatments, and disease activity measurements of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). Recent findings Genetic and microbiome studies have provided new information regarding possible pathogenesis of JSpA. Recent work suggests that children with JSpA have decreased thresholds for pain in comparison to healthy children. Additionally, pain on physical examination and abnormalities on ultrasound of the entheses are not well correlated. Treatment guidelines for juvenile arthritis, including JSpA, were published by the American College of Rheumatology and are based on active joint count and presence of sacroiliitis. Recent studies have established the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in the symptomatic treatment of axial disease, though their efficacy for halting progression of structural damage is less clear. Newly developed disease activity measures for JSpA include the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and the JSpA Disease Activity index. In comparison to other categories of juvenile arthritis, children with JSpA are less likely to attain and sustain inactive disease. Summary Further microbiome and genetic research may help elucidate JSpA pathogenesis. More randomized therapeutic trials are needed and the advent of new composite disease activity measurement tools will hopefully allow for the design of these greatly needed trials. PMID:26002028

  18. Interstitial deletions 4q21.1q25 and 4q25q27: Phenotypic variability and relation to Rieger anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Kulharya, A.S.; Schneider, N.R.; Tonk, V.

    1995-01-16

    We describe clinical and chromosomal findings in two patients with del(4q). Patient 1, with interstitial deletion (4)(q21.1q25), had craniofacial and skeletal anomalies and died at 8 months hydrocephalus. Patient 2, with interstitial deletion (4)(q25q27), had craniofacial and skeletal anomalies with congenital hypotonia and developmental delay. These patients shared certain manifestations with other del(4q) patients but did not have Rieger anomaly. Clinical variability among patients with interstitial deletions of 4q may be related to variable expression, variable deletion, or imprinting of genes within the 4q region. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A de novo 1.38 Mb duplication of 1q31.1 in a boy with hemifacial microsomia, anophthalmia, anotia, macrostomia, and cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-shuang; Zhu, Bao; Jiang, Hai-ou; Wu, Su-fan; Zhang, Zai-qi; Xiao, Lin; Yi, Li-lan; Zhang, Jian-xiang

    2013-04-01

    We reported a 2-year-old boy with developmental delay, mild mental retardation, and severe craniofacial malformation, including facial asymmetry with hypoplasia of the left zygoma, maxilla, and mandible, and left anophthalmia and anotia. A genome-wide screen revealed a 1.38 Mb duplication on chromosome 1q31.1, which was absent in his parents and 27 healthy controls. The duplication region contains two Refseq genes, PLA2G4A and C1orf99, which have not been reported to be implicated in craniofacial malformation. Functional studies of these genes and additional clinical analysis are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of craniofacial malformation.

  20. Anti-C1q autoantibodies are linked to autoimmune thyroid disorders in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Vitkova, H; Jiskra, J; Springer, D; Limanova, Z; Telicka, Z; Bartakova, J; Trendelenburg, M; Potlukova, E

    2016-10-01

    Anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between anti-C1q and thyroid function in pregnancy-associated AITD. In 96 pregnant women screened positive for AITD (thyroid dysfunction and/or antibodies against thyroperoxidase - TPOAb), anti-C1q were measured during the 9-11th gestational week and after delivery (median 16 months after delivery), and compared to the corresponding serum levels of thyroid hormones. As controls, 80 healthy pregnant women, 72 non-pregnant AITD patients and 72 blood donors were included. In the non-pregnant AITD group, two serum samples ≥ 6 months apart were analysed. Compared to blood donors, anti-C1q levels were substantially higher in all pregnant women analysed. In pregnancy, anti-C1q levels were higher in the TPOAb-positive women than in controls (37 versus 17·5%, P < 0·0001). Anti-C1q-positive pregnant women screened positive for AITD had higher thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels than anti-C1q-negative women (2·41 versus 1·94 mU/l, P = 0·01), and TSH correlated positively with anti-C1q (r = 0·226, P = 0·045) in the TPOAb-positive women. After delivery, serum levels of anti-C1q decreased in the positively screened TPOAb-negative women (8·8 versus 5·9 U/l, P = 0·002), but not in the TPOAb-positive ones, and they no longer correlated with TSH. Anti-C1q antibody levels increase during pregnancy in general and even more in the context of AITD, where they correlate with thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27198614

  1. Identification of C1q as a Binding Protein for Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, Miho; Shibata, Takahiro; Hatasa, Yukinori; Hirose, Sayumi; Otaki, Natsuki; Nakashima, Fumie; Ito, Mika; Machida, Sachiko; Maruyama, Shoichi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-26

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) make up a heterogeneous group of molecules formed from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino groups of proteins. The abundance of AGEs in a variety of age-related diseases, including diabetic complications and atherosclerosis, and their pathophysiological effects suggest the existence of innate defense mechanisms. Here we examined the presence of serum proteins that are capable of binding glycated bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA), prepared upon incubation of BSA with dehydroascorbate, and identified complement component C1q subcomponent subunit A as a novel AGE-binding protein in human serum. A molecular interaction analysis showed the specific binding of C1q to the AGEs-BSA. In addition, we identified DNA-binding regions of C1q, including a collagen-like domain, as the AGE-binding site and established that the amount of positive charge on the binding site was the determining factor. C1q indeed recognized several other modified proteins, including acylated proteins, suggesting that the binding specificity of C1q might be ascribed, at least in part, to the electronegative potential of the ligand proteins. We also observed that C1q was involved in the AGEs-BSA-activated deposition of complement proteins, C3b and C4b. In addition, the AGEs-BSA mediated the proteolytic cleavage of complement protein 5 to release C5a. These findings provide the first evidence of AGEs as a new ligand recognized by C1q, stimulating the C1q-dependent classical complement pathway. PMID:26731343

  2. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  3. Role of C1q in Rhesus haemolytic disease of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Poorkhorsandi, M E; Gupte, S C

    1996-09-01

    Present study attempts to find out if maternal anti-D can bind the first complement component C1q and its impact on phagocytosis and severity of Rh haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). One hundred Rh immunised women were enrolled, however six having Rh(D) negative infants were excluded. Immunometric assay revealed that of 94 sera, 18 (19.1%) were able to bind C1q but failed to bind C3. Six mothers had anti-C (two bound C1q) and one had anti-E (C1q nonbinding) in addition to anti-D. Various characteristics of anti-D like titre, concentration, IgG subtypes and phagocytic activity showed comparable results (P > 0.3) in C1q binding and nonbinding groups. No significant difference in the severity of Rhesus haemolytic disease of the newborn (Rh HDN), judged by the outcome of pregnancy, cord blood haemoglobin, peak and pre exchange transfusion (ET), indirect serum bilirubin and requirement of ET, was observed in these two groups. Hence this study suggests that though some anti-D sera can bind C1q, there is no further activation of complement pathway and the severity of Rh HDN is not influenced by this phenomenon.

  4. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  5. Atomic resolution model of the antibody Fc interaction with the complement C1q component.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The globular C1q heterotrimer is a subunit of the C1 complement factor. Binding of the C1q subunit to the constant (Fc) part of antibody molecules is a first step and key event of complement activation. Although three-dimensional structures of C1q and antibody Fc subunits have been determined experimentally no atomic resolution structure of the C1q-Fc complex is known so far. Based on systematic protein-protein docking searches and Molecular Dynamics simulations a structural model of the C1q-IgG1-Fc-binding geometry has been obtained. The structural model is compatible with available experimental data on the interaction between the two partner proteins. It predicts a binding geometry that involves mainly the B-subunit of the C1q-trimer and both subunits of the IgG1-Fc-dimer with small conformational adjustments with respect to the unbound partners to achieve high surface complementarity. In addition to several charge-charge and polar contacts in the rim region of the interface it also involves nonpolar contacts between the two proteins and is compatible with the carbohydrate moiety of the Fc subunit. The model for the complex structure provides a working model for rationalizing available biochemical data on this important interaction and can form the basis for the design of Fc variants with a greater capacity to activate the complement system for example on binding to cancer cells or other target structures.

  6. C1q, the recognition subcomponent of the classical pathway of complement, drives microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Färber, Katrin; Cheung, Giselle; Mitchell, Daniel; Wallis, Russell; Weihe, Eberhard; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2009-02-15

    Microglia, central nervous system (CNS) resident phagocytic cells, persistently police the integrity of CNS tissue and respond to any kind of damage or pathophysiological changes. These cells sense and rapidly respond to danger and inflammatory signals by changing their cell morphology; by release of cytokines, chemokines, or nitric oxide; and by changing their MHC expression profile. We have shown previously that microglial biosynthesis of the complement subcomponent C1q may serve as a reliable marker of microglial activation ranging from undetectable levels of C1q biosynthesis in resting microglia to abundant C1q expression in activated, nonramified microglia. In this study, we demonstrate that cultured microglial cells respond to extrinsic C1q with a marked intracellular Ca(2+) increase. A shift toward proinflammatory microglial activation is indicated by the release of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nitric oxide and the oxidative burst in rat primary microglial cells, an activation and differentiation process similar to the proinflammatory response of microglia to exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Our findings indicate 1) that extrinsic plasma C1q is involved in the initiation of microglial activation in the course of CNS diseases with blood-brain barrier impairment and 2) that C1q synthesized and released by activated microglia is likely to contribute in an autocrine/paracrine way to maintain and balance microglial activation in the diseased CNS tissue. PMID:18831010

  7. Why the Y Chromosome?--A Look at Male Lineage and Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Edwards, Felecia; Latourelle, Sandra M.

    2006-01-01

    Up until a short time ago the Y chromosome played the role of the juvenile delinquent within human chromosomes. It was considered to be rich in junk, short on genes, and rapidly degenerating. Now the Y chromosome is growing up by providing a means for investigating human migration. Through the use of genetic markers on the Y chromosomes, students…

  8. [Juvenile angiofibroma].

    PubMed

    Thuesen, Anne Daugaard; Jakobsen, John; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2005-08-22

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare, benign, rich vascular tumor, and approximately one new case is diagnosed in Denmark each year. It sits in the foramen sphenopalatinum and occurs in boys from 14 to 25 years of age. The most frequent initial symptoms are nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Through the years, the treatment of juvenile angiofibroma has included many methods, including surgical excision, electrocoagulation, interstitial or external radiation therapy, cryosurgery, hormone administration and chemotherapy. Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery have proven to be the most effective treatments. The most serious complication has been preoperative bleeding, but since the introduction of preoperative particle embolization the blood loss has been greatly reduced. Today, surgery preceded by embolization is the primary standard treatment. It is important to diagnose the tumor early, when radical surgery is easier and the frequency of recurrence is lower.

  9. Evidence that complement protein C1q interacts with C-reactive protein through its globular head region.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Fabian D G; Brouwer, Mieke C; Arlaud, Gérard J; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik; Roos, Anja

    2006-03-01

    C1q acts as the recognition unit of the first complement component, C1, and binds to immunoglobulins IgG and IgM, as well as to non-Ig ligands, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). IgG and IgM are recognized via the globular head regions of C1q (C1qGR), whereas CRP has been postulated to interact with the collagen-like region (C1qCLR). In the present study, we used a series of nine mAbs to C1q, five directed against C1qGR and four against C1qCLR, to inhibit the interaction of C1q with CRP. The F(ab')(2) of each of the five mAbs directed against C1qGR inhibited binding of C1q to polymerized IgG. These five mAbs also successfully inhibited the interaction of C1q with CRP. Moreover, these five mAbs inhibited C1 activation by CRP as well as by polymerized IgG in vitro. In contrast, none of the four mAbs against C1qCLR inhibited C1q interaction with CRP or IgG, or could reduce activation of complement by CRP or polymerized IgG. These results provide the first evidence that the interaction of C1q with CRP or IgG involves sites located in the C1qGR, whereas sites in the CLR do not seem to be involved in the physiological interaction of C1q with CRP.

  10. 22.5 MB DELETION OF 13q31.1-q34 ASSOCIATED WITH HPE, DWM, AND HSCR: A CASE REPORT AND REDEFINING THE SMALLEST DELETED REGIONS.

    PubMed

    Alp, M Y; Çebi, A H; Seyhan, S; Cansu, A; Aydin, H; Ikbal, M

    2016-01-01

    Partial deletion of the long arm of the chromosome 13, 13q deletion syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder characterized by severe growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, brain malformations (holoprosencephaly, Dandy-Walker malformation), distal limb defects, eye anomalies, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract malformations (Hirschsprung's disease). Approximately 1.2 Mb region in 13q32 was suggested as minimal critical region which is responsible for severe mental and growth retardation and brain anomalies. Here we described a male patient with de novo interstitial deletion of 13q31.1-q34 associated with short stature, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, clinodactyly, cryptorchidism, micropenis, epilepsy, HPE, DWM, and HSCR. According to the literature review, present case indicated that smallest deleted region associated with DWM and HPE might be located at the 13q32.3, limb defects 13q34, anogenital malformations 13q33.3-34, and HSCR 13q31.1-32.1. PMID:27192891

  11. Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) from two candidate regions of chromosomes 1 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfarazi, M.; Akarsu, A.N.; Barsoum-Homsy, M.

    1994-09-01

    PCG is a genetically heterogeneous condition in which a significant proportion of families inherit in an autosomally recessive fashion. Although association of PCG with chromosomal abnormalities has been repeatedly reported in the literature, the chromosomal location of this condition is still unknown. Therefore, this study is designed to identify the chromosomal location of the PCG locus by positional mapping. We have identified 80 PCG families with a total of 261 potential informative meiosis. A group of 19 pedigrees with a minimum of 2 affected children in each pedigree and consanguinity in most of the parental generation were selected as our initial screening panel. This panel consists of a total of 44 affected and 93 unaffected individuals giving a total of 99 informative meiosis, including 5 phase-known. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing polyacrylamide gels and silver staining to genotype our families. We first screened for markers on 1q21-q31, the reported location for juvenile primary open-angle glaucoma and excluded a region of 30 cM as the likely site for the PCG locus. Association of PCG with both ring chromosome 6 and HLA-B8 has also been reported. Therefore, we genotyped our PCG panel with PCR applicable markers from 6p21. Significant negative lod scores were obtained for D6S105 (Z = -18.70) and D6S306 (Z = -5.99) at {theta}=0.001. HLA class 1 region has also contained one of the tubulin genes (TUBB) which is an obvious candidate for PCG. Study of this gene revealed a significant negative lod score with PCG (Z = -16.74, {theta}=0.001). A multipoint linkage analysis of markers in this and other regions containing the candidate genes will be presented.

  12. Trisomy 1q41-qter and monosomy 3p26.3-pter in a family with a translocation (1;3): further delineation of the syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trisomy 1q and monosomy 3p deriving from a t(1;3) is an infrequent event. The clinical characteristics of trisomy 1q41-qter have been described but there is not a delineation of the syndrome. The 3p25.3-pter monosomy syndrome (MIM 613792) characteristics include low birth weight, microcephaly, psychomotor and growth retardation and abnormal facies. Case presentation A 2 years 8 months Mexican mestizo male patient was evaluated due to a trisomy 1q and monosomy 3p derived from a familial t(1;3)(q41;q26.3). Four female carriers of the balanced translocation and one relative that may have been similarly affected as the proband were identified. The implicated chromosomal regions were defined by microarray analysis, the patient had a trisomy 1q41-qter of 30.3 Mb in extension comprising about 240 protein coding genes and a monosomy 3p26.3-pter of 1.7 Mb including only the genes CNTN6 (MIM 607220) and CHL1 (MIM 607416), which have been implicated in dendrite development. Their contribution to the phenotype, regarding the definition of trisomy 1q41-qter and monosomy 3p26.3-pter syndromes are discussed. Conclusion We propose that a trisomy 1q41-qter syndrome should be considered in particular when the following characteristics are present: postnatal growth delay, macrocephaly, wide fontanelle, triangular facies, frontal bossing, thick eye brows, down slanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, hypoplasic nostrils, long filtrum, high palate, microretrognathia, ear abnormalities, neural abnormalities (in particular ventricular dilatation), psychomotor developmental delay and mental retardation. Our patient showed most of these clinical characteristics with exception of macrocephaly, possibly due to a compensatory effect by haploinsufficiency of the two genes lost from 3p. The identification of carriers has important implications for genetic counseling as the risk of a new born with either a der(3) or der(1) resulting from an adjacent-1

  13. A novel multi-domain C1qDC protein from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri provides new insights into the function of invertebrate C1qDC proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Daoxiang; Jiang, Qiufen; Sun, Rui; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2015-10-01

    The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins are a family of proteins possessing globular C1q (gC1q) domains, and they rely on this domain to recognize various ligands such as PAMPs, immunoglobulins, ligands on apoptotic cell. In the present study, a novel multi-domain C1qDC protein (CfC1qDC-2) was identified from scallop Chlamys farreri, and its full length cDNA was composed of 1648 bp, encoding a signal peptide and three typical gC1q domains. BLAST analysis revealed significant sequence similarity between CfC1qDC-2 and C1qDC proteins from mollusks. Three gC1q domains were predicted in its tertiary structure to form a tightly packed bell-shaped trimer, and each one adopted a typical 10-stranded sandwich fold with a jelly-roll topology and contained six aromatic amino acids forming the hydrophobic core. The mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were mainly detected in the tissues of hepatopancreas and gonad of adult scallops, and the expression level was up-regulated in hemocytes after stimulated by LPS, PGN and β-glucan. During the embryonic development of scallop, the mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were presented in all the detected stages, and the expression level was up-regulated from D-hinged larvae and reached the highest at eye-spot larvae. The recombinant protein of MBP-CfC1qDC-2 (rCfC1qDC-2) could bind various PAMPs including LPS, PGN, LTA, β-glucan, mannan as well as polyI:C, and different microorganisms including three Gram-negative bacteria, three Gram-positive bacteria and two yeasts, as well as scallop apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, rCfC1qDC-2 could interact with human heat-aggregated IgG and IgM, and inhibit the C1q-dependent hemolysis of rabbit serum. All these results indicated that CfC1qDC-2 could recognize not only PAMPs as a PRR, but also the apoptotic cells. Moreover, the similar structures and functions shared by CfC1qDC-2 and complement C1q provided a new insight into the evolution of C1qDC proteins in complement system.

  14. C1q-latex assay for immune complexes. Complexes that react with both C1q and monoclonal rheumatoid factor in lupus erythematosus and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Medof, M.E.

    1982-05-01

    A solid phase radioassay for measurement of ICs in biological fluids is described in which ICs present in test sample bind to C1q immobilized on latex particles and bound complexes are quantitated by reaction with radioiodinated mRF. The radioassay can reproducibly measure 10 ng of aggregated human IgG in serum and differentiate soluble complexes from IC-like materials that precipitate with centrifugation or low temperature or stick to test tube walls. Reagents used in the assay, including C1q-L, can be stored for extended periods of time before use. One hundred four of 171 sera from patients with SLE and 8 of 50 sera from patients with LC, assayed by this method, contained elevated levels of ICs relative to controls . IC levels determined by this method correlated with IC data generated by 125I-C1q-PEG precipitation. Raji cell radioimmune assay, and solid-phase conglutinin assay, in some cases but not other.

  15. Meta-analysis of Genome-wide Association Studies Identifies 1q22 as a Susceptibility Locus for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Daniel; Falcone, Guido J.; Devan, William J.; Brown, W. Mark; Biffi, Alessandro; Howard, Timothy D.; Anderson, Christopher D.; Brouwers, H. Bart; Valant, Valerie; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Radmanesh, Farid; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Baedorf-Kassis, Sylvia; Deka, Ranjan; Woo, Jessica G.; Martin, Lisa J.; Haverbusch, Mary; Moomaw, Charles J.; Sun, Guangyun; Broderick, Joseph P.; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Martini, Sharyl R.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Kissela, Brett; Comeau, Mary E.; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Freudenberger, Paul; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Hansen, Björn M.; Norrving, Bo; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; Roquer, Jaume; Kraft, Peter; Ayres, Alison M.; Schwab, Kristin; McCauley, Jacob L.; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Rost, Natalia S.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Stögerer, Eva-Maria; Tirschwell, David L.; Selim, Magdy; Brown, Devin L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Malik, Rainer; Dichgans, Martin; Greenberg, Steven M.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the stroke subtype with the worst prognosis and has no established acute treatment. ICH is classified as lobar or nonlobar based on the location of ruptured blood vessels within the brain. These different locations also signal different underlying vascular pathologies. Heritability estimates indicate a substantial genetic contribution to risk of ICH in both locations. We report a genome-wide association study of this condition that meta-analyzed data from six studies that enrolled individuals of European ancestry. Case subjects were ascertained by neurologists blinded to genotype data and classified as lobar or nonlobar based on brain computed tomography. ICH-free control subjects were sampled from ambulatory clinics or random digit dialing. Replication of signals identified in the discovery cohort with p < 1 × 10−6 was pursued in an independent multiethnic sample utilizing both direct and genome-wide genotyping. The discovery phase included a case cohort of 1,545 individuals (664 lobar and 881 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 1,481 individuals and identified two susceptibility loci: for lobar ICH, chromosomal region 12q21.1 (rs11179580, odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, p = 7.0 × 10−8); and for nonlobar ICH, chromosomal region 1q22 (rs2984613, OR = 1.44, p = 1.6 × 10−8). The replication included a case cohort of 1,681 individuals (484 lobar and 1,194 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 2,261 individuals and corroborated the association for 1q22 (p = 6.5 × 10−4; meta-analysis p = 2.2 × 10−10) but not for 12q21.1 (p = 0.55; meta-analysis p = 2.6 × 10−5). These results demonstrate biological heterogeneity across ICH subtypes and highlight the importance of ascertaining ICH cases accordingly. PMID:24656865

  16. Deficiency in complement C1q improves histological and functional locomotor outcome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Manuel D.; Luchetti, Sabina; Burgos, Adrian M.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Hooshmand, Mitra J.; Anderson, Aileen J.; Hamers, Frank P.T.

    2009-01-01

    Although studies have suggested a role for the complement system in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), that role remains poorly defined. Additionally, the relative contribution of individual complement pathways in SCI is unknown. Our initial studies revealed that systemic complement activation was strongly influenced by genetic background and gender. Thus, to investigate the role of the classical complement pathway in contusion-induced SCI, male C1q knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice on a complement sufficient background (BUB) received a mild-moderate T9 contusion injury with the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor. BUB C1q KO mice exhibited greater locomotor recovery in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Improved recovery observed in BUB C1q KO mice was also associated with decreased threshold for withdrawal from a mild stimulus using von Frey filament testing. Surprisingly, quantification of microglia/macrophages (F4/80) by FACS analysis showed that BUB C1q KO mice exhibited a significantly greater percentage of macrophages in the spinal cord compared to BUB WT mice 3 days post injury (p < 0.05). However, this increased macrophage response appeared to be transient as stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue obtained 28 days post injury revealed no difference in F4/80 positive cells between groups. Stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue showed that BUB C1q KO mice had reduced lesion volume and an increase in tissue sparing in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that initiation of the classical complement pathway via C1q is detrimental to recovery after SCI. PMID:19091977

  17. Possible C1q bypass loop activation in the haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Nolin, L; O'Regan, S; Pelletier, M; Rivard, G E; Mongeau, J G; Robitaille, P

    1979-01-01

    Ultrastructural and immunofluorescent microscopic studies were performed on renal tissue obtained from nine patients during the acute and convalescent phase of the haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). All had glomerular deposits of IgM in the absence of circulating immune complexes. This was associated with deposition of C1q during the acute phase, and properdin and C3 during the convalescent phase. C4 was consistently absent. Since such a pattern of complement deposition does not fulfil criteria either for alternate or classical pathway activation, the possibility of C1q bypass loop activation by IgM is suggested. PMID:371879

  18. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  19. C1q protein binds to the apoptotic nucleolus and causes C1 protease degradation of nucleolar proteins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yitian; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Yeo, Joo Guan; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-09-11

    In infection, complement C1q recognizes pathogen-congregated antibodies and elicits complement activation. Among endogenous ligands, C1q binds to DNA and apoptotic cells, but whether C1q binds to nuclear DNA in apoptotic cells remains to be investigated. With UV irradiation-induced apoptosis, C1q initially bound to peripheral cellular regions in early apoptotic cells. By 6 h, binding concentrated in the nuclei to the nucleolus but not the chromatins. When nucleoli were isolated from non-apoptotic cells, C1q also bound to these structures. In vivo, C1q exists as the C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2), and C1q binding to ligands activates the C1r/C1s proteases. Incubation of nucleoli with C1 caused degradation of the nucleolar proteins nucleolin and nucleophosmin 1. This was inhibited by the C1 inhibitor. The nucleoli are abundant with autoantigens. C1q binding and C1r/C1s degradation of nucleolar antigens during cell apoptosis potentially reduces autoimmunity. These findings help us to understand why genetic C1q and C1r/C1s deficiencies cause systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

  1. Characterization of a gC1qR from the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Huang, Xin; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Yan-Ru; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    gC1qR, as a multicompartmental and a multifunctional protein, plays an important role in innate immunity. In this study, a gC1qR homolog (MrgC1qR) in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was identified. MrgC1qR, a 258-amino-acid polypeptide, shares high identities with gC1qR from other species. MrgC1qR gene was expressed in different tissues and was highest expressed in the hepatopancreas. In addition, the MrgC1qR transcript was significantly enhanced after 6 h of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection or post 2 h, 24 h of Vibrio anguillarum challenge compared to appropriate controls. Moreover, recombinant MrgC1qR (rMrgC1qR) had bacterial binding activity, the result also revealed that rMrgC1qR could bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as LPS or PGN, suggesting that MrgC1qRmight function as a pathogen-recognition receptor (PRR). Furthermore, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays showed that rMrgC1qR with GST-tag could bind to rMrFicolin1 or rMrFicolin2 with His-tag. Altogether, these results may demonstrate a role for MrgC1qR in innate immunity in the giant freshwater prawns.

  2. Hemifacial microsomia in cat-eye syndrome: 22q11.1-q11.21 as candidate loci for facial symmetry.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2013-08-01

    Cat-Eye syndrome (CES), (OMIM 115470) also known as chromosome 22 partial tetrasomy or inverted duplicated 22q11, was first reported by Haab [1879] based on the primary features of eye coloboma and anal atresia. However, >60% of the patients lack these primary features. Here, we present a 9-month-old female who at birth was noted to have multiple defects, including facial asymmetry with asymmetric retrognathia, bilateral mandibular hypoplasia, branchial cleft sinus, right-sided muscular torticollis, esotropia, and an atretic right ear canal with low-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral preauricular ear tag/pits, and two skin tags on her left cheek. There were no signs of any colobomas or anal atresia. Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) was suspected clinically. Chromosome studies and FISH identified an extra marker originated from 22q11 consistent with CES, and this was confirmed by aCGH. This report expands the phenotypic variability of CES and includes partial tetrasomy of 22q11.1-q11.21 in the differential diagnosis of HFM. In addition, our case as well as the previous association of 22q11.2 deletions and duplications with facial asymmetry and features of HFM, supports the hypothesis that this chromosome region harbors genes important in the regulation of body plan symmetry, and in particular facial harmony. PMID:23794175

  3. Inherited 1q21.1q21.2 duplication and 16p11.2 deletion: a two-hit case with more severe clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Sophie; Capri, Yline; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Tosca, Lucie; Gras, Domitille; Fauret-Amsellem, Anne-Laure; Pineau, Dominique; Saada, Julien; Ortonne, Valérie; Verloes, Alain; Goossens, Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard; Métay, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    We report paternally inherited duplication of 1q12q21.2 of 5.8 Mb associated with maternally inherited deletion of 16p11.2 of 545 Kb, this latter first identified in a fetus exhibiting an absent nasal bone detected during pregnancy. During the neonatal period, the young boy presented developmental delay, epilepsy, congenital anomalies and overweight. The clinical features of the proband with two rearrangements were more severe than in either of the parents carrying only one or the other mutation. Thus our data support a two-hit model in which the concomitant presence of these two copy-number variations exacerbates the neurodevelopmental phenotype. PMID:26162704

  4. Inherited 1q21.1q21.2 duplication and 16p11.2 deletion: a two-hit case with more severe clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Sophie; Capri, Yline; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Tosca, Lucie; Gras, Domitille; Fauret-Amsellem, Anne-Laure; Pineau, Dominique; Saada, Julien; Ortonne, Valérie; Verloes, Alain; Goossens, Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard; Métay, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    We report paternally inherited duplication of 1q12q21.2 of 5.8 Mb associated with maternally inherited deletion of 16p11.2 of 545 Kb, this latter first identified in a fetus exhibiting an absent nasal bone detected during pregnancy. During the neonatal period, the young boy presented developmental delay, epilepsy, congenital anomalies and overweight. The clinical features of the proband with two rearrangements were more severe than in either of the parents carrying only one or the other mutation. Thus our data support a two-hit model in which the concomitant presence of these two copy-number variations exacerbates the neurodevelopmental phenotype.

  5. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  6. An amphioxus gC1q protein binds human IgG and initiates the classical pathway: Implications for a C1q-mediated complement system in the basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-12-01

    The origin of the classical complement pathway remains open during chordate evolution. A C1q-like member, BjC1q, was identified in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum, hindgut, and notochord, and is significantly upregulated following challenge with bacteria or lipoteichoic acid and LPS. Recombinant BjC1q and its globular head domain specifically interact with lipoteichoic acid and LPS, but BjC1q displays little lectin activity. Moreover, rBjC1q can assemble to form the high molecular weight oligomers necessary for binding to proteases C1r/C1s and for complement activation, and binds human C1r/C1s/mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 as well as amphioxus serine proteases involved in the cleavage of C4/C2, and C3 activation. Importantly, rBjC1q binds with human IgG as well as an amphioxus Ig domain containing protein, resulting in the activation of the classical complement pathway. This is the first report showing that a C1q-like protein in invertebrates is able to initiate classical pathway, raising the possibility that amphioxus possesses a C1q-mediated complement system. It also suggests a new scenario for the emergence of the classical complement pathway, in contrast to the proposal that the lectin pathway evolved into the classical pathway.

  7. An amphioxus gC1q protein binds human IgG and initiates the classical pathway: Implications for a C1q-mediated complement system in the basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-12-01

    The origin of the classical complement pathway remains open during chordate evolution. A C1q-like member, BjC1q, was identified in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum, hindgut, and notochord, and is significantly upregulated following challenge with bacteria or lipoteichoic acid and LPS. Recombinant BjC1q and its globular head domain specifically interact with lipoteichoic acid and LPS, but BjC1q displays little lectin activity. Moreover, rBjC1q can assemble to form the high molecular weight oligomers necessary for binding to proteases C1r/C1s and for complement activation, and binds human C1r/C1s/mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 as well as amphioxus serine proteases involved in the cleavage of C4/C2, and C3 activation. Importantly, rBjC1q binds with human IgG as well as an amphioxus Ig domain containing protein, resulting in the activation of the classical complement pathway. This is the first report showing that a C1q-like protein in invertebrates is able to initiate classical pathway, raising the possibility that amphioxus possesses a C1q-mediated complement system. It also suggests a new scenario for the emergence of the classical complement pathway, in contrast to the proposal that the lectin pathway evolved into the classical pathway. PMID:25174509

  8. Presence of C1q-reactive immune complexes in patients with leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O.; Mendez-Navarrete, I.; Estrada-Parra, S.

    1972-01-01

    Presence of soluble immune complexes was investigated in sera from persons with a well documented clinical diagnosis of leprosy. The complexes were detected by their reactivity with the C1q component of complement. More than 70% of the studied patients with lepromatous-leprosy had immune complexes demonstrable by this method (39/51), while only a small proportion of the healthy control group (1/35 or about 3%) had precipitable complexes. Two out of nine sera from patients with tuberculoid leprosy reacted when tested with C1q component. The presence of free-antibody to mycobacterial antigens was determined as well. The possible relationship between the presence of such immune complexes and the pathology of some reactional states of the disease is discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4630778

  9. Complexes between C1q and C3 or C4: novel and specific markers for classical complement pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Wiessenberg, Hans D; Hart, Margreet; Bruins, Peter; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2005-03-01

    Classical pathway activation is often assessed by measuring circulating levels of activated C4. However, this parameter does not discriminate between activation through the classical or the lectin pathway. We hypothesized that during classical pathway activation, complexes are formed between C1q and activated C4 or C3. Using ELISA, we investigated whether such complexes constitute specific markers for classical pathway activation. In vitro, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were generated upon incubation of normal recalcified plasma with aggregated IgG or an anti-C1q mAb that activates C1 (mAb anti-C1q-130). In contrast, during incubation with C1s or trypsin, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated, which excludes an innocent bystander effect. Additionally, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated during activation of the alternative or the lectin pathway. Repeated freezing and thawing did not influence levels of C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in recalcified plasma. To measure C1q-complement complexes in plasma samples, we separated unbound complement proteins from C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in the samples prior to testing with ELISA. In samples from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery or suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, we found higher levels of C1q-C4 complexes than in samples from healthy individuals. We conclude that complexes between C1q and C4 or C3 are specific markers of classical complement pathway activation.

  10. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    PubMed

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, p<0.001) and oral ulcers (49% versus 24%, p<0.001) occurred significantly more frequent in C1q deficiency-associated SLE/SLE-like disease than in sporadic SLE, whereas arthritis (38% versus 84%, p<001) and anti-ds-DNA (18% versus 78%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently. Renal and neurological manifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations.

  11. Juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Quartier, Pierre; Gherardi, Romain K

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a systemic, inflammatory, idiopathic disease, mainly affecting the skin and the muscles, starting before the age of 16, with an incidence around one case per 1 million children. Some patients display typical features of JDM without skin involvement, or even without muscle involvement; however, both tissues are affected over time in most cases. Diagnosis criteria were established by Bohan and Peter 35 years ago, based on the presence of typical skin rash and proximal muscle involvement. Other conditions have to be ruled out before making a diagnosis of JDM, such as other connective tissue diseases, polymyositis, infectious/postinfectious myositis, genetic diseases, or metabolic or drug-induced myopathies. Unlike adult-onset dermatomyositis, JDM is exceptionally associated with a malignant disease. JDM may also affect several organs, including the lungs and the digestive tract. In a subset of patients, glucose intolerance, lipodystrophia and/or calcinosis develop. Delay in treatment initiation or inadequate treatment may favor diffuse, debilitating calcinosis. JDM patients have to be referred to reference pediatric centers to properly assess disease activity and disease-related damage (including low bone density in most cases), and to define the best treatment. Long-lasting corticosteroid therapy remains the gold standard, together with physiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing the effect of several immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory drugs, which may help to control the disease and possibly demonstrate a corticosteroid-sparing effect. Most patients respond to treatment; relapses are frequent but a complete disease remission is achieved in most cases before adulthood.

  12. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  13. One Adaptive Synchronization Approach for Fractional-Order Chaotic System with Fractional-Order 1 < q < 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Bai, Rongji

    2014-01-01

    Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1 < q < 2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1 < q < 2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:25247207

  14. One adaptive synchronization approach for fractional-order chaotic system with fractional-order 1 < q < 2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Bai, Rongji

    2014-01-01

    Based on a new stability result of equilibrium point in nonlinear fractional-order systems for fractional-order lying in 1 < q < 2, one adaptive synchronization approach is established. The adaptive synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system with fractional-order 1 < q < 2 is considered. Numerical simulations show the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:25247207

  15. Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Single-Chain Form of the Recognition Domain of Complement Protein C1q

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Christophe; Bally, Isabelle; Chouquet, Anne; Bottazzi, Barbara; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Complement C1q is a soluble pattern recognition molecule comprising six heterotrimeric subunits assembled from three polypeptide chains (A–C). Each heterotrimer forms a collagen-like stem prolonged by a globular recognition domain. These recognition domains sense a wide variety of ligands, including pathogens and altered-self components. Ligand recognition is either direct or mediated by immunoglobulins or pentraxins. Multivalent binding of C1q to its targets triggers immune effector mechanisms mediated via its collagen-like stems. The induced immune response includes activation of the classical complement pathway and enhancement of the phagocytosis of the recognized target. We report here, the first production of a single-chain recombinant form of human C1q globular region (C1q-scGR). The three monomers have been linked in tandem to generate a single continuous polypeptide, based on a strategy previously used for adiponectin, a protein structurally related to C1q. The resulting C1q-scGR protein was produced at high yield in stably transfected 293-F mammalian cells. Recombinant C1q-scGR was correctly folded, as demonstrated by its X-ray crystal structure solved at a resolution of 1.35 Å. Its interaction properties were assessed by surface plasmon resonance analysis using the following physiological C1q ligands: the receptor for C1q globular heads, the long pentraxin PTX3, calreticulin, and heparin. The 3D structure and the binding properties of C1q-scGR were similar to those of the three-chain fragment generated by collagenase digestion of serum-derived C1q. Comparison of the interaction properties of the fragments with those of native C1q provided insights into the avidity component associated with the hexameric assembly of C1q. The interest of this functional recombinant form of the recognition domains of C1q in basic research and its potential biomedical applications are discussed. PMID:26973654

  17. A novel C1qDC protein acting as pattern recognition receptor in scallop Argopecten irradians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Kong, Pengfei; Yang, Jialong; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Mengqiang; Zhou, Zhi; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2012-08-01

    The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins refer to a family of proteins containing the versatile charge pattern recognition globular C1q domain in the C-terminus, which could bind various ligands including PAMPs and trigger a serial of immune response. In this study, a novel C1qDC protein was identified from Argopecten irradians (designated as AiC1qDC-2). Its full-length cDNA was of 1062 bp with an open reading frame of 720 bp encoding a polypeptide of 240 amino acids containing a typical gC1q domain. This gC1q domain possessed the typical 10-stranded β-sandwich fold with a jelly-roll topology common to all C1q family members, and shared high homology with most of the other identified gC1q domains. The mRNA transcripts of AiC1qDC-2 were mainly detected in hepatopancreas, and also marginally detectable in mantle, gonad, adductor, gill and hemocytes. Its relative expression level in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated after challenges of fungi Pichia pastoris GS115 (P < 0.05), Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus (P < 0.05) and Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum (P < 0.05). The recombinant protein of AiC1qDC-2 (rAiC1qDC-2) could bind various PAMPs, including LPS, PGN, polyI:C, mannan, β-1,3-glucan as well as Yeast-glucan, and displayed agglutinating activity to fungi P. pastoris GS115, Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli TOP10F' as well as V. anguillarum. All these results indicated that AiC1qDC-2 could function as a pattern recognition receptor to recognize various PAMPs on different pathogens in the innate immune responses of scallop, and provided new clues to understand the role of invertebrate C1qDC proteins in the ancient complement system.

  18. Soluble gC1qR in Blood and Body Fluids: Examination in a Pancreatic Cancer Patient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, Ellinor IB; Brandwijk, Ricardo JMGE; Dembitzer, Francine R; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2015-01-01

    Background gC1qR is a multifunctional cellular protein that has been linked to inflammation and cancer. gC1qR is highly upregulated in adenocarcinomas as compared to normal tissue counterparts, and soluble gC1qR (sgC1qR) has been detected in vitro in the pericellular milieu of proliferating malignant cells. Aim The present study explored the tissue expression of gC1qR in pancreatic cancer by immunohistochemistry, and the presence of sgC1qR in vivo, by examining blood and malignant effusions from patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods Tissue expression of gC1qR by pancreatic adenocarcinoma was visualized by immunohistochemistry. SgC1qR was quantified in serum from healthy volunteers (n=20) and pancreatic cancer patients (n=34), as well as in malignant pleural (n=23) and peritoneal effusions (n=27), using a newly developed, sensitive immunocapture sandwich ELISA. Results Overexpression of gC1qR was confirmed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to nonmalignant pancreatic tissue. Moreover, increased serum levels of sgC1qR (0.29 ± 0.22 ng/ml) were noted in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer compared to healthy controls (0.15 ± 0.10 ng/ml) (mean ± S.D.) (p=0.035). In 11 of 16 patients for whom sequential samples were available, serum sgC1qR levels rose with disease progression, and paralleled changes in tumor biomarkers, CEA and CA19.9. In addition to blood, sgC1qR was detected in malignant pleural (0.55 ± 0.47 ng/ml) and peritoneal effusions (0.57 ± 0.38 ng/ml). Conclusion This study provides the first evidence for the presence of sgC1qR in vivo. The ability to detect sgC1qR in blood and body fluids will enable further studies to elucidate its pathophysiology in malignancy. PMID:26973884

  19. Complimentary action: C1q increases ganglion cell survival in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Blom, Anna M; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-09-15

    Using a previously described retinal explant culture system as an acute injury model, we here explore the role of C1q, the initiator of the classical complement pathway, in neuronal cell survival and retinal homeostasis. Full-thickness adult rat retinal explants were divided into four groups, receiving the following supplementation: C1q (50nM), C1-inhibitor (C1-inh; Berinert; 500mg/l), C1q+C1-inh, and no supplementation (culture controls). Explants were kept for 12h or 2days after which they were examined morphologically and with a panel of immunohistochemical markers. C1q supplementation protects ganglion cells from degeneration within the explant in vitro system. This effect is correlated to an attenuated endogenous production of C1q, and a quiesced gliotic response. PMID:27609284

  20. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  1. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  2. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

  3. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  4. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  5. Calreticulin contributes to C1q-dependent recruitment of microglia in the leech Hirudo medicinalis following a CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Le Marrec-Croq, Françoise; Bocquet-Garcon, Annelise; Vizioli, Jacopo; Vancamp, Christelle; Drago, Francesco; Franck, Julien; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Sautiere, Pierre-Eric; Lefebvre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background The medicinal leech is considered as a complementary and appropriate model to study immune functions in the central nervous system (CNS). In a context in which an injured leech’s CNS can naturally restore normal synaptic connections, the accumulation of microglia (immune cells of the CNS that are exclusively resident in leeches) has been shown to be essential at the lesion to engage the axonal sprouting. HmC1q (Hm for Hirudo medicinalis) possesses chemotactic properties that are important in the microglial cell recruitment by recognizing at least a C1q binding protein (HmC1qBP alias gC1qR). Material/Methods Recombinant forms of C1q were used in affinity purification and in vitro chemotaxis assays. Anti-calreticulin antibodies were used to neutralize C1q-mediated chemotaxis and locate the production of calreticulin in leech CNS. Results A newly characterized leech calreticulin (HmCalR) has been shown to interact with C1q and participate to the HmC1q-dependent microglia accumulation. HmCalR, which has been detected in only some microglial cells, is consequently a second binding protein for HmC1q, allowing the chemoattraction of resident microglia in the nerve repair process. Conclusions These data give new insight into calreticulin/C1q interaction in an immune function of neuroprotection, suggesting another molecular target to use in investigation of microglia reactivity in a model of CNS injury. PMID:24747831

  6. Activation-dependent surface expression of gC1qR/p33 on human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Murphy, Tara K; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2003-02-01

    GC1qR/p33 (gC1qR) is expressed by a variety of somatic and cultured cells, including blood platelets. It interacts with several cellular, viral, bacterial, and plasma proteins, suggesting a potential role in thrombosis, inflammation, and infection. Considerable controversy has surrounded the surface membrane localization of gC1qR, however, since its cDNA sequence does not predict a traditional membrane-anchoring domain, and bears a typical mitochondrial targeting sequence. The present study examined gC1qR expression on resting and activated human blood platelets using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with two monoclonal antibodies, 74.5.2 and 60.11, directed against gC1qR C-terminal amino acids 204-218, and N-terminal amino acids 76-93, respectively. Unstimulated platelets reacted minimally with either antibody. In contrast, platelet activation with TRAP, epinephrine, or ADP produced markedly increased gC1qR expression as reflected by 74.5.2 binding but not 60.11 binding. Platelet activation was verified using PAC-1 and anti CD 62 antibodies. Whereas PAC-1 binding to activated platelets could be reversed following platelet incubation with PGE1, 74.5.2 binding remained unchanged, suggesting the sustained expression of gC1qR following platelet stimulation. The data further demonstrate that detection of cell surface gC1qR may be dependent on antibody specificity. The ability of gC1qR to bind proteins involved in complement, coagulation, and kinin systems, as well as viral and bacterial pathogens including S. aureus protein A, supports the hypothesis that gC1qR expressed on activated platelets may contribute directly to thrombosis, inflammation, and endovascular infections.

  7. Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

  8. Juveniles in court.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Matthew F; Scott, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Nineteenth-century American reformers were concerned about the influence of immaturity and development in juvenile offenses. They responded to their delinquent youths through the creation of juvenile courts. This early American juvenile justice system sought to treat children as different from adults and to rehabilitate wayward youths through the state's assumption of a parental role. Although these rehabilitative goals were never fully realized, the field of American child psychiatry was spawned from these efforts on behalf of delinquent youths. Early child psychiatrists began by caring for juvenile offenders. The function of a child psychiatrist with juvenile delinquents expanded beyond strictly rehabilitation, however, as juvenile courts evolved to resemble criminal adult courts-due to landmark Supreme Court decisions and also juvenile legislation between 1966 and 1975. In response to dramatically increased juvenile violence and delinquency rates in the 1980s, juvenile justice became more retributional, and society was forced to confront issues such as capital punishment for juveniles, their transfer to adult courts, and their competency to stand trial. In the modern juvenile court, child psychiatrists are often asked to participate in the consideration of such issues because of their expertise in development. In that context we review the role of psychiatrists in assisting juvenile courts.

  9. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  10. The Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in leukemia. III. Complex Ph translocation plus inversion in chronic myelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; Stebbins, R D; Hecht, F; Sandberg, A A

    1985-01-01

    Remarkable chromosome abnormalities were observed in bone marrow cells from a woman with chronic myelocytic leukemia and atypical tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Four chromosome breaks occurred at bands 1p13, 1q32, 11p15, and 22q11. These breaks resulted in a complex Philadelphia (Ph) translocation between chromosomes #1, #11, and #22 and in an inversion of chromosome #1. Oncogenes on these chromosomes include N-ras and c-sk on chromosome #1, c-H-ras on chromosome #11, and c-sis on chromosome #22. Complex chromosome rearrangements may facilitate multiple oncogene changes, thereby permitting several steps in cancer development to occur simultaneously.

  11. Juveniles on trial.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kathleen M

    2002-10-01

    This article describes common forensic evaluations requested of juvenile court mental health evaluators. There has been a legal shift toward criminalization of juvenile court, with a greater emphasis on rights, abandonment of the rehabilitative model, and greater movement of adolescents into the adult criminal court. A resulting shift has been the redefinition of juvenile court forensic evaluations toward the specificity of adult forensic work. The challenge for evaluators is to refine their knowledge of the forensic standards and bring knowledge of development, assessment, and diagnosis in juveniles and interview techniques appropriate to juveniles to improve the evaluation and forensic reports.

  12. Integrative analysis of 1q23.3 copy number gain in metastatic urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Markus; Werner, Lillian; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Selvarajah, Shamini; Guancial, Elizabeth A.; Weir, Barbara A.; Stack, Edward C.; Park, Rachel S.; O’Brien, Robert; Schutz, Fabio A. B.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Lloreta, Josep; Marchionni, Luigi; Gallardo, Enrique; Rojo, Federico; Garcia, Denise I.; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Kwiatkowski, David; Bochner, Bernard; Hahn, William C.; Ligon, Azra H.; Barletta, Justine A.; Loda, Massimo; Berman, David M.; Kantoff, Philip; Michor, Franziska; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is associated with multiple somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). We evaluated SCNAs to identify predictors of poor survival in patients with metastatic UC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Experimental Design We obtained overall survival (OS) and array DNA copy number data from metastatic UC patients in two cohorts. Associations between recurrent SCNAs and OS were determined by a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for performance status and visceral disease. mRNA expression was evaluated for potential candidate genes by Nanostring nCounter to identify transcripts from the region that are associated with copy number gain. In addition, expression data from an independent cohort was used to identify candidate genes. Results Multiple areas of recurrent significant gains and losses were identified. Gain of 1q23.3 was independently associated with a shortened OS in the both cohorts (adjusted HR 2.96; 95% CI, 1.35 to 6.48; P = 0.01 and adjusted HR 5.03; 95% CI 1.43-17.73; P < 0.001). The F11R, PFDN2, PPOX, USP21 and DEDD genes, all located on 1q23.3, were closely associated with poor outcome. Conclusions 1q23.3 copy number gain displayed association with poor survival in two cohorts of metastatic UC. The identification of the target of this copy number gain is ongoing, and exploration of this finding in other disease states may be useful for the early identification of poor risk UC patients. Prospective validation of the survival association is necessary to demonstrate clinical relevance. PMID:24486590

  13. Chromosome mapping of five human cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Otsu, K.; Fujii, J.; MacLennan, D.H. ); Periasamy, M. ); Difilippantonio, M.; Uppender, M.; Ward, D.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments were performed using genomic and complementary DNA probes in order to determine the location on human chromosomes for five genes expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. The chromosome location of each gene was determined in terms of both cytogenetic bands and fractional chromosome length. The ATP2A2 gene, expressing the SERCA2 isoform of the Ca[sup 2+] pump, maps to bands 12q23-q24.1, the phospholamban gene (PLN) to 6q22.1, the human skeletal muscle calsequestrin gene (CASQ1) to band 1q21, the cardiac calsequestrin gene (CASQ2) to bands 1p11-p13.3, and the cardiac calcium release channel gene (RYR2) to the interval between band 1q42.1 (distal) and band 1q43 (proximal). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  14. New heritable fragile site with spontaneous expression at 1q41

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, H.; Bar-El, H.; Ziv, M.

    1995-01-16

    The report presents a family ascertained through recurrent spontaneous abortions in which a new heritable fragile site located at 1q41 is segregating. The fragile site is present in the mother and her son. It is expressed spontaneously in 100% of the metaphases from lymphocyte culture using standard conditions. The use of folate deficient medium and the addition of FUdR to the medium did not affect the appearance nor the level of expression of the fragile site. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Complement Protein C1q Modulates Neurite Outgrowth In Vitro and Spinal Cord Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Sheri L.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Mendez, Oscar A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to CNS fiber tracts is accompanied by failure of severed axons to regenerate and results in lifelong functional deficits. The inflammatory response to CNS trauma is mediated by a diverse set of cells and proteins with varied, overlapping, and opposing effects on histological and behavioral recovery. Importantly, the contribution of individual inflammatory complement proteins to spinal cord injury (SCI) pathology is not well understood. Although the presence of complement components increases after SCI in association with axons and myelin, it is unknown whether complement proteins affect axon growth or regeneration. We report a novel role for complement C1q in neurite outgrowth in vitro and axon regrowth after SCI. In culture, C1q increased neurite length on myelin. Protein and molecular assays revealed that C1q interacts directly with myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in myelin, resulting in reduced activation of growth inhibitory signaling in neurons. In agreement with a C1q-outgrowth-enhancing mechanism in which C1q binding to MAG reduces MAG signaling to neurons, complement C1q blocked both the growth inhibitory and repulsive turning effects of MAG in vitro. Furthermore, C1q KO mice demonstrated increased sensory axon turning within the spinal cord lesion after SCI with peripheral conditioning injury, consistent with C1q-mediated neutralization of MAG. Finally, we present data that extend the role for C1q in axon growth and guidance to include the sprouting patterns of descending corticospinal tract axons into spinal gray matter after dorsal column transection SCI. PMID:25762679

  16. Chromosome imbalance, normal phenotype, and imprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Bortotto, L; Piovan, E; Furlan, R; Rivera, H; Zuffardi, O

    1990-01-01

    A duplication of the sub-bands 1q42.11 and 1q42.12 was found in a boy and his mother. The proband has short stature (around the 10th centile) but a normal phenotype and psychomotor development. His mother is also asymptomatic. We found 30 published cases of normal subjects with an imbalance of autosomal euchromatic material. In these cases the imbalance involved either only one G positive band or a G positive and a G negative band. Thus the absence of a phenotypic effect cannot always be ascribed to the deficiency in the G positive bands of coding DNA. Moreover, in some cases, the method of transmission of the chromosome abnormality was such that an imprinting effect could be postulated. Images PMID:2231652

  17. Inherited and de novo deletion of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene locus at 16q22.1----q22.3 in a patient with tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Natt, E; Westphal, E M; Toth-Fejel, S E; Magenis, R E; Buist, N R; Rettenmeier, R; Scherer, G

    1987-12-01

    Tyrosinemia II is an autosomal-recessively inherited condition caused by deficiency in the liver-specific enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; EC 2.6.1.5). We have restudied a patient with typical symptoms of tyrosinemia II who in addition suffers from multiple congenital anomalies including severe mental retardation. Southern blot analysis using a human TAT cDNA probe revealed a complete deletion of both TAT alleles in the patient. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of the patient and his family showed one deletion to be maternally inherited, extending over at least 27 kb and including the complete TAT structural gene, whereas loss of the second TAT allele results from a small de novo interstitial deletion, del 16 (pter----q22.1::q22.3----qter), in the paternally inherited chromosome 16. Three additional loci previously assigned to 16q22 were studied in our patient: haptoglobin (HP), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and the metallothionein gene cluster MT1,MT2. Of these three markers, only the HP locus was found to be codeleted with the TAT locus on the del(16) chromosome.

  18. Fenamiphos is recalcitrant to the hydrolysis by alloforms PON1 Q192R of human serum.

    PubMed

    Damianys, Almenares-López; Fernanda, Martínez-Salazar María; Laura, Ortiz-Hernández María; Rafael, Vazquez-Duhalt; Antonio, Monroy-Noyola

    2013-03-01

    Fenamiphos (ethyl 4-methylthio-m-tolyl isopropylphosphoramidate) is a racemic organophosphorus nematicide widely used in agriculture around the world. The paraoxonase 1 from human serum (PON1) is a phosphotriesterase (PTE) that hydrolyses several xenobiotics including drugs and organophosphorus compounds (OPs). In this work, the separation of the enantiomers of fenamiphos by HPLC using the column CHIRALCEL OJ and a mobile phase of hexane/ethanol (99/1) is presented. A liquid-liquid extraction method was implemented for the characterization of commercial nematicide hydrolysis by PON1 Q192R alloforms of human serum from children and adults. The results show a recovery of 94% for each isomer from the biological matrix. The method resulted linear response in a range concentration between 50 and 800μM with a detection and quantification limit between 0.6 and 2μM for the (+)-fenamiphos, and between 0.7 and 2.3μM for the (-)-fenamiphos. The levels of the Ca(2+)-dependent hydrolysis (residual concentration [μM]) quantified during 30min of reaction were only just 4-14% for both fenamiphos enantiomers with the three alloforms of PON1 Q192R of the two groups of serum studied. These results demonstrate that human serum PON1 is could be involved in the detoxification of a limited number of organophosphorus insecticides.

  19. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler IV: Planet Sample from Q1-Q8 (22 Months)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Mullally, F.; Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Still, Martin; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Chaplin, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cochran, William D.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Havel, Mathieu; Henze, Christopher E.; Howell, Steve B.; Huber, Daniel; Latham, David W.; Li, Jie; Morehead, Robert C.; Morton, Timothy D.; Pepper, Joshua; Quintana, Elisa; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E.; Shah, Yash; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wolfgang, Angie

    2014-02-01

    We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon nearly two years of high-precision photometry (i.e., Q1-Q8). From an initial list of nearly 13,400 threshold crossing events, 480 new host stars are identified from their flux time series as consistent with hosting transiting planets. Potential transit signals are subjected to further analysis using the pixel-level data, which allows background eclipsing binaries to be identified through small image position shifts during transit. We also re-evaluate Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) 1-1609, which were identified early in the mission, using substantially more data to test for background false positives and to find additional multiple systems. Combining the new and previous KOI samples, we provide updated parameters for 2738 Kepler planet candidates distributed across 2017 host stars. From the combined Kepler planet candidates, 472 are new from the Q1-Q8 data examined in this study. The new Kepler planet candidates represent ~40% of the sample with R P ~ 1 R ⊕ and represent ~40% of the low equilibrium temperature (T eq < 300 K) sample. We review the known biases in the current sample of Kepler planet candidates relevant to evaluating planet population statistics with the current Kepler planet candidate sample.

  20. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  1. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Terry L

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients' sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA. PMID:27242784

  2. C1q-mediated chemotaxis by human neutrophils: involvement of gClqR and G-protein signalling mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, L E; Ghebrehiwet, B; Perera, T P; Bird, I N; Strong, P; Kishore, U; Reid, K B; Eggleton, P

    1998-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical pathway of the complement system, interacts with various cell types and triggers a variety of cell-specific cellular responses, such as oxidative burst, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, etc. Different biological responses are attributed to the interaction of C1q with more than one putative cell-surface C1q receptor/C1q-binding protein. Previously, it has been shown that C1q-mediated oxidative burst by neutrophils is not linked to G-protein-coupled fMet-Leu-Phe-mediated response. In the present study, we have investigated neutrophil migration brought about by C1q and tried to identify the signal-transduction pathways involved in the chemotactic response. We found that C1q stimulated neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent manner, primarily by enhancing chemotaxis (directed movement) rather than chemokinesis (random movement). This C1q-induced chemotaxis could be abolished by an inhibitor of G-proteins (pertussis toxin) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002). The collagen tail of C1q appeared to mediate chemotaxis. gC1qR, a C1q-binding protein, has recently been reported to participate in C1q-mediated chemotaxis of murine mast cells and human eosinophils. We observed that gC1qR enhanced binding of free C1q to adherent neutrophils and promoted C1q-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils by nearly seven-fold. Our results suggests C1q-mediated chemotaxis involves gC1qR as well as G-protein-coupled signal-transduction mechanisms operating downstream to neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:9461517

  3. The t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia produces a novel fusion gene, NPM-MLF1.

    PubMed

    Yoneda-Kato, N; Look, A T; Kirstein, M N; Valentine, M B; Raimondi, S C; Cohen, K J; Carroll, A J; Morris, S W

    1996-01-18

    A t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) chromosomal translocation associated with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was found to rearrange part of the nucleophosmin (NPM) gene on chromosome 5 with sequences from a novel gene on chromosome 3. Chimeric transcripts expressed by these cells contain 5' NPM coding sequences fused in-frame to those of the new gene, which we named myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1). RNA-based polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed identical NPM-MLF1 mRNA fusions in each of the three t(3;5)-positive cases of AML examined. The predicted MLF1 amino acid sequence lacked homology to previously characterized proteins and did not contain known functional motifs. Normal MLF1 transcripts were expressed in a variety of tissues, most abundantly in testis, ovary, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and colon. Anti-MLF1 antibodies detected the wild-type 31 kDa protein in K562 and HEL erythroleukemia cell lines, but not in HL-60, U937 or KG-1 myeloid leukemia lines. By contrast, t(3;5)-positive leukemia cells expressed a 54 kDa NPM-MLF1 protein, but not normal MLF1. Immunostaining experiments indicated that MLF1 is normally located in the cytoplasm, whereas NPM-MLF1 is targeted to the nucleus, with highest levels in the nucleolus. The nuclear/nucleolar localization of NPM-MLF1 mirrors that of NPM, indicating that NPM trafficking signals direct MLF1 to an inappropriate cellular compartment in myeloid leukemia cells.

  4. Fine mapping of the uterine leiomyoma locus on 1q43 close to a lncRNA in the RGS7-FH interval

    PubMed Central

    Aissani, Brahim; Zhang, Kui; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H; Wiener, Howard W

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) on chromosome 1q43 cause a rare cancer syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), but are rare in nonsyndromic and common uterine leiomyoma (UL) or fibroids. Studies suggested that variants in FH or in a linked gene may also predispose to UL. We re-sequenced 2.3 Mb of DNA spanning FH in 96 UL cases and controls from the multiethnic NIEHS-uterine fibroid study, and in 18 HLRCC-associated UL probands from European families then selected 221 informative SNPs for follow-up genotyping. We report promising susceptibility associations with UL peaking at rs78220092 (P=7.0×10−5) in the RGS7-FH interval in African Americans. In race-combined analyses and in meta-analyses (n=916), we identified promising associations with risk peaking upstream of a non-protein coding RNA (lncRNA) locus located in the RGS7-FH interval closer to RGS7, and associations with tumor size peaking in the distal phospholipase D family, member 5 (PLD5) gene at rs2654879 (P=1.7×10−4). We corroborated previously reported FH mutations in nine out of the 18 HLRCC-associated UL cases and identified two missense mutations in FH in only two nonsyndromic UL cases and one control. Our fine association mapping and integration of existing gene profiling data showing upregulated expression of the lncRNA and downregulation of PLD5 in fibroids, as compared to matched myometrium, suggest a potential role of this genomic region in UL pathogenesis. While the identified variations at 1q43 represent a potential risk locus for UL, future replication analyses are required to substantiate our observation. PMID:26113603

  5. Fine mapping of the uterine leiomyoma locus on 1q43 close to a lncRNA in the RGS7-FH interval.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Brahim; Zhang, Kui; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H; Wiener, Howard W

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) on chromosome 1q43 cause a rare cancer syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), but are rare in nonsyndromic and common uterine leiomyoma (UL) or fibroids. Studies suggested that variants in FH or in a linked gene may also predispose to UL. We re-sequenced 2.3 Mb of DNA spanning FH in 96 UL cases and controls from the multiethnic NIEHS-uterine fibroid study, and in 18 HLRCC-associated UL probands from European families then selected 221 informative SNPs for follow-up genotyping. We report promising susceptibility associations with UL peaking at rs78220092 (P=7.0×10(-5)) in the RGS7-FH interval in African Americans. In race-combined analyses and in meta-analyses (n=916), we identified promising associations with risk peaking upstream of a non-protein coding RNA (lncRNA) locus located in the RGS7-FH interval closer to RGS7, and associations with tumor size peaking in the distal phospholipase D family, member 5 (PLD5) gene at rs2654879 (P=1.7×10(-4)). We corroborated previously reported FH mutations in nine out of the 18 HLRCC-associated UL cases and identified two missense mutations in FH in only two nonsyndromic UL cases and one control. Our fine association mapping and integration of existing gene profiling data showing upregulated expression of the lncRNA and downregulation of PLD5 in fibroids, as compared to matched myometrium, suggest a potential role of this genomic region in UL pathogenesis. While the identified variations at 1q43 represent a potential risk locus for UL, future replication analyses are required to substantiate our observation.

  6. Copy number variation at 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Diskin, Sharon J.; Hou, Cuiping; Glessner, Joseph T.; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Laudenslager, Marci; Bosse, Kristopher; Cole, Kristina; Mosse, Yael P.; Wood, Andrew; Lynch, Jill E.; Pecor, Katlyn; Diamond, Maura; Winter, Cynthia; Wang, Kai; Kim, Cecilia; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; McGrady, Patrick W.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; London, Wendy B.; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Bradfield, Jonathan; Grant, Struan F. A.; Li, Hongzhe; Devoto, Marcella; Rappaport, Eric R.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Maris, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Common copy number variations (CNVs) represent a significant source of genetic diversity, yet their influence on phenotypic variability, including disease susceptibility, remains poorly understood. To address this problem in cancer, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of CNVs in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, a disease where SNP variations are known to influence susceptibility1,2. We first genotyped 846 Caucasian neuroblastoma patients and 803 healthy Caucasian controls at 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and performed a CNV-based test for association. We then replicated significant observations in two independent sample sets comprised of a total of 595 cases and 3,357 controls. We identified a common CNV at 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma in the discovery set, which was confirmed in both replication sets (Pcombined = 2.97 × 10−17; OR = 2.49, 95% CI: 2.02 to 3.05). This CNV was validated by quantitative PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and analysis of matched tumor specimens, and was shown to be heritable in an independent set of 713 cancer-free trios. We identified a novel transcript within the CNV which showed high sequence similarity to several “Neuroblastoma breakpoint family” (NBPF) genes3,4 and represents a new member of this gene family (NBPFX). This transcript was preferentially expressed in fetal brain and fetal sympathetic nervous tissues, and expression level was strictly correlated with CNV state in neuroblastoma cells. These data demonstrate that inherited copy number variation at 1q21.1 is associated with neuroblastoma and implicate a novel NBPF gene in early tumorigenesis of this childhood cancer. PMID:19536264

  7. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  8. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  9. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  10. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya, Patil; Mahima, V G; Bagewadi, Shivanand B

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, histologically benign yet locally aggressive, vascular tumor that typically affects adolescent males. It accounts for 0.5 percent of all neoplasms of the head and neck. A case of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma manifesting in the oral cavity in a 20-year-old male patient is presented and discussed.

  11. Renewing Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

  12. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  13. The C1q domain containing proteins of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis: a widespread and diverse family of immune-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Manfrin, Chiara; De Moro, Gianluca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    The key component of the classical complement pathway C1q is regarded as a major connecting link between innate and acquired immunity due to the highly adaptive binding properties of its trimeric globular domain gC1q. The gC1q domain also characterizes many non-complement proteins involved in a broad range of biological processes including apoptosis, inflammation, cell adhesion and cell differentiation. In molluscs and many other invertebrates lacking of adaptive immunity, C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins are abundant, they most probably emerged as lectins and subsequently evolved in a specialized class of pattern recognition molecules through the expanding interaction properties of gC1q. Here we report the identification of 168 C1qDC transcript sequences of Mytilus galloprovincialis. The remarkable abundance of C1qDC transcripts in the Mediterranean mussel suggests an evolutionary strategy of gene duplication, functional diversification and selection of many specific C1qDC variants. A comprehensive transcript sequence survey in Protostomia also revealed that the C1qDC family expansion observed in mussel could have occurred in some specific taxa independently from the events leading to the establishment of a large complement of C1qDC genes in the Chordates lineage. PMID:21295069

  14. Reporting Crimes Against Juveniles. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

    This bulletin addresses the issue of reporting crimes against juveniles, describing findings from the National Crime Victimization Survey, which gathers information from citizens on crime, including whether and how they are reported. The survey also collects information about characteristics of victimizations, the nature of the incident location,…

  15. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  16. Complement C1q-induced activation of β-catenin signalling causes hypertensive arterial remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Tomokazu; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Nomura, Seitaro; Nakagawa, Akito; Higo, Tomoaki; Hashimoto, Akihito; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Ito, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Toshihiro; Oka, Toru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Lee, Jong-Kook; Minamino, Tohru; Offermanns, Stefan; Noda, Tetsuo; Botto, Marina; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Morita, Hiroyuki; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Toshio; Shiojima, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension induces structural remodelling of arteries, which leads to arteriosclerosis and end-organ damage. Hyperplasia of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and infiltration of immune cells are the hallmark of hypertensive arterial remodelling. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of arterial remodelling remain elusive. We have recently reported that complement C1q activates β-catenin signalling independent of Wnts. Here, we show a critical role of complement C1-induced activation of β-catenin signalling in hypertensive arterial remodelling. Activation of β-catenin and proliferation of VSMCs were observed after blood-pressure elevation, which were prevented by genetic and chemical inhibition of β-catenin signalling. Macrophage depletion and C1qa gene deletion attenuated the hypertension-induced β-catenin signalling, proliferation of VSMCs and pathological arterial remodelling. Our findings unveil the link between complement C1 and arterial remodelling and suggest that C1-induced activation of β-catenin signalling becomes a novel therapeutic target to prevent arteriosclerosis in patients with hypertension. PMID:25716000

  17. Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, P; Danda, Debashish; Danda, Sumita; Srivastava, Vivi M

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis (JAS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder which causes considerable morbidity when left untreated; it occurs predominantly in men. We describe an Asian Indian woman who had JAS with phenotypic features of Turner syndrome (TS) and was found to be a mosaic for 45, X/46, X, psu idic (X) (p11) by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of peripheral blood. The absence of Y chromosome material was confirmed by FISH. Haplo-insufficiency of the X chromosome can predispose to autoimmunity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of JAS in association with mosaic Turner syndrome. This case highlights the possible effects of gene dosage in development of an autoimmune disease. PMID:25073991

  18. Diagnostic value of serum anti-C1q antibodies in patients with lupus nephritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Wu, X; Shan, G; Zhang, X

    2012-09-01

    The autoantibodies against C1q (anti-C1q) have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the past decade, though there were increasing studies suggesting it is relatively specific in lupus nephritis (LN), its overall diagnostic value in LN has not been evaluated. The meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of autoantibodies against C1q in patients with LN, and to provide more precise evidence of a correlation between anti-C1q antibodies and activity of LN. We searched Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases and contacted authors if necessary. A total of 25 studies including 2,502 patients with SLE and 1,317 with LN met our inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Among all 25 studies, 22 studies were available for comparison between SLE with and without LN, and 9 studies compared anti-C1q between patients with active and inactive LN. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve was used to summarize comprehensive test performance. The QUADAS tool was used to assess the quality of the studies. For the diagnosis of LN, the pooled sensitivity and specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of anti-C1q were 0.58 (0.56-0.61, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]), 0.75 (0.72-0.77, 95% CI), 2.60 (2.06-3.28, 95% CI), 0.51 (0.41-0.63, 95% CI), and 6.08 (3.91-9.47, 95% CI) respectively. The area under the SROC curve (AUC) was 0.7941. For comparison between active and inactive LN, the weighted sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR and DOR were 0.74 (0.68-0.79, 95% CI), 0.77 (0.71-0.82, 95% CI), 2.91 (1.83-4.65, 95% CI), 0.33 (0.19-0.56, 95% CI), and 10.56 (4.56-24.46, 95% CI) respectively. The AUC was 0.8378. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that anti-C1q antibodies have relatively fair sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of LN, suggesting that the presence of anti-C1q antibodies may be a valuable adjunct for predicting

  19. C1q binding to dengue virus decreases levels of infection and inflammatory molecules transcription in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P; Soares de Melo, Klecia M; Smith, Amanda P; Krishna, Neel K; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M; Evans, Jared D; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2014-01-22

    Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to dengue virus envelope protein and to whole dengue virus serotype 2. Incubation of dengue virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses.

  20. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood. PMID:27222141

  1. New insights into the evolution of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Weise, A; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2005-01-01

    A complex low-repetitive human DNA probe (BAC RP11-35B4) together with two microdissection-derived region-specific probes of the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 1 were used to re-analyze the evolution of human chromosome 1 in comparison to four ape species. BAC RP11-35B4 derives from 1q21 and contains 143 kb of non-repetitive DNA; however, it produces three specific FISH signals in 1q21, 1p12 and 1p36.1 of Homo sapiens (HSA). Human chromosome 1 was studied in comparison to its homologues in Hylobates lar (HLA), Pongo pygmaeus (PPY), Gorilla gorilla (GGO) and Pan troglodytes (PTR). A duplication of sequences homologous to human 1p36.1 could be detected in PPY plus an additional signal on PPY 16q. The region homologous to HSA 1p36.1 is also duplicated in HLA, and split onto chromosomes 7q and 9p; the region homologous to HSA 1q21/1p12 is present as one region on 5q. Additionally, the breakpoint of a small pericentric inversion in the evolution of human chromosome 1 compared to other great ape species could be refined. In summary, the results obtained here are in concordance with previous reports; however, there is evidence for a deletion of regions homologous to human 1p34.2-->p34.1 during evolution in the Pongidae branch after separation of PPY.

  2. A C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas serves as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin with high binding affinity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Li, Hui; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Jinsheng; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    C1q proteins serve as pattern recognition receptors and involve in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, a novel C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas (designated CgC1qDC-1) was isolated by liposaccharide-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 gene was determined by performing a homologous search of eight tryptic peptides identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS against the genome of C. gigas. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 was of 387 bp encoding a polypeptide of 128 amino acids containing a typical globular C1q domain. The globular C1q domain possessed eight β strands with a jelly-roll topology structure, which was similar to the structure of human gC1q domain. The mRNA transcripts of CgC1qDC-1 were dominantly expressed in mantle and hemocytes, while low expressed in hepatopancreas, gonad, gill and muscle. The expression level of CgC1qDC-1 increased drastically at 6 h after Vibrio splendidus stimulation, and then gradually fell to the normal level at about 24 h. ELISA assay quantified that CgC1qDC-1 bound to LPS with high binding affinity (Kd = 0.09 × 10(-6) M). Moreover, CgC1qDC-1 significantly enhanced the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. splendidus. These results collectively indicated that CgC1qDC-1 could serve as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin in the innate immune response against invading Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein is a marker for proliferation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jane Scully, Olivia; Yu, Yingnan; Salim, Agus; Aye Thike, Aye; Wai-Cheong Yip, George; Hun Baeg, Gyeong; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Matsumoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP), is a multi-compartmental protein with higher mRNA expression reported in breast cancer tissues. This study evaluated the association between immunohistochemical expression of the C1QBP protein in breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) and clinicopathological parameters, in particular tumor size. In addition, an in vitro study was conducted to substantiate the breast cancer TMA findings. Breast cancer TMAs were constructed from pathological specimens of patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. C1QBP protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical analyses were subsequently performed in the TMAs. C1QBP immunostaining was detected in 131 out of 132 samples examined. The C1QBP protein was predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the breast cancer cells. Univariate analysis revealed that a higher C1QBP protein expression was significantly associated with older patients (P = 0.001) and increased tumor size (P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that C1QBP is an independent predictor of tumor size in progesterone-positive tumors. Furthermore, C1QBP was also significantly correlated with expression of PCNA, a known marker of proliferation. Inhibition of C1QBP expression was performed by transfecting C1QBP siRNA into T47D breast cancer cells, a progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer cell line. C1QBP gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, and protein expression by Western blot. Cell proliferation assays were also performed by commercially available assays. Down-regulation of C1QBP expression significantly decreased cell proliferation and growth in T47D cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the C1QBP protein could be a potential proliferative marker in breast cancer. PMID:25573962

  4. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  5. Complement Component C1q Programs a Pro-Efferocytic Phenotype while Limiting TNFα Production in Primary Mouse and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hulsebus, Holly J.; O’Conner, Sean D.; Smith, Emily M.; Jie, Chunfa; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency in complement component C1q is associated with an inability to clear apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and aberrant inflammation in lupus, and identification of the pathways involved in these processes should reveal important regulatory mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this study, C1q-dependent regulation of TNFα/IL-6 expression and efferocytosis was investigated using primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. C1q downregulated LPS-dependent TNFα production in mouse and human macrophages. While prolonged stimulation with C1q (18 h) was required to elicit a dampening of TNFα production from mouse macrophages, the human macrophages responded to C1q with immediate downregulation of TNFα. IL-6 production was unchanged in mouse and upregulated by human macrophages following prolonged stimulation with C1q. Our previous studies indicated that C1q programmed enhanced efferocytosis in mouse macrophages by enhancing expression of Mer tyrosine kinase and its ligand Gas6, a receptor–ligand pair that also inhibits proinflammatory signaling. Here, we demonstrated that C1q-dependent programming of human macrophage efferocytosis required protein synthesis; however, neither Mer nor the related receptor Axl was upregulated in human cells. In addition, while the C1q-collagen-like tails are sufficient for promoting C1q-dependent phagocytosis of antibody-coated targets, the C1q-tails failed to program enhanced efferocytosis or dampen TNFα production. These data further elucidate the mechanisms by which C1q regulates proinflammatory signaling and efferocytosis in macrophages, functions that are likely to influence the progression of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27379094

  6. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the third type, known as juvenile polyposis coli, affected individuals develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli typically develop polyps during childhood. Most juvenile polyps ...

  7. The genome of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas brings new insights on the massive expansion of the C1q gene family in Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    C1q domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins are regarded as important players in the innate immunity of bivalve mollusks and other invertebrates and their highly adaptive binding properties indicate them as efficient pathogen recognition molecules. Although experimental studies support this view, the molecular data available at the present time are not sufficient to fully explain the great molecular diversification of this family, present in bivalves with hundreds of C1q coding genes. Taking advantage of the fully sequenced genome of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and more than 100 transcriptomic datasets, we: (i) re-annotated the oyster C1qDC loci, thus identifying the correct genomic organization of 337 C1qDC genes, (ii) explored the expression pattern of oyster C1qDC genes in diverse developmental stages and adult tissues of unchallenged and experimentally treated animals; (iii) investigated the expansion of the C1qDC gene family in all major bivalve subclasses. Overall, we provide a broad description of the functionally relevant features of oyster C1qDC genes, their comparative expression levels and new evidence confirming that a gene family expansion event has occurred during the course of Bivalve evolution, leading to the diversification of hundreds of different C1qDC genes in both the Pteriomorphia and Heterodonta subclasses.

  8. Anti-C1q autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus patients activate the complement system via both the classical and lectin pathways.

    PubMed

    Thanei, Sophia; Vanhecke, Dominique; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-10-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q) strongly correlate with the occurrence of lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although a direct pathogenic role of anti-C1q has been suggested, the assumed complement-activating capacity remains to be elucidated. Using an ELISA-based assay, we found that anti-C1q activate the classical (CP) and lectin pathways (LP) depending on the anti-C1q immunoglobulin-class repertoire present in the patient's serum. IgG anti-C1q resulted in the activation of the CP as reflected by C4b deposition in the presence of purified C1 and C4 in a dose-dependent manner. The extent of C4b deposition correlated with anti-C1q levels in SLE patients but not in healthy controls. Our data indicate that SLE patient-derived anti-C1q can activate the CP and the LP but not the alternative pathway of complement. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the role of anti-C1q in SLE suggesting a direct link to hypocomplementemia.

  9. Constitutive heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and Duffy blood group alleles in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kosower, N.S.; Gerad, L.; Goldstein, M.; Parasol, N.

    1995-04-24

    Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in unrelated schizophrenic patients, unrelated controls and patients and family members in multiplex families. The size-distribution of chromosome 1 heterochromatic region (1qH, C-band variants) among 21 unrelated schizophrenic patients was different from that found in a group of 46 controls. The patient group had 1qH variants of smaller size than the control group (P < 0.01). Incubation of phytohemagglutinin-treated blood lymphocytes with 5-azacytidine (which causes decondensation and extension of the heterochromatin) led to a lesser degree of heterochromatin decondensation in a group of patients than in the controls (7 schizophrenic, 9 controls, P < 0.01). The distribution of phenotypes of Duffy blood group system (whose locus is linked to the 1qH region) among 28 schizophrenic patients was also different from that in the general population. Cosegregation of schizophrenia with a 1qH (C-band) variant and Duffy blood group allele was observed in one of six multiplex families. The overall results suggest that alterations within the Duffy/1qH region are involved in schizophrenia in some cases. This region contains the locus of D5 dopamine receptor pseudogene 2 (1q21.1), which is transcribed in normal lymphocytes. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. gC1qR expression in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic infection: Potential role of HCV core/gC1qR-mediated T cell suppression in the outcome of HCV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zhiqang; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Tricoche, Nancy; Shan, M.M.; Brotman, Betsy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Hahn, Young S. . E-mail: ysh5e@virginia.edu; Prince, Alfred M.

    2006-03-15

    Chimpanzee is a unique animal model for HCV infection, in which about 50% of infections resolve spontaneously. It has been reported that the magnitude of T cell responses to HCV core in recovered chimpanzees is greater than that in chronically infected ones. However, the mechanism(s) by which the chimpanzees with resolved infection overcome core-mediated immunosuppression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of HCV core on T cell responsiveness in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic HCV infection. We found that core protein strongly inhibited T cell activation and proliferation in chimpanzees with chronic infection, while this inhibition was limited in chimpanzees with resolved infection. Notably, the level of gC1qR, as well as the binding of core protein, on the surface of T cells was lower in recovered chimpanzees when compared to chimpanzees with chronic HCV infection. Intriguingly, the observed differences in gC1qR expression levels and susceptibility to core-induced suppression amongst HCV-chronically infected and recovered chimpanzees were observed prior to HCV challenge, suggesting a possible genetic determination of the outcome of infection. These findings suggest that gC1qR expression on the surface of T cells is crucial for HCV core-mediated T cell suppression and viral clearance, and that represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps host machinery for persistence.

  11. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements underlying karyotype differences between Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Yang, Fengtang

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), a representative species of the order Pholidota, has been enlisted in the mammalian whole-genome sequencing project mainly because of its phylogenetic importance. Previous studies showed that the diploid number of M. pentadactyla could vary from 2n = 36 to 42. To further characterize the genome organization of M. pentadactyla and to elucidate chromosomal mechanism underlying the karyotype diversity of Pholidota, we flow-sorted the chromosomes of 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla, and generated a set of chromosome-specific probes by DOP-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. A comparative chromosome map between M. pentadactyla and the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica, 2n = 38), as well as between human and M. pentadactyla, was established by chromosome painting for the first time. Our results demonstrate that seven Robertsonian rearrangements, together with considerable variations in the quantity of heterochromatin and in the number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) differentiate the karyotypes of 2n = 38 M. javanica and 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla. Moreover, we confirm that the M. javanica Y chromosome bears one NOR. Comparison of human homologous segment associations found in the genomes of M. javanica and M. pentadactyla revealed seven shared associations (HSA 1q/11, 2p/5, 2q/10q, 4p+q/20, 5/13, 6/19p and 8q/10p) that could constitute the potential Pholidota-specific signature rearrangements. PMID:19283495

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements underlying karyotype differences between Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Yang, Fengtang

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), a representative species of the order Pholidota, has been enlisted in the mammalian whole-genome sequencing project mainly because of its phylogenetic importance. Previous studies showed that the diploid number of M. pentadactyla could vary from 2n = 36 to 42. To further characterize the genome organization of M. pentadactyla and to elucidate chromosomal mechanism underlying the karyotype diversity of Pholidota, we flow-sorted the chromosomes of 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla, and generated a set of chromosome-specific probes by DOP-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. A comparative chromosome map between M. pentadactyla and the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica, 2n = 38), as well as between human and M. pentadactyla, was established by chromosome painting for the first time. Our results demonstrate that seven Robertsonian rearrangements, together with considerable variations in the quantity of heterochromatin and in the number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) differentiate the karyotypes of 2n = 38 M. javanica and 2n = 40 M. pentadactyla. Moreover, we confirm that the M. javanica Y chromosome bears one NOR. Comparison of human homologous segment associations found in the genomes of M. javanica and M. pentadactyla revealed seven shared associations (HSA 1q/11, 2p/5, 2q/10q, 4p+q/20, 5/13, 6/19p and 8q/10p) that could constitute the potential Pholidota-specific signature rearrangements.

  14. The distortive mechanism for the activation of complement component C1 supported by studies with a monoclonal antibody against the "arms" of C1q.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Martens, M; Brouwer, M C; Hack, C E

    1988-05-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) against human C1q (MAb 130) is presented that activates C1 in serum through its antigen-binding sites at an optimal molar ratio of 3 MAbs:1 C1q. The antibody does not inhibit binding of C1q to IgG. Experiments with pepsin- and collagenase-digested C1q showed that MAb 130 binds to the fibril-like strands (arms) of C1q, close to the globular heads. Bivalency of MAb 130 was a requirement for C1-activation, but not for binding to C1q. Increasing the segmental flexibility of the intact antibody by reduction and alkylation destroyed its capacity to activate C1. A MAb against the globular heads of C1q completely inhibited C1-activation by aggregated IgG (AHG), but did not prevent activation by MAb 130. C1, reconstituted by adding C1q-stalks that lack the globular heads to C1q-depleted serum was not activated by AHG, whereas activation by MAb 130 was not affected. Activation of serum-C1 by AHG and MAb 130 was inhibited by addition of excess purified C1-inhibitor in a comparable and dose-dependent manner. Sucrose-gradient analysis indicated a predominance of stable complexes of a single C1q-molecule with three MAbs at the optimal activating ratio. When isolated and added to C1q-depleted serum, these complexes activated C1 efficiently. A mechanism for activation by MAb 130 is proposed that supports the "distortive" model of C1-activation.

  15. Complement protein C1q bound to apoptotic cells suppresses human macrophage and dendritic cell-mediated Th17 and Th1 T cell subset proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Weist, Brian M.; Walsh, Craig M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    A complete genetic deficiency of the complement protein C1q results in SLE with nearly 100% penetrance in humans, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this association have not yet been fully determined. C1q opsonizes ACs for enhanced ingestion by phagocytes, such as Mϕ and iDCs, avoiding the extracellular release of inflammatory DAMPs upon loss of the membrane integrity of the dying cell. We previously showed that human monocyte-derived Mϕ and DCs ingesting autologous, C1q-bound LALs (C1q-polarized Mϕ and C1q-polarized DCs), enhance the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and reduce proinflammatory cytokines relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone. Here, we show that C1q-polarized Mϕ have elevated PD-L1 and PD-L2 and suppressed surface CD40, and C1q-polarized DCs have higher surface PD-L2 and less CD86 relative to Mϕ or DC ingesting LAL alone, respectively. In an MLR, C1q-polarized Mϕ reduced allogeneic and autologous Th17 and Th1 subset proliferation and demonstrated a trend toward increased Treg proliferation relative to Mϕ ingesting LAL alone. Moreover, relative to DC ingesting AC in the absence of C1q, C1q-polarized DCs decreased autologous Th17 and Th1 proliferation. These data demonstrate that a functional consequence of C1q-polarized Mϕ and DC is the regulation of Teff activation, thereby “sculpting” the adaptive immune system to avoid autoimmunity, while clearing dying cells. It is noteworthy that these studies identify novel target pathways for therapeutic intervention in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25381385

  16. Soluble gC1qR Is an Autocrine Signal That Induces B1R Expression on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yan; Valentino, Alisa; Pednekar, Lina; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Habiel, David; Kew, Richard R.; Hosszu, Kinga H.; Galanakis, Dennis K.; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2014-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is one of the most potent vasodilator agonists known and belongs to the kinin family of proinflammatory peptides. BK induces its activity via two G protein–coupled receptors: BK receptor 1 (B1R) and BK receptor 2. Although BK receptor 2 is constitutively expressed on endothelial cells (ECs), B1R is induced by IL-1β. The C1q receptor, receptor for the globular heads of C1q (gC1qR), which plays a role in BK generation, is expressed on activated ECs and is also secreted as soluble gC1qR (sgC1qR). Because sgC1qR can bind to ECs, we hypothesized that it may also serve as an autocrine/paracrine signal for the induction of B1R expression. In this study, we show that gC1qR binds to ECs via a highly conserved domain consisting of residues 174–180, as assessed by solid-phase binding assay and deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. Incubation of ECs (24 h, 37°C) with sgC1qR resulted in enhancement of B1R expression, whereas incubation with gC1qR lacking aa 174–180 and 154–162 had a diminished effect. Binding of sgC1qR to ECs was through surface-bound fibrinogen and was inhibited by anti-fibrinogen. In summary, our data suggest that, at sites of inflammation, sgC1qR can enhance vascular permeability by upregulation of B1R expression through de novo synthesis, as well as rapid translocation of preformed B1R. PMID:24319267

  17. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P

    2016-01-01

    Public policy has tended to treat juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) as adult sex offenders in waiting, despite research that contradicts this notion. Although as a group, JSOs are more similar to general delinquents than to adult sex offenders, atypical sexual interests and sexual victimization during childhood may be a pathway for sexual offending that differentiates some JSOs from their nonsexually delinquent peers. Developmental considerations must be considered in risk assessment evaluations of these youth. This article reviews theories of sexual offending in youth, risk factors for juvenile offending and reoffending, psychopathology in JSOs, risk assessment, and treatment. PMID:26593121

  18. Report on the radiochemical and environmental isotope character for monitoring well UE-1-q: Groundwater Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.; Nimz, G.J.; Rego, J.H.

    1993-06-01

    Well UE-1-q is located in the northeastern portion of area 1 of the Nevada Test Site in southwestern Nevada, 1244.1 meters above sea level. The well was originally an exploratory hole drilled to a depth of 743 meters below the surface (mbs) by LANL in November of 1980. In May 1992, the Groundwater Characterization Program (GCP) extended the total depth to approximately 792.5 mbs. UE-1-q is cased to a total depth of 749.5 mbs, with the remaining uncased depth exposed exclusively to Paleozoicaged carbonate rock, the principle zone of groundwater sampling. Geologic logging indicates approximately 390 meters of tuffaceous and calcareous alluvium overlies 320 meters of Tertiary-aged volcanic ash-flow and bedded tuffs. Paleozoic carbonate lithology extends from 716 mbs to the total well depth and is separated from the overlying Tertiary volcanic deposits by 6 meters of paleocolluvium. This report outlines the results and interpretations of radiochemical and environmental isotopic analyses of groundwater sampled from UE-1-q on July 10, 1992 during the well pump test following well development. In addition, results of the field tritium monitoring performed during the well drilling are reported in Appendix 1. Sampling, analytical techniques, and analytical uncertainties for the groundwater analyses are presented in Appendix 2.

  19. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  20. A hantavirus causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome requires gC1qR/p32 for efficient cell binding and infection

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun; Kwon, Young-Chan; Kim, Soo-In; Park, Jung-Min; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Ahn, Byung-Yoon

    2008-11-25

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) is a pathogenic hantavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). HTNV infection is mediated by {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin. We used protein blots of Vero E6 cell homogenates to demonstrate that radiolabeled HTNV virions bind to gC1qR/p32, the acidic 32-kDa protein known as the receptor for the globular head domain of complement C1q. RNAi-mediated suppression of gC1qR/p32 markedly reduced HTNV binding and infection in human lung epithelial A549 cells. Conversely, transient expression of either simian or human gC1qR/p32 rendered non-permissive CHO cells susceptible to HTNV infection. These results suggest an important role for gC1qR/p32 in HTNV infection and pathogenesis.

  1. Juvenile Justice in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Donald P.; Frederick, Charles

    This four part guide provides secondary students with information about Maryland laws, courts, and legal system. The first section examines the nature and causes of increasing involvement of youth in crime, and identifies those crimes most commonly committed by juveniles. A special section on shoplifting is included. Section II examines the nature…

  2. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, S P; Bosch, A; Jose, B

    1980-01-01

    Seven cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma were seen in the Division of Radiation Oncology of the Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Hospitals from 1961 to 1977. The method of treatments and the end results are discussed. The clinical manifestations and the biological nature of this tumor are analyzed in detail, along with treatment recommendations.

  3. Treating the Juvenile Offender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

  4. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction.

  5. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  6. Assignment of a human homolog of the mouse Htr3 receptor gene to chromosome 11q23.1-q23.2

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, B.; Mertz, A.; Rappold, G.

    1995-09-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) represents a family of neurotransmitters acting through the 5-HT neuroreceptors. One of these receptors, HTR3, belongs to the family of ligand gated ion channels. Activation of the HTR3 receptor mediates a variety of physiological effects in central and peripheral neurons such as cytotoxic drug-evoked emesis and nociception and is believed to influence behavior relevant to anxiety and cognitive disorders. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait loci for heat tolerance at anthesis in rice using chromosomal segment substitution lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Lei, Jianguo; Huang, Yingjin; Zhu, Shan; Chen, Hongping; Huang, Renliang; Peng, Zhiqin; Tu, Qinghua; Shen, Xianhua; Yan, Song

    2016-01-01

    To study the genetic basis of heat tolerance at anthesis, a set of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from Sasanishiki (japonica ssp. heat susceptible) and Habataki (indica spp. heat tolerant) were used for analysis across three high temperature environments. Spikelet fertility (SF), daily flowering time (DFT) and pollen shedding level (PSL) under high temperature (HT) were assessed. Eleven related QTLs were detected, of which, two QTLs qSFht2 and qSFht4.2 for spikelet fertility were identified on chromosomes 2 and 4. Four QTLs qDFT3, qDFT8, qDFT10.1 and qDFT11 for daily flowering time were detected on chromosomes 3, 8, 10 and 11. The other five QTLs qPSLht1, qPSLht4.1, qPSLht5, qPSLht7 and qPSLht10.2 on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7 and 10, respectively, were found had effects both on spikelet fertility and pollen shedding level. Of the 11 QTLs, 8 were overlapped with QTLs reported by others, 3 QTLs qPSLht4.1, qPSLht7 and qPSLht10.2 identified in this study were novel. The stability of qPSLht4.1 was further verified at different temperatures, which could be used to improve the pollen shedding and pollen growth on stigma for rice heat-tolerance breeding. PMID:27436945

  8. A radiation hybrid map of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) chromosome 1 (BBU1).

    PubMed

    Miziara, M N; Goldammer, T; Stafuzza, N B; Ianella, P; Agarwala, R; Schaffer, A A; Elliott, J S; Riggs, P K; Womack, J E; Amaral, M E J

    2007-01-01

    The largest chromosome in the river buffalo karyotype, BBU1, is a submetacentric chromosome with reported homology between BBU1q and bovine chromosome 1 and between BBU1p and BTA27. We present the first radiation hybrid map of this chromosome containing 69 cattle derived markers including 48 coding genes, 17 microsatellites and four ESTs distributed in two linkage groups spanning a total length of 1330.1 cR(5000). The RH map was constructed based on analysis of a recently developed river buffalo-hamster whole genome radiation hybrid (BBURH(5000)) panel. The retention frequency of individual markers across the panel ranged from 17.8 to 52.2%. With few exceptions, the order of markers within linkage groups is identical to the order established for corresponding cattle RH maps. The BBU1 map provides a starting point for comparison of gene order rearrangements between river buffalo chromosome 1 and its bovine homologs.

  9. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    MedlinePlus

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  10. gC1q receptor ligation selectively down-regulates human IL-12 production through activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Stephen N; Cruise, Michael W; Kassel, Rachel; Hahn, Young S

    2005-10-01

    gC1qR, a complement receptor for C1q, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory and antiviral T cell responses. Several pathogens, including hepatitis C virus, exploit gC1qR-dependent regulatory pathways to manipulate host immunity. However, the molecular mechanism(s) of gC1qR signaling involved in regulating inflammatory responses remains unknown. We report the selective inhibition of TLR4-induced IL-12 production after cross-linking of gC1qR on the surface of macrophages and dendritic cells. Suppression of IL-12 did not result from increased IL-10 or TGF-beta, but was dependent on PI3K activation. Activation of PI3K and subsequent phosphorylation of Akt define an intracellular pathway mediating gC1qR signaling and cross-talk with TLR4 signaling. This is the first report to identify signaling pathways used by gC1qR-mediated immune suppression, and it establishes a means of complement-mediated immune suppression to inhibit Th1 immunity crucial for clearing pathogenic infection.

  11. T Cell–dependent Immune Response in C1q-deficient Mice: Defective Interferon γ Production by Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Antony J.; Botto, Marina; van Essen, Dominic; Rivi, Roberta; Davies, Kevin A.; Gray, David; Walport, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the classical complement pathway in humoral immune responses was investigated in gene-targeted C1q-deficient mice (C1qA−/−). Production of antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a and IgG3 in primary and secondary responses to T cell–dependent antigen was significantly reduced, whereas IgM, IgG1, and IgG2b responses were similar in control and C1qA−/− mice. Despite abnormal humoral responses, B cells from C1qA−/− mice proliferated normally to a number of stimuli in vitro. Immune complex localization to follicular dendritic cells within splenic follicles was lacking in C1qA−/− mice. The precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells was similar in C1qA−/− and wild-type mice. However, analysis of cytokine production by primed T cells in response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin revealed a significant reduction in interferon-γ production in C1qA−/− mice compared with control mice, whereas interleukin 4 secretion was equivalent. These data suggest that the classical pathway of complement may influence the cytokine profile of antigen-specific T lymphocytes and the subsequent immune response. PMID:9607920

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planetary candidates. V. 3yr Q1-Q12 (Rowe+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, J. F.; Coughlin, J. L.; Antoci, V.; Barclay, T.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Burke, C. J.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Campbell, J. R.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Christiansen, J. L.; Cochran, W.; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Haas, M. R.; Helminiak, K. G.; Henze, C. E.; Hoffman, K. L.; Howell, S. B.; Huber, D.; Hunter, R. C.; Jang-Condell, H.; Jenkins, J. M.; Klaus, T. C.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lissauer, J. J.; McCauliff, S. D.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F.; Ofir, A.; Quarles, B.; Quintana, E.; Sabale, A.; Seader, S.; Shporer, A.; Smith, J. C.; Steffen, J. H.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Laerhoven, C.; Wolfgang, A.; Zamudio, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    We began with the transit-event candidate list from Tenenbaum et al. (2013ApJS..206....5T) based on a wavelet, adaptive matched filter to search 192313 Kepler targets for periodic drops in flux indicative of a transiting planet. Detections are known as Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs). Tenenbaum et al. utilized three years of Kepler photometric observations (Q1-Q12) -the same data span employed by this study based on SOC 8.3 as part of Data Release 21 (Thompson S. E., Christiansen J. L., Jenkins J. M. et al. Kepler (KSCI-19061-001)). (3 data files).

  13. Stroke-Like Presentation Following Febrile Seizure in a Patient with 1q43q44 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. Elliott; Wolfe, Stephanie M.; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen; Greenwood, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Hemiconvulsion–hemiplegia–epilepsy syndrome (HHE) is a rare outcome of prolonged hemiconvulsion that is followed by diffuse unilateral hemispheric edema, hemiplegia, and ultimately hemiatrophy of the affected hemisphere and epilepsy. Here, we describe the case of a 3-year-old male with a 1;3 translocation leading to a terminal 1q43q44 deletion and a terminal 3p26.1p26.3 duplication that developed HHE after a prolonged febrile seizure and discuss the pathogenesis of HHE in the context of the patient’s complex genetic background. PMID:27199890

  14. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:26918856

  15. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells.

  16. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  18. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sellars, S L

    1980-12-13

    The juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, a locally invasive, non-metastasizing tumour of male adolescence, occurs sporadically throughout the world. Its histiogenesis remains uncertain and its management controversial. These facets of a troublesome and dangerous conditions are discussed and the experiences from handling 9 such tumours seen at Groote Schuur Hospital over a 4-year period (1976-1979) are presented. Surgical excision, using a wide field exposure and pre-operative systemic oestrogen medication, is recommended as the treatment of choice.

  19. Intracranial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Wylie, J P; Slevin, N J; Johnson, R J

    1998-01-01

    We report the case history of a 26-year-old man who was diagnosed with advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with intracranial extension. The lesion was considered to be inoperable and the patient was treated with radical radiotherapy. Serial magnetic resonance imaging has shown continued tumour regression and he remains well after 3 years. The literature is reviewed and radiotherapy recommended as the modality of choice for these patients.

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gowdie, Peter J; Tse, Shirley M L

    2012-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a complex group of disorders with arthritis as a common feature. This article provides the pediatrician with a review of the epidemiology, classification, clinical manifestations, and complications of JIA. It also provides an update on the current understanding of the cause of JIA and recent developments in management and a recent review of the long-term outcome in JIA.

  1. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  2. Inferring Planet Occurrence Rates With a Q1-Q16 Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog Produced by a Machine Learning Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Burke, Christopher J.; McCauliff, Sean D.; Kepler Science Operations Center

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope monitored the photometric variations of over 170,000 stars within a ~100 square degree field in the constellation Cygnus, at half-hour cadence, over its four year prime mission. The Kepler SOC (Science Operations Center) pipeline calibrates the pixels of the target apertures for each star, corrects light curves for systematic error, and detects TCEs (threshold-crossing events) that may be due to transiting planets. Finally the pipeline estimates planet parameters for all TCEs and computes quantitative diagnostics that are used by the TCERT (Threshold Crossing Event Review Team) to produce a catalog containing KOIs (Kepler Objects of Interest). KOIs are TCEs that are determined to be either likely transiting planets or astrophysical false positives such as background eclipsing binary stars. Using examples from the Q1-Q16 TCERT KOI catalog as a training set, we created a machine-learning classifier that dispositions the TCEs into categories of PC (planet candidate), AFP (astrophysical false positive) and NTP (non-transiting phenomenon). The classifier uniformly and consistently applies heuristics developed by TCERT as well as other diagnostics to the Q1-Q16 TCEs to produce a more robust and reliable catalog of planet candidates than is possible with only human classification. In this work, we estimate planet occurrence rates, based on the machine-learning-produced catalog of Kepler planet candidates. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  3. Influence of the hinge region on complement activation, C1q binding, and segmental flexibility in chimeric human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L K; Shopes, R J; Oi, V T; Morrison, S L

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a series of genetically engineered chimeric human IgG3 and IgG4 anti-dansyl (DNS) antibodies with identical antibody-combining sites but different hinge region amino acid compositions to determine how the hinge region influences Fab fragment segmental flexibility, C1q binding, and complement activation. Our data support the correlation between "upper hinge" length and Fab segmental flexibility; moreover, we confirm that a hinge region is essential for C1q binding and complement activation. However, the hinge length by itself is not sufficient for complement activity in IgG molecules. We have demonstrated that the IgG4 hinge, which imparts restricted segmental flexibility, reduces the ability of IgG3 molecules to activate complement. We also find that the IgG3 hinge region, which imparts greater segmental motion, is not sufficient to create complement activation activity in IgG4 anti-DNS antibodies. Finally, we conclude that (i) segmental motion is correlated with "upper hinge" length, (ii) hinge length and segmental flexibility is not enough to alter complement binding and activation, and (iii) segmental flexibility does not correlate with proficiency to activate the complement cascade. PMID:2296577

  4. Maternal uniparental meroisodisomy in the LAMB3 region of chromosome 1 results in lethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Y; Pulkkinen, L; Shimizu, H; Lin, L; Hagiwara, S; Nishikawa, T; Uitto, J

    1998-05-01

    Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (OMIM#226700) is a lethal, autosomal recessive blistering disorder caused by mutations in one of the three genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, encoding the constitutive polypeptide subunits of laminin 5. In this study, we describe a patient homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation Q936X in exon 19 of LAMB3, which has been mapped to chromosome 1q32. The patient was born with extensive blistering and demonstrated negative immunofluorescence staining for laminin 5, and transmission electron microscopy revealed tissue separation within lamina lucida of the dermal-epidermal junction, diagnostic of Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The mother of the proband was found to be a heterozygous carrier for this mutation, whereas the father demonstrated the wild-type LAMB3 allele only. Nonpaternity was excluded by 13 microsatellite markers in six different chromosomes. Genotype analysis using 28 microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 1 revealed that the patient had maternal primary heterodisomy, as well as meroisodisomy within two regions of chromosome 1, one on 1p and the other one on 1q, the latter region containing the maternal LAMB3 mutation. These results suggest that Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa in this patient developed as a result of reduction to homozygosity of the maternal LAMB3 mutation on chromosome 1q32. PMID:9579554

  5. Telepsychiatry in juvenile justice settings.

    PubMed

    Kaliebe, Kristopher E; Heneghan, James; Kim, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Telepsychiatry is emerging as a valuable means of providing mental health care in juvenile justice settings. Youth in the juvenile justice system have high levels of psychiatric morbidity. State and local juvenile justice systems frequently struggle to provide specialized psychiatric care, as these systems have limited resources and often operate in remote locations. Case studies in the use of telepsychiatry to provide improved care in juvenile corrections in 4 states are described, along with a review of advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry in these settings. PMID:21092916

  6. Telepsychiatry in juvenile justice settings.

    PubMed

    Kaliebe, Kristopher E; Heneghan, James; Kim, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Telepsychiatry is emerging as a valuable means of providing mental health care in juvenile justice settings. Youth in the juvenile justice system have high levels of psychiatric morbidity. State and local juvenile justice systems frequently struggle to provide specialized psychiatric care, as these systems have limited resources and often operate in remote locations. Case studies in the use of telepsychiatry to provide improved care in juvenile corrections in 4 states are described, along with a review of advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry in these settings.

  7. Localization of two metabotropic glutamate receptor genes, GRM3 and GRM8, to human chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.W.; Heng, H.H.Q.; Lap-Chee Tsui

    1996-01-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (GRMs) are neutrotransmitter receptors that respond to glutamate stimulations by activating GTP-binding proteins and modulating second-messenger cascades. Eight related GRMs have been identified to date. In this study, we have mapped GRM3 and GRM8 to human chromosome 7q21.1-q21.2 and 7q31.3-q32.1, respectively, using somatic cell hybrid and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. A yeast artificial chromosome contig was constructed surrounding the genes, allowing their location to be integrated into the genetic and physical map of chromosome 7. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Detection of chromosome imbalances in retinoblastoma by parallel karyotype and CGH analyses.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Pinglier, E; Gilbert, E; Peter, M; Validire, P; Desjardins, L; Doz, F; Aurias, A; Couturier, J

    2000-08-01

    We have studied a series of 20 primary retinoblastomas by karyotypic analysis and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to perform an exhaustive evaluation of chromosome imbalances in this tumor. In addition, 4 tumors were studied by CGH only. On the whole, CGH results were largely in agreement with those of karyotypic analysis and with known cytogenetic data. The most frequent imbalances were +6p (13/24 cases), +1q (12/24), -16/-16q (11/24), and +2p (9/24). Recurrent high-level amplifications were observed in 2p23-25 and 1q21. Amplification of 2p23-25, present in 4 cases among which 3 showed double-minute chromosomes, was related to MYCN amplification, as demonstrated by FISH and PCR. No evident correlation was found in this small series between any of the imbalances identified and either the differentiation or the histoprognostic risk. PMID:10862045

  9. The IgG detected in the C1q solid-phase immune-complex assay is not always of immune-complex nature.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Belmer, A J

    1986-01-01

    The properties of the solid-phase C1q immune-complex assay as well as the nature of the IgG detected by this assay in patients' sera were investigated. Aggregated IgG was used as a model for immune complexes. Aggregated IgG bound to solid-phase C1q was detected by 125I-anti-IgG. Fluid-phase C1q (either in normal human serum or purified) neither inhibited the binding of aggregated IgG to solid-phase C1q nor dissociated bound aggregated IgG from the solid-phase C1q. Therefore, we concluded that the solid-phase C1q has a higher affinity for aggregated IgG than the fluid-phase C1q, probably because of the polymerization of the solid-phase C1q. To get more insight into the nature of the IgG detected by the C1q solid-phase assay in patients' sera, we investigated whether C4 and/or C3 were present on it. With the use of 125I-anti-C4 and 125I-anti-C3 instead of 125I-anti-IgG, C4 and C3, respectively, were easily detected on the aggregated IgG that had bound to the solid-phase C1q. The lower limit of detection of these assays was 30 micrograms aggregated IgG/ml of normal human serum. Sera of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus were tested with these assays and, despite positive results with 125I-anti-IgG, no positive results were obtained with either 125I-anti-C4 or 125I-anti-C3. So, on the IgG detected by the C1q solid-phase assay in patients' sera, neither C4 nor C3 are present. Furthermore, in five of the six sera tested, this IgG sedimented as monomeric IgG. Therefore, it seems unjustified to refer to this IgG as circulating immune complexes.

  10. In Silico and In Vitro Studies on the Protein-Protein Interactions between Brugia malayi Immunomodulatory Protein Calreticulin and Human C1q

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunita; Gupta, Smita; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Verma, Anita; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Filarial parasites modulate effective immune response of their host by releasing a variety of immunomodulatory molecules, which help in the long persistence of the parasite within the host. The present study was aimed to characterize an immunomodulatory protein of Brugia malayi and its interaction with the host immune component at the structural and functional level. Our findings showed that Brugia malayi Calreticulin (BmCRT) is responsible for the prevention of classical complement pathway activation via its interaction with the first component C1q of the human host. This was confirmed by inhibition of C1q dependent lysis of immunoglobulin-sensitized Red Blood Cells (S-RBCs). This is possibly the first report which predicts CRT-C1q interaction on the structural content of proteins to explain how BmCRT inhibits this pathway. The molecular docking of BmCRT-C1q complex indicated that C1qB chain (IgG/M and CRP binding sites on C1q) played a major role in the interaction with conserved and non-conserved regions of N and P domain of BmCRT. Out of 37 amino acids of BmCRT involved in the interaction, nine amino acids (Pro126, Glu132, His147, Arg151, His153, Met154, Lys156, Ala196 and Lys212) are absent in human CRT. Both ELISA and in silico analysis showed the significant role of Ca+2 in BmCRT-HuC1q complex formation and deactivation of C1r2–C1s2. Molecular dynamics studies of BmCRT-HuC1q complex showed a deviation from ∼0.4 nm to ∼1.0 nm. CD analyses indicated that BmCRT is composed of 49.6% α helix, 9.6% β sheet and 43.6% random coil. These findings provided valuable information on the architecture and chemistry of BmCRT-C1q interaction and supported the hypothesis that BmCRT binds with huC1q at their targets (IgG/M, CRP) binding sites. This interaction enables the parasite to interfere with the initial stage of host complement activation, which might be helpful in parasites establishment. These results might be utilized for help in blocking the C1q

  11. C1q Differentially Modulates Phagocytosis and Cytokine Responses during Ingestion of Apoptotic Cells by Human Monocytes, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Laust, Amanda K.; Nelson, Edward L.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical complement pathway, is also a pattern recognition receptor involved in the recognition and clearance of apoptotic cells. C1q deficiency in humans leads to development of lupus-like autoimmune disease, and it has been speculated that impaired clearance of apoptotic cells may contribute to disease development. Since phagocytes initiate specific and appropriate immune responses as a result of initial ligand-receptor interactions, regulation of gene expression by C1q may also contribute to the sculpting of an immune response to the ingested “self-Ags.” In this study, the role of C1q in apoptotic cell clearance and subsequent modulation of cytokine release by phagocytes was assessed including donor matched human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs), and dendritic cells (DCs). First, C1q binding is much greater to late compared with early apoptotic cells. Second, C1q binding to apoptotic cells significantly enhanced the levels of ingestion by monocytes but had no effect on HMDM and DC uptake. Third, in the presence of serum, C1q bound to apoptotic cells, activated the complement pathway, leading to C3b deposition, and enhancement of uptake of apoptotic cells by monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs. Finally, although C1q, either immobilized on a plate or bound to apoptotic cells, modulates the LPS-induced cytokine levels released by human monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs toward a more limited immune response, both the degree and direction of modulation differed significantly depending on the differentiation state of the phagocyte, providing further evidence of the integration of these cell- and environment-specific signals in determining appropriate immune responses. PMID:19864605

  12. Improving Literacy Skills of Juvenile Detainees. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Jane; And Others

    The Office of Juvenile and Delinquency Prevention funded a model designed to improve the literacy level of youth in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. The model specified training language arts teachers and relevant staff and volunteers in direct instruction methods for rapid improvement of students' comprehension, particularly for…

  13. Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

    The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

  14. Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    This bulletin summarizes the latest and most comprehensive research and serious and violent juvenile (SJV) offenders taken from a report by the Study Group on Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders. It describes characteristics of SVJ offenders and predictors of SVJ offending. Some interventions to prevent offenses by SVJs are reviewed. Recently…

  15. Apparent transmission distortion of a pericentric chromosome one inversion in a large multi-generation pedigree.

    PubMed

    Honeywell, Christina; Argiropoulos, Bob; Douglas, Stuart; Blumenthal, Andrea L; Allanson, Judith; McGowan-Jordan, Jean; McCready, M Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    Pericentric chromosome inversions are often associated with infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and an increased risk for offspring with congenital anomalies. We report on a chromosome 1 inversion between 1p36.21 and 1q42.13, one of the largest described familial pericentric inversions of chromosome 1. The inversion was ascertained following the birth of a female with multiple congenital anomalies due to a recombinant chromosome 1. The inversion was subsequently detected or inferred in 16 healthy individuals over five generations. Interestingly, with a ratio of 16 carriers to 6 noncarriers, there appears to be transmission distortion of the inverted chromosome 1 within the family. Although there is no reported difficulty conceiving in the family, the risk of miscarriage is higher than predicted at 34% (13/38). The recurrence risk of a recombinant chromosome also appears to be lower than expected based on the mode of ascertainment. This case contributes to the spectrum of clinical features of chromosome 1 recombinants and raises the question of whether or not there is a selective advantage of the inverted chromosome at meiosis, conception, or post-zygotically that has contributed to transmission distortion of the inverted chromosome.

  16. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  17. 1q25.2-q31.3 Deletion in a female with mental retardation, clinodactyly, minor facial anomalies but no growth retardation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The reports of 1q25-32 deletion cases are rare. We reported here an 11-year-old Chinese Han female with an interstitial 1q25 deletion displaying mental retardation, clinodactyly of the 5th finger and minor facial anomalies. Notably, the patient did not present growth retardation which is quite common in patients with 1q25-32 deletion encompassing LHX4. The heterozygous deletion in this patient was characterized as 46,XX,del(1)(q25.2-q31.3) with a length of 20.5 Mb according to SNP-array test results. STRP (Short Tandem Repeat Polymorphism) analysis of the family trio indicated the genomic abnormality was de novo with paternal origin. After a genotype-phenotype analysis, we proposed here the loss of a 3.1 Mb critical region including 24 genes within 1q25.2 (chr1:174.5-177.6 Mb, build 36) may account for the mental retardation in patients with 1q25-32 deletion. PMID:23915434

  18. A rare mosaic interstitial deletion of 7q, 46,XX/46,XX,del(7)(q22.1q31.33), results in a mild clinical phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, S.K.; Kochanek, S.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional mosaic structural rearrangements, including deletions, are extremely rare in the population. We present a case of mosaicism for a deletion of chromosome 7q. The patient`s phenotype is much milder than that of non-mosaic patients with a similar deletion of 7q. A 6 and 9/12-year-old Caucasian girl was evaluated because of attention deficit disorder and speech delay. She was born at 38 weeks gestation to her 37 year old G2P2 mother. Her birth weight was 2.2 kg (3rd centile), length was 47 cm (10th-25th centile), and OFC was 30.5 cm (<10th centile). Her motor development was normal. Her speech development was profoundly delayed with her first words spoken at 3 years, and 2-3 word sentences spoken at 5-6 years. At 6 and 9/12 years, she manifested mild mental retardation and profound speech delay, but only mildly dysmorphic features (protuberant ears with under-developed antihelices, flattened forehead, moderate micro-retrognathia). Height, weight, and OFC were at the 10th centile. Chromosomal analysis showed the presence of two cell lines, with 66% of the lymphocytes having a 46,XX pattern and 33% having a 46,XX,del(7)(q22.1q31.33) karyotype. Less than 20 cases of interstitial 7q deletions extending from bands 7q21 or 7q22 to 7q31 or 7q32 have been reported. Our patient represents the first documented case with a mosaic interstitial deletion of chromosome 7q. Furthermore, the deletion resulted in a relatively mild phenotype when compared to reported non-mosaic interstitial 7q deletions, and thus expands the range of clinical heterogeneity that can be anticipated in interstitial deletion patients.

  19. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Larralde, M; Santos-Muñoz, A; Calb, I; Magariños, C

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, gingival hypertrophy, and flexion contractures of the large joints. The light and electron microscopic features are very distinctive. Here we report an 8-month-old boy with characteristic stiffness of the knees and elbows and pink confluent papules on the paranasal folds, and periauricular and perianal regions. He also had hard nodules all over the scalp and around the mouth, and severe gingival hypertrophy. Histologic and ultrastructural features were typical of JHF. Clinical features, pathology, and physiology are discussed.

  20. Juvenile psittacine environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth; Rupley, Agnes E

    2015-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is of great import to the emotional, intellectual, and physical development of the juvenile psittacine and their success in the human home environment. Five major types of enrichment include social, occupational, physical, sensory, and nutritional. Occupational enrichment includes exercise and psychological enrichment. Physical enrichment includes the cage and accessories and the external home environment. Sensory enrichment may be visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or taste oriented. Nutritional enrichment includes variations in appearance, type, and frequency of diet, and treats, novelty, and foraging. Two phases of the preadult period deserve special enrichment considerations: the development of autonomy and puberty.

  1. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Blount, Angela; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2011-08-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are rare, benign, highly vascular, locally aggressive tumors that primarily affect male adolescents. Historical treatment of these neoplasms has been primarily surgical. In the past decade, endoscopic resection of JNAs has become a viable and promising surgical treatment option. Endoscopic resection has many advantages over traditional open techniques, including better cosmesis, decreased blood loss, shortened hospital stays, and equivalent or improved recurrence rates. Emerging endoscopic technology continues to push the boundaries of resection of skull base tumors and will no doubt become the surgical treatment of choice for most JNAs in the near future.

  2. Juvenile Dermatomyositis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Anthony Emeka; Omih, Edwin; Baguley, Elaine; Lindow, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis has variable clinical presentations both in and outside of pregnancy. A literature review indicated that optimal maternal and fetal outcomes can be anticipated when the pregnancy is undertaken while the disease is in remission. Poorer outcomes are associated with flare-up of the disease in early pregnancy compared with exacerbation in the second or third trimester, when fetal prognosis is usually good. We present a case of JDM in pregnancy with disease exacerbation late in pregnancy and review of the relevant literature. PMID:23662227

  3. Juvenile dermatomyositis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Madu, Anthony Emeka; Omih, Edwin; Baguley, Elaine; Lindow, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis has variable clinical presentations both in and outside of pregnancy. A literature review indicated that optimal maternal and fetal outcomes can be anticipated when the pregnancy is undertaken while the disease is in remission. Poorer outcomes are associated with flare-up of the disease in early pregnancy compared with exacerbation in the second or third trimester, when fetal prognosis is usually good. We present a case of JDM in pregnancy with disease exacerbation late in pregnancy and review of the relevant literature.

  4. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  5. Psychopathology in Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Angela; Howie, Pauline; Starling, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio-demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and…

  6. Iatrogenic Effect of Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Uberto; Tremblay, Richard E.; Vitaro, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular individual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adolescence increases involvement in adult crime.…

  7. Case history and genome-wide scans for copy number variants in a family with patient having 15q11.1-q11.2 duplication and 22q11.2 deletion, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sakae; Suzuki, Takahiro; Nakamura-Tomizuka, Sakura; Osaki, Koichi; Sotome, Yuta; Sagawa, Tomoaki; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have indicated that chromosomes 15q11 and 22q11 may be associated with the genetic etiologies of schizophrenia. We have followed an adult schizophrenia case with 15q11.1-q11.2 duplication and 22q11.2 deletion. Here we report his clinical history, and copy number variants (CNVs) identified by microarray and real-time PCR in the patient and his parents. This is the first report describing a detailed phenotype of an adult schizophrenic case with both 15q11 and 22q11 CNVs as revealed by novel and trustworthy technologies. Subjects were a 33-year-old male patient with 15q11 and 22q11 CNVs, and his normal parents. He fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia at age 18 years. He was also diagnosed with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) at age 18 years. To search for CNVs in more detail, whole-genome array-CGH analyses including ∼ 420,000 probes were carried out in the patient and his parents. For validations of the CNVs detected by array-CGH, real-time PCR analyses of these CNVs were performed. The patient had two disease-specific CNVs, 15q11.1-q11.2 duplication (∼ 2.7 Mb) and 22q11.21 deletion (∼ 2.9 Mb). These two regions are important for the development of schizophrenia, and this patient had shown symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, the two areas may contain causal genes for schizophrenia.

  8. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents astrocyte death by neuromyelitis optica-specific IgG via inhibition of C1q binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Cheon, Soyoung; Kim, Seung Woo; Kim, Boram; Kim, Heejaung; Park, Ki Duk; Kim, Sung-Min

    2016-09-16

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of NMO-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (NMO-IgG). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has numerous pharmacological effects including inhibition of the complement pathway. We aimed to study the influence of GA on NMO-IgG-induced CDC. NMO-IgG samples from 7 patients with NMO, together with human complement, induced CDC in an aquaporin 4 M23-overexpressing glial cell line, an in vitro NMO model. GA attenuated NMO-IgG-induced CDC in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of the GA-related CDC inhibition was sequentially dissected and found to involve inhibition of C1q binding to NMO-IgG. Consequently, GA attenuates NMO-IgG-induced CDC and may be a promising novel therapeutic agent against NMO. PMID:27462020

  9. Uncoupling complement C1s activation from C1q binding in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and immunosuppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip; Elkon, Keith B

    2016-02-01

    Complement activation contributes to inflammation in many diseases, yet it also supports physiologic apoptotic cells (AC) clearance and its downstream immunosuppressive effects. The roles of individual complement components in AC phagocytosis have been difficult to dissect with artificially depleted sera. Using human in vitro systems and the novel antibody complement C1s inhibitor TNT003, we uncoupled the role of the enzymatic activation of the classical pathway from the opsonizing role of C1q in mediating a) the phagocytosis of early and late AC, and b) the immunosuppressive capacity of early AC. We found that C1s inhibition had a small impact on the physiologic clearance of early AC, leaving their immunosuppressive properties entirely unaffected, while mainly inhibiting the phagocytosis of late apoptotic/secondary necrotic cells. Our data suggest that C1s inhibition may represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to control classical pathway activation without causing significant AC accumulation in diseases without defects in AC phagocytosis.

  10. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Lee A.; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-01-01

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided. PMID:26901213

  11. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Lee A; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-02-18

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided.

  12. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Lee A; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-02-01

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided. PMID:26901213

  13. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40-70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  14. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40–70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  15. Autosomal localization of the amelogenin gene in monotremes and marsupials: implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Watson, J M; Spencer, J A; Graves, J A; Snead, M L; Lau, E C

    1992-11-01

    We have determined by Southern blot analysis that DNA sequences homologous to the AMG gene probe are present in the genomes of both marsupial and monotreme mammals, although adult monotremes lack teeth. In situ hybridization and Southern analysis of cell hybrids demonstrate that AMG homologues are located on autosomes. In the Tammar Wallaby, AMG homologues are located on chromosomes 5q and 1q and in the Platypus, on chromosomes 1 and 2. The autosomal location of the AMG homologues provides additional support for the hypothesis that an autosomal region equivalent to the human Xp was translocated to the X chromosome in the Eutheria after the divergence of the marsupials 150 million years ago. The region containing the AMG gene is therefore likely to have been added 80-150 million years ago to a pseudoautosomal region shared by the ancestral eutherian X and Y chromosome; the X and Y alleles must have begun diverging after this date.

  16. Innate Immune Proteins C1q and Mannan-Binding Lectin Enhance Clearance of Atherogenic Lipoproteins by Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of modified lipoproteins in the arterial intima. C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are not only recognition components involved in activation of inflammation via the complement cascade, but they are also able to directly modulate phagocyte activation. Studies in C1q−/− and MBL−/− mice suggest that these molecules play a protective role in the early atherosclerotic lesion in the absence of, or prior to, expression of other complement components. However, in later stages, complement activation becomes an inappropriate inflammatory response, contributing to disease pathology. Therefore, to investigate possible molecular interactions of C1q and MBL in atherosclerotic lesions, we examined the influence of C1q and MBL in the clearance of native and modified lipoproteins by human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Both C1q and MBL are shown to bind and enhance the monocyte/monocyte-derived macrophage clearance of modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), including oxidized LDL and acetylated LDL, but not native LDL. Modified forms of LDL activate the classical complement pathway, but no lectin pathway activation was detected. Interestingly, monocytes that ingested modified LDL in the presence of C1q or MBL upregulated surface CD80 and CD31, as well as CCL2 chemokine gene expression. However, C1q and MBL also significantly reduced levels of free cholesterol accumulation in monocytes and human monocyte-derived macrophages that ingested oxidized LDL, while enhancing high-density lipoprotein–specific cholesterol efflux from these cells. These results suggest a novel pathway in which C1q and MBL influence removal and metabolism of atherogenic forms of LDL in the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:20833838

  17. C1q-targeted monoclonal antibody prevents complement-dependent cytotoxicity and neuropathology in in vitro and mouse models of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Zhang, Hua; Asavapanumas, Nithi; Leviten, Michael; Rosenthal, Arnon; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disorder with inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system, particularly in the spinal cord and optic nerve. NMO pathogenesis is thought to involve binding of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoantibodies to astrocytes, which causes complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and downstream inflammation leading to oligo-dendrocyte and neuronal injury. Vasculocentric deposition of activated complement is a prominent feature of NMO pathology. Here, we show that a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against the C1q protein in the classical complement pathway prevents AQP4 autoantibody-dependent CDC in cell cultures and NMO lesions in ex vivo spinal cord slice cultures and in mice. A monoclonal antibody against human C1q with 11 nM binding affinity prevented CDC caused by NMO patient serum in AQP4-transfected cells and primary astrocyte cultures, and prevented complement-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CDCC) produced by natural killer cells. The anti-C1q antibody prevented astrocyte damage and demyelination in mouse spinal cord slice cultures exposed to AQP4 autoantibody and human complement. In a mouse model of NMO produced by intracerebral injection of AQP4 autoantibody and human complement, the inflammatory demyelinating lesions were greatly reduced by intracerebral administration of the anti-C1q antibody. These results provide proof-of-concept for C1q-targeted monoclonal antibody therapy in NMO. Targeting of C1q inhibits the classical complement pathway directly and causes secondary inhibition of CDCC and the alternative complement pathway. As C1q-targeted therapy leaves the lectin complement activation pathway largely intact, its side-effect profile is predicted to differ from that of therapies targeting downstream complement proteins. PMID:23677375

  18. C1q modulates the response to TLR7 stimulation by pristane-primed macrophages: implications for pristane-induced lupus

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Francesco; Ishaque, Attia; Ling, Guang Sheng; Szajna, Marta; Sandison, Ann; Donatien, Philippe; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The complement component C1q is known to play a controversial role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome whose pathogenesis implicates the secretion of type I IFN by CD11b+ Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes in a TLR7-dependent fashion. C1q has also been shown to influence the secretion of IFN-α. Herein we explored whether C1q deficiency could affect pristane-induced lupus (PIL). Surprisingly, C1qa−/− mice developed lower titres of circulating antibodies and milder arthritis compared to the controls. In keeping with the clinical scores, two weeks after pristane injection the peritoneal recruitment of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes in the C1qa−/− mice was impaired. Furthermore, C1q-deficient pristane-primed resident peritoneal macrophages secreted significantly less CCL3, CCL2, CXCL1 and IL-6 when stimulated in vitro with TLR7 ligand. Replenishing C1q in vivo during the pristane priming phase rectified this defect. Conversely, pristane-primed macrophages from C3-deficient mice did not show any impaired cytokine production. These findings demonstrate that C1q deficiency impairs the TLR7-dependent chemokine production by pristane-primed peritoneal macrophages and suggest that C1q, and not C3, is involved in the handling of pristane by phagocytic cells which is required to trigger disease in this model. PMID:26773156

  19. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. A report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Sinha, P P; Aziz, H I

    1978-05-01

    Seven cases of biopsy-proved juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma are presented. All patients were males. Examination under anesthesia and tomography and angiography were very rewarding in determining the full extent of tumor. Selective carotid angiography revealed a characteristic early arterial phase with reticulated vessels, and a homogeneous blush continuing into the venous phase without early draining veins. The tumor has a strong predilection for young males. Chromosomal studies and estimation of 17-ketosteroids in 4 patients were normal. None of the patients demonstrated sexual underdevelopment. All were treated by external radiotherapy with 3000 rads in 15 fractions in three weeks with good results. There were no undue side effects.

  20. The Juvenile Justice System of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladstone, William

    1995-01-01

    A former juvenile and family court judge reflects on experiences with juvenile issues, calling for critical changes in juvenile case handling. Advocates many changes for juvenile and family courts of the future, such as a new type of due process for children and the abolishment of labels such as "delinquent," runaway," or "abandoned" in favor of…

  1. Miranda Rights: Implications for Juveniles with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Barrett, David E.; Losinski, Mickey L.

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency in the United States has been a persistent concern for decades. Consequently, because more juveniles have been referred to juvenile court and the arrest rate of preteen offenders has increased to almost three times that of older youth, the persistent and often controversial issue of the capacity of juvenile offenders to waive…

  2. Chromosomal localization of the human fibromodulin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roughley, P.J.; Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and mapping of genes is a fundamental step in understanding inherited diseases. This study reports the chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding fibromodulin, a collagen-binding proteoglycan which exhibits a wide distribution in connective tissue extracellular matrices. Attempts to localize the gene utilizing a probe covering the published coding region of the human fibromodulin cDNA were unsuccessful. Thus, in order to obtain an alternate probe, the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNA was cloned utilizing the 3{prime}-RACE protocol. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA with probes covering either the coding sequence or the 3{prime}-untranslated region revealed simple patterns, indicative of a single-copy gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the 3{prime}-untranslated region probe resulted in hybridization at two chromosomal regions. The majority of signals were observed at 1q32, but some signals were also observed at 9q34.1. The localization of the fibromodulin gene to chromosome 1 was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrid lines. In addition to allowing the gene localization, cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region demonstrates that the human fibromodulin cDNA possesses an insert of approximately 160 base pairs which is not present in the published bovine sequence. The human sequence also possesses a single polyadenylation signal, yielding a 3 kb mRNA which was observed in Northern blotting experiments. These results now provide the necessary information to evaluate the potential role of fibromodulin in genetic disorders of connective tissues.

  3. The relationship between sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Sandberg, A A

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of the break points of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was compared with that of chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome by using differential sister chromatid staining and banding techniques. A comparison was made of the distribution in chromosomes 1, 2, and 3, since the exact identification of other chromosomes is difficult with the differential sister-chromatid staining technique. It was shown that SCE and chromosome breaks do not necessarily correlate as to location. Some chromosome break points, e.g., 1q21, 1p36, 2q31, 3q12, and 3p13, were common with those of SCE, whereas others (at 1p13, 2p11, 2q11, and 3q11) showed little or no SCE. SCE breaks were not observed in the centromeric regions. In addition, the SCE frequency was examined in Bloom's syndrome cells with and without chromosome aberrations, and no significant differences of SCE frequency were observed between cells with chromatid- or chromosome-type of aberrations and those with normal complements. Banding analyses indicated a nonrandom distribution of chromosome breaks in the lymphocytes and marrow cells of the Bloom's syndrome patient.

  4. Diversity of breakpoints of variant Philadelphia chromosomes in chronic myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari; Bandeira, Ana Carolina de Almeida; da Silva, Aline Schiavoni Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome or t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2), resulting in the break-point cluster region-Abelson tyrosine kinase fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase protein. The Philadelphia chromosome is detected by karyotyping in around 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but 5–10% may have variant types. Variant Philadelphia chromosomes are characterized by the involvement of another chromosome in addition to chromosome 9 or 22. It can be a simple type of variant when one other chromosome is involved, or complex, in which two or more chromosomes take part in the translocation. Few studies have reported the incidence of variant Philadelphia chromosomes or the breakpoints involved among Brazilian chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Objective The aim of this report is to describe the diversity of the variant Philadelphia chromosomes found and highlight some interesting breakpoint candidates for further studies. Methods the Cytogenetics Section Database was searched for all cases with diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia during a 12-year period and all the variant Philadelphia chromosomes were listed. Results Fifty (5.17%) cases out of 1071 Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia were variants. The most frequently involved chromosome was 17, followed by chromosomes: 1, 20, 6, 11, 2, 10, 12 and 15. Conclusion Among all the breakpoints seen in this survey, six had previously been described: 11p15, 14q32, 15q11.2, 16p13.1, 17p13 and 17q21. The fact that some regions get more frequently involved in such rare rearrangements calls attention to possible predisposition that should be further studied. Nevertheless, the pathological implication of these variants remains unclear. PMID:25638762

  5. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Makhasana, Jashika Adil Shroff; Kulkarni, Meena A; Vaze, Suhas; Shroff, Adil Sarosh

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. It is an aggressive neoplasm and shows a propensity for destructive local spread often extending to the base of the skull and into the cranium. Clinically, however, it is obscure with painless, progressive unilateral nasal obstruction being the common presenting symptom with or without epistaxis and rhinorrhea. Diagnosis of JNA is made by complete history, clinical examination, radiography, nasal endoscopy and by using specialized imaging techniques such as arteriography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathology reveals a fibrocellular stroma with spindle cells and haphazard arrangement of collagen interspersed with an irregular vascular pattern. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a 17-year-old male patient is presented in the article. JNA being an aggressive tumor may recur posttreatment. Thus, early diagnosis, accurate staging, and adequate treatment are essential in the management of this lesion.

  6. [JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS AND CALCINOSIS].

    PubMed

    Zhvania, M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Dermatomiositis (JD) is autoimmune disease that progresses with time; JD's main differentiated syndromes are rash on the skin, poor function of muscles, and often developing invalidism. If the health practitioners manage to diagnose the JD on an early stage and prescribe the adequate treatment the disease will not progress aggressively. This approach is tangible for practical rheumatology and pediatric. The article aims to present the reasons of the development of the JD and calcinosis. The study based on the description of the patients with JD. There are distinguished the main symptoms of the disease in children: frequent and acute developments of muscles calcinosis, occasionally with diffuse character followed with hypotrophy of the muscles, contractures and invalidism. One of the patient cases that describe the article is the thirteen-year boy with JD indicating repeated sequence of the disease, with diffusive calcinosis, cellulitis followed with secondary infection and impaired vision.

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Maria; Gottlieb, Beth S

    2012-07-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthrithis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood.JIA is a chronic disease that is associated with periods of disease flares and periods of disease inactivity.Early, aggressive treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, or methotrexate, has significantly improved the outcome of most children who have JIA. Biologics have been shown to be both safe and effective for the treatment of more aggressive forms of arthritis and for uveitis. Long-term safety data of biologics is still uncertain. In the near future, it is hoped that genetic testing will allow earlier diagnosis of JIA as well as help predict the disease course of children who have JIA. Genetic analysis also may allow physicians to target therapies more effectively. It is hoped that development of more specific therapies will decrease overall immunosuppression and other associated toxicities.

  8. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Makhasana, Jashika Adil Shroff; Kulkarni, Meena A; Vaze, Suhas; Shroff, Adil Sarosh

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. It is an aggressive neoplasm and shows a propensity for destructive local spread often extending to the base of the skull and into the cranium. Clinically, however, it is obscure with painless, progressive unilateral nasal obstruction being the common presenting symptom with or without epistaxis and rhinorrhea. Diagnosis of JNA is made by complete history, clinical examination, radiography, nasal endoscopy and by using specialized imaging techniques such as arteriography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathology reveals a fibrocellular stroma with spindle cells and haphazard arrangement of collagen interspersed with an irregular vascular pattern. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a 17-year-old male patient is presented in the article. JNA being an aggressive tumor may recur posttreatment. Thus, early diagnosis, accurate staging, and adequate treatment are essential in the management of this lesion. PMID:27601836

  9. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Makhasana, Jashika Adil Shroff; Kulkarni, Meena A; Vaze, Suhas; Shroff, Adil Sarosh

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. It is an aggressive neoplasm and shows a propensity for destructive local spread often extending to the base of the skull and into the cranium. Clinically, however, it is obscure with painless, progressive unilateral nasal obstruction being the common presenting symptom with or without epistaxis and rhinorrhea. Diagnosis of JNA is made by complete history, clinical examination, radiography, nasal endoscopy and by using specialized imaging techniques such as arteriography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathology reveals a fibrocellular stroma with spindle cells and haphazard arrangement of collagen interspersed with an irregular vascular pattern. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a 17-year-old male patient is presented in the article. JNA being an aggressive tumor may recur posttreatment. Thus, early diagnosis, accurate staging, and adequate treatment are essential in the management of this lesion. PMID:27601836

  10. Juvenile homosexual homicide.

    PubMed

    Myers, Wade C; Chan, Heng Choon Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Limited information exists on juvenile homosexual homicide (JHH), that is, youths who perpetrate sexual homicides against same-sex victims. Only a handful of cases from the United States and internationally have been described in the literature. This study, the first of its kind, examines the epidemiology, victimology, victim-offender relationship, and weapon-use patterns in JHH offenders using a large U.S. database on homicide spanning three decades. The data for this study were derived from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHRs) for the years 1976 through 2005. A total of 93 cases of JHH were identified. On average, three of these crimes occurred annually in the U.S., and there was a marked decline in its incidence over the study period. Ninety-five percent were male offender-male victim cases and 5% were female offender-female victim cases. JHH offenders were over-represented amongst all juvenile sexual murderers, similar to their adult counterparts. The majority of these boys were aged 16 or 17 and killed adult victims. They were significantly more likely to kill adult victims than other age groups, to be friends or acquaintances of the victims, and to use contact/edged weapons or firearms. Most offenders killed same-race victims, although Black offenders were significantly more likely than White offenders to kill interracially. A case report is provided to illustrate JHH. Further research is needed to promote our understanding of the pathogenesis, etiology, and associated risk factors for this aberrant form of murder by children.

  11. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  12. Transfer of Juvenile Cases to Criminal Court.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kraus, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The first juvenile court was founded in 1899 with the focus on rehabilitation of a juvenile offender as opposed to punishment in adult court. Determining culpability and disposition for adolescents has become a source of much discussion. With serious crimes, juvenile delinquents may be transferred from juvenile court to adult criminal court; this practice became more prevalent in the past century. However, growing knowledge of adolescent development has mitigated the culpability of youth offenders and resulted in judicial decisions influential to juvenile dispositions.

  13. Inferring Planet Occurrence Rates With a Q1-Q17 Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog Produced by a Machine Learning Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Jenkins, Jon Michael; McCauliff, Sean D.; Burke, Christopher; Bryson, Steve; Batalha, Natalie; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason; mullally, fergal; thompson, susan; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph; Li, Jie; morris, robert; smith, jeffrey; haas, michael; christiansen, jessie; Clarke, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope monitored the photometric variations of over 170,000 stars, at half-hour cadence, over its four-year prime mission. The Kepler pipeline calibrates the pixels of the target apertures for each star, produces light curves with simple aperture photometry, corrects for systematic error, and detects threshold-crossing events (TCEs) that may be due to transiting planets. The pipeline estimates planet parameters for all TCEs and computes diagnostics used by the Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT) to produce a catalog of objects that are deemed either likely transiting planet candidates or false positives.We created a training set from the Q1-Q12 and Q1-Q16 TCERT catalogs and an ensemble of synthetic transiting planets that were injected at the pixel level into all 17 quarters of data, and used it to train a random forest classifier. The classifier uniformly and consistently applies diagnostics developed by the Transiting Planet Search and Data Validation pipeline components and by TCERT to produce a robust catalog of planet candidates.The characteristics of the planet candidates detected by Kepler (planet radius and period) do not reflect the intrinsic planet population. Detection efficiency is a function of SNR, so the set of detected planet candidates is incomplete. Transit detection preferentially finds close-in planets with nearly edge-on orbits and misses planets whose orbital geometry precludes transits. Reliability of the planet candidates must also be considered, as they may be false positives. Errors in detected planet radius and in assumed star properties can also bias inference of intrinsic planet population characteristics.In this work we infer the intrinsic planet population, starting with the catalog of detected planet candidates produced by our random forest classifier, and accounting for detection biases and reliabilities as well as for radius errors in the detected population.Kepler was selected as the 10th mission

  14. Editor's Shelf: International Juvenile Titles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of international juvenile picture books and notes those that emphasize text over pictures. The 49 titles present international perspectives for educators, librarians, and parents seeking materials with alternative cultural content. The majority are folk tales. (SLD)

  15. Evaluation of Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecules and Anti-C1q Antibody in Discriminating between Active and Non-Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahayidin, Hasni; Yahya, Nurul Khaiza; Wan Ghazali, Wan Syamimee; Mohd Ismail, Asmahan; Wan Ab Hamid, Wan Zuraida

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting the active state of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is important but challenging. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE. Methods Using SELENA-SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), 95 SLE patients (45 active and 50 non-active) were assessed. A score above five was considered indicative of active SLE. The blood samples were tested for serum ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The levels of serum VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody were significantly higher in active SLE patients. Both VCAM-1 and anti-C1q were able to discriminate between active and non-active SLE (p-value < 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). From the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) constructed, the optimal cut-off values for VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE were 30.5 ng/mL (69.0% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity, PPV 58.5%, NPV 66.7%) and 7.86 U/mL (75.6% sensitivity, 80% specificity, PPV 77.3%, NPV 78.4%), respectively. However, serum ICAM-1 level was unable to discriminate between the two groups (p-value = 0.193). Conclusion Anti-C1q antibody demonstrated the best diagnostic accuracy in discriminating between active and non-active SLE patients. PMID:27418866

  16. The Exosporium of B.cereus Contains a Binding Site for gC1qR/p33: Implication in Spore Attachment and/or Entry.

    SciTech Connect

    GHEBREHIWET,B.; TANTRAL, L.; TITMUS, M.A.; PANESSA-WARREN, B.J.; TORTORA, G.T.; WONG, S.S.; WARREN, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    B. cereus, is a member of a genus of aerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming rod-like bacilli, which includes the deadly, B. anthracis. Preliminary experiments have shown that gC1qR binds to B.cereus spores that have been attached to microtiter plates. The present studies were therefore undertaken, to examine if cell surface gC1qR plays a role in B.cereus spore attachment and/or entry. Monolayers of human colon carcinoma (Caco-2) and lung cells were grown to confluency on 6 mm coverslips in shell vials with gentle swirling in a shaker incubator. Then, 2 {micro}l of a suspension of strain SB460 B.cereus spores (3x10{sup 8}/ml, in sterile water), were added and incubated (1-4 h; 36{sup 0} C) in the presence or absence of anti-gC1qR mAb-carbon nanoloops. Examination of these cells by EM revealed that: (1) When B. cereus endospores contacted the apical Caco-2 cell surface, or lung cells, gClqR was simultaneously detectable, indicating upregulation of the molecule. (2) In areas showing spore contact with the cell surface, gClqR expression was often adjacent to the spores in association with microvilli (Caco-2 cells) or cytoskeletal projections (lung cells). (3) Furthermore, the exosporia of the activated and germinating spores were often decorated with mAb-nanoloops. These observations were further corroborated by experiments in which B.cereus spores were readily taken up by monocytes and neutrophils, and this uptake was partially inhibited by mAb 60.11, which recognizes the C1q binding site on gC1qR. Taken together, the data suggest a role, for gC1qR at least in the initial stages of spore attachment and/or entry.

  17. The Exosporium of B.cereus Contains a Binding Site for gC1qR/p33: Implication in Spore Attachment and/or Entry*

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Tantral, Lee; Titmus, Mathew A.; Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Tortora, George T.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Warren, John B.

    2009-01-01

    B. cereus, is a member of a genus of aerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming rod-like bacilli, which includes the deadly, B. anthracis. Preliminary experiments have shown that gC1qR binds to B.cereus spores that have been attached to microtiter plates. The present studies were therefore undertaken, to examine if cell surface gC1qR plays a role in B.cereus spore attachment and/or entry. Monolayers of human colon carcinoma (Caco-2) and lung cells were grown to confluency on 6 mm coverslips in shell vials with gentle swirling in a shaker incubator. Then, 2 μl of a suspension of strain SB460 B.cereus spores (3×108/ml, in sterile water), were added and incubated (1–4 h; 36° C) in the presence or absence of anti-gC1qR mAb-carbon nanoloops. Examination of these cells by EM revealed that: (1) When B. cereus endospores contacted the apical Caco-2 cell surface, or lung cells, gClqR was simultaneously detectable, indicating upregulation of the molecule. (2) In areas showing spore contact with the cell surface, gClqR expression was often adjacent to the spores in association with microvilli (Caco-2 cells) or cytoskeletal projections (lung cells). (3) Furthermore, the exosporia of the activated and germinating spores were often decorated with mAb-nanoloops. These observations were further corroborated by experiments in which B.cereus spores were readily taken up by monocytes and neutrophils, and this uptake was partially inhibited by mAb 60.11, which recognizes the C1q binding site on gC1qR. Taken together, the data suggest a role, for gC1qR at least in the initial stages of spore attachment and/or entry. PMID:17892212

  18. Positive clinical response to clopidogrel is independent of paraoxonase 1 Q192R and CYP2C19 genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Medina-Gil, José M; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Limiñana, José M; Saavedra, Pedro; Tugores, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing controversy about the influence of serum paraoxonase type 1 and cytochrome CYP2C19 in the conversion of clopidogrel to its pharmaceutically active metabolite. The effect of concomitant medication with the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole has been also subject of intense scrutiny. We present a cohort of 263 patients receiving anti-platelet aggregation treatment with clopidogrel and aspirin for 1 year. The paraoxonase 1 gene Q192R variant along with the presence of CYP2C19*2 and *3 loss of function alleles, concomitant medication with proton pump inhibitors and known cardiovascular risk factors were examined to determine their influence in disease relapse due to an ischaemic event during the 12 month treatment period. The low number of patients suffering a relapse (20 out of 263), indicates that double anti-aggregation therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel was very effective in our patients. Among the relapsers, evidence of coronary heart disease was the most influencial factor affecting response to therapy, while the presence of the paraoxonase 1 Q192R variant, loss of function of CYP2C19, and concomitant medication with omeprazole were non-significant. PMID:24504666

  19. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SALTSTONE FORMULATED USING 1Q11, 2Q11 AND 3Q11 TANK 50 SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Nichols, R.

    2012-06-27

    As part of the Saltstone formulation work requested by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing Saltstone samples for fresh property analysis and hydraulic conductivity measurements using actual Tank 50 salt solution rather than simulated salt solution. Samples of low level waste salt solution collected from Tank 50H during the first, second, and third quarters of 2011 were used to formulate the Saltstone samples. The salt solution was mixed with premix (45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash, and 10 wt % cement), in a ratio consistent with facility operating conditions during the quarter of interest. The fresh properties (gel, set, bleed) of each mix were evaluated and compared to the recommended acceptance criteria for the Saltstone Production Facility. ASTM D5084-03, Method C was used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the Saltstone samples. The hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples prepared from 1Q11 and 2Q11 samples of Tank 50H is 4.2E-9 cm/sec and 2.6E-9 cm/sec, respectively. Two additional 2Q11 and one 3Q11 sample were not successfully tested due to the inability to achieve stable readings during saturation and testing. The hydraulic conductivity of the samples made from Tank 50H salt solution compare well to samples prepared with simulated salt solution and cured under similar conditions (1.4E-9 - 4.9E-8 cm/sec).

  20. C1q/TNF-related protein-1 functions to protect against acute ischemic injury in the heart.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Daisuke; Ohashi, Koji; Shibata, Rei; Mizutani, Naoki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kambara, Takahiro; Uemura, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Kanemura, Noriyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoko; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Ito, Masanori; Ogawa, Hayato; Murate, Takashi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. C1q/TNF-related protein (CTRP)-1 is a poorly characterized adipokine that is up-regulated in association with ischemic heart disease. We investigated the role of CTRP1 in myocardial ischemia injury. CTRP1-knockout mice showed increased myocardial infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and proinflammatory gene expression after I/R compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, systemic delivery of CTRP1 attenuated myocardial damage after I/R in WT mice. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with CTRP1 led to reduction of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced apoptosis and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which was reversed by inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with CTRP1 also resulted in the increased production of cAMP, which was blocked by suppression of S1P signaling. The antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions of CTRP1 were cancelled by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase or knockdown of adiponectin receptor 1. Furthermore, blockade of S1P signaling reversed CTRP1-mediated inhibition of myocardial infarct size, apoptosis, and inflammation after I/R in vivo. These data indicate that CTRP1 protects against myocardial ischemic injury by reducing apoptosis and inflammatory response through activation of the S1P/cAMP signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes, suggesting that CTRP1 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transit metric for Q1-Q17 Kepler candidates (Thompson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Mullally, F.; Coughlin, J.; Christiansen, J. L.; Henze, C. E.; Haas, M. R.; Burke, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a new metric that uses machine learning to determine if a periodic signal found in a photometric time series appears to be shaped like the signature of a transiting exoplanet. This metric uses dimensionality reduction and k-nearest neighbors to determine whether a given signal is sufficiently similar to known transits in the same data set. This metric is being used by the Kepler Robovetter to determine which signals should be part of the Q1-Q17 DR24 catalog of planetary candidates. The Kepler Mission reports roughly 20000 potential transiting signals with each run of its pipeline, yet only a few thousand appear to be sufficiently transit shaped to be part of the catalog. The other signals tend to be variable stars and instrumental noise. With this metric, we are able to remove more than 90% of the non-transiting signals while retaining more than 99% of the known planet candidates. When tested with injected transits, less than 1% are lost. This metric will enable the Kepler mission and future missions looking for transiting planets to rapidly and consistently find the best planetary candidates for follow-up and cataloging. (1 data file).

  2. A giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Yüce, Salim; Uysal, Ismail Önder; Doğan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Salk, Ismail; Müderris, Suphi

    2013-05-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are locally growing and highly vascular tumors. They are primarily treated through surgical excision ranging from an open approach to an endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old man with a giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma that bilaterally obliterated the pterygopalatine fossa, invaded the sphenoid bone, and extended to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically using the endoscopic approach and declared cured and discharged without any complications.

  3. A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Yüce, Salim; Uysal, İsmail Önder; Doğan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Şalk, İsmail; Müderris, Suphi

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication. PMID:23714961

  4. Four small supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosomes 6, 8, 11 and 12 in a patient with minimal clinical abnormalities: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Small supernumerary marker chromosomes are still a problem in cytogenetic diagnostic and genetic counseling. This holds especially true for the rare cases with multiple small supernumerary marker chromosomes. Most such cases are reported to be clinically severely affected due to the chromosomal imbalances induced by the presence of small supernumerary marker chromosomes. Here we report the first case of a patient having four different small supernumerary marker chromosomes which, apart from slight developmental retardation in youth and non-malignant hyperpigmentation, presented no other clinical signs. Case presentation Our patient was a 30-year-old Caucasian man, delivered by caesarean section because of macrosomy. At birth he presented with bilateral cryptorchidism but no other birth defects. At age of around two years he showed psychomotor delay and a bilateral convergent strabismus. Later he had slight learning difficulties, with normal social behavior and now lives an independent life as an adult. Apart from hypogenitalism, he has multiple hyperpigmented nevi all over his body, short feet with pes cavus and claw toes. At age of 30 years, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 50,XY,+min(6)(:p11.1-> q11.1:),+min(8)(:p11.1->q11.1:),+min(11)(:p11.11->q11:),+min(12)(:p11.2~12->q10:), leading overall to a small partial trisomy in 12p11.1~12.1. Conclusions Including this case, four single case reports are available in the literature with a karyotype 50,XN,+4mar. For prenatally detected multiple small supernumerary marker chromosomes in particular we learn from this case that such a cytogenetic condition may be correlated with a positive clinical outcome. PMID:20682055

  5. Human chromosome 22.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J C; Aurias, A; Julier, C; Prieur, M; Szajnert, M F

    1987-01-01

    The acrocentric chromosome 22, one of the shortest human chromosomes, carries about 52 000 kb of DNA. The short arm is made up essentially of heterochromatin and, as in other acrocentric chromosomes, it contains ribosomal RNA genes. Ten identified genes have been assigned to the long arm, of which four have already been cloned and documented (the cluster of lambda immunoglobulin genes, myoglobin, the proto-oncogene c-sis, bcr). In addition, about 10 anonymous DNA segments have been cloned from chromosome 22 specific DNA libraries. About a dozen diseases, including at least four different malignancies, are related to an inherited or acquired pathology of chromosome 22. They have been characterised at the phenotypic or chromosome level or both. In chronic myelogenous leukaemia, with the Ph1 chromosome, and Burkitt's lymphoma, with the t(8;22) variant translocation, the molecular pathology is being studied at the DNA level, bridging for the first time the gap between cytogenetics and molecular genetics. PMID:3550088

  6. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  7. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  8. Juvenile xanthogranuloma with lichenoid appearance.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kozo; Demitsu, Toshio; Kubota, Yasuo

    2012-05-01

    Juvenile xanthogranulomas are benign histiocytic cell tumors that develop mainly in infancy and early childhood and then spontaneously regress. We report a 2-year-old boy who presented with generalized eruption of a mixture of micronodular and macronodular juvenile xanthogranuloma with a large number of widely distributed lichenoid papules. Light microscopic and immunocytochemical analyses of the lesion were consistent with juvenile xanthogranuloma. Abdominal ultrasonography did not detect any visceral lesions, and brain magnetic resonance imaging did not detect any mass lesions. We decided to observe the course without treatment in this case because there are no internal masses of juvenile xanthogranuloma. Regular follow up has therefore been scheduled. To our knowledge, this is the third report of a case demonstrating juvenile xanthogranuloma with lichenoid appearance. Future analyses of various cytokines such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and/or tumor necrosis factor-α in juvenile xanthogranuloma lesions should be of great help in elucidating the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21980990

  9. Mapping of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase 10 to human chromosome 1q21-q23 and mouse chromosome 1H1-5 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Lai, C.

    1995-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a critical role in the transduction of signals important to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations affecting the expression of receptor PTK genes have been associated with a number of vertebrate and invertebrate developmental abnormalities, and the aberrant regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in a variety of neoplasias. One estimate suggests that approximately 100 receptor PTK genes exist in the mammalian genome, about half of which have been identified. The tyro-10 receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, first identified in a PCR-based survey for novel tyrosine kinases in the rat nervous system, defines a new subfamily of PTKs. It exhibits a catalytic domain most closely related to those found in the trk PTK receptor subfamily, which transduces signals for nerve growth factor and the related molecules brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 (NT-3 and NT-4). Trk and the related PTK receptors trkB and trkC play a critical role in the neurotrophin-dependent survival of subsets of sensory and motor neurons. The predicted tyro-10 extracellular region is, however, distinct from that of the trk subfamily and is unique except for a domain shared with the blood coagulation factors V and VIII, thought to be involved in phospholipid binding. Although tyro-10 RNA is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle in the adult rat, it is expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the developing and mature brain. Tyro-10 appears identical to the murine TKT sequence reported by Karn et al. and exhibits a high degree of similarity with the CaK, DDR, and Nep PTKs. A ligand for tyro-10 has not yet been identified. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  11. The expression level of gC1qR is down regulated at the early time of infection with porcine circovirus of type 2 (PCV-2) and gC1qR interacts differently with the Cap proteins of porcine circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kouokam Fotso, Guy Baudry; Bernard, Cécilia; Bigault, Lionel; de Boisséson, Claire; Mankertz, Annette; Jestin, André; Grasland, Béatrice

    2016-07-15

    Porcine circoviruses (PCV) are small, non-enveloped single-stranded DNA-viruses. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) is the causal agent of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) whereas porcine circovirus of type 1 (PCV-1) is non- pathogenic. gC1qR is a membrane-located receptor of the complement protein subunit C1q and interacts with PCV capsid proteins. The mechanisms associated with the triggering of PMWS are not well known and gC1qR may have a role in the life cycle and eventually in the pathogenicity of PCV. The objectives of this study were to determine the level of expression of gC1qR during early PCV-2 infection, to determine the region of PCV-2 capsid protein (Cap) required for the interaction with gC1qR and to evaluate the interaction of gC1qR with Cap proteins of different PCV strains. The results indicate that gC1qR transcripts are downregulated in the tonsils and the tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of piglets infected by PCV-2 at the early time of the infection. The N-terminal amino acids (a.a. 1-59) of PCV-2b Cap, an arginine rich region, are involved in the interaction with gC1qR. Porcine gC1qR interacts with Cap proteins of two pathogenic viral strains, PCV-2a and PCV-2b, while interaction has been observed with only one Cap protein of two investigated strains of PCV-1. The amino acids 30 and 49 of PCV-1Cap, solely, were not responsible of the difference of interaction observed. We have also shown that gC1qR interacts strongly with PCV-2Caps and PCV-1 GER Cap. This result suggests that the different interaction of gC1qR with PCV Cap proteins may have an impact on the pathogenicity of the PCV. PMID:27063333

  12. Consistent chromosome abnormalities including double minutes (dms) in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Morsberger, L.; Ellingham, T.

    1994-09-01

    Little is known about the somatic genetic changes which characterize pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), and identification of acquired genomic alterations would further our understanding of the biology of this neoplasm. We have studied 62 primary specimens of PA using classical and FISH methods. Clonally abnormal karyotypes were observed in 44 neoplasms. Karyotypes were generally complex (greater than 3 abnormalities) including both numerical and structural chromosome changes. Many tumors contained at least one marker chromosome. The most frequent whole chromosomal gains were chromosomes 20 (7 tumors) and 7 (5 tumors). Losses were much more frequent: chromosome 18 was lost in 22 tumors, followed by chromosomes 13 (15 tumors), 12 (13 tumors), and 6 (12 tumors). Structural abnormalities were common. 200 chromosome breakpoints were identified. Excluding Robertsonian translocations, chromosomal arms most frequently involved were 6q (12 chromosomes), 1p and 3p (10 each), 11p and 17p (9 each), 1q (8), 8p and 19q (7 each). Of particular interest, we found dms in 6 cases. These represent the first PAs with cytogenetic evidence of gene amplification, and are under investigation using chromosome microdissection. To begin to define the smallest region of 6q which is deleted, 5 tumors with 6q deletions were hybridized with a biotin-labeled probe, made by microdissection of 6q24-qter. Loss of one copy of this region was verified in 4/5 tumors; additional probes are being made. Our results are similar to those of 34 other reported PAs, and the combined data suggest that gains of chromosomes 7 and 20 and deletions and rearrangements of 1p and 6q may be particularly important in the biology of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  13. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    PubMed

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  14. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  15. Complex chromosomal rearrangements involving five chromosomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FU, GUO-NING; FAN, HAI-YING; HAN, XUE-JING; XIN, CHUN-LEI

    2016-01-01

    The typical breakpoint cluster region/Abelson (BCR-ABL) fusion gene, which is located in the Philadelphia chromosome, in association with a complex translocation event is only observed in 2–10% of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). CML is diagnosed based on the presence of splenomegaly, increased peripheral white blood cells and the expression of BCR-ABL. The present study reports the case of a patient with CML that possessed complex aberrations involving 5 chromosome translocations, which consisted of t(1;6)(p36.1;q25) and t(9;22;11)(q34;q11.2;q11). After 2 months of follow-up, the patient is in remission following treatment with imatinib (400 mg/day) and hydroxyurea (3,000 mg/day). The hematological parameters of the patient were significantly improved and the white blood cell count returned to normal (from 361.00×109 cells/l to 6.83×109cells/l; normal range, 3.50–9.50×109 cells/l). The results of the ultrasonic examination revealed that the presence of splenomegaly had disappeared, indicating that the treatment strategy was effective. According to the outcome of the treatment, hydroxyurea in combination with imatinib is recommended for use in similar cases of CML. PMID:27073533

  16. Preferential localization of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A gene in the proximal part of a 1-cM 15q15.1-q15.3 interval.

    PubMed

    Allamand, V; Broux, O; Richard, I; Fougerousse, F; Chiannilkulchai, N; Bourg, N; Brenguier, L; Devaud, C; Pasturaud, P; Pereira de Souza, A

    1995-06-01

    A gene for a recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2A) has been localized to chromosome 15. A physical map of the 7-cM candidate 15q15.1-q21.1 region has been constructed by means of a 10-12-Mb continuum of overlapping YAC clones. New microsatellite markers developed from these YACs were genotyped on large, consanguineous LGMD2A pedigrees from different origins. The identification of recombination events in these families allowed the restriction of the LGMD2A region to an estimated 1-cM interval, equivalent to approximately 3-4 Mb. Linkage disequilibrium data on genetic isolates from the island of Réunion and from the Amish community suggest a preferential location of the LGMD2A gene in the proximal part of this region. Analysis of the interrelated pedigrees from Réunion revealed the existence of at least six different carrier haplotypes. This allelic heterogeneity is incompatible with the presumed existence of a founder effect and suggests that multiple LGMD2A mutations may segregate in this population. PMID:7762565

  17. An intermediate-risk multiple myeloma subgroup is defined by sIL-6r: levels synergistically increase with incidence of SNP rs2228145 and 1q21 amplification.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Owen W; Zhang, Qing; Qu, Pingping; Zhou, Yiming; Chavan, Shweta; Tian, Erming; Williams, David R; Epstein, Joshua; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2012-01-12

    IL-6 signaling can be enhanced through transsignaling by the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6r), allowing for the pleiotropic cytokine to affect cells it would not ordinarily have an effect on. Serum levels of sIL-6r can be used as an independent prognostic indicator and further stratify the GEP 70-gene low-risk group to identify an intermediate-risk group in multiple myeloma (MM). By analyzing more than 600 MM patients with ELISA, genotyping, and gene expression profiling tools, we show how the combination of 2 independent molecular genetic events is related to synergistic increases in sIL-6r levels. We also show that the rs2228145 minor allele is related to increased expression levels of an IL-6r splice variant that purportedly codes exclusively for a sIL-6r isoform. Together, the SNP rs2228145 minor allele C and amplification of chromosome 1q21 are significantly correlated to an increase in sIL-6r levels, which are associated with lower overall survival in 70-gene low-risk disease, and aid in identification of the intermediate-risk MM group.

  18. An intermediate-risk multiple myeloma subgroup is defined by sIL-6r: levels synergistically increase with incidence of SNP rs2228145 and 1q21 amplification

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Owen W.; Zhang, Qing; Qu, Pingping; Zhou, Yiming; Chavan, Shweta; Tian, Erming; Williams, David R.; Epstein, Joshua; Barlogie, Bart

    2012-01-01

    IL-6 signaling can be enhanced through transsignaling by the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6r), allowing for the pleiotropic cytokine to affect cells it would not ordinarily have an effect on. Serum levels of sIL-6r can be used as an independent prognostic indicator and further stratify the GEP 70-gene low-risk group to identify an intermediate-risk group in multiple myeloma (MM). By analyzing more than 600 MM patients with ELISA, genotyping, and gene expression profiling tools, we show how the combination of 2 independent molecular genetic events is related to synergistic increases in sIL-6r levels. We also show that the rs2228145 minor allele is related to increased expression levels of an IL-6r splice variant that purportedly codes exclusively for a sIL-6r isoform. Together, the SNP rs2228145 minor allele C and amplification of chromosome 1q21 are significantly correlated to an increase in sIL-6r levels, which are associated with lower overall survival in 70-gene low-risk disease, and aid in identification of the intermediate-risk MM group. PMID:22072558

  19. Inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1) in a man with mental retardation, short stature, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism: clinical study and mutation analysis of the NXF5 gene.

    PubMed

    Frints, Suzanna G M; Jun, Lin; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koen; Teulingkx, Rudi; Van den Berghe, Lut; De Vos, Bernice; Borghgraef, Martine; Chelly, Jamel; Des Portes, Vincent; Van Bokhoven, Hans; Hamel, Ben; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera; Raynaud, Martine; Moraine, Claude; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2003-06-15

    We describe a 59-year-old male (patient A059) with moderate to severe mental retardation (MR) and a pericentric inversion of the X-chromosome: inv(X)(p21.1;q22.1). He had short stature, pectus excavatum, general muscle wasting, and facial dysmorphism. Until now, no other patients with similar clinical features have been described in the literature. Molecular analysis of both breakpoints led to the identification of a novel "Nuclear RNA export factor" (NXF) gene cluster on Xq22.1. Within this cluster, the NXF5 gene was interrupted with subsequent loss of gene expression. Hence, mutation analysis of the NXF5 and its neighboring homologue, the NXF2 gene was performed in 45 men with various forms of syndromic X-linked MR (XLMR) and in 70 patients with nonspecific XLMR. In the NXF5 gene four nucleotide changes: one intronic, two silent, and one missense (K23E), were identified. In the NXF2 gene two changes (one intronic and one silent) were found. Although none of these changes were causative mutations, we propose that NXF5 is a good candidate gene for this syndromic form of XLMR, given the suspected role of NXF proteins is within mRNA export/transport in neurons. Therefore, mutation screening of the NXF gene family in phenotypically identical patients is recommended.

  20. Preferential localization of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A gene in the proximal part of a 1-cM 15q15.1-q15.3 interval

    SciTech Connect

    Allamand, V.; Broux, O.; Richard, I.

    1995-06-01

    A gene for a recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2A) has been localized to chromosome 15. A physical map of the 7-cM candidate 15q15.1-q21.1 region has been constructed by means of a 10-12-Mb continuum of overlapping YAC clones. New microsatellite markers developed from these YACs were genotyped on large, consanguineous LGMD2A pedigrees from different origins. The identification of recombination events in these families allowed the restriction of the LGMD2A region to an estimated 1-cM interval, equivalent to {approximately}3-4 Mb. Linkage disequilibrium data on genetic isolates from the island of Reunion and from the Amish community suggest a preferential location of the LGMD2A gene in the proximal part of this region. Analysis of the interrelated pedigrees from Reunion revealed the existence of at least six different carrier haplotypes. This allelic heterogeneity is incompatible with the presumed existence of a founder effect and suggests that multiple LGMD2A mutations may segregate in this population. 40 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Juvenile temporal arteritis revisited.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, F H; Lie, J T; Nienhuis, B J; Konzen, K M; Groover, R V

    1994-05-01

    We describe a case of arteritis involving the superficial temporal artery in an 8-year-old boy. After a 2-week prodrome of headache in the right temporal region, a painful pulsatile 6-mm nodule developed. No history of trauma or systemic disease was noted. The differential diagnosis included vasculitis or thrombosis of a vascular malformation of the temporal artery. The lesion was surgically excised for both diagnostic and cosmetic reasons. Histologic features of the nodule were diagnostic of juvenile temporal arteritis and characterized by non-giant cell granulomatous inflammation of the temporal artery, occlusive fibrous intimal proliferation, and microaneurysmal disruption of the media. At 12-month follow-up, the patient was well; no recurrent lesions or systemic disease was noted. Although rare, this disease should be recognized as arteritis that affects the external carotid circulation and should not be confused with classic giant cell temporal arteritis. If physicians are aware of this benign inflammatory disease of the temporal artery in children and young adults, unnecessary treatment will not be administered.

  2. Imaging for juvenile angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G; Howard, D; Lund, V J; Savy, L

    2000-09-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma presents characteristic imaging signs, may of which allow diagnosis and accurate estimation of extent without recourse to the dangers of biopsy. The diagnosis by computed tomography (CT) is based upon the site of origin of the lesion in the pterygopalatine fossa. There are two constant features: (1) a mass in the posterior nasal cavity and pterygopalatine fossa; (2) erosion of bone behind the sphenopalatine foramen with extension to the upper medial pterygoid plate. Good bone imaging on CT is essential to show invasion of the cancellous bone of the sphenoid. This is the main predictor of recurrence: the deeper the extension, the larger the potential tumour remnant likely to be left following surgery. The characteristic features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are due to the high vascularity of the tumour causing signal voids and strong post-contrast enhancement. MRI shows the pre-operative soft tissue extent of angiofibroma optimally, but its more important application is to provide post-operative surveillance: to show any residual or recurrent tumour, record tumour growth or natural involution and monitor the effects of radiotherapy.

  3. Managing juvenile Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Quarrell, Oliver W J; Nance, Martha A; Nopoulos, Peggy; Paulsen, Jane S; Smith, Jonathan A; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2013-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a well-recognized progressive neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Onset is insidious and can occur at almost any age, but most commonly the diagnosis is made between the ages of 35 and 55 years. Onset ≤20 years of age is classified as juvenile HD (JHD). This age-based definition is arbitrary but remains convenient. There is overlap between the clinical pathological and genetic features seen in JHD and more traditional adult-onset HD. Nonetheless, the frequent predominance of bradykinesia and dystonia early in the course of the illness, more frequent occurrence of epilepsy and myoclonus, more widespread pathology, and larger genetic lesion means that the distinction is still relevant. In addition, the relative rarity of JHD means that the clinician managing the patient is often doing so for the first time. Management is, at best, symptomatic and supportive with few or no evidence-based guidelines. In this article, the authors will review what is known of the condition and present some suggestions based on their experience. PMID:24416077

  4. Chromosome territories, X;Y translocation and Premature Ovarian Failure: is there a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, Sara; Baronchelli, Simona; Villa, Nicoletta; Lucchini, Valeria; Betri, Enrico; Cavalli, Pietro; Dalprà, Leda

    2009-01-01

    Background Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a secondary hypergonadotrophic amenorrhea occurring before the age of 40 and affecting 1-3% of females. Chromosome anomalies account for 6-8% of POF cases, but only few cases are associated with translocations involving X and Y chromosomes. This study shows the cytogenetic and molecular analysis of a POF patient came to our attention as she developed a left ovary choriocarcinoma at the age of 10 and at 14 years of age she presented secondary amenorrhea with elevated levels of gonadotropins. Results Breakpoint position on X and Y chromosomes was investigated using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) with a panel of specific BAC probes, microsatellite analysis and evaluation of copy number changes and loss of heterozigosity by Affymetrix® GeneChip platform (Santa Clara, CA, USA). Patient's karyotype resulted 46, X, der(Y)t(X;Y)(q13.1;q11.223). X inactivation study was assessed by RBA banding and showed preferential inactivation of derivative chromosome. The reciprocal spatial disposition of sexual chromosome territories was investigated using whole chromosome painting and centromeres probes: patient's results didn't show a significant difference in comparison to normal controls. Conclusion The peculiar clinical case come to our attention highlighted the complexity of POF aetiology and of the translocation event, even if our results seem to exclude any effect on nuclear organisation. POF phenotype could be partially explained by skewed X chromosome inactivation that influences gene expression. PMID:19781104

  5. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  6. Type I bipolar disorder associated with a fragile site on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Turecki, G.; Mari, J.J.; M. de Smith, A.C.

    1995-06-19

    The objective of this paper is to study the association between chromosomal fragile sites and type I bipolar disorder. This case-control study compares bipolar patients with normal controls. Ten cases of type I bipolar disorder diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) were selected from the Escola Paulista affective disorders outpatient clinic and 10 healthy controls (CIDI negative for psychiatric diagnoses) matched for sex and age were drawn from the otorhinolaryngologic outpatient clinic of the same hospital. The cytogenetic analysis was carried out with blood lymphocytes, which were cultured in a folic acid-free medium. A total of 100 mitoses per subject were blindly analyzed to the psychiatric diagnostic assignment, and fragile sites were identified according to a minimum expected frequency of events per band in conformity with a Poisson distribution. A higher frequency of chromosomal lesions for cases than controls was found for the following bands: 1q32, 5q31, and 11q23, the 1q32 being considered a fragile site. Although no evident neuropsychiatric etiological component has been mapped to the 1q32 region so far, this finding may lead to further investigation of a possible linkage between genetic markers of this region and bipolar disorder. 40 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  8. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  9. Solid-phase classical complement activation by C-reactive protein (CRP) is inhibited by fluid-phase CRP-C1q interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoewall, Christopher; Askendal, Agneta; Almroth, Gunnel

    2007-01-05

    C-reactive protein (CRP) interacts with phosphorylcholine (PC), Fc{gamma} receptors, complement factor C1q and cell nuclear constituents, yet its biological roles are insufficiently understood. The aim was to characterize CRP-induced complement activation by ellipsometry. PC conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (PC-KLH) was immobilized to cross-linked fibrinogen. A low-CRP serum with different amounts of added CRP was exposed to the PC-surfaces. The total serum protein deposition was quantified and deposition of IgG, C1q, C3c, C4, factor H, and CRP detected with polyclonal antibodies. The binding of serum CRP to PC-KLH dose-dependently triggered activation of the classical pathway. Unexpectedly, the activation was efficiently down-regulated at CRP levels >150 mg/L. Using radial immunodiffusion, CRP-C1q interaction was observed in serum samples with high CRP concentrations. We propose that the underlying mechanism depends on fluid-phase interaction between C1q and CRP. This might constitute another level of complement regulation, which has implications for systemic lupus erythematosus where CRP is often low despite flare-ups.

  10. Angiotensin II receptor blockade promotes repair of skeletal muscle through down-regulation of aging-promoting C1q expression

    PubMed Central

    Yabumoto, Chizuru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Rie; Yano, Masamichi; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Sumida, Tomokazu; Kamo, Takehiro; Yagi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Yu; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Uejima, Etsuko; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor prolonged life span in mice. Since aging-related decline in skeletal muscle function was retarded in Atgr1a−/− mice, we examined the role of AT1 receptor in muscle regeneration after injury. Administration of AT1 receptor blocker irbesartan increased the size of regenerating myofibers, decreased fibrosis, and enhanced functional muscle recovery after cryoinjury. We recently reported that complement C1q, secreted by macrophages, activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promoted aging-related decline in regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Notably, irbesartan induced M2 polarization of macrophages, but reduced C1q expression in cryoinjured muscles and in cultured macrophage cells. Irbesartan inhibited up-regulation of Axin2, a downstream gene of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, in cryoinjured muscles. In addition, topical administration of C1q reversed beneficial effects of irbesartan on skeletal muscle regeneration after injury. These results suggest that AT1 receptor blockade improves muscle repair and regeneration through down-regulation of the aging-promoting C1q-Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26571361

  11. SOCS1 and SOCS3 Are Targeted by Hepatitis C Virus Core/gC1qR Ligation To Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Cruise, Michael W.; Hall, Caroline; Xie, Xuefang; Oldach, David W.; Hahn, Young S.

    2005-01-01

    T cells play an important role in the control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously demonstrated that the HCV core inhibits T-cell responses through interaction with gC1qR. We show here that core proteins from chronic and resolved HCV patients differ in sequence, gC1qR-binding ability, and T-cell inhibition. Specifically, chronic core isolates bind to gC1qR more efficiently and inhibit T-cell proliferation as well as gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production more profoundly than resolved core isolates. This inhibition is mediated by the disruption of STAT phosphorylation through the induction of SOCS molecules. Silencing either SOCS1 or SOCS3 by small interfering RNA dramatically augments the production of IFN-γ in T cells, thereby abrogating the inhibitory effect of core. Additionally, the ability of core proteins from patients with chronic infections to induce SOCS proteins and suppress STAT activation greatly exceeds that of core proteins from patients with resolved infections. These results suggest that the HCV core/gC1qR-induced T-cell dysfunction involves the induction of SOCS, a powerful inhibitor of cytokine signaling, which represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps the host machinery for persistence. PMID:16306613

  12. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  13. Mapping quantitative trait loci for heat tolerance at anthesis in rice using chromosomal segment substitution lines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Lei, Jianguo; Huang, Yingjin; Zhu, Shan; Chen, Hongping; Huang, Renliang; Peng, Zhiqin; Tu, Qinghua; Shen, Xianhua; Yan, Song

    2016-06-01

    To study the genetic basis of heat tolerance at anthesis, a set of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from Sasanishiki (japonica ssp. heat susceptible) and Habataki (indica spp. heat tolerant) were used for analysis across three high temperature environments. Spikelet fertility (SF), daily flowering time (DFT) and pollen shedding level (PSL) under high temperature (HT) were assessed. Eleven related QTLs were detected, of which, two QTLs qSF (ht) 2 and qSF (ht) 4.2 for spikelet fertility were identified on chromosomes 2 and 4. Four QTLs qDFT3, qDFT8, qDFT10.1 and qDFT11 for daily flowering time were detected on chromosomes 3, 8, 10 and 11. The other five QTLs qPSL (ht) 1, qPSL (ht) 4.1, qPSL (ht) 5, qPSL (ht) 7 and qPSL (ht) 10.2 on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7 and 10, respectively, were found had effects both on spikelet fertility and pollen shedding level. Of the 11 QTLs, 8 were overlapped with QTLs reported by others, 3 QTLs qPSL (ht) 4.1, qPSL (ht) 7 and qPSL (ht) 10.2 identified in this study were novel. The stability of qPSL (ht) 4.1 was further verified at different temperatures, which could be used to improve the pollen shedding and pollen growth on stigma for rice heat-tolerance breeding. PMID:27436945

  14. Number of X-chromosome genes influences social behavior and vasopressin gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kimberly H; Quinnies, Kayla M; Eschendroeder, Alex; Didrick, Paula M; Eugster, Erica A; Rissman, Emilie F

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behavior are widespread and often caused by hormonal differences between the sexes. In addition to hormones, the composition and numbers of the sex chromosomes also affect a variety of sex differences. In humans, X-chromosome genes are implicated in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. fragile-X, autism). To investigate the role of X-chromosome genes in social behavior, we used a mouse model that has atypical sex chromosome configurations resembling Turner (45, XO) and Klinefelter syndromes (47, XXY). We examined a number of behaviors in juvenile mice. Mice with only one copy of most X-chromosome genes, regardless of gonadal sex, were less social in dyadic interaction and social preference tasks. In the elevated plus maze, mice with one X-chromosome spent less time in the distal ends of the open arms as compared to mice with two copies of X-chromosome genes. Using qRTPCR, we noted that amygdala from female mice with one X-chromosome had higher expression levels of vasopressin (Avp) as compared to mice in the other groups. Finally, in plasma from girls with Turner syndrome we detected reduced vasopressin (AVP) concentrations as compared to control patients. These novel findings link sex chromosome genes with social behavior via concentrations of AVP in brain, adding to our understanding of sex differences in neurobehavioral disorders.

  15. Loss of heterozygosity in human ductal breast tumors indicates a recessive mutation on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, C.; Skoog, L.; Cavenee, W.K.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1987-04-01

    The genotypes at chromosomal loci defined by recombinant DNA probes revealing restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in constitutional and tumor tissue from 10 cases of ductal breast cancer: eight premenopausal females and two males. Somatic loss of constitutional heterozygosity was observed at loci on chromosome 13 in primary tumor tissue from three females and one male. In two cases, specific loss of heterozygosity at three distinct genetic loci along the length of the chromosome was observed. In another case, concurrent loss of alleles at loci on chromosomes 2, 13, 14, and 20 was detected, whereas a fourth case showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosomes 5 and 13. In each instance, the data were consistent with loss of one of the homologous chromosomes by mitotic nondisjunction. Analysis of loci on several other chromosomes showed retention of constitutional heterozygosity suggesting the relative specificity of the events. In contrast, similar analyses of other breast cancers, including comedocarcinoma, medullary carcinoma, and juvenile secretory carcinoma, showed no loss of alleles at loci on chromosome 13. These data indicate that the pathogenesis of ductal breast cancer may, in a substantial proportion of cases, involve unmasking of a recessive locus on chromosome 13 and suggest the involvement of such a locus in heritable forms of this disease.

  16. Forensic aspects of juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Haller, L H

    2000-10-01

    The juvenile justice system was created because it was recognized that youthful offenders needed to be managed differently from adults. They were to receive habilitation services instead of punishment. It is now more than a century since the creation of the first juvenile court. After 67 years, the US Supreme Court, in Kent v United States stated that the model was not working because juveniles in the criminal justice system received no treatment and they had no rights. Because the issue that had been appealed was the lack of rights (not lack of treatment), the Court mandated that juveniles, like adults, be given certain rights. The following year, in In re Gault, the Court expanded these rights. Subsequent Supreme Court cases have dealt with these kinds of issues--that is, whether juvenile offenders are entitled to the same rights as adults and subject to the same penalties. The Supreme Court has never heard a "right to treatment" case, which is the other part of the juvenile court system. Cases have been brought in lower courts (e.g., Nelson v. Heyne, 1972) alleging inadequate treatment services, but no national impact has resulted. Thus, in general, children in the juvenile court system do not have an enforceable right to treatment and can obtain only what services are available in their jurisdictions. The services often are woefully inadequate. Sentencing a youth to probation, with the requirement that he or she participate in counseling or mental health treatment, is meaningless if services are not available. Community-based, model programs that provide effective treatment do exist. They are, as yet, the rare exception rather than the norm and, therefore, are not available to most youthful offenders. Incarcerated juveniles, obviously, cannot avail themselves of community programs. Litigation to give these youth the same rights as adults in penal institutions is not the answer because incarcerated adults don't have a right to treatment, only a right to be free

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi )

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile myositis is a heterogeneous group of systemic autoimmune diseases, in which clinical and serologic subgroups result in subsets of patients with distinct clinical manifestations, disease courses, immunogenetic associations, responses to therapy, and prognoses. A newly identified autoantibody of unknown specificity, anti-p155, is myositis-associated and seen in up to 20 – 30% of juvenile and adult DM patients. HLA DRB1*0301 and its linked allele DQA1*0501 have been identified as the major immunogenetic risk factor for juvenile and adult DM in both European- and African- American patients, and DQA1*0301 is an additional risk factor in European American patients. Several DQA1 alleles also are protective for juvenile DM. Environmental risk factors are poorly understood, but growing evidence suggests a role for infectious agents and ultraviolet radiation. The current therapy of juvenile DM consists of corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents, with the adjunctive treatment of cutaneous manifestations and rehabilitation. Therapeutic trials of biologic agents, including anti-TNFα and anti-CD20, may aid in developing promising new therapies for these disorders. PMID:17317616

  19. Toxicity of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon in a transgenic mouse model of the human paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2005-08-01

    The Q192R polymorphism of paraoxonase (PON1) has been shown to affect hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. The Q192 and R192 alloforms exhibit equivalent catalytic efficiencies of hydrolysis for diazoxon, the oxon form of the pesticide (DZ). However, the R192 alloform has a higher catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis than does the Q192 alloform for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), the oxon form of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPS). The current study examined the relevance of these observations for in-vivo exposures to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon. Methods Using a transgenic mouse model we examined the relevance of the Q192R polymorphism for exposure to CPS and CPO in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed either human PON1Q192 or PON1R192 at equivalent levels, in the absence of endogenous mouse PON1. Dose-response and time course experiments were performed on adult mice exposed dermally to CPS or CPO. Morbidity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and diaphragm were determined in the first 24 h following exposure. Results Mice expressing PON1Q192 were significantly more sensitive to CPO, and to a lesser extent CPS, than were mice expressing PON1R192. The time course of inhibition following exposure to 1.2 mg/kg CPO revealed maximum inhibition of brain AChE at 6?12 h, with PON1R192, PON1Q192, and PON1? /? mice exhibiting 40, 70 and 85% inhibition, respectively, relative to control mice. The effect of PON1 removal on the dose?response curve for CPS exposure was remarkably consistent with a PBPK/PD model of CPS exposure. Conclusion These results indicate that individuals expressing only the PON1Q192 allele would be more sensitive to the adverse effects of CPO or CPS exposure, especially if they are expressing a low level of plasma PON1Q192.

  20. Linkage mapping in Papio baboons: Conservation of a syntenic group of six markers on human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.; Witte, S.M.; Kammerer, C.M.; Hixson, J.E.; MacCluer, J.W.

    1995-07-20

    We have established multipoint genetic linkage among six loci in baboons (Papio hamadryas). Published PCR primers designed to amplify five human microsatellite loci were used to amplify homologous loci in 229 pedigreed baboons. Southern blotting was used to type two RFLPs in a functional gene (anti-thrombin III) in a subset of those animals. All six loci are known to map to human chromosome 1q, a region of the genome predicted by karyotype studies to be conserved in baboons. Pairwise recombination frequencies and lod scores indicate that the six loci are also linked in baboons. Recombination distances among the loci are similar to those reported for humans. Like humans, the baboons exhibit higher rates of recombination in females than in males. This study demonstrates that (1) microsatellite loci first described and characterized in the human genome can be effectively used for genetic linkage mapping in nonhuman primates, (2) a group of genetic loci known to be linked on human chromosome 1q are also linked in the baboon genome, and (3) sex differences in recombination frequencies among loci on human chromosome 1q are also observe din the genome of this Old World monkey. This constitutes the first reported multipoint linkage map in any nonhuman primate. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... juvenile Paget disease: Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatasemia with bone disease These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... familial osteoectasia hyperostosis corticalis deformans juvenilis hyperphosphatasemia ... idiopathic idiopathic hyperphosphatasia JPD juvenile Paget's ...

  2. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  3. Characteristics of adopted juvenile delinquents.

    PubMed

    Kim, W J; Zrull, J P; Davenport, C W; Weaver, M

    1992-05-01

    There have been many reports describing the uniqueness of adopted children and adolescents' delinquent behaviors in terms of both their delinquent characteristics and courts' treatment of them. A total of 43 adopted juveniles, 32 extrafamilial (1.0%) and 11 intrafamilial (0.3%) adoptions were initially identified out of 3,280 juvenile delinquents. The adopted subjects were then compared with the demographically matched and offense matched nonadopted subjects. The family variables, such as marital and employment status of parents, were significantly different. However, there were only a few discernible trends, and in general there were no significant differences between the adopted and nonadopted juveniles in terms of their offense characteristics and dispositions. PMID:1592787

  4. Novel microdeletion syndromes detected by chromosome microarrays.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne M

    2008-08-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has revolutionized the cytogenetic testing available for patients with learning disabilities who have "chromosomal" phenotypes with dysmorphic features and multiple anomalies. Screening large patient cohorts with mental retardation by array CGH has recently lead to the characterization of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, initially according to the shared cytogenetic aberrations, with secondary characterization of the corresponding phenotypes. This review provides a detailed clinical and molecular cytogenetic description of several of the most common of these aberrations. We have chosen to focus on patients in whom the cytogenetic abnormalities were principally described by array CGH, rather than by G-banded karyotyping or fluorescence in-situ hybridization. The syndromes that we have chosen include the 17q21.31 deletion and 17q21.31 duplication syndromes, 15q13.3 deletion syndrome, 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, 15q24 deletion syndrome, 1q41q42 deletion syndrome, 2p15p16.1 deletion syndrome and 9q22.3 deletion syndrome. In time, we hypothesize that at least some of these will become as clinically well characterized and recognizable to the clinician as the commoner microdeletion syndromes today. Although the full extent of the phenotypes is still evolving for many of these novel microdeletions, it is clear that array CGH has heralded an unparalleled era of discovery for clinical cytogenetics. PMID:18512078

  5. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of ENU-induced Disc1-Q31L and -L100P mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is considered to be a candidate susceptibility gene for psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. A recent study reported that N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutations in exon 2 of the mouse Disc1 gene, which resulted in the amino acid exchange of Q31L and L100P, caused an increase in depression-like behavior in 31 L mutant mice and schizophrenia-like behavior in 100P mutant mice; thus, these are potential animal models of psychiatric disorders. However, remaining heterozygous mutations that possibly occur in flanking genes other than Disc1 itself might induce behavioral abnormalities in the mutant mice. Here, to confirm the effects of Disc1-Q31L and Disc1-L100P mutations on behavioral phenotypes and to investigate the behaviors of the mutant mice in more detail, the mutant lines were backcrossed to C57BL/6JJcl through an additional two generations and the behaviors were analyzed using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Results Contrary to expectations, 31 L mutant mice showed no significant behavioral differences when compared with wild-type control mice in any of the behavioral tests, including the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests, commonly used tests for depression-like behavior. Also, 100P mutant mice exhibited no differences in almost all of the behavioral tests, including the prepulse inhibition test for measuring sensorimotor gating, which is known to be impaired in schizophrenia patients; however, 100P mutant mice showed higher locomotor activity compared with wild-type control mice in the light/dark transition test. Conclusions Although these results are partially consistent with the previous study in that there was hyperactivity in 100P mutant mice, the vast majority of the results are inconsistent with those of the previous study; this discrepancy may be explained by differences in the genetic background of the mice, the laboratory

  6. Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing. OJJDP Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mankey, Jennifer; Baca, Patricia; Rondenell, Stephanie; Webb, Marilyn; McHugh, Denise

    2006-01-01

    The juvenile information sharing (JIS) guidelines were prepared by the Center for Network Development (CND) for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The guidelines suggest a course of action for key agency and organization stakeholders involved in a state or local effort to implement and sustain juvenile information…

  7. Disability and Juvenile Delinquency: Issues and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Kimberly A.; Morris, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    The US juvenile justice system has gone through many changes since its inception in the late 1890s. Even with these changes and more than 100 years of empirical research, there is a paucity of literature published on juvenile delinquents with disabilities. The present article focuses on juvenile delinquents with disabilities, addressing…

  8. Families, Juvenile Justice and Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme issue of this bulletin is a discussion of youth with emotional disturbances who are in the juvenile justice system and how to meet their needs. Articles include: (1) "Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Youth in the Juvenile Justice System" (Susan Rotenberg); (2) "Prevalence of Mental Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice…

  9. Counseling Juvenile Offenders in Institutional Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaneles, Sol, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews several aspects of counseling services for institutionalized juvenile offenders. The six articles include studies on the functional analysis of behavior in detention, vocational and social rehabilitation, the impact of a juvenile awareness program on personality traits, and the effectiveness of a juvenile transition center. (JAC)

  10. On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

  11. Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

  12. Reforming Our Expectations about Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Pamela F.; Baille, Daphne M.

    2010-01-01

    Typing the term "juvenile justice reform" into a Google[TM] search will result in 60 pages of entries. But what is meant by juvenile justice reform? What does it look like? How will one know when it is achieved? This article defines juvenile justice reform, discusses the principles of effective reform, and describes the practice of juvenile…

  13. Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

    This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

  14. Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Sue; Warboys, Loren

    This bulletin summarizes provisions of federal law as they pertain to special education and juvenile justice. It discusses provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 1997 including: the definition of disability; free appropriate public education; identification, referral, and evaluation; the individualized education program…

  15. Mobilizing Communities To Prevent Juvenile Crime. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bownes, Donna; Ingersoll, Sarah

    Through Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs (Community Prevention Grants), the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) allocated $20 million in fiscal year 1997 to states to complement law enforcement and justice system efforts by helping local communities foster strong families and nurture…

  16. Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Carl E.; Snyder, Howard E.

    This bulletin examines the effect of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody. Analysis of 1997 and 1998 data on 17 states from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System indicates that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that police are more likely to arrest nonwhite juvenile…

  17. Deletion of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital hypothyroidism and mild mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Anneren, G.; Sidenvall, R.

    1996-08-23

    We report on a girl with a large interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 21 and with mild mental retardation, congenital hypothyroidism, and hyperopia. The deletion [del(21)(q11.1-q22.1)] extends molecularly from marker D21S215 to D21S213. The distal breakpoint is not clearly defined but is situated between markers D21S213 and IFNAR. This patient has the largest deletion of chromosome 21 known without having severe mental retardation or malformations. The deletion does not involve the {open_quotes}Down syndrome chromosome{close_quotes} region, the region of chromosome 21 which in trisomy causes most of the manifestations of Down syndrome. Apparently, the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 21 does not include genes that are responsible for severe clinical effects in the event of either deletion or duplication, since several reported patients with either trisomy or deletion of this region have mild phenotypic abnormalities. Congenital hypothyroidism is much more common in Down syndrome than in the average population. Thus, the congenital hypothyroidism of the present patient might indicate that there is one or several genes on the proximal part of chromosome 21, which might be of importance for the thyroid function. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A unique case of female pseudohermaphroditism with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and small supernumerary marker chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Wafa, Abdulsamad; Assaad, Manar; Ehlers, Christian; Liehr, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) are present in ~2.6x10⁶ individuals worldwide. Concerning their clinical consequences as well as their chromosomal origin and shape, sSMCs are a heterogeneous group of derivative chromosomes; 70% of sSMC carriers are clinically normal. In the present study, we report on a female with mosaicism (45%) of a de novo sSMC derived from chromosome 7, in which the observed clinical signs do not correspond to comparable cases in the literature. She is clinically normal apart from problems in gender determination, a uterus without ovaries and an external penis, pointing overall towards an adrenogenital syndrome (AGS). 21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of AGS. A corresponding analysis for underlying mutations in the CYP21A2 gene revealed a homozygous mutation c.518T>A (p.Ile173Asn) inherited from both non-related parents. Overall, in this study, we report a unique case of female pseudohermaphroditism, classified as a simple virilization form of 21-OHD having an additional minute-shaped chromosome 7 [min(7)(:p11.1->q11.23:)]. Notably, AGS was due to a mutation in the CYP21A2 gene located on chromosome 6. This is a further example that detection of an sSMC does not always resolve the clinical case. PMID:23450434

  19. Oregon's Juvenile Psychiatric Security Review Board.

    PubMed

    Newman, Stewart S; Buckley, Mary Claire; Newman, Senia Pickering; Bloom, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Oregon Legislature passed a bill modifying the existing Psychiatric Security Review Board (PRSB) statute, creating a juvenile panel for management of juvenile insanity acquittees. Dubbed the Juvenile PSRB (JPSRB), it borrows heavily from the 30 years of experience of its adult predecessor. Statutory language was also modified to create a plea of "responsible except for insanity" for juveniles in Oregon. The authors discuss the similarities of the JPSRB to the adult PSRB system and highlight the differences that take into account the unique needs of juvenile defendants. They go on to discuss potential problems foreseen with implementation of the JPSRB system and to recommend possible solutions.

  20. Factors affecting attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Sahlstrom, Kimberly J; Jeglic, Elizabeth L

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment amenability were negative. No differences in attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders were found between those who had been victims of sexual abuse and those that had not. Sex offenses committed by juvenile female sex offenders were viewed to be more serious and require more intervention than those committed by juvenile male sex offenders. PMID:19042245

  1. Detection of numerical alterations of chromosome 1 in cytopathological specimens of breast tumors by chromogen in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Takarabe, T; Tsuda, H; Okada, S; Fukutomi, T; Hirohashi, S

    2001-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of chromogen in situ hybridization (CISH) in the diagnosis of breast tumors, numerical alterations of chromosome 1 were examined by CISH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods, and the presence of der(16)t(1;16) was also examined by FISH in imprinted cytology specimens from resected tissues of 14 carcinomas and five non-malignant lesions. The modal signal counts of chromosome 1 were compared between the specimens processed by CISH and FISH for each case. Aneusomies of the long arm of chromosome 1 were detected in 10 (71%) carcinomas as the major clones by both methods. In addition, one atypical papilloma demonstrated tetrasomy of 1q12 as a major clone by CISH, but such a clone was at first overlooked by FISH. Four other benign lesions showed disomic 1q12 signals as a major clone by both CISH and FISH. As additional information from FISH, eight cancers showed structural or numerical alterations of chromosome 16, and four showed der(16)t(1;16). In total, 10 carcinomas showed chromosome 16 alterations, and all of these overlapped with the carcinomas with 1q12 aneusomies. The CISH method provided almost the same results as the FISH method, and both methods were considered applicable in supportive diagnosis of cytological specimens of breast tumors. In addition, the CISH method was superior in the detection of numerical alterations in carcinoma cells by referring to the morphology of cells and in the detection of significant clones which might be missed under dark-field microscopy. PMID:11881731

  2. Juvenile Diabetes and Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, J. Blair; Gregg, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    Severe complications of diabetes are more likely to occur with the juvenile diabetic and problems of psychosocial adjustment are recurring and difficult. Implications for the rehabilitation counselor are discussed in terms of employment considerations, the effects of complications, genetic counseling, and cooperation with other professionals.…

  3. Juvenile Justice and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chassin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad…

  4. [Juvenile angiofibroma. Results of radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rosset, A; Korzeniowski, S

    1990-01-01

    8 patients with the nasofibromata were treated by radiotherapy in Oncologic Center in Kraków. In most part of these patients tumors exceeded the nasopharynx or gave the massive postoperational recurrencies. Complete regression was obtained in 6 out of 8 cases. The radiation changes are described. The radiotherapy is effective in more advanced and recurrent stages of the juvenile nasofibroma.

  5. Familial short stature due to a 5q22.1-q23.2 duplication refines the 5q duplication spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zahnleiter, Diana; Trautmann, Udo; Ekici, Arif B; Goehring, Ina; Reis, André; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T

    2011-01-01

    We identified a maternally inherited 14.2Mb duplication 5q22.1-q23.2 in two female siblings and their mother by molecular karyotyping. Both siblings were small for gestational age and presented with pronounced postnatal growth retardation, mild motor delay, congenital heart disease in one of the siblings, and distinct facial dysmorphism. As this duplication is one of the smallest reported 5q duplications, short stature and facial dysmorphism can be attributed to duplications of 5q22, whereas severe mental retardation is not part of the phenotypic spectrum of the 5q22.1-q23.2 region. Congenital heart defects, as observed in other 5q duplications, have a variable penetrance. We compared the facial features of patients with 5q duplications and found some consistent features such as high arched eyebrows, bulbous nasal tip and small lips with thin vermilion border. PMID:21777705

  6. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of inv8 chromosome breakpoints associated with recombinant 8 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graw, S L; Sample, T; Bleskan, J; Sujansky, E; Patterson, D

    2000-03-01

    Rec8 syndrome (also known as "recombinant 8 syndrome" and "San Luis Valley syndrome") is a chromosomal disorder found in individuals of Hispanic descent with ancestry from the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Affected individuals typically have mental retardation, congenital heart defects, seizures, a characteristic facial appearance, and other manifestations. The recombinant chromosome is rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.1q22.1), and is derived from a parental pericentric inversion, inv(8)(p23.1q22.1). Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of the 8p23.1 and 8q22 breakpoints from the inversion 8 chromosome associated with Rec8 syndrome. Analysis of the breakpoint regions indicates that they are highly repetitive. Of 6 kb surrounding the 8p23.1 breakpoint, 75% consists of repetitive gene family members-including Alu, LINE, and LTR elements-and the inversion took place in a small single-copy region flanked by repetitive elements. Analysis of 3.7 kb surrounding the 8q22 breakpoint region reveals that it is 99% repetitive and contains multiple LTR elements, and that the 8q inversion site is within one of the LTR elements.

  7. Comparative mapping in the beige-satin region of mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.; Kaplan, J.

    1997-01-15

    The proximal end of mouse chromosome (Chr) 13 contains regions conserved on human chromosomes 1q42-q44, 6p23-p21, and 7p22-p13. This region also contains mutations that may be models for human disease, including beige (human Chediak-Higashi syndrome). An interspecific backcross of SB/Le and Mus spretus mice was used to generate a molecular genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 with an emphasis on the proximal region including beige (bg) and satin (sa). This map provides the gene order of the two phenotypic markers bg and sa relative to restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in 131 backcross animals. In parallel, we have created a physical map of the region using Nidogen (Nid) as a molecular starting point for cloning a YAC contig that was used to identify the beige gene. The physical map provides the fine-structure order of genes and anonymous DNA fragments that was not resolved by the genetic linkage mapping. The results show that the bg region of mouse Chr 13 is highly conserved on human Chr 1q42-q44 and provide a starting point for a complete functional analysis of the entire bg-sa interval. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity.

  9. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity. PMID:27688904

  10. Direct Binding of Hepatitis C Virus Core to gC1qR on CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Leads to Impaired Activation of Lck and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Eisen-Vandervelde, Audrey; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Cale, Evan M.; Hahn, Young S.

    2004-01-01

    Complement plays a pivotal role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. It has been shown that the binding of C1q, a natural ligand of gC1qR, on T cells inhibits their proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that direct binding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core to gC1qR on T cells leads to impaired Lck/Akt activation and T-cell function. The HCV core associates with the surface of T cells specifically via gC1qR, as this binding is inhibited by the addition of either anti-gC1qR antibody or soluble gC1qR. The binding affinity constant of core protein for gC1qR, as determined by BIAcore analysis, is 3.8 × 10−7 M. The specificity of the HCV core-gC1qR interaction is confirmed by reduced core binding on Molt-4 T cells treated with gC1qR-silencing small interfering RNA and enhanced core binding on GPC-16 guinea pig cells transfected with human gC1qR. Interestingly, gC1qR is expressed at higher levels on CD8+ than on CD4+ T cells, resulting in more severe core-induced suppression of the CD8+-T-cell population. Importantly, T-cell receptor-mediated activation of the Src kinases Lck and ZAP-70 but not Fyn and the phosphorylation of Akt are impaired by the HCV core, suggesting that it inhibits the very early events of T-cell activation. PMID:15163734

  11. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Guerra, José M; Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Alberú, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80-259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27-19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85-100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3-100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity. PMID:27688904

  12. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  13. [Phenotypic variability of the 1q21.1 microdeletion syndrome in members of the same family: relevance of detection of neuropsychiatric disorders for diagnosis of genetic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Natera-De Benito, Daniel; Vidal-Esteban, Arantxa; Sanchez-Del Pozo, Jaime; Moreno-Garcia, Marta; Suela-Rubio, Javier; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Rivero-Martin, María José

    2015-12-16

    Introduccion. El sindrome de microdelecion 1q21.1 esta causado por una delecion recurrente de aproximadamente 800 kb que incluye al menos siete genes y se asocia a un fenotipo variable. Esta variacion en el numero de copias patogenica puede aparecer de novo o ser heredada de uno de los progenitores. La presencia de trastornos psiquiatricos se ha descrito en muchos de los casos publicados, pero se desconoce su prevalencia exacta. Objetivo. Exponer la variabilidad fenotipica de los individuos que presentan una microdelecion 1q21.1. Casos clinicos. Se incluyen cuatro individuos portadores de una delecion de 1,74 Mb en 1q21.1, todos miembros de la misma familia. El estudio genetico del caso indice se llevo a cabo mediante array de hibridacion genomica comparada, y el del resto de familiares mediante hibridacion in situ fluorescente, con una sonda especifica para la region delecionada. Los individuos presentan un fenotipo heterogeneo, y es comun a todos ellos la presencia de alteraciones psiquiatricas o del comportamiento, con un claro predominio de la presencia de trastornos relacionados con las dificultades para el control de impulsos en sus diferentes subtipos. Conclusiones. El sindrome de microdelecion 1q21.1 es fenotipicamente heterogeneo, incluso entre los miembros de una misma familia. Destaca la presencia de alteraciones psiquiatricas o del comportamiento como rasgo comun en todos los pacientes que presentamos. Existen formas paucisintomaticas en las que el individuo portador de la delecion presenta exclusivamente alteraciones psiquiatricas.

  14. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Blanchong, Julie A; Heisey, Dennis M; Scribner, Kim T; Libants, Scot V; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M; Langenberg, Julia A; Samuel, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case-control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n=68) and CWD-negative (n=91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p<0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  15. Application of chromosome 16 markers in the differential diagnosis of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Taschner, P.E.M.; Vos, N. de; Breuning, M.H.

    1995-06-05

    Accurate diagnosis of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is important for a correct prognosis of the disease and for genetic counseling. Up to now, no direct diagnostic test has been available for NCL. The clinical diagnosis is made on the basis of symptoms, neurophysiological, neuroradiological, and specific lipopigment pattern data. Recent advances in the genetics of NCL have enabled us to use polymorphic DNA markers linked to the CLN1 and CLN3 loci as a tool in the differential diagnosis of NCL. We have applied genetic analysis with polymorphic DNA markers flanking the CLN3 gene on chromosome 16 to two consanguineous families in which NCL occurs. In the first family, which is of Turkish extraction, two patients suffering from a protracted form of juvenile NCL previously had been diagnosed with juvenile NCL. Haplotypes from this family indicate that the patients and their healthy sibling are haplo-identical, suggesting that this protracted form of juvenile NCL is not linked to the CLN3 locus. In the second family, which is Moroccan origin, one patient suffers from the early juvenile variant of NCL (Lake-Cavanagh). In this family, the patient and one of the healthy siblings have identical haplotypes, excluding linkage of early juvenile NCL to the CLN3 locus on 16p12.1-11.2. Therefore, these cases from different populations demonstrate that haplotype analysis can be used as an additional method to exclude the diagnosis of juvenile NCL. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Genetic dosage and position effect of small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) in human sperm nuclei in infertile male patient.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Marta; Wanowska, Elzbieta; Kishore, Archana; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Georgiadis, Andrew P; Yatsenko, Alexander N; Mikula, Mariya; Zastavna, Danuta; Wiland, Ewa; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-11-30

    Chromosomes occupy specific distinct areas in the nucleus of the sperm cell that may be altered in males with disrupted spermatogenesis. Here, we present alterations in the positioning of the human chromosomes 15, 18, X and Y between spermatozoa with the small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC; sSMC(+)) and spermatozoa with normal chromosome complement (sSMC(-)), for the first time described in the same ejaculate of an infertile, phenotypically normal male patient. Using classical and confocal fluorescent microscopy, the nuclear colocalization of chromosomes 15 and sSMC was analyzed. The molecular cytogenetic characteristics of sSMC delineated the karyotype as 47,XY,+der(15)(pter->p11.2::q11.1->q11.2::p11.2->pter)mat. Analysis of meiotic segregation showed a 1:1 ratio of sSMC(+) to sSMC(-) spermatozoa, while evaluation of sperm aneuploidy status indicated an increased level of chromosome 13, 18, 21 and 22 disomy, up to 7 × (2.7 - 15.1). Sperm chromatin integrity assessment did not reveal any increase in deprotamination in the patient's sperm chromatin. Importantly, we found significant repositioning of chromosomes X and Y towards the nuclear periphery, where both chromosomes were localized in close proximity to the sSMC. This suggests the possible influence of sSMC/XY colocalization on meiotic chromosome division, resulting in abnormal chromosome segregation, and leading to male infertility in the patient.

  17. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  18. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  19. Lack of activation of C1, despite circulating immune complexes detected by two C1q methods, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Lim, U G; Haverman, J; Aalberse, R C

    1984-01-01

    The activation of C1 by circulating immune complexes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was investigated. C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes in EDTA-plasma, reflecting C1 activation in vivo, were slightly raised in 35 of 57 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, though most patients had elevated levels of circulating immune complexes as measured with either the 125I-C1q binding test or the C1q solid phase assay. The activation of C1 by circulating immune complexes in vitro was investigated by measuring the generation of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes during 60 minutes at 37 degrees C in diluted recalcified EDTA-plasma. In 16 of the 57 patients, a slightly increased C1 activation in vitro was observed. These patients tended to have high levels of circulating immune complexes. However, the majority of the patients with high levels of circulating immune complexes showed a normal C1 activation in vitro. Therefore, it was concluded that measurement of circulating immune complexes by either of the two C1q methods in patients with rheumatoid arthritis does not imply that these circulating immune complexes are able to activate C1.

  20. A de novo 163 kb interstitial 1q44 microdeletion in a boy with thin corpus callosum, psychomotor delay and seizures.

    PubMed

    Selmer, Kaja K; Bryne, Einar; Rødningen, Olaug K; Fannemel, Madeleine

    2012-12-01

    The 1q44 deletion syndrome has shown to be a recognizable phenotype with developmental delay, short stature and corpus callosum abnormalities as relatively consistent features. However, the disorder is still clinically heterogeneous and a genotype-phenotype correlation has been challenging to establish. In particular, a delineation of a critical region for the corpus callosum development has turned out to be difficult, and many candidate genes have been proposed. We present here a patient boy with a clinical picture of the 1q44 deletion syndrome, including a thin corpus callosum, and a small de novo 1q44 deletion. The deletion spans a maximum of 163 kb, a region which only contains the two genes FAM36A and HNRNPU. This finding supports the previously suggested hypothesis that the HNRNPU is an essential gene to the development of corpus callosum. However, as patients with deletions outside this interval also have been reported to have corpus callosum abnormalities, other mechanisms are probably also involved. We also identified two conserved non-coding regions in the deleted region of the patient, and speculate that also other elements interfere with the complex interplay and spatiotemporal gene expression during embryonic development. PMID:22975012

  1. Mitotic chromosome structure and condensation.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Andrew S

    2006-12-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure has been the cell biology equivalent of a 'riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma'. Observations that genetic knockout or knockdown of condensin subunits or topoisomerase II cause only minimal perturbation in overall chromosome condensation, together with analysis of early stages of chromosome condensation and effects produced by histone H1 depletion, suggest a need to reconsider textbook models of mitotic chromosome condensation and organization. PMID:17046228

  2. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Joan, Ed.; Widom, Cathy Spatz, Ed.; Crowell, Nancy A., Ed.

    This book discusses patterns and trends in crimes committed by children and adolescents, analyzing youth crime as a subset of general crime and studying the impact of race and gender. It evaluates different approaches to forecasting future crime rates. Data come from a national panel that examined what is known about juvenile crime and its…

  3. Brief Report: A Case of Autism Associated with del(2)(q32.1q32.2) or (q32.2q32.3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Louise; Becker, Kristin; Kearney, Geraldine; Dunlop, Adam; Stallings, Ray; Green, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gill, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a clinical case of autism with a deletion on chromosome 2 in a young male with high functioning autism. The deletion seems to correspond with regions emerging from linkage studies. The paper proposes this chromosomal region as a possible candidate region in the search for autism genes. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  4. Juvenile glaucoma linked to GLCIA in a Panamanian family.

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, P R; Richards, J E; Boehnke, M; Othman, M; Cameron, B D; Stringham, H M; Downs, C A; Lewis, S B; Boyd, B F

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To carry out clinical and genetic characterization of juvenile-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in a Panamanian family. METHODS: Twenty-two members of a six-generation Panamanian family underwent an ophthalmologic evaluation. Blood samples were collected from 20 of these individuals for preparation of DNA for use in screening of microsatellite repeat genetic markers via polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Eleven living family members covering 4 generations were diagnosed as affected with open-angle glaucoma of primarily juvenile onset. Four of 6 other at-risk individuals examined and enrolled were characterized as unaffected and two as indeterminate. Two additional individuals were not included in this study because they were too young to characterize or to provide a blood sample. Three spouses of affected family members were also examined and found not to have glaucoma. Of clinical importance was the finding of markedly elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in 2 affected brothers, both of whom were advised to have urgent filtration surgery; the finding of elevated IOP in the only seeing eye of the mother of these brothers, causing us to advise her to pursue more aggressive treatment; and the finding of early signs of glaucoma in a previously undiagnosed 9-year-old family member. Linkage analysis using selected microsatellite repeat markers in the 1q21-q31 region revealed strong evidence for linkage to the GLC1A gene with a maximum lod score of 3.75 for marker D1S431 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. CONCLUSIONS: The most likely interpretation of our data is that a mutation in the GLC1A gene is responsible for juvenile-onset POAG in this Panamanian family, thus expanding the countries of origin where this gene has been found to exist. The numbers of families with GLC1A glaucoma now reported from only a few centers worldwide raise questions about whether this disease may be more common than once thought

  5. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    PubMed

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis.

  6. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in a recombinant chromosome.

    PubMed

    Berend, Sue Ann; Bodamer, Olaf A F; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bacino, Carlos A

    2002-05-15

    Familial complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare and tend to involve fewer breakpoints and fewer chromosomes than CCRs that are de novo in origin. We report on a CCR identified in a child with congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Initially, the child's karyotype was thought to involve a straightforward three-way translocation between chromosomes 3, 8, and 16. However, after analyzing the mother's chromosomes, the mother was found to have a more complex rearrangement that resulted in a recombinant chromosome in the child. The mother's karyotype included an inverted chromosome 2 and multiple translocations involving chromosomes 3, 5, 8, and 16. No evidence of deletion or duplication that could account for the clinical findings in the child was identified.

  7. Intrachromosomal rearrangements in two representatives of the genus Saltator (Thraupidae, Passeriformes) and the occurrence of heteromorphic Z chromosomes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Silva, Fabio Augusto Oliveira; Ledesma, Mario Angel; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2015-10-01

    Saltator is a genus within family Thraupidae, the second largest family of Passeriformes, with more than 370 species found exclusively in the New World. Despite this, only a few species have had their karyotypes analyzed, most of them only with conventional staining. The diploid number is close to 80, and chromosome morphology is similar to the usual avian karyotype. Recent studies using cross-species chromosome painting have shown that, although the chromosomal morphology and number are similar to many species of birds, Passeriformes exhibit a complex pattern of paracentric and pericentric inversions in the chromosome homologous to GGA1q in two different suborders, Oscines and Suboscines. Hence, considering the importance and species richness of Thraupidae, this study aims to analyze two species of genus Saltator, the golden-billed saltator (S. aurantiirostris) and the green-winged saltator (S. similis) by means of classical cytogenetics and cross-species chromosome painting using Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis probes, and also 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric sequences. The results show that the karyotypes of these species are similar to other species of Passeriformes. Interestingly, the Z chromosome appears heteromorphic in S. similis, varying in morphology from acrocentric to metacentric. 5S and 18S probes hybridize to one pair of microchromosomes each, and telomeric sequences produce signals only in the terminal regions of chromosomes. FISH results are very similar to the Passeriformes already analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics (Turdus species and Elaenia spectabilis). However, the paracentric and pericentric inversions observed in Saltator are different from those detected in these species, an observation that helps to explain the probable sequence of rearrangements. As these rearrangements are found in both suborders of Passeriformes (Oscines and Suboscines), we propose that the fission of GGA1 and inversions in GGA1q have occurred very

  8. Intrachromosomal rearrangements in two representatives of the genus Saltator (Thraupidae, Passeriformes) and the occurrence of heteromorphic Z chromosomes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Silva, Fabio Augusto Oliveira; Ledesma, Mario Angel; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2015-10-01

    Saltator is a genus within family Thraupidae, the second largest family of Passeriformes, with more than 370 species found exclusively in the New World. Despite this, only a few species have had their karyotypes analyzed, most of them only with conventional staining. The diploid number is close to 80, and chromosome morphology is similar to the usual avian karyotype. Recent studies using cross-species chromosome painting have shown that, although the chromosomal morphology and number are similar to many species of birds, Passeriformes exhibit a complex pattern of paracentric and pericentric inversions in the chromosome homologous to GGA1q in two different suborders, Oscines and Suboscines. Hence, considering the importance and species richness of Thraupidae, this study aims to analyze two species of genus Saltator, the golden-billed saltator (S. aurantiirostris) and the green-winged saltator (S. similis) by means of classical cytogenetics and cross-species chromosome painting using Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis probes, and also 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric sequences. The results show that the karyotypes of these species are similar to other species of Passeriformes. Interestingly, the Z chromosome appears heteromorphic in S. similis, varying in morphology from acrocentric to metacentric. 5S and 18S probes hybridize to one pair of microchromosomes each, and telomeric sequences produce signals only in the terminal regions of chromosomes. FISH results are very similar to the Passeriformes already analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics (Turdus species and Elaenia spectabilis). However, the paracentric and pericentric inversions observed in Saltator are different from those detected in these species, an observation that helps to explain the probable sequence of rearrangements. As these rearrangements are found in both suborders of Passeriformes (Oscines and Suboscines), we propose that the fission of GGA1 and inversions in GGA1q have occurred very

  9. New case of trichorinophalangeal syndrome-like phenotype with a de novo t(2;8)(p16.1;q23.3) translocation which does not disrupt the TRPS1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterised by distinctive craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. TRPS is generally associated with mutations in the TRPS1 gene at 8q23.3 or microdeletions of the 8q23.3-q24.11 region. However, three deletions affecting the same chromosome region and a familial translocation t(8;13) co-segregating with TRPS, which do not encompass or disrupt the TRPS1 gene, have been reported. A deregulated expression of TRPS1 has been hypothesised as cause of the TRPS phenotype of these patients. Case presentation We report the clinical and molecular characterisation of a 57-year-old Caucasian woman carrying the t(2;8)(p16.1;q23.3) de novo balanced translocation. The proband presented with peculiar clinical features (severe craniofacial dysmorphism, alopecia universalis, severe scoliosis, mitral valve prolapse, mild mental impairment and normal growth parameters) that partially overlap with TRPS I. Mutational and array CGH analyses ruled out any genetic defect affecting TRPS1 or genomic alteration at the translocation breakpoint or elsewhere in the genome. Breakpoint mapping excluded disruption of TRPS1, and revealed that the chromosome 8q23.3 breakpoint was located within the IVS10 of the long intergenic non-coding RNA LINC00536, at approximately 300 kb from the TRPS1 5’ end. Conversely, the 2p16.1 breakpoint mapped within a LINE sequence, in a region that lacks transcriptional regulatory elements. As a result of the translocation, nucleotide base pair additions and deletions were detected at both breakpoint junction fragments, and an evolutionarily conserved VISTA enhancer element from 2p16.1 was relocated at approximately 325 kb from the TRPS1 promoter. Conclusions We suggest that the disruption of the genomic architecture of cis regulatory elements downstream the TRPS1 5′ region, combined with the translocation of a novel enhancer element nearby TRPS1, might be the

  10. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  11. Segregation analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbecker, K.A.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.; Medina, M.T.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a non-progressive epilepsy characterized by involuntary jerks and an adolescent age of onset. There conflicting reports regarding the mode of inheritance of JME - polygenic, autosomal recessive, and two-locus models have all been proposed. We performed a segregation analysis of 53 nuclear families of JME probands using the Elston and Stewart algorithm (S.A.G.E version 2.1). Relatives of the proband were classified as affected if they had a confirmed history of JME, absence or grand mal epilepsy, or if they were clinically asymptomatic but had 3.5-6 Hz multispike wave complexes on electroencephalography. Using these criteria, 40 relatives were affected in addition to the 53 probands. All Mendelian models were rejected when compared to the unrestricted model which estimated transmission probabilities. The environmental models were also rejected. Of the Mendelian modes, the most parsimonious model was the autosomal recessive model with 53% penetrance and a rate of sporadic cases of 0.0039. We conclude that although there is evidence for a genetic component contributing to the familiality of JME, this component can not be explained by a single major gene. These results, along with contradictory reports regarding the linkage of JME to the short arm of chromosome 6, suggest the presence of genetic heterogeneity and/or a more complex mode of inheritance, such as a two-locus model. Since lod score linkage analyses are dependent on the assumption of a single major gene mode, these findings emphasize the necessity of performing non-parametric linkage analyses when studying JME.

  12. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the 'chromosome cycle'. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice 'progressive' chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are 'segregation forks' in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the 'nucleoid administration' system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle.

  13. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  14. Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution.

  15. Comparative genomic hybridisation divides retinoblastomas into a high and a low level chromosomal instability group

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, J E; Hermsen, M A J A; Gille, H J P; Schouten-Van Meeteren, N Y N; Moll, A C; Imhof, S M; Meijer, G A; Baak, J P A; van der Valk, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in childhood and is responsible for approximately 1% of all deaths caused by childhood cancer. Aims/methods: Comparative genomic hybridisation was performed on 13 consecutive, histologically confirmed retinoblastomas to analyse patterns of chromosomal changes and correlate these to clinicopathological variables. Six cases were hereditary and seven cases were sporadic. Results: In 11 of the 13 tumours chromosomal abnormalities were detected, most frequently gains. Frequent chromosomal gains concerned 6p (46%), 1q (38%), 2p, 9q (30%), 5p, 7q, 10q, 17q, and 20q (23%). Frequent losses occurred at Xq (46%), 13q14, 16q, and 4q (23%). High level copy number gains were found at 5p15 and 6p11–12. A loss at 13q14 occurred in three cases only. Relatively few events occurred in the hereditary cases (27) compared with the non-hereditary cases (70 events). The number of chromosomal aberrations in these 13 retinoblastomas showed a bimodal distribution. Seven tumours showed less than four chromosomal aberrations, falling into a low level chromosomal instability (CIN) group, and six tumours showed at least eight aberrations, falling into a high level CIN group. In the low level CIN group the mean age was half that seen in the high level CIN group, there were less male patients, and there were more hereditary and bilateral cases. Microsatellite instability was not detected in either of the two groups. Conclusion: Despite the complex pattern of genetic changes in retinoblastomas, certain chromosomal regions appear to be affected preferentially. On the basis of the number of genetic events, retinoblastomas can be divided in low and a high level chromosomal instability groups, which have striking differences in clinical presentation. PMID:12499428

  16. Construction of human chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M K; Shero, J H; Cheung, M C; Kan, Y W; Hieter, P A; Antonarakis, S E

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) have been constructed by a method that performs all steps in agarose, allowing size selection by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the use of nanogram to microgram quantities of DNA. The DNA sources used were hybrid cell line WAV-17, containing chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome and flow-sorted chromosome 21. The transformation efficiency of ligation products was similar to that obtained in aqueous transformations and yielded YACs with sizes ranging from 100 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1 megabase when polyamines were included in the transformation procedure. Twenty-five YACs containing human DNA have been obtained from a mouse-human hybrid, ranging in size from 200 to greater than 1000 kb, with an average size of 410 kb. Ten of these YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 21 by hybridization of RNA probes (corresponding to the YAC ends recovered in Escherichia coli) to a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNA. Twenty-one human YACs, ranging in size from 100 to 500 kb, with an average size of 150 kb, were obtained from approximately equal to 50 ng of flow-sorted chromosome 21 DNA. Three were localized to subregions of chromosome 21. YACs will aid the construction of a physical map of human chromosome 21 and the study of disorders associated with chromosome 21 such as Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

  17. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  19. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  20. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  1. Refinement of the cone-rod retinal dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C.Y.; Evans, K.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Whittaker, J.L.; Fryer, A.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a severe example of an inherited retinal dystrophy: ophthalmic diseases that as a group constitute the commonest causes of blindness in children in the developed world and account for a significant proportion of visual handicap in adults. Two case reports suggested loci for CRD-causing genes on chromosomes 18q and chromosome 17q. Recently, we reported the results of a total genome search that localized an autosomal dominant form of CRD to chromosome 19q in the region 19q13.1-q13.2. Since then, using data from a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19 and recently developed microsatellite markers in this region, we have been able to further refine the localization of the chromosome 19q CRD-causing gene. Seven new microsatellite markers were used to genotype 34 affected subjects, 22 unaffected subjects, and 15 spouses. Two-point, multipoint, and FASTMAP analyses were performed. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 2 associated with cryptic duplication of 2q14 and deletion of 2q37 in a patient with autism.

    PubMed

    Devillard, Françoise; Guinchat, Vincent; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Gruchy, Nicolas; Guillem, Pascale; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Leporrier, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Lespinasse, James; Betancur, Catalina

    2010-09-01

    We describe a patient with autism and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 2q14.2q37.3, with a concurrent duplication of the proximal breakpoint at 2q14.1q14.2 and a deletion of the distal breakpoint at 2q37.3. The abnormality was derived from his mother with a balanced paracentric inversion. The inversion in the child appeared to be cytogenetically balanced but subtelomere FISH revealed a cryptic deletion at the 2q37.3 breakpoint. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed the presence of a 3.5 Mb deletion that extended to the telomere, and showed a 4.2 Mb duplication at 2q14.1q14.2. FISH studies using a 2q14.2 probe showed that the duplicated segment was located at the telomeric end of chromosome 2q. This recombinant probably resulted from breakage of a dicentric chromosome. The child had autism, mental retardation, speech and language delay, hyperactivity, growth retardation with growth hormone deficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes, and mild facial dysmorphism. Most of these features have been previously described in individuals with simple terminal deletion of 2q37. Pure duplications of the proximal chromosome 2q are rare and no specific syndrome has been defined yet, so the contribution of the 2q14.1q14.2 duplication to the phenotype of the patient is unknown. These findings underscore the need to explore apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements inherited from a phenotypically normal parent in subjects with autism and/or developmental delay. In addition, they provide further evidence indicating that chromosome 2q terminal deletions are among the most frequently reported cytogenetic abnormalities in individuals with autism.

  3. Sex hormones in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tissue.

    PubMed

    Kumagami, H

    1993-01-01

    Five cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma were studied in terms of the presence of progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone in the juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tissue using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Progesterone and estradiol were positive in all cases. Testosterone was positive in 2 of the 5 patients. Dihydrotestosterone was positive in 3 of the 5 patients. Hormone in the juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tissue seems to change by the activity of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

  4. Black Juveniles in the Juvenile Justice System: A Cause for Alarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFlore, Larry

    This report examines the representation of black youth in the juvenile justice system, describes changes in juvenile justice philosophy, and discusses policy implications. Black youth are overrepresented at all stages of the juvenile justice system compared to white youth. Positivist theories explain this overrepresentation as the result of…

  5. Juvenile Practice Is Not Child's Play: A Handbook for Attorneys Who Represent Juveniles in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This handbook is an attempt to summarize the most important aspects of juvenile law for a new practitioner, and to offer some additional ideas and strategies to any juvenile defense attorney. The goal is to help improve representation of juveniles across the state of Texas. References to useful books, cases, and statutes are included. The handbook…

  6. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

    THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

  7. A Handbook for Juveniles and Parents on Maine's Juvenile Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Irene

    This guide explains Maine's juvenile justice system so that juveniles and/or their parents can know what to expect or what to do in a situation involving juveniles, public officials and the law. Although it is geographically specific, it could serve as a model to other states. The booklet can serve as a checklist to make sure law enforcement…

  8. Planning for Juvenile Detention Reforms: A Structured Approach. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhart, David

    This report is a guide to juvenile detention planning, based largely on the experiences of Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) sites. Its eight chapters include: (1) "Why Is Comprehensive Juvenile Detention Planning Needed?"; (2) "Guiding Principles" (e.g., detention planning must be based on adequate data, must be collaborative,…

  9. Runaway Juvenile Crime? The Context of Juvenile Arrests in America. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziedenberg, Jason; Schiraldi, Vincent

    The Violent and Repeat Juvenile Offender Act of 1997 (S-10) was to be debated in the Senate in spring 1998. This bill would blur the distinction between juvenile and adult criminal systems, making it easier to imprison children as young as 14. Supporters of S-10 were citing statistics to indicate that juvenile crime was on the rise. In fact, the…

  10. National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

  11. The 4q25, 1q21, and 16q22 polymorphisms and recurrence of atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation

    PubMed Central

    Kozluk, Edward; Franaszczyk, Maria; Lodzinski, Piotr; Piatkowska, Agnieszka; Ploski, Rafal; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in atrial fibrillation (AF) is well documented. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with AF, mainly in the 4q25 locus, but also in 16q22 and 1q21. The aim of our study was to test the association between those SNPs and short- and long-term results of PVI. Material and methods Patients with AF who underwent PVI between 2006 and 2009 were included in the study. Pulmonary vein isolation was performed using a 4-mm non-irrigated ablation catheter, circular mapping catheter, and the LocaLisa system. All patients were genotyped for the 4q25, 16q22, and 1q21 SNPs. Results Two-hundred and thirty-eight patients were included. The median follow-up was 45 months. Six-month efficacy was 59.7%. None of the polymorphisms was linked with the risk of AF recurrence after 6 months in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis rs2200733 in the recessive model was linked significantly with AF recurrence (odds ratio 1.87, p = 0.008). None of the polymorphisms predicted AF recurrence in long-term follow-up. Conclusions There is a trend in the relationship between TT genotype of the rs2200733 polymorphism and increased rate of AF recurrence after PVI in short-term (6 months) follow-up. None of the tested SNPs 4q25, 16q22, and 1q21 correlated with the results of a single AF ablation in long-term follow-up. PMID:26925117

  12. PON1Q192R genetic polymorphism modifies organophosphorous pesticide effects on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers from southern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Herrera, N.; Polanco-Minaya, H. |; Salazar-Arredondo, E. |; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Rojas-Garcia, E.; Alvarado-Mejia, J.; Borja-Aburto, V.H.; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2008-07-15

    Pesticide exposure, including organophosphorous (OP) insecticides, has been associated with poor semen quality, and paraoxonase (PON1), an enzyme involved in OP deactivation, may have a role on their susceptibility, due to PON1 polymorphisms. Our objective was to evaluate the role of PON1Q192R polymorphism on the susceptibility to OP toxicity on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in farmers with Mayan ascendancy from southeastern Mexico chronically exposed to pesticides; mostly OP. Fifty four agricultural workers (18-55 years old) were included, who provided semen and blood samples. Semen quality was evaluated according to WHO, sperm DNA damage by in situ-nick translation (NT-positive cells), PON1Q192R polymorphism by real-time PCR and serum PON1 activity by using phenylacetate and paraoxon. Two OP exposure indexes were created: at the month of sampling and during 3 months before sampling, representing the exposure to spermatids-spermatozoa and to cells at one spermatogenic cycle, respectively. PON1 192R and 192Q allele frequencies were 0.54 and 0.46, respectively. Significant associations were found between OP exposure at the month of sampling and NT-positive cells and sperm viability in homozygote 192RR subjects, and dose-effect relationships were observed between OP exposure during 3 months before sampling and sperm quality parameters and NT-positive cells in homozygote 192RR farmers. This suggests that cells at all stages of spermatogenesis are target of OP, and that there exists an interaction between OP exposure and PON1Q192R polymorphism on these effects; farmers featuring the 192RR genotype were more susceptible to develop reproductive toxic effects by OP exposure.

  13. Detection of numerical chromosome aberrations using in situ hybridization in paraffin sections of routinely processed bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Hopman, A H; van Hooren, E; van de Kaa, C A; Vooijs, P G; Ramaekers, F C

    1991-07-01

    An improved protocol for in situ hybridization (ISH) to routinely processed, paraffin-imbedded tissue sections from transitional bladder carcinoma (TCC) is presented. The protocol to detect numerical chromosome aberrations involved treatment of sections with thiocyanate prior to proteolytic digestion, resulting in reproducible ISH reactions. It was used to explore the influence of nuclear truncation in the detection of numerical chromosome aberrations and the detection of tumor cells among stromal and inflammatory cells, to compare the flow cytometric DNA index with chromosome copy number, and to study chromosome heterogeneity within tumors. For this study, a DNA probe for the chromosome region 1q12 was used. Hybridization of model systems with known chromosome numbers, such as sections of paraffin-embedded lymph nodes, paraffin-embedded human peripheral lymphocytes, T24 and Molt-4 cells with two, three, and four chromosomes 1, respectively, showed in at least 50% of the cells the proper number of chromosome hybridization signals in standard 6-microns-thick sections. Depending on the size of the nucleus, a certain percentage of the cells showed lower copy numbers as a result of truncation. In four cases of normal urothelium in paraffin sections, the percentage of nuclei with more than two chromosome spots did not exceed 5%. Comparison of the number of ISH signals, as detected in ethanol-fixed single cell suspensions of 11 TCCs [five flow cytometric (FCM) diploid, three FCM aneuploid, and three FCM tetraploid], with ISH results obtained in paraffin sections of the same tumors showed that typical numerical chromosome aberrations, such as trisomy and tetrasomy up to nonasomy, could be detected. However, the real chromosome copy number is underestimated, especially in tumors with high copy numbers, as detected in the single cell suspensions of the same tumors. Hybridization of a TCC with extremely large nuclei (DNA index = 3.2) containing six to nine ISH signals as

  14. Reduction in erythrocyte-bound complement activation products and titres of anti-C1q antibodies associate with clinical improvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Buyon, Jill; Furie, Richard; Putterman, Chaim; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Kalunian, Kenneth; Barken, Derren; Conklin, John; Dervieux, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPs: EC4d, EC3d), anti-C1q, soluble complement C3/C4 and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was evaluated. Methods Per protocol, at baseline all SLE subjects enrolled in this longitudinal study presented with active disease and elevated CB-CAPs. At each monthly visit, the non-serological (ns) Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA-SLEDAI) and the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG)-2004 index scores were determined as was a random urinary protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR). Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires were also collected. All soluble markers were determined using immunoassays, while EC4d and EC3d were determined using flow cytometry. Statistical analysis consisted of linear mixed models with random intercept and fixed slopes. Results A total of 36 SLE subjects (mean age 34 years; 94% female) were enrolled and evaluated monthly for an average 11 visits per subject. Clinical improvements were observed during the study, with significant decreases in ns-SELENA-SLEDAI scores, BILAG-2004 index scores and uPCR, and increases in all domains of SF-36 (p<0.01). The longitudinal decrease in ns-SELENA-SLEDAI and BILAG-2004 index scores was significantly associated with reduced EC4d and EC3d levels, reduced anti-C1q titres and increased serum complement C3/C4 (p<0.05). The changes in uPCR significantly correlated with C3, C4, anti-C1q and EC4d, with EC4d outperforming C3/C4 by a multivariate analysis. The reduced EC4d or EC3d was associated with improvements in at least six out of the eight domains of SF-36 and outperformed C3/C4. Anti-dsDNA titres did not correlate with changes in disease activity. Conclusions These data indicate that CB-CAPs and anti-C1q are helpful in monitoring patients with SLE. PMID:27752336

  15. Clinical delineation of a patient with trisomy 1q32.qter and monosomy 5p resulting from a familial translocation 1;5.

    PubMed

    Flores Ramírez, F; Abreu González, M; García Delgado, C; Aparicio Onofre, A; Guevara Yáñez, R; Sánchez Urbina, R; Murguía Peniche, T; Ramírez-Ortíz, M A; Ibarra Ríos, D; Ortiz de Luna, R I; Cervantes Peredo, A B; Morán Barroso, V F

    2010-01-01

    We describe a patient who had multiple malformations including ventriculomegaly, colpocephaly, corpus callosum, cerebellum and vermix hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia, corneal opacity and congenital heart disease in whom a trisomy 1q32-qter and monosomy 5p derived from a t(1;5)mat was diagnosed by karyotype and FISH analysis. This trisomy/monosomy association has not been previously reported. The familial analysis of the translocation was carried out in four generations and its implications on the phenotype of the patient and genetic counseling are discussed. PMID:21290965

  16. A new small supernumerary marker chromosome, generating mosaic pure trisomy 16q11.1–q12.1 in a healthy man

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Laura; Liehr, Tomas; Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Lara, Ana; Torres, Antonio; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Here we report on a healthy and fertile 30 years old man, who was carrier of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC). The application of molecular techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), microdissection and reverse painting, helped to characterize the sSMC which resulted to be derived from chromosome 16. In fact, the presence of euchromatin material from the long arm (16q) in the sSMC was demonstrated, and the karyotype can be written as mos 47, XY,+min(16)(:p11.1->q12.1:)[20]/46, XY [10]. PMID:18471313

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human homeobox gene Prox 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovieva, R.D.; Duncan, M.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the human homeobox gene Prox 1 as well as its chromosomal localization have been determined. This gene spans more than 40 kb, consists of at least 5 exons, and encodes an 83-kDa protein. It shows 89% identity with the chicken sequence at the nucleotide level in the coding region, while the human and chicken proteins are 94% identical. Among the embryonic tissues analyzed (lens, brain, lung, liver, and kidney), the human Prox 1 gene is most actively expressed i the developing lens, similar to the expression pattern of the chicken Prox 1 gene. The Prox 1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q32.2-q32.3. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Down syndrome consequent to a cryptic maternal 12p;21q chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.; Wenger, S.L.; Chakravarti, A.

    1995-03-13

    A 9-year-old, mildly mentally retarded girl presented with phenotypic manifestations of Down syndrome. G-banded chromosomal analyses of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the patient and her parents, and skin fibroblasts from the patient, did not detect any abnormality. Molecular analysis of 15 highly polymorphic chromosome 21 dinucleotide repeat markers demonstrated a partial duplication of the Down syndrome critical region (D21S55, subband 21q22.2) of maternal origin in the patient. The segmental trisomy was confirmed by FISH analysis using the cosmid probe D21S55. Further analysis demonstrated that the trisomy was due to segregation of an apparently balanced cryptic translocation from the mother. The patient`s karyotype is 46,XX,-12,tder(12)t(12;21)(p13.1;q22.2)mat. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 with reduction to homozygosity of the LAMB3 locus in a patient with Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Bullrich, F; Czarnecki, P; Weiss, L; Uitto, J

    1997-09-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by blister formation at the level of the lamina lucida within the cutaneous basement-membrane zone. Classic lethal JEB (Herlitz type [H-JEB]; OMIM 226700) is frequently associated with premature-termination-codon mutations in both alleles of one of the three genes (LAMA3, LAMC2, or LAMB3) encoding the subunit polypeptides (alpha3, beta3, and gamma2) of laminin 5. In this study, we describe a unique patient with H-JEB, who was homozygous for a nonsense mutation, Q243X, in the LAMB3 gene on chromosome 1 and who had normal karyotype 46,XY. The mother was found to be a carrier of the Q243X mutation, whereas the father had two normal LAMB3 alleles. Nonpaternity was excluded by use of 11 microsatellite markers from six different chromosomes. The use of 17 partly or fully informative microsatellite markers spanning the entire chromosome 1 revealed that the patient had both maternal uniparental meroisodisomy of a 35-cM region on 1q containing the maternal LAMB3 mutation and maternal uniparental heterodisomy of other regions of chromosome 1. Thus, the results suggested that reduction to homozygosity of the 1q region containing the maternal LAMB3 mutation caused the H-JEB phenotype. The patient was normally developed at term and did not show overt dysmorphisms or malformations. This is the first description of uniparental disomy of human chromosome 1. PMID:9326326

  1. Detection of numerical and structural alterations and fusion of chromosomes 16 and 1 in low-grade papillary breast carcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, H; Takarabe, T; Susumu, N; Inazawa, J; Okada, S; Hirohashi, S

    1997-10-01

    Intracystic papillary breast tumors, including intraductal papilloma and low-grade intracystic papillary carcinoma, constitute a group for which differential diagnosis is frequently difficult. We examined the status of chromosomes 16 and 1 by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses and the DNA ploidy patterns by flow cytometry in 26 intracystic papillary tumors. Alterations of chromosomes 16 and 1 were detected by FISH in 93 and 85%, respectively, of 14 low-grade papillary carcinomas, and the latter alterations always concurred with the former. Two-color FISH using probes for the D1Z1 (1q12) and D16Z2 (16cen) loci or the D1Z1 and D16Z3 (16q11) loci showed that fusion of chromosomes 16 and 1, mostly with breakpoints distal to 16q11.2 and proximal to 1q12, occurred in 77% of the papillary carcinomas. DNA aneuploidy was detected in 6% of these carcinomas. No papilloma showed these chromosome alterations or DNA aneuploidy. Chromosome 16 and 1 fusions appeared to occur frequently in diploid breast carcinomas and to be involved in the acquisition of a malignant phenotype by duct epithelial cells. We suggest that two-color FISH methods for detecting 1;16 fusions might be applicable as supportive methods for the differential diagnosis of intracystic papillary breast tumors. PMID:9327736

  2. Genetic isolation of a chromosome 1 region affecting susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    St Lezin, E; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Churchill, M C; Churchill, P C; Kurtz, T W; Liu, W; Wang, N; Kren, V; Zidek, V; Pravenec, M; Bidani, A K

    1999-08-01

    Linkage studies in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat have suggested that genes influencing susceptibility to hypertension-associated renal failure may exist on rat chromosome 1q. To investigate this possibility in a widely used model of hypertension, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), we compared susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage between an SHR progenitor strain and an SHR congenic strain that is genetically identical except for a defined region of chromosome 1q. Backcross breeding with selection for the markers D1Mit3 and Igf2 on chromosome 1 was used to create the congenic strain (designated SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2) that carries a 22 cM segment of chromosome 1 transferred from the normotensive Brown Norway rat onto the SHR background. Systolic blood pressure (by radiotelemetry) and urine protein excretion were measured in the SHR progenitor and congenic strains before and after the induction of accelerated hypertension by administration of DOCA-salt. At the same level of DOCA-salt hypertension, the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain showed significantly greater proteinuria and histologically assessed renal vascular and glomerular injury than the SHR progenitor strain. These findings demonstrate that a gene or genes that influence susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage have been trapped in the differential chromosome segment of the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain. This congenic strain represents an important new model for the fine mapping of gene(s) on chromosome 1 that affect susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  3. Chromosome assortment in Saccharum.

    PubMed

    Al-Janabi, S M; Honeycutt, R J; Sobral, B W

    1994-12-01

    Recent work has revealed random chromosome pairing and assortment in Saccharum spontaneum L., the most widely distributed, and morphologically and cytologically variable of the species of Saccharum. This conclusion was based on the analysis of a segregating population from across between S. spontaneum 'SES 208' and a spontaneously-doubled haploid of itself, derived from anther culture. To determine whether polysomic inheritance is common in Saccharum and whether it is observed in a typical biparental cross, we studied chromosome pairing and assortment in 44 progeny of a cross between euploid, meiotically regular, 2n=80 forms of Saccharum officinarum 'LA Purple' and Saccharum robustum ' Mol 5829'. Papuan 2n=80 forms of S. robustum have been suggested as the immediate progenitor species for cultivated sugarcane (S. officinarum). A total of 738 loci in LA Purple and 720 loci in Mol 5829 were amplified and typed in the progeny by arbitrarily primed PCR using 45 primers. Fifty and 33 single-dose polymorphisms were identified in the S. officinarum and S. robustum genomes, respectively (χ 2 at 98%). Linkage analysis of single-dose polymorphisms in both genomes revealed linkages in repulsion and coupling phases. In the S. officinarum genome, a map hypothesis gave 7 linkage groups with 17 linked and 33 unlinked markers. Four of 13 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase and 9 were in coupling phase. In the S. robustum genome, a map hypothesis gave 5 linkage groups, defined by 12 markers, with 21 markers unlinked, and 2 of 9 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase. Therefore, complete polysomic inheritance was not observed in either species, suggesting that chromosomal behavior is different from that observed by linkage analysis of over 500 markers in the S. spontaneum map. Implications of this finding for evolution and breeding are discussed.

  4. HCV core/gC1qR interaction arrests T cell cycle progression through stabilization of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Eisen-Vandervelde, Audrey; Ray, Suma; Hahn, Young S

    2003-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is efficient in the establishment of persistent infection. We have previously shown that HCV core protein inhibits T cell proliferation through its interaction with the complement receptor, gC1qR. Here we show that HCV core-induced inhibition of T cell proliferation involves a G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest, which is reversible upon addition of anti-gC1qR antibody. Correspondingly, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) 2/4 and cyclin E/D, as well as subsequent phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (pRb), is reduced in core-treated T cells in response to mitogenic stimulation. Remarkably, degradation of p27(Kip1), a negative regulator of both Cdk4/cyclin D and Cdk2/cyclin E complexes, is significantly diminished in T cells treated with HCV core upon mitogenic stimulation. These data indicate that the stability of p27(Kip1) by HCV core is associated with blocking activated T cells for the G(1) to S phase transition and inhibiting T cell proliferation.

  5. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning at least 10 cM in 1q41, the critical region of Usher II gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Y.; Zhen, D.K.; Li, B.F.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder causing congenital hearing loss, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. The Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. At least three genetic types of Usher syndrome are know to exist. The Usher II (USH2) syndrome has originally been linked to 1q41 between D1S70 and D1S81. more recently its location was refined and placed between D1S217 and D1S229. We have constructed a YAC contig containing 23 clones and a minimum of 10 Mbp of human DNA. A total of three NotI linking clones, fourteen polymorphic microsatelite markers, eight YAC end clones and twenty lambda and cosmid subclones have been used to order the YACs and assess their integrity. The YAC subclones were used to reassess the location of the USH2 gene. Seven CpG islands have already been identified in the region. Several potential exons have been identified by exon amplification in the cosmid subclones. This map of overlapping clones, the set of densely spaced physical markers and potential exons will promote our understanding of the 1q1 region, its associated genes and eventually the gene mutated in Usher syndrome type II.

  6. Measuring Transit Signal Recovery in the Kepler Pipeline. III. Completeness of the Q1-Q17 DR24 Planet Candidate Catalogue with Important Caveats for Occurrence Rate Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Burke, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Haas, Michael R.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Kamal Uddin, AKM; Zamudio, Khadeejah; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Henze, Christopher E.

    2016-09-01

    With each new version of the Kepler pipeline and resulting planet candidate catalog, an updated measurement of the underlying planet population can only be recovered with a corresponding measurement of the Kepler pipeline detection efficiency. Here we present measurements of the sensitivity of the pipeline (version 9.2) used to generate the Q1-Q17 DR24 planet candidate catalog. We measure this by injecting simulated transiting planets into the pixel-level data of 159,013 targets across the entire Kepler focal plane, and examining the recovery rate. Unlike previous versions of the Kepler pipeline, we find a strong period dependence in the measured detection efficiency, with longer (>40 day) periods having a significantly lower detectability than shorter periods, introduced in part by an incorrectly implemented veto. Consequently, the sensitivity of the 9.2 pipeline cannot be cast as a simple one-dimensional function of the signal strength of the candidate planet signal, as was possible for previous versions of the pipeline. We report on the implications for occurrence rate calculations based on the Q1-Q17 DR24 planet candidate catalog, and offer important caveats and recommendations for performing such calculations. As before, we make available the entire table of injected planet parameters and whether they were recovered by the pipeline, enabling readers to derive the pipeline detection sensitivity in the planet and/or stellar parameter space of their choice.

  7. Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Although the use of corticosteroids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is now much more limited owing to the availability of methotrexate and biological agents, there are clinical scenarios where it is still indicated. For example, corticosteroids may be indicated for intraarticular injections to prevent joint deformities, as a "bridge" drug to relieve symptoms in polyarticular disease while waiting for methotrexate and biologics to exert their full therapeutic effects, and in the treatment of chronic iridocyclitis, macrophage activation syndrome, and systemic JIA, although the advent of interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockers has greatly reduced the latter indication.

  8. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

  9. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

  10. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  11. Juvenile Delinquency: Research, Theory, and Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Bernice Milburn

    While this booklet on juvenile delinquency does not attempt a full review of the literature, it has been designed to further an understanding and appreciation of the social-psychological problems of deviant behavior. The booklet briefly covers the publicity which juvenile delinquency has been given in recent years, as well as the difficulties…

  12. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  13. Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Or, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

  14. Peer Relationships Among Institutionalized Juvenile Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preveaux, Neal E.; Ray, Glen E.; LoBello, Steven G.; Mehta, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    This study examined peer relationships (sociometric status and friendship) of institutionalized juvenile males ages 12 to 18. Results replicated previous studies using "normal" nondelinquent samples demonstrating that sociometrically popular status juveniles were evaluated higher on sociability and leadership than were average- or rejected-status…

  15. Wilderness/Adventure Programs for Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Richard Owen

    Over 80 wilderness/adventure programs have emerged as a valuable alternative to traditional treatment for juvenile offenders, especially in combination with other services. Participants are referred from many points in the juvenile justice system by agents who should have a thorough understanding of wilderness programs so as to prepare the…

  16. Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

  17. Literacy Levels of Male Juvenile Justice Detainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheldall, Kevin; Watkins, Renae

    2004-01-01

    The assessment records detailing the reading and spelling performance of a group of male juvenile justice detainees admitted over a 3-month period were examined in an attempt to quantify the basic literacy levels of juvenile offenders. Results of student self-ratings of their reading ability were also analysed. The participants comprised 68 males…

  18. Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Donnie W.

    2004-01-01

    The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

  19. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  20. Different segregation patterns in five carriers due to a pericentric inversion of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqin; Xu, Chenming; Sun, Yixi; Wang, Liya; Chen, Songchang; Jin, Fan

    2014-12-01

    Pericentric inversion can produce recombinant gametes; however, meiotic segregation studies on the relationship between the frequency of recombinants and the inverted segment size are rare. Triple-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to analyze the meiotic behavior in five inv(1) carriers with different breakpoints. Recombination gametes were absent in Patient 1, whereas the percentages of the recombinants in Patients 2, 3, 4, and 5 were of 9.2%, 15.3%, 17.3%, and 40.9%, respectively. A significant difference was present for the frequencies of the recombinant spermatozoa among the five patients (p < 0.001). For each patient, the frequency of the two types of recombinant gametes (dup(1p)/del(1q) or del(1p)/dup(1q)) did not exhibit a significant difference in comparison with the expected 1:1 ratio (p > 0.05). The meiotic segregation of nine inv(1) carriers (including those presented in this paper) is now available. A significant correlation was discovered between the rate of recombination and the proportion of the chromosome implicated in the inversion (R = 0.9435, p < 0.001). The frequency of the recombinant gametes was directly related to the proportion of the chromosome that was inverted. Sperm-FISH allowed an additional comprehension of the patterns of meiotic segregation and provided accurate genetic counseling. PMID:25096371