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Sample records for chromosome trisomy xxx

  1. A review of trisomy X (47,XXX).

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Nicole R; Howell, Susan; Sutherland, Ashley; Wilson, Rebecca; Wilson, Lennie

    2010-05-11

    Trisomy X is a sex chromosome anomaly with a variable phenotype caused by the presence of an extra X chromosome in females (47,XXX instead of 46,XX). It is the most common female chromosomal abnormality, occurring in approximately 1 in 1,000 female births. As some individuals are only mildly affected or asymptomatic, it is estimated that only 10% of individuals with trisomy X are actually diagnosed. The most common physical features include tall stature, epicanthal folds, hypotonia and clinodactyly. Seizures, renal and genitourinary abnormalities, and premature ovarian failure (POF) can also be associated findings. Children with trisomy X have higher rates of motor and speech delays, with an increased risk of cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in the school-age years. Psychological features including attention deficits, mood disorders (anxiety and depression), and other psychological disorders are also more common than in the general population. Trisomy X most commonly occurs as a result of nondisjunction during meiosis, although postzygotic nondisjunction occurs in approximately 20% of cases. The risk of trisomy X increases with advanced maternal age. The phenotype in trisomy X is hypothesized to result from overexpression of genes that escape X-inactivation, but genotype-phenotype relationships remain to be defined. Diagnosis during the prenatal period by amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling is common. Indications for postnatal diagnoses most commonly include developmental delays or hypotonia, learning disabilities, emotional or behavioral difficulties, or POF. Differential diagnosis prior to definitive karyotype results includes fragile X, tetrasomy X, pentasomy X, and Turner syndrome mosaicism. Genetic counseling is recommended. Patients diagnosed in the prenatal period should be followed closely for developmental delays so that early intervention therapies can be implemented as needed. School-age children and adolescents benefit from a

  2. Neurocognitive Outcomes of Individuals with a Sex Chromosome Trisomy: XXX, XYY, or XXY--A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggett, Victoria; Jacobs, Patricia; Nation, Kate; Scerif, Gaia; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To review systematically the neurodevelopmental characteristics of individuals with sex chromosome trisomies (SCTs). Method: A bibliographic search identified English-language articles on SCTs. The focus was on studies unbiased by clinical referral, with power of at least 0.69 to detect an effect size of 1.0. Results: We identified 35…

  3. Double trisomy (48,XXX,+18) with features of Roberts syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Descartes, M.; Longshore, J.W.; Crawford, E.

    1994-09-01

    We report an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18, who also displayed features of Roberts syndrome. All previously published cases with similar double trisomy have presented with features of trisomy 18 syndrome. The chromosome analysis done at birth revealed the double trisomy; parental chromosomes were normal. The proband presented with microbrachycephaly, unilateral cleft lip and palate, choanal atresia, midfacial capillary hemanioma, thin nares, shallow orbits, malformed ears, sparse hair, hypomelia of the upper limbs, rocker-bottom feet, auricular septal defect and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Characteristic features of Roberts syndrome included hypomelia, midfacial defects, and severe growth deficiency. Among the many different features reported in the literature for patients with trisomy 18 syndrome, the most consistent were growth deficiency, clenched fingers and congenital heart defects (e.g. VSD, ASD, PDA). Although some of our patient`s features such as cleft lip and cleft palate, low-set malformed ears, ASD, defects of the corpus callosum, choanal atresia, radial aplasia could also be seen in trisomy 18 syndrome (in 10-50% of the cases), her phenotype was more typical of Roberts syndrome because of symmetrical hypomelia and midfacial defects. Our patient`s chromosomes did not show premature separation of centromeric heterochromatin, a feature reported to occur in approximately one-half of individuals with Roberts syndrome. Sporadic aneuploidy involving different chromosomes has been found in lymphocyte cultures from some Roberts syndrome patients and is considered by some authors as a mitotic mutant. This aneuploidy is most likely to be chromosome gain. The simultaneous occurrence of trisomy X and 18 is extremely rare with only 11 cases having been reported in the literature. Our patient is unique since she has the double trisomy in addition to the characteristic features of Roberts syndrome.

  4. Double trisomy mosaic (47,XXX/48,XXX,+13) confirmed by FISH and skin fibroblast culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, E.; Grady, V.; Dosik, H.

    1994-09-01

    A 4 lb 8 oz female was born to a 49-year-old woman (P1200G12) at 40 weeks. The baby had tetralogy of Fallot, polydactyly, microcephaly, low set simple ears, posterior cleft of the soft palate and overlapping flexion deformities of both hands. The eyes were deep set. The clinical impression was trisomy 13. The baby is not doing well and needs a gastrotomy tube for feeding. Sucking is allright but swallowing is impeded. An MRI showed an anomaly of the corpus callosum. The ophthalmological examination showed no abnormalities. A chromosome study on a 2-day peripheral blood sample resulted in poor growth and poor morphology; however, 20 Giemsa-banded cells revealed a 47,XXX karyotype. A second specimen was obtained to search for mosaicism and a blood smear revealed nuclear projections on the neutrophils. FISH analysis using whole chromosome painting probe (Life Technologies) first identified the extra chromosome number 13, the final results showing five of sixty metaphase cells (8.3%) with trisomy 13. Cytogenetic analysis using Giemsa-banding technique revealed four cells in fifty examined (8.0%) with a 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. In order to further evaluate the mosaicism, cytogenetic analysis of a skin fibroblast culture was performed. Twenty one of twenty three cells examined (91.3%) showed the 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. FISH analysis of the skin biopsy revealed eighteen of twenty cells (90.9%) with the trisomy 13. The FISH technique is an important enhancement to routine cytogenetic studies when they do not immediately correlate with clinical impressions.

  5. An infant with double trisomy (48,XXX,+18)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaruratanasirikul, S.; Jinorose, U.

    1994-01-15

    The authors report on an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18. She presented with manifestation of trisomy 18: prominent occiput, microphthalmia, small mouth, micrognathia, malformed ears, congenital heart defect, overlapping fingers, talipes equinovarus, and rockerbottom feet. An extra palmar crease was present only on the right hand. This patient was alive at 12 months. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of 10 previously reported cases. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic analysis of double trisomy 48,XXX,+18.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Chern, S R; Yeh, L F; Chen, W L; Chen, L F; Wang, W

    2000-09-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of simultaneous occurrence of double trisomy involving chromosomes 18 and X is extremely rare. We report on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a fetus with both trisomy 18 and trisomy X. A 26-year-old, para 1 woman was referred for genetic counselling at 36 weeks' gestation with the sonographic findings of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), polyhydramnios, ventricular septal defect, and an enlarged cisterna magna. Both cordocentesis and amniocentesis revealed a consistent karyotype of 48,XXX,+18. Quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using polymorphic small tandem repeat markers specific for chromosomes 18 and X rapidly determined that both aneuploidies arose as a result of non-disjunction in maternal meiosis II. Our case shows that two non-disjunction events can occur not only in the same parent, but also in the same cell division. Our case also shows that double trisomy, 48,XXX,+18, can demonstrate an enlarged cisterna magna, IUGR and polyhydramnios in prenatal ultrasound.

  7. Enamel Pit Defects and Taurodontism in a Patient with Ring Chromosome 14 and 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Janice A; Lacour, Letitia; Scheuerle, Angela E

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical findings and management of a case involving a patient with co-occurring ring chromosome 14 syndrome and 47,XXX presenting with enamel pit defects and taurodontism. Ring chromosome 14 syndrome is an unusual condition with uncontrolled seizure disorder as its most significant finding; 47,XXX (trisomy X; triple X) is a more common condition and has characteristic physical and behavioral findings. Neither condition has been associated with enamel pit defects.

  8. 47,XXX chromosome constitution in a male.

    PubMed

    Bigozzi, U; Simoni, G; Montali, E; Dalpra, L; Rossella, F; Piazzini, M; Borghi, A

    1980-02-01

    An 18-year-old boy with a male phenotype was examined because of testicular hypoplasia. Chromosome analysis using Q- and R-banding techniques and BUdR treatment showed a 47,XXX karotype, in both lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Cytogenetic problems raised by this case are discussed in relation to data from previous published reports.

  9. Everyday executive functions in Down syndrome from early childhood to young adulthood: evidence for both unique and shared characteristics compared to youth with sex chromosome trisomy (XXX and XXY).

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Anand, Payal; Will, Elizabeth; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I; Clasen, Liv S; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Giedd, Jay N; Daunhauer, Lisa A; Fidler, Deborah J; Edgin, Jamie O

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are thought to be impaired in Down syndrome (DS) and sex chromosome trisomy (Klinefelter and Trisomy X syndromes; +1X). However, the syndromic specificity and developmental trajectories associated with EF difficulties in these groups are poorly understood. The current investigation (a) compared everyday EF difficulties in youth with DS, +1X, and typical development (TD); and (b) examined relations between age and EF difficulties in these two groups and a TD control group cross-sectionally. Study 1 investigated the syndromic specificity of EF profiles on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) in DS (n = 30), +1X (n = 30), and a TD group (n = 30), ages 5-18 years. Study 2 examined age effects on EF in the same cross-sectional sample of participants included in Study 1. Study 3 sought to replicate Study 2's findings for DS by examining age-EF relations in a large independent sample of youth with DS (n = 85) and TD (n = 43), ages 4-24 years. Study 1 found evidence for both unique and shared EF impairments for the DS and +1X groups. Most notably, youth with +1X had relatively uniform EF impairments on the BRIEF scales, while the DS group showed an uneven BRIEF profile with relative strengths and weaknesses. Studies 2 and 3 provided support for fairly similar age-EF relations in the DS and TD groups. In contrast, for the +1X group, findings were mixed; 6 BRIEF scales showed similar age-EF relations to the TD group and 2 showed greater EF difficulties at older ages for +1X. These findings will be discussed within the context of efforts to identify syndrome specific cognitive-behavioral profiles for youth with different genetic syndromes in order to inform basic science investigations into the etiology of EF difficulties in these groups and to develop treatment approaches that are tailored to the needs of these groups.

  10. Everyday executive functions in Down syndrome from early childhood to young adulthood: evidence for both unique and shared characteristics compared to youth with sex chromosome trisomy (XXX and XXY)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Anand, Payal; Will, Elizabeth; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I.; Clasen, Liv S.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Giedd, Jay N.; Daunhauer, Lisa A.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Edgin, Jamie O.

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are thought to be impaired in Down syndrome (DS) and sex chromosome trisomy (Klinefelter and Trisomy X syndromes; +1X). However, the syndromic specificity and developmental trajectories associated with EF difficulties in these groups are poorly understood. The current investigation (a) compared everyday EF difficulties in youth with DS, +1X, and typical development (TD); and (b) examined relations between age and EF difficulties in these two groups and a TD control group cross-sectionally. Study 1 investigated the syndromic specificity of EF profiles on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) in DS (n = 30), +1X (n = 30), and a TD group (n = 30), ages 5–18 years. Study 2 examined age effects on EF in the same cross-sectional sample of participants included in Study 1. Study 3 sought to replicate Study 2's findings for DS by examining age-EF relations in a large independent sample of youth with DS (n = 85) and TD (n = 43), ages 4–24 years. Study 1 found evidence for both unique and shared EF impairments for the DS and +1X groups. Most notably, youth with +1X had relatively uniform EF impairments on the BRIEF scales, while the DS group showed an uneven BRIEF profile with relative strengths and weaknesses. Studies 2 and 3 provided support for fairly similar age-EF relations in the DS and TD groups. In contrast, for the +1X group, findings were mixed; 6 BRIEF scales showed similar age-EF relations to the TD group and 2 showed greater EF difficulties at older ages for +1X. These findings will be discussed within the context of efforts to identify syndrome specific cognitive-behavioral profiles for youth with different genetic syndromes in order to inform basic science investigations into the etiology of EF difficulties in these groups and to develop treatment approaches that are tailored to the needs of these groups. PMID:26539087

  11. Partial Trisomy of Chromosome 11: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk Rena E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A case of partial trisomy of the short arms of chromosome number 11 resulting in profound retardation and multiple physical defects was confirmed by means of fluorescent karyotyping of the chromosomally balanced carrier father. (Author)

  12. [Double aneuploidy (trisomy X, trisomy 18) in a newborn with trisomy 18 phenotype].

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn girl with a double trisomy, with a chromosome complement 48,XXX,+18, with Edwards syndrome phenotype (trisomy 18). The clinical feature included intrauterine growth retardation, dysmorphic facies, hand with overlapping fingers, ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis and left clubfoot. A review of the literature and discussion of previously reported cases is made.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    Khoury-Collado, Fady; Wehbeh, Ammar N; Fisher, Allan J; Bombard, Allan T; Weiner, Zeev

    2005-05-01

    We report 2 cases of 47,XXX that were diagnosed prenatally and were screened positive for trisomy 21 by biochemical and ultrasound markers. These cases underline the importance of discussing the sex chromosome abnormalities during the genetic counseling after an abnormal triple screen test or ultrasound examination.

  14. Complex chromosomal rearrangement leading to partial trisomy 22.

    PubMed Central

    Hansteen, I L; Schirmer, L; Hestetun, S; Brøgger, A

    1980-01-01

    We have examined a boy with a peculiar facial appearance and mental retardation. Cytogenetic studies showed 47,XY, monosomy 22, two marker chromosomes, M1 and M2. The karotype is interpreted as functionally partial trisomy 22. Chromosome analyses of both parents and three sibs were normal. Images PMID:7365766

  15. Genomic characterization of chromosome 8 pericentric trisomy

    PubMed Central

    Vander Pluym, Juliana H; O’Sullivan, Julia; Andrew, Gail; Bolduc, Francois V

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a patient with trisomy 8p11.21q11.21 associated with language, gross motor, fine motor, and cognitive delay. Furthermore, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we identify the specific genes duplicated in our patient. PMID:26273445

  16. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  17. [Partial trisomy of chromosome 15 with new phenotypic manifestations].

    PubMed

    Mar González, J; Llaurado Robles, R A; Cabrera Rivas, T; Lantigua Cruz, A; Rodríguez Verdecia, B

    1994-01-01

    A patient with a 15 partial trisomy and a 4 target chromosome in 100% of metaphases is presented. Phenotypic manifestations not previously described were observed such as macrocephally, long face, low implantation of ears, narrow forehead, epicanthal fold, copious eyebrows and synophrys, short nasolabial distance, convergent strabismus, delayed bucal eruption, long neck, hypertrophy of thenar and hypothenar bulging and articular hypermobility. The eyeground was degeneratively myopic. This case makes more extensive the variety of clinical manifestations of this disease.

  18. Poor socio-economic status in 47,XXX --an unexpected effect of an extra X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common sex chromosomal abnormalities in females is 47,XXX syndrome, which is characterized by tall stature and reduced IQ, but with a variable phenotype. In order to elaborate on the characteristics of this syndrome, we undertook an investigation in all diagnosed 47,XXX females at risk in Denmark and compared their socio-economic status with an age-matched cohort of the female background population as well as with all Danes diagnosed with Turner syndrome. We focused on cohabitation, motherhoods, income, education, retirement and convictions. Furthermore, we investigated whether some of these parameters influenced the increased mortality identified previously. Thus, socio-economic data were retrieved in 108 47,XXX persons, 10,297 controls, and 831 with Turner syndrome. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with their controls, we identified significantly decreased numbers of first partnership, number of mothers, and number of persons with an education in 47,XXX persons. Significantly more 47,XXX persons retired. In the younger age groups an increased number had income below the median among controls. The increased mortality identified previously was not explained by the reduced number of partnerships or the reduced number of persons with an education. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with Turner syndrome persons, we identified increased number of first partnership, number of mothers, and reduced level of education. We hypothesize that the significantly decreased number of 47,XXX persons becoming mothers could be due to hypogonadism in some. The affected socio-economic status suggests that the presence of an extra X chromosome has more detrimental effects than previously appreciated.

  19. A Case of Partial Trisomy of Chromosome 8p Associated with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanikolaou, Katerina; Paliokosta, Elena; Gyftodimou, Jolanda; Kolaitis, Gerassimos; Vgenopoulou, Sofia; Sarri, Catherine; Tsiantis, John

    2006-01-01

    We report on a case of a 6-year-old female with partial trisomy 8p(21-23) associated with autism, mild dysmorphic features, and moderate learning disability. Although mental retardation is a common finding in patients with mosaic trisomy 8 or partial trisomy of various regions of chromosome 8, only two cases associated with autism have been…

  20. The parental origin of the extra X chromosome in 47,XXX females.

    PubMed

    May, K M; Jacobs, P A; Lee, M; Ratcliffe, S; Robinson, A; Nielsen, J; Hassold, T J

    1990-04-01

    We used X-linked DNA polymorphisms to study the parental origin of X chromosome nondisjunction in 28 47,XXX live-born females. Errors in oogenesis accounted for 26 of the cases, with the majority of these being attributable to an error at meiosis I. We observed an association between advanced parental age and meiosis I nondisjunction--but not meiosis II nondisjunction--in the maternally derived cases. In studies of recombination we found little evidence for an association between pairing failure and X chromosome nondisjunction, but our results suggest that increased recombination near the centromere may play a role in the etiology of the 47,XXX condition.

  1. Children with sex chromosome trisomies: parental disclosure of genetic status.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Nikki C; Myring, Jessica; Middlemiss, Prisca; Shears, Deborah; Wellesley, Diana; Wynn, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy Vm; Scerif, Gaia

    2016-05-01

    Sex chromosome trisomies (SCTs) are frequently diagnosed, both prenatally and postnatally, but the highly variable childhood outcomes can leave parents at a loss on whether, when and how to disclose genetic status. In two complementary studies, we detail current parental practices, with a view to informing parents and their clinicians. Study 1 surveyed detailed qualitative data from focus groups of parents and affected young people with either Trisomy X or XYY (N=34 families). These data suggested that decisions to disclose were principally affected by the child's level of cognitive, social and emotional functioning. Parents reported that they were more likely to disclose when a child was experiencing difficulties. In Study 2, standardised data on cognitive, social and emotional outcomes in 126 children with an SCT and 63 sibling controls highlighted results that converged with Study 1: logistic regression analyses revealed that children with the lowest levels of functioning were more likely to know about their SCT than those children functioning at a higher level. These effects were also reflected in the likelihood of parents to disclose to unaffected siblings, schools and general practitioners. In contrast, specific trisomy type and the professional category of the clinician providing the original diagnosis did not affect likelihood of disclosure. Our study emphasises the complex weighing up of costs and benefits that parents engage in when deciding whether to disclose a diagnosis.

  2. The parental origin of the extra X chromosome in 47,XXX females.

    PubMed Central

    May, K M; Jacobs, P A; Lee, M; Ratcliffe, S; Robinson, A; Nielsen, J; Hassold, T J

    1990-01-01

    We used X-linked DNA polymorphisms to study the parental origin of X chromosome nondisjunction in 28 47,XXX live-born females. Errors in oogenesis accounted for 26 of the cases, with the majority of these being attributable to an error at meiosis I. We observed an association between advanced parental age and meiosis I nondisjunction--but not meiosis II nondisjunction--in the maternally derived cases. In studies of recombination we found little evidence for an association between pairing failure and X chromosome nondisjunction, but our results suggest that increased recombination near the centromere may play a role in the etiology of the 47,XXX condition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2316522

  3. Beyond Trisomy 21: Additional Chromosomal Anomalies Detected through Routine Aneuploidy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Amy; Hippman, Catriona; Pastuck, Melanie; Johnson, Jo-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal screening is often misconstrued by patients as screening for trisomy 21 alone; however, other chromosomal anomalies are often detected. This study aimed to systematically review the literature and use diagnostic meta-analysis to derive pooled detection and false positive rates for aneuploidies other than trisomy 21 with different prenatal screening tests. Non-invasive prenatal testing had the highest detection (DR) and lowest false positive (FPR) rates for trisomy 13 (DR: 90.3%; FPR: 0.2%), trisomy 18 (DR: 98.1%; FPR: 0.2%), and 45,X (DR: 92.2%; FPR: 0.1%); however, most estimates came from high-risk samples. The first trimester combined test also had high DRs for all conditions studied (trisomy 13 DR: 83.1%; FPR: 4.4%; trisomy 18 DR: 91.9%; FPR: 3.5%; 45,X DR: 70.1%; FPR: 5.4%; triploidy DR: 100%; FPR: 6.3%). Second trimester triple screening had the lowest DRs and highest FPRs for all conditions (trisomy 13 DR: 43.9%; FPR: 8.1%; trisomy 18 DR: 70.5%; FPR: 3.3%; 45,X DR: 77.2%; FPR: 9.3%). Prenatal screening tests differ in their ability to accurately detect chromosomal anomalies. Patients should be counseled about the ability of prenatal screening to detect anomalies other than trisomy 21 prior to undergoing screening. PMID:26237381

  4. Partial epilepsy and 47,XXX karyotype: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Roubertie, Agathe; Humbertclaude, Véronique; Leydet, Julie; Lefort, Geneviève; Echenne, Bernard

    2006-07-01

    Epilepsy is a common finding in chromosomal imbalances, but only a few chromosome abnormalities have a characteristic electro-clinical pattern. Trisomy X is one of the most common sex chromosome abnormalities in females, and is associated with considerable phenotypic variability. This report describes four 47,XXX females with mental deficiency and epilepsy. Although a specific electro-clinical pattern could not be defined, the epileptic phenotypes of these patients share many features; we suggest that the association 47,XXX/epilepsy/mental retardation may not be coincidental. This report also enlarges the clinical spectrum of the 47,XXX phenotype. Moreover, these observations highlight the critical role of chromosome X in epilepsy and mental retardation.

  5. Trisomy 18

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone. Chromosome studies will show trisomy 18. The chromosome abnormality may be present in every cell or present in only a certain percentage of the cells (called mosaicism). ... of the chromosome in some cells. Rarely, part of the chromosome ...

  6. Trisomy 4 associated with double minute chromosomes and MYC amplification in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Receveur, Aline; Ong, Jeanne; Merlin, Laurent; Azgui, Zahia; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Berger, Roland; Nguyen-Khac, Florence

    2004-01-01

    A case of de novo acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) M2, with trisomy 4 and double minute (dmin) chromosomes is reported. Amplification of the MYC gene ascertained by FISH was associated with dmin. A review of the literature of trisomy 4-dmin-associated AML shows that this entity preferentially occurs in elderly women and is not always associated with previously identified exposition to mutagens.

  7. Partial trisomy of chromosome 18 (pter leads to q11): a discussion on the identification of the critical segment.

    PubMed

    San Martin, V; Fernandez-Novoa, C; Hevia, A; Novales, A; Fornell, J; Galera, H

    1981-01-01

    Partial trisomy for the short arm and the proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 18 was observed in a male child of 4 years of age. The trisomy appeared de novo as a free, practically metacentric chromosome. A review of other cases of partial trisomy 18 suggests that there is a critical segment of the chromosome responsible for typical phenotype of the trisomy 18. In this report we add the description of a new case to the work already carried out in the delimitation of this critical segment.

  8. Gain of MYC underlies recurrent trisomy of the MYC chromosome in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Letetia; Wei, Guangwei; Sevcikova, Sabina; Phan, Vernon; Jain, Sachi; Shieh, Angell; Wong, Jasmine C. Y.; Li, Min; Dubansky, Joshua; Maunakea, Mei Lin; Ochoa, Rachel; Zhu, George; Tennant, Thelma R.; Shannon, Kevin M.; Lowe, Scott W.; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has been hypothesized that gain of the MYC protooncogene is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the experimental data to support this are limited and controversial. In a mouse model of promyelocytic leukemia in which the MRP8 promoter drives expression of the PML-RARA fusion gene in myeloid cells, a Myc allele is gained in approximately two-thirds of cases as a result of trisomy for mouse chromosome 15. We used this model to test the idea that MYC underlies acquisition of trisomy in AML. We used a retroviral vector to drive expression of wild-type, hypermorphic, or hypomorphic MYC in bone marrow that expressed the PML-RARA transgene. MYC retroviruses cooperated in myeloid leukemogenesis and suppressed gain of chromosome 15. When the PML-RARA transgene was expressed in a Myc haploinsufficient background, we observed selection for increased copies of the wild-type Myc allele concomitant with leukemic transformation. In addition, we found that human myeloid leukemias with trisomy 8 have increased MYC. These data show that gain of MYC can contribute to the pathogenic effect of the most common trisomy of human AML. PMID:21059853

  9. First report of a patient with a mixoploidy 47,XXX/94,XXXXXX.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Criado, G; Galán Gómez, E; Tizzano, E F; García Rodríguez, E; Gómez de Terreros, I

    2007-01-01

    We present a 16 years old female with a chromosomal mixoploidy and multiple phenotypic anomalies. Peripheral blood G-band karyotype was 47,XXX and her skin fibroblast karyotype revealed a mosaic with a 47,XXX cell line in 88% of metaphases and a 94,XXXXXX cell line in 12% of metaphases, consistent with a hypertetraploidy. The most prominent clinical signs were: short stature, left upper limb asymmetry, senile-like appearance, generalized hypertrichosis, and small hands and feet. Radiological examination showed bone dysplasia. The result of molecular studies demonstrated that the patient inherited the two X chromosomes from the mother and one from the father, indicating that her 47,XXX trisomy resulted from an oogenesis error in the first meiotic division. The 94,XXXXXX cell line was likely the result of a cytokinesis error. To our knowledge, this is the first documented patient with a trisomy and a hypertetraploidy.

  10. Recombinant chromosome 7 in a mosaic 45,X/47,XXX patient.

    PubMed

    Tirado, Carlos A; Gotway, Garrett; Torgbe, Emmanuel; Iyer, Santha; Dallaire, Stephanie; Appleberry, Taylor; Suterwala, Mohamed; Garcia, Rolando; Valdez, Federico; Patel, Sangeeta; Koduru, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with pericentric inversions are at risk for producing offspring with chromosomal gains and losses, while those carrying paracentric inversions usually produce unviable gametes [Madan, 1995]. In this current study, we present a newborn with dysmorphic features and malformations, whose karyotype showed an abnormal copy of chromomosome 7 described at first as add(7)(q32) as well as mos 45,X/47,XXX. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed an interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 7 involving bands q35 to q36.3 but retaining the 7q subtelomere. The patient's deletion is believed to be due to meiotic recombination in the inversion loop in the phenotypically normal father who seems to carry two paracentric inversions in the long arm of chromosome 7, which was described as rec(7)(7pter- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter)pat. The abnormal copy of chromosome 7 in the father has been described as: der(7)(7pter- > q22.1::q36.3- > q35::q22.1- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter). This is a unique karyotype that to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature and predisposes to meiotic recombination that can result in deletions or duplications of 7q35-36.

  11. Molecular analysis of the nondisjoined chromosome in trisomy 21 with and without endocardial cushion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zittergruen, M.M.; Murray, J.C.; Lauer, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is found in approximately 40% of patients with Down syndrome (DS), with endocardial cushion defects (ECDs) comprising one-third of the defects. Sixteen highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were typed in two groups (Group 1: DS with ECD, n=43, and Group 2: DS without ECD, n=52) to determine: (1) the parental origin of the extra chromosome, (2) the presence or absence of disomic homozygosity (reduced) or heterozygosity (nonreduced) of the markers along 21q, and (3) the presence or absence of recombination in the nondisjoined chromosome. The association of these three factors with the presence of ECD in DS was then determined. The origin of the nondisjoined chromosome was maternal in 86.3% of the total cases with no significant differences between groups 1 and 2. The most centromeric marker was nonreduced in 77% of the maternally-derived trisomies (indicative of a meiosis II nondisjunction) with no significant differences between groups 1 and 2. The most telomeric markers showed no differences in the number of reduced or nonreduced markers between maternally and paternally derived chromosomes or between groups 1 and 2. Recombination was significantly decreased in group 1 (28%) compared to group 2 (56%) (chi-square 7.45, p < 0.01) with similar values for both paternally and maternally-derived trisomies. Overall, recombination was present in 43.2% of the nondisjoined chromosomes which is similar to the 42.3% recombination reported in nondisjoined chromosomes in trisomy 21.

  12. Familial translocation with partial trisomy of 13 and 22: evidence that specific regions of chromosomes 13 and 22 are responsible for the phenotype of each trisomy.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Goldsmith, L C; Strauss, L; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A newborn infant with clinical and pathological findings typical trisomy 13 and 22 syndromes had an extra chromosome which was a derivative chromosome from maternal balanced translocation affecting Nos. 13 and 22; 47,XY,+der(22),t(13:22)(q22:q12)Mat. The presence of extra specific euchromatic regions of No. 13(13q22 and/or 13q34) and No. 22 (22q11) seem to be responsible for the trisomy 13 and 22 syndromes. Images PMID:853317

  13. Maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 by secondary nondisjunction of a initial trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Morichon-Delvallez, N.; Segues, B.; Pinson, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    Three cases of maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 (UD 14) have been described in the literature. In all three cases, the UD was found in carriers of Robertsonian translocations (13q14q or 14q and 14q). Here, we report on a new case of UD for chromosome 14 in a fetus in which the UD arose presumably by secondary nondisjunction of a trisomy 14. Prenatal diagnosis was performed on a 40-year-old woman by trans-abdominal chorionic villi sampling. Cytogenetic analysis showed a confined placental mosaicism (CPM) for trisomy 14 (100% of cells trisomic in short term preparations and 20% trisomic in cultured villi). The ultrasound examination was normal and after counselling the parents agreed to continue the pregnancy. Amniocentesis was performed and a normal 46,XX karyotype was found in the 70 cells examined. Molecular analysis of the parental origin of the fetus`s chromosome 14 was performed using microsatellite DNA markers evenly distributed on chromosome 14. Molecular results suggested a maternal heterodisomy. Another ultrasound examination was normal and after genetic counselling based on the small number of cases reported in the literature, the parents decided to keep the pregnancy. At birth, the clinical examination was normal. In conclusion, among the different mechanisms leading to UD, the correction of an initial trisomy by secondary nondisjunction might also be an important one. CPM is observed in about 2% of CVS studies and theoretically 1/3 of corrected trisomies could result in UD for the chromosomal pair that was originally trisomic. In order to provide adequate genetic counselling in these cases, it will be important to undergo molecular studies in the instances of confined placental mosaicism.

  14. Tertiary trisomy due to a reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 5 and 21 in a four-generation family.

    PubMed

    Braddock, S R; Henley, K M; Potter, K L; Nguyen, H G; Huang, T H

    2000-06-19

    Tertiary trisomy, or double trisomy, is a rare occurrence. We present two individuals with a previously unreported tertiary trisomy for chromosomes 5p and 21q in an eight-generation pedigree. Their phenotypes are compared with other partial trisomies of either 5p or 21q from the literature. The propositus was diagnosed with trisomy 21 at 2 years of age after a karyotype study for short stature and developmental delay. His phenotype was described as atypical for Down syndrome. He presented at 9 years of age because of pervasive behavioral problems and obesity. He was brachycephalic with a flattened nasal bridge, but he lacked other characteristics of trisomy 21. Because of lack of phenotypic evidence of Down syndrome, a repeat karyotype was obtained and showed 47,XY, +der(21)t(5;21)(p15.1; q22.1), incorporating partial trisomies of both chromosomes 5 and 21. Mother had a balanced translocation, 46, XX,t(5;21)(p15.1; q22.1); 8 other relatives were examined. The translocation originated from the maternal great-grandmother, but only the propositus and his mentally retarded aunt had a similar phenotye and the derivative chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed absence of band 21q22.2 in the derivative chromosome of the propositus and his aunt, indicating that neither had trisomy for the Down syndrome critical region. These cases represent a unique double partial trisomy of chromosome arms 5p and 21q that occurred because of 3:1 malsegregation of a reciprocal translocation. These cases further demonstrate that phenotypic discordance with cytogenetic results dictate further investigation using advanced cytogenetic hybridization.

  15. Pyramidal tract abnormalities in the human fetus and infant with trisomy 18 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hajime; Miyata, Mio; Ohama, Eisaku

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome is known to exhibit various developmental abnormalities in the central nervous system. We report dominant uncrossed pyramidal tract in trisomy 18 syndrome, based on the postmortem neuropathologic study of eight consecutive autopsied fetuses and infants with trisomy 18 ranging in age from 16 to 39 weeks of gestation, including six males and two females, along with autopsy cases of a stillborn triploid infant with 69XXX and two stillborn infants without chromosomal or neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Five out of eight cases with trisomy 18 showed a larger proportion of uncrossed than crossed pyramidal tract. All of these cases were male, and the anterior corticospinal tract on one side was constantly larger than the contralateral lateral corticospinal tract in the spinal cord on both sides, while the pyramidal tract was hypoplastic in female cases with trisomy 18 and a case with 69XXX. Abnormal pyramidal decussation has been found in cases with posterior fossa malformations such as occipital encephaloceles, Dandy-Walker malformation, Joubert syndrome and Möbius syndrome, but has not been described in cases with trisomy 18. Our data, together with the previous reports describing uncrossed aberrant ipsilateral pyramidal tract in patients with congenital mirror movements caused by DCC gene mutation in chromosome 18, and hypolasia and hyperplasia of the pyramidal tract in X-linked recessive disorders caused by L1CAM and Kal1 gene mutations, respectively, suggest a role of trisomy 18 in association with X-chromosome in the abnormal development of the pyramidal tract.

  16. Recurrent trisomy and Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 14 in murine iPS cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Xiaoyun; Rudolph, Cornelia; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Ding; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Mai, Sabine; Wang, Gang; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have greatly provoked people's interest due to their enormous potential of clinical applications. Increasing care is taken with the genetic safety of iPS cells. However, up to now, the chromosomal integrity of murine iPS (miPS) cells has been largely unknown. We have observed recurrent trisomy and/or Robertsonian translocation (Rb) of chromosome 14 in six out of nine independent miPS cell lines from three laboratories by G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) analyses, while all the miPS cell lines were derived from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or neural precursor cells (NPCs) with a normal karyotype. The miPS cells with trisomy and/or Rb of chromosome 14 showed growth advantage over the miPS cells with a normal karyotype. We found a significantly higher frequency of Rbs in the miPS cell lines induced with c-Myc than those without c-Myc. Our findings demonstrate that miPS cell lines have the propensity for chromosomal aberrations and there is an obvious correlation between the extent of chromosomal aberrations in miPS cells and the transcriptional factors used for their reprogramming. Therefore, our study raises awareness of the need for improvements of the induction conditions of miPS cells in order to avoid the chromosomal aberrations and ensure future safe applications.

  17. Turner syndrome and 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Akbas, E; Mutluhan, H; Savasoglu, K; Soylemez, F; Ozturk, I; Yazici, G

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of double aneuploidy is a relatively rare phenomenon. We report on a 17-year-old woman with short stature, minimal pubic and axillar hair and short hands. In cultured lymphocyte a double aneuploidy mosaicism was detected, consisting of a cell line with trisomy for X chromosome and a cell line with monosomy for the X-chromosome and no cell line with a normal karyotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of mosaic 45,X/47,XXX in Turkey.

  18. A case-control study of brain structure and behavioral characteristics in 47,XXX syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lenroot, R K; Blumenthal, J D; Wallace, G L; Clasen, L S; Lee, N R; Giedd, J N

    2014-11-01

    Trisomy X, the presence of an extra X chromosome in females (47,XXX), is a relatively common but under-recognized chromosomal disorder associated with characteristic cognitive and behavioral features of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine whether there were neuroanatomical differences in girls with Trisomy X that could relate to cognitive and behavioral differences characteristic of the disorder during childhood and adolescence. MRI scans were obtained on 35 girls with Trisomy X (mean age 11.4, SD 5.5) and 70 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cognitive and behavioral testing was also performed. Trisomy X girls underwent a semi-structured psychiatric interview. Regional brain volumes and cortical thickness were compared between the two groups. Total brain volume was significantly decreased in subjects with Trisomy X, as were all regional volumes with the exception of parietal gray matter. Differences in cortical thickness had a mixed pattern. The subjects with Trisomy X had thicker cortex in bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and right medial temporal lobe, but decreased cortical thickness in both lateral temporal lobes. The most common psychiatric disorders present in this sample of Trisomy X girls included anxiety disorders (40%), attention-deficit disorder (17%) and depressive disorders (11%). The most strongly affected brain regions are consistent with phenotypic characteristics such as language delay, poor executive function and heightened anxiety previously described in population-based studies of Trisomy X and also found in our sample.

  19. A case-control study of brain structure and behavioral characteristics in 47,XXX Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Wallace, Gregory L.; Clasen, Liv S.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2014-01-01

    Trisomy X, the presence of an extra X chromosome in females (47,XXX), is a relatively common but under-recognized chromosomal disorder associated with characteristic cognitive and behavioral features of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine whether there were neuroanatomical differences in girls with Trisomy X that could relate to cognitive and behavioral differences characteristic of the disorder during childhood and adolescence. MRI scans were obtained on 35 girls with Trisomy X (mean age 11.4, s.d. 5.5) and 70 age- and sex- matched healthy controls. Cognitive and behavioral testing was also performed. Trisomy X girls underwent a semi-structured psychiatric interview. Regional brain volumes and cortical thickness were compared between the two groups. Total brain volume was significantly decreased in subjects with Trisomy X, as were all regional volumes with the exception of parietal gray matter. Differences in cortical thickness had a mixed pattern. The subjects with Trisomy X had thicker cortex in bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and right medial temporal lobe, but decreased cortical thickness in both lateral temporal lobes. The most common psychiatric disorders present in this sample of Trisomy X girls included anxiety disorders, (40%), Attention-Deficit Disorder (17%), and depressive disorders (11%). The most strongly affected brain regions are consistent with phenotypic characteristics such as language delay, poor executive function, and heightened anxiety previously described in population-based studies of Trisomy X and also found in our sample. PMID:25287572

  20. MYC amplification in two further cases of acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 4 and double minute chromosomes.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, F; Rayeroux, K; Cole-Sinclair, M; Tong, M; Campbell, L J

    1999-03-01

    We report two cases of trisomy 4 with double minute chromosomes (dmin): one in a woman with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), French-American-British subtype M2, the other in a man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. In the former case, many cells without trisomy 4 but with dmin were present, a finding not observed in previously reported cases. In both cases, fluorescence in situ hybridization studies demonstrated the double minutes to be MYC amplicons. Ten cases of AML with trisomy 4 and dmin have now been described; in the five cases investigated, the dmin have been shown to be amplified MYC gene sequences.

  1. Allelic methylation status of CpG islands on chromosome 21q in patients with Trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin-Yin; Ding, Yu-Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Chen, Xue-Mei; Cheng, Shu-Qun; Li, Lian-Bing; Ma, Ming-Fu; He, Jun-Lin; Wang, Ying-Xiong

    2014-05-01

    Trisomy 21 is a chromosomal condition caused by the presence of all or part of an extra 21st chromosome. There has been limited research into the DNA methylation status of CpG islands (CGIs) in trisomy 21, therefore, exploring the DNA methylation status of CGIs in 21q is essential for the development of a series of potential epigenetic biomarkers for prenatal screening of trisomy 21. First, DNA sequences of CGIs in 21q from the USCS database were obtained and 149 sequences and 148 pairs of primers in the BGI YH database were aligned. All 300 cases were analyzed by a heavy methyl-polymerase chain reaction (HM-PCR) assay and a comparison of the DNA methylation status of CGIs was made between trisomy 21 and the control. The HM-PCR assay results did not show a difference in the DNA methylation status between individuals with trisomy 21 and the control. In total, there were 11 CGIs that showed various DNA methylation statuses between Japanese and Chinese patients. Subsequently, bisulfite genomic sequencing found variations in the methylation status of CpG dinucleotides in CGIs (nos. 14, 75, 109, 134 and 146) between trisomy 21 and the control. The different DNA methylation status of CpG dinucleotides in CGIs may be a potential epigenetic marker for diagnosing trisomy 21. No difference was identified in the DNA methylation status of 21q CGIs among Chinese individuals with trisomy 21 and the control. The homogeneity of the DNA methylation status of 21q CGIs in Chinese patients indicates that DNA methylation is likely to be an epigenetic marker distinguishing ethnicities.

  2. Trisomy 14pter --> q21: a case with associated ovarian germ cell tumor and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee-Jones, Lisa; Williams, Tom; Little, Elizabeth; Sampson, Julian

    2004-07-01

    We report a patient with trisomy X and a supernumerary marker chromosome. The marker chromosome was characterized by comparative genomic hybridization and shown to be derived from chromosome 14, resulting in trisomy for 14pter --> q21. The karyotype was thus redefined as 48,XXX,+mar.rev ish enh(14pterq21). The patient presented with facial dysmorphism and a high-pitched cry, exhibited severe developmental delay, and developed an aggressive ovarian immature teratoma. In this paper, we also review reports of 11 other patients with constitutional trisomy of the same chromosomal region. Previous studies have identified somatic gains of chromosome 14 in ovarian germ cell tumors. We propose that the constitutional gain of chromosomal 14 material may have predisposed to the development of this tumor.

  3. Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy: XXY, XXX, XYY, and XXYY

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole R.; Ayari, Natalie; Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Boada, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective Attentional problems, hyperactivity, and impulsivity have been described as behavioral features associated with sex chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). In this study, the authors compare attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in 167 participants aged 6 to 20 years with 4 types of SCA (XXY n = 56, XYY n = 33, XXX n = 25, and XXYY n = 53). They also evaluate factors associated with ADHD symptomatology (cognitive and adaptive scores, prenatal vs postnatal ascertainment) and describe the clinical response to psychopharmacologic medications in a subset of patients treated for ADHD. Methods Evaluation included medical and developmental history, cognitive and adaptive functioning assessment, and parent and teacher ADHD questionnaires containing DSM-IV criteria. Results In the total study group, 58% (96/167) met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD on parent-report questionnaires (36% in XXY, 52% in XXX, 76% in XYY, and 72% in XXYY). The Inattentive subtype was most common in XXY and XXX, whereas the XYY and XXYY groups were more likely to also have hyperactive/impulsive symptoms. There were no significant differences in Verbal, Performance, or Full Scale IQ between children with symptom scores in the ADHD range compared with those below the ADHD range. However, adaptive functioning scores were significantly lower in the group whose scores in the ADHD range were compared with those of the group who did not meet ADHD DSMIV criteria. Those with a prenatal diagnosis of XXY were less likely to meet criteria for ADHD compared with the postnatally diagnosed group. Psychopharmacologic treatment with stimulants was effective in 78.6% (66/84). Conclusions Children and adolescents with SCA are at increased risk for ADHD symptoms. Recommendations for ADHD evaluation and treatment in consideration of other aspects of the SCA medical and behavioral phenotype are provided. PMID:22333574

  4. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K.; Wilkerson, C.; Meisner, L. |

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Partial X chromosome trisomy with functional disomy of Xp due to failure of X inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Gustashaw, K.M.; Zurcher, V.; Dickerman, L.H.; Stallard, R.; Willard, H.F.

    1994-10-15

    A 5-month-old girl with mild phenotypic abnormalities, developmental delay, and seizures was found to have the de novo karyotype 46,XX,-13,+der(13)t(X;13)(p21.2;p11.1). The partial trisomy of Xp21.2 {yields} pter was confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization, using an X chromosome painting probe and several cosmid and YAC probes for Xp sequences. Replication banding showed that one of the structurally normal X chromosomes was late-replicating, but that the Xp segment of the der(13) was early-replicating in all cells examined. Since segments of the X chromosome separated from the X inactivation center in Xq13.2 cannot undergo X inactivation, the result is functional disomy of distal Xp. As the loss of short arm material from chromosome 13 is not considered to be clinically significant, the genomic imbalance of Xp expressed in this patient most likely accounts for her abnormal phenotype. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Trisomy 6 and double minute chromosomes in a case of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sambani, C; Trafalis, D T; Vessalas, G; Politis, G; Peristeris, P; Nakopoulou, L; Giannopoulou, J; Michaelidis, C; Ayoutantis, M; Pantelias, G E

    1998-10-15

    A 65-year-old woman with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was shown to have trisomy 6 and multiple double minute chromosomes. The patient had no history of prior exposure to any mutagenic or carcinogenic agents. To our knowledge, this is the first report for presence of only these two aberrations. The expression of several oncoproteins and onco-related proteins was detected immunohistochemically in bone marrow cells. Among them, only the bcl-2 oncoprotein was positively stained in 100% of myeloblasts. Although the c-myc oncogene is frequently reported to be overexpressed in myeloid disorders with double minutes and associated with chemotherapy resistance and disease aggressiveness, in our case, the c-myc oncoprotein was not positively expressed. The patient received chemotherapy and complete hematological remission was successfully achieved.

  7. Partial trisomy of chromosome 22 resulting from a supernumerary marker chromosome 22 in a child with features of cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bélien, Valérie; Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Serero, Stéphane; Le Dû, Nathalie; Baumann, Clarisse; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Dupont, Céline; Krabchi, Kada; Drunat, Séverine; Elbez, Annie; Janaud, Jean-Claude; Benzacken, Brigitte; Verloes, Alain; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Aboura, Azzedine

    2008-07-15

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes are present in about 0.05% of the human population. In approximately 28% of persons with these markers (excluding the approximately 60% derived from one of the acrocentric chromosomes), an abnormal phenotype is observed. We report on a 3-month-old girl with intrauterine growth retardation, craniofacial features, hypotonia, partial coloboma of iris and total anomalous pulmonary venous return. Cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome, identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization as part of chromosome 22, and conferring a proximal partial trisomy 22q22.21, not encompassing the DiGeorge critical region (RP11-154H4 + , TBX1-). This observation adds new information relevant to cat eye syndrome and partial trisomy of 22q.

  8. Down syndrome and the molecular pathogenesis resulting from trisomy of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Aarti; Wiseman, Frances; Sheppard, Olivia; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2010-03-01

    Chromosome copy number aberrations, anueploidies, are common in the human population but generally lethal. However, trisomy of human chromosome 21 is compatible with life and people born with this form of aneuploidy manifest the features of Down syndrome, named after Langdon Down who was a 19(th) century British physician who first described a group of people with this disorder. Down syndrome includes learning and memory deficits in all cases, as well as many other features which vary in penetrance and expressivity in different people. While Down syndrome clearly has a genetic cause - the extra dose of genes on chromosome 21 - we do not know which genes are important for which aspects of the syndrome, which biochemical pathways are disrupted, or, generally how design therapies to ameliorate the effects of these disruptions. Recently, with new insights gained from studying mouse models of Down syndrome, specific genes and pathways are being shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder. This is opening the way for exciting new studies of potential therapeutics for aspects of Down syndrome, particularly the learning and memory deficits.

  9. Down syndrome and the molecular pathogenesis resulting from trisomy of human chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Aarti; Wiseman, Frances; Sheppard, Olivia; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome copy number aberrations, anueploidies, are common in the human population but generally lethal. However, trisomy of human chromosome 21 is compatible with life and people born with this form of aneuploidy manifest the features of Down syndrome, named after Langdon Down who was a 19th century British physician who first described a group of people with this disorder. Down syndrome includes learning and memory deficits in all cases, as well as many other features which vary in penetrance and expressivity in different people. While Down syndrome clearly has a genetic cause - the extra dose of genes on chromosome 21 - we do not know which genes are important for which aspects of the syndrome, which biochemical pathways are disrupted, or, generally how design therapies to ameliorate the effects of these disruptions. Recently, with new insights gained from studying mouse models of Down syndrome, specific genes and pathways are being shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder. This is opening the way for exciting new studies of potential therapeutics for aspects of Down syndrome, particularly the learning and memory deficits. PMID:23554618

  10. Chromosomes and causation of human cancer and leukemia. XXX. Banding studies of primary intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Sonta, S; Sandberg, A A

    1978-01-01

    The chromosomes of 15 primary intestinal tumors were analyzed with a banding technique. Of the 15 tumors, 12 had some chromosomal abnormalities (8 with numerical changes and 4 with both numerical and structural abnormalities) and in the remaining three no karyotypic abnormalities were found. No common marker chromosomes were seen among the various tumors and no two tumors with chromosomal changes and identical karyotypes, though some chromosomes were involved more often than others. Excessive chromosomes in the primary tumors were usually due to extra chromosomes in the following groups (numbers of tumors involved are shown in parenthesis): No. 8 (7), No. 13 (4), No. 15 (4), No. 17 (6) and No. 21 (6). On the other hand, chromosomes losses, though much less frequent, involved chromosomes No. 5, No. 6, No. 7, No. 10 and No. 16. Most of the tumor cells with chromosomal changes were hyperdiploid and usually contained less than 60 chromosomes. Only one tumor contained hypodiploid cells. The cytogenetic data presented on primary intestinal tumors indicate that they consist primarily of numerical changes, relative infrequency (when compared to metastases) and small number (1-4) of markers.

  11. Trisomy of chromosome 16p13.3 due to an unbalanced insertional translocation into chromosome 22p13.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Thomy; Aerssens, Peter; Vermeesch, Joris R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    A dysmorphic boy with severe mental retardation was found on array CGH to have an insertional translocation of chromosome 16p13.3 into the short arm of chromosome 22, karyotype 46,XY,.ish der(22),ins(22;16)(p13;p13.3p13.3) de novo. His clinical features overlap with the reported cases of 'duplication 16p' syndrome, namely a round face, hypertelorism, a long philtrum, micrognathia, a thin upper lip, a posterior cleft palate and low set, simple ears, clubbed feet, severe developmental delay, psychomotor retardation and seizures. This 4-year boy with trisomy 16p13.3 has the smallest duplication reported of this critical region, which could not be detected without array CGH. The maximal duplicated region is gene rich and contains about 80 genes and/or candidate genes. Assignment of the genes that contribute to the observed phenotype awaits the characterisation of other patients with small duplications in this region.

  12. Partial trisomy 5q resulting from chromosome 7 insertion: An expansion of the phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, M.H.; Reilly, P.A.; Williams, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 5q has been categorized into three separate phenotypes; however, a distinctive phenotype has not been described for duplications spanning 5q23-q35. We report a case of partial trisomy 5q for this region as a result of a ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1)mat. The liveborn male infant was delivered by emergency cesarean section at 37 weeks after a pregnancy notable for oligohydramnios, with birth weight 1792 g (<3%). Postnatal course was marked by psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and biopsy demonstrated neonatal giant cell hepatitis with a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts. His appearance was remarkable for lack of subcutaneous fat, midline displaced hair whorl, bitemporal narrowing with frontal bossing, wide anterior fontanel, widow`s peak, protuberant eyes with periorbital and lid edema, short flat nasal bridge with broad flattened nasal tip, long smooth philtrum, wide mouth with thin lips, wide gingival ridges, micrognathia, posteriorly rotated low-set ears, hepatomegaly, flexion contractions of elbows, and generalized hypertonicity. Urine organic acids, oligosaccharide/mucopolysaccharide screen, and plasma amino acids were negative. GTG-banding on prometaphase chromosomes showed an unbalanced translocation involving chr. 7. This was identified as an insertion of chr. 5 (q23.2q35.1) into distal 7q after FISH using chr. 5 and chr. 7 painting probes. The infant`s mother carries the balanced insertional rearrangement: 46,XX,dir ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1). This phenotype overlaps that of previously described duplications with the addition of giant cell hepatitis, coarsened facial features, gingival thickening, and flexion contractures, suggestive of a yet undiagnosed storage disorder.

  13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 in a baby with trisomy 2 mosaicism in amniotic fluid culture

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.; Eisenger, K.; Brown, S.

    1995-08-28

    We describe the first case of a baby with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2. Growth failure, hypothyroidism, and hyaline membrane disease were present at birth, and the first year of life was complicated by bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At age 14 months, motor and intellectual development were normal, but growth remained below the 10th centile. The baby was investigated for uniparental disomy because trisomy 2 mosaicism had been detected in a second trimester amniocentesis. This is the first reported case in which amniotic fluid chromosome mosaicism has been associated with uniparental disomy. Implications for prenatal diagnosis are considered. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 in a baby with trisomy 2 mosaicism in amniotic fluid culture

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.B.; Eisenger, K.; Brown, S.

    1994-09-01

    We describe the first case of a baby with maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 2. Growth failure, hypothyroidism and hyaline membrane disease were present at birth, and the first year of life was complicated by bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At 14 months, motor and intellectual development appear to be normal, but growth remains below the 10th percentile. The baby was investigated for uniparental disomy because trisomy 2 mosaicism had been detected in a second trimester amniocentesis. This is the first reported case in which amniotic fluid chromosome mosaicism has been associated with uniparental disomy. Implications for prenatal diagnosis are considered.

  15. The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klinefelter syndrome (KS), caused by XXY karyotype, is characterized by low testosterone, infertility, cognitive deficits, and increased prevalence of health problems including obesity and diabetes. It has been difficult to separate direct genetic effects from hormonal effects in human studies or in mouse models of KS because low testosterone levels are confounded with sex chromosome complement. Methods In this study, we present the Sex Chromosome Trisomy (SCT) mouse model that produces XXY, XYY, XY, and XX mice in the same litters, each genotype with either testes or ovaries. The independence of sex chromosome complement and gonadal type allows for improved recognition of sex chromosome effects that are not dependent on levels of gonadal hormones. All mice were gonadectomized and treated with testosterone for 3 weeks. Body weight, body composition, and motor function were measured. Results Before hormonal manipulation, XXY mice of both sexes had significantly greater body weight and relative fat mass compared to XY mice. After gonadectomy and testosterone replacement, XXY mice (both sexes) still had significantly greater body weight and relative fat mass, but less relative lean mass compared to XY mice. Liver, gonadal fat pad, and inguinal fat pad weights were also higher in XXY mice, independent of gonadal sex. In several of these measures, XX mice also differed from XY mice, and gonadal males and females differed significantly on almost every metabolic measure. The sex chromosome effects (except for testis size) were also seen in gonadally female mice before and after ovariectomy and testosterone treatment, indicating that they do not reflect group differences in levels of testicular secretions. XYY mice were similar to XY mice on body weight and metabolic variables but performed worse on motor tasks compared to other groups. Conclusions We find that the new SCT mouse model for XXY and XYY recapitulates features found in humans with these aneuploidies

  16. Early Bilateral Gonadoblastoma in a Young Child with Mosaicism for Turner Syndrome and Trisomy 18 with Y Chromosome.

    PubMed

    MacMahon, Jayne M; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; McDermott, Michael; Quinn, Feargal; Morris, Thomas; Green, Andrew J; Betts, David R; O'Connell, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    Mosaic Turner syndrome (TSM) commonly occurs in the form of 45,X/46,XX and 45,X/46,X,i(X)(q10). Mosaicism for a Y chromosome, 45,X/46,XY, has been well documented and is associated with increased risk of gonadoblastoma (GB). To date, there are only six reported cases of TSM with a trisomy 18 karyotype, and only two of these were phenotypically female with 45,X/47,XY,+18 karyotype. We present the case of a phenotypically female infant born with dysmorphic features. G-banded karyotype and interphase FISH of blood showed 45,X in 95% and 47,XY,+18 (trisomy 18) in 5% of cells analysed. However, interphase FISH of buccal cells showed only the presence of the 45,X cell line. Due to the presence of Y chromosome material, elective gonadectomy was performed at 13 months of age. There were bilateral streak ovaries with early evidence of GB bilaterally, a rudimentary uterus and bilateral fallopian tubes with unilateral ectopic adrenal tissue identified histologically. Interphase FISH of the gonadal tissue was similar to the blood findings with 45,X in 86% of cells and 47,XY,+18 in 14% of cells analysed. This case highlights a rare karyotype of TSM and trisomy 18 in the same patient and is the first reporting the associated finding of bilateral GB.

  17. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X): A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girls with Trisomy X), 58 children with ASD and 106…

  18. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13; 14) trisomy 14

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E.; Blouin, J.L.; Maher, J.; Avramopoulos, D.; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C.C. Jr. )

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. The authors recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hyperchloesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, they have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed -- and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed -- that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a [open quotes]maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome[close quotes] is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Hormonal studies in a male with a 47,XXX chromosome constitution: comparison with the hormonal pattern of a 46,XX male and patients with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borghi, A; Forti, G; Fusi, S; Bigozzi, U; Giusti, G

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts of a 18 year old chromatin-positive man showed a 47,XXX karyotype. The following hormonal studies were performed: 1) FSH and LH response to GnRH; 2) hypothalamic-pituitary responsiveness to short-term testosterone administration; 3) plasma levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, estradiol before and after hCG stimulation. Results were compared with similar studies performed in a 46,XX male and in a group of patients with Klinefelter's syndrome. Our data support the hypothesis that this rare cytogenetical disorder can be considered, from the endocrine point of view, as a variant of the Klinefelter's syndrome.

  20. Analysis of DNA haplotypes suggests a genetic predisposition to trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, S E; Kittur, S D; Metaxotou, C; Watkins, P C; Patel, A S

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic predisposition to nondisjunction and trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21, we used DNA polymorphism haplotypes for chromosomes 21 to examine the distribution of different chromosomes 21 in Down syndrome and control families from the same ethnic group. The chromosomes 21 from 20 Greek families with a Down syndrome child and 27 control Greek families have been examined for DNA polymorphism haplotypes by using four common polymorphic sites adjacent to two closely linked single-copy DNA sequences (namely pW228C and pW236B), which map somewhere near the proximal long arm of chromosome 21. Three haplotypes, +, +---, and - with respective frequencies of 43/108, 24/108, and 23/108, account for the majority of chromosomes 21 in the control families. However, haplotype - was found to be much more commonly associated with chromosomes 21 that underwent nondisjunction in the Down syndrome families (frequency of 21/50; X2 for the two distributions is 9.550; P = 0.023; degrees of freedom, 3). The two populations (control and trisomic families) did not differ in the distribution of haplotypes for two DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 17. The data from this initial study suggest that the chromosome 21, which is marked in Greeks with haplotype - for the four above described polymorphic sites, is found more commonly in chromosomes that participate in nondisjunction than in controls. We propose an increased tendency for nondisjunction due to DNA sequences associated with a subset of chromosomes 21 bearing this haplotype. Images PMID:2987923

  1. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  2. Autosomal Trisomies and Partial Trisomy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, W. A.

    1963-01-01

    The establishing of 46 chromosomes as the normal complement in man and the report of the sex chromatin bodies in buccal smears were followed by reports of trisomies and other abnormal patterns of the X and Y chromosomes in Klinefelter's and Turner's syndromes. Abnormal autosomal complements were described in mongolism, in the E-trisomy syndrome, the D-trisomy syndrome, in the Sturge-Weber syndrome, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, benign congenital hypotonia, atrial septal defect and in the schizoid personality. Certain of these conditions, as well as the “oral-facial-digital” syndrome, were also found to exist as partial trisomies. The mechanism of a trisomy is one of non-disjunction and of partial trisomy translocation or insertion. Two cases of the partial trisomy in the E group are described; these are of especial interest because of the familial incidence, longer survival and male sex occurrence, features which are rarely seen in the full E-trisomy syndrome. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:20327419

  3. Development of mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome in a patient with trisomy X.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M; Ikeda, K; Nakamura, T; Iwamoto, T; Furuta, S; Nakajima, H

    2015-10-01

    Increased risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been reported in patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Here, we describe a 16-year-old Japanese patient with trisomy X (47,XXX) who developed mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Sjögren's syndrome. She had polyarthritis, edematous fingers with Raynaud's phenomenon, sicca syndrome, interstitial lung disease, possible myositis, and was positive for anti-nuclear antibody, anti-nRNP antibody and rheumatoid factor. This is the first report in the literature of a case of MCTD with female polysomy X, which further supports the link between the presence of extra X chromosome(s) and the development of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: trisomy 13

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health ... trisomy 13 result from having three copies of chromosome 13 in each cell in the body instead ...

  5. Ultrasound manifestations of unusual trisomies-excluding trisomy 13, 18, and 21: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri; Cheng, Edith; Dubinsky, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    Trisomy is the most commonly identified chromosome abnormality, occurring in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies (1). Most of the trisomies are associated with a single additional chromosome, although 2 other types of trisomic conceptions are occasionally observed, those with 2 additional chromosomes or double trisomy and those with both a normal and trisomic cell line or mosaic trisomies. The adverse effects of trisomy on the phenotype are well established. In this review article, we consider the prevalence of the unusual trisomies (excluding 13, 18, and 21) and present a review of their ultrasound findings.

  6. Overdosage of Hand2 causes limb and heart defects in the human chromosomal disorder partial trisomy distal 4q.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Hosoya, Masaki; Fujita, Motoi; Iida, Tomoko; Amano, Takanori; Maeno, Akiteru; Kataoka, Taro; Otsuka, Taketo; Tanaka, Shigekazu; Tomizawa, Shuichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2013-06-15

    Partial trisomy distal 4q (denoted 4q+) is a human chromosomal disorder caused by duplication of the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 4 (Chr4). This disorder manifests typical phenotypes, including craniofacial, renal, heart and thumb developmental defects. Although these clinical features are likely caused by a dosage imbalance in the gene network involving the trisomic region, the causative gene or genes and the molecular bases are largely unknown. Here, we report mouse Recombination-induced mutation 4 (Rim4) as a model animal of 4q+. The Rim4 genome contains an insertion of a 6.5 Mb fragment from mouse chromosome 8 into chromosome 6. This insertion fragment contains 17 genes, including Hand2, that encode the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor and is syntenic to the distal end of human Chr4, 4q32.3 to 4q34.1, which is responsible for 4q+. A comparison of phenotypes between patients with Rim4 and 4q+ revealed that Rim4 shows direct parallels with many phenotypes of 4q+ such as craniofacial, heart, cervical vertebra and limb deformities. Rebalancing the gene dosage by a genetic cross with Hand2 knockout mice ameliorated symptoms of the heart and limb deformities of Rim4. Conversely, an increase in copy number of Hand2 in wild-type mice recaptures the heart and limb deformities of Rim4. Our results collectively demonstrate that overdosage of Hand2 is a major cause for at least the limb and heart phenotypes of 4q+ and that mouse Rim4 provides a unique animal model for understanding the molecular bases underlying the complex phenotypes of 4q+.

  7. Trisomy 18p caused by a supernumerary marker with a chromosome 13/21 centromere: a possible recurrent chromosome aberration.

    PubMed

    Plaja, Alberto; Lloveras, Elisabet; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Barreña, Beatriz; Del Campo, Miguel; Fernández, Asunción; Herrero, Marta; Barranco, Laura; Palau, Nuria; López-Aríztegui, M Asunción; Català, Vicenç; Tejada, Maria-Isabel

    2013-09-01

    We present a clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of two new patients with a complex supernumerary marker consisting of the entire short arm of chromosome 18 with a chromosome 13/21 centromere. One patient is a girl with a nonsyndromic intellectual disability and the second is a prenatally diagnosed fetus. To our knowledge, these are the fourth and fifth such cases to be described in the literature, suggesting the existence of a possible recurring constitutional structural chromosome abnormality.

  8. Characterization of a de novo complex chromosomal rearrangement in a patient with cri-du-chat and trisomy 5p syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Escalona, Ariadna; Ballesta-Martínez, María J; Fuster, Carme; Fernández, Asunción; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2009-11-01

    Two syndromes with abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 5 have been described: cri-du-chat (resulting from 5p deletion) and trisomy 5p. We report for the first time a patient with both syndromes, resulting from a complex chromosomal rearrangement with an inverted duplication of 5p13.1-p14.2, a deletion of 5p14.2-pter, and a duplication of 5p12, characterized by array-CGH and BAC clones. The patient showed phenotypic characteristics of both syndromes and died at 3 months of age as a result of cardiorespiratory failure, probably associated with the clinical severity of the trisomy 5p syndrome. We propose a potential causative mechanism for this rearrangement.

  9. Trisomy 21 with XYY.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Ramesh C; Muranjan, Mamta N; Swami, Savita

    2002-11-01

    A case of double aneuploidy involving chromosome 21 and Y is reported in an eight-month-old infant with developmental delay and failure to thrive. Patient had all classical phenotypical features of trisomy 21 except, absence of epicanthal folds. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytogenetic study performed on peripheral blood leucocyte culture using G-banding. Literature review revealed only 17 cases of XYY and trisomy 21 reported so far. No such case is reported in Indian literature. Relevant literature is reviewed and possible effects of trisomy 21 on XYY and that of XYY on trisomy 21 has been discussed. A routine chromosomal study even in patient with classical features of Down syndrome has been advocated. Interestingly, our patient also had left to right shunts at atrial and ductal level and tricuspid regurgitation. Given the rarity of the disorder and scanty published data the incidence, phenotype and recurrence risk are difficult to establish.

  10. Normal phenotype and partial trisomy for the G positive region of chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, A

    1979-01-01

    A prenatally diagnosed male fetus and his mother, who was referred because of her advanced age, both carried an abnormal bisatellited chromosome 21 as an extra chromosome. The abnormal 21 was monocentric and the G negative band q22 and part of q21 had been deleted during formation. The phenotype of both the mother and child (at birth) was normal. Images PMID:157396

  11. Double nondisjunction in maternal meiosis II giving rise to a fetus with 48,XXX,+21

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, R.R.; Shulman, L.P.; Tharapel, A.T.

    1994-09-01

    The occurrence of multiple aneuploidy is quite rare, and the mechanisms by which it arises have not been well-characterized except in cases of 49,XXXXX and 49,XXXXY. These originate by successive nondisjunction of the X chromosomes in meiosis I and meiosis II, giving rise to a gamete with four X chromosomes. Here, we describe a case of double trisomy involving chromosome 21 and the X chromosome. The 19-year-old patient underwent amniocentesis at 17.5 weeks gestation following a positive serum analyte screen (estimated 1/120 risk of Down syndrome). Ultrasound findings at the time of the procedure were ventricular septal defect, dilated renal calyx, clinodactyly, and a two-vessel cord. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a nonmosaic karyotype of 48,XXX,+21. The couple opted for pregnancy termination. A comfimatory karyotype could not be obtained due to microbial contamination of the products of conception. Therefore, we used a {open_quotes}touch prep{close_quotes} procedure to deposit fetal cells on microscope slides and performed interphase FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) to confirm the presence of three X chromosomes and three copies of chromosome 21. Microsatellite polymorphisms in the mother, father, and fetus were used to evaluate segregation of the X and 21 chromosomes. Based on the results obtained with the most centromeric loci, both extra chromosomes arose from nondisjunction in maternal meiosis II. More distal markers showed evidence of recombination in both chromosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a double trisomy arising by this mechanism. Based on our results and those reported for tetrasomy/pentasomy X, we postulate that multiple aneuploidies are more likely to arise by related errors (involving a single chromosome or a single cell division) than by independent errors (in different cell divisions or different gametes).

  12. Y-chromosome disomy and trisomy in scarabaeid and cerambycid beetles.

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, A M; Dutrillaux, B

    2011-01-01

    In a series of about 500 specimens, including 420 males, of karyotyped Polyphaga beetles, 5 males with chromosome Y aneuploidy were detected. One male of each Dicronorrhina derbyana oberthuri (Scarabaeidae), Agapanthia violacea and Morimus funereus (Cerambycidae) were XYY, and 2 probably related and sterile males of Marmylida marginella (Scarabaeidae) were XYYY. These and literature data suggest that Y chromosome aneuploidies are much more frequent in polyphagan beetles than any other group of animals with an XY/XX sex determinism. The origin of this particularity probably lies in the unique mode of sex chromosome association at meiosis I: it is not synaptic but realized through nucleolar proteins forming the well-known parachute-like structure (Xy(p)). This has 2 possible consequences. The first one is the regular association of several sex chromosomes at metaphase I and segregation at anaphase I. It allows, for instance, XYY (Xyy(p)) males to procreate XYY sons. The second consequence is the occasional remain of nucleolar proteins embedding sex chromosomes in spermatocytes II. We propose that it could impede the correct segregation of Y chromatids after centromere split at anaphase II, and contribute to form YY gametes by XY males and YYY gametes by XYY males. The tendency for increasing the number of Ys would not be strongly limited at the XY level, but only at the XYY level by male infertility at higher Y ploidies.

  13. A patient with mosaic partial trisomy 18 resulting from dicentric chromosome breakage.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Medne, Livija; Bentley, Tyrone; Owens, Nancy L; Geiger, Elizabeth; Pipan, Mary; Zackai, Elaine H; Shaikh, Tamim; Spinner, Nancy B

    2005-08-30

    We present a patient with minor dysmorphic features and a mosaic karyotype with two different abnormal cell lines, both involving abnormalities of chromosome 18. Twenty percent of cells studied (4/20) had 46 chromosomes with a large derivative pseudoisodicentric chromosome 18. This chromosome was deleted for 18pter and duplicated for part of proximal 18p (18p11.2 based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies and all of 18q. The two copies of portions of chromosome 18 were fused in an inverted fashion (duplicated for 18qter->18p11.3). The smaller der(18) was present in 80% of cells studied (16/20) and had a normal q-arm, while the p-arm was missing the subtelomere region but had duplication of a part of 18p. FISH studies showed that the larger derivative 18 contained the 18q subtelomere at each end, but the 18p subtelomere was absent, consistent with fusion of two regions within 18p resulting in deletion of the subtelomeric regions. The smaller der(18) was also missing the 18p subtelomere (with normal 18q as expected). Further testing with BAC clones mapping within 18p11.2 showed that these sequences were duplicated and inverted in both of the der(18)s. These findings lead us to hypothesize that the smaller der(18) was derived from the larger, dicentric 18 following anaphase bridge formation, with breakage distal to the duplicated segment.

  14. [Gonosomal trisomy syndrome. Five case reports and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Schwemmle, C; Jungheim, M; Ptok, M

    2013-11-01

    Gonosomal trisomies (GT) or so called sex chromosome trisomies (SCTs) are the most common chromosomal abnormalities in humans. The addition of extra X and/or Y chromosomes leads to neurodevelopmental differences, with increased risk for developmental delays, cognitive impairments, executive dysfunction, and behavioural and psychological disorders. Attentional problems, hyperactivity, autistic spectrum disorders and impulsivity are commonly described. Rates of language and communication problems are high in all 3 trisomies. Especially in cases of language impairment ENT specialists may be the main contact to rule out hearing loss. Here, we present 5 patients with SCT. In 2 boys and a young man, SCT was already known (47,XXY; 47,XYY; 47,XYY), in 2 cases we initiated genetic investigation (47,XXX; 47,XXY). Main symptom of the 4 children was a language delay; the young man reported had a history of mild language and motor coordination delay, too. Main complaints of the adult patient were problems with speech-in-noise perception. Furthermore 2 of the patients had mild facial dysmorphic features. The prognosis of the development in patients with SCT is variable, depending on severity of the manifestations and on quality and timing of treatment. Furthermore, in children with motor development/language delay a chromosomal analysis may be initiated at least at the request of the parents to clarify the etiology of developmental abnormalities. If the suspicion of hearing impairment as the cause of problems is not confirmed in a patient, ENT specialists should also consider SCA as a possible cause in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of a trisomy 7/trisomy 13 mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Huijsdens-van Amsterdam, Karin; Barge-Schaapveld, Daniela Qcm; Mathijssen, Inge B; Alders, Mariëlle; Pajkrt, Eva; Knegt, Alida C

    2012-01-27

    Double aneuploidy mosaicism of two different aneuploidy cell lines is rare. We describe for the first time a double trisomy mosaicism, involving chromosomes 7 and 13 in a fetus presenting with multiple congenital anomalies. No evidence for chimerism was found by DNA genotyping. The origin of both trisomies are consistent with isodisomy of maternal origin. Therefore, it is most likely that the double trisomy mosaicism arose from two independent events very early in embryonic development. The trisomy 7 and 13 cells were shown to be of maternal origin.

  16. Reduced recombination in maternal meiosis coupled with non-disjunction at meiosis II leading to recurrent 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    Reish, Orit; Berryman, Todd; Cunningham, Thomas R; Sher, Carron; Oetting, William S

    2004-01-01

    We determined the meiotic origin and the stage of non-disjunction of the extra X chromosomes in two sisters with 47,XXX chromosomal complements. Segregation of the X chromosomes in all family members was analyzed using X-linked short tandem repeat polymorphic (STRP) markers. Densitometric analysis of two STRP markers confirmed that both sisters had three copies of the X chromosome and the extra X chromosomes were maternally derived. Both sisters did not share the same maternal homologue suggesting that the recurrent trisomy is non-homologous X chromosome-specific. Haplotype analysis demonstrated a reduction to homozygosity for markers examined, covering most of the length of the X chromosomes in both sisters. These findings suggested that the extra X chromosomes have derived from meiotic II non-disjunction following a nullitransitional meiosis I (MI). A lack of recombination in the X chromosomes of both sisters suggests a possible maternal genetic defect leading to an erratic recombination at MI. This information may contribute to further understanding of mechanisms leading to X chromosome non-disjunction and may assist in counseling of families with this chromosomal rearrangement.

  17. Parental trisomy 21 mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D J; Begleiter, M L; Chamberlin, J; Hankins, L; Magenis, R E

    1982-01-01

    A family with three children with trisomy 21 in which the mother is a phenotypically normal, trisomy 21/normal mosaic was studied. Chromosome 21 fluorescent heteromorphisms were used to document that two of the three number 21's in two of the Down syndrome offspring were of maternal origin. Five cytogenetic surveys in which both parents of a child with trisomy 21 were studied have been reviewed. From these data, it is estimated that 3% of couples producing a child with trisomy 21 can be explained by parental mosaicism. From 17 informative sibships, with one parent mosaic, the segregation ratio was estimated to be 0.43 +/- 0.11. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6211090

  18. Anatomy of trisomy 12.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wallisa; Zurada, Anna; Zurada-ZieliŃSka, Agnieszka; Gielecki, Jerzy; Loukas, Marios

    2016-07-01

    Trisomy 12 is a rare aneuploidy and fetuses with this defect tend to spontaneously abort. However, mosaicism allows this anomaly to manifest itself in live births. Due to the fact that mosaicism represents a common genetic abnormality, trisomy 12 is encountered more frequently than expected at a rate of 1 in 500 live births. Thus, it is imperative that medical practitioners are aware of this aneuploidy. Moreover, this genetic disorder may result from a complete or partial duplication of chromosome 12. A partial duplication may refer to a specific segment on the chromosome, or one of the arms. On the other hand, a complete duplication refers to duplication of both arms of chromosome 12. The combination of mosaicism and the variable duplication sites has led to variable phenotypes ranging from normal phenotype to Potter sequence to gross physical defects of the various organ systems. This article provides a review of the common anatomical variation of the different types of trisomy 12. This review revealed that further documentation is needed for trisomy 12q and complete trisomy 12 to clearly delineate the constellation of anomalies that characterize each genetic defect. Clin. Anat. 29:633-637, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Double trisomy in spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K S

    1997-12-01

    Cytogenetic data on products of conception from spontaneous abortions studied over a 10-year period have been reviewed for double trisomies. A total of 3034 spontaneous abortions were karyotyped between 1986 and 1997. Twenty-two cases with double trisomy, one case with triple trisomy, and a case with a trisomy and monosomy were found. The tissues studied were mostly sac, villi, or placenta. The gestational age ranged from 6 to 11 weeks and the mean age was 8.2 +/- 1.7 (SD) weeks. The mean maternal age in years was 35.9 +/- 5.3. Of the twenty-two cases, four were mosaics. All but two of the cases involved autosomal aneuploidies. The double trisomies included chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, and 22. The chromosomes that were trisomic in more than one double trisomy case were numbers 16 (8 cases), 8 (5 cases), 15 (4 cases), 2, 13, and 21 (3 cases each), and 5, 7, 14, 18, 20, 22, and X (2 cases). The triple trisomy involved chromosomes 18, 21, and X. The monosomy and trisomy case was a mosaic, with a monosomy 21 in all cells and some cells also with a trisomy 5. The double trisomies cited for the first time in this study were 4/13, 5/16, 8/14, 8/15, 14/21, 15/20, and 7/12. The pooled mean maternal age for double trisomy cases (34.1 +/- 5.7 years) was higher than that for single trisomy cases (31 +/- 6.1 years). The difference was statistically significant at P = < 0.001. The pooled mean gestational age of spontaneous abortions was lower for double trisomy (8.7 +/- 2.2 weeks) than for reported single trisomy cases (10.1 +/- 2.9 weeks). This difference is also statistically significant at P = < 0.001. The sex ratio among double trisomies was 15 females to 13 males. This difference was not statistically significant from the expected 1:1.

  20. The trisomy 18 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Anna; Carey, John C

    2012-10-23

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common

  1. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common

  2. A de novo 2.78-Mb duplication on chromosome 21q22.11 implicates candidate genes in the partial trisomy 21 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeld-Adams, James D; Tkachuk, Amanda K; Maclean, Kenneth N; Meeks, Naomi L; Scott, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) and in the majority of cases is the result of complete trisomy 21. The hypothesis that the characteristic DS clinical features are due to a single DS critical region (DSCR) at distal chromosome 21q has been refuted by recently reported segmental trisomy 21 cases characterised by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH). These rare cases have implicated multiple regions on chromosome 21 in the aetiology of distinct features of DS; however, the map of chromosome 21 copy-number aberrations and their associated phenotypes remains incompletely defined. We report a child with ID who was deemed very high risk for DS on antenatal screening (1 in 13) and has partial, but distinct, dysmorphologic features of DS without congenital heart disease (CHD). Oligonucleotide aCGH testing of the proband detected a previously unreported de novo 2.78-Mb duplication on chromosome 21q22.11 that includes 16 genes; however, this aberration does not harbour any of the historical DSCR genes (APP, DSCR1, DYRK1A and DSCAM). This informative case implicates previously under-recognised candidate genes (SOD1, SYNJ1 and ITSN1) in the pathogenesis of specific DS clinical features and supports a critical region for CHD located more distal on chromosome 21q. In addition, this unique case illustrates how the increasing resolution of microarray and high-throughput sequencing technologies can continue to reveal new biology and enhance understanding of widely studied genetic diseases that were originally described over 50 years ago. PMID:27840696

  3. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important.

  4. Edwards syndrome with double trisomy.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, J; Kandasamy, Y; Alcock, G; Koh, T H

    2008-07-01

    Double trisomy is rare and the only case reported in the literature died soon after birth. We present another case of double trisomy (48XYY, +18) in a male neonate, who was born to a 28-year-old gravida three parity one mother at 35 weeks of gestation. The baby had features of trisomy 18. Karyotype of the patient showed 48, XYY, +18, Ish (DYZ3*2), (D18Z1*3), nuc ish (DYZ3*2), (D18Z1*3) . The patient had clinical features of trisomy 18. There was no family history of diabetes mellitus and no exposure to chemicals. It has been suggested that the rarity of Y-chromosome involvement in trisomy 18 may be due to discrepancy between the sexes.

  5. Neuropsychological and Behavioural Phenotype of Dandy-Walker Variant Presenting in Chromosome 22 Trisomy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searson, Ruth; Hare, Dougal Julian; Sridharan, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a case of Dandy-Walker variant syndrome associated with trisomy 22 in a 17-year-old man is described. This is the first account of this combination in a person surviving into adulthood, and the neuropsychological and behavioural presentation is described in detail and a clinical formulation is presented for the benefit of…

  6. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  7. [An XXX female with essential thrombocythemia].

    PubMed

    Ohta, Tadanobu; Hagiwara, Kioyuki; Makita, Kaori; Mugitani, Atuko; Ohta, Kensuke; Yamane, Takahisa; Takubo, Takayuki; Hino, Masayuki

    2003-07-01

    We describe an XXX female patient accompanied with essential thrombocythemia. To our knowledge this is the first case ever to have been reported. The patient was asymptomatic, but her platelet count had increased to 111.2 x 10(4)/microliter, and she was diagnosed as having essential thrombocythemia based on the diagnostic criteria of the Polycythemia Vera Study Group. At the same time, chromosome analysis of bone marrow cells revealed that she was an XXX female. The patient remained asymptomatic throughout the course of treatment.

  8. Mosaic partial trisomy 19p12-q13.11 due to a small supernumerary marker chromosome: a locus associated with Asperger syndrome?

    PubMed

    Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Souza, Josiane; Bonalumi Filho, Aguinaldo; Sotomaior, Vanessa Santos; Frantz, Egon; Antoniuk, Sergio; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Raskin, Salmo

    2011-09-01

    In the neurodevelopmentally impaired population the frequency of small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) is about 0.3%. To find the origin of a sSMC in a 4-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome (AS) a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), using a 135K-feature whole-genome microarray, and Metaphase FISH analysis, was performed. The sSMC was characterized as being composed of 18.4 Mb from 19p12q13.11. Based on the size and genic content, it is expected that the partial trisomy detected is responsible for the characteristics observed in the patient. In that case it could be an indication of a novel locus associated with AS.

  9. A case of partial trisomy 15

    PubMed Central

    Watson, E. Janet; Gordon, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    A girl with mental retardation but few distinctive physical abnormalities is described. Chromosome analysis revealed an extra small acrocentric chromosome with both long and short arms satellited which was identified as a deleted chromosome No. 15. The origin of this chromosome is discussed and the clinical findings compared with those of previously reported cases of partial trisomy 15. Images PMID:4443991

  10. Trisomy 16p in a liveborn infant and a review of partial and full trisomy 16.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S H; Duckett, D P

    1978-01-01

    An abnormal female infant, who survived for 10 months with almost complete trisomy 16p and monosomy of sub-band 21q22.3, is described. The chromosome anomaly was the result of an unbalanced segregation of a maternal balanced translocation t(16;21)(p11;q22.3). The partial monosomy was considered to have had little or no adverse phenotypic effect. Cases with trisomy of chromosome 16 material are reviewed. It appears that while full trisomy 16 always results in early spontaneous abortion, trisomy 16p or 16q may be compatible with limited postnatal survival. Images PMID:739528

  11. Effects of individual segmental trisomies of human chromosome 21 syntenic regions on hippocampal long-term potentiation and cognitive behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Liu, Chunhong; Belichenko, Pavel; Clapcote, Steven J.; Li, Shaomin; Pao, Annie; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Bechard, Allison R.; Asrar, Suhail; Chen, Rongqing; Fan, Ni; Zhou, Zhenyu; Jia, Zhengping; Chen, Chu; Roder, John C.; Liu, Bin; Baldini, Antonio; Mobley, William C.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    As the genomic basis for Down syndrome (DS), human trisomy 21 is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability in children and young people. The genomic regions on human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) are syntenic to three regions in the mouse genome, located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. Recently, we have developed three new mouse models using chromosome engineering carrying the genotypes of Dp(10)1Yey/+, Dp(16)1Yey/+, or Dp(17)1Yey/+, which harbor a duplication spanning the entire Hsa21 syntenic region on Mmu10, Mmu16, or Mmu17, respectively. In this study, we analyzed the hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and cognitive behaviors of these models. Our results show that, while the genotype of Dp(17)1Yey/+ results in abnormal hippocampal LTP, the genotype of Dp(16)1Yey/+ leads to both abnormal hippocampal LTP and impaired learning/memory. Therefore, these mutant mice can serve as powerful tools for further understanding the mechanism underlying cognitively relevant phenotypes associated with DS, particularly the impacts of different syntenic regions on these phenotypes. PMID:20932954

  12. [Trisomy 21 in visual art].

    PubMed

    Stahl, A; Tourame, P

    2013-12-01

    In 1866, J. Langdon Down published a paper on "an ethnic classification of idiots" and noted their facial resemblance with individuals of the Mongolian people. In 1959, J. Lejeune, M. Gautier, and R. Turpin demonstrated that the children with Down syndrome had an extra copy of chromosome 21. There is now a debate within the medical literature on the age of trisomy 21 as a disease affecting mankind. Since it was not described before 1866, some authors questioned whether this disease is an old or new condition in humans. Three methods of investigation are useful for demonstrating that trisomy 21 has been present in humans for a long time: the figuration of this condition in historical paintings, figurines, and pottery; its presence in old skeletal remains; and the origin of human chromosome 21 during primate phylogeny. Figurines strongly suggestive of trisomy 21 have been found in the Greco-Roman world, in many Central and South American pre-Columbian cultures, and in Khmer temples. In Europe, during the Renaissance, Italian and Flemish artists represented trisomy 21 in paintings of religious inspiration. Studies on the origin and pathology of chromosome 21 have shown that the ancestral human chromosome 21 arose 30-50 million years ago and that trisomy 21 has existed since time immemorial.

  13. Molecular studies of trisomy 18

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.M.; Harvey, J.F.; Jacobs, P.A. ); Lindenbaum, R.H. ); Boyd, P.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have determined the parental origin of 50 cases of trisomy 18. In 48 cases the additional chromosome was maternal in origin, and in 2 cases it was paternal in origin. Seven cases, including both those with an additional paternal chromosome, appeared to be the result of a postzygotic error. In contrast to the situation in nondisjunction involving chromosomes 21 and X, there was no evidence for nullochiasmate nondisjunction. 44 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. 47,XXX: what is the prognosis?

    PubMed

    Linden, M G; Bender, B G; Harmon, R J; Mrazek, D A; Robinson, A

    1988-10-01

    Eleven unselected 47,XXX girls, now 15 to 22 years of age, have been observed from birth in a prospective study of children with sex chromosome anomalies. A description of their growth and development is presented. The 47,XXX infants were not generally distinguishable from chromosomally normal children in the first year of life, even though there was a slight delay in neuromotor development. By 2 years of age, developmental delays in speech and language often became evident, and speech therapy was often necessitated in the preschool years. Early school problems included speech and language deficiencies, lack of coordination, poor academic performance, and immature behavior; these persisted throughout the school years. By high school age, a 47,XXX girl was generally tall and often subject to somatic complaints. Sexual development was generally normal. Seven of the 11 propositae had a diagnosed psychiatric disorder or disturbance at some time during adolescence. Variability within this syndrome is great; one proposita is in college and another is mentally retarded. The frequency of the diagnosis of the 47,XXX karyotype by genetic amniocentesis is estimated to be 1/1000, the same incidence as in the newborn population. Expectant parents must be counseled as to the significance of this karyotype and prognostic information must be given. Suggested guidelines are included.

  15. Mosaic trisomy 13 and a sacral appendage

    PubMed Central

    Pachajoa, Harry; Meza Escobar, Luis Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Mosaic trisomy 13 occurs when there is a percentage of trisomic cells for an entire chromosome 13, while the remaining percentage of cells is euploid. The prevalence of this syndrome ranges from 1 in 10 000 to 1 in 20 000 births. Complete, partial or mosaic forms of this disorder can occur. The phenotype of mosaic trisomy 13 patients varies widely. Patients with mosaic trisomy 13 usually have a longer survival and a less severe phenotype compared to patients with complete trisomy 13. Genetic counselling is difficult due to the wide variation among the clinical manifestations of these patients. There have been 49 cases of mosaic trisomy 13 reported in the literature. We report the case of a patient with mosaic trisomy 13, a sacral appendage and a cleft lip and palate. PMID:23904413

  16. Mosaic trisomy 13 and a sacral appendage.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Meza Escobar, Luis Enrique

    2013-07-31

    Mosaic trisomy 13 occurs when there is a percentage of trisomic cells for an entire chromosome 13, while the remaining percentage of cells is euploid. The prevalence of this syndrome ranges from 1 in 10 000 to 1 in 20 000 births. Complete, partial or mosaic forms of this disorder can occur. The phenotype of mosaic trisomy 13 patients varies widely. Patients with mosaic trisomy 13 usually have a longer survival and a less severe phenotype compared to patients with complete trisomy 13. Genetic counselling is difficult due to the wide variation among the clinical manifestations of these patients. There have been 49 cases of mosaic trisomy 13 reported in the literature. We report the case of a patient with mosaic trisomy 13, a sacral appendage and a cleft lip and palate.

  17. Natural outcome of trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy after prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lakovschek, Ioana Claudia; Streubel, Berthold; Ulm, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    Trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy belong to the chromosomal abnormalities which are compatible with life, but which are also associated with a high rate of spontaneous abortion, intrauterine death, and a short life span. This study was conducted to analyze natural outcome after prenatal diagnosis of these disorders. Between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2009, we investigated all amniocenteses and chorionic villus biopsies carried out at our department. All cases with fetal diagnosis of triploidy, trisomy 13, and 18 were analyzed, with a focus on cases with natural outcome. Overall, 83 (78%) cases of pregnancy termination and 24 (22%) patients with natural outcome (NO) were identified. The NO group included 15 cases of trisomy 18, six cases of triploidy, and three cases of trisomy 13. No case of triploidy was born alive. The live birth rate was 13% for trisomy 18 and 33% for trisomy 13. The three live-born infants with trisomy 13 and 18 died early after a maximum of 87 hr postpartum. Our data are consistent with the literature concerning outcome of triploidy, with none or only a few live births. Analyzes of trisomy 13 and 18 indicate a very short postnatal life span. Different study designs and diverse treatment strategies greatly affect the fetal and neonatal outcome of fetuses with triploidy, trisomy 13, and 18. More studies analyzing natural outcome after prenatal diagnosis of these chromosomal abnormalities are needed. Non-termination of these pregnancies remains an option, and specialists advising parents need accurate data for counseling.

  18. Pure trisomy 10p involving an isochromosome 10p.

    PubMed

    Berend, S A; Shaffer, L G; Bejjani, B A

    1999-05-01

    We report a child with trisomy 10p due to a translocation of the long arm of chromosome 10 to the short arm of chromosome 14 and isochromosome formation of 10p [46,XX,i(10)(p10),der(14)t(10;14)(q10;p10)]. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p involve double segmental imbalance. In contrast, the clinical features described in the current case represent pure trisomy 10p and, thus, delineate the 10p trisomy syndrome phenotype. Mechanisms of the chromosomal rearrangements in this case are suggested.

  19. Meiotic crossing-over in nondisjoined chromosomes of children with trisomy 21 and a congenital heart defect

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, C.M.; Davis, G.E.; Farrer, M.J.; Cullen, L.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Williamson, R.; Wyse, R.K.H.; Palmer, R.; Kessling, A.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors have used DNA polymorphisms to study meiotic crossovers of chromosome 21q in 27 nuclear families. Each family had a child with Down syndrome and a congenital heart defect. Twenty DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 21 were used to determine parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction and to identify crossovers. Twenty-four cases were of maternal origin, and three were of paternal origin. Twenty-two unequivocal crossover events were identified. Sixteen crossovers were observed in 22 chromosome pairs nondisjoining at the first meiotic division (MI), and six crossovers were observed in five chromosome pairs disjoining at the second meiotic division. Fifty percent of crossover events in MI nondisjunction are detectable by molecular genetic means. Thus, the results suggest that, in this sample, each nondisjoined chromosome 21 pair has been involved in at least one crossover event. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Chromosomal aberration leads to recurrent pregnancy loss and partial trisomy of 5p12-15.3 in the offspring: report of a Syrian couple and review of the literature .

    PubMed

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Moassass, Faten; Al-Ablog, Ayman; Liehr, Thomas; Fan, Xiaobo; Wafa, Abdulsamad

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a Syrian couple having recurrent pregnancy loss in the first trimester, fetal malformations, and/or neonatal death. The father had a balanced chromosomal translocation t(5;15), an sY125 microdeletion of locus b in the azoospermia factor (AZF) gene, and an MTHFR C677T homozygous polymorphism with normal phenotype. Interestingly, his healthy wife had another MTHFR A1298C homozygous polymorphism. The couple experienced two pregnancy losses and had two stillborn children with severe malformations due to partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 5. The couple does not have any living offspring after 10 years of marriage.

  1. A 14-year follow-up of a case detected prenatally of partial trisomy 13q21.32-qter and monosomy 18q22.3-qter as a result of a maternal complex chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 6, 13, and 18.

    PubMed

    Quadrelli, Roberto; Quadrelli, Andrea; Milunsky, Aubrey; Zou, Ying S; Huang, Xin-Li; Viera, Estela; Mechoso, Búrix; Bellini, Sylvia; Costabel, Mariana; Vaglio, Alicia

    2009-06-01

    A balanced complex chromosome rearrangement (CCR) involving three chromosomes is rare and may lead to different types of aneuploid germ cells. We report here a 14-year follow-up of a boy with a karyotype defined as 46,XY,der(18)t(6;13;18)(q21;q21.32;q22.3).ish der(18)(13qter+,18qter-) characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, including distinctive minor facial anomalies, short neck, abnormalities of the extremities, anogenital abnormalities, flexion contractures, especially at extremities, and severe mental and growth retardation. Chromosome analysis in the mother showed a CCR involving chromosomes 6, 13, and 18. This CCR was the result of a three-break rearrangement, and the derivative chromosome 13 consisted of parts of chromosomes 18 and 13. The karyotype of the child was not balanced, and resulted in partial trisomy for 13q and partial monosomy for 18q detected prenatally by conventional and molecular cytogenetics. Although such a karyotype and its phenotype have not previously been reported, we have compared the clinical and cytogenetic data from our patient with previously described cases of partial trisomy 13q and monosomy 18q despite different break points. We are presenting a new CCR in a woman with normal phenotype with a history of four early abortions and a long follow-up of her malformed newborn with partial 13q trisomy and 18q monosomy.

  2. Ectopia cordis in a fetus with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, Po-Jen; Chueh, Ho-Yen; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Soong, Yung-Kuei

    2006-02-01

    Trisomy 18 is the second-most common autosomal trisomy and represents one third of the chromosomal trisomies identified prenatally. We present a case of a fetus with trisomy 18 in which thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis was detected prenatally; it was noted as a dominant defect on a sonographic examination performed at 19 weeks' gestation. Furthermore, our case exhibits a rare type of multiple-marker screening result with increased maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein. This case demonstrates the need for thorough sonographic evaluation of the fetal thoracoabdominal wall as early as possible, because fetal ectopia cordis can be the major abnormality of trisomy 18.

  3. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Ultrasound findings in trisomy 22.

    PubMed

    Schwendemann, Wade D; Contag, Stephen A; Koty, Patrick P; Miller, Richard C; Devers, Patricia; Watson, William J

    2009-02-01

    We sought to identify the characteristic sonographic findings of fetal trisomy 22 by performing a retrospective review of nine cases of fetal trisomy 22. All cases of chromosomal mosaicism were excluded, as were first-trimester losses. Indications for sonography, gestational age, and sonographically detected fetal anomalies were analyzed. The majority of patients were referred for advanced maternal age or abnormal ultrasound findings on screening exam. Oligohydramnios was the most common sonographic finding, present in 55% of affected fetuses. Intrauterine growth restriction and increased nuchal thickness were slightly less frequent.

  5. Antenatal diagnosis of an XXX female. A dilemma for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Krone, L R; Prichard, L L; Bradshaw, C L; Jones, O W; Peterson, R M; Dixson, B K

    1975-07-01

    This report describes the first antenatal diagnosis of an XXX female. Over 150 postnatal cases of XXX females have been described. There is no specific phenotype associated with the sex chromosome abnormality and most such persons are fertile. The frequency of XXX females in mental institutions is 3.9 per 1,000 female subjects whereas the frequency in consecutive newborn infants is 1.1 per 1,000 newborns. Chi-square analysis shows this difference cannot be due to chance. On the other hand, data from consecutive newborn studies suggest that intellectual development in XXX newborns is within normal range. Available evidence favors normal development in XXX female infants although the risk for developmental disabilities may be higher for the XXX than for the XX infant.

  6. Mortality and incidence in women with 47,XXX and variants.

    PubMed

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2010-02-01

    47,XXX syndrome is among the most common sex chromosomal disorders; however, apart from screening surveys, epidemiological data are limited. We report data on 136 women diagnosed with 47,XXX or a compatible karyotype in Denmark during 1963-2008. We identified an incidence of 10.7 per 100,000 liveborn girls, which was lower than expected and was stable during the study period. Age at diagnosis ranged from 0 to 73 years, with a diagnostic delay of 18.2 years or more in half the 47,XXX persons. We compared persons with 47,XXX with an age-matched cohort of the female background population (born same year and month), identified in Statistics Denmark (n = 13,400). Mortality was significantly increased in total with a hazard ratio of 2.5 (1.6-3.9), corresponding to a difference in median survival of 7.7 years. When we divided causes of death into 19 chapters according to the International Classification of Diseases, a generally increased mortality was identified in all informative chapters. Furthermore, we identified significantly increased mortality in cardiovascular diseases, in the chapter concerning chromosomal and congenital defects, and in the chapter of unspecified diseases. Better delineation of the clinical phenotype of 47,XXX is needed; available information does not readily explain the increased mortality.

  7. Trisomy of the short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX), resulting from a duplication-deletion of the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Adamson, K A; Cross, I; Batch, J A; Rappold, G A; Glass, I A; Ball, S G

    2002-05-01

    The Turner syndrome (TS) is a complex disorder associated with almost invariant short stature and gonadal dysgenesis, as well as a variety of other major organ malformations. Recently, a homeobox-containing gene entitled short-stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX), was isolated from a minimal short stature gene interval from the pseudoautosomal region of Xp (and Yp). Together with the demonstrable escape of SHOX from X-inactivation, this suggested SHOX to be a strong candidate gene for the short stature component of TS, and as SHOX haploinsufficiency appears to be the molecular basis of a mesomelic short statured skeletal dysplasia (Leri-Weill syndrome), this suggested that SHOX protein expression levels may confer a dosage effect on human stature. However, in this communication we report a normal statured female with gonadal dysgenesis, due to the inheritance of a recombinant duplication-deletion X-chromosome. The karyotype of the proband was 46,X,rec(X)dup(Xp)inv(X)(p11.22q21.2)mat and fluorescent in situ hybridization of her metaphases with a SHOX cosmid confirmed the proband to be trisomic for SHOX. This communication suggests the relationship between levels of SHOX expression and human stature to be more complex than envisaged previously. The presence of normal stature in our patient rather than tall stature is likely to represent the natural variation seen in patients with transcription factor disorders.

  8. The effect of early life stress on the cognitive phenotype of children with an extra X chromosome (47,XXY/47,XXX).

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sophie; Barneveld, Petra; Descheemaeker, Mie-Jef; Giltay, Jacques; Swaab, Hanna

    2016-11-28

    Studies on gene-environment interactions suggest that some individuals may be more susceptible to life adversities than others due to their genetic profile. This study assesses whether or not children with an extra X chromosome are more vulnerable to the negative impact of early life stress on cognitive functioning than typically-developing children. A total of 50 children with an extra X chromosome and 103 non-clinical controls aged 9 to 18 years participated in the study. Cognitive functioning in domains of language, social cognition and executive functioning were assessed. Early life stress was measured with the Questionnaire of Life Events. High levels of early life stress were found to be associated with compromised executive functioning in the areas of mental flexibility and inhibitory control, irrespective of group membership. In contrast, the children with an extra X chromosome were found to be disproportionally vulnerable to deficits in social cognition on top of executive dysfunction, as compared to typically-developing children. Within the extra X group the number of negative life events is significantly correlated with more problems in inhibition, mental flexibility and social cognition. It is concluded that children with an extra X chromosome are vulnerable to adverse life events, with social cognition being particularly impacted in addition to the negative effects on executive functioning. The findings that developmental outcome is codependent on early environmental factors in genetically vulnerable children also underscores opportunities for training and support to positively influence the course of development.

  9. The craniofacial complex in 47, XXX females.

    PubMed

    Krusinskiene, Viktorija; Krusinskie, Viktorija; Alvesalo, Lassi; Sidlauskas, Antanas

    2005-08-01

    A study of the craniofacial complex in four 47, XXX Finnish females, or females with an extra X chromosome, was carried out using cephalometric analysis comprising linear and angular measurements. The lengths of the anterior and posterior cranial bases, the calvarium, mandibular ramus and posterior and upper anterior face heights were found to be significantly shorter than in female controls, while the angles between the foraminal and clival planes, the mandibular plane and cranial base, the maxillary and occlusal planes, the maxillary and mandibular planes and the foraminal and mandibular planes, and also the gonial angle, were significantly enlarged. The present findings of reduced linear measurements, together with the results of studies on the craniofacial complex of 47, XXY and 47, XYY males, suggest dimensional variation between these groups from the promoting effect of an extra Y chromosome and the retarding effect of an extra X chromosome on craniofacial growth.

  10. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  11. Maternal Germinal Trisomy 21 in Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hultén, Maj A; Öijerstedt, Linn; Iwarsson, Erik; Jonasson, Jon

    2014-01-28

    It has now been over 50 years since it was discovered that Down syndrome is caused by an extra chromosome 21, i.e., trisomy 21. In the interim, it has become clear that in the majority of cases, the extra chromosome is inherited from the mother, and there is, in this respect, a strong maternal age effect. Numerous investigations have been devoted to clarifying the underlying mechanism, most recently suggesting that this situation is exceedingly complex, involving both biological and environmental factors. On the other hand, it has also been proposed that germinal trisomy 21 mosaicism, arising during the very early stages of maternal oogenesis with accumulation of trisomy 21 germ cells during subsequent development, may be the main predisposing factor. We present data here on the incidence of trisomy 21 mosaicism in a cohort of normal fetal ovarian samples, indicating that an accumulation of trisomy 21 germ cells does indeed take place during fetal oogenesis, i.e., from the first to the second trimester of pregnancy. We presume that this accumulation of trisomy 21 (T21) cells is caused by their delay in maturation and lagging behind the normal cells. We further presume that this trend continues during the third trimester of pregnancy and postnatally, up until ovulation, thereby explaining the maternal age effect in Down syndrome.

  12. Outcome of prenatally diagnosed trisomy 6 mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert; Oh, Tracey; Durcan, Judy; Abdelhak, Yaakov; Clachko, Mark; Aviv, Hana

    2002-08-01

    We report the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 6 mosaicism via amniocentesis, in which trisomy 6 cells were identified in three of five culture vessels with 33% (5/15) of colonies showing trisomic cells. The pregnancy was electively terminated and examination revealed minor abnormalities (shortening of the femurs, micrognathia, posterior malrotation of the ears, and bilateral camptomelia of the second digit of the hands and fifth digits of the feet). Cytogenetic analysis of the placenta showed trisomy 6 in 100% of 20 cells studied. Karyotype was 46,XX in 100 cells examined from fetal skin. There are relatively few prenatally diagnosed cases of mosaic trisomy 6 at amniocentesis. Confined placental mosaicism (CPM) has been postulated in other cases where follow-up cytogenetic studies were not available. The present case differs from those previously reported, as it appears to represent CPM of chromosome 6 with phenotypic effects to the fetus.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping in acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome with trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Chorong; Mun, Yeung Chul; Seong, Chu Myong; Han, Sung-Hee; Chung, Wha Soon; Huh, Jungwon

    2013-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with trisomy 8 as the sole abnormality may result from cytogenetically undetectable genetic changes. The purpose of this study was to identify hidden genomic aberrations not detected by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping in AML/MDS patients with a sole trisomy 8. The study group included 8 patients (3 AML and 5 MDS) and array-based karyotyping was done using whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0 and SNP 2.7M). By SNP-A, additional genomic aberrations not detected by MC were identified in 2 patients: 1 AML patient exhibited a copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 3q21.1-q29 and 11q13.1-q25 and the other patient with MDS (refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia) had CN-LOH of 2p25.3-p15. In particular, the latter patient progressed to AML 18 months after the diagnosis. In 3 patients, aberrations in addition to trisomy 8 were not identified by SNP-A. In the remaining 3 patients, SNP-A could not detect trisomy 8, while trisomy 8 was found in 25-67% of metaphase cells by MC. This study suggests that additional genomic aberrations may in fact be present even in cases of trisomy 8 as sole abnormality by MC, and SNP-A could be a useful karyotyping tool to identify hidden aberrations such as CN-LOH.

  14. Adult case of partial trisomy 9q

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete and partial trisomy 9 is the fourth most common chromosomal disorder. It is also associated with various congenital characteristics affecting the cranio-facial, skeletal, central nervous, gastrointestinal, cardiac and renal systems. Very few cases have been reported in adults. Partial trisomy 9q is also associated with short stature, poor growth and growth hormone deficiency. This is the first reported case of an extensive endocrinology investigation of short stature in trisomy 9q and the outcome of growth hormone treatment. Case Presentation The case involves a 23-year-old female of pure partial trisomy 9q. The case involves a 23-year old female with pure partial trisomy 9q involving a duplication of 9q22.1 to q32, de novo, confirmed by genetic studies using fluorescene in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The diagnosis was at 6 years of age. She did not demonstrate all the congenital morphologies identified with trisomy 9q disorders especially in relation to multi-organ morphologies. There is also a degree of associated intellectual impairment. At prepuberty, she was referred for poor growth and was diagnosed with partial growth hormone deficiency. She responded very well to treatment with growth hormone and is currently living an independent life with some support. Conclusions Trisomy 9q is associated with short stature and failure to thrive. Growth hormone deficiency should be identified in cases of trisomy 9q and treatment offered. This is the first reported case of response to growth hormone replacement in partial trisomy 9. PMID:20158889

  15. [Trisomy 21 and cancers].

    PubMed

    Ayed, W; Gouas, L; Penault-Llorca, F; Amouri, A; Tchirkov, A; Vago, P

    2012-10-01

    Patients with trisomy 21, still called Down's syndrome (DS), present a particular tumoral profile compared to the general population with an increased incidence of leukaemia in the childhood and a low risk of solid cancer in the adulthood. DS children indeed present a 50-fold risk of developing a leukaemia compared to age-matched non-trisomic children and most of them develop a specific myelodysplasic disorder called transient myelodysplasic disorder. In spite of the low incidence of solid tumors, some are very rare as breast cancer, nephroblastoma, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma, whereas the others remain more frequent as retinoblastoma, lymphoma and gonadal and extragonadal germ cell tumours. In this review, we present possible mechanisms which can favour, or on the contrary repress the formation and progression of tumours in DS patients, which are related to gene effect dosage of oncogenes or tumour repressors on chromosome 21, tumour angiogenesis, apoptosis and epithelial cell-stroma interactions.

  16. Hepatoblastoma in a mosaic trisomy 18 child with hemihypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Wheeler, Kate; Stewart, Helen; Campbell, Carolyn

    2016-01-21

    To date, there are 12 reported cases of hepatoblastoma in trisomy 18 patients, three of whom had a mosaic chromosome pattern. We report on an 18-month-old child who had hemihypertrophy and developmental delay, was found to have hepatoblastoma on surveillance ultrasound scan, and was subsequently diagnosed with mosaic trisomy 18 on array comparative genomic hybridisation from a peripheral blood sample and molecular cytogenetic analysis of the tumour specimen. Although hemihypertrophy has been associated with mosaic trisomies, there are only a couple of published case reports of hemihypertrophy or asymmetry in mosaic trisomy 18 patients and none in the reported cases of hepatoblastoma in a mosaic trisomy 18 setting. We have reviewed the published case reports of hepatoblastoma in trisomy 18 patients and found that they seem to tolerate the intensive treatment very well if there are no significant comorbidities.

  17. Live-Born Trisomy 22: Patient Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, T.; Nanda, I.; Rehn, M.; Zollner, U.; Frieauff, E.; Wirbelauer, J.; Grimm, T.; Schmid, M.

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 22 is a common trisomy in spontaneous abortions. In contrast, live-born trisomy 22 is rarely seen due to severe organ malformations associated with this condition. Here, we report on a male infant with complete, non-mosaic trisomy 22 born at 35 + 5 weeks via caesarean section. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts showed an additional chromosome 22 in all metaphases analyzed (47,XY,+22). In addition, array CGH confirmed complete trisomy 22. The patient's clinical features included dolichocephalus, hypertelorism, flattened nasal bridge, dysplastic ears with preauricular sinuses and tags, medial cleft palate, anal atresia, and coronary hypospadias with scrotum bipartitum. Essential treatment was implemented in close coordination with the parents. The child died 29 days after birth due to respiratory insufficiency and deterioration of renal function. Our patient's history complements other reports illustrating that children with complete trisomy 22 may survive until birth and beyond. PMID:23599696

  18. Mosaicism most likely accounts for extended survival of trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Kalousek, D.K.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} discusses the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations and how this corresponds to the discussion of trisomy 22, including the survival time of the patient. 5 refs.

  19. Trisomy and early brain development

    PubMed Central

    Haydar, Tarik F.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    Trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) results in Down syndrome (DS). The finished human genome sequence provides a thorough catalog of the genetic elements whose altered dosage perturbs development and function in DS. However, understanding how small alterations in the steady state transcript levels for <2% of human genes can disrupt development and function of essentially every cell presents a more complicated problem. Mouse models that recapitulate specific aspects of DS have been used to identify changes in brain morphogenesis and function. Here we provide a few examples of how trisomy for specific genes affects the development of the cortex and cerebellum to illustrate how gene dosage effects might contribute to divergence between the trisomic and euploid brains. PMID:22169531

  20. Partial Trisomy of Chromosome 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Peebles, Patricia N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The importance of cytogentic studies, including banding techniques, in moderately retarded individuals without significant physical anomalies was pointed out by the analysis of a moderately retarded 10 year old, non-Down's female. (BB)

  1. Complete trisomy 14 mosaicism: first live-born case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Taegyu

    2012-01-01

    Trisomy 14 mosaicism is a rare chromosome disorder characterized by delayed development, failure to thrive, and facial dysmorphism. Only approximately 30 trisomy 14 mosaicism cases have been reported in the literature because trisomy 14 is associated with early spontaneous abortion. We report a case of a 17-month-old girl with abnormal skin pigmentation, delayed development, facial dysmorphism, and failure to thrive with the 47,XX,+14/46,XX chromosome complement. PMID:23133487

  2. Dermatoglyphic Patterns in 9p Trisomy Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loesch, Danuta; Czyzewska, Jadwiga

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-seven palm prints and 30 sole prints of people with 9p trisomy (a chromosomal anomaly associated with abnormal limb development) were analysed with respect to frequency distribution of loops and triradii on palms, soles, and fingertips, as well as of the total pattern types. (Author)

  3. A very rare case of trisomy 4q32.3-4q35.2 and trisomy 21q11.2-21q22.11 in a patient with recombinant chromosomes 4 and 21.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Sha; Xue, Dan; Xi, Zuo-Ming; Liu, Dan-Na; Zou, Peng-Shu; Ma, Ming; Xia, Ying; Chen, Xia-Hui; Qiu, Guang-Bin; Cao, Dong-Hua

    2015-05-25

    We report the case of a patient with a clinical phenotype consistent with Down Syndrome (DS) who has a novel karyotypic abnormality. Karyotypic analyses were performed to investigate the cause of two spontaneous abortions. A balanced translocation between chromosomes 4 and 21 was identified, along with an additional abnormal chromosome 21. We performed high-resolution banding, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and FISH studies in both the patient and her mother to define the abnormality and determine its origin. CGH revealed a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 4, spanning at least 24.4 Mb, and a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 21, spanning at least 16.2 Mb. FISH analysis using a chromosome 21 centromere probe and chromosome 4 long arm telomere (4pter) probe confirmed the origin of the marker chromosome. It has been confirmed by the State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics of China that this is the first reported instance of the karyotype 47,XX,t(4;21)(q31.3;q11.2),+der(21)t(4;21)mat reported in the world.

  4. c-myc amplification in a preleukemia patient with trisomy 4 and double minutes: review of the unique coexistence of these two chromosome abnormalities in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K S; Sulcova, V

    1997-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow from a woman with preleukemia showed an aberrant clone with trisomy 4, double minutes, and a translocation t(8;9)(q21;q34). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated that the double minutes were c-myc amplifications. A review of six cases in the literature and the present case with trisomy 4 and double minutes showed a preponderance of females and that the patients were mostly elderly. The acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in these patients was either FAB subtype M2 or M4. In two out of seven cases, the double minutes were c-myc amplicons. The patients responded to treatment and there was karyotypic normalization during remission. There was no strong evidence of exposure to genotoxic agents.

  5. Overlapping trisomies for human chromosome 21 orthologs produce similar effects on skull and brain morphology of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Dutka, Tara; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-08-01

    Trisomy 21 results in gene-dosage imbalance during embryogenesis and throughout life, ultimately causing multiple anomalies that contribute to the clinical manifestations of Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with manifestations of variable severity (e.g., heart anomalies, reduced growth, dental anomalies, shortened life-span). Craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive dysfunction are consistently observed in all people with Down syndrome. Mouse models are useful for studying the effects of gene-dosage imbalance on development. We investigated quantitative changes in the skull and brain of the Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome mouse model and compared these mice to Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography images of Dp(16)1Yey and euploid mouse crania were morphometrically evaluated. Cerebellar cross-sectional area, Purkinje cell linear density, and granule cell density were evaluated relative to euploid littermates. Skulls of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice displayed similar changes in craniofacial morphology relative to their respective euploid littermates. Trisomy-based differences in brain morphology were also similar in Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice. These results validate examination of the genetic basis for craniofacial and brain phenotypes in Dp(16)1Yey mice and suggest that they, like Ts65Dn mice, are valuable tools for modeling the effects of trisomy 21 on development.

  6. Phenotypic overlapping of trisomy 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inage, Eisuke; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Minowa, Kei; Akimoto, Nahoko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy of 12p is a rare chromosomal abnormality, which sometimes coexists with other chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient with a supernumerary chromosome involving chromosomes 12 and 14, which was confirmed by array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). He had developmental delay and dysmorphic features overlapped with those of Pallister-Killian syndrome, which is derived from an isodicentric chromosome 12. The microblepharon identified in our patient is a characteristic feature of 12p trisomy. Further patients are needed to establish the phenotypic difference between trisomy 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome.

  7. Long survival in a 69,XXX triploid infant in Greece.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Vassiliou, Georgia; Sekerli, Eleni; Sidiropoulou, Vasiliki; Tsiga, Alexandra; Dimopoulou, Despina; Voyiatzis, Nikolaos

    2005-12-30

    The live birth of a triploidy infant is a very rare event and death usually occurs within the first hours of life. Triploid cases with a survival of more than two months are infrequent. We report on an infant with a 69,XXX chromosome constitution who survived 164 days. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated a 69,XXX karyotype with no evidence of mosaicism. This is the longest survival reported for this condition to date in Greece and the fourth longest worldwide. The infant was admitted to our clinic several times due to respiratory problems, and supplementary oxygen was required. The improved survival of our case was possibly due to better management of respiratory illness and prematurity, and these are essential factors that physicians should consider carefully with such rare cases.

  8. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Molecular studies of non-disjunction in trisomy 16.

    PubMed Central

    Hassold, T J; Pettay, D; Freeman, S B; Grantham, M; Takaesu, N

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the additional chromosome in 26 trisomy 16 spontaneous abortions was studied using DNA probes for chromosome 16, including a probe for centromeric alpha sequences. We were able to determine the parent and meiotic stage of origin of trisomy in 22 cases, with all being attributable to maternal meiosis I non-disjunction. Furthermore, in each of the remaining four cases the results were compatible with this origin. Thus, it is likely that the high incidence of trisomy 16 results from an abnormal process acting at maternal meiosis I which more frequently involves chromosome 16 than other similar sized chromosomes. In studies of recombination, we found little evidence for an association between reduced or absent recombination and chromosome 16 non-disjunction; however, we were unable to rule out an effect of hyperrecombination. Images PMID:2051452

  10. Pre- and postnatal findings in trisomy 17 mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Utermann, Barbara; Riegel, Mariluce; Leistritz, Dru; Karall, Thomas; Wisser, Josef; Meisner, Lorraine; Fauth, Christine; Baldinger, Rosa; Johnson, Julie; Erdel, Martin; Taralczak, Malgorzata; Pauli, Richard M; Baumer, Alessandra; Schinzel, Albert; Kotzot, Dieter

    2006-08-01

    Trisomy 17 mosaicism is one of the rarest autosomal trisomies in humans. Thus far, only 23 cases have been described, most of them detected prenatally. In only five instances has mosaicism been demonstrated in lymphocytes and/or fibroblasts postnatally, and only in these have multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), facial dysmorphisms, and mental retardation been reported. Patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism at amniocentesis and a normal karyotype in blood and fibroblasts (n = 17) were always healthy. Here, we report on pre- and postnatal clinical, cytogenetic, molecular-cytogenetic, and molecular findings in four patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism. The first case was detected in cultured but not in short-term chorionic villi and amniocytes. Due to MCA on prenatal ultrasound examination the pregnancy was terminated. The second patient is a 13-month-old healthy boy, in whom low level trisomy 17 mosaicism was detected in cultured chorionic villi only. The third patient is a 2-year-old girl with growth retardation, developmental delay, MCA, and trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, fibroblasts, and placenta, but not in blood and buccal smear. The fourth patient is a 9-year-old boy with growth and mental retardation, sensoneurinal hearing loss, and MCA. Cytogenetic analyses showed trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, skin fibroblasts, and urinary sediment cells, whereas in blood and buccal smear a 46,XY karyotype was found. Molecular investigations in all four cases indicated biparental inheritance of chromosome 17. Formation of trisomy was most likely due to a maternal meiosis I error in Patient 1 and a postzygotic non-disjunction of the paternal chromosome 17 in Patient 4. Cerebellar malformations, reported in two cases from the literature and in two reported here may be a specific feature of trisomy 17 mosaicism. Since the aberration has rarely been reported in lymphocytes, chordocentesis is not indicated in prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal genetic counseling for trisomy 17

  11. Trisomy 9: Review and report of two new cases

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.L.; Kirby, R.S.; Stern, T.P.

    1995-04-10

    Trisomy 9 is a relatively uncommon chromosome abnormality that may sometimes be seen in the nonmosaic state. We reviewed 23 mosaic and 15 nonmosaic cases of trisomy 9, including 2 new cases, in order to better define the prognosis and phenotype of this disorder. A recognizable trisomy 9 phenotype was identified and included a {open_quotes}bulbous{close_quotes} nose, microphthalmia, and dislocated limbs. Other nonspecific anomalies involving various organ systems were also common. With one exception, all survivors had severe mental impairment. Mosaicism for trisomy 9 predicted longer survival, but the degree of mosaicism in lymphocytes or fibroblasts did not predict survival or degree of impairment. Parental chromosome variations were not uncommon. In contrast to prior reports, no specific prognostic finding was identified. A meiotic origin with loss of a trisomic cell line in mosaic cases is suggested. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. [Trisomy 21. Report of 2 cases with unusual karyotypes].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; de Marade, S; Guerra, D

    2001-03-01

    We report two patients with trisomy 21 whose karyotypes revealed unusual translocations. In the first case there was a tandem translocation with two chromosomes 21 attached to the long arm of chromosome 10 (45,XX + tan(10:21;21). In the second case there was an inverted tandem translocation between two chromosomes 21 attached through their long arms (46,XY + dic(21q:21q). The clinical picture in both patients was not different from the usually found in trisomy 21. Since the parent's karyotypes were normal in both cases, it is assumed that both translocations arose "de novo". The need for karyotyping all cases of Down syndrome is emphasized.

  13. Severe epilepsy in an adult with partial trisomy 18q.

    PubMed

    del Gaudio, Luigi; Striano, Salvatore; Coppola, Antonietta

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common presentations associated with chromosome aberrations. Detailed descriptions of some aberration-specific epileptic and electroencephalographic (EEG) phenotypes have been reported (i.e., Angelman syndrome, ring 20 etc.). However there is limited and mixed information about the characteristics of epilepsy related to trisomy 18. Thus a common seizure phenotype has not been characterized yet. Here we describe in detail a patient with refractory epilepsy and partial 18q trisomy.

  14. Trisomy 13: Changing Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Macias, Gabriel; Riley, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of trisomy 13 has been considered incompatible with life. Trisomy 13 is associated with a pattern of congenital anomalies and mental disabilities that make caring for these infants a challenge for both the family and health care professionals. The clinical management of trisomy 13 varies based on the organ systems involved. The current standard of care has been withholding intensive support and providing comfort care. Recent literature suggests there are improved outcomes in infants who receive intensive care at birth. In addition, case reports evaluating older children with trisomy 13 report that, although there are significant intellectual and psychomotor disabilities, these children do meet developmental milestones such as smiling in response to parents, sitting unassisted, and walking with a walker. This case review will include a discussion of the clinical course of an infant born with mosaic trisomy 13 where the parents requested intensive care.

  15. Trisomy 8 restricted to cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Niss, R; Passarge, E

    1976-01-01

    In the course of re-examing cultured fibroblasts stored in liquid nitrogen from a patient with developmental retardation, solitary left kidney, and Wilms tumour, a cell line trisomic for chromosome 8 was found. Trisomy 8 was restricted to fibroblasts in the first 22 subcultures and was absent in later passages as well as in lymphocytes. A familial pericentric inversion of chromosome 2 was observed in three generations including the propositus but was though to be unrelated to the clinical problem. Multiple spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements were seen in several late subcultures. Images PMID:180293

  16. Parental origin and cell stage of non-disjunction of double trisomy in spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing Ying; Tsukishiro, Sami; Nakagawa, Chiaki; Tanemura, Mitsuyo; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Suzumori, Kaoru; Sonta, Shin-ichi

    2005-03-01

    Using polymorphic analysis of microsatellites, we investigated the parental origin and mechanism of double trisomies seen in cases of spontaneous abortion. We obtained chorionic villi from spontaneous abortions, and peripheral blood from females who experienced abortion and their spouses. Chromosomal analysis of 170 cases revealed four cases with double trisomy. The karyotypes of these cases are 48,XX,+16,+22, 48,XXY,+18, 48,XX,+15,+21 and 48,XX,+2,+5. In the present study, the incidence of double trisomy was 2.4% of spontaneous abortions. Polymorphic analysis of microsatellites indicated that extra chromosomes were all of maternal origin in the four cases of double trisomy. The predominance of maternal origin in cases of double trisomy is similar to cases of single trisomy. The result also indicated that both extra chromosomes in two cases occurred by non-disjunction at the first meiotic division, and extra chromosomes in the other two cases occurred by non-disjunction at the first mitotic division. The mean maternal age in cases of double trisomy was significantly higher than that in cases of single trisomy. These findings suggest the possibility that abnormal separation of two or more chromosomes may occur simultaneously in oogonia, and that this phenomenon may increase in relation to the increase in age of women.

  17. Trisomy 18 mosaicism in a 15-year-old boy with normal intelligence and short stature

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    We report a 15-year-old boy with mosaicism for trisomy 18 and normal intelligence. Approximately 50% of his leukocytes are trisomic. This patient represents the sixth report of an individual with trisomy 18 mosaicism and normal intelligence. Those individuals with trisomy 18 mosaicism and normal intelligence need to be advised of increased risks for offspring with chromosome abnormalities and offered the option of prenatal diagnosis for cytogenetic anomalies. 6 refs.

  18. Two trisomy 22 live births in one hospital in 15 months: is it as rare as we thought?

    PubMed

    Naicker, Thirona; Aldous, Colleen

    2014-02-01

    We report two cases of complete non-mosaic trisomy 22 who were born within 15 months of each other in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. In an effort to consolidate diagnostic criteria to suspect trisomy 22 prior to chromosomal testing, we compare the clinical features of these infants with those of 23 other trisomy 22 live borns presented in the literature. We further compare the clinical phenotype of trisomy 22 with those of trisomies 13 and 18 to delineate a clinical picture to presume possible trisomy 22 soon after birth. Dysmorphic features which distinguish trisomy 22 from trisomy 13 and 18 include hypertelorism, long philtrum, long and thin upper lip, webbing of the neck, low set, wide spread nipples and an abnormal anus. Given the poor prognosis of this disorder and early mortality of most confirmed cases, non-aggressive versus aggressive treatment measures should be weighed up as soon after birth as possible.

  19. Recombination and non-disjunction: Molecular studies of trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Hassold, T.; Merrill, M.; Adkins, K.

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy 16 is the most common trisomy in humans, occurring in at least 1% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. It is thought to be completely maternally age dependent, thus it provides a useful model for studying the association of increasing maternal age and non-disjunction. We recently initiated a molecular study of non-disjunction of chromosome 16 to determine the parent and meiotic stage of origin of the extra chromosome, and to study the possible association of non-disjunction and aberrant recombination. To date, we have analyzed 62 spontaneous abortions with trisomy 16. All trisomies were maternally-derived and in virtually all the error occurred at meiosis I. Thus, our results are consistent with the idea that a single, maternal age-related non-disjunctional mechanism is responsible for the vast majority of cases of trisomy 16. In studies of genetic recombination, we have used a panel of 25 chromosome 16 markers to examine the frequency and location of crossing-over in the non-disjunctional meioses. Our results indicate a highly significant reduction in recombination, with 20% of cases having no detectable exchanges, 50% a single exchange and 30% two exchanges; no multiple exchange events were identified. This suggests that reduced - but not absent - recombination is the important predisposing factor, since most cases had at least one exchange. Additionally, our data indicate an altered distribution of crossing-over in trisomy 16, as we rarely observed exchanges in the proximal long and short arms. Thus, it may be that, at least for chromosome 16, the association between maternal age and trisomy is due to diminished recombination, particularly in the proximal regions of the chromosome.

  20. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  1. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Demir, Şenay; Alehan, Fusun; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and hypotonia. As far as we know, this is a new chromosomal anomaly associated with West syndrome. PMID:25878738

  2. Preaxial Polydactyly of the Foot: Variable Expression of Trisomy 13 in a Case from Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mbuyi-Musanzayi, Sébastien; Lumaka, Aimé; Yogolelo Asani, Bienvenu; Lubala Kasole, Toni; Lukusa Tshilobo, Prosper; Kalenga Muenze, Prosper; Tshilombo Katombe, François; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2014-01-01

    Trisomy 13 is a chromosomal disorder characterized by a severe clinical picture of multiple congenital anomalies. We here describe the clinical and genetic features and prognosis observed in a newborn with trisomy 13 from Central Africa. He presented the rare feature of preaxial polydactyly of the feet. PMID:25254124

  3. Generation of trisomies in cancer cells by multipolar mitosis and incomplete cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gisselsson, David; Jin, Yuesheng; Lindgren, David; Persson, Johan; Gisselsson, Lennart; Hanks, Sandra; Sehic, Daniel; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Øra, Ingrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Mertens, Fredrik; Mitelman, Felix; Mandahl, Nils

    2010-01-01

    One extra chromosome copy (i.e., trisomy) is the most common type of chromosome aberration in cancer cells. The mechanisms behind the generation of trisomies in tumor cells are largely unknown, although it has been suggested that dysfunction of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) leads to an accumulation of trisomies through failure to correctly segregate sister chromatids in successive cell divisions. By using Wilms tumor as a model for cancers with trisomies, we now show that trisomic cells can form even in the presence of a functional SAC through tripolar cell divisions in which sister chromatid separation proceeds in a regular fashion, but cytokinesis failure nevertheless leads to an asymmetrical segregation of chromosomes into two daughter cells. A model for the generation of trisomies by such asymmetrical cell division accurately predicted several features of clones having extra chromosomes in vivo, including the ratio between trisomies and tetrasomies and the observation that different trisomies found in the same tumor occupy identical proportions of cells and colocalize in tumor tissue. Our findings provide an experimentally validated model explaining how multiple trisomies can occur in tumor cells that still maintain accurate sister chromatid separation at metaphase–anaphase transition and thereby physiologically satisfy the SAC. PMID:21059955

  4. Mosaic Trisomy 17: Variable Clinical and Cytogenetic Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daber, Robert D.; Chapman, Kimberly A.; Ruchelli, Eduardo; Kasperski, Stefanie; Mulchandani, Surabhi; Thiel, Brian D.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Zackai, Elaine H.; Conlin, Laura K.; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2011-01-01

    Mosaic trisomy 17 is rare with only 28 cases reported and the clinical presentation is highly variable. The diagnosis is most commonly made by prenatal karyotype and in most cases is followed by a normal postnatal karyotype on blood lymphocytes. We present two cases of mosaic trisomy 17 diagnosed prenatally, with follow up in multiple tissues at birth. In the first case, trisomy 17 was identified in all amniocytes, and at birth standard results of chromosome analysis in peripheral blood were normal, but mosaic trisomy 17 was identified (50–75%) in skin fibroblasts by genome-wide SNP array analysis. This patient presented with minor anomalies, congenital heart disease, asymmetry, intestinal malrotation and died on day 9 of life. In the second patient amniocentesis after ultrasound finding of tetralogy of Fallot showed mosaic trisomy 17. Postnatally, results of a SNP array were normal in blood, buccal mucosa and skin. It is possible that the cardiac defect is related to trisomy 17 in key tissues during heart development, although at birth the aneuploidy could not be identified in tissues that are routinely analyzed for diagnosis. These cases add to our understanding of mosaic trisomy 17, highlighting the failure to diagnose this aneuploidy in peripheral blood. PMID:21998853

  5. Partial trisomy D: a diagnostic and cytogenetic dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M M; Rosenmann, A; Dagan, J; Legum, C

    1976-01-01

    An 18-month-old proposita with psychomotor retardation and other congenital abnormalities is presented. Chromosomal analysis of both parents proved normal. However, the karyotype of the proposita contained 47 chromosomes in both lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts. The marker chromosome proved to be a deleted No. 14 or 15. Comparison of the reported cases of partial trisomy D indicates that a definitive clinical syndrome is not apparent in either case. Images PMID:1018316

  6. An unusual case of trisomy 18 associated with paucity of bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Kahramaner, Zelal; Erdemir, Aydin; Cosar, Hese; Turkoglu, Ebru; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Turelik, Ozlem; Cumurcu, Suheyla; Bayol, Umit; Ozer, Esra

    2013-10-01

    A case of neonatal cholestasis associated with Trisomy 18 (Edward's syndrome) is presented. A 3-day-old boy was referred to our clinic due to respiratory distress, elevated serum direct bilirubin levels, a systolic heart murmur, growth restriction and micrognathia. Liver biopsy and chromosomal analysis revealed paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts and Trisomy 18. Extrahepatic biliary atresia was reported in only a few patients with Trisomy 18. To our knowledge, we described for the first time a patient with Trisomy 18 and neonatal cholestasis associated with paucity of interlobular bile ducts.

  7. Surgical Repair of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection in a Neonate With Mosaic Trisomy 8.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Trisomy 8 mosaicism is a relatively rare chromosomal abnormality and has extremely variable phenotype with a wide range of clinical manifestations. Although no well-defined criteria for cardiac surgical indications are available for patients with mosaic trisomy 8, we present a case of hypoplastic left heart syndrome with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) in a neonate with mosaic trisomy 8. Although primary sutureless repair of TAPVC with concomitant bilateral pulmonary artery banding was performed successfully in this case, the indications for cardiac surgery in patients with mosaic trisomy 8 should be carefully individualized. The entire dialog with parents and family, including the process of informed consent, is of great importance.

  8. Clinical features of trisomy 12 mosaicism-Report and review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Zunich, Janice; Openshaw, Amanda; M Toydemir, Reha

    2017-03-27

    Trisomy 12 mosaicism is a rare condition. Herein, we report a patient with mosaic trisomy 12 who was conceived by in vitro fertilization. She presented with mild dysmorphic features at birth, including down-slanting palpebral fissures, a depressed and creased nasal bridge, and mild rhizomelic shortening of the limbs. She had age-appropriate development at 6 months of age, but displayed slightly more dysmorphic features than at birth. Chromosome analysis on peripheral blood revealed a normal female karyotype in 50 metaphases. A concurrent genomic microarray analysis showed trisomy 12 in about 25% of the specimen, which was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the CEP12 probe. Our findings further delineate the clinical features in trisomy 12 mosaicism in liveborns and demonstrate the utility of genomic microarray analysis in identification of mosaic aneuploidies.

  9. Recombination and maternal age-dependent nondisjunction: Molecular studies of trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Hassold, T.; Merrill, M.; Adkins, K.

    1995-10-01

    Trisomy 16 is the most common human trisomy, occurring in {ge} 1% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. It is thought to be completely dependent on maternal age and thus provides a useful model for studying the association of increasing maternal age and nondisjunction. We have been conducting a study to determine the parent and meiotic stage of origin of trisorny 16 and the possible association of nondisjunction and aberrant recombination. In the present report, we summarize our observations on 62 spontaneous abortions with trisomy 16. All trisomies were maternally derived, and in virtually all the error occurred at meiosis I. In studies of genetic recombination, we observed a highly significant reduction in recombination in the trisomy-generating meioses by comparison with normal female meioses. However, most cases of trisomy 16 had at least one detectable crossover between the nondisjoined chromosomes, indicating that it is reduced-and not absent-recombination that is the important predisposing factor. Additionally, our data indicate an altered distribution of crossing-over in trisomy 16, as we rarely observed crossovers in the proximal long and short arms. Thus, it may be that, at least for trisomy 16, the association between maternal age and trisomy is due to diminished recombination, particularly in the proximal regions of the chromosome. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. 47,XXX male: A clinical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Matsuo, M; Muroya, K; Koyama, Y; Fukutani, K

    2001-02-01

    We report a 53-year-old Japanese male with a 47,XXX karyotype. His clinical features included hypoplastic scrotal testes (4 ml bilaterally), normally formed small penis (3.8 cm), relatively poor pubic hair development (Tanner stage 3), gynecomastia, age-appropriate male height (159.1 cm), and mental retardation (verbal IQ of 56). Serum testosterone was markedly reduced (0.6 nmol/L). A needle biopsy showed severe testicular degeneration. FISH analysis revealed complex mosaicism consisting of (1) 47,XXX cells with a single copy of SRY (n = 177), two copies of SRY (n = 3), and no SRY (n = 1); (2) 46,XX cells with a single copy of SRY (n = 9) and no SRY (n = 3); (3) 45,X cells with no SRY (n = 5); and (4) 48,XXXX cells with a single copy of SRY (n = 1) and two copies of SRY (n = 1). PCR analysis showed the presence of Yp portion with the breakpoint between DYS264 and AMELY. Microsatellite analysis demonstrated three alleles for DMD and AR. X-inactivation analysis for the methylation status of the AR gene showed random inactivation of the three X chromosomes. The results suggest that this 47,XXX male has resulted from abnormal X-Y interchange during paternal meiosis and X-X nondisjunction during maternal meiosis. Complex mosaicism may be due to the age-related increase in mitotic nondisjunction which is prone to occur in rapidly dividing lymphocytes and to the presence of two randomly inactivated X chromosomes which may behave asynchronously during mitosis, and clinical features of this male would primarily be explained by the genetic information on the SRY (+) der(X) chromosome and his advanced age.

  11. The growth of XXX females: population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, S G; Pan, H; McKie, M

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinal measurements of height, sitting height and leg length are compared between 11 XXX girls identified by cytogenetic screening, and 16 chromosomally normal controls from the same population using a nonparametric method. While height velocity did not differ between the two groups either during the pubertal or the mid-childhood spurts, leg length velocity was significantly increased during the mid-childhood spurt, between 4 and 9 years of age. A further contribution to the increased leg length came from the slower decline in leg length velocity at the end of the pubertal spurt. The possible mechanisms involved in these changes are discussed.

  12. Bethe vectors for XXX-spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdík, Čestmír; Fuksa, Jan; Isaev, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    The paper deals with algebraic Bethe ansatz for XXX-spin chain. Generators of Yang-Baxter algebra are expressed in basis of free fermions and used to calculate explicit form of Bethe vectors. Their relation to N-component models is used to prove conjecture about their form in general. Some remarks on inhomogeneous XXX-spin chain are included.

  13. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  14. Anatomy of trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wallisa; Zurada, Anna; Zurada-ZieliŃSka, Agnieszka; Gielecki, Jerzy; Loukas, Marios

    2016-07-01

    Trisomy 18 is the second most common aneuploidy after trisomy 21. Due to its multi-systemic defects, it has a poor prognosis with a 50% chance of survival beyond one week and a <10% chance of survival beyond one year of life. However, this prognosis has been challenged by the introduction of aggressive interventional therapies for patients born with trisomy 18. As a result, a review of the anatomy associated with this defect is imperative. While any of the systems can be affected by trisomy 18, the following areas are the most likely to be affected: craniofacial, musculoskeletal system, cardiac system, abdominal, and nervous system. More specifically, the following features are considered characteristic of trisomy 18: low-set ears, rocker bottom feet, clenched fists, and ventricular septal defect. Of particular interest is the associated cardiac defect, as surgical repairs of these defects have shown an improved survivability. In this article, the anatomical defects associated with each system are reviewed. Clin. Anat. 29:628-632, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses.

    PubMed Central

    Loughna, S; Bennett, P; Gau, G; Nicolaides, K; Blunt, S; Moore, G

    1993-01-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8213811

  16. Prenatal detection of double aneuploidy trisomy 10/monosomy X in a liveborn twin with exclusively monosomy X in blood.

    PubMed

    Mielke, G; Enders, H; Goelz, R; Klein-Vogler, U; Ulmer, R; Trautmann, U

    1997-04-01

    Both double aneuploidy and trisomy 10 are rare chromosome findings. All five published cases of trisomy 10 in liveborns were found to be mosaic with an euploid cell line. In a liveborn female twin, double aneuploidy mosaicism 47,XX, + 10/45,X was detected prenatally by amniocentesis performed because of severe intrauterine growth retardation and malformations. Chromosome analysis from neonatal lymphocyte cultures revealed exclusively the 45,X cell line. Double aneuploidy mosaicism trisomy 10/monosomy X was confirmed from skin fibroblasts. The child died at the age of 7 weeks. This is the first reported case of double aneuploidy involving trisomy 10, and the first case of trisomy 10 without a normal cell line in a liveborn. Prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 10 in a liveborn has not been published so far. The case illustrates that in specific cases amniotic fluid cells may reflect the karyotype of the fetus better than blood.

  17. Reduced size of the amygdala in individuals with 47,XXY and 47,XXX karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Anil J; Brown, Wendy E; Bender, Bruce G; Linden, Mary G; Eliez, Stephan; Reiss, Allan L

    2002-01-08

    The excess of 47,XXX and 47,XXY karyotypes found in cytogenetic screening studies of individuals with schizophrenia has given support for an increased risk of psychiatric illness among men and women with sex chromosomal aneuploidy (SCA). Mesial temporal lobe structures, including the amygdala and hippocampus, are thought to be associated with abnormalities of mood and behavior in humans and in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. This study focuses on variations in volumes of mesial temporal lobe structures in men and women with SCA. Utilizing an unselected birth cohort of subjects with SCA and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we investigated the neuroanatomical consequences of a supernumerary X chromosome on the morphology of the amygdala and hippocampus. Regional and total brain volumes were measured in 10 subjects with 47,XXY, 10 subjects with 47,XXX, and 20 euploid controls. Amygdala volumes were significantly reduced in men with 47,XXY, compared to control men, while the decrease in women with 47,XXX was not as pronounced. Hippocampus volumes were preserved in both groups, compared to same-gender controls. Longitudinal studies of SCA individuals have shown an increased incidence of mild psychopathology and behavioral dysfunction in men with 47,XXY and more overt psychiatric illness in women with 47,XXX, compared to control populations. The alteration in amygdala volumes in individuals with a supernumerary X chromosome may provide a neuroanatomic basis for these findings.

  18. The impact of trisomy 21 on foetal haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Irene; O'Connor, David; Roy, Anindita; Cowan, Gillian; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-12-01

    The high frequency of a unique neonatal preleukaemic syndrome, transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM), and subsequent acute myeloid leukaemia in early childhood in patients with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) points to a specific role for trisomy 21 in transforming foetal haematopoietic cells. N-terminal truncating mutations in the key haematopoietic transcription factor GATA1 are acquired during foetal life in virtually every case. These mutations are not leukaemogenic in the absence of trisomy 21. In mouse models, deregulated expression of chromosome 21-encoded genes is implicated in leukaemic transformation, but does not recapitulate the effects of trisomy 21 in a human context. Recent work using primary human foetal liver and bone marrow cells, human embryonic stem cells and iPS cells shows that prior to acquisition of GATA1 mutations, trisomy 21 itself alters human foetal haematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell biology causing multiple abnormalities in myelopoiesis and B-lymphopoiesis. The molecular basis by which trisomy 21 exerts these effects is likely to be extremely complex, to be tissue-specific and lineage-specific and to be dependent on ontogeny-related characteristics of the foetal microenvironment.

  19. The impact of trisomy 21 on foetal haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Irene; O'Connor, David; Roy, Anindita; Cowan, Gillian; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    The high frequency of a unique neonatal preleukaemic syndrome, Transient Abnormal Myelopoiesis (TAM), and subsequent acute myeloid leukaemia in early childhood in patients with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) points to a specific role for trisomy 21 in transforming foetal haematopoietic cells. N-terminal truncating mutations in the key haematopoietic transcription factor GATA1 are acquired during foetal life in virtually every case. These mutations are not leukaemogenic in the absence of trisomy 21. In mouse models, deregulated expression of chromosome 21-encoded genes is implicated in leukaemic transformation, but does not recapitulate the effects of trisomy 21 in a human context. Recent work using primary human foetal liver and bone marrow cells, human embryonic stem cells and iPS cells cells shows that prior to acquistion of GATA1 mutations, trisomy 21 itself alters human foetal haematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell biology causing multiple abnormalities in myelopoiesis and B-lymphopoiesis. The molecular basis by which trisomy 21 exerts these effects is likely to be extremely complex, to be tissue- and lineage-specific and to be dependent on ontogeny-related characteristics of the foetal microenvironment. PMID:23932236

  20. Klinefelter's syndrome in nontwin brothers and maternal XX/XXX mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Monti, D; Gaspari, G; Ravaglia, G; Guadagni, C; Businello, M; Lamedica, R; Lenzi, S

    1979-01-01

    A case of two nontwin brothers, 19 and 17 years old, who had both Klinefelter's syndrome with a chromosomal mosaicism 46 XY/47 XXY, is reported here. The analysis of their mother's karyotype revealed a 46 XX/47 XXX mosaicism. It is hypothesized that the presence of an extra X chromosome in all three subjects could depend on the transmission of two X chromosomes from the mother to the sons or, less likely, on an increased liability to nondisjunction of the X chromosomes during one of the early mitotic divisions in the zygotes.

  1. Trisomy 13, 18, 21, Triploidy and Turner syndrome: the 5T’s. Look at the hands

    PubMed Central

    Witters, G.; Van Robays, J.; Willekes, C.; Coumans, A.; Peeters, H.; Gyselaers, W.; Fryns, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    First trimester spontaneous abortions occur in 15 to 20% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. Chromosomal anomalies are responsible for more than 50% of spontaneous abortions. The majority (90%) of these chromosomal anomalies are numerical, particularly autosomal trisomies (involving chromosomes 13,16, 18, 21, 22), polyploidy and monosomy X. At birth chromosomal anomalies are still an important cause of congenital malformations occurring in 0,55% of newborns (autosomal: 0,40%, sex chromosomal: 0,15%). Autosomal trisomies result from maternal meiotic nondisjunction of gametogenesis and the risk increases with maternal age. Polyploidy (triploidy (3n = 69) or tetraploidy (4n = 92)), results from a contribution of one or more extra haploid chromosome sets at fertilization. Unlike the risk for autosomal trisomies, the risk for polyploidies and for monosomy X (Turner syndrome) does not increase with maternal age. In the prenatal period the ultrasonographic diagnosis of some autosomal trisomies such as trisomy 13 and 18 is feasible based on the frequently seen major malformations while the diagnosis of trisomy 21 often remains challenging due to the absence of major malformations in > 50% of cases. For Turner syndrome (monosomy X), the lethal form will present with cystic hygroma colli and hydrops but the non lethal form is difficult to recognize by ultrasound in the second trimester. The 5 frequently encountered chromosomal anomalies (Trisomy 13, 18, 21, Turner syndrome and Triploidy) referred here as the 5T’s have specific hand features which will be discussed. PMID:24753843

  2. Familial distal trisomy 8(q24.13----qter).

    PubMed Central

    Romain, D R; Bloxham, R A; Columbano-Green, L M; Chapman, C J; Parfitt, R G; Smythe, R H; Cairney, H

    1989-01-01

    Trisomy for the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 8(q24.13----qter) is described in three sibs. The anomaly arose as an adjacent 1 meiotic segregation from a balanced reciprocal translocation t(1;8)(q44; q24.13)mat. Images PMID:2918543

  3. Trisomy 1q in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Prodromos; Kojouri, Kiarash; Lee, Jiyun; Kern, William; Mulvihill, John J; Li, Shibo

    2006-08-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare, serious disease characterized by hypocellular bone marrow and pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Most cases are acquired, idiopathic, and without gross cytogenetic abnormalities. A few chromosome abnormalities have recurred among a small subset of patients, most commonly trisomy 8 and monosomy 7. Some of these chromosome abnormalities have prognostic and therapeutic significance, although for most the clinical relevance is not known. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with idiopathic severe aplastic anemia in bone marrow cells with trisomy of the whole long arm of chromosome 1 due to an unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 1 and 15 at breakpoints of q10 and 15q10. This clonal abnormality (which, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported in a patient with aplastic anemia) suggests that genes on 1q may be involved in marrow aplasia.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and prognosis of triple X syndrome: 47, XXX.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamouda, H; Mkacher, N; Elghezal, H; Bannour, H; Kamoun, M; Soua, H; Saad, A; Souissi, M M; Sfar, M T

    2009-11-01

    Triple X syndrome is a relatively common sex chromosomal abnormality occurring in 0,1% of live-born female infants. Most of these infants have a normal phenotype and only a few cases with 47, XXX karyotype have congenital malformations. We report three cases of triple X syndrome that were diagnosed prenatally by genetic amniocentesis for advanced maternal age and have been observed from birth to age of 3 to 12 years. A description of their growth and development is presented. The birth weight was normal in all patients and one of them had facial dysmorphism with right microphtalmia and auricular septal defect. During the first 2 years of life, the neuromotor development of these infants was not distinguishable from chromosomally normal children. By 3 years of age, two patients have a moderate developmental delay in speech and language. One girl 12-year-old had normal schooling. The diagnosis of the triple X syndrome can be never made because clinical demonstrations are not rather important to arouse the demand of a karyotype. Prenatal diagnosis is often made in front of the advanced maternal age. Expectant parents must be counseled as to the significance of this 47, XXX karyotype and prognostic information must be given.

  5. DNA sequencing of maternal plasma reliably identifies trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 as well as Down syndrome: an international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Palomaki, Glenn E.; Deciu, Cosmin; Kloza, Edward M.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn M.; Haddow, James E.; Neveux, Louis M.; Ehrich, Mathias; van den Boom, Dirk; Bombard, Allan T.; Grody, Wayne W.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Canick, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether maternal plasma cell–free DNA sequencing can effectively identify trisomy 18 and 13. Methods: Sixty-two pregnancies with trisomy 18 and 12 with trisomy 13 were selected from a cohort of 4,664 pregnancies along with matched euploid controls (including 212 additional Down syndrome and matched controls already reported), and their samples tested using a laboratory-developed, next-generation sequencing test. Interpretation of the results for chromosome 18 and 13 included adjustment for CG content bias. Results: Among the 99.1% of samples interpreted (1,971/1,988), observed trisomy 18 and 13 detection rates were 100% (59/59) and 91.7% (11/12) at false-positive rates of 0.28% and 0.97%, respectively. Among the 17 samples without an interpretation, three were trisomy 18. If z-score cutoffs for trisomy 18 and 13 were raised slightly, the overall false-positive rates for the three aneuploidies could be as low as 0.1% (2/1,688) at an overall detection rate of 98.9% (280/283) for common aneuploidies. An independent academic laboratory confirmed performance in a subset. Conclusion: Among high-risk pregnancies, sequencing circulating cell–free DNA detects nearly all cases of Down syndrome, trisomy 18, and trisomy 13, at a low false-positive rate. This can potentially reduce invasive diagnostic procedures and related fetal losses by 95%. Evidence supports clinical testing for these aneuploidies. PMID:22281937

  6. Communication ability in persons with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Barbara; McDaniel, Jena; Spragge, Sara; Loncke, Filip; Braddock, Stephen R; Carey, John C

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess communication abilities among a sample of 10 individuals with Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13. These 10 individuals were diagnosed with Trisomy 18 (n = 8) or Trisomy 13 (n = 2) and had a mean age of 15.96 years. The sample consisted of one male and nine females. Caregivers completed a case history and reported on words and gestures understood and/or produced. Participants were also videotaped during communication temptation tasks. Auditory comprehension was reported to be higher than expressive language. No participant produced intelligible words or word approximations, yet most produced hand gestures. The process and results of these 10 cases point to a potentially promising approach for assessing communication abilities in individuals with Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13.

  7. Analysis of two 47,XXX males reveals X-Y interchange and maternal or paternal nondisjunction.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G; Schempp, W; Fraccaro, M; Bausch, E; Bigozzi, V; Maraschio, P; Montali, E; Simoni, G; Wolf, U

    1989-02-01

    Two cases of 47,XXX males were studied, one of which has been published previously (Bigozzi et al. 1980). Analysis of X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed that in this case, one X chromosome was of paternal and two were of maternal origin, whereas in the other case, two X chromosomes were of paternal and one of maternal origin. Southern blot analysis with Y-specific DNA probes demonstrated the presence of Y short arm sequences in both XXX males. In one case, the results obtained pointed to a paracentric inversion on Yp of the patient's father. In situ hybridization indicated that the Y-specific DNA sequences were localized on Xp22.3 in one of the three X chromosomes in both cases. The presence of Y DNA had no effect on random X inactivation. It is concluded that both XXX males originate from aberrant X-Y interchange during paternal meiosis, with coincident nondisjunction of the X chromosome during maternal meiosis in case 1, and during paternal meiosis II in case 2.

  8. Familial 10p trisomy resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, C.; Meck, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors report a familial recombination of a pericentric inversion of chromosome 10 resulting in 2 affected relatives who had 10p trisomy and 10q monosomy with the karyotypic abnormality designated rec(10) dup p,inv(10) (p11.2q26). Both of these individuals had the typical characteristics of 10p trisomy, however, at birth the proposita had mild facial anomalies suggesting that the distinct facial characteristics may be of postnatal onset in some cases. In addition, the proposita had gastroesophageal reflux causing severe anemia. The phenotype of the patients is compared to 41 patients with 10p trisomy reported in the literature. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A tumor profile in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18).

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Constitutional trisomy 18 causes Edwards syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability and a particular set of malformations. Although this condition carries high mortality during prenatal and early postnatal life, some of the rare infants who survive the first months develop benign and malignant tumors. To determine the tumor profile associated with Edwards syndrome, we performed a systematic review of the literature. This review reveals a tumor profile differing from those of Down (trisomy 21) and Patau (trisomy 13) syndromes. The literature covers 45 malignancies: 29 were liver cancers, mainly hepatoblastomas found in Japanese females; 13 were kidney tumors, predominantly nephroblastomas; 1 was neuroblastoma; 1 was a Hodgkin disease; and 1 was acute myeloid leukemia in an infant with both trisomy 18 and type 1 neurofibromatosis. No instances of the most frequent malignancies of early life-cerebral tumors, germ cell tumors, or leukemia--are reported in children with pure trisomy 18. Tumor occurrence does not appear to correlate with body weight, tissue growth, or cancer genes mapping to chromosome 18. Importantly, the most recent clinical histories report successful treatment; this raises ethical concerns about cancer treatment in infants with Edwards syndrome. In conclusion, knowledge of the Edwards' syndrome tumor profile will enable better clinical surveillance in at-risk organs (i.e., liver, kidney). This knowledge also provides clues to understanding oncogenesis, including the probably reduced frequency of some neoplasms in infants and children with this genetic condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Tertiary trisomy of 10p15.pter and 14pter.ql3 due to maternal translocation t(10;14)(p15;q13).

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Mihci, E; Keser, I; Luleci, G

    2012-01-01

    Double partial trisomy resulting from 3:1 segregation of the respective chromosomal segments of the chromosomes involved in a balanced translocation in meiosis is rarely reported in the literature. We present here a first patient with multiple congenital malformations associated with double partial trisomy of 10pter-p15 and 14pter-q13 resulting from 3:1 segregation of maternal balanced translocation t(10;14)(p15;q13). Proximal partial trisomy of chromosome 14 and subterminal trisomy of the short arm of the chromosome 10 are rare. The present case is the first case with double partial trisomy of these segments resulting from 3:1 segregation of a maternal balanced translocation.

  11. Trisomy 7 CVS mosaicism: Pregnancy outcome, placental and DNA analysis in 14 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kalousek, D.K.; Langlois, S.; Robinson, W.P.

    1996-11-11

    Prenatal diagnosis by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) documents placental chromosomal mosaicism in approximately 2% of viable pregnancies at 9-12 weeks of gestation and can involve various chromosomes and placental cell lineages. Confined placental mosaicism (CPM) is the result of postzygotic mitotic errors occurring in either diploid or trisomic zygotes. With trisomic zygote rescue, depending on the parental origin of the chromosome which is lost, uniparental disomy (UPD) or biparental disomy (BPD) may arise. In this paper, we present 14 pregnancies which were diagnosed by CVS as mosaic trisomy 7. All follow-up amniocenteses showed a normal diploid karyotype. Using both classical cytogenetics and interphase analysis, studies of term placentae showed variable levels of trisomy 7. DNA analysis was performed in nine cases to determine whether the diploid fetus had BPD 7 or UPD 7. Fetal UPD 7 was present only in one case; in eight other cases biparental inheritance was demonstrated. DNA analysis to establish the origin of trisomy 7 in the placenta was fully informative in six cases. One trisomy resulted from a meiotic error and was associated with fetal UPD 7, while the rest were somatic in origin. It is difficult to compare the effect of CPM for trisomy 7 to other trisomies confined to the placenta, as for most chromosomes there are few available cases. It appears that intrauterine fetal growth is not greatly affected by the presence of a trisomy 7 cell line in the placenta. This finding is in contrast to the serious effect of high levels of trisomy 16 within the placenta on fetal intrauterine growth in a series of well-documented cases of CPM 16. 36 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Trisomy 21 with 47,+18 lymphocyte cell line: double mitotic nondisjunction.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M B; Kriel, R L; Boyd, L; Barnwell, A

    1978-01-01

    A patient with Down's syndrome was found to have 47,XX,+18/47,XX,+21 mosaicism. Chromosome 18 trisomy was found only in 18% of lymphocytes and not in skin fibroblasts. A likely interpretation is double nondisjunction in a single lymphocyte precursor of a trisomy 21 embryo. A brief review of other cases of mitotic multiple nondisjunction and double aneuploid mosiacism is presented. Images PMID:153975

  13. Double aneuploidy involving trisomy 7 with Potter sequence.

    PubMed

    Biri, Aydan; Karaoğuz, Meral Yirmibes; Ince, Gönül Didem; Ergün, Mehmet Ali; Menevşe, Sevda; Bingöl, Banu

    2005-01-01

    We report a prenatal case of double aneuploidy (consisting of chromosome 7 and X) with the features of Potter sequence. Of the stillborn fetus, skin fibroblast cultures were performed and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was also used for further investigation. On physical examination; the fetus was found to have malformed ears, micrognatia, hypertelorism, abnormal extremities, rocker-bottom feet and abnormal external genitalia and polycystic right kidney was seen after an extensive autopsy. As amniocentesis and cordocentesis materials revealed X chromosome mosaicism, trisomy 7 was detected in the skin fibroblast culture of the ex fetus and karyotype evaluated as composite; 46~47,X,+7,-X[cp18]. FISH results confirmed the double aneuploidy and also revealed XX and XXXX cell lines. Comparison with the previously reported cases of trisomy 7 with Potter syndrome suggests a possible link (if not coincidental) between trisomy 7 and Potter syndrome in our case. This is the first reported case of double aneuploidy involving trisomy 7 with the features of Potter syndrome.

  14. Autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome in a 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic woman.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a patient with autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A 36-year-old woman was admitted due to petechiae, purpura, gingival bleeding, dyspnea on exertion, and a lack of concentration. She had pancytopenia and was diagnosed with SS. A bone marrow study showed hypercellular marrow with reticulin fibrosis. Lymphocytic infiltrates and aggregates composed of a mixture of T and B cells in the marrow were also observed. A chromosomal analysis of the marrow cells showed 47, XXX and an analysis of peripheral lymphocytes revealed 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic results. The patient's cytopenia resolved following treatment with oral prednisolone.

  15. Confined trisomy 8 mosaicism of meiotic origin: a rare cause of aneuploidy in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Valind, Anders; Pal, Niklas; Asmundsson, Jurate; Gisselsson, David; Holmquist Mengelbier, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Whether chromosome abnormalities observed in tumor cells may in some cases reflect low-grade somatic mosaicism for anomalies present already at zygote formation, rather than acquired somatic mutations, has for long remained a speculation. We here report a patient with Wilms tumor, where constitutional somatic mosaicism of trisomy 8 was detected in a previously healthy 2 ½-year-old boy. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of tumor tissue revealed a complex distribution of allele frequencies for chromosome 8 that could not be explained solely by mitotic events. Combined analysis of allele frequencies, chromosome banding, and fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the majority of tumor cells contained four copies of chromosome 8, with three distinct haplotypes at a 2:1:1 ratio. Because the patient had not been subject to organ transplantation, these findings indicated that the tumor karyotype evolved from a cell with trisomy 8 of meiotic origin, with subsequent somatic gain of one additional chromosome copy. Haplotype analysis was consistent with trisomy 8 through nondisjunction at meiosis I. Matched normal renal tissue or peripheral blood did not contain detectable amounts of cells with trisomy 8, consistent with the complete lack of mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome features in the patient. This case provides proof of principle for the hypothesis that tumor genotypes may in rare cases reflect meiotic rather than mitotic events, also in patients lacking syndromic features. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [A case of partial 1p36.1 deletion and partial trisomy 6p diagnosed by karyotype].

    PubMed

    Fernández Pineda, Monica; Ramírez-Cheyne, Julián; Isaza, Carolina; Saldarriaga, Wilmar

    The deletion of chromosomal region 1p36 is one of the most common sub-telomeric microdeletion syndromes and has distinctive dysmorphic features. On the other hand, partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 6 is a rare chromosomal abnormality with a variable phenotype.

  17. Germline mosaicism does not explain the maternal age effect on trisomy.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, Ross; Kashevarova, Anna; Murdoch, Brenda; Dickenson, Carrie; Woodruff, Tracey; Cheng, Edith; Hunt, Patricia; Hassold, Terry

    2013-10-01

    A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between trisomy and increasing maternal age in humans, virtually all of which assume that the underlying mechanisms involve meiotic errors. However, recently Hultén and colleagues [Hulten et al., 2010b] proposed a provocative model-the Oocyte Mosaicism Selection Model (OMSM)-that links age-dependent trisomy 21 to pre-meiotic errors in the ovary. Specifically, they propose that nondisjunctional events occur in a proportion of germ cells as they mitotically proliferate, resulting in mosaicism for trisomy 21. Assuming that the presence of an additional chromosome 21 delays meiotic progression, these cells would be ovulated later in reproductive life, resulting in an age-dependent increase in aneuploid eggs. Because this model has important clinical implications, we initiated studies to test it. We first analyzed oocytes from two trisomy 21 fetuses, combining immunostaining with FISH to determine the likelihood of detecting the additional chromosome 21 at different stages of meiosis. The detection of trisomy was enhanced during the earliest stage of prophase (leptotene), before homologs synapsed. Accordingly, in subsequent studies we examined the chromosome content of leptotene oocytes in seven second trimester female fetuses, analyzing three chromosomes commonly associated with human trisomies (i.e., 13, 16, and 21). In contrast to the prediction of the OMSM, we found no evidence of trisomy mosaicism for any chromosome. We conclude that errors in pre-meiotic germ cells are not a major contributor to human aneuploidy and do not provide an explanation for the age-related increase in trisomic conceptions.

  18. Rare case of massive congenital bilateral chylothorax in a hydropic fetus with true mosaicism 47,XXX/46,XX.

    PubMed

    Cremonini, Giorgio; Poggi, Alice; Capucci, Roberta; Vesce, Fortunato; Patella, Alfredo; Marci, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Fetal congenital chylothorax is a rare condition that occurs sporadically or can be associated with abnormal karyotype or structural chromosomal anomalies. We report a unique case of fetal congenital bilateral chylothorax associated with mosaicism 47,XXX/46,XX. A female fetus affected by massive bilateral hydrothorax and ascites was diagnosed at 34(+1) weeks of gestation. Previous ultrasonographic exams were completely normal. Immune causes of hydrops were excluded. Elective cesarean section was performed soon after bilateral thoracocentesis. The analysis of drained pleural fluid revealed its lymphatic nature. The fetal karyotyping, performed on chorionic villi at the 11th week, had shown mosaicism 47,XXX/46,XX, later confirmed in the newborn's blood. We hypothesized that chylothorax may be part of the phenotypic spectrum of 47 XXX karyotype and we suggest an ultrasound follow-up of the fetus at closer intervals than the routine timing for this condition, even if it is not usually characterized by severe phenotypic features.

  19. [Generalized angitis and recurrent infection associated hemophagocytic syndrome in a girl with XXX syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Satoh, T; Kubo, M

    1995-06-01

    We have encountered a case of a girl with XXX syndrome who had infection associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) recurrently. The patient presented hyper-gammaglobulinemia during the clinical course and developed IAHS probably because of infection with Rubella virus and EB virus each as a trigger. Diseases that cause abnormality in X chromosome are said to present immune abnormality such as SLE in many cases. It is possible that the excessive X chromosome in this cases partially concerned with such as an immune abnormality as to cause recurrent IAHS.

  20. Understanding the role of hyperdiploidy in myeloma prognosis: which trisomies really matter?

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, Marie-Lorraine; Corre, Jill; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Magrangeas, Florence; Cleynen, Alice; Yon, Edwige; Hulin, Cyrille; Leleu, Xavier; Orsini-Piocelle, Frederique; Blade, Jean-Sebastien; Sohn, Claudine; Karlin, Lionel; Delbrel, Xavier; Hebraud, Benjamin; Roussel, Murielle; Marit, Gerald; Garderet, Laurent; Mohty, Mohamad; Rodon, Philippe; Voillat, Laurent; Royer, Bruno; Jaccard, Arnaud; Belhadj, Karim; Fontan, Jean; Caillot, Denis; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Attal, Michel; Facon, Thierry; Moreau, Philippe; Minvielle, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of multiple myeloma is mainly dependent upon chromosomal changes. The 2 major abnormalities driving poor outcome are del(17p) and t(4;14). However, the outcome of these high-risk patients is not absolutely uniform, with some patients presenting long survival. We hypothesized that these better outcomes might be related to concomitant “good-risk” chromosomal changes exploring hyperdiploidy. We analyzed a large series of 965 myeloma patients, including 168 patients with t(4;14) and 126 patients with del(17p), using high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays after plasma cell sorting. As expected, trisomic chromosomes were highly associated. Using the LASSO model, we found that only chromosome 3, when trisomic, was associated with a longer progression-free survival and that 3 trisomies modulated overall survival (OS) in myeloma patients: trisomies 3 and 5 significantly improved OS, whereas trisomy 21 worsened OS. In patients with t(4;14), trisomies 3 and/or 5 seemed to overcome the poor prognosis. For the first time, using a specific modeling approach, we show that not all trisomies display the same prognostic impact. This finding could be important for routine assessment of prognosis in myeloma, and some high-risk patients with a traditional evaluation could in fact be standard-risk patients. PMID:26516228

  1. The role of cytologic NOR variants in the etiology of trisomy 21.

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, N B; Eunpu, D L; Schmickel, R D; Zackai, E H; McEldrew, D; Bunin, G R; McDermid, H; Emanuel, B S

    1989-01-01

    Silver-stained chromosomes from 29 couples with a trisomy 21 offspring and from 25 control couples were studied to determine whether there was an association of nucleolar-organizing-region variants in parents of children with trisomy 21. A reproducible scoring system for the analysis of silver-stained chromosomes was developed, and this was applied to the analysis of study participants in a blinded fashion. Seven of the 58 parents of children with trisomy 21 and seven of the 50 control parents were found to have variant NORs on silver staining. Therefore, we do not find a demonstrable risk for nondisjunction of chromosome 21 in individuals with silver-staining variants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2523191

  2. Aberrant "Barbed-Wire" Nuclear Projections of Neutrophils in Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Kahwash, Basil M; Nowacki, Nicholas B; Kahwash, Samir B

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the significance of neutrophils with increased, aberrant nuclear projections mimicking "barbed-wire" in a newborn child with trisomy 18 (T18). Increased, aberrant nuclear projections have been previously reported in trisomy of the D group of chromosomes (chromosomes 13, 14, and 15), and we report similar findings in a patient with T18. The peripheral blood smear showed relative neutrophilia with the majority (37%) of neutrophils showing two or more thin, rod-shaped or spike-shaped, and often pedunculated aberrant nuclear projections. The number of projections ranged from 2 to 6 per cell, averaged 2 per affected neutrophil, and ranged in length from 0.22 μm to 0.83 μm. This case confirms that the morphologic finding described is not restricted to trisomy of one of the chromosomes in group D, as implied in the literature.

  3. A rare case of trisomy 11q23.3-11q25 and trisomy 22q11.1-22q11.21.

    PubMed

    Zou, P-S; Li, H-F; Chen, L-S; Ma, M; Chen, X-H; Xue, D; Cao, D-H

    2016-05-09

    Partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 11 and the partial trisomy of 22q are uncommon karyotypic abnormalities. Here, we report the case of a 6-year-old girl who showed partial trisomy of 11q and 22q, as a result of a maternal balanced reciprocal translocation (11;22), and exhibited dysmorphic features, severe intellectual disability, brain malformations, and speech delay related to this unique chromosomal abnormality. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) revealed a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 11, spanning at least 18.22 Mb. Additionally, there was a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 22, spanning at least 3.46 Mb. FISH analysis using a chromosome 11 short arm telomere probe (11p14.2), a chromosome 11 long arm telomere probe (11q24.3), and a chromosome 22 long arm telomere probe (22q13.33) confirmed the origin of the marker chromosome. It has been confirmed by the State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics of China that this is the first reported instance of the karyotype 47,XX, +der(22)t(11;22)(q23.3;q11.1)mat in the world. Our study reports an additional case that can be used to further characterize and delineate the clinical ramifications of partial trisomy of 11q and 22q.

  4. DNA polymorphism analysis in families with recurrence of free trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Pangalos, Constantinos G.; Talbot, C. Conover; Lewis, John G.; Adelsberger, Patricia A.; Petersen, Michael B.; Serre, Jean-Louis; Rethoré, Marie-Odile; de Blois, Marie-Christine; Parent, Philipe; Schinzel, Albert A.; Binkert, Franz; Boue, Joelle; Corbin, Elisabeth; Croquette, M. F.; Gilgenkrantz, Simone; de Grouchy, Jean; Bertheas, M. F.; Prieur, Marguerite; Raoul, Odile; Serville, Francoise; Siffroi, J. P.; Thepot, Francois; Lejeune, Jerome; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    1992-01-01

    We used DNA polymorphic markers on the long arm of human chromosome 21 in order to determine the parental and meiotic origin of the extra chromosome 21 in families with recurrent free trisomy 21. A total of 22 families were studied, 13 in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were siblings (category 1), four families in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were second-degree relatives (category 2), and five families in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were third-degree relatives, that is, their parents were siblings (category 3). In five category 1 families, parental mosaicism was detected, while in the remaining eight families, the origin of nondisjunction was maternal. In two of the four families of category 2 the nondisjunctions originated in individuals who were related. In only one of five category 3 families, the nondisjunctions originated in related individuals. These results suggest that parental mosaicism is an important etiologic factor in recurrent free trisomy 21 (5 of 22 families) and that chance alone can explain the recurrent trisomy 21 in many of the remaining families (14 of 22 families). However, in a small number of families (3 of 22), a familial predisposing factor or undetected mosaicism cannot be excluded. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:1415248

  5. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  6. Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with mosaic trisomy 18: First clinical observation.

    PubMed

    Motta, Serena; Sala, Debora; Sala, Alessandra; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Giudici, Giovanni; Villa, Nicoletta; Biondi, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old boy with a mosaic trisomy 18, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient showed only poor growth and two muscular ventricular septal defects; no facial dysmorphims were present. He was admitted to our hospital because of asthenia and weight loss; a mediastinal enlargement was found and an histological diagnosis of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma on mediastinal biopsy was performed. Contextually, a chromosomal analysis on bone marrow aspirate and on peripheral blood revealed a mosaic trisomy 18. This result was confirmed also with cytogenetic analysis on skin fibroblasts. While there is a well-documented association between trisomy 18 and solid cell tumors, this is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with a mosaic trisomy 18, enlarging the spectrum of possible oncologic manifestations of the disease.

  7. Fetal-specific DNA methylation ratio permits noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Elisavet A; Karagrigoriou, Alex; Tsaliki, Evdokia; Velissariou, Voula; Carter, Nigel P; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2011-04-01

    The trials performed worldwide toward noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of Down's syndrome (or trisomy 21) have shown the commercial and medical potential of NIPD compared to the currently used invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures. Extensive investigation of methylation differences between the mother and the fetus has led to the identification of differentially methylated regions (DMRs). In this study, we present a strategy using the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDiP) methodology in combination with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) to achieve fetal chromosome dosage assessment, which can be performed noninvasively through the analysis of fetal-specific DMRs. We achieved noninvasive prenatal detection of trisomy 21 by determining the methylation ratio of normal and trisomy 21 cases for each tested fetal-specific DMR present in maternal peripheral blood, followed by further statistical analysis. The application of this fetal-specific methylation ratio approach provided correct diagnosis of 14 trisomy 21 and 26 normal cases.

  8. Transient leukemia with trisomy 21: Description of a case and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Schreck, R.; Graham, J.M.

    1995-09-25

    Transient myeloproliferative disease (TMD) is often associated with a trisomy 21 cell line, but it is not always associated with clinical signs of Down syndrome. We report on a phenotypically normal newborn boy who presented with a high white blood cell count, undifferentiated blasts, and cutaneous leukemic infiltrates and compare this patient with the literature on TMD and trisomy 21. Chromosome analysis of bone marrow, and subsequently of skin fibroblasts, documented constitutional mosaicism for trisomy 21. A decrease in the frequency of blast cells paralleled a decrease in cells demonstrating trisomy 21 in hematopoietic tissues, and a complete clinical recovery was seen without the use of chemotherapy. Recognition of this transient form of congenital leukemia is important to prevent the unnecessary use of toxic chemotherapeutic agents in such patients. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Surgical intervention for esophageal atresia in patients with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Eriko; Takamizawa, Shigeru; Iio, Kenji; Yamada, Yasumasa; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Hatata, Tomoko; Hiroma, Takehiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2014-02-01

    Trisomy 18 is a common chromosomal aberration syndrome involving growth impairment, various malformations, poor prognosis, and severe developmental delay in survivors. Although esophageal atresia (EA) with tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a potentially fatal complication that can only be rescued through surgical correction, no reports have addressed the efficacy of surgical intervention for EA in patients with trisomy 18. We reviewed detailed clinical information of 24 patients with trisomy 18 and EA who were admitted to two neonatal intensive care units in Japan and underwent intensive treatment including surgical interventions from 1982 to 2009. Nine patients underwent only palliative surgery, including six who underwent only gastrostomy or both gastrostomy and jejunostomy (Group 1) and three who underwent gastrostomy and TEF division (Group 2). The other 15 patients underwent radical surgery, including 10 who underwent single-stage esophago-esophagostomy with TEF division (Group 3) and five who underwent two-stage operation (gastrostomy followed by esophago-esophagostomy with TEF division) (Group 4). No intraoperative death or anesthetic complications were noted. Enteral feeding was accomplished in 17 patients, three of whom were fed orally. Three patients could be discharged home. The 1-year survival rate was 17%: 27% in those receiving radical surgery (Groups 3 and 4); 0% in those receiving palliative surgery (Groups 1 and 2). Most causes of death were related to cardiac complications. EA is not an absolute poor prognostic factor in patients with trisomy 18 undergoing radical surgery for EA and intensive cardiac management.

  10. [Fetal atrioventricular septal defect associated with Patau and Edwards syndromes, as well as trisomy 22].

    PubMed

    Cesko, I; Hajdú, J; Marton, T; Tóth-Pál, E; Papp, C; Papp, Z

    1998-05-03

    The atrioventricular septal defect is usually associated with trisomy 21 and it may be observed in the heterotaxia syndromes. Atrioventricular septal defect may be associated with 8p deletion. There are reported cases of familial atrioventricular septal defect. Atrioventicular septal defect is rarely associated with other chromosomal abnormalities. We are reporting three unusual cases of atrioventricular septal defect that were associated with trisomy 13, 18 and 22. This association may be due to effect of genetic loci on the 13, 18 and 22 chromosome which could play the role in the development and fusion of endocardial cushion and atrioventricular septal defect.

  11. PARTIAL TRISOMY 4p AND PARTIAL MONOSOMY 13q: CASE REPORT AND A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Puvabanditsin, S; Herrera-Garcia, G; Gengel, N; Hussein, K; February, M; Mayne, J; Mehta, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on a term first born dichorionic-diamniotic twin with deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 13, partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 4, intrauterine growth retardation, and multiple anomalies including microcephaly, colpocephaly, absent corpus callosum, bulbous tip of the nose, large and low set ears, macroglossia, thin upper lip, double outlet right ventricle, atria/ventricular septal defect, cleft mitral valve, pulmonary stenosis, single umbilical artery, multicystic dysplastic left kidney, sacral dimple, anterior displacement of anus, simian creases, abnormal thumb (congenital clasped thumb), overlapping toes, and congenital hypothyroidism. This is the first report of a patient with partial trisomy 4p and partial monosomy 13q.

  12. Pure partial trisomy 4q syndrome in a child with der(9)ins(9;4)(q34.3;q26q35.2)mat.

    PubMed

    Topcu, V; Ilgin-Ruhi, H; Yurur-Kutlay, N; Ekici, C; Vicdan, A; Tukun, F A

    2014-01-01

    Pure partial trisomy 4q syndrome in a child with der(9)ins(9;4)(q34.3;q26q35.2)mat: Partial trisomy 4q is a rare chromosomal abnormality and mostly results from unbalanced inheritance of balanced parental chromosomal translocations. Here, we present a 5-year-old boy with partial trisomy 4q who exhibited distinctive features of 'pure' partial trisomy 4q syndrome including moderate mental and growth retardation, microcephaly, peculiar face appearance, tooth anomaly, cleft palate, language handicap, preaxial polydactyly, and urogenital anomaly. Karyotype analysis of the child revealed der(9)ins(9;4)(q34.3;q26q35.2) inherited from mother carrying ins(9;4)(q34.3;q26q35.2) resulting in trisomy of the 4q26qter segment. Whole chromosome painting, locus specific, and subtelomeric FISH analysis in mother proved that q26qter of the chromosome 4 segment was directly inserted into the telomeric sequence in chromosome 9, and depending on nature of the rearrangement in mother, karyotype of the child was determined to be pure partial 4q trisomy. This is the first report of this kind of rearrangement causing pure partial trisomy 4q with accompanying white matter change demonstrated by MRI and bilateral preaxial polydactyly of both hands.

  13. Molecular Delineation of Partial Trisomy 14q and Partial Trisomy 12p in a Patient with Dysmorphic Features, Heart Defect and Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Bose, Divya; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Venkatesh, K S; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Shetty, Mitesh; Rao, Sudha N; Kutty, A V M

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a molecular analysis of partial trisomy 14q and partial trisomy 12p in a 5-year-old male child presenting with dysmorphic features, congenital heart disease and global developmental delay. Chromosomal analysis of the patient with GTG bands revealed a 47,XY,+der(14)t(12;14)(p13;q22)mat karyotype; the mother's karyotype was 46,XX,t(12;14)(p13;q22). Further, oligonucleotide array- CGH studies revealed an amplification of 32.3 Mb in the 14q11.1q22.1 region, substantiating partial trisomy 14q and additionally displaying an amplification of ∼1 Mb in the 12p13.3pter region for partial trisomy 12p. This is the first study to demonstrate a novel association of partial trisomies of 14q and 12p due to a 3:1 segregation of a maternal balanced translocation involving chromosomes 12 and 14. Gene ontology studies indicated 5 potential candidate genes in the amplified regions for the observed congenital anomalies.

  14. Array-CGH study of partial trisomy 9p without mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Hannachi, Hanane; Zerelli, Soumaya Mougou; Labalme, Audrey; Gmidène, Abir; Soyah, Najla; Missaoui, Sonia; Sanlaville, Damien; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Partial trisomy 9p is one of the most common detected autosomal structural anomalies, so the phenotype-genotype correlation of this rearrangement has been well described. Despite variation in size of the 9p duplications, trisomy 9p syndrome is characterized by typical dysmorphic features and a variable but constant psychomotor and mental retardation. Previously reported phenotype genotype correlation studies proposed that the critical region for phenotype is located in 9p22. We report here on a new patient with partial trisomy 9p13.3→9pter in an 8-year-old boy with typical trisomy 9p dysmorphic features but a normal mental development. Cytogenetics investigations showed that our patient karyotype was 47,XY,+ der(22)t(9;22)(p13.q11) inherited by a 3:1 disjunction of a maternal reciprocal translocation t(9;22)(p13.q11). FISH and array CGH analysis were used to better characterize duplicated chromosomal regions and showed a large duplication of chromosome 9p13.3→9pter associated to microduplication in 22q11.1. The size of the duplications in chromosomes 9p and 22q were estimated about 33.9 and 2.67 Mb, respectively. The comparison between this case and those reported in the literature allows us to support that all syndromes show variability and that not all partial trisomies 9p are associated with intellectual disability.

  15. Non-Invasive Prenatal Detection of Trisomy 13 Using a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism- and Informatics-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Megan P.; Hill, Matthew; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Westemeyer, Margaret; Saucier, Jennifer; Demko, Zachary; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine how a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and informatics-based non-invasive prenatal aneuploidy test performs in detecting trisomy 13. Methods Seventeen trisomy 13 and 51 age-matched euploid samples, randomly selected from a larger cohort, were analyzed. Cell-free DNA was isolated from maternal plasma, amplified in a single multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay that interrogated 19,488 SNPs covering chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and sequenced. Analysis and copy number identification involved a Bayesian-based maximum likelihood statistical method that generated chromosome- and sample-specific calculated accuracies. Results Of the samples that passed a stringent DNA quality threshold (94.1%), the algorithm correctly identified 15/15 trisomy 13 and 49/49 euploid samples, for 320/320 correct copy number calls. Conclusions This informatics- and SNP-based method accurately detects trisomy 13-affected fetuses non-invasively and with high calculated accuracy. PMID:24805989

  16. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Schreck, R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, N.

    1995-05-08

    Trisomy 22 is commonly found among spontaneous abortions, second in frequency of occurrence only to trisomy 16. Most earlier reports of surviving trisomy 22 cases in the literature are thought to represent the product of unbalanced 11;22 translocations or the result of undetected mosaicism, since this condition is thought to manifest early embryonic or fetal lethality. We present two strikingly similar cases of non-mosaic trisomy 22 surviving to late gestation. In this paper we emphasize the unique phenotype of this trisomy which included intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, broad flat nasal bridge with epicanthal folds and ocular hypertelorism, microtia, variable cleft palate, webbed neck, congenital heart defects involving anomalous great vessels, anorectal and renal anomalies, and hypoplastic distal digits with thumb anomalies. We also explore why some cases survive to late gestation. Confined placental mosaicism, a frequent finding in other lethal trisomies, has been ruled out in one of the cases. Molecular studies done to assess the parental origin of the extra chromosome in the other case showed that the non-disjunction originated during maternal meiosis II. Parental origin of the extra chromosome does not seem to play a role in late survival for trisomy 22. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of aging condition on the fracture toughness of 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the effects of matrix aging condition (i.e., matrix temper) on the fracture toughness of 2XXX and 7XXX Al matrix alloys reinforced with SiC particulates, and the results are compared with the mechanical behavior. Fracture toughness testing was conducted on fatigue precracked bend specimens, and fracture surfaces were examined using SEM. Results revealed dramatic differences in the effect of matrix microstructure on the fracture properties of the two composite series. In the 7XXX material, the toughness values decreased from the underaged (UA) condition to the overaged (OA) condition by approximately 40 percent, while in the 2XXX series composite, the effect of matrix microstructure was marginal. In the 7XXX series composites, a transition in fracture mode from particle cracking (in UA) to matrix and linear-interface failure (in OA) was observed, while the 2XXX series composite failed predominantly by particle cracking.

  18. A female newborn having mosaicism with near-tetraploidy and trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuka; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Mizuguchi, Koichi; Nakamura, Tomoo; Ito, Yushi; Sago, Haruhiko; Kosaki, Rika

    2016-05-01

    Tetraploidy is characterized by the presence of four complete sets of chromosomes in an individual. Full tetraploidy is usually considered lethal. To date, only ten live-births with the condition have been reported. Trisomy 18 without neonatal intensive treatment is also known to be fatal. We report a female newborn who had mosaicism with near-tetraploidy and trisomy 18 (94,XXXX,+18,+18/47,XX,+18). She had features of conditions. The most plausible mechanism of the formation was a failure of cytoplasmic cleavage at the first division of the zygote. The longer survival of the patient compared with the 10 previously reported live-births with non-mosaic tetraploidy may be due to the dominance of the trisomy cells. We suggest that non-tetraploid cells, even when trisomic for chromosome 18, might contribute to longer survival in comparison to non-mosaic tetrapolid patients.

  19. Partial trisomy 13q identified by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Carpenter, N.J.; Gucsavas, M.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 19-month-old boy with partial trisomy 13q resulting from a probable balanced translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 13. The infant presented with omphalocele, malrotation, microcephaly with overriding skull bones, micrognathia, apparently low-set ears, rocker-bottom feet, and congenital heart disease, findings suggestive of trisomy 13. Karyotypic studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes documented an unbalanced karyotype 46,XY,-1,+der. The mother`s chromosomes were normal, and the father was not available. Conventional cytogenetic techniques were unable to identify the extra material on the terminal 1q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the GTL-banded metaphases, the extra material on 1q was identified as the terminal long arm of 13, thus resulting in partial trisomy 13 (q32-qter). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Prenatally diagnosed partial trisomy 3q case with an omphalocele and less severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Arıkan, Deniz Cemgil; Coşkun, Ayhan; Arıkan, Ilker; Kıran, Gürkan; Ceylaner, Gülay

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy 3q is a very rarely reported chromosomal disorder. Duplication of part of the long arm of human chromosome 3 causes a distinct and severe syndrome that leads to multiple congenital abnormalities. A 27 year-old pregnant woman was admitted to our clinic at 17 weeks of gestation. Prenatal sonography identified a fetus with an omphalocele that contained the liver and bowel, mild ventriculomegaly and polyhydramnios. Amniocentesis revealed the karyotype of 46, XY, der (3) (3qter→3q21: : 3pter→3qter). The pregnancy was subsequently terminated. Postnatally, the proband showed midfacial hypoplasia, micrognathia, hypoplastic 12th ribs, omphalocele and prominent heels. We reported this partial trisomy 3q case because he had less marked malformations compared to other reported cases and also different features such as an omphalocele and hypoplastic 12th rib which have not been described previously in an isolated Trisomy 3q case with this karyotype.

  1. Occurrence of nephroblastomatosis with dup(18)(q11.2-q23) implicates trisomy 18 tumor screening protocol in select patients with 18q duplication.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lois J; Sanmann, Jennifer N; Olney, Ann Haskins; Wandoloski, Melissa; Sanger, Warren G; Coulter, Donald W

    2014-04-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in patients with phenotypic findings similar to full trisomy 18. Trisomy 18 increases the risk for Wilms tumor and it is currently recommended that these patients undergo abdominal ultrasonography screening every 6 months. We report on nephroblastomatosis in a 27-month-old male with a 55 Mb duplication of chromosome 18q11.2-q23 (chr18:22693370-77982126, hg 19) and propose that the trisomy 18 tumor screening protocol could also benefit patients with large 18q duplications.

  2. Hepatoblastoma in a mosaic trisomy 18 patient.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elaine Maria; Marion, Robert; Ramesh, K H; Kim, Jane S; Ewart, Michelle; Ricafort, Rosanna

    2012-05-01

    We report a case of hepatoblastoma in a 10-year-old girl with mosaic-type trisomy 18. A comprehensive literature review reveals only 2 cases involving mosaic trisomy 18 patients. Our patient underwent an abbreviated chemotherapy course before complete surgical resection. Her hepatoblastoma did not contain cells with trisomy 18. The conservative management approach resulted in a successful outcome; she remains disease free >2 years after surgery. Along with presenting a literature review, this report demonstrates a favorable outcome in a mosaic trisomy 18 child with hepatoblastoma where tumor cells lacked a trisomy 18 karyotype.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of partial trisomy 9q in a case with pyloric stenosis and a review

    PubMed Central

    Heller, A.; Seidel, J; Hubler, A; Starke, H; Beensen, V; Senger, G; Rocchi, M; Wirth, J; Chudoba, I; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2000-01-01

    Partial trisomy 9q represents a rare and heterogeneous group of chromosomal aberrations characterised by various clinical features including pyloric stenosis. Here, we describe the case of a 1 year old female patient with different dysmorphic features including pyloric stenosis and prenatally detected partial trisomy 9q. This partial trisomy 9q has been analysed in detail to determine the size of the duplication and to characterise the chromosomal breakpoints. According to the data gained by different molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with whole and partial chromosome painting probes, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) probes, and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), the derivative chromosome 9 can be described as dup(9)(pter→q22.1::q31.1→q22.1::q31.1→ q22.1::q31.1→qter). Four breakpoint spanning YACs have been identified (y806f02, y906g6, y945f5, and y747b3) for the proximal breakpoint. According to this new case and previously published data, the recently postulated putative critical region for pyloric stenosis can be narrowed down to the subbands 9q22.1-q31.1 and is the result of either partial trisomy of gene(s) located in this region or a gene disrupted in 9q31.


Keywords: partial trisomy 9q; pyloric stenosis; FISH; CGH PMID:10882757

  4. Early lineage priming by trisomy of Erg leads to myeloproliferation in a Down syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ashley P; Hu, Yifang; Metcalf, Donald; Hyland, Craig D; Ierino, Helen; Phipson, Belinda; Wu, Di; Baldwin, Tracey M; Kauppi, Maria; Kiu, Hiu; Di Rago, Ladina; Hilton, Douglas J; Smyth, Gordon K; Alexander, Warren S

    2015-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS), with trisomy of chromosome 21 (HSA21), is the commonest human aneuploidy. Pre-leukemic myeloproliferative changes in DS foetal livers precede the acquisition of GATA1 mutations, transient myeloproliferative disorder (DS-TMD) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia (DS-AMKL). Trisomy of the Erg gene is required for myeloproliferation in the Ts(1716)65Dn DS mouse model. We demonstrate here that genetic changes specifically attributable to trisomy of Erg lead to lineage priming of primitive and early multipotential progenitor cells in Ts(1716)65Dn mice, excess megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors, and malignant myeloproliferation. Gene expression changes dependent on trisomy of Erg in Ts(1716)65Dn multilineage progenitor cells were correlated with those associated with trisomy of HSA21 in human DS hematopoietic stem and primitive progenitor cells. These data suggest a role for ERG as a regulator of hematopoietic lineage potential, and that trisomy of ERG in the context of DS foetal liver hemopoiesis drives the pre-leukemic changes that predispose to subsequent DS-TMD and DS-AMKL.

  5. Report of a Case with Trisomy 9 Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Shadmani, Zahra; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 9 is a rare chromosome disorder with high neonatal mortality. It is often seen in mosaic form. Most patients who survive are severely mentally retarded. The main features of this syndrome are “bulbous” nose, microphthalmia, dislocated limbs, and other anomalies of skeletal, cardiac, genitourinary, and central nervous system. Most patients have developmental and cognitive impairment. Patients with mosaicism survive longer than non-mosaics, but it was believed that the degree of mosaicism in lymphocytes or fibroblasts does not associate with survival or degree of impairment. In this report, we present a 2.5-year-old male case of mosaic trisomy 9, to show the wide range of clinical findings in this chromosome disorder. The patient had cardiac anomalies, inguinal hernia, and undescendent testes. He had low-set slightly malformed ears, deeply-set malformed eyes, small palpebral fissures, micrognathia, developmental delay and unilateral optic hypoplasia. The most prominent facial anomaly in this patient was eye anomalies. Cytogenetic analysis with G banding showed karyotype 47XY,+9 in 44% of peripheral lymphocytes examined (47XY,+9[22], 46XY[28]). His parents’ karyotypes were normal. Moderate developmental delay, which was detected in this patient shows that the range of motor and cognitive impairment in this chromosomal disorder is quite broad. This fact should be considered in genetic counseling as well as prenatal diagnosis of this chromosomal disorder. PMID:27217611

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of cell-free fetal RNA suggests a specific molecular phenotype in trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Koide, Keiko; Slonim, Donna K; Johnson, Kirby L; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Cowan, Janet M; Bianchi, Diana W

    2011-03-01

    Trisomy 18 is a common human aneuploidy that is associated with significant perinatal mortality. Unlike the well-characterized "critical region" in trisomy 21 (21q22), there is no corresponding region on chromosome 18 associated with its pathogenesis. The high morbidity and mortality of affected individuals has limited extensive investigations. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the congenital anomalies observed in this condition, we investigated the in utero gene expression profile of second trimester fetuses affected with trisomy 18. Total RNA was extracted from cell-free amniotic fluid supernatant from aneuploid fetuses and euploid controls matched for gestational age and hybridized to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Individual differentially expressed transcripts were obtained by two-tailed t tests. Over-represented functional pathways among these genes were identified with DAVID and Ingenuity(®) Pathways Analysis. Results show that three hundred and fifty-two probe sets representing 251 annotated genes were statistically significantly differentially expressed between trisomy 18 and controls. Only 7 genes (2.8% of the annotated total) were located on chromosome 18, including ROCK1, an up-regulated gene involved in valvuloseptal and endocardial cushion formation. Pathway analysis indicated disrupted function in ion transport, MHCII/T cell mediated immunity, DNA repair, G-protein mediated signaling, kinases, and glycosylation. Significant down-regulation of genes involved in adrenal development was identified, which may explain both the abnormal maternal serum estriols and the pre and postnatal growth restriction in trisomy 18. Comparison of this gene set to one previously generated for trisomy 21 fetuses revealed only six overlapping differentially regulated genes. This study contributes novel information regarding functional developmental gene expression differences in fetuses with trisomy 18.

  7. Gross and fine motor development in 45,X and 47,XXX girls.

    PubMed

    Salbenblatt, J A; Meyers, D C; Bender, B G; Linden, M G; Robinson, A

    1989-10-01

    Neuromuscular deficits have been described in 47,XXY and 47,XYY boys, but gross and fine motor development of girls with sex chromosome aneuploidy has not been extensively studied. Twenty-one propositae 8 to 19 years of age, identified through newborn screening to be 45,X, 47,XXX, or 45,X mosaic, and 11 control girls were evaluated by a physical therapist unaware of their genetic constitution. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) was administered, and the quality of neuromuscular function was determined. The 45,X and 47,XXX propositae exhibited both gross and fine motor dysfunction, with 12 of 15 BOTMP composite scores below the 10th percentile. The clinical assessment confirmed the BOTMP findings, with 13 propositae exhibiting dysfunctional sensory-motor integration. A delay in the age of independent walking confirmed the consistency of motor developmental dysfunction throughout time. Sex chromosome mosaics were more similar to control girls. The gross and fine motor delays were frequently associated with a moderate to severe language dysfunction which adversely affected classroom performance. Regular developmental assessments of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy, including sensory-motor integration, should assist in the identification of early developmental delays and permit appropriate intervention.

  8. A case of constitutional trisomy 3 mosaicism in a teenage patient with mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kekis, Mariana; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Deeg, Carol; Calloway, Inga; McKinney, Aimee; Shuss, Christine; Hickey, Scott; Astbury, Caroline

    2016-11-01

    Constitutional mosaicism for trisomy 3 is extremely rare, with only a few postnatally diagnosed cases reported in the literature. We report a case of constitutional trisomy 3 mosaicism in a 16-year-old female, who presented with chronic joint pain, easy bruising, joint hypermobility and dysmorphic features, including long, thin facies, over-folded dysplastic ears, and Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS) with cleft palate. The patient was small at birth, had cleft palate repair, developed chronic joint pain at age 12, and has a history of mild leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia. Microarray analysis was consistent with a mosaic gain of an entire chromosome 3. FISH analysis of peripheral blood and buccal cells showed the presence of the supernumerary chromosome 3 in a low percentage of cells in both tissues, suggesting that the nondisjunction event occurred prior to the germ cell layer differentiation. Since trisomy 3 has been observed somatically in lymphoma, a Hematology/Oncology consultation was provided for the patient. The oncologist's evaluation for malignancy was unremarkable. A review of findings from other trisomy 3 patients reported in the literature reveals a diverse phenotypic spectrum and does not show a correlation between the proportion of abnormal cells observed in peripheral blood and the patients' clinical features or severity. This case demonstrates that the clinical presentation of an individual with trisomy 3 is highly individualized and the clinical course is difficult to predict.

  9. Meiosis and Maternal Aging: Insights from Aneuploid Oocytes and Trisomy Births

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Mary; Kalleas, Dimitrios; Cooney, Daniel; Lamb, Mahdi; Lister, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    In most organisms, genome haploidization requires reciprocal DNA exchanges (crossovers) between replicated parental homologs to form bivalent chromosomes. These are resolved to their four constituent chromatids during two meiotic divisions. In female mammals, bivalents are formed during fetal life and remain intact until shortly before ovulation. Extending this period beyond ∼35 years greatly increases the risk of aneuploidy in human oocytes, resulting in a dramatic increase in infertility, miscarriage, and birth defects, most notably trisomy 21. Bivalent chromosomes are stabilized by cohesion between sister chromatids, which is mediated by the cohesin complex. In mouse oocytes, cohesin becomes depleted from chromosomes during female aging. Consistent with this, premature loss of centromeric cohesion is a major source of aneuploidy in oocytes from older women. Here, we propose a mechanistic framework to reconcile data from genetic studies on human trisomy and oocytes with recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of chromosome segregation during meiosis in model organisms. PMID:25833844

  10. Meiosis and maternal aging: insights from aneuploid oocytes and trisomy births.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mary; Kalleas, Dimitrios; Cooney, Daniel; Lamb, Mahdi; Lister, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    In most organisms, genome haploidization requires reciprocal DNA exchanges (crossovers) between replicated parental homologs to form bivalent chromosomes. These are resolved to their four constituent chromatids during two meiotic divisions. In female mammals, bivalents are formed during fetal life and remain intact until shortly before ovulation. Extending this period beyond ∼35 years greatly increases the risk of aneuploidy in human oocytes, resulting in a dramatic increase in infertility, miscarriage, and birth defects, most notably trisomy 21. Bivalent chromosomes are stabilized by cohesion between sister chromatids, which is mediated by the cohesin complex. In mouse oocytes, cohesin becomes depleted from chromosomes during female aging. Consistent with this, premature loss of centromeric cohesion is a major source of aneuploidy in oocytes from older women. Here, we propose a mechanistic framework to reconcile data from genetic studies on human trisomy and oocytes with recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of chromosome segregation during meiosis in model organisms.

  11. Congenital chylothorax in newborn with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Lomauri, Kh

    2014-11-01

    Neonatal chylothorax results from the accumulation of chyle in the pleural space and may be either congenital or an acquired condition. Congenital chylothorax is most likely due to abnormal development or obstruction of the lymphatic system. It is often associated with hydrops fetalis. It can be idiopathic or may be associated with various chromosomal anomalies including Trisomy 21, Turner syndrome, Noonan syndrome, and other genetic abnormalities. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia and generalized lymphangiomatosis have also been reported to be associated with congenital chylothorax. Several case reports indicate that congenital chylothorax can recur in subsequent offspring, suggesting a possible underlying genetic etiology. It is important to identify infants with chylothorax, as there are specific issues that need to be addressed in the management of these patients. We present a case of newborn with trysomy 21 (trisomy 21 was diagnosed antenatally by amniocentesis with support of Association "Perinatology"), who developed moderate Respiratory Distress Syndrome, chest X-ray and US reveal pleural effusion on right side rapid intervention was made before deterioration, requiring intensive life-saving measures. In the neonate, chylous effusion is not a common cause of pleural effusions. It is characterized as an exudate because of the high protein and lipid content once the infant is fed. The fluid will be clear/yellow to slightly cloudy in the unfed state and will quickly become milky following feeding, as chylomicrons appear in the fluid. Lymphocytes predominate in the differential cell count of chyle. The volume of fluid output can be high, and management can be challenging. We review the common manifestations of congenital chylotoraxes and emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and intervention in preventing devastating outcomes from this condition.

  12. De-novo 'pure' partial trisomy (6)(p22.3→pter): a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Murthy, Kanakavalli; Oruganti, Venkata P; Deenadayalu, Anuradha; R Samuel, Chandra; Kandukuri, Lakshmi R

    2017-01-01

    Partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 6 is a rare and clinically distinct syndrome. The breakpoints have been found to be variable ranging from bands 6p11 to 6p25. This study reports partial trisomy for 6p22.3→pter in a 2-year-old boy referred with a complaint of developmental delay and facial dysmorphism. Conventional cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of an abnormal chromosome 5 resulting from an unbalanced translocation in the proband. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed trisomy of distal 6p which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization using subtelomeric probes for chromosomes 5 and 6. A comparison of the phenotypic features in similar cases of trisomy for different segments of 6p will facilitate an accurate karyotype-phenotype correlation and, subsequently, in the identification of the candidate genes through molecular characterization of the potential genes mapped to these loci.

  13. Non-mosaic trisomy 16 in a near-term child

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, T.A.; Kuslich, C.D.; Murray, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy 16 is the most common trisomy in first trimester spontaneous abortions, suggesting a high rate of non-disjunction. While cases of confined placental mosaicism and fetal mosaicism or partial trisomy of chromosome 16 have been reported in term fetuses, there have been no previous reports of a near-term fetus with full trisomy 16, indicating a high rate of selection against such cases. Our patient is a 25 year old Filipino female who underwent obstetrical sonographic evaluation at 32 weeks gestation due to suspicion of intrauterine growth retardation. Evaluation was remarkable for severe growth restriction and multiple dysmorphic features. The fetal karyotype was 47,XX,+16 (20 cells in blood, 30 cells from amniocytes); however, the remainder of the laboratory analysis was unremarkable. The patient went into spontaneous labor at 35 weeks gestation and had noted fetal movement prior to admission, but subsequently delivered a stillborn female fetus with a birthweight of 983 grams. Chromosomes from skin and brain fibroblasts and chorionic villus were examined and all (30 cells each) demonstrated trisomy 16. Fetal autopsy confirmed the presence of multiple major structural defects including facial dismorphism, webbing of the neck and axilla, pulmonary hypoplasia, cardiosplenic syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. While full trisomy 16 has previously been thought to be incompatible with fetal survival past the early second trimester, this case demonstrates this premise to be invalid. Previous studies by other laboratories have shown the extra chromosome 16 in aborted cases to be of maternal origin, consistent with a higher rate of maternal vs. paternal non-disjunction. The parental origin results of the present case will be presented.

  14. Partial trisomy 4q and partial monosomy 9p in a girl with choanal atresia and various dysmorphic findings.

    PubMed

    Cakmak-Genc, Gunes; Karakas-Celik, Sevim; Dursun, Ahmet; Piskin, İbrahim Etem

    2015-09-01

    We report a new-born girl with partial trisomy of 4q28-qter and partial monosomy of 9p24-9ter. Our patient has choanal atresia, hypertelorism, wide nasal bridge, high arched palate, discrete nipples, heart defects, myoclonic seizures and various dysmorphic findings. Standard chromosomal analysis with G-banding with Trypsin-Giemsa revealed 46,XX,der(9)t(4;9)(q28;p24) resulting from the mother's t(4,9) (q28;p24) karyotype. Deletions of the terminal part of 9p and partial trisomy of chromosome 4q are rare chromosomal alterations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of choanal atresia in a patient with a partial trisomy of 4q28-qter and partial monosomy 9p24-9ter combination, which were detected by integrated cytogenetic and genomic analysis.

  15. Gonadal dysgenesis in a 46,XY female mosaic for double autosomal trisomies 8 and 21.

    PubMed Central

    Sulewski, J M; Thao-phuong-Dang; Ward, S; Ladda, R L

    1980-01-01

    The proband was evaluated at 19 years of age because of primary amenorrhoea and, on chromosomal analysis, was found to have a 46,XY karyotype in 75% of her cells and 48,XY, +8, +21 in 25% of her cells. She appeared normal at birth and exhibited normal intellectual and physical development until puberty when secondary sexual differentiation failed. This young women showed none of the dysmorphic features associated with either trisomy 8 or trisomy 21. Her XY gonadal dysgenesis was manifested by late developmental problems of amenorrhoea, sexual infantilism, and gonadal neoplasia. Images PMID:6451706

  16. Partial trisomy 14 (q23 leads to qter) via segregation of a 14/X translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M M; Charrow, J; Balkin, N E; Harris, C J

    1983-01-01

    An infant with delayed development and multiple congenital anomalies was found to possess a duplication of 14q23 leads to qter. This imbalance arose through segregation of a maternal 14/X translocation, observed in only 28% of the mother's cells. Although the X-chromosome-derived portion of the translocation was late replicating in the proposita, the autosomal segment was not inactivated, leading to functional trisomy for distal 14q. Phenotypic comparison to cases with similar duplications does not allow the clinical description of a partial trisomy syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6881140

  17. Trisomy 4 mosaicism: Delineation of the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Arjan; van der Kevie-Kersemaekers, Anne-Marie; Huijsdens-van Amsterdam, Karin; Dahhan, Nordin; Knegt, Lia; Vansenne, Fleur; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 4 mosaicism in liveborns is very rare. We describe a 17-month-old girl with trisomy 4 mosaicism. Clinical findings in this patient are compared to previously reported patients. Based on the few descriptions available in the literature the common phenotype of trisomy 4 mosaicism seems to consist of IUGR, low birth weight/length/OFC, congenital heart defects, characteristic thumb anomalies (aplasia/hypoplasia), skin abnormalities (hypo-/hyperpigmentation), several dysmorphic features, and likely some degree of intellectual disability. When trisomy 4 mosaicism is suspected clinicians should be aware that a normal karyotype in lymphocytes does not exclude mosaicism for trisomy 4. This report contributes to a further delineation of the phenotype associated with trisomy 4 mosaicism.

  18. A complex three way translocation resulting in two sibs with partial trisomy 3p23----3pter.

    PubMed Central

    Voss, R; Gross-Kieselstein, E; Hurvitz, H; Dagan, J; Kerem, E; Zlotogora, J

    1984-01-01

    A male infant with multiple congenital anomalies and psychomotor retardation was found to have a translocation resulting in partial trisomy for the distal part of chromosome 3p. An older sister with similar clinical findings had an identical karyotype. Chromosome studies in the phenotypically normal parents revealed a balanced translocation in the mother involving chromosomes 3, 11, and 18. An identical translocation was found in one of the normal children. Images PMID:6512835

  19. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 by maternal plasma DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric Z; Chiu, Rossa W K; Sun, Hao; Akolekar, Ranjit; Chan, K C Allen; Leung, Tak Y; Jiang, Peiyong; Zheng, Yama W L; Lun, Fiona M F; Chan, Lisa Y S; Jin, Yongjie; Go, Attie T J I; Lau, Elizabeth T; To, William W K; Leung, Wing C; Tang, Rebecca Y K; Au-Yeung, Sidney K C; Lam, Helena; Kung, Yu Y; Zhang, Xiuqing; van Vugt, John M G; Minekawa, Ryoko; Tang, Mary H Y; Wang, Jun; Oudejans, Cees B M; Lau, Tze K; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of DNA molecules in the plasma of pregnant women has been shown to allow accurate and noninvasive prenatal detection of fetal trisomy 21. However, whether the sequencing approach is as accurate for the noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 and 18 is unclear due to the lack of data from a large sample set. We studied 392 pregnancies, among which 25 involved a trisomy 13 fetus and 37 involved a trisomy 18 fetus, by massively parallel sequencing. By using our previously reported standard z-score approach, we demonstrated that this approach could identify 36.0% and 73.0% of trisomy 13 and 18 at specificities of 92.4% and 97.2%, respectively. We aimed to improve the detection of trisomy 13 and 18 by using a non-repeat-masked reference human genome instead of a repeat-masked one to increase the number of aligned sequence reads for each sample. We then applied a bioinformatics approach to correct GC content bias in the sequencing data. With these measures, we detected all (25 out of 25) trisomy 13 fetuses at a specificity of 98.9% (261 out of 264 non-trisomy 13 cases), and 91.9% (34 out of 37) of the trisomy 18 fetuses at 98.0% specificity (247 out of 252 non-trisomy 18 cases). These data indicate that with appropriate bioinformatics analysis, noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 by maternal plasma DNA sequencing is achievable.

  20. Percutaneous right ventricle outflow tract stenting in a patient with trisomy 18 associated with double outlet right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Erkut; Odemiş, Ender; Kıplapınar, Neslihan

    2013-07-01

    Trisomy 18, or Edwards syndrome, is the second most common chromosome anomaly after trisomy 21. Various types of congenital heart diseases are seen in the majority of trisomy 18 patients. Palliative treatment of right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) stenosis includes options like balloon dilatation, stenting and surgery. Herein, we present a case with trisomy 18 and double outlet right ventricle, pulmonary stenosis, and ventricular septal defect. During the follow-up, at the age of three months, his saturation dropped to 70% and an interventional procedure was planned. The patient was considered high risk, and after discussing treatment options with the family, RVOT stenting was chosen. The patient was lost on the 8th day of the follow-up.

  1. Partial trisomy of 11q23.3-q25 inherited from a maternal low-level mosaic unbalanced translocation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungyoon; Lee, Hojung; Lee, Cha Gon

    2015-08-01

    Partial trisomy of 11q is characterized by pre/postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, dysmorphic craniofacial features, cognitive disability, abnormal muscle tone, inguinal hernia, and possible congenital heart defects. Here, we describe a 17-year-old male with a 17.77 Mb-sized [arr 11q23.3-q25 (116,667,559 -134,434,130) ×3] partial trisomy resulting from the unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 11 and 22. The terminal translocation was detected using oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmation. The partial trisomy was inherited from his mother who had the low-level (22.7%) mosaic unbalanced translocation and a normal phenotype. The patient showed most of the common features of partial trisomy 11q syndrome, with additional findings, including mesenteric fibromatosis.

  2. Mosaic vs. nonmosaic trisomy 9: Report of a liveborn infant evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, E.S.; Eicher, D.J.; Shashidhar Pai, G.; Donahue, C.J.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-04-24

    We report on a newborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies and apparent nonmosaic trisomy 9 in the blood (by conventional cytogenetic studies) who died shortly after birth. Clinical observations at birth and autopsy are compared with phenotypes of mosaic and nonmosaic trisomy 9 cases reported previously. Unlike the initial cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of metaphase and interphase blood cells and skin fibroblasts detected the presence of euploid and trisomy 9 cells. These results suggest that earlier reports of trisomy 9, which relied on conventional chromosome analysis of a few metaphase cells and/or only one tissue type, may not have excluded mosaicism, and that trisomy 9 may be viable only in the mosaic state. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Trisomy 18 with unilateral atypical ectrodactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Becerra et al. recently reported on an infant with multiple congenital anomalies who had trisomy 18. This preterm infant presented with bilateral ectrodactyly of feet, small cleft palate, esophageal atresia with associated tracheoesophageal fistula, congenital heart disease and other anomalies. The authors referenced article by Castle and Bernstein, in which they reported a male with trisomy 18 and cleft foot as well as a review of the literature which showed 2 other infants with trisomy 18 and ectrodactyly of the feet. An additional case of trisomy 18 associated with multiple congenital anomalies, including unilaterial, atypical ectrodactyly of the left foot.

  4. Trisomy 15 mosaicism and uniparental disomy (UPD) in a liveborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Milunsky, J.M. |; Wyandt, H.E.; Amos, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a liveborn infant with UPD in association with trisomy 15 mosaicism. Third trimester amniocentesis was performed for suspected IUGR. Results revealed 46,XX/47,XX,+15. The infant initially had respiratory distress and fed poorly. Symmetrical growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism, excess nuchal folds, a heart murmur, hypermobile joints, minor limb abnormalities, absent spontaneous movement and an abnormal cry were noted. Further study showed complex heart defects, including VSD and PDA, a left choroid plexus cyst, 13 ribs bilaterally, abnormal optic discs, abnormal visual evoked potentials and abnormal auditory brain stem responses. The infant died at 6 weeks of life from cardio-respiratory complications. Blood chromosomes were normal, 46,XX in 100 cells. Parental blood chromosomes were normal. Skin biopsy revealed 46,XX/47,XX,+15 in 40/50 (80%) cells as did autopsy lung tissue. Molecular analysis of the infant`s blood revealed maternal uniparental heterodisomy for chromosome 15 in the 46,XX cell line. Microsatellite analysis demonstrated that the extra chromosome originated from a maternal meiosis I nondisjunction. To our knowledge, this is the first liveborn infant with mosaic trisomy 15 and UPD in the diploid cells. Trisomy 15, heretofore, has been regarded as nonviable, even in mosaic form. While maternal UPD is associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype, mosaicism for trisomy 15 has been reported only when confined to the placenta. UPD in this case generally complicated prediction of the phenotype and raises the question whether all cases with UPD 15 should have more than one tissue studied to determine undetected trisomy 15.

  5. Ocular manifestations of mosaic trisomy 22: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Parker, M; Tan, J; Duckett, D; Woodruff, G

    2004-03-01

    Mosaic trisomy 22 is rare, but can be compatible with prolonged life. Patients with mosaic trisomy 22 usually present with intrauterine growth retardation, mental retardation, failure to thrive, and craniofacial asymmetry. We report the case of a five-year-old boy who had a birth weight of 3.8 kg and normal developmental milestones. He presented with unilateral ocular manifestations of ptosis, double elevator palsy, high myopia, and choroidal coloboma involving the macula. Cytogenetic evaluation showed a low level of trisomy 22 in peripheral blood lymphocytes (1 in 100) and in cultured fibroblasts from a conjunctival biopsy of the affected eye (1 in 60). Our case demonstrates the value of chromosomal analysis of the tissues involved rather than just karyotyping of the blood lymphocytes to detect mosaicism in patients with localised and unilateral congenital malformations.

  6. Trisomy 12 and t(14;18) in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Taniwaki, M; Yoshino, T; Katayama, Y; Sunami, K; Fukuda, S; Omoto, E; Harada, M; Sezaki, T

    1998-02-01

    We report a case of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) in which trisomy 12 and t(14;18)(q32;q21) were simultaneously detected in the same leukemic clone. Southern blot analysis showed that the BCL2/IgJH rearrangement occurred at the major breakpoint region in the hot spot of the BCL2 gene. Double color fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using multiple probes indicated that clonal B-cell with t(14;18) represented a subpopulation of the total leukemic cells and that trisomy 12 followed t(14;18) as the cytogenetic aberration in the development of B-CLL. Our findings suggests that both the t(14;18) and the trisomy are secondary chromosomal changes in the leukemogenesis of B-CLL.

  7. Trisomy 15 mosaicism and uniparental disomy (UPD) in a liveborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Milunsky, J.M.; Wyandt, H.E.; Milunsky, A.

    1996-01-22

    We describe a liveborn infant with uniparental disomy (UPD) with trisomy 15 mosaicism. Third trimester amniocentesis yielded a 46,XX/47,XX,+15 karyotype. Symmetrical growth retardation, distinct craniofacies, congenital heart disease, severe hypotonia and minor skeletal anomalies were noted. The infant died at 6 weeks of life. Peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes were {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} 46,XX in 100 cells. Parental lymphocyte chromosomes were normal. Skin biopsy showed 47,XX,+15 in 80% of fibroblasts and results were equivalent in fibroblasts from autopsy lung tissue. Molecular analysis revealed maternal uniparental heterodisomy for chromosome 15 in the 46,XX cell line. We describe an emerging phenotype of trisomy 15 mosaicism, confirm that more than one tissue should be studied in all cases of suspected mosaicism, and suggest that UPD be considered in all such cases. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Turner's syndrome and pregnancy: has the 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism a different prognosis? Own clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Dimitraki, Marina; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Papoulidis, Ioannis; Maroulis, George; Liberis, Anastasios; Liberis, Vasileios

    2011-05-01

    Turner's syndrome is characterized by an ovarian failure which occurs in most cases before puberty and leads to infertility. In less than 10% of women with Turner syndrome, puberty may occur and spontaneous pregnancies is possible but with a high risk of fetal loss, chromosomal and congenital abnormalities. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a mosaic Turner's syndrome karyotype 45,X/47,XXX who conceived spontaneously and had two successful pregnancies. Short stature was the only manifestation of Turner's syndrome. In the present report, we reviewed the available literature on the fertility of women with Turner's syndrome and the phenotypic effects of mosaicism for a 47,XXX cell line in Turner's syndrome.

  9. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pangalos, C.; Abazis, D.; Avramopoulos, D.; Blouin, J.L.; Antonaraksi, S.E. ); Raoul, O.; deBlois, M.C.; Prieur, M. ); Schinzel, A.A.

    1994-03-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, the authors genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a third allele' of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a third allele' was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in anormal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results. Within class I, there were nine cases with maternal meitoic errors (six meiosis I and three meiosis II errors, on the basis of pericentromeric markers) and one with paternal meiosis I error. The postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 was determined in eight maternal class I cases, and it was maternally derived in five cases and paternally derived in three; this suggests that the postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 is probably random. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Trisomy 18 mosaicism in a woman with normal intelligence, pigmentary dysplasia, and an 18 trisomic daughter

    SciTech Connect

    Ukita, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Nakahori, Takashi

    1997-01-20

    Survival beyond the age of 10 years is rare among 18-trisomic individuals. Most of these long-term survivors, when more than one tissue is studied, are normal/trisomy mosaics. They are usually mentally severely retarded with a variety of anomalies. There is another group of mosaic individuals: 7 women and a 13-year-old girl, with a low frequency of 18-trisomic cells, normal or mildly retarded intelligence, and minor anomalies. Two of them were diagnosed after delivering malformed stillborn infants. One of them was the mother of a trisomy 18 patient who was coincidentally found to have trisomy 18 mosaicism. Pigmentary dysplasia, previously called hypomelanosis of Ito, is a disorder with linear, swirly, or patchy, hypo- or hyperpigmented areas of skin, resulting from migration and interaction of melanoblasts of different pigmentary potential. The disorder is often accompanied by mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, including mosaic trisomy 18. Here we report a 26-year-old woman with low frequency trisomy 18 mosaicism, normal intelligence, and pigmentary dysplasia, who gave birth to an 18-trisomic girl. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Natural killer cell function in trisomy-21 (Down's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Nurmi, T; Huttunen, K; Lassila, O; Henttonen, M; Säkkinen, A; Linna, S L; Tiilikainen, A

    1982-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) activity and antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against a human myeloid target cell line (K 562) was measured in adult patients with trisomy-21 (Down's syndrome) and in chromosomally normal age and sex matched control subjects. The effect of human leucocyte interferon (IFN-alpha) on the NK activity was also estimated. Spontaneous NK activity was stronger in the adult patients with trisomy-21 than in the healthy controls, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The augmentation of NK activity by IFN-alpha, measured using lymphocytes not depleted of monocytes as effector cells, was statistically significant in both the trisomic patients (P less than 0.004) and the healthy controls (P less than 0.0005). Using monocyte and macrophage depleted lymphocytes in the patients with trisomy-21 the NK activity proved stronger than in the healthy controls, but not significantly and IFN-alpha did not augment it as it did in the healthy controls (P = n.s., P less than 0.05), for augmentations respectively). These results support the view that monocytes and macrophages are connected with the NK cell system. ADCC correlated with NK activity in both groups. Since NK cells are important components of many immune processes, including tumour and virus and/or bacteria-infected cell elimination, and have regulatory functions in immune reactions, the deficient augmentation of trisomic NK cells shown in vitro with extrinsic human leucocyte interferon may, paradoxically be an explanation for the greater susceptibility of trisomic individuals to lymphatic leukaemia and virus and bacterial infections. In vivo, this could be explained by the more potent secondary suppression by the 'immune' interferon produced by the virus, bacteria and malignant cells. In other words, the potential of the 'fighting couple' of the immune system, NK cell/interferon, is perhaps disturbed genetically due to the chromosome 21. PMID:6177458

  12. Molecular characterization of de novo secondary trisomy 13

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, L.G.; McCaskill, C.; Han, Jin-Yeong; Choo, K.H.A.; Cutillo, D.M.; Donnenfeld, A.E.; Weiss, L.; Van Dyke, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Unbalanced Robertsonian translocations are a significant cause of mental retardation and fetal wastage. The majority of homologous rearrangements of chromosome 21 in Down syndrome have been shown to be isochromosomes. Aside from chromosome 21, very little is known about other acrocentric homologous rearrangements. In this study, four cases of de novo secondary trisomy 13 are presented. FISH using alpha-satellite sequences, rDNA, and a pTRI-6 satellite I sequence specific to the short arm of chromosome 13 showed all four rearrangements to be dicentric an apparently devoid of ribosomal genes. Three of four rearrangements retained the pTRI-6 satellite I sequence. Case 1 was the exception, showing a deletion of this sequence in the rearrangement, although both parental chromosomes 13 had strong positive hybridization signals. Eleven microsatellite markers from chromosome 13 were also used to characterize the rearrangements. Of the four possible outcomes, one maternal Robertsonian translocation, two paternal isochromosomes, and one maternal isochromosomes were observed. A double recombination was observed in the maternally derived rob(13q13q). No recombination events were detected in any isochromosome. The parental origins and molecular chromosomal structure of these cases are compared with previous studies of de novo acrocentric rearrangements. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Molecular analysis of a family with three cases of first cousins with free trisomy 21 excludes the existence of a familial predisposing factor for nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Girginoudis, P.; Avramopoulos, D.; Robert, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied a French family with three individuals, paternally related first cousins, that presented free and complete trisomy 21. Using short sequence repeat polymorphisms from chromosome 21, we analyzed the DNA of two of the three affected individuals that were available. We determined the parental origin of the supernumerary chromosome in both cases. The trisomy in these cases was found to be due to maternal meiotic errors. Since the individuals were related through their paternal grandparents (their fathers were siblings) we conclude that the recurrence of trisomy 21 in this family is a result of chance and is not due to any possible genetic predisposing factors. This is in accordance with previous results on recurrent trisomy 21 families, where predisposing factors were also often excluded through the same kind of analysis.

  14. Trisomy 10p resulting from an inv dup of 10p defined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, S.J.; Easterling, T.R.; Leppig, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo cases of trisomy for the entire short arm of chromosome 10 are infrequently reported and are most commonly the result of translocation of 10p to an acrocentric chromosome. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p are not trisomy for the complete short arm of chromosome 10, but are duplication, deficiency syndromes that result from either inheritance of an unbalanced translocation from a parent possessing a balanced reciprocal translocation, or from a recombinant chromosome derived from a parental pericentric inversion of chromosome 10. Here, we report a case of a de novo trisomy 10p that resulted from an inverted duplication of the entire short arm of chromosome 10. A 42 year old G7,P5,SAB1 woman was referred for amniocentesis because of advanced maternal age. Ultrasound examination at 17 weeks demonstrated a fetus of normal size with no apparent anatomic abnormalities. Cytogenetic evaluation demonstrated one homologue of chromosome 10 had a tandem inverted duplication of the short arm. The fetal karyotype was interpreted to be 46,XX,inv dup (10) (peter-cen::cen-p15::q11-pter). Parental karyotype are normal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a chromosome 10 paint, chromosome 10 centromere, and all telomere probe, confirmed the inverted duplication involved the entire short arm of chromosome 10. Termination of pregnancy was performed at 20 weeks gestation. Autopsy revealed multiple anomalies including low-set posteriorly rotated ears, cleft of the soft palate, ocular hypertelorism, small upturned nose, agenesis of the gallbladder, sacral hemivertebrae, and abnormal flexion of the thumbs. The fetal karyotype was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis in lung and kidney. This is the second reported case of a de novo tandem duplication of 10p of which we are aware, and the first using FISH technology to characterize the abnormality.

  15. Origin of extra chromosome in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriyama, S; Niikawa, N

    1984-01-01

    Five live-born infants with Patau syndrome were studied for the nondisjunctional origin of the extra chromosome. Transmission modes of chromosomes 13 from parents to a child were determined using both QFQ- and RFA-heteromorphisms as markers, and the origin was ascertained in all of the patients. The extra chromosome had originated in nondisjunction at the maternal first meiotic division in two patients, at the maternal second meiosis in other two, and at the paternal first meiosis in the remaining one. Summarizing the results of the present study, together with those of the previous studies on a liveborn and abortuses with trisomy 13, nondisjunction at the maternal and the paternal meiosis occurred in this trisomy in the ratio of 14:3. This ratio is not statistically different from that inferred from the previous studies for Down syndrome. These findings suggest that there may be a fundamental mechanism common to the occurrence of nondisjunction in the acrocentric trisomies.

  16. Plurimalformative syndrome associating trisomy 18 and omphalocele. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ţarcă, Elena; Plămădeală, Petru; Savu, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome is a rare chromosomal anomaly, associated with mild to severe intellectual disabilities and multiple congenital anomalies. Trisomies 18 and 13 are lethal, only 5-10% of patients surviving the first year of life. Although prenatal biological and ultrasound investigations are mandatory and free and the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities is high, the birth of children with no real chance at a normal life being thus avoided by therapeutic abortion, the parents of the here presented child did not benefit from medical examination or prenatal tests, unfortunately the case of many families in Romania. The policy of limiting medical intervention in newborns with Edwards syndrome due to the broad spectrum of severe congenital malformations, severe mental retard and reduced life expectancy is unanimously accepted, but yet difficult to apply from an ethical point of view. That is why very important for both healthcare providers and families to have accurate and detailed knowledge of survival, disease course, and quality of life so that they can make fully informed decisions regarding care of these babies. The particularity of this case is the association of multiple congenital anomalies in a male newborn with trisomy 18, almost all apparata and systems being affected, with the presence of an omphalocele and complete right labiopalatine cleft, which are less frequent at children with trisomy 18.

  17. Normal growth and normalization of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in atypical Turner syndrome (45,X/46,XX/47,XXX). Correlation of body height with distribution of cell lines.

    PubMed

    Partsch, C J; Pankau, R; Sippell, W G; Tolksdorf, M

    1994-06-01

    A comparison has been made of a case with 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism with some 50 cases in the literature. A significant positive correlation was found between height standard deviation scores of mosaic patients from the literature and the frequency of cells with a normal chromosome constitution (n = 21, rs = 0.552, P < 0.01). In contrast, a significant negative correlation was seen between body height and the frequency of cells with a 45,X constitution (n = 21, rs = -0.594, P < 0.01). There was no significant correlation of height standard deviation score with the 47,XXX cell line (n = 21, rs = -0.353). A patient with a rare chromosomal mosaicism (45,X/46,XX/47,XXX) is described. The diagnosis was first made by chromosome analysis in amniotic cells. The patient showed no symptoms suggestive of Turner syndrome and growth followed the 75th height percentile. Basal and gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulated gonadotropin levels normalized after age 4.8 years and did not subsequently return to hypergonadotropic levels. In blood lymphocytes, there was an increase in the frequency of cells with a normal chromosome constitution over 9 years. This in vivo cell selection is discussed. Chromosome analysis in skin fibroblasts showed the same triple mosaicism with a similar distribution of cell lines as in blood lymphocytes. In conclusion, statistical evidence was demonstrated that the severity of short stature is correlated with the distribution of cell lines in 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism. This finding is of importance for the genetic counselling in cases of prenatal diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome.

  18. Transplants of mouse trisomy 16 hippocampus provide a model of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, S J; Waters, J J; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Wischik, C M; Sparkman, D R; White, C L; Abraham, C R; Dunnett, S B

    1991-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, which is characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, may be attributed to the abnormal expression of gene(s) located on human chromosome 21. Genetic linkage studies have narrowed the region of candidate genes to 21q11.2-21q22 of the long arm of this chromosome. Several single copy sequences within this region, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP), have been mapped to mouse chromosome 16. Reliable strategies exist for breeding Trisomy 16 mice. However, the consequences of developmental overexpression of genes on chromosome 16 have not been previously investigated, because of the lethal effects of this aneuploidy during gestation. In the present report, we employ neural transplantation to study long-term survival and pathogenesis in Trisomy 16 central nervous system tissues. Immunocytochemical staining with antiserum raised against the synthetic APP, beta-A4 and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin revealed numerous densely stained cells within hippocampal grafts of Trisomy 16 mice. Similarly, a population of grafted cells were positively stained following incubation with an antiserum raised against components of the pathological neurofibrillary tangle and with the monoclonal antibodies Tau 6.423 and ubiquitin. Images PMID:1899372

  19. [Confirmation of a prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)].

    PubMed

    Marton, T; Thein, A; Bán, Z; Soothill, P; Oroszné, N J; Papp, Z

    2001-05-13

    Trisomy 13 was diagnosed with genetic amniocentesis in a fetus of a 50 years old patient. Fetopathologic examination has shown cyclopy, proboscis and semilobar holoprosencephaly of the fetus, which is consistent with Patau syndrome. DNA was extracted from frozen liver tissue. Result of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was consistent with trisomy 13. They processed the DNA according Kallioniemi's method with modifications. CGH was developed for cancer genetics in mid 90s and now it is widely used in prenatal diagnosis too. CGH allows global analysis to detect unbalanced chromosome gains and losses in the whole genome in a single experiment without the need for cell culture. Significant results can be expected in those cases where conventional cytogenetics is not able to provide an answer either because postmortem tissue is not appropriate for cytogenetics or because the chromosomal change is sub-microscopical. CGH is a fluorescent in situ hybridization on a healthy target metaphase, with equal amount of competitive hybridization of green labelled digested test DNA and red labelled digested control DNA. Red to green ratio is assessed with the help of an image analyser. Green dominance represents chromosome gain, while red shift chromosome loss. In the paper they present the fetopathologic report of a trisomy 13 fetus and illustrate the method being the first Hungarian obstetric case diagnosed by CGH.

  20. Executive dysfunction and the relation with behavioral problems in children with 47,XXY and 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, S; Swaab, H

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that having an extra X chromosome is associated with abnormal structure and function of brain areas in the frontal lobe, which is crucially involved in executive functioning. However, there is little of knowledge of the type and severity of executive dysfunction, and the impact on emotional and behavioral problems. The present study aims to provide in this. In total, 40 children (23 boys with 47,XXY and 17 girls with 47,XXX) with an extra X chromosome and 100 non-clinical controls (47 boys and 53 girls) participated in the study. The participants were 9-18 years old. Processing speed and executive functioning were assessed using the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Testbattery (ANT) and the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX). Problems in emotional and behavioral functioning were assessed with the Childhood Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Children with an extra X chromosome showed deficits in inhibition, mental flexibility, sustained attention and visual working memory. Parental report showed high levels of everyday manifestations of executive dysfunction. More severe inhibition difficulties were associated with higher levels of thought problems, aggression and rule breaking behavior. Boys and girls with an extra X chromosome could not be differentiated based on severity of executive dysfunction, however, girls had lower information processing speed than boys. These findings suggest that executive dysfunction may be part of the phenotype of children with an extra X chromosome, impacting the ability to function adequately in everyday life. Furthermore, children with impairments in inhibition may have more problems in regulating their thinking, emotions and behavior.

  1. Trisomy 3 is not a common feature in malignant lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type.

    PubMed

    Ott, G; Kalla, J; Steinhoff, A; Rosenwald, A; Katzenberger, T; Roblick, U; Ott, M M; Müller-Hermelink, H K

    1998-09-01

    The genetic background of extranodal marginal zone B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type is poorly understood. In contrast to most entities of primary nodal lymphomas, few cytogenetic data are available, and gene rearrangements frequently encountered in and highly characteristic of certain entities of systemic NHL are absent in this type of lymphoma. Recently, it was suggested that MALT-type NHLs are associated with certain numerical chromosome aberrations and especially with trisomy 3. We performed an extensive study using a sensitive double (bicolor) fluorescence in situ hybridization technique for the analysis of trisomies for chromosomes 3, 7, 12, and 18 in 60 samples of low-grade and 45 high-grade MALT-type tumors. In the low-grade cases, trisomy 3 was found in a frequency of only 20%. High-grade lymphomas of MALT type were associated with trisomies 3, 7, 12, and 18 in 36, 20, 18, and 13% of the cases, respectively. Whereas no difference was encountered for trisomy 3 in primary and secondary/simultaneous high-grade lymphomas, +7 and +12 were associated with primary lymphomas, and a +18 was predominantly found in secondary/simultaneous high-grade NHL. These results challenge earlier reports describing a high frequency of +3 in low-grade MALT-type NHL and indicate a possibly different genetic evolution pattern of primary and secondary/simultaneous high-grade lymphomas of primary mucosal origin.

  2. Mosaic trisomy 9 hematopoietic chimera.

    PubMed

    DeLoache, Kristina B; Bradshaw, Wanda T

    2014-06-01

    A 1.57-kg infant presented at a major medical center in the southeastern United States at 32 weeks of gestation with growth restriction and no major anomalies after an uncomplicated pregnancy. At 1 month of life, the infant was found to be chimeric for blood types O and A. Genetic testing revealed mosaic trisomy 9 as the cause for the 2 distinct blood types. Without phenotypic presentation of trisomy 9, the infant's genetic diagnosis was not detected until an issue arose. Genetic diagnosis and treatment and future considerations are discussed in this article. Full-text English articles from CINAHL and PubMed were analyzed for assistance in understanding the infant's condition. Book chapters, review articles, and meta-analyses were also reviewed. Implications of this case study indicate that phenotypically normal presenting infants may still have underlying issues that should be investigated genetically when they arise. This article cannot be generalized to the population because of its specific situation, but the underlying concept can be applied to any case.

  3. Co-occurrence of non-mosaic trisomy 22 and inherited balanced t(4;6)(q33;q23.3) in a liveborn female: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Folasade I; Anderson, Carol E; McGowan, Jane E; Jethva, Reena N; Wahab, Mohammed A; Glick, Adina R; Sterner, Mark R; Pascasio, Judy M; Punnett, Hope H; Liu, Jinglan

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 22 is the third most common autosomal trisomy occurring in about 0.4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. Complete non-mosaic trisomy 22 is extremely rare in live births. Most affected children die before one year of age. To date, only 29 liveborn cases have been reported and none has carried an additional genetic lesion. In this report, we describe the clinical presentation, cytogenetic, and cytogenomic findings in a liveborn female with complete non-mosaic trisomy 22 as well as a paternally inherited, balanced reciprocal chromosomal rearrangement t(4;6)(q33;q23.3). The proband manifested features commonly seen in individuals with non-mosaic trisomy 22 such as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), single umbilical artery, cranial abnormalities, short neck, cleft lip and palate, dysmorphic ears, hypoplastic nipples, digital malformation, congenital heart defects, dysplastic kidneys, and genital anomalies. In addition, she had lobar holoprosencephaly, aqueductal stenosis, and limb and eye problems that have not been associated with complete trisomy 22 in previous reports. She died at 35 days of age of complex heart disease and renal failure. We are hereby expanding the cytogenetic and clinical spectrum of this rare chromosome disorder. Clinical features of liveborn children with non-mosaic trisomy 22 are reviewed and compared to those in our proband. The impact of genomic content in relation to the survival of trisomies in humans is also discussed.

  4. Patau syndrome with long survival in a case of unusual mosaic trisomy 13.

    PubMed

    Fogu, Giuseppina; Maserati, Emanuela; Cambosu, Francesca; Moro, Maria Antonietta; Poddie, Fausto; Soro, Giovanna; Bandiera, Pasquale; Serra, Gigliola; Tusacciu, Gianni; Sanna, Giuseppina; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Montella, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We report a 12-year-old patient with Patau syndrome, in whom two cell lines were present from birth, one with total trisomy 13 due to isochromosome (13q), and one with partial trisomy 13. A cytogenetic re-evaluation at 9 years of age brought to light in skin fibroblasts a third cell line, partially monosomic for chromosome 13. The derivatives (13) present in the three cell lines were characterized through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments with suitable probes; the results suggested a sequence of rearrangements which beginning from an isochromosome (13q) could have led to the other two derivatives. We report the clinical data at birth and at the age of 12; at this age pigmentary lesions with phylloid pattern were noted. Cytogenetic findings of the chromosomal analyses on different tissues, including skin fibroblasts from differently pigmented areas, are also reported.

  5. The iliac angle: a sonographic marker of trisomy 21 during the midtrimester: dependency of fetal lying?

    PubMed

    Massez, Anne; Rypens, Françoise; Metens, Thierry; Donner, Catherine; Avni, Fred E

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the fetal iliac wing angle measurements in the detection of trisomy 21 during the second trimester and the impact of the fetal position on this measurement. During a 43-month period, the iliac wing angle was prospectively measured in 695 fetuses at genetic ultrasonography performed before amniocentesis. The iliac wing angle measurements were performed in a true axial section of the fetal pelvis and the relative position of the fetal spine was recorded (decubitus, lateral). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and likelihood ratio (LR) were computed for multiple cutoff angles. The prevalence of trisomy 21 was 1.4%; 447 fetuses were in lateral position, 240 fetuses were in decubitus position, including, respectively, 2 and 8 fetuses with trisomy 21 (8 fetuses with other chromosomal anomalies were excluded). In euploid fetuses, the mean iliac wing angle was 83.7 degrees in decubitus and 68.7 degrees in lateral position; in fetuses with trisomy 21 the respective mean angles were 104.9 degrees and 102.5 degrees. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve provided an absolute cutoff angle of 90 degrees, predicting trisomy 21 with a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 72.4%, an NPV of 100%, a PPV value of 11.1%, and an LR of 3.6. The measurement of iliac wing angles in an axial section of the fetal pelvis is dependent on spine orientation and provides an efficient cutoff angle for the exclusion of trisomy 21 in patients at risk.

  6. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pangalos, C.; Avramopoulos, D.; Blouin, J. L.; Raoul, O.; deBlois, M. C.; Prieur, M.; Schinzel, A. A.; Gika, M.; Abazis, D.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, we genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a "third allele" of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a "third allele" was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in a normal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:8116616

  7. De novo 7p partial trisomy characterized by subtelomeric FISH and whole-genome array in a girl with mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements involving telomeres have been established as one of the major causes of idiopathic mental retardation/developmental delay. This case of 7p partial trisomy syndrome in a 3-year-old female child presenting with developmental delay emphasizes the clinical relevance of cytogenetic diagnosis in the better management of genetic disorders. Application of subtelomeric FISH technique revealed the presence of interstitial telomeres and led to the ascertainment of partial trisomy for the distal 7p segment localized on the telomeric end of the short arm of chromosome 19. Whole-genome cytogenetic microarray-based analysis showed a mosaic 3.5 Mb gain at Xq21.1 besides the approximately 24.5 Mb gain corresponding to 7p15.3- > pter. The possible mechanisms of origin of the chromosomal rearrangement and the clinical relevance of trisomy for the genes lying in the critical regions are discussed. PMID:21968244

  8. Phenotype-karyotype correlation in patients trisomic for various segments of chromosome 13.

    PubMed Central

    Tharapel, S A; Lewandowski, R C; Tharapel, A T; Wilroy, R S

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of clinical and cytogenetic findings taken from 62 published cases of partial trisomies of chromosome 13 showed that 15 had partial trisomy for the proximal long arm and 47 had trisomy for the distal long arm. Persistence of fetal haemoglobin (Hb F), increased projections of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN), depressed nasal bridge, cleft lip/palate, and clinodactyly were more frequent in patients with proximal trisomy 13. In the distal trisomy group, the common features included haemangioma, bushy eyebrows, long curled eyelashes, prominent nasal bridge, long philtrum, thin upper lip, highly arched palate, and hexadactyly. In addition, several other features were common to both the groups, often showing inconsistency even when the same segment was in trisomy. The influence of the second aneusomy as the most likely cause for such inconsistent and overlapping phenotypes is discussed in view of the fact that 42 of 62 cases were derived from a balanced translocation carrier parent. PMID:3746829

  9. Trisomy 9 syndrome: Report of a case with Crohn disease and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Wolldridge, J.; Zuncih, J.

    1995-04-10

    We report on a 6-year-old boy with mosaic trisomy 9. The patient was born at 42 weeks of gestation to a 27-year-old G1 white woman. Birth weight was 2,820 g, length 52 cm, and Apgar scores were 4 and 6 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. The infant presented with apparently low-set ears, overfolded helices, epicanthal folds, prominent nasal bridge, high-arched palate, micrognathia, bilateral dislocated hips, left genu recurvatum, and cryptorchidism. Chromosome analysis showed an unusual karyotype: 47,XY,+inv(9qh+)/47,XY,+mar. The marker chromosome was thought to be a remnant of the inv (9qh+), while the father`s was 46,XY. At age 5 months, the patient developed seizures and gastroesophageal reflux. Crohn disease was diagnosed at age 2 years, although symptoms began at age 1 year. Recurrent bouts of pneumonia have occurred since the patient`s birth. Severe psychomotor retardation was also noted. Trisomy 9 syndrome was first reported in 1973. Over 30 cases have been reported since then. Of these case reports, only 5 patients were older than 1 year. Inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in association with other chromosome abnormalities, but to our knowledge, has not been reported in trisomy 9 syndrome. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. [Succesful management of esophageal banding and gastrostomy for esophageal atresia in a trisomy 18 child with complex cardiac malformation].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Ando, Takeshi; Kozono, Yuuki; Saito, Ikue; Saito, Rie; Shimada, Muneaki

    2014-11-01

    Trisomy 18 is one of the congenital disorders caused by a chromosomal abnormality. Ninety percent of fetuses with trisomy 18 have various other malformations. The present patient had heart failure due to a complex cardiac malformation and a Gross C type esophageal atresia. Before the esophageal banding, ventilation of the lungs was impossible and respiratory condition was unstable. Considering that direction of the shunt can easily change by hyperventilation and high oxygen concentration, we employed the lowest oxygen concentration and ventilation as possible. In the present case, it was necessary to provide respiratory care for both esophageal atresia and complex cardiac malformation.

  11. Trisomy 2q11.2-->q21.1 resulting from an unbalanced insertion in two generations.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, I A; Stormer, P; Oei, P T; Hacking, E; Cotter, P D

    1998-01-01

    In this communication, we describe two cases of proximal 2q trisomy (2q11.2--> q21.1) resulting from an interchromosomal insertion. The chromosomal origin of the insertion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. An unbalanced karyotype, 46,XX,der(8) ,ins(8;2) (p21.3; q21.1q11.2), was found in the proband and her mother, who both have mild mental retardation, short stature, dysmorphic features, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and a psychotic illness. This family is a rare example of direct transmission of a partial autosomal trisomy. Images PMID:9598728

  12. Natural history of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13: II. Psychomotor development.

    PubMed

    Baty, B J; Jorde, L B; Blackburn, B L; Carey, J C

    1994-01-15

    Developmental data were abstracted from medical records on 50 trisomy 18 individuals ranging in age from 1 to 232 months and 12 trisomy 13 individuals ranging in age from 1 to 130 months. Data on the age when trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 children achieved developmental skills were collected from a larger group of 62 trisomy 18 individuals and 14 trisomy 13 individuals whose families filled out parent questionnaires. Developmental quotient (DQ), defined as developmental age divided by chronological age, averaged 0.18 for trisomy 18 and 0.25 for trisomy 13. There was a dramatic drop in DQ from infancy to later childhood. The highest DQs and the greatest variation in DQs were in the first 2-3 years of life. Developmental ages in 7 skill areas were significantly different, with daily living and receptive language having the highest values and motor and communication skills having the lowest. When chronological age was taken into account, there was no significant difference in DQs in the same 7 skill areas, although there was a trend that was similar to the pattern of differences with developmental age. Older children could use a walker, understand words and phrases, use a few words and/or signs, crawl, follow simple commands, recognize and interact with others, and play independently. Walking and some toileting skills were also reported for trisomy 13. Although individuals with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 were clearly functioning in the severe to profound developmentally handicapped range, they did achieve some psychomotor maturation and always continued to learn.

  13. Acromegaly accompanied by Turner syndrome with 47,XXX/45,X/46,XX mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Sato, Ai; Nishio, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Teiji; Miyamoto, Takahide; Katai, Miyuki; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman was hospitalized for examination of edematous laryngopharynx. She was acromegalic. A pituitary adenoma with elevated serum levels of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was detected, indicating acromegaly caused by GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. Multiple pigmented nevi were also noted without overt short stature and cubitus valgus. Chromosome analysis revealed that she had contracted Turner syndrome with 47,XXX/45,X/46,XX mosaicism. Transsphenoidal resection of the tumor decreased serum GH and IGF-I levels, but the edema was not improved. Both premature ovarian failure and hypertension appeared after surgery. This case may indicate the important relationships between GH/IGF-I and Turner syndrome.

  14. Trisomy and triploidy are sources of embryo mortality in the zebra finch

    PubMed Central

    Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Ellegren, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Hatching failure is a surprisingly common phenomenon given that natural selection constantly works against it. In birds, an average of about 10 per cent of eggs across species fail to hatch, often owing to the death of embryos. While embryo mortality owing to inbreeding is both well-documented and evolutionarily plausible, this is not true for other sources of mortality. In fact, the basis for hatching failure in natural populations remains largely unexplained. Here, we demonstrate that embryo mortality in captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) follows from chromosomal aneuploidy or polyploidy. As part of microsatellite genotyping of a captive breeding population, we found 12 individuals (3.6%) with three alleles among 331 embryos that had died during development, while there were no such cases observed among 1210 adult birds. Subsequent genotyping of 1920 single nucleotide polymorphism markers distributed across the genome in birds with three alleles at microsatellite loci, and in greater than 1000 normal birds, revealed that the aberrant karyotypes involved cases of both trisomies and triploidy. Cases of both maternally and paternally inherited trisomies resulted from non-disjunction during meiosis. Maternally inherited cases of triploidy were attributable to failure of meiosis leading to diploid eggs, while paternally inherited triploidy could have arisen either from diploid sperm or from dispermy. Our initial microsatellite screening set only had the power to detect less than 10 per cent of trisomies and by extrapolation, our data therefore tentatively suggest that trisomy might be a major cause of embryo mortality in zebra finches. PMID:20444723

  15. CASE-REPORT Low-level trisomy 14 mosaicism in a male newborn with ectrodactyly.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M A; Morgade, L F; Dias, L F A; Moreira, R V; Maia, P D; Sales, A F H; Ribeiro, P D

    2016-12-02

    Complete trisomy 14 mosaicism is a rare chromosome disorder and was first reported in 1970. We describe a case of a male neonate who presented complete trisomy 14 mosaicism in only 4% of the cells from peripheral blood. A nineteen-day-old male neonate was born as result of the second pregnancy. The infant was delivered by cesarean section due to gestational hypertension and chronic fetal distress. The length of the term pregnancy was 37 weeks, the birth weight was 3.105 g, the length was 48 cm, and the head circumference was 35.5 cm. The baby remained hospitalized for 19 days in the neonatal intensive care unit due to respiratory distress syndrome and congenital malformations. Physical examination revealed a toned and normal activity, followed by phenotypic changes such as a broader forehead, formation of a cleft palate, hypertelorism, low-set ears, bilateral cryptorchidism, absence of the second toe of the left foot (ectrodactyly), and fusion of third and fourth toes in the right foot (bilateral syndactyly). Cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood cultures after hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit. Analysis of 200 G-banded metaphases showed that 192 (96%) had normal karyotype 46,XY and only 8 (4%) presented trisomy 47,XY,+14. It was not possible to perform cytogenetic analysis on the patient's parents. Our patient represents the first case of trisomy 14 disorder to present ectrodactyly.

  16. Partial monosomy 8q and partial trisomy 9q due to the maternal translocation t(8;9(q24.3;q34.1): a case report.

    PubMed

    Tos, T; Alp, M Y; Eker, H K; Cebi, A H; Ikbal, M

    2014-01-01

    Partial trisomy 9q34-qter and partial monosomy 8q24.3-qter are very rare chromosomal abnormalities. Characteristic features of partial trisomy 9q34-qter are hypotonia, developmental delay, mild intellectual disability, dolichocephaly, distinct facial phenotype, long and thin fingers, and cardiac anomalies. Unlike the partial trisomy 9q34-qter, partial monosomy 8q24.3-qter has no distinct phenotype. Here we report a four years old female patient with partial trisomy 9q34-qter and partial monosomy 8q24.3-qter due to the maternal translocation t(8;9)(q24.3;q34. I). She has developmental delay, brachycephaly, facial dysmorphism, hand and foot anomalies, bilateral hearing loss, cardiac defect and abnormal brain MRI findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the combination of partial trisomy 9q and partial monosomy 8q.

  17. Double partial trisomy 9q34.1-->qter and 21pter-->q22.11: FISH and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Mattina, T; Pierluigi, M; Mazzone, D; Scardilli, S; Perfumo, C; Mollica, F

    1997-11-01

    We describe a patient with double trisomy 9q34.1-->qter and 21pter-->q22.1 resulting from 3:1 segregation of a maternal balanced translocation. The patient shows a clinical syndrome similar to that observed in patients with duplication of the chromosome 9q distal region, while no signs of trisomy 21 were observed. The use of high resolution banding and FISH were of fundamental importance for the cytogenetic diagnosis and for definition of the breakpoints on both chromosomes 9 and 21.

  18. Cytogenetic characterization of cat eye syndrome marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wenger, S L; Surti, U; Nwokoro, N A; Steele, M W

    1994-01-01

    Cat eye syndrome is associated with a partial tetrasomy 22q and can be inherited. The authors have evaluated the marker chromosome in a proband and his mother by cytogenetic banding techniques to verify the dicentric chromosomal rearrangement and by fluorescence in situ hybridization to confirm the involvement of 22. The mother also had an affected offspring with an unrelated aneuploidy, trisomy 21.

  19. Partial trisomy 16p in an adolescent with autistic disorder and Tourette`s syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hebebrand, J.; Martin, M.; Remschmidt, H.

    1994-09-15

    A partial trisomy 16p was identified in a 14-year-old male adolescent with autistic disorder. He additionally showed complex motor and vocal phenomena, including some simple tics which had first appeared in childhood. Whereas these simple tics were of subclinical significance, an additional diagnosis of Tourette`s syndrome (TS) appears justified. The case report illustrates the diagnostic difficulties in assessing psychiatric symptomatology associated with both disorders, especially complex motor and vocal phenomena. The cytogenetic finding is discussed critically in the light of other chromosome abnormalities reported in both TS and autistic disorder. Chromosome 16p should be considered as a candidate region especially for autistic disorder. 21 refs.

  20. Holoprosencephaly with caudal dysplasia. Pseudo-trisomy 13 or a distinct entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.P.B.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Timmons, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied three chromosomally normal patients with multiple anomalies that include holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia. Each has features found in patients with pseudo-trisomy 13, though each lacks malformations common in that syndrome. Patients 1 and 2 did not have polydactyly and patients 2 and 3 had no congenital heart malformation. Patient 1 is also unusual in that he does not have typical holoprosencephalic facies and is alive at age 25 months. We have also identified two other similar patients in the London Dysmorphology Database, each of which had holoprosencephaly, congenital heart malformation, and imperforate anus. Isolated caudal dysplasia and holoprosencephaly are both causally heterogeneous. They have been reported together rarely in patients with several different syndromes including chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic syndromes, teratogenic insults, and syndromes of unknown cause. Over thirty cases of {open_quotes}pseudo-trisomy 13{close_quotes} have now been reported and eight of these have had features of caudal dysplasia. There have been four with imperforate anus or anal stenosis, one with lumbosacral vertebral anomaly, and three others with bilateral renal agenesis or hypoplasia. Based on our patients and this review of other reported and unreported cases, we suggest that caudal dysplasia may be a significant clinical feature of pseudo-trisomy 13. Alternatively, holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia with a normal karyotype may represent a similar though distinct entity. Some may have submicroscopic chromosomal deletions. Molecular studies of regions known to be associated with holoprosencephaly are currently in progress on tissue from Patient 1. We hope these observations will stimulate reports of similarly affected patients to allow better definition of pseudo-trisomy 13 and other overlap syndromes.

  1. Pure 9p trisomy derived from a terminal balanced unreciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, A J L; Neira, V A; Vásquez-Velásquez, A I; Jimenez-Arredondo, R E; Chávez-González, E L; Picos-Cárdenas, V J; Fletes-Rayas, A L; Figuera, L E

    2014-01-01

    The 9p trisomy is a relatively frequent disorder, while pure 9p trisomies are less frequent and usually derived from 9;22 translocations, duplications or 9p extra chromosomes. Here we report a patient with pure trisomy 9p derived from a terminal balanced unreciprocal translocation. The patient derived to the genetic service by psychomotor delay, presented at 2 years and 11 months: short stature, open anterior fontanelle, dysplastic ears, facial dysmorphisms, long and broad first toes with hypoplastic nails, central nervous system and skeletal alterations. The patient karyotype was: 46,XY,der(10)t(9;10) (p13.1;qter)mat while the mother karyotype was: 46,XX,t(9;10)(p13.1;qter). The presence of the subtelomeric region of 10q showed by FISH as well as the duplication of 9p subtelomere was further confirmed with multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for the subtelomeric region of all chromosomes. The mechanism of formation seems to be due to a telomere break in 10q leading to loss of telomeric functions, permitting the 9p fusion; this has been supported with molecular probes showing telomere shortening in interstitial telomeric repeats, which are unable to prevent chromosome fusion. This is one of the few cases reported with terminal translocations (not jumping) preserving the subtelomeric region and highlights the importance of subtelomeric probes in terminal arrangements, and the utility of molecular probes, such as MLPA in defining this kind of abnormalities. In the clinical context, the patient presented a high proportion of 9p trisomy features which is expected considering the large 9p segment involved and the presence of the critical region 9p22.

  2. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  3. Survival of trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) and trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome) in England and Wales: 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhua; Springett, Anna; Morris, Joan K

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the survival of live births with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 and their variants. Information on live births with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 recorded in the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register (NDSCR) was linked by the NHS Information Centre to obtain information about survival. Survival was known for 326 (88%) of live births with trisomy 18 and 142 (82%) of live births with trisomy 13 born in England and Wales between 2004 and 2011. The median survival time for live births with full trisomy 18 was 14 days and with full trisomy 13 was 10 days, the 3-month survival was 20% and 18%, respectively, and the 1-year survival for both syndromes was 8%. The 1-year survival for live births with trisomy 18 mosaicism (n = 17) was 70%, for those with trisomy 13 mosaicism (n = 5) was 80% and for those with partial trisomy 13 (Robertsonian translocations) (n = 17) was 29%. This study is based on the largest data set on survival for live births with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13. Although median survival for these children is 2 weeks or less, about one in five survive for 3 months or more and about 1 in 12 survive for 1 year or more. We suggest that these survival rates are used in counselling as well as the median survival time.

  4. Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) with an 11-year survival.

    PubMed

    Zoll, B; Wolf, J; Lensing-Hebben, D; Pruggmayer, M; Thorpe, B

    1993-01-01

    Trisomy 13 is very rare in live-born children. Only a small number of these children survive the first year and very few cases are reported to live longer. Survival time depends partly on the cytogenetic findings--full trisomy 13 or trisomy 13 mosaicism--and partly on the existence of serious somatic malformations. We report on a 11-year-old girl with full trisomy 13. In this case, missing cerebral and cardiovascular malformations probably allowed the long survival.

  5. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  6. Molecular cytogenetic determination of a deletion/duplication of 1q that results in a trisomy 18 syndrome-like phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.; Davee, M.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-08-15

    We report on an infant who presented at birth with some characteristics of trisomy 18 syndrome, including low birth weight, facial abnormalities, overlapping fingers, and congenital heart defects. On chromosome analysis, no additional chromosome 18 was observed and both chromosome 18 homologues appeared normal. However, a small piece of chromosomal material of unknown origin was detected at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome 18 painting probes disclosed no additional hybridization at the telomere of 1q, suggesting that the material was derived from another chromosome. Further chromosome painting experiments suggested that the telomeric addition was of chromosome 1 origin. To identify subchromosomal regions involved in the rearrangement, additional FISH analyses were performed using single copy and repetitive DNA probes mapping different portions of chromosome 1. The analyses showed that probes mapping to 1q34-43 were duplicated in the derivative chromosome 1. In addition, a DNA probe mapping to 1q44 was found to be deleted from the derivative chromosome 1. Our composite analysis suggests that a deletion and a duplication of chromosome 1q can result in some of the clinical findings usually associated with trisomy 16 syndrome. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FISH analysis when karyotype analysis is not consistent with the clinical description. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Monozygotic twins with trisomy 18: a report of discordant phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Schlessel, J S; Brown, W T; Lysikiewicz, A; Schiff, R; Zaslav, A L

    1990-01-01

    The predicted incidence of liveborn monozygotic trisomy 18 twins is one per million births. The first case of liveborn monozygotic trisomy 18 twins was reported in 1989 and we report a second case in which striking phenotypic discordance existed. The probability of monozygotic trisomy 18 twinning and the mechanisms for phenotypic discordance in trisomic twins is discussed. Images PMID:2246775

  8. Role of Trisomy 21 Mosaicism in Sporadic and Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Huntington; Granic, Antoneta; Caneus, Julbert

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 21 and the consequent extra copy of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide production underlie the universal development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and high risk of AD dementia in people with Down syndrome (DS). Trisomy 21 and other forms of aneuploidy also arise among neurons and peripheral cells in both sporadic and familial AD and in mouse and cell models thereof, reinforcing the conclusion that AD and DS are two sides of the same coin. The demonstration that 90% of the neurodegeneration in AD can be attributed to the selective loss of aneuploid neurons generated over the course of the disease indicates that aneuploidy is an essential feature of the pathogenic pathway leading to the depletion of neuronal cell populations. Trisomy 21 mosaicism also occurs in neurons and other cells from patients with Niemann-Pick C1 disease and from patients with familial or sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), as well as in their corresponding mouse and cell models. Biochemical studies have shown that Aβ induces mitotic spindle defects, chromosome mis-segregation, and aneuploidy in cultured cells by inhibiting specific microtubule motors required for mitosis. These data indicate that neuronal trisomy 21 and other types of aneuploidy characterize and likely contribute to multiple neurodegenerative diseases and are a valid target for therapeutic intervention. For example, reducing extracellular calcium or treating cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) blocks the induction of trisomy 21 by Aβ. The latter finding is relevant in light of recent reports of a lowered risk of dementia in bipolar patients treated with LiCl and in the stabilization of cognition in AD patients treated with LiCl.

  9. Epilepsy in children with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Tomohiro; Maihara, Toshiro; Higuchi, Yoshihisa; Nishida, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-04-01

    Although the reported incidence of epilepsy associated with trisomy 18 is 25-50%, there have been no detailed descriptions of the characteristics of trisomy 18-related epilepsy. We investigated the characteristics of epilepsy in children with trisomy 18 who remained alive for over 1 year by sending questionnaires to pediatric neurologists belonging to the Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology. Eleven patients with trisomy 18 were enrolled (age at the study, from 15 to 134 months; median, 43 months), of whom seven (64%) had epilepsy. The age at seizure onset ranged from 1 to 42 months (median: 11 months). Among the seven patients with epilepsy, two had focal epilepsy, four had generalized epilepsy including infantile spasms in three, and the remaining one had an unclassified type. Seizure seminology included complex partial seizures in both the patients with focal epilepsy. At the time of the investigation, three children with generalized epilepsy still had daily seizures, while the remaining four were seizure-free. In conclusion, the characteristics of epilepsy in patients with trisomy 18 were as follows: over half of the children developed epilepsy during infancy or early childhood; infantile spasms might be one of the common epileptic syndromes; the epilepsy was intractable in half of the children, especially in those with generalized epilepsy.

  10. Oral health needs in individuals with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13: Implications for dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah; Martinez, Alyssa; Campbell, Emily All

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine oral health needs and dental care in individuals with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 (full, mosaic, partial and other, mixed types). Primary feeding method was also examined. Data was collected from a parent-completed, mixed method survey (TRIS Survey). Mean age in months was 120.2 (range 38 to 394 months) and 133 (range 36 to 405 months), respectively, for trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 individuals. Results indicated the majority of individuals received routine dental care from their family dentist. Approximately 80% in both groups needed some form of specialized dental care. Close to 25% and 30% of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 individuals, respectively, required hospital admission for specialized dental care. Responses indicated the presence of excessive plaque and tooth decay across the groups with a higher incidence for individuals with trisomy 13. Although not the primary form of intake, over half of the individuals received oral feedings. Implications for dental care and management are provided along with the need for additional research to confirm or disconfirm this study's findings.

  11. Detection of mosaicism in lymphocytes of parents of free trisomy 21 offspring.

    PubMed

    Frias, Sara; Ramos, Sandra; Molina, Bertha; del Castillo, Victoria; Mayén, Dora Gilda

    2002-09-26

    Down syndrome (DS) resulting from free trisomy 21 (FT21) has been largely associated with advanced maternal age. However, approximately 60% of FT21 cases are born to young couples. Thus, the etiological factors responsible for these FT21 children must differ from those proposed for maternal age-related FT21. These factors have not been defined. In this study, we analyzed the chromosomes of peripheral blood lymphocytes from three groups of couples aged < or =35 years, to identify chromosomal trisomies: Group I included 5 couples with normal offspring; Group II included 22 couples with one FT21 child; and Group III consisted of 3 couples with recurrent FT21. A total of 13,809 metaphases were analyzed with G-banding and 60,205 metaphases were analyzed with FISH using a 13/21 centromeric probe. Aneuploidy was significantly more frequent in Groups II and III. The frequencies of hyperdiploid cells were 0.19, 0.49 and 0.96% in Groups I-III, respectively. FISH analysis showed that trisomy 21 cell percentages were 0.08, 0.21 and 0.76 for Groups I-III, respectively, and were very similar to those obtained with G-banding. Trisomy 21 mosaicism was found in 2/22 couples with one FT21 offspring, and in 2/3 couples with recurrent FT21. Our data suggest that mosaicism is an important cause of FT21 offspring in young couples, and that aneuploidy is more frequent among couples with FT21 offspring. This may be related with age and other undetermined intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  12. Trisomy 17 in a bonobo (Pan paniscus) and deletion of 3q in a lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): comparison with human trisomy 18 and human deletion 4q syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lear, T L; Houck, M L; Zhang, Y W; Debnar, L A; Sutherland-Smith, M R; Young, L; Jones, K L; Benirschke, K

    2001-01-01

    A female bonobo (Pan paniscus) born at the San Diego Zoo exhibited inability to nurse and progressive weakness plus multiple congenital abnormalities including aural canal atresia and stenosis, malformed auricles, clenched hands, lordosis, agenesis of the caudal vertebra and cardiac abnormalities. Chromosome analysis identified the bonobo as being trisomic for chromosome 17, the homolog of human chromosome 18. Genotyping with human microsatellites suggested the extra chromosome was maternal in origin. In addition, a male lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), also born at the zoo, exhibited postnatal growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms and small hands with short fingers. Karyotype analysis revealed the gorilla carried a deletion of the distal q arm of chromosome 3, the homolog of human chromosome 4. The phenotypic and karyotypic abnormalities found in the bonobo and gorilla were consistent with the characteristics of human trisomy 18 and human deletion 4q syndrome, respectively.

  13. Pattern of trisomy 1q in hematological malignancies: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Vesna; Dencić-Fekete, Marija; Jovanović, Jelica; Drakulić, Danijela; Stevanović, Milena; Janković, Gradimir; Gotić, Mirjana

    2008-10-01

    An extra copy of 1q usually originates from the translocated unbalanced derivative chromosome, isochromosome, or "jumping translocation." We report a pattern of partial trisomies and unbalanced whole-arm translocations of 1q in 10 patients: 5 with myelodysplastic syndrome, 3 with acute myeloid leukemia, and a single patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myeloproliferative syndrome. The trisomy of 1q was registered as the sole karyotype aberration in one patient, while it was accompanied by a limited number of additional chromosomal changes in nine patients. These patients are a subset of a larger group of 92 adults carrying a wide variety of chromosome 1 anomalies within a complex cytogenetic context observed over a period between 1994 and 2006 in a panel of 3,786 hematologic patients at the Institute of Hematology in Belgrade. Conventional cytogenetics was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a probe specific for the paracentric region of 1q. Whole-arm 1q translocations involved chromosomes Y, 7, 14, 15, 16, and 19. This study suggests that gain of 1q as the sole cytogenetic abnormality may be sufficiently mutagenic to favor leukemogenesis and hematopoietic tissue degeneration (trilineage myelodysplasia).

  14. Combined trisomy 9 and Ullrich-Turner syndrome in a girl with a 46,X,der(9)t(X;9)(q12;q32) karyotype.

    PubMed

    Canún, S; Mutchinick, O; Shaffer, L G; Fernández, C

    1998-11-16

    Total trisomy 9 is a rare disorder with most patients dying before age 4 months. Herein, we report a 9-year-old girl with mental retardation, short stature, a peculiar face and other minor defects, who was diagnosed as having an unbalanced de novo X-autosome translocation with a 46,X,der(9)t(X;9)(q12;q32) karyotype resulting in almost a full trisomy 9(pter-->q32) and a partial monosomy X(q12-->pter). The clinical findings of our patient, almost exclusively resemble those of trisomy 9p and the Ullrich-Turner syndromes and has few manifestations of 9q trisomy. BrdU replication studies by Giemsa staining showed an earlier replication of 9p in the translocated chromosome, but a marked late-replication pattern for almost the complete 9q arm involved in the translocation. FISH studies confirmed the presence of three 9 centromeres, excluded the presence of the X centromere signal in the rearranged chromosome, and showed that both Xq telomeric sequences were present. BrdU replication studies by FISH showed an usual pattern of striking late-replication around the XIC of the derivative chromosome, but early replication of the chromosome 9p segment and distal Xq.

  15. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

  16. Segregation of a paternal insertional translocation results in partial 4q monosomy or 4q trisomy in two siblings

    SciTech Connect

    Hegmann, K.M.; Spikes, A.S.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1996-01-02

    A genetics evaluation was requested for a 6-week-old infant with multiple congenital malformations including mild craniofacial anomalies, truncal hypotonia, hypospadias, and a ventriculoseptal defect. Blood obtained for chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal chromosome 4. Paternal chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY, inv ins (3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2), inv(4)(p15.3q21.2) karyotype. Therefore, the proband`s chromosome 4 was the unbalanced product of this insertional translocation from the father resulting in partial monosomy 4q. Additionally, the derivative 4 had a pericentric inversion which was also seen in the father`s chromosome 4. During genetic counseling, the proband`s 2-year-old brother was evaluated. He was not felt to be abnormal in appearance, but was described as having impulsive behavior. Chromosome analysis on this child revealed 46, XY, der(3) inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2)pat. This karyotype results in partial trisomy 4q. FISH using two-color {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} probes for chromosomes 3 and 4 confirmed the G-banded interpretation in this family. The segregation seen in this family resulted in both reciprocal products being observed in the two children, with partial 4q monosomy showing multiple congenital anomalies, and partial 4q trisomy showing very few phenotypic abnormalities. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Partial trisomy 3p and partial monosomy 11q associated with double outlet right ventricle and septum pellucidum et vergae: a case report.

    PubMed

    Say, B; Guzoglu, N; Uras, N; Candemir, Z; Akin, I; Dilmen, U

    2013-01-01

    Su Partial trisomy 3p and partial monosomy 11q are rare chromosomal disorders with a deletion of part of chromosome 11 combined with a duplication of part of chromosome 3. These are usually inherited from a parent who carries a balanced translocation involving chromosome 3, which can result in the unbalanced translocation trisomy 3p in a child. In this paper, we report a newborn who has dysmorphic facial features, double outlet right ventricle, hypotonia, hypospadias, neonatal thrombocytopenia, hydroureteronephrosis, talipes equinovarus and septum pellucidum et vergae. Cytogenetic investigation revealed 46,XY,der(11)t(3;11)(p22.2;q23.3) and the karyotype of his father showed a balanced translocation, 46XY,t(3;11)(p22.2;p23.3).

  18. Detection of X chromosome aneuploidy using Southern blot analysis during routine population-based screening for fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adir, Vardit; Shahak, Elena; Dar, Hanna; Borochowitz, Zvi U

    2003-01-01

    We report herein two cases where detection of X chromosome aneuploidy (cytogenetically proved 45,X/46XX and 47,XXX) was made possible by molecular diagnosis during population-based carrier screening for Fragile X syndrome, using Southern blot analysis. This study emphasizes the value of molecular analysis for gene dosage to suggest chromosomal aneuploidy.

  19. Ts1Cje, a partial trisomy 16 mouse model for Down syndrome, exhibits learning and behavioral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Sago, Haruhiko; Carlson, Elaine J.; Smith, Desmond J.; Kilbridge, Joshua; Rubin, Edward M.; Mobley, William C.; Epstein, Charles J.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    1998-01-01

    A mouse model for Down syndrome, Ts1Cje, has been developed. This model has made possible a step in the genetic dissection of the learning, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities associated with segmental trisomy for the region of mouse chromosome 16 homologous with the so-called “Down syndrome region” of human chromosome segment 21q22. Tests of learning in the Morris water maze and assessment of spontaneous locomotor activity reveal distinct learning and behavioral abnormalities, some of which are indicative of hippocampal dysfunction. The triplicated region in Ts1Cje, from Sod1 to Mx1, is smaller than that in Ts65Dn, another segmental trisomy 16 mouse, and the learning deficits in Ts1Cje are less severe than those in Ts65Dn. In addition, degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, which was observed in Ts65Dn, was absent in Ts1Cje. PMID:9600952

  20. Multiple pilomatricomas in association with trisomy 9.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Bruno; Gonzalez-Hermosa, Rosario; Gardeazabal, Jesus; Diaz-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2009-01-01

    Multiple appearance of pilomatricoma is a rare phenomenon that has been associated with some diseases like Gardner syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. We present a case of association of multiple pilomatricoma and trisomy 9, which represents the third published in literature. As a result of the small prevalence of these two entities, we believe they could be related.

  1. Trisomy 4 leading to duplication of a mutated KIT allele in acute myeloid leukemia with mast cell involvement.

    PubMed

    Beghini, A; Ripamonti, C B; Castorina, P; Pezzetti, L; Doneda, L; Cairoli, R; Morra, E; Larizza, L

    2000-05-01

    A G-->T transversion at nucleotide 2467 of the c-KIT gene leading to Asp816-->Tyr (D816Y) substitution in the phosphotransferase domain has been previously identified in a patient with rapidly progressing AML-M2 and mast cell involvement; the patient's blasts had a 47,XY, +4,t(8;21)(q22;q22) karyotype. Herein we confirm the simultaneous presence of both major chromosomal changes by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on interphase CD34+ mononuclear cells. By setting up culture leukemic blasts, spontaneous differentiation of adherent cells with mast-cell like features was proved by histochemical and immunoenzymatic analyses. Fluorescence in situ hybridization evidence of trisomy 4 confirmed the origin of differentiated cells from the leukemic blasts. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and phosphoimage densitometry of wild-type and mutated KIT alleles on bone marrow blasts made it possible to demonstrate that chromosome 4 trisomy led to a double dosage of the mutated KIT allele. This finding, and that of trisomy 7 and MET mutation in hereditary renal carcinoma represent the only cases of human tumors in which an increased number of chromosomes carrying an oncogene activated by point mutation have been detected.

  2. Chromosome mis-segregation and cytokinesis failure in trisomic human cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Joshua M; Macedo, Joana C; Mattingly, Aaron J; Wangsa, Darawalee; Camps, Jordi; Lima, Vera; Gomes, Ana M; Dória, Sofia; Ried, Thomas; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2015-05-05

    Cancer cells display aneuploid karyotypes and typically mis-segregate chromosomes at high rates, a phenotype referred to as chromosomal instability (CIN). To test the effects of aneuploidy on chromosome segregation and other mitotic phenotypes we used the colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 (2n = 46) and two variants with trisomy 7 or 13 (DLD1+7 and DLD1+13), as well as euploid and trisomy 13 amniocytes (AF and AF+13). We found that trisomic cells displayed higher rates of chromosome mis-segregation compared to their euploid counterparts. Furthermore, cells with trisomy 13 displayed a distinctive cytokinesis failure phenotype. We showed that up-regulation of SPG20 expression, brought about by trisomy 13 in DLD1+13 and AF+13 cells, is sufficient for the cytokinesis failure phenotype. Overall, our study shows that aneuploidy can induce chromosome mis-segregation. Moreover, we identified a trisomy 13-specific mitotic phenotype that is driven by up-regulation of a gene encoded on the aneuploid chromosome.

  3. Differential Brain, Cognitive and Motor Profiles Associated with Partial Trisomy. Modeling Down Syndrome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roubertoux, Pierre L; Baril, Nathalie; Cau, Pierre; Scajola, Christophe; Ghata, Adeline; Bartoli, Catherine; Bourgeois, Patrice; Christofaro, Julie di; Tordjman, Sylvie; Carlier, Michèle

    2017-02-15

    We hypothesize that the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) is the additive and interactive outcome of the triple copy of different regions of HSA21. Because of the small number of patients with partial trisomy 21, we addressed the question in the Mouse in which three chromosomal regions located on MMU10, MMU17 and MMU16 carries almost all the HSA21 homologs. Male mice from four segmental trisomic strains covering the D21S17-ETS2 (syntenic to MMU16) were examined with an exhaustive battery of cognitive tests, motor tasks and MRI and compared with TS65Dn that encompasses D21S17-ETS2. None of the four strains gather all the impairments (measured by the effect size) of TS65Dn strain. The 152F7 strain was close to TS65Dn for motor behavior and reference memory and the three other strains 230E8, 141G6 and 285E6 for working memory. Episodic memory was impaired only in strain 285E6. The hippocampus and cerebellum reduced sizes that were seen in all the strains indicate that trisomy 21 is not only a hippocampus syndrome but that it results from abnormal interactions between the two structures.

  4. [Introduction of noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal trisomies: preliminary results and consequences on invasive samplings].

    PubMed

    Van Wymersch, D; Gilson, G

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has marked a revolution in aneuploidy screening because it allows a simple maternal blood test to detect trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in a foetus with a very high level of accuracy. After one year of NIPT utilisation with 683 samples, we analyzed retrospectively the performance of the test for 2014 : 3 positive samples (2 trisomies 21 and 1 trisomy 18) were correctly detected (100% sensitivity) and no foetal aneuploidy was missed for the pregnancies having already resulted in delivery by decembre 2014 (280 true negatif, 100% specificity). However, the additionnally available analysis of the sex chromosomes resulted in 2 erronous results: 1 uncorrect sex determination (1 male resulting in a female phenotype at birth) and 1 result suggesting a Turner syndrome was not confirmed by amniocentesis. The failure rate leading to a resampling was at 1.46% (10/683). The test used was the NIFTY of the BGI laboratory in Hong-Kong. By comparison to the year 2013, the utilisation of NIPT lead to a significant diminution of invasive samples performed by amniocentesis or choriocentesis 144 vs. 239 (- 63%). We confirmed that NIPT is a high-performance tool for the screening of the main foetal aneuploidies and report that during its first year of utilisation, 63% of invasive samples collected could be avoided. The test is expensive, not reimboursed by Luxembourg social security and therefore prohibitive for a number of women and their families.

  5. Noninvasive prenatal testing for trisomy 21: challenges for implementation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hui, Lisa; Hyett, Jon

    2013-10-01

    The term 'Non invasive prenatal testing' is used to describe the rapidly emerging molecular technologies related to cell free DNA assessment that are being applied to prenatal screening for Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities. This technology is now available to Australian women through a number of off-shore laboratories. We review the basis of this method of testing, the literature describing the effectiveness of NIPT in screening for trisomy 21 and the potential methods by which this tool could be incorporated into current screening strategies.

  6. A case of confined placental mosaicism with double trisomy associated with stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, L R; Batra, G; Hall, V; McHale, E; Heazell, A E P

    2011-09-01

    We present a case of stillbirth in which the fetus was well grown and karyotypically normal, but the placenta was morphologically abnormal and had confined placental mosaicism (CPM) for a double trisomy of chromosomes 12 and 15. A compilation of published cases of CPM reveals that whilst approximately 80% of pregnancies progress normally, there is an association with abnormal placental morphology, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal abnormalities and stillbirth. This case highlights the potential adverse effects of CPM and the benefit of placental examination in determining the cause of stillbirth.

  7. External Quality Assessment for Detection of Fetal Trisomy 21, 18, and 13 by Massively Parallel Sequencing in Clinical Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hongyun; Li, Yulong; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-03-01

    An external quality assessment for detection of trisomy 21, 18, and 13 by massively parallel sequencing was implemented by the National Center for Clinical Laboratories of People's Republic of China in 2014. Simulated samples were prepared by mixing fragmented abnormal DNA with plasma from non-pregnant women. The external quality assessment panel, comprising 5 samples from pregnant healthy women, 2 samples with sex chromosome aneuploidies, and 13 samples with different concentrations of fetal fractions positive for trisomy 21, 18, and 13, was then distributed to participating laboratories. In total, 55.6% (47 of 84) of respondents correctly identified each of the samples in the panel. Seventeen false-negative and 87 gray zone results were reported, most [102 of 104 (98.1%)] of which were derived from for trisomy samples with effective fetal fractions <4%. No laboratories generated false-positive results. In addition, we observed varied diagnostic capabilities of different assays, with the assay on the basis of NextSeq CN500 performing better than others, whereas Z values generated by BGISEQ-100 fluctuated greatly. There were no significant correlations between the numbers of unique sequence reads and Z values from any trisomy sample generated by BGISEQ-100. Overall, most clinical laboratories detected samples containing effective fetal fractions >4%. Our study shows need for further laboratory training in the management of samples with low fetal fractions. For some assays, precision of Z values needs to be improved.

  8. A malformed newborn with 9p and 4q trisomy.

    PubMed

    Fryns, J P; Azou, M; Devliegher, H; Eggermont, E; van den Berghe, H

    1981-01-01

    A malformed male newborn with partial trisomy 9p (qter-9q13) and distal 4q trisomy (4qter-4q31), being the unbalanced product of a balanced reciprocal translocation in the mother karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;9)(q31;q13) is reported. Besides the typical craniofacial stigmata of pure 9q trisomy the child presented with poor neurological condition and failure to thrive.

  9. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  10. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  11. 77 FR 23241 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; Notice of Intent To File License... Friends Fund XXX, LLC. e. Name of Project: New Cumberland Locks and Dam Hydroelectric Project. f. Location... XXX, c/o Hydro Green Energy, LLC, 900 Oakmont Lane, Suite 310, Westmont, IL 60559; (877) 556-6566...

  12. [Phenotypic variability in 47, XXX patients: Clinical report of four new cases].

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Ernesto; Márquez, Marisa; Solari, Andrea; Ziembar, María I; Laudicina, Alejandro

    2010-08-01

    The 47, XXX karyotype has a frequency of 1 in 1000 female newborns. However, this karyotype is not usually suspected at birth or childhood. These patients are usually diagnosed during adulthood when they develop premature ovarian failure or infertility, because the early phenotype doesn t have any specific features. The study describes four cases and the clinical variability of the 47, XXX karyotype.

  13. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  14. Germ cell tumor showing partial trisomy 1 in a gonadectomized intersex child with monosomy X and double Y mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Ogur, Gönül; Pinarli, Faruk Güçlü; Dağdemir, Ayhan; Artan, Sevilhan; Artürk, Ender; Elli, Murat; Sezer, Ozlem Türkeli; Okten, Gülsen

    2006-11-01

    High incidence of germ cell tumors arising from dysgenetic gonads in patients with sexual chromosome abnormalities has been described, especially in patients with a Y chromosome bearing cell line. Here we report a 14-year-old patient with ambiguous genitalia. Constitutional karyotype showed 45,X/46,X,derY [?t(Yp;Yq)] mosaicism. The patient developed an abdominally located mixed malignant germ cell tumor 5 years after the removal of the dysgenetic gonads. Tumor karyotype showed partial trisomy 1q, a derivative 8q, and a hyperdiploidy with +X, +7, +12, +15, +19, +21, and an unidentified marker.

  15. Hydrocephalus in an infant with trisomy 22.

    PubMed Central

    Fahmi, F; Schmerler, S; Hutcheon, R G

    1994-01-01

    We present an infant with true trisomy 22. Mosaicism is ruled out by the finding of a 47,XX, +22 karyotype in all cells analysed originating from two embryonic germ layers. The physical findings are consistent with the previously noted features including developmental delay, ear abnormalities, micrognathia, clefting, and congenital heart disease. The patient is the first described with macrocephaly and hydrocephalus and the second with holoprosencephaly. Images PMID:8182721

  16. Molecular characterisation of partial chromosome 21 aneuploidies by fluorescent PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valero, R.; Marfany, G.; Gil-Benso, R.; Ibanez, M. d.; Lopez-Pajares, I.; Prieto, F.; Rul.lan, G.; Sarret, E.; Gonzalez-Duarte, R.

    1999-01-01

    Although trisomy of chromosome 21 is the most prevalent human genetic disorder, data from partial 21 aneuploidies are very scanty. Eight different partial aneuploidies for chromosome 21 were characterised by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Allelic dosage analysis was performed for each patient using 25 CHLC STRs covering the entire q arm. The length of the corresponding trisomies and monosomies was ascertained for five partial trisomics and three partial monosomics. All trisomic patients carried unbalanced translocations involving chromosome 21, whereas one of the monosomic patients bore a ring chromosome 21 and another showed an interstitial deletion of chromosome 21. The chromosomal breakpoints of two partial trisomy patients could be clearly delimited. However, the other three trisomies involved most of the 21 q arm as three allelic doses were detected for each marker. Although these latter patients do not show all the features of Down syndrome, genotype/phenotype correlations agree with previously reported data. The chromosomal breakpoints observed in two partially monosomic patients helped further to define the region involved in different phenotypic features associated with chromosome 21 monosomy. Telomeric material loss was also detected in a patient bearing a ring 21 chromosome. The parental origin of the aneuploidy was assigned for each case, which allowed us to conclude that two of the monosomic cases originated from de novo chromosomal rearrangements. There was no correlation with parental sex in contrast to trisomic patients originating from meiotic non-disjunction.


Keywords: Down syndrome; partial trisomy; partial monosomy; chromosome 21 PMID:10507727

  17. Trisomy 15 mosaic derived from trisomic conceptus: Report of a case and a review

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, V.D.; Chodakowski, B.A.; Chitayat, D.A.

    1996-02-02

    We report on a fetus with 47,XX,+15 chromosome abnormality detected on chorionic villus sampling (CVS). The pregnancy was terminated at 15.5 weeks of gestation and chromosome analysis done on aminocytes and fetal tissues showed a karyotype 46,XX/47,XX,+15. Autopsy showed multiple abnormalities. Short-arm polymorphisms of the three number 15 chromosomes were highly informative in the delineation of parental origin and the stage of meiotic error. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with D15Z1 and a chromosome 15 painting probe, in addition to DA/DAPI and G-banding, we were able to show that the trisomic conceptus was derived through maternal meiosis I error. The trisomic state was then partially corrected by the loss of one of the two maternal 15s resulting in mosaicism without uniparental disomy (UPD). Striking differences in the proportion of trisomic cells in kidneys, blood, intestine, and skin, and lower proportions of trisomic cells in transformed and frozen than in fresh tissues, illustrate the continuing cell selection in this fetus in favour of the normal cell line. Trisomy 15 conceptions are usually aborted spontaneously in the first trimester of pregnancy. The longer survival of this fetus is most probably the result of a chromosome 15 loss from the trisomic zygote. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of this lethal trisomy has been reported in only five livborn infants, and in five fetuses including the present case, it was detected prenatally and the pregnancies were terminated. 46 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Laboratory produced P/M aluminum 2XXX + Zr sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, Dick M.; Singleton, O. R.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory-scale batch of aluminum alloy sheeting samples in the 2XXX + Zr system has been produced by P/M techniques in the T8X temper and subjected to tensile and Kahn tear property tests in both the longitudinal and long-transverse directions. The results obtained were compared to those of a NASA study concerning the same alloy powders; it appears that laboratory production-scale sheet-sample properties are good to excellent predictors of pilot-scale process products' tensile and tear notch toughness properties. The tear resistance toughness of the laboratory samples was not predictive of the pilot-scale products, however.

  19. Interphase cytogenetic analysis in Argentinean B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients: association of trisomy 12 and del(13q14).

    PubMed

    Chena, Christian; Arrossagaray, Guillermo; Scolnik, Mariano; Palacios, María F; Slavutsky, Irma

    2003-10-15

    We have evaluated genomic aberrations by conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in a series of 57 Argentinean B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. The studies were performed on stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH analysis for trisomy 12, 13q14 deletion, and monosomy of TP53 (also known as p53) was performed according to standard protocols. Our results showed 46.3% of patients with clonal chromosomal alterations by conventional cytogenetics and 80.7% by FISH. Trisomy 12 was found in 21.9% of patients by G-banding analysis and in 35% by FISH studies. Allelic loss of 13q14 was observed in 63.2% patients, most of them showing D13S319 and D13S25 deletion; 11% of patients showed TP53 monosomy. Coexistence of trisomy 12 and 13q14 deletion was found in 17.5% of patients. In this group, deletion 13q14 was the prevalent clone, with percentages 25-35% higher than those observed for trisomy 12, suggesting clonal evolution. The coexistence of trisomy 12 with deletion 13q14 was observed in a higher frequency than reported in the literature. A probable adverse prognosis is suggested for this group of patients, likely related to clonal evolution.

  20. The meiotic stage of nondisjunction in trisomy 21: Determination by using DNA polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Petersen, Michael B.; McInnis, Melvin G.; Adelsberger, Patricia A.; Schinzel, Albert A.; Binkert, Franz; Pangalos, Constantine; Raoul, Odile; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Hafez, Mohamed; Cohen, Maimon M.; Roulson, Diane; Schwartz, Stuart; Mikkelsen, Margareta; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Greenberg, Frank; Hoar, David I.; Rudd, Noreen L.; Warren, Andrew C.; Metaxotou, Caterina; Bartsocas, Christos; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    1992-01-01

    We have studied DNA polymorphisms at loci in the pericentromeric region on the long arm of chromosome 21 in 200 families with trisomy 21, in order to determine the meiotic origin of nondisjunction. Maintenance of heterozygosity for parental markers in the individual with trisomy 21 was interpreted as resulting from a meiosis I error, while reduction to homozygosity was attributed to a meiosis II error. Nondisjunction was paternal in 9 cases and was maternal in 188 cases, as reported earlier. Among the 188 maternal cases, nondisjunction occurred in meiosis I in 128 cases and in meiosis II in 38 cases; in 22 cases the DNA markers used were uninformative. Therefore meiosis I was responsible for 77.1% and meiosis II for 22.9% of maternal nondisjunction. Among the 9 paternal nondisjunction cases the error occurred in meiosis I in 2 cases (22.2%) and in meiosis II in 7 (77.8%) cases. Since there was no significant difference in the distribution of maternal ages between maternal I error versus maternal II error, it is unlikely that an error at a particular meiotic stage contributes significantly to the increasing incidence of Down syndrome with advancing maternal age. Although the DNA polymorphisms used were at loci which map close to the centromere, it is likely that rare errors in meiotic-origin assignments may have occurred because of a small number of crossovers between the markers and the centromere. Analysis of these polymorphisms may provide a more accurate understanding of the meiotic stage of nondisjunction in trisomy 21 than that previously provided by chromosomal heteromorphisms. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:1347192

  1. Constitutional trisomy 8p11.21-q11.21 mosaicism: a germline alteration predisposing to myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Tim; Tauscher, Marcel; Praulich, Inka; Pabst, Brigitte; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Yeoh, Allen; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Flotho, Christian; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Steinemann, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is a unique myeloproliferative disorder of early childhood. Frequently, mutations in NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11, NF1 or CBL are found in these patients. Monosomy 7 is the most common cytogenetic aberration. To identify submicroscopic genomic copy number alterations, 20 JMML samples were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization. Ten out of 20 samples displayed additional submicroscopic alterations. In two patients, an almost identical gain of chromosome 8 was identified. In both patients, fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed a constitutional partial trisomy 8 mosaic (cT8M). A survey on 27 cT8M patients with neoplasms showed that 21 had myeloid malignancies, and five of these had a JMML. Notably, the region gained in our cases is the smallest gain of chromosome 8 reported in cT8M cases with malignancies so far. Our results dramatically reduce the critical region to 8p11.21q11.21 harbouring 31 protein coding genes and two non-coding RNAs, e.g. MYST3, IKBKB, UBE2V2, GOLGA7, FNTA and MIR486--a finding with potential implications for the role of somatic trisomy 8 in myeloid malignancies. Further investigations are required to more comprehensively determine how constitutional partial trisomy 8 mosaicisms may contribute to leukaemogenesis in different mutational subtypes of JMML and other myeloid malignancies.

  2. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jang Choon; Shin, Jimin; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15{sup INK4b} in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic Kras{sup G12D}. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15{sup Ink4b} tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals.

  3. Ectopia cordis in a fetus with mosaic trisomy 16.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutoglou, Christos; Meditskou, Soultana; Keivanidou, Anastasia; Manthou, Marilena; Anesidis, Nikolaos; Assimakopoulos, Efstratios; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Kumar, Sailesh

    2010-09-01

    Ectopia cordis and mosaic trisomy 16 are two rare fetal anomalies, which have not been reported in association. We report a case of an isolated ectopia cordis at 11(+3) weeks. Subsequent embryological examination confirmed thoracic ectopia cordis with normal heart structure and array comparative genomic hybridization of fetal tissue detected trisomy 16 mosaicism.

  4. Double partial trisomy of 6p23-pter and 9pter-q21.2 in a neonate resulting from 4:2 meiotic segregation of a maternal complex t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2) translocation.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Mihci, E; Keser, I; Karaali, K; Berker, S; Luleci, G

    2012-01-01

    We report, a newborn presenting multiple congenital abnormalities with karyotype; 47,XY,der(7)t(6;7)(pter-p23::p15-->qter),+der(9)t(7;9)(pter-->p15::q21.2--> pter)t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)mat[20]. The mother and her phenotypically normal daughter were carriers of a complex chromosomal rearrangement with karyotypes; 46,XX,t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)[20]. Paternal chromosomes were normal. In our case the extra derivative chromosome was the result of a 4:2 segregation of the chromosomes involved in translocation during oogenesis. Double partial trisomy in newborns resulting from 4:2 segregation is a rare event, and double partial trisomies of the 6p23-pter and trisomy 9pter-q22 regions have not reported to date.

  5. Clinical features and prognosis of a sample of patients with trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Petry, Patrícia; Polli, Janaina B; Mattos, Vinícius F; Rosa, Rosana C M; Zen, Paulo R G; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio A; Rosa, Rafael F M

    2013-06-01

    Trisomy 13 or Patau syndrome (PS) is a chromosomal disorder characterized by a well known presentation of multiple congenital anomalies. Our objective was to determine the clinical features and prognosis observed in a sample of patients with PS. The series was composed of patients with diagnosis of PS consecutively evaluated by a Clinical Genetics Service from a reference hospital of southern Brazil, in the period between 1975 and 2012. Statistical analysis was performed using PEPI program (version 4.0), with two-tailed Fisher's exact test for comparison of frequencies (P<0.05). The sample consisted of 30 patients, 60% male, median age at first evaluation of 9 days. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic alteration (73%). The major clinical findings included: cryptorchidism (78%), abnormal auricles (77%), congenital heart defects (76%), polydactyly (63%), microphthalmia (60%) and micrognathia (50%). Four patients (13%) simultaneously had micro/anophthalmia, oral clefts and polydactyly. Some findings were only observed in our sample and included, among others, preauricular tags (10%), duplication of the hallux (3%) and spots following the lines of Blaschko (3%). Mosaicism (20% of cases) had a statistically significant association only with absence of cryptorchidism. The median of survival was 26 days. Patients with and without mosaicism had similar median of survival. Our findings, in agreement with the literature, show that the anomalies in patients with PS can be quite variable, sometimes even atypical. There is no pathognomonic finding, which may make the early identification of these patients challenging.

  6. When does maternal age-dependent trisomy 21 arise relative to meiosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Jiang Zheng; Byers, B.

    1996-07-01

    Polymorphic DNA markers have recently been used to estimate the fraction of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) cases that may be attributable to postzygotic nondisjunction - indicative of a loss in the fidelity of the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In these studies, a postzygotic nondisjunction is defined as a case in which two chromosomes of the trisomic set are homozygous for all informative markers (i.e., for those markers that were heterozygous in their parent of origin). These studies estimate that the postzygotic mutation mechanism accounts for 4.5% (11/238) and 3.5% (9/255) of their cases, respectively, but their estimates may actually be conservative, since all noninformative haplotypes (frequency not reported) are arbitrarily attributed to meiosis II-type nondisjunction. Nevertheless, even the conservative estimates would, if confirmed, constitute a new and nonnegligible source of chromosomal segregation errors leading to trisomy. These studies` conclusions are supported by the observation that the 20 reported {open_quotes}postzygotic{close_quotes} cases (5 paternal and 15 maternal) appear to be less dependent on maternal age (mean maternal age 28.4 years) than maternal meiosis I-type failures (mean maternal age 31.2 years). However, given the limited sample size involved, one should be cautious in positing the absence of a maternal age effect. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Detection of a de novo duplication of 1q32-qter by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in a boy with multiple malformations: further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duba, H C; Erdel, M; Löffler, J; Bereuther, L; Fischer, H; Utermann, B; Utermann, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a dysmorphic boy with a de novo partial trisomy 1q. The boy has microcephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate, low set and dysmorphic ears, brain anomalies, pulmonary stenosis, duodenal obstruction, dysplastic kidneys, and bifid thumbs. The trisomic segment 1q32-qter is duplicated with an inverted insertion at 1p36.3. The aberration was initially detected at amniocentesis and confirmed and defined by GTG banding, chromosome microdissection, and FISH on postnatal blood samples. The parents had normal karyotypes. De novo partial duplications of chromosome 1q have rarely been reported. Comparison of our patient with other published pure trisomy 1q cases showed similarities which allowed the further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome. Images PMID:9138155

  8. Constellation of congenital abnormalities in an infant: A new syndrome or tissue-specific mosaicism for trisomy 18?

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Wilson, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    A newborn infant born to consanguineous (first cousin) parents was noted to have complex cogenital heart defect and minor anomalies suggestive of trisomy 18. Blood lymphocyte and skin fibroblast karyotypes were normal. He died in the neonatal period of postoperative complications. On interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) using autopsy specimens, a significant number of cells in the liver (17%) were trisomic for chromosome 18, compared to normal control liver tissue. However, interphase FISH analyses of blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and kidney tissue were normal. It is our opinion that this apparent mosaicism for trisomy 18 in the patient`s liver may be spurious, though it brings into focus the issue of possible tissue/organ-specific mosaicism. The anomalies in this infant do not resemble a previously described malformation syndrome. Parental consanguinity raises the possibility that this represents a new autosomal recessive malformation syndrome. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Could Digital PCR Be an Alternative as a Non-Invasive Prenatal Test for Trisomy 21: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    El Khattabi, Laïla Allach; Rouillac-Le Sciellour, Christelle; Le Tessier, Dominique; Luscan, Armelle; Coustier, Audrey; Porcher, Raphael; Bhouri, Rakia; Nectoux, Juliette; Sérazin, Valérie; Quibel, Thibaut; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tsatsaris, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Objective NIPT for fetal aneuploidy by digital PCR has been hampered by the large number of PCR reactions needed to meet statistical requirements, preventing clinical application. Here, we designed an octoplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay which allows increasing the number of available targets and thus overcomes statistical obstacles. Method After technical optimization of the multiplex PCR on mixtures of trisomic and euploid DNA, we performed a validation study on samples of plasma DNA from 213 pregnant women. Molecular counting of circulating cell-free DNA was performed using a mix of hydrolysis probes targeting chromosome 21 and a reference chromosome. Results The results of our validation experiments showed that ddPCR detected trisomy 21 even when the sample’s trisomic DNA content is as low as 5%. In a validation study of plasma samples from 213 pregnant women, ddPCR discriminated clearly between the trisomy 21 and the euploidy groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that digital PCR can meet the requirements for non-invasive prenatal testing of trisomy 21. This approach is technically simple, relatively cheap, easy to implement in a diagnostic setting and compatible with ethical concerns regarding access to nucleotide sequence information. These advantages make it a potential technique of choice for population-wide screening for trisomy 21 in pregnant women. PMID:27167625

  10. Molecular genetics of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P C; Tanzi, R E; Cheng, S V; Gusella, J F

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome 21 is the smallest autosome, comprising only about 1.9% of human DNA, but represents one of the most intensively studied regions of the genome. Much of the interest in chromosome 21 can be attributed to its association with Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder that afflicts one in every 700 to 1000 newborns. Although only 17 genes have been assigned to chromosome 21, a very large number of cloned DNA segments of unknown function have been isolated and regionally mapped. The majority of these segments detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and therefore represent useful genetic markers. Continued molecular genetic investigation of chromosome 21 will be central to elucidating molecular events leading to meiotic non-disjunction and consequent trisomy, the contribution of specific genes to the pathology of Down's syndrome, and the possible role of chromosome 21 in Alzheimer's disease and other as yet unmapped genetic defects. PMID:2884319

  11. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroki; Nguyen, Huong Thi Nguyen; Pham, Thanh Thi Mai; Han, Xu; Hirofuji, Yuta; Nonaka, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV). Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I.

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  13. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. |

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Commentary: Unravelling the Effects of Additional Sex Chromosomes on Cognition and Communication--Reflections on Lee et al. (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most people have 23 pairs of chromosomes; one set from the mother and one from the father. However, nondisjunction errors during meiosis can lead to a case of trisomy, where there are three rather than two chromosomes. Although such events are not uncommon, they are usually lethal, and account for a high proportion of spontaneous abortions. There…

  15. 45,X/47,XXX Mosaicism and Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G; Raissouni, Nouhad; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a ten-year-old girl with short stature and 45,X/47,XXX genotype. She also suffered from vesicoureteric reflux and kidney dysfunction prior to having surgery on her ureters. Otherwise, she does not have any of the characteristics of Turner nor Triple X syndrome. It has been shown that this mosaic condition as well as other varieties creates a milder phenotype than typical Turner syndrome, which is what we mostly see in our patient. However, this patient is a special case, because she is exceptionally short. Overall, one cannot predict the resultant phenotype in these mosaic conditions. This creates difficulty in counseling parents whose children or fetuses have these karyotypes.

  16. Familial partial monosomy 5p and trisomy 5q; three cases due to paternal pericentric inversion 5 (p151q333).

    PubMed

    Beemer, F A; de France, H F; Rosina-Angelista, I J; Gerards, L J; Cats, B P; Guyt, R

    1984-09-01

    A family is described in which the mother's 9 pregnancies ended in the birth of 2 healthy girls, 4 spontaneous abortions and 3 infants with multiple congenital malformations as bird-headed appearance, pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, micrognathia with small mouth and cat-like cry. Two of the three affected sibs had complex cardiac malformations incompatible with life; the third had a bicuspid aortic valve. Chromosomal investigation revealed an abnormal karyotype: 46,XX,rec(5),dupq,inv(5)(p151q333)pat, leading to a partial monosomy 5p and partial trisomy 5q. A large pericentric inversion of chromosome 5 was found in the father: 46,XY,inv(5)(p151q333) as well as in the firstborn healthy female sib. The clinical features partly fit the partial monosomy 5p as well as the partial trisomy 5q syndrome.

  17. Paternal adjacent I segregation of an insertional translocation results in partial 4q monosomy and 4q trisomy in two siblings

    SciTech Connect

    Hegman, K.; Spikes, A.S.; Orr-Urteger, A.

    1994-09-01

    A genetic evaluation was requested for a 6 week old infant with multiple congenital malformations including mild craniofacial anomalies, truncal hypotonia, hypospadias and a VSD. Blood obtained for chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal chromosome 4. Paternal chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY,inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2),inv(4)(p15.3q21.3) karyotype. Therefore, the proband`s chromosome 4 was the unbalanced product of this insertional translocation from the father resulting in partial monosomy 4q. Additionally, the derivative 4 had a pericentric inversion which was also seen in the father`s chromosome 4. During genetic counseling, the proband`s 2 year-old brother was evaluated. Although he was not felt to be dysmorphic, he was described as having impulsive behavior. Chromosome analysis on this child revealed 46,XY,der(3)inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2)pat. This karyotype results in partial trisomy 4q. FISH using two-color {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} probes for chromosomes 3 and 4 confirmed the G-banded interpretation in this family. The segregation seen in this family was due to adjacent I segregation with both reciprocal products observed in the two children. Few patients with partial 4q trisomy or partial 4q monosomy have been described in the literature. This family revealed both possible unbalanced products from adjacent I segregation with partial 4q monosomy showing multiple congenital anomalies and partial 4q trisomy showing very few phenotypic abnormalities.

  18. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  19. Partial trisomy due to a de novo duplication 22q11.1-22q13.1: a cat-eye syndrome variant with brain anomalies.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, D; Ceylaner, S; Ceylaner, G; Dalkilic, S; Karli-Oguz, K; Kandemir, O

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of partial trisomy 22q with de novo duplication of chromosomal region 22q11.1-22q13.1, also confirmed by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) analysis. The fetus had interhemispheric cyst and corpus callosum agenesis diagnosed by MRI which has not been reported in the literature. This novel phenotype differs from the reported cat eye syndromes by the absence of heart defects and the presence of brain anomalies.

  20. Variable expressivity in Patau syndrome is not all related to trisomy 13 mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hui-Fang; Hou, Jia-Woei

    2007-08-01

    Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) is very rare in live-born babies. Individuals with this chromosomal syndrome have a short lifespan and are rarely seen beyond infancy. This study is aimed at the clinical spectrum, natural history, and survival of patients with trisomy 13. We reviewed the detailed data of 13 Patau syndrome live-born babies. Among them two individuals were delivered from continuation of pregnancy even after prenatal diagnosis. The remaining 11 patients were born to younger mothers who did not undergo amniocentesis because no major anomalies except for cleft lip/palate were found on prenatal sonograms. The common features of Patau syndrome including the clinical triad (microphthalmia, cleft lip/palate, and polydactyly) and non-cyanotic heart defects were always found in our series. However, certain serious central defects (holoprosencephaly, omphalocele, and single umbilical artery), which are easily recognized from prenatal sonogram, occurred less frequently than those stated in the literature. The median survival time was 95 days and was longer than that previously reported. There were two infants with trisomic mosaicism with different outcomes in both clinical spectrum and survival. Otherwise, we also found the increased recurrence risks of aneuploidy in two individuals, and the longest survivor (84 months) of non-mosaic trisomy 13 in Taiwan. We thus suggest that long-term survival in our series is strongly correlated with different expressivity after prenatal selection, in addition to cytogenetic mosaicism. Less associated anomalies such as polyhydramnios, oligohydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation, single umbilical artery, eye defects, holoprosencephaly, omphalocele, and polycystic kidney may contribute to their clinical courses.

  1. Clinical features and survival in individuals with trisomy 18: A retrospective one-center study of 44 patients who received intensive care treatments

    PubMed Central

    IMATAKA, GEORGE; SUZUMURA, HIROSHI; ARISAKA, OSAMU

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 18 syndrome is a common autosomal aneuploidy chromosomal abnormality caused by the presence of extra chromosome 18 that leads to malformations of various parts of the body. In this study, we retrospectively investigated the effect of the medical progression and prognosis of 44 cases of trisomy 18, admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit between 1992 and 2013. The patients were divided into group A (n=20, 1992–2002) and group B (n=24, 2003–2012). Following delivery, karyotype, gender, gestational weeks, birth place, cesarean section, Apgar score and birth weight were analyzed using the Fisher's exact test, unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the statistical results, a comparison was made of the two groups and no significant differences were observed. Clinical data of major complications, mechanical ventilation, discharge from hospital and survival days were reviewed for the cases of trisomy 18. Of the 44 patients, 42 had cardiac anomaly, 16 had esophageal atresia, and 3 patients had brain anomaly. Ventilation treatment was performed in 29 cases (65.9%) and an increased percentage was identified in group B patients. The percentage survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and the two groups were analyzed using the generalized Wilcoxon test. Improvement in life prognosis was observed in group B as compared to group A. The log-rank test was used to assess survey periods of 180 days, 1 year, and the entire observation period. Although significant differences were observed for the prognosis of trisomy 18 at 180 days after birth, after 1 year and the entire survey period after birth, the significant differences were not confirmed. In conclusion, results of the present study provide information concerning genetic counseling for parents/guardians and life prognosis, prior to applying intensive management to newborns with trisomy 18. PMID:26820816

  2. Clinical features and survival in individuals with trisomy 18: A retrospective one-center study of 44 patients who received intensive care treatments.

    PubMed

    Imataka, George; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Trisomy 18 syndrome is a common autosomal aneuploidy chromosomal abnormality caused by the presence of extra chromosome 18 that leads to malformations of various parts of the body. In this study, we retrospectively investigated the effect of the medical progression and prognosis of 44 cases of trisomy 18, admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit between 1992 and 2013. The patients were divided into group A (n=20, 1992‑2002) and group B (n=24, 2003‑2012). Following delivery, karyotype, gender, gestational weeks, birth place, cesarean section, Apgar score and birth weight were analyzed using the Fisher's exact test, unpaired t‑test and Mann‑Whitney U test. Based on the statistical results, a comparison was made of the two groups and no significant differences were observed. Clinical data of major complications, mechanical ventilation, discharge from hospital and survival days were reviewed for the cases of trisomy 18. Of the 44 patients, 42 had cardiac anomaly, 16 had esophageal atresia, and 3 patients had brain anomaly. Ventilation treatment was performed in 29 cases (65.9%) and an increased percentage was identified in group B patients. The percentage survival was estimated using Kaplan‑Meier curves and the two groups were analyzed using the generalized Wilcoxon test. Improvement in life prognosis was observed in group B as compared to group A. The log‑rank test was used to assess survey periods of 180 days, 1 year, and the entire observation period. Although significant differences were observed for the prognosis of trisomy 18 at 180 days after birth, after 1 year and the entire survey period after birth, the significant differences were not confirmed. In conclusion, results of the present study provide information concerning genetic counseling for parents/guardians and life prognosis, prior to applying intensive management to newborns with trisomy 18.

  3. Chromosomal mosaicism in amniotic fluid cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, D C; Moreton, M F; Corn, B J; Robinson, A

    1979-01-01

    Over the past 6 years, using in situ processing methods, we have identified 32 cases of mosaicism in amniotic fluid cell cultures prepared from 1,100 samples. Two of these (45,X/46,XX and 46,XX/47,XX, + 21) were called true mosaics because multiple colonies demonstrated the same abnormal chromosome complement, and on subsequent evaluation of the newborn blood or fetal tissues, mosaicism was confirmed. Of the remaining cases, 29 were designated as pseudomosaics because only single or partial colonies exhibited an aberrant chromosome complement, 12 having a trisomy 2 line. In the final case, a double trisomy was demonstrated in only one of eight colonies in the first culture, but in the culture from a repeat sample an additional two colonies showed the same double trisomy. Since no abnormal cells were observed in infant blood, it was postulated that the mosaicism may only have been present in the extraembryonic tissues. It is our conviction that the use of these cloning methods should diminish the danger of misdiagnosis in genetic amniocentesis. PMID:453199

  4. Double trisomy 8 and 21 in acute myelocytic leukemias, one with rearrangement of the RUNX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Berger, Roland; Coniat, Maryvonne Busson-Le

    2003-04-15

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was carried out in five patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia of various French-American-British subtypes and with double trisomy of chromosomes 8 and 21. PML-RARA fusion was detected with appropriate molecular probes in one patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia without t(15;17). Two PAC probes covering the 5' and 3' part of the RUNX1 gene were used in the four other patients. While three copies were present in three patients, as expected from conventional karyotype analysis, only two hybridization signals were present in the fifth patient. This was due to the apparent loss of the 3' part of RUNX1. Since chromosome number abnormalities may be associated with submicroscopic gene rearrangements, it should be important to search for them for a better understanding of mechanisms of leukemogenesis, and to understand the prognostic heterogeneity in leukemic patients with aneusomies without apparent chromosome structure rearrangements.

  5. The 50th anniversary of the discovery of trisomy 21: the past, present, and future of research and treatment of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, André; Ravel, Aimé; Mircher, Clotilde; Sturtz, Franck; Grattau, Yann; Rethoré, Marie-Odile; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Mobley, William C

    2009-09-01

    Trisomy 21 or Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder resulting from the presence of all or part of an extra Chromosome 21. It is a common birth defect, the most frequent and most recognizable form of mental retardation, appearing in about 1 of every 700 newborns. Although the syndrome had been described thousands of years before, it was named after John Langdon Down who reported its clinical description in 1866. The suspected association of Down syndrome with a chromosomal abnormality was confirmed by Lejeune et al. in 1959. Fifty years after the discovery of the origin of Down syndrome, the term "mongolism" is still inappropriately used; persons with Down syndrome are still institutionalized. Health problems associated with that syndrome often receive no or little medical care, and many patients still die prematurely in infancy or early adulthood. Nevertheless, working against this negative reality, community-based associations have lobbied for medical care and research to support persons with Down syndrome. Different Trisomy 21 research groups have already identified candidate genes that are potentially involved in the formation of specific Down syndrome features. These advances in turn may help to develop targeted medical treatments for persons with Trisomy 21. A review on those achievements is discussed.

  6. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  7. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  8. Ebstein anomaly and Trisomy 21: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Siehr, Stephanie L; Punn, Rajesh; Priest, James R; Lowenthal, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a patient with Trisomy 21 with Ebstein anomaly, a ventricular septal defect, and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis; a rare combination, diagnosed during a routine neonatal examination.

  9. The genetic architecture of Down syndrome phenotypes revealed by high-resolution analysis of human segmental trisomies.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Jan O; Tirosh-Wagner, Tal; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Chen, Xiao-Ning; Kasowski, Maya; Dai, Li; Grubert, Fabian; Erdman, Chandra; Gao, Michael C; Lange, Ken; Sobel, Eric M; Barlow, Gillian M; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Carpenter, Nancy J; Clark, Robin Dawn; Cohen, Monika Y; Doran, Eric; Falik-Zaccai, Tzipora; Lewin, Susan O; Lott, Ira T; McGillivray, Barbara C; Moeschler, John B; Pettenati, Mark J; Pueschel, Siegfried M; Rao, Kathleen W; Shaffer, Lisa G; Shohat, Mordechai; Van Riper, Alexander J; Warburton, Dorothy; Weissman, Sherman; Gerstein, Mark B; Snyder, Michael; Korenberg, Julie R

    2009-07-21

    Down syndrome (DS), or trisomy 21, is a common disorder associated with several complex clinical phenotypes. Although several hypotheses have been put forward, it is unclear as to whether particular gene loci on chromosome 21 (HSA21) are sufficient to cause DS and its associated features. Here we present a high-resolution genetic map of DS phenotypes based on an analysis of 30 subjects carrying rare segmental trisomies of various regions of HSA21. By using state-of-the-art genomics technologies we mapped segmental trisomies at exon-level resolution and identified discrete regions of 1.8-16.3 Mb likely to be involved in the development of 8 DS phenotypes, 4 of which are congenital malformations, including acute megakaryocytic leukemia, transient myeloproliferative disorder, Hirschsprung disease, duodenal stenosis, imperforate anus, severe mental retardation, DS-Alzheimer Disease, and DS-specific congenital heart disease (DSCHD). Our DS-phenotypic maps located DSCHD to a <2-Mb interval. Furthermore, the map enabled us to present evidence against the necessary involvement of other loci as well as specific hypotheses that have been put forward in relation to the etiology of DS-i.e., the presence of a single DS consensus region and the sufficiency of DSCR1 and DYRK1A, or APP, in causing several severe DS phenotypes. Our study demonstrates the value of combining advanced genomics with cohorts of rare patients for studying DS, a prototype for the role of copy-number variation in complex disease.

  10. Liveborn with both partial trisomy of 3q and partial monosomy of 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Farren-Chavez, D.M.; Guzman, E.R.; Peters, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    A 32-year-old G{sub 3}P{sub 2002} Hispanic female presented at 14 weeks gestation for routine dating ultrasound. At that time ultrasonography revealed a septated cystic hygroma, omphalocele, bilateral talipes equinovarus, and hydrops. Amniocentesis was performed at 15 weeks and revealed a 46,XX,9p+ chromosome complement. The origin of the extra material on the terminal short arm of chromosome 9 could not be identified. Chromosome analysis was performed on the parents and the mother was found to carry the balanced translocation 46,XX,p(3;9)(q23;p13). Further analysis revealed that the fetus had inherited the derivative 9 chromosome. The fetus was therefore monosomic for 9p13-9pter and trisomic for 3q23-3pter. The patient chose to continue the pregnancy. Serial ultrasonography later demonstrated a sloping forehead, small nose, micrognathia, ventriculomegaly, possible VSD, micropenis, hypospadias, cryptorchidism and post-axial polydactyly of the hands. The fetus was delivered prematurely at 31 weeks and survived one hour. Post-mortem examination confirmed the ultrasound findings and revealed additional stigmata consistent with both 9p monosomy and 3q trisomy. A review of the literature indicates no previous report of both syndromes concurrently.

  11. Changing Paradigms in Down Syndrome: The First International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society.

    PubMed

    Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Allinquant, Bernadette; Bianchi, Diana; Blumenthal, Tom; Dekker, Alain; Edgin, Jamie; O'Bryan, John; Dierssen, Mara; Potier, Marie-Claude; Wiseman, Frances; Guedj, Faycal; Créau, Nicole; Reeves, Roger; Gardiner, Katheleen; Busciglio, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) in humans with an incidence of ∼1:1,000 live births worldwide. It is caused by the presence of an extra copy of all or a segment of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). People with DS present with a constellation of phenotypic alterations involving most organs and organ systems. ID is present in all people with DS, albeit with variable severity. DS is also the most frequent genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ∼50% of those with DS will develop AD-related dementia. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in understanding the crucial genotype-phenotype relationships in DS, in identifying the alterations in molecular pathways leading to the various clinical conditions present in DS, and in preclinical evaluations of potential therapies to improve the overall health and well-being of individuals with DS. In June 2015, 230 scientists, advocates, patients, and family members met in Paris for the 1st International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society. Here, we report some of the most relevant presentations that took place during the meeting.

  12. Management Considerations for Ongoing Pregnancies Complicated by Trisomy 13 and 18.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Kuller, Jeffrey A; Grace, Matthew R; Laifer, Steven A; Strauss, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancies complicated by trisomy 13 (T13) or trisomy 18 (T18) present unique challenges for obstetric management. From the initial diagnosis, the task of counseling these women and families is difficult because fetal and neonatal outcomes vary depending on the phenotype and degree of intervention chosen by the family. A literature review was performed using PubMed to gather information regarding obstetric management and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18. Spontaneous abortion and in uterofetal demise occur at rates well above those seen in chromosomally normal pregnancies. In addition, infants with T13 or T18 frequently have structural anomalies, which lead to worse prognoses and long-term survival. In cases in which a woman and her family desire to continue the pregnancy, multidisciplinary consultation with obstetrics, social work, genetics, and pediatrics can optimize care of both the fetus and the mother. Most commonly, prenatal care does not differ from routine. A detailed delivery plan should be generated, specifically discussing interventions for the patient and her fetus. When managing pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18, active, open, and frequent communication between the patient, her family, and a multidisciplinary health care team throughout the pregnancy is crucial.

  13. Changing Paradigms in Down Syndrome: The First International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society

    PubMed Central

    Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Allinquant, Bernadette; Bianchi, Diana; Blumenthal, Tom; Dekker, Alain; Edgin, Jamie; O'Bryan, John; Dierssen, Mara; Potier, Marie-Claude; Wiseman, Frances; Guedj, Faycal; Créau, Nicole; Reeves, Roger; Gardiner, Katheleen; Busciglio, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) in humans with an incidence of ∼1:1,000 live births worldwide. It is caused by the presence of an extra copy of all or a segment of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). People with DS present with a constellation of phenotypic alterations involving most organs and organ systems. ID is present in all people with DS, albeit with variable severity. DS is also the most frequent genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ∼50% of those with DS will develop AD-related dementia. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in understanding the crucial genotype-phenotype relationships in DS, in identifying the alterations in molecular pathways leading to the various clinical conditions present in DS, and in preclinical evaluations of potential therapies to improve the overall health and well-being of individuals with DS. In June 2015, 230 scientists, advocates, patients, and family members met in Paris for the 1st International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society. Here, we report some of the most relevant presentations that took place during the meeting. PMID:27867340

  14. Pattern of malformations in the axial skeleton in human trisomy 18 fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Kjaer, I.; Hansen, B.F.; Keeling, J.W.

    1996-11-11

    We examined and described the development and abnormalities of the axial skeleton in 10 human trisomy 18 fetuses. Whole-body radiographs and radiographs of midsagittal tissue blocks of the cranial base and the spine were studied. In 3 fetuses no spinal radiographs were available. Seven osseous regions or fields along the body axis were analyzed, four in the spine, and three in the cranial base and nasal bones. Malformations occurred in the occipital field in all fetuses. This was a characteristic notching, either unilateral or bilateral, of the basilar part of the occipital bone. Nasal bones were abnormal in 8 cases, either absent or hypoplastic. Malformations were found in the thoracic and/or lumbosacral field in 7 fetuses. A single abnormality was found in the cervical spine in one fetus. The pattern of axial skeletal malformation in trisomy 18 fetuses recorded in the present study has not been described previously. Axial skeletal radiography should be included in autopsies of fetuses when chromosome disorders are present or suspected. The methods applied here are unaffected by autolysis. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Sacrococcygeal teratoma in a female newborn with clinical features of trisomy 13: a case report from Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lubala, Toni Kasole; Mukuku, Olivier; Shongo, Mick Pongombo; Mutombo, Augustin Mulangu; Lubala, Nina; Luboya, Oscar Numbi; Lukusa-Tshilobo, Prosper

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this report is to describe the first patient presenting clinical features of trisomy 13 in association with a sacrococcygeal teratoma. Case presentation We present the case of a Congolese female infant born with bilateral cleft lip and palate, hypotelorism, microcephaly, and capillary hemangioma on her face. She presented with a large sacrococcygeal mass (15.0 cm ×12.0 cm ×5.0 cm) with a cystic consistency and a positive transillumination. Conclusion This observation suggests that overexpression of certain genes on chromosome 13 may lead to tumor formation from remnant cells of Hensen’s node. PMID:26715863

  16. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  18. Developmental status of 22 children with trisomy 18 and eight children with trisomy 13: implications and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A

    2015-08-01

    Trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 are conditions often referred to as "incompatible with life" or "lethal anomalies." If there is long-term survival, the outlook is considered "grim." Developmental status is presumed to be minimal. Yet, Baty et al. [1994; 49:189-194] described a variety of developmental skills in their sample. An additional 22 children with trisomy 18 and eight with trisomy 13 are described here. A range of developmental skills is noted with strengths in the language and communication, gross and fine motor and social-emotional domains including indicating preferences, exploration of objects and a range of voluntary mobility. These results serve to expand the knowledge base on developmental status for these groups and advance the need to further explore developmental abilities rather than focus on deficits. Avenues for future research, implications, and recommendations are provided.

  19. Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study (CWAS) in workers exposed to an established leukemogen, benzene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; Li, Guilan; Rappaport, Stephen M.; McHale, Cliona M.; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Yin, Songnian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that de novo, therapy-related and benzene-induced acute myeloid leukemias (AML) occur via similar cytogenetic and genetic pathways, several of which involve aneuploidy, the loss or gain of chromosomes. Aneuploidy of specific chromosomes has been detected in benzene-related leukemia patients as well as in healthy benzene-exposed workers, suggesting that aneuploidy precedes and may be a potential mechanism underlying benzene-induced leukemia. Here, we analyzed the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 47 exposed workers and 27 unexposed controls using a novel OctoChrome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique that simultaneously detects aneuploidy in all 24 chromosomes. Through this chromosome-wide aneuploidy study (CWAS) approach, we found heterogeneity in the monosomy and trisomy rates of the 22 autosomes when plotted against continuous benzene exposure. In addition, statistically significant, chromosome-specific increases in the rates of monosomy [5, 6, 7, 10, 16 and 19] and trisomy [5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21 and 22] were found to be dose dependently associated with benzene exposure. Furthermore, significantly higher rates of monosomy and trisomy were observed in a priori defined ‘susceptible’ chromosome sets compared with all other chromosomes. Together, these findings confirm that benzene exposure is associated with specific chromosomal aneuploidies in hematopoietic cells, which suggests that such aneuploidies may play roles in benzene-induced leukemogenesis. PMID:21216845

  20. Natural histroy of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13: I. Growth, physical assessment, medical histories, survival, and recurrence risk

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, B.J.; Blackburn, B.L.; Carey, J.C.

    1994-01-15

    The natural history of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 was investigated using data derived from parent questionnaires and medical records from 98 families with an index case of trisomy 18 and 32 families with an index case of trisomy 13. Data are presented on pregnancy, delivery, survival, medical complications, immunizations, growth, cause of death, cytogenetics, and recurrence risk. Half of the trisomy 18 babies were delivered by C-section. Fetal distress was a factor in half, and the only reason in a third of C-section deliveries. One minute Apgar scores were significantly lower in C-section and breech deliveries. There were more small-for-gestational-age babies than in the general population, but most of the low-birth-weight newborns were small for gestational age, unlike the general population. Survival in this group of children was better than in other studies due to ascertainment bias. There were more girls than boys at all ages for both conditions, and the sex ratio decreased with time. Growth curves for length, weight, head circumference, and weight vs height are provided. Long-term survival did not appear to be due to mosaicism. There were no adverse reactions attributable to immunizations. At age 1 year there was an average of approximately 2 operations per living child. The authors report the second case of successful major cardiac surgery in a trisomy 18 child. Almost 70% of deaths were attributed to cardiopulmonary arrest. The sibling recurrence risk for trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 was 0.55%. 86 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Flexible xxx-asp/asn and gly-xxx residues of equine cytochrome C in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c'-ions originating from specific cleavage at N-Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c'-ions originating from N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z'-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX.

  2. Pure duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 15 with ebstein anomaly and clavicular anomaly.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rachel; Al-Murrani, Amel; Aftimos, Salim; Asquith, Philip; Mazzaschi, Roberto; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; George, Alice M; Love, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    This report is of a patient with pure trisomy of 15q24-qter who presents with the rare Ebstein anomaly and a previously unreported skeletal anomaly. Chromosome microarray analysis allowed high-resolution identification of the extent of the trisomy and provided a means of achieving higher-resolution breakpoint data. The phenotypic expression of unbalanced chromosomal regions is a complex phenomenon, and fine mapping of the involved region, as described here, is only a first step on the path to its full understanding. Overexpression of the LINGO-1 and CSPG4 genes has been implicated in developmental delay seen in other patients with trisomy of 15q24-qter, but our patient is currently too young to ascertain developmental progress. The genetic underpinning of Ebstein anomaly and the skeletal anomaly reported here is unclear based on our high-resolution dosage mapping.

  3. Medial defects of the small pulmonary arteries in fatal pulmonary hypertension in infants with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masahiro; Shimozono, Saiko; Nitta, Tetsuya; Yamaki, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of early death in patients with trisomy 13 or 18 and congenital heart disease (CHD). Pulmonary artery banding for these patients early in life is preferred to protect the lungs from high pulmonary flow rates and improve survival. We performed open lung biopsies in 11 patients with trisomy 13 or 18 accompanied by CHD and severe pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) between 2009 and 2011. Two (18.2%) of these 11 patients had medial defects of the small pulmonary arteries. One patient with trisomy 13 and an atrial septal defect developed lung hemorrhage and lung edema at the age of 9 months and died at the age of 13 months. The lumens of the small pulmonary arteries of the other patient with trisomy 18 and a ventricular septal defect became occluded due to the intimal proliferation of fibrous tissues at the age of 2 months. This patient died at the age of 27 months. The deaths of both patients were associated with heart-related factors. Patients with medial defects are vulnerable to intimal proliferation in the small pulmonary arteries. More patients with trisomy 13 or 18 and CHD might have similar pulmonary vascular changes. The small pulmonary arteries of patients with trisomy 13 and 18 should be further analyzed.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of inverted duplication deletion 8p syndrome mimicking trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Mehmet Ozgur; Higgs, Amanda; Turan, Ozerk T; Turan, Ozhan M; Turan, Sifa

    2017-03-01

    Inverted duplication deletion of 8p (invdupdel[8p]) is a well-described and uncommon chromosomal rearrangement. The majority of the reported cases have revealed no life-threatening malformations. Although the invdupdel[8p] syndrome in children with central nervous system abnormalities has been reported before, we present the first prenatal microarray diagnosis of invdupdel[8p] syndrome mimicking trisomy 18 due to similar sonographic features. Contrary to reported cases with invdupdel[8p] syndrome, the present case had severe polyvalvular dysplasia and the infant deceased at day 12 of life. In this case, we also emphasize the diagnostic power of microarray analysis in detecting the underlying genetic causes for fetuses with multiple congenital anomalies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Normal outcome of a pregnancy with mosaicism for double trisomy in amniotic fluid cells.

    PubMed

    Bartels, I; Franke, U; Braulke, I; Rauskolb, R; Raab-Vetter, M

    1997-09-01

    True chromosomal mosaicism of double trisomy (48,XX, +7, +20) was detected in amniotic fluid cell cultures at 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. No aneuploid cells were found in chorionic villus samples (CVS) by semidirect preparation and long-term culture. High-level ultrasound did not indicate any structural abnormality of the fetus. At 38 weeks of gestation, a phenotypically normal girl was born. She is now 22 months old and normally developed. At birth, various samples were investigated by routine cytogenetic methods or by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the probe p7t1 (umbilical cord blood, placental tissue, umbilical cord fibroblasts, urine sediment) and no abnormal cells could be detected in any of those tissues.

  6. Parental allelic variation at COL6A1 and congenital heart defects in trisomy 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessling, A.M.; Howard, C.M.; Farrer, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Overt congenital heart defects (CHD) affect over 40% of newborns with Down syndrome. On the hypothesis that genetic variation on chromosome 21 determines this clinical variability, we studied a CHD candidate locus (COL6A1) on 21q22.3. We studied three RFLP loci in COL6A1 in 37 families of known British/Irish population of ancestral origin, and in population-matched controls. Each family had a child with trisomy 21 with or without accompanying congenital heart defect (CHD). Parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction were determined using peri-centromeric markers. For the analysis, we considered groups of families with trisomic children with and without CHD, and subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents. Parental genotypes at nine control RFLP loci on chromosome 21 showed no association with CHD in the trisomic child. By contrast, parental genotypes at all three individual RFLP loci within COL6A1 showed statistically significant association with the trisomic child`s CHD status. Pairwise consideration of these loci in groups of families of trisomic children with and without CHD showed subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents to have different linkage disequilibrium patterns at these loci than population-matched controls. This suggests that the COL6A1 alleles of the parents are not representative of the population as a whole. Consideration of all three loci together as haplotypes supports this conclusion. Four results suggest that a functional mutation within, or in linkage disequilibrium with COL6A1 influences CHD outcome in trisomy 21.

  7. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  8. Effects of sex chromosome dosage on corpus callosum morphology in supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (sSCA) are characterized by the presence of one or more additional sex chromosomes in an individual’s karyotype; they affect around 1 in 400 individuals. Although there is high variability, each sSCA subtype has a characteristic set of cognitive and physical phenotypes. Here, we investigated the differences in the morphometry of the human corpus callosum (CC) between sex-matched controls 46,XY (N =99), 46,XX (N =93), and six unique sSCA karyotypes: 47,XYY (N =29), 47,XXY (N =58), 48,XXYY (N =20), 47,XXX (N =30), 48,XXXY (N =5), and 49,XXXXY (N =6). Methods We investigated CC morphometry using local and global area, local curvature of the CC boundary, and between-landmark distance analysis (BLDA). We hypothesized that CC morphometry would vary differentially along a proposed spectrum of Y:X chromosome ratio with supernumerary Y karyotypes having the largest CC areas and supernumerary X karyotypes having significantly smaller CC areas. To investigate this, we defined an sSCA spectrum based on a descending Y:X karyotype ratio: 47,XYY, 46,XY, 48,XXYY, 47,XXY, 48,XXXY, 49,XXXXY, 46,XX, 47,XXX. We similarly explored the effects of both X and Y chromosome numbers within sex. Results of shape-based metrics were analyzed using permutation tests consisting of 5,000 iterations. Results Several subregional areas, local curvature, and BLDs differed between groups. Moderate associations were found between area and curvature in relation to the spectrum and X and Y chromosome counts. BLD was strongly associated with X chromosome count in both male and female groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that X- and Y-linked genes have differential effects on CC morphometry. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare CC morphometry across these extremely rare groups. PMID:25780557

  9. 78 FR 34092 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; FFP Project 121, LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; FFP Project 121, LLC; Notice of Competing... Competing Applications Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC and FFP Project 121, LLC filed preliminary permit... 8:30 a.m. on the next regular business day. See id. at 385.2001(a)(2). Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund...

  10. 78 FR 49509 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; FFP Project 121, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; FFP Project 121, LLC; Notice Announcing... Virginia and Jefferson County, Ohio. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC...

  11. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic visualization of fetal chromosome abnormalities: a preliminary experience report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Komwilaisak, Ratana; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan

    2004-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis of fetal malformations in utero can provide both heath care providers and parents a number of management options. Three-dimensional ultrasonography is a new technique of diagnosis which has several potential advantages to allow for evaluation of specific anomalies by permitting high-quality views of body surface. We report 4 cases of fetal chromosomal abnormalities including 2 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 13 and 1 case of 48, XXY/+18. All cases were proved to have abnormal chromosomes by amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. After 3D reconstruction, we can identify specific facial abnormalities which can not be visualized by conventional two-dimensional ultrasound such as low set ear Mongolian's slant eyes, facial dysmorphism of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. We also clearly visualized abnormalities of digits such as overlapping fingers, club hands and sandal gap. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the fetal body surface improves the antenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities characterized by a particular dysmorphism. Our report suggests that three-dimensional ultrasonography has the potential to provide novel informations on the fetal anatomy and be useful in visualization and identification of chromosomal abnormalities in utero.

  12. Survival of Texas infants born with trisomies 21, 18, and 13.

    PubMed

    Vendola, Catherine; Canfield, Mark; Daiger, Stephen P; Gambello, Michael; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; King, Terri; Noblin, Sarah J; Waller, D Kim; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2010-02-01

    Trisomies 21, 18, and 13 are the three most common trisomies among infants who survive to 20 weeks gestation or more. Overall information about birth prevalence, natural history, and mortality for all three trisomies is well defined, but information about ethnic-specific rates is limited. Only a few studies have examined mortality rates of trisomies 18 and 13 because so few cases are liveborn and most have very short life spans. This study assessed ethnic-specific population-based survival probabilities among infants for each trisomy. All cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 born in Texas between 1999 and 2003 were obtained from the Texas Birth Defects Registry and included 2,260 cases of trisomy 21, 398 cases of trisomy 18, and 213 cases of trisomy 13. Date and cause of death were obtained from the Texas vital statistics records and the National Death Index. Overall, birth prevalence rates (per 10,000 adjusted live births) for the three trisomies were 11.74 (95% CI: 11.25-12.25), 1.34 (95% CI: 1.18-1.52), 0.92 (95% CI: 0.79-1.07), respectively, and are consistent with previously reported rates. There were no differences in survival rates by ethnicity and the median survival for each trisomy was consistent with previous reports. The results of this study provide comprehensive population-based information for survival of infants with trisomies 21, 18, and 13.

  13. Identification of supernumerary ring chromosome 1 mosaicism using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Wertelecki, W.

    1995-03-27

    We report on a 15-year-old black boy with severe mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, and a supernumerary ring chromosome mosaicism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a chromosome 1 painting probe (pBS1) identified the ring as derived from chromosome 1. The karyotype was 46,XY/47,XY,+r(1)(p13q23). A review showed 8 reports of ring chromosome 1. In 5 cases, the patients had a non-supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in partial monosomies of the short and/or long arm of chromosome 1. In 3 cases, the presence of a supernumerary ring resulted in partial trisomy of different segments of chromosome 1. In one of these cases of the supernumerary ring was composed primarily of the centromere and the heterochromatic region of chromosome 1, resulting in normal phenotype. Our patient represents the third report of a supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in abnormal phenotype. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Diagnostic Significance of Comorbidities of Congenital Heart Diseases, Low-Set Ears, and Intrauterine Growth Restriction in Neonates With Trisomies 13 and 18

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoshimitsu; Kanda, Eriko; Hirabayashi, Masato; Mine, Kenji; Ohashi, Atsushi; Tsuji, Shoji; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background Trisomies 13 and 18 (T13/18) are autosomal trisomy syndromes with dismal prognoses. Deciding whether to perform a chromosomal analysis for the definitive diagnosis is often difficult (even for experienced pediatricians) because representative clinical signs may not be found in all T13/18 neonates. Objectives This study aimed to investigate any clinical signs that could be useful for screening for T13/18 in participants without the representative clinical signs traditionally found in odd-looking neonates with malformation syndromes. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 15 T13/18 patients, 33 trisomy 21 patients, and 48 controls with other malformation syndromes, for apparent clinical signs during the neonatal period. All participants had been admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Kansai Medical University over a nine-year period. Results The three leading clinical signs in patients with T13/18 were congenital heart diseases (CHD; 100%), low-set ears (LSE; 80%), and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR; 73.3%). A comorbidity of these two leading non-specific clinical signs was CHD with LSE, which showed the highest diagnostic accuracy between T13/18 and controls with a sensitivity of 80.0% and a negative predictive value of 92.5%. The chi-square test among these three groups (P < 0.01) and multiple comparison tests of proportional differences showed that the comorbidity of CHD with LSE was specific for autosomal trisomy syndromes. A comorbidity of CHD with IUGR also revealed a similar diagnostic accuracy with a sensitivity of 73.3% and a negative predictive value of 90.9% as well as a specificity for T13/18. Conclusions The comorbidities of either CHD with LSE or CHD with IUGR should be suspected in neonates with autosomal trisomy syndromes, particularly T13/18 without the expected representative clinical signs. PMID:27713807

  15. Cat-eye syndrome with different marker chromosomes in a mother and daughter.

    PubMed

    Ing, P S; Lubinsky, M S; Smith, S D; Golden, E; Sanger, W G; Duncan, A M

    1987-03-01

    Except for atypical eye findings in the daughter, a mother and daughter with bisatellited marker chromosomes had abnormalities consistent with cat-eye syndrome. The mother's marker chromosome (mar number 1) is derived from one 22 and another acrocentric, possibly also a 22; the daughter's marker (mar number 2) may be an iso-dicentric, inv-dup (22) derivative of mar number 1. The mother has a tertiary trisomy translocation chromosome composed of at least one and perhaps two copies of 22pter----q11.2, whereas the daughter clearly has a secondary trisomy 22pter----q11.2 isochromosome, confirming this region as a cause of cat-eye syndrome. Results of hybridization using a unique sequence probe localized to 22q11 are consistent with the interpretation that both ends of both marker chromosomes are derived from 22.

  16. Modelling and rescuing neurodevelopmental defect of Down syndrome using induced pluripotent stem cells from monozygotic twins discordant for trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Grad, Iwona; Letourneau, Audrey; Sailani, M Reza; Dahoun, Sophie; Santoni, Federico A; Gimelli, Stefania; Guipponi, Michel; Pelte, Marie Francoise; Béna, Frédérique; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Feki, Anis

    2014-02-01

    Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is the most common viable chromosomal disorder with intellectual impairment and several other developmental abnormalities. Here, we report the generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from monozygotic twins discordant for trisomy 21 in order to eliminate the effects of the variability of genomic background. The alterations observed by genetic analysis at the iPSC level and at first approximation in early development illustrate the developmental disease transcriptional signature of Down syndrome. Moreover, we observed an abnormal neural differentiation of Down syndrome iPSCs in vivo when formed teratoma in NOD-SCID mice, and in vitro when differentiated into neuroprogenitors and neurons. These defects were associated with changes in the architecture and density of neurons, astroglial and oligodendroglial cells together with misexpression of genes involved in neurogenesis, lineage specification and differentiation. Furthermore, we provide novel evidence that dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on chromosome 21 likely contributes to these defects. Importantly, we found that targeting DYRK1A pharmacologically or by shRNA results in a considerable correction of these defects.

  17. Overexpression of liver-type phosphofructokinase (PFKL) in transgenic-PFKL mice: implication for gene dosage in trisomy 21.

    PubMed Central

    Elson, A; Levanon, D; Weiss, Y; Groner, Y

    1994-01-01

    The human liver-type subunit of the key glycolytic enzyme, phosphofructokinase (PFKL), is encoded by a gene residing on chromosome 21. This chromosome, when triplicated, causes the phenotypic expression of Down's syndrome (trisomy 21). Increased phosphofructokinase activity, a result of gene dosage, is commonly found in erythrocytes and fibroblasts from Down's syndrome patients. We describe the construction of transgenic mice overexpressing PFKL for use as a well-defined model system, in which the effects of PFKL overexpression in various tissues, and throughout development, can be studied. Mice transgenic for a murine PFKL 'gene cDNA' hybrid construct were found to overexpress PFKL in a tissue-specific manner resembling that of the endogenous enzyme. Although unchanged in adult brain, PFK specific activity was found to have been almost doubled in brains of embryonic transgenic-PFKL mice, suggesting that the extra copies of the PFKL gene are expressed during the developmental period. This pattern of overexpression of PFKL in brains of transgenic-PFKL mice suggests that gene-dosage effects may be temporally separated from some of their consequences, adding an additional layer of complexity to the analysis of gene dosage in trisomy 21. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8172601

  18. Trisomy 15 with loss of the paternal 15 as a cause of Prader-Willi syndrome due to maternal disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, S.B.; Lai, Li-Wen; Erickson, R.P. ); Magnuson, L.; Thomas, E.; Herrmann, J. ); Gendron, R. )

    1992-10-01

    Uniparental disomy has recently been recognized to cause human disorders, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). The authors describe a particularly instructive case which raises important issues concerning the mechanisms producing uniparental disomy and whose evaluation provides evidence that trisomy may precede uniparental disomy in a fetus. Chorionic villus sampling performed for advanced maternal age revealed trisomy 15 in all direct and cultured cells, though the fetus appeared normal. Chromosome analysis of amniocytes obtained at 15 wk was normal in over 100 cells studied. The child was hypotonic at birth, and high-resolution banding failed to reveal the deletion of 15q11-13, a deletion which is found in 50%-70% of patients with PWS. Over time, typical features of PWS developed. Molecular genetic analysis using probes for chromosome 15 revealed maternal disomy. Maternal nondisjunction with fertilization of a disomic egg by a normal sperm, followed by loss of the paternal 15, is a likely cause of confined placental mosaicism and uniparental disomy in this case of PWS, and advanced maternal age may be a predisposing factor. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Interstitial deletion 5p accompanied by dicentric ring formation of the deleted segment resulting in trisomy 5p13-cen

    SciTech Connect

    Schuffenhauer, S.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Murken, J.

    1996-10-02

    Karyotypes with an interstitial deletion and a marker chromosome formed from the deleted segment are rare. We identified such a rearrangement in a newborn infant, who presented with macrocephaly, asymmetric square skull, minor facial anomalies, omphalocele, inguinal hernias, hypospadias, and club feet. The karyotype 46,XY,del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter)/47,XY,+dicr(5)(:p13{r_arrow}cen::p13{r_arrow}cen),del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter) was identified by banding studies and FISH analysis in the peripheral lymphocytes. One breakpoint on the del(5) maps distal to GDNF, and FISH analysis using an {alpha}-satellite probe suggests that the proximal breakpoint maps within the centromere. The dicentric r(5) consists of two copies of the segment deleted in the del(5), resulting in trisomy of proximal 5p (5p13-cen). The phenotype of the propositus is compared with other trisomy 5p cases and possible mechanisms for the generation of this unique chromosomal rearrangement are discussed. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Jacobsen and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes in a child with mosaicism for partial 11pter trisomy and partial 11qter monosomy.

    PubMed

    Putoux, Audrey; Labalme, Audrey; André, Jean-Marie; Till, Marianne; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Berard, Jérôme; Bertrand, Yves; Edery, Patrick; Putet, Guy; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-02-01

    We report on a child with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS, OMIM 147791) and abnormalities consistent with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS, OMIM 130650). The constitutional karyotype was apparently normal, but FISH analysis with probes specific for the short and long arms of chromosome 11 found 11qter deletion with 11pter trisomy in 80% of the cells studied. Array-CGH identified breakpoints in the 11p15.3 and 11q24.1 regions consistent with Jacobsen and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes. We suggest that this chromosome imbalance results from a pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 inherited from the father, with mosaicism resulting from meiotic recombination of a paternal inversion followed by mitotic recombination during the first embryonic divisions. This hypothesis is supported by the results of microsatellite marker analysis. Three previous cases of pericentric inversion and recombination of chromosome 11 have been reported. Our case is unusual in that it combines the Jacobsen and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes with mosaicism.

  1. Cytological and epidemiological findings in trisomies 13, 18, and 21: England and Wales 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Alberman, Eva; Mutton, David; Morris, Joan K

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the cytological and epidemiological findings in 985 trisomy 13 and 2512 trisomy 18 compared with 10,255 trisomy 21 diagnoses between 2004 and 2009 included in the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register of England and Wales. The frequency of occurrence, proportions diagnosed prenatally, sex ratios, mean maternal age, and proportions of mothers with recurrences were analyzed. Ninety-seven, 98%, and 92% were free karyotypes for trisomy 21, 18, and 13, respectively; 3% of 21, 1% of 18, and 8% of trisomy 13 were translocations; and under 1% of trisomies 21 and 18 were double or triple aneuploids. Overall 1% of each trisomy had mosaicism, but 48% of the trisomy 21 double aneuploids, and 10% of trisomy 18 multiple aneuploids had mosaicism. The proportion of livebirths was 40% of trisomy 21, 11% of 18, and 13% of 13, respectively. Free trisomies 21 and 13 had an excess of males, and 18 had an excess of females, as did mosaic free trisomies 21 and 18. Mean maternal ages were 35.9 years in trisomy 21, 36.4 years in 18, and 34.6 years in 13. During the 6 years of data collection 1% of the mothers had recurrences, most recurrent trisomy 21 or 18 were identical translocations, but hetero-trisomic recurrences included 21 and 18, and 21 and 13. There are significant differences between the trisomic karyotypes and attributes, possibly related to their variable origins. Notable are the relative excess of trisomy 13 translocations, mosaicism in cases with multiple aneuploidy, and the types of homo- and hetero-recurrences.

  2. A prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal anomaly with mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balci, S; Altugan, F S; Alehan, D; Aypar, E; Baltaci, V

    2009-01-01

    A prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal anomaly with mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion/DiGeorge syndrome: We report a prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal and urogenital anomaly. Postnatally, the patient presented with seizures, hypocalcemia, hypoparathyroidism and thymic aplasia and diagnosed as DiGeorge syndrome. Echocardiography showed malalignment VSD, supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and overriding aorta. Chromosome and FISH studies showed the association of mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion. The present patient is the second case of mosaic type of Down syndrome associated with 22q11.2 microdeletion. In addition the patient also had clinical and laboratory features of DiGeorge syndrome.

  3. The clinical application of array CGH for the detection of chromosomal defects in 20,126 unselected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a powerful tool for detecting unbalanced chromosomal alterations. To validate the usefulness of array CGH in newborn screening, we examined 20,126 unselected infants. In addition, the number of newborns analyzed with array CGH is the largest one ever reported. Findings A total of 20,126 unselected newborns were investigated with array CGH and cytogenetic analyses. The analyses revealed 87 cases with chromosome abnormalities. Of these, 53 cases had significant chromosome aneuploidies, including trisomy 13, trisomy 21, 47,XXY or 45,X, and the other 34 cases presented partial chromosomal deletions or duplications. Conclusions In this study, we show that array CGH is an appropriate tool for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities in newborns, especially for the infants without distinct clinical features. PMID:23725218

  4. Marker chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  5. On the cause of mental retardation in Down syndrome: extrapolation from full and segmental trisomy 16 mouse models.

    PubMed

    Galdzicki, Z; Siarey, R; Pearce, R; Stoll, J; Rapoport, S I

    2001-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21, Ts21) is the most common known cause of mental retardation. In vivo structural brain imaging in young DS adults, and post-mortem studies, indicate a normal brain size after correction for height, and the absence of neuropathology. Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) shows normal brain glucose metabolism, but fewer significant correlations between metabolic rates in different brain regions than in controls, suggesting reduced functional connections between brain circuit elements. Cultured neurons from Ts21 fetuses and from fetuses of an animal model for DS, the trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, do not differ from controls with regard to passive electrical membrane properties, including resting potential and membrane resistance. On the other hand, the trisomic neurons demonstrate abnormal active electrical and biochemical properties (duration of action potential and its rates of depolarization and repolarization, altered kinetics of active Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) currents, altered membrane densities of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels). Another animal model, the adult segmental trisomy 16 mouse (Ts65Dn), demonstrates reduced long-term potentiation and increased long-term depression (models for learning and memory related to synaptic plasticity) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Evidence suggests that the abnormalities in the trisomy mouse models are related to defective signal transduction pathways involving the phosphoinositide cycle, protein kinase A and protein kinase C. The phenotypes of DS and its mouse models do not involve abnormal gene products due to mutations or deletions, but result from altered expression of genes on human chromosome 21 or mouse chromosome 16, respectively. To the extent that the defects in signal transduction and in active electrical properties, including synaptic plasticity, that are found in the Ts16 and Ts65Dn mouse models, are found in the brain of DS subjects, we postulate that mental

  6. Trisomy and tetrasomy 15q11-q13 diagnosed by molecular cytogenetic analysis in two patients with mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Soyah, Najla; Hanene, Hannachi; Mougou, Soumaya; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report two patients with the supernumerary marker chromosome (15)s. The first case is an 8.5-year-old girl with an inv dup (15) syndrome, mental retardation and dysmorphic features. The second case is a 13-year-old boy with a ring chromosome 15, who was referred to the Laboratory of Cytogenetic and Biology of Reproduction in Sousse, Tunisia for mental retardation, epilepsy, speech delay, hypotonia and other mild dysmorphic features. R banding showed the presence of a marker chromosome in both cases. Molecular cytogenetic investigation using fluorescence in situ hybridization method allowed us to characterize the markers including the Prader-Willi syndrome locus that contains the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene. Tetrasomy and trisomy for the 15q11-q13 chromosomal region were found in the first and the second patient, respectively. This observation reinforces the hypothesis that additional copies of proximal chromosome 15q11 segment may be causally related to mental retardation and dysmorphic features. PMID:27625804

  7. PREFACE: XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, V. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Karamurzov, B. S.; Efremov, V. P.; Sultanov, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is a preface to the proceedings of the XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter, which was held in Elbrus settlement, in the Kabardino-Balkar Republic of the Russian Federation, from March 1-6, 2015.

  8. Expression of VEGF(xxx)b, the inhibitory isoforms of VEGF, in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pritchard-Jones, R O; Dunn, D B A; Qiu, Y; Varey, A H R; Orlando, A; Rigby, H; Harper, S J; Bates, D O

    2007-07-16

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal of the skin cancers and the UK incidence is rising faster than that of any other cancer. Angiogenesis - the growth of new vessels from preexisting vasculature - is an absolute requirement for tumour survival and progression beyond a few hundred microns in diameter. We previously described a class of anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF, VEGF(xxx)b, that inhibit tumour growth in animal models, and are downregulated in some cancers, but have not been investigated in melanoma. To determine whether VEGF(xxx)b expression was altered in melanoma, PCR and immunohistochemistry of archived human tumour samples were used. In normal epidermis and in a proportion of melanoma samples, VEGF(xxx)b staining was seen. Some melanomas had much weaker staining. Subsequent examination revealed that expression was significantly reduced in primary melanoma samples (both horizontal and vertical growth phases) from patients who subsequently developed tumour metastasis compared with those who did not (analysis of variance (ANOVA) P<0.001 metastatic vs nonmetastatic), irrespective of tumour thickness, while the surrounding epidermis showed no difference in expression. Staining for total VEGF expression showed staining in metastatic and nonmetastatic melanomas, and normal epidermis. An absence of VEGF(xxx)b expression appears to predict metastatic spread in patients with primary melanoma. These results suggest that there is a switch in splicing as part of the metastatic process, from anti-angiogenic to pro-angiogenic VEGF isoforms. This may form part of a wider metastatic splicing phenotype.

  9. Exact solution of the XXX Gaudin model with generic open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Kun; Cao, Junpeng; Yang, Tao; Yang, Wen-Li

    2015-03-01

    The XXX Gaudin model with generic integrable open boundaries specified by the most general non-diagonal reflecting matrices is studied. Besides the inhomogeneous parameters, the associated Gaudin operators have six free parameters which break the U(1) -symmetry. With the help of the off-diagonal Bethe ansatz, we successfully obtained the eigenvalues of these Gaudin operators and the corresponding Bethe ansatz equations.

  10. Diploid/Tetraploid Mosaicism in the Offspring of a 46XX/47XXX Mosaic Mother

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Churku Mohan; Singh, D. N.; Crump, E. Perry

    1977-01-01

    A 10½-year-old boy with an IQ of 71, short stature, and isolated growth hormone deficiency was found to have diploid/tetraploid mosaicism. He was born to a 46xx/47xxx mosaic mother. The mother was found to be moderately mentally retarded but showed no other abnormalities. A review of literature pertinent to this case is presented. PMID:904007

  11. Hepatoblastoma in a 15-month-old female with trisomy 13.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rachana; Tran, Hung Chi; Randolph, Linda; Mascarenhas, Leo; Venkatramani, Rajkumar

    2014-02-01

    Trisomy 13 (T13) is a rare autosomal aneuploidy. Greater than 90% of patients die during the first year of life. Malignancies reported in association with T13 include two cases of Wilms tumor and one case of pilocytic astrocytoma. There is no previous report of hepatoblastoma in patients with T13. We report a unique case of hepatoblastoma in a 15-month-old female with constitutional T13. Our patient was born at 38 weeks gestation and was noted to have phenotypic features consistent with T13. Genetic testing confirmed an abnormal karyotype of 47,XX,+13 in all cells. At fifteen months of age she was noted to have a right hepatic lobe mass on a routine follow-up renal ultrasound for hydronephrosis. Serum alpha-fetoprotein level was 55,300 ng/ml. Staging work-up revealed the absence of metastases. She underwent a complete surgical resection with right hepatic lobectomy. Histopathology was consistent with hepatoblastoma, mixed epithelial and mesenchymal type. She had a protracted postoperative course complicated by Enterobacter aerogenes urosepsis, a significant biloma, chronic pancreatitis, and apneic episodes of uncertain etiology. She received four courses of doxorubicin monotherapy without any severe or unexpected toxicity. She continues to be in remission 8 months following diagnosis. This is the first reported case of hepatoblastoma in a child with constitutional T13. This may represent a non-random association, as somatic trisomy of chromosome 13 in hepatoblastoma tumors has been previously described in the literature. Prolonged survival may have allowed for hepatoblastoma to present in our patient.

  12. Partial trisomy 14q and monosomy 20q due to an unbalanced familial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Menasse-Palmer, L; Leo, J.; Cannizaro, L.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy of distal 14q and monosomy of 20q are rare. There have been several reports of a partial distal trisomy 14q with characteristic clinical findings, including hypogonadism and a conotruncal cardiac anomaly. There is no deletion distal 20q syndrome. We have recently examined a newborn with this unique duplication/deletion syndrome. Case report: J.S. was the 2980 gm product of a term uneventful pregnancy delivered to a 24-year-old gravida 2, para 1001 mother. The newborn exam revealed a dysmorphic newborn male with a sloping forehead, bitemporal narrowing, glabellar furrowing and micrognathia. A systolic murmur was audible. The genital abnormalities were micropenis, hypospadias with chordee and bifid scrotum with prominent raphe, and gonads were palpable. A CAT scan of the head revealed grade I IVH. An echocardiogram showed a VSD, ASD and an AP window. A sonogram of the liver showed absence of the gallbladder. Chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal male karyotype containing a derivative 20, subsequently shown to be inherited as a result of malsegregation of a paternal translocation: 46,XY,-20,+der(20)t(14;20)(q32.1;q13.3)pat. The infant fed poorly and required tube feedings and was treated for congestive heart failure with Digoxin, Lasix and oxygen. A decreased cortisol level and cholestasis were noted. The infant died after a cardiopulmonary arrest at one month of age. No post-mortem was obtained. Clinical cytogenetic correlation (conotruncal abnormality and hypogonadism) with partial duplication of distal 14q was positive. This case helps to further delineate duplication 14q and a syndrome due to partial deletion 20q.

  13. Ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (AFA) associated with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Ilikkan, Barbaros; Vural, Mehmet; Perk, Yildiz

    2002-01-01

    Ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (AFA) is a rare congenital anomaly which is characterized by single or multiple strands joining the upper and lower lids. Its etiology is unknown. A girl with a gestational age of 38 weeks is presented. It was interesting to find an association of AFA with hypoplasia of hair, eyelashes, eyebrows and nails and a karyotype of trisomy 18 in this case.

  14. Confirmation of trisomy 22 by trypsin-giemsa staining.

    PubMed Central

    Begleiter, M L; Kulkarni, P; Harris, D J

    1976-01-01

    A small-for-dates male infant with mental retardation, microcephaly, malformed ears, preauricular sinuses, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, congenital heart diseases, micropenis, and micropolygyria of the parietal and occipital lobes of the cerebral cortex was shown to have a 47,XY,+22 karyotype by trypsin-giemsa banding. Review of reported cases confirms that there may be distinctive trisomy 22 syndrome. Images PMID:138743

  15. Isolated Mitral Cleft in Trisomy 21: An Initially 'Silent' Lesion.

    PubMed

    Thankavel, Poonam P; Ramaciotti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cardiac anomalies are common in trisomy 21, and transthoracic echocardiogram within the first month of life is recommended. While a cleft mitral valve associated with atrioventricular septal defect has been well defined in this population, the prevalence of isolated mitral valve cleft has not been previously reported. The aim of our study was to define the occurrence of isolated mitral cleft in the first echocardiogram of patients with trisomy 21. This retrospective chart review examined echocardiographic data on all Trisomy 21 patients <1 year of age obtained during January 1, 2010, to May 1, 2014, at our institution. Images were reviewed by one of the authors with no knowledge of the official diagnosis. In addition to evaluation for isolated mitral valve cleft, data obtained included presence of additional congenital heart defects and need for surgical intervention. A total of 184 patients (median age 5 days) were identified. Isolated mitral cleft was identified in 12 patients (6.5 %). Four were diagnosed retrospectively (33 %). Only one had mitral regurgitation on initial echocardiogram. Seven required surgery for closure of ventricular septal defects. Isolated mitral cleft is present in an important number of neonates with Trisomy 21. Mitral regurgitation is often absent in the neonatal period and should not be used as a reliable indicator of absence of valve abnormality. Careful attention should be directed toward the mitral valve during the first echocardiogram to exclude an isolated cleft, which can lead to progressive mitral regurgitation.

  16. Natural history of fetal trisomy 13 after prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Sinead C; Walsh, Colin A; Burke, Annette L; McParland, Peter; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Morrison, John J

    2015-01-01

    There are currently limited data describing the natural history and outcome for fetal trisomy 13 diagnosed prenatally. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fetal and neonatal outcome for pregnancies with an established prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomy 13, and a parental decision for continuation of the pregnancy. To this end, the obstetric and neonatal outcome data for such pregnancies, diagnosed at two referral Fetal Medicine Centers, were retrospectively obtained and examined. During the study period, there were 45 cases of trisomy 13 diagnosed at both units, of which 26 (56%) continued with the pregnancy to its natural outcome. There were 12 intrauterine deaths in the cohort resulting in a rate of 46.2% of intrauterine lethality. Conversely, the live birth rate was 53.8%. For infants born alive, neonatal death on day 1 of life occurred in 78.6% of cases. The overall early neonatal mortality rate was 93%. There was one infant death at 6 weeks of age and no survival noted beyond this period. These data provide reliable information for parental counseling pertaining to risk of intrauterine death when trisomy 13 is diagnosed prenatally. These data also indicate that the survival outcome is worse than that previously accepted from studies of postnatal follow up of live born infants with this diagnosis.

  17. Absence of trisomy 7 in nonneoplastic human ascitic and pleural fluid cells. An interphase cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Larramendy, M L; Björkqvist, A M; Tammilehto, L; Taavitsainen, M; Mattson, K; Knuutila, S

    1994-11-01

    Trisomy 7 is a frequent aneuploid change in lymphomas, adenocarcinomas, and malignant mesenchymal and neurogenic tumors. Moreover, it has been observed in cultured and uncultured non-neoplastic cells from brain, kidney, liver, lung, and atherosclerotic plaques, among other tissues, opening debate on the role of this change in normal and neoplastic tissue. We used nonradioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) with a biotinylated chromosome 7-specific alpha-satellite DNA probe to seek an extra copy of chromosome 7 in ascitic and pleural fluid interphase cells from 26 donors. The donors comprised 24 patients with nonmalignant clinical history, one patient with non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma (positive control), and one patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, negative control). The highest frequency of fluid cells with three hybridization signals in patients without neoplasia was 0.5%, in contrast to the frequency of 40.5% noted in the fluid cells of the patient with non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma. The results demonstrate that the frequency of trisomic cells in pleural as well as in ascitic fluid is very low, making possible use of the cells in ascitic or pleural fluids in identification of malignancy.

  18. Down Syndrome, Partial Trisomy 21, and Absence of Alzheimer's Disease: The Role of APP.

    PubMed

    Doran, Eric; Keator, David; Head, Elizabeth; Phelan, Michael J; Kim, Ron; Totoiu, Minodora; Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Potkin, Steven G; Lott, Ira T

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21 in Down syndrome (DS) has been linked to increased brain amyloid levels and early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). An elderly man with phenotypic DS and partial trisomy of chromosome 21 (PT21) lacked triplication of APP affording an opportunity to study the role of this gene in the pathogenesis of dementia. Multidisciplinary studies between ages 66-72 years comprised neuropsychological testing, independent neurological exams, amyloid PET imaging with 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB), plasma amyloid-β (Aβ) measurements, and a brain autopsy examination. The clinical phenotype was typical for DS and his intellectual disability was mild in severity. His serial neuropsychological test scores showed less than a 3% decline as compared to high functioning individuals with DS who developed dementia wherein the scores declined 17-28% per year. No dementia was detected on neurological examinations. On PiB-PET scans, the patient with PT21 had lower PiB standard uptake values than controls with typical DS or sporadic AD. Plasma Aβ42 was lower than values for demented or non-demented adults with DS. Neuropathological findings showed only a single neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary degeneration consistent with normal aging but not AD. Taken together the findings in this rare patient with PT21 confirm the obligatory role of APP in the clinical, biochemical, and neuropathological findings of AD in DS.

  19. Congenital anomalies associated with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13: A registry-based study in 16 European countries, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Springett, Anna; Wellesley, Diana; Greenlees, Ruth; Loane, Maria; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bergman, Jorieke; Cavero-Carbonell, Clara; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Draper, Elizabeth S; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lynch, Catherine; Dias, Carlos Matias; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Catherine; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tuckerz, David; Zymak-Zakutnia, Natalya; Morris, Joan K

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of trisomies 18 and 13 in Europe and the prevalence of associated anomalies. Twenty-five population-based registries in 16 European countries provided data from 2000-2011. Cases included live births, fetal deaths (20+ weeks' gestation), and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFAs). The prevalence of associated anomalies was reported in live births. The prevalence of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 were 4.8 (95%CI: 4.7-5.0) and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.8-2.0) per 10,000 total births. Seventy three percent of cases with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 resulted in a TOPFA. Amongst 468 live born babies with trisomy 18, 80% (76-83%) had a cardiac anomaly, 21% (17-25%) had a nervous system anomaly, 8% (6-11%) had esophageal atresia and 10% (8-13%) had an orofacial cleft. Amongst 240 Live born babies with trisomy 13, 57% (51-64%) had a cardiac anomaly, 39% (33-46%) had a nervous system anomaly, 30% (24-36%) had an eye anomaly, 44% (37-50%) had polydactyly and 45% (39-52%) had an orofacial cleft. For babies with trisomy 18 boys were less likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared with girls (OR = 0.48 (0.30-0.77) and with trisomy 13 were less likely to have a nervous system anomaly [OR = 0.46 (0.27-0.77)]. Babies with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 do have a high proportion of associated anomalies with the distribution of anomalies being different in boys and girls.

  20. Chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. I

    SciTech Connect

    Vig, B.K.

    1993-12-31

    Of all genetic afflictions of man, aneuploidy ranks as the most prevalent. Among liveborn babies aneuploidy exist to the extent of about 0.3%, to about 0.5% among stillborns and a dramatic 25% among miscarriages. The burden is too heavy to be taken lightly. Whereas cytogeneticists are capable of tracing the origin of the extra or missing chromosome to the contributing parent, it is not certain what factors are responsible for this {open_quote}epidemic{close_quote} affecting the human genome. The matter is complicated by the observation that, to the best of our knowledge, all chromosomes do not malsegregate with equal frequency. Chromosome number 16, for example, is the most prevalent among abortuses - one-third of all aneuploid miscarriages are due to trisomy 16 - yet it never appears in aneuploid constitution among the liveborn. Some chromsomes, number 1, for example, appear only rarely, if at all. In the latter case painstaking efforts have to be made to karyotype very early stages of embryonic development, as early as the 8-cell stage. Even though no convincing data are yet available, it is conceivable that the product of most aneuploid zygotes is lost before implantation.

  1. Conotruncal anomalies in the trisomy 16 mouse: an immunohistochemical analysis with emphasis on the involvement of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Waller, B R; McQuinn, T; Phelps, A L; Markwald, R R; Lo, C W; Thompson, R P; Wessels, A

    2000-11-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse is generally considered a model for human Down's syndrome (trisomy 21). However, many of the cardiac defects in the Ts16 mouse do not reflect the heart malformations seen in patients suffering from this chromosomal disorder. In this study we describe the conotruncal malformations in mice with trisomy 16. The development of the outflow tract was immunohistochemically studied in serially sectioned hearts from 34 normal and 26 Ts16 mouse embryos ranging from 8.5 to 14.5 embryonic days. Conotruncal malformations observed in the Ts 16 embryos included double outlet right ventricle, persistent truncus arteriosus, Tetralogy of Fallot, and right-sided aortic arch. This spectrum of malformations is remarkably similar to that seen in humans suffering from DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). As perturbation of neural crest development has been proposed in the pathogenesis of DGS we specifically focussed on the fate of neural crest derived cells during outflow tract development of the Ts16 mouse using an antibody that enabled us to trace these cells during development. Severe perturbation of the neural crest-derived cell population was observed in each trisomic specimen. The abnormalities pertained to: 1) the size of the columns of neural crest-derived cells (or prongs); 2) the spatial orientation of these prongs within the mesenchymal tissues of the outflow tract; and 3) the location in which the neural crest cells interact with the myocardium. The latter abnormality appeared to be responsible for ectopic myocardialization found in trisomic embryos. Our observations strongly suggest that abnormal neural crest cell behavior is involved in the pathogenesis of the conotruncal malformations in the Ts16 mouse.

  2. Occurrence of fetal choroid plexus cysts in siblings: concerns regarding recurrence and chromosomal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Kimura, Tadashi; Tokugawa, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Masayasu; Murata, Yuji; Shimizu, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    Choroid plexus cysts (CPC) are a well-known ultrasound aneuploidy marker easily detectable at second-trimester ultrasound examination. However, their genetic etiology is totally unknown. We report two cases of Japanese mothers who carried two and three siblings respectively; all the fetuses that had CPC were noticed at second trimester. Genetic amniocentesis revealed that each fetus had different karyotypes, that is, trisomy 18 and 46,XX in the case of one mother, and trisomy 18, 46,XY and trisomy 21 in the case of the other. These observations indicate that the genetic basis of the cysts is not linked to abnormal chromosomes. We propose that careful ultrasound observation and genetic counseling of the siblings should be offered to patients who have previously had a baby with CPC, despite that baby having a normal karyotype.

  3. [Soluble brain proteins in autosomal trisomy syndromes].

    PubMed

    Mikhneva, L M; Baryshevskaia, V D

    1981-01-01

    The authors examined the soluble proteins of the brain frontal lobes in the newborn with trisomias of the 13th, 18th, and 21st chromosomes (Down's, Patau's, and Edwards' syndromes). The examinations were carried out on autopsy material (the post-mortem period not exceeding 24 hours) by the method of disc electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. The brain tissue was taken from 17 newborn infants with Down's syndrome; 9 infants with Patau's syndrome; and 7 infants with Edwards' syndrome. For the control the brain of 21 newborn infants without defects of the CNS development (the death cause being analogous) was taken. In all the syndromes studied diversely directed but relatively specific shifts were revealed on the proteinograms. It was the albumin section which appeared to be the most sensitive to the chromosomal pathology: in cases of Down's and Patau's syndromes the protein content in it was reduced, whereas in cases of Edwards' syndrome it was increased. In the latter syndrome the relative amount of neuronines S-5 and S-6, and in Patau's syndrome the amount of neuronine S-6 were lowered, this lowering being statistically significantly. In all the trisomias a tendency to a diminution of the zone of the acidic neurospecific cerebral proteins was noted. This is, possibly, due to the lower level of the CNS functional activity in chromosomal pathologies.

  4. Subtle familial translocation t(11;22)(q24.2;q13.33) resulting in Jacobsen syndrome and distal trisomy 22q13.3: further details of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer, Aleksander; Smyk, Marta; Wierzba, Jolanta; Kołowska, Jolanta; Woźniak, Anna; Skołozdrzy, Joanna; Fischer, Maria; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    We report on 3 kindred patients with terminal 11q monosomy and distal 22q trisomy involving the SHANK3 gene, resulting from a subtle familial translocation t(11;22)(q24.2;q13.33). The patients presented with the characteristic symptoms of Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), including: mental retardation, short stature, and craniofacial dysmorphism in all 3 cases; cardiac defects in 2 cases; and thrombocytopenia, brain abnormality, eye coloboma, recurrent infections, cryptorchidism and toe anomalies in single cases. The oldest patient also had Hashimoto disease and diabetes mellitus type 2. So far, these 2 conditions have not been reported in adult patients with JBS. Features typical for distal 22q trisomy in our patients include muscular hypotonia and prenatal failure to thrive, seen in 2 and 1 cases, respectively. We also present a family member with 11q24.2-qter trisomy and 22q13.33-qter monosomy, whose clinical phenotype is partially overlapping with several dysmorphic features of JBS. In addition, multiple pregnancy losses and infantile deaths occurred in this family, suggesting that these chromosomal imbalances may produce a lethal phenotype. FISH with a panel of BAC probes determined the accurate sizes of the deletion 11q (9.9 Mb) and trisomy 22q (0.8 Mb). To date, only 5 cases of submicroscopic 22q13.3-qter trisomy have been reported. A detailed clinical description of our patients, along with a precise cytogenetic designation of chromosomal breakpoints, allow further refinement of genotype-phenotype correlation for distal imbalances in 11q and 22q.

  5. The asymmetry of female meiosis reduces the frequency of inheritance of unpaired chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel B; McNally, Karen L; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy, the presence of a third copy of one chromosome, is deleterious and results in inviable or defective progeny if passed through the germ line. Random segregation of an extra chromosome is predicted to result in a high frequency of trisomic offspring from a trisomic parent. Caenorhabditis elegans with trisomy of the X chromosome, however, have far fewer trisomic offspring than expected. We found that the extra X chromosome was preferentially eliminated during anaphase I of female meiosis. We utilized a mutant with a specific defect in pairing of the X chromosome as a model to investigate the apparent bias against univalent inheritance. First, univalents lagged during anaphase I and their movement was biased toward the cortex and future polar body. Second, late-lagging univalents were frequently captured by the ingressing polar body contractile ring. The asymmetry of female meiosis can thus partially correct pre-existing trisomy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06056.001 PMID:25848744

  6. A complex chromosomal rearrangement involving chromosomes 2, 5, and X in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Moreira, Danielle de Paula; Davis-Wright, Nicole; Sanders, Stephan; Mason, Christopher; Orabona, Guilherme Müller; Vadasz, Estevão; Bertola, Débora Romeo; State, Matthew W; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2012-07-01

    Here, we describe a female patient with autism spectrum disorder and dysmorphic features that harbors a complex genetic alteration, involving a de novo balanced translocation t(2;X)(q11;q24), a 5q11 segmental trisomy and a maternally inherited isodisomy on chromosome 5. All the possibly damaging genetic effects of such alterations are discussed. In light of recent findings on ASD genetic causes, the hypothesis that all these alterations might be acting in orchestration and contributing to the phenotype is also considered.

  7. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D.

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  8. Mild craniosynostosis with 1p36.3 trisomy and 1p36.3 deletion syndrome caused by familial translocation t(Y;1).

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Yoko; Fujita, Hiroko; Yamamori, Shunji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Eguchi, Maki; Harada, Naoki; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2006-08-15

    We report on a 20-year-old man and a 16-year-old woman with a chromosomal imbalance derived from a balanced translocation, t(Y;1)(q12;p36.3) of the father. The man had a partial trisomy for 1p36.3-pter [46,X,der(Y)t(Y:1)(q12;p36.3)] and mild craniosynostosis of metopic and sagittal sutures as well as a borderline mental impairment, while the woman with a deletion for 1p36.3-pter [46,XX,der(1)t(Y;1)(q12;p36.3)] showed dysmorphic face with large anterior fontanel and severe developmental delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that his trisomy spanned the 5.3-Mb region from 1p telomere harboring the critical region for craniosynostosis. To our knowledge, the man is the first case of a pure type of simple 1p36.3 trisomy as the effect of heterochromatic Yq12-qter deletion likely does not affect phenotype.

  9. Trisomy 1q41-qter and monosomy 3p26.3-pter in a family with a translocation (1;3): further delineation of the syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trisomy 1q and monosomy 3p deriving from a t(1;3) is an infrequent event. The clinical characteristics of trisomy 1q41-qter have been described but there is not a delineation of the syndrome. The 3p25.3-pter monosomy syndrome (MIM 613792) characteristics include low birth weight, microcephaly, psychomotor and growth retardation and abnormal facies. Case presentation A 2 years 8 months Mexican mestizo male patient was evaluated due to a trisomy 1q and monosomy 3p derived from a familial t(1;3)(q41;q26.3). Four female carriers of the balanced translocation and one relative that may have been similarly affected as the proband were identified. The implicated chromosomal regions were defined by microarray analysis, the patient had a trisomy 1q41-qter of 30.3 Mb in extension comprising about 240 protein coding genes and a monosomy 3p26.3-pter of 1.7 Mb including only the genes CNTN6 (MIM 607220) and CHL1 (MIM 607416), which have been implicated in dendrite development. Their contribution to the phenotype, regarding the definition of trisomy 1q41-qter and monosomy 3p26.3-pter syndromes are discussed. Conclusion We propose that a trisomy 1q41-qter syndrome should be considered in particular when the following characteristics are present: postnatal growth delay, macrocephaly, wide fontanelle, triangular facies, frontal bossing, thick eye brows, down slanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, hypoplasic nostrils, long filtrum, high palate, microretrognathia, ear abnormalities, neural abnormalities (in particular ventricular dilatation), psychomotor developmental delay and mental retardation. Our patient showed most of these clinical characteristics with exception of macrocephaly, possibly due to a compensatory effect by haploinsufficiency of the two genes lost from 3p. The identification of carriers has important implications for genetic counseling as the risk of a new born with either a der(3) or der(1) resulting from an adjacent-1

  10. Chromosomal microarray analysis in a girl with mental retardation and spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Inesse; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal imbalances comprise a major cause of mental retardation, particularly in association with congenital malformations and dysmorphic features. Chromosomal analysis using banded karyotyping is limited by the low resolution of this technique, and cryptic chromosomal rearrangements cannot be detected. We describe a 6-year-old girl with mental retardation, mild growth, congenital malformation, and facial anomalies. Chromosomal analysis with karyotyping produced normal results. Because the phenotype suggested chromosomal abnormality, microarray comparative genomic hybridization was used to search for a possible cryptic anomaly. A subtelomeric chromosomal imbalance, consisting of partial trisomy 2q35 and partial monosomy 3p26, was detected and confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This rearrangement was inherited from an equilibrated maternal t(2;3) reciprocal translocation. Comparative genomic hybridization array in similar situations is useful in detecting cryptic chromosomal rearrangements, identifying genes contained in deleted or duplicated regions, establishing a precise phenotype-genotype correlation, and offering unambiguous genetic counseling.

  11. Adaptive-filtering of trisomy 21: risk of Down syndrome depends on family size and age of previous child

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, Markus; Krackow, Sven

    2007-02-01

    The neonatal incidence rate of Down syndrome (DS) is well-known to accelerate strongly with maternal age. This non-linearity renders mere accumulation of defects at recombination during prolonged first meiotic prophase implausible as an explanation for DS rate increase with maternal age, but might be anticipated from chromosomal drive (CD) for trisomy 21. Alternatively, as there is selection against genetically disadvantaged embryos, the screening system that eliminates embryos with trisomy 21 might decay with maternal age. In this paper, we provide the first evidence for relaxed filtering stringency (RFS) to represent an adaptive maternal response that could explain accelerating DS rates with maternal age. Using historical data, we show that the proportion of aberrant live births decrease with increased family size in older mothers, that inter-birth intervals are longer before affected neonates than before normal ones, and that primiparae exhibit elevated levels of DS incidence at higher age. These findings are predicted by adaptive RFS but cannot be explained by the currently available alternative non-adaptive hypotheses, including CD. The identification of the relaxation control mechanism and therapeutic restoration of a stringent screen may have considerable medical implications.

  12. Chronic up-regulation of the SHH pathway normalizes some developmental effects of trisomy in Ts65Dn mice

    PubMed Central

    Dutka, Tara; Hallberg, Dorothy; Reeves, Roger H.

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is a highly complex developmental genetic disorder caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). All individuals with DS exhibit some degree of brain structural changes and cognitive impairment; mouse models such as Ts65Dn have been instrumental in understanding the underlying mechanisms. Several phenotypes of DS might arise from a reduced response of trisomic cells to the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) growth factor. If all trisomic cells show a similar reduced response to SHH, then up-regulation of the pathway in trisomic cells might ameliorate multiple DS phenotypes. We crossed Ptch1tm1Mps/+ mice, in which the canonical SHH pathway is expected to be up-regulated in every SHH-responsive cell due to the loss of function of one allele of the pathway suppressor, Ptch1, to the Ts65Dn DS model and assessed the progeny for possible rescue of multiple DS-related phenotypes. Down-regulation of Ptch produced several previously unreported effects on development by itself, complicating interpretation of some phenotypes, and a number structural or behavioral effects of trisomy were not compensated by SHH signaling. However, a deficit in a nest-building task was partially restored in Ts;Ptch+/− mice, as were structural anomalies of the cerebellum in Ts65Dn mice. These results extend the body of evidence indicating that reduced response to SHH in trisomic cells and tissues contributes to various aspects of the trisomic phenotype. PMID:25511459

  13. Trisomy 21 Alters DNA Methylation in Parent-of-Origin-Dependent and -Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Alves da Silva, Antônio Francisco; Machado, Filipe Brum; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Biselli-Périco, Joice Matos; Zampieri, Bruna Lancia; da Silva Francisco Junior, Ronaldo; Mozer Rodrigues, Pedro Thyago; Terra Machado, Douglas; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros; Gomes Fernandes, Maria; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana Marina; Lopes Rios, Álvaro Fabricio

    2016-01-01

    The supernumerary chromosome 21 in Down syndrome differentially affects the methylation statuses at CpG dinucleotide sites and creates genome-wide transcriptional dysregulation of parental alleles, ultimately causing diverse pathologies. At present, it is unknown whether those effects are dependent or independent of the parental origin of the nondisjoined chromosome 21. Linkage analysis is a standard method for the determination of the parental origin of this aneuploidy, although it is inadequate in cases with deficiency of samples from the progenitors. Here, we assessed the reliability of the epigenetic 5mCpG imprints resulting in the maternally (oocyte)-derived allele methylation at a differentially methylated region (DMR) of the candidate imprinted WRB gene for asserting the parental origin of chromosome 21. We developed a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-specific PCR assay, based on the WRB DMR, across single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the methylation statuses in the parental alleles. In genomic DNA from blood cells of either disomic or trisomic subjects, the maternal alleles were consistently methylated, while the paternal alleles were unmethylated. However, the supernumerary chromosome 21 did alter the methylation patterns at the RUNX1 (chromosome 21) and TMEM131 (chromosome 2) CpG sites in a parent-of-origin-independent manner. To evaluate the 5mCpG imprints, we conducted a computational comparative epigenomic analysis of transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and histone modification expression patterns. We found allele fractions consistent with the transcriptional biallelic expression of WRB and ten neighboring genes, despite the similarities in the confluence of both a 17-histone modification activation backbone module and a 5-histone modification repressive module between the WRB DMR and the DMRs of six imprinted genes. We concluded that the maternally inherited 5mCpG imprints at the WRB DMR are uncoupled from the parental allele

  14. Prenatal Isolated Ventricular Septal Defect May Not Be Associated with Trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ori; Lieberman, Sari; Farber, Benjamin; Terner, Daniel; Lahad, Amnon; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2014-04-23

    The aim of this study was to examine if isolated fetal ventricular septal defect (VSD) is associated with trisomy 21. One hundred twenty six cases with prenatal VSD diagnosed by a pediatric cardiologist were reviewed. Cases with known risk factors for congenital heart disease, the presence of other major anomalies, soft signs for trisomy 21 or a positive screen test for trisomy 21 were excluded. Ninety two cases formed the study group. None of the cases in the study group had trisomy 21. The upper limit of prevalence for trisomy 21 in isolated VSD is 3%. When prenatal VSD is not associated with other major anomalies, soft markers for trisomy 21 or a positive nuchal translucency or biochemical screen, a decision whether to perform genetic amniocentesis should be individualized. The currently unknown association between isolated VSD and microdeletions and microduplications should be considered when discussing this option.

  15. Procedures in the 1st year of life for children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18, a 25-year, single-center review.

    PubMed

    Josephsen, Justin B; Armbrecht, Eric S; Braddock, Stephen R; Cibulskis, Catherine C

    2016-09-01

    Care of the child born with trisomy 13 or 18 has evolved over the past few decades, leading to increased healthcare utilization. We hypothesized that there has been an increase in procedures across all intensity types, including major, invasive procedures. We performed a retrospective-cohort study of children with trisomy 13 or 18 from 1990 to 2014 in a quaternary, free-standing children's hospital. Children were identified using ICD-9 billing diagnoses. Procedures were identified during these encounters and categorized by intensity (major, intermediate, or minor). One hundred thirty-two children with trisomy 13 or 18 were identified. In children with trisomy 13, major procedures increased from period 1 (1990-1997) to period 3 (2006-2013) from 0.11 to 0.78 procedures per patient. For trisomy 18, the increase between the time periods was from 0.14 to 1.33 procedures per patient. By the end of the study period, nearly all trisomy 13 patients had a major procedure and the majority of those with trisomy 18 had undergone a major procedure. Estimated 1-year survival for those with a major procedure was 30% and 22% for trisomies 13 and 18, respectively. In conclusion, there was an increasing rate of procedures per patient of all intensity levels over the 25-year study period. Given differences in characteristics in those with trisomies 13 and 18, and effects of intervention on survival, an individualized approach to care of these patients should be employed by parents and healthcare providers, using factors such as trisomy type, infant gender, co-morbidities, and parental preference. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Multiorgan autoimmunity in a Turner syndrome patient with partial monosomy 2q and trisomy 10p.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Armando; Palma, Alessia; Zanni, Ginevra; Novelli, Antonio; Loddo, Sara; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-02-25

    Turner syndrome is a condition caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome, and is characterized by a series of clinical features, the most common being short stature and gonadal dysgenesis. An increased frequency of autoimmune diseases as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies has been observed in Turner patients. We present a unique case of mosaic Turner syndrome with a complex rearrangement consisting of a partial deletion of chromosome 2q and duplication of chromosome 10p {[46],XX,der(2)t(2;10)(2pter→2q37::10p13→10pter)[127]/45,X,der(2)t(2;10)(2pter→2q37::10p13→10pter)[23]}. The patient is affected by partial empty sella, in association with a group of multiorgan autoimmunity-related manifestations including Hashimoto's thyroiditis, celiac disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes, T1D), possible autoimmune inner ear disease with sensorineural deficit, preclinical Addison disease and alopecia universalis. The patient was previously described at the age of 2.4 years and now re-evaluated at the age of 14 years after she developed autoimmune conditions. AIRE gene screening revealed heterozygous c.834 C>G polymorphism (p.Ser278Arg) and IVS9+6G>A variation, thus likely excluding autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome Type 1 (APECED). Heterozygous R620W polymorphism of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene was detected in patient's DNA. SNP-array analysis revealed that autoimmunity-related genes could be affected by the partial monosomy 2q and trisomy 10p. These data suggest that early genetic analysis in TS patients with complex associations of multiorgan autoimmune manifestations would permit a precise diagnostic classification and also be an indicator for undiscovered pathogenetic mechanisms.

  17. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  18. Unilateral Ectrodactyly in a Newborn with Trisomy 18 Syndrome: An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Kislal, Fatih Mehmet; Altuntas, Nilgun; Ozdemir, Osman; Ceylaner, Serdar; Kislal, Mustafa Hayri; Andiran, Nesibe

    2015-08-01

    The case of a newborn male with trisomy 18 syndrome, having bilateral syndactyly, aplasia and hypoplasia of the foot digits, unilateral ectrodactyly of the left foot and a prominently dorsiflexed hallux, clenched hand with overlapping fingers and general hypertonia, is presented. There are only 5 cases of trisomy 18 syndrome associated with ectrodactyly in the literature. We present a case of trisomy 18 syndrome with unilateral ectrodactyly of the left foot, which is an infrequent association.

  19. Intestinal atresia, encephalocele, and cardiac malformations in infants with 47,XXX: Expansion of the phenotypic spectrum and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bağci, Soyhan; Müller, Andreas; Franz, Axel; Heydweiller, Andreas; Berg, Christoph; Nöthen, Markus M; Bartmann, Peter; Reutter, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the 47,XXX karyotype often occurs adventitiously during prenatal fetal karyotyping in cases of advanced maternal age. Although most females with 47,XXX appear healthy at birth, various types of congenital malformations have been reported, of which urinary tract anomalies are the most frequent. We report on 2 newborns with 47,XXX and congenital cardiac defects, one of whom had duodenal atresia and the other an occipital encephalocele. This expands the spectrum of malformations reported in association with the triple-X syndrome. We also present a review of the literature on non-urinary tract malformations in females with 47,XXX. We conclude that prenatal identification of the 47,XXX karyotype is an indication for detailed fetal ultrasonography which should include examination of multiple organ systems. Such prenatal screening for possible associated congenital malformations should help to ensure optimal perinatal clinical management of 47,XXX cases.

  20. Sex-determining mechanisms in insects based on imprinting and elimination of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L

    2014-01-01

    As a rule, the sex of an individual is fixed at fertilization, and the chromosomal constitution of the zygote is a direct consequence of the chromosomal constitution of the gametes. However, there are cases in which the chromosomal differences determining sex are brought about by elimination or inactivation of chromosomes in the embryo. In Sciaridae insects, all zygotes start with the XXX constitution; the loss of either 1 or 2 X chromosomes determines whether the zygote becomes XX (female) or X0 (male). In Cecydomyiidae and Collembola insects, all zygotes start with the XXXX constitution. If the embryo does not eliminate any X chromosome, this remains XXXX and develops as female, whereas if 2 X chromosomes are eliminated, the embryo becomes XX0 and develops as a male. In the coccids (scale insects), the chromosomal differences between the sexes result from either the elimination or the heterochromatinization (inactivation) of half of the chromosomes giving rise to haploid males and diploid females. The chromosomes that are eliminated or inactivated are those inherited from the father. Therefore, in the formation of the sex-determining chromosomal signal in those insects, a marking ('imprinting') process must occur in one of the parents, which determines that the chromosomes to be eliminated or inactivated are of paternal origin. In this article, the sex determination mechanism of these insects and the associated imprinting process are reviewed.

  1. Fatal Outcome in a Newborn Calf Associated with Partial Trisomy 25q and Partial Monosomy 11q, 60,XX,der(11)t(11;25)(q11;q14∼21).

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Alessandra; Genualdo, Viviana; Perucatti, Angela; Pauciullo, Alfredo; Varricchio, Giovanna; Incarnato, Domenico; Matassino, Donato; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    A newborn calf of the Agerolese cattle breed underwent clinical cytogenetic investigation because of hyperflexion of the forelimbs, red eyes and the inability to stand. Anamnesis revealed that the mother, phenotypically normal, carried a chromosomal aberration. The newborn died after 2 weeks, and no remarkable alterations were found by the veterinarian on postmortem examination. The mother was a carrier of a reciprocal balanced translocation rcp(11;25)(q11,q14∼21) detected after a cytogenetic investigation in 2011; however, the analysis of the newborn revealed a different chromosomal aberration with partial trisomy of chromosome 25 and partial monosomy of chromosome 11. In fact, the results showed both chromosomes 25, one chromosome 11 and only one long derivative chromosome (der11). FISH analysis, performed using BAC clones, confirmed the chromosomes and their regions involved. Finally, both the localization of the breakpoints on band q11 (centromere) of chromosome 11 and band q14-21 of chromosome 25, and the complete loss of the der25 identified the aberration as an unbalanced translocation 60,XX,der(11)t(11;25)(q11;q14∼21). A comparison with human chromosomes was also performed to search for similarities and possible genes involved in order to study their effects, thus extending the knowledge of these aberrations by case reports.

  2. Language and cognitive development in 47,XXX females followed since birth.

    PubMed

    Pennington, B; Puck, M; Robinson, A

    1980-01-01

    In this report, data are presented on language and cognitive development in an unselected group of eleven 47,XXX females, followed since birth, who are now 6--14 years old. The results of the Yale Developmental Exam (at 2 years) and the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA) (at 4--6 years) show an early delay in language development. Those girls who presently have serious language and learning problems were significantly delayed in first walking or talking, whereas the relatively unaffected girls were not. Results of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI) at 4 years of age and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC or WISC-R) at 8 years of age are similar and show a generalized depression of both verbal and nonverbal abilities. Thus, unlike 45,X females or 47,XXX males, triple-X females do not have a specifically nonverbal or verbal cognitive deficit.

  3. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  4. Prenatal screening for trisomy 21: recent advances and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Canick, Jacob

    2012-06-01

    The performance of prenatal screening tests for the identification of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) has markedly improved since the 1970s and early 1980s when maternal age was the sole mode of screening the general pregnant population. With the discovery of second trimester serum markers in the 1980s and 1990s and implementation of double, triple, and quad marker testing; the discovery of first trimester serum and ultrasound markers in the 1990s and implementation of the combined test; and the development of the integrated test and sequential screening strategies over the past decade, the performance of screening has improved to a detection rate of 90%–95% at a false positive rate of 2%–5%. In this review, I will describe the advances in prenatal screening for trisomy 21, present current screening strategies, and discuss guidelines published by professional societies and regulatory bodies, with a focus on current prenatal screening practice in the USA.

  5. Slavnov and Gaudin-Korepin Formulas for Models without U(1) Symmetry: the Twisted XXX Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, Samuel; Pimenta, Rodrigo A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the XXX spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain on the circle with an arbitrary twist. We characterize its spectral problem using the modified algebraic Bethe anstaz and study the scalar product between the Bethe vector and its dual. We obtain modified Slavnov and Gaudin-Korepin formulas for the model. Thus we provide a first example of such formulas for quantum integrable models without U(1) symmetry characterized by an inhomogenous Baxter T-Q equation.

  6. Delineation of a clinical syndrome caused by mosaic trisomy 15

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, E.M.; Bienz, G.; Straumann, E.; Bosceh, N.

    1996-03-15

    We report on a boy with mosaic trisomy 15. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of the few cases reported up to now. A clinical syndrome is delineated consisting of a characteristic shape of the nose and other minor craniofacial anomalies, as well as typical deformities of the hands and feet. Different degrees of mosaicism may explain the more or less severe manifestations in individual patients. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Single-agent lenalidomide induces complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with isolated trisomy 13

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Todd A.; Byrd, John C.; Marcucci, Guido; Abboud, Camille N.; Kefauver, Cheryl; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Vij, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently fail chemotherapy due to refractory disease, relapse, or toxicity. Among older AML patients (age > 60 years), there are few long-term survivors. Lenalidomide is a candidate for study in AML based on its clinical activity in a related disorder, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), with the 5q− chromosomal abnormality. We report induction of sustained morphologic and cytogenetic complete remission in 2 older AML patients treated with high-dose, single-agent lenalidomide; each patient had trisomy 13 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. We show for the first time that lenalidomide has clinical activity in this poor-risk cytogenetic subset of AML. The clinical trials described in this paper have been registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov under identifiers NCT00466895 and NCT00546897. PMID:18824593

  8. Nonimmune fetal hydrops and placentomegaly: Diagnosis of familial Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome with trisomy 11p15 using FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Drut, R.M.; Drut, R.

    1996-03-15

    We have studied a family in which four members of the same generation were affected with Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS). Trisomy 11p15 was demonstrated using molecular probes in interphase nuclei of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded placenta from a stillborn fetus and in peripheral blood lymphocytes from two liveborn female relatives. Clinical examination showed nonimmune hydrops and placentomegaly in two siblings and multiple phenotypic abnormalities consistent with WBS in the two other relatives. Paternal karyotype of the stillborn infants demonstrated a reciprocal translocation (46,XY,t(10;11) (q26;p15)) explaining the origin of the extra 11p15 material. This study illustrates the advantages of FISH for interphase analysis of chromosome aberrations otherwise not detected even by conventional cytogenetic analysis and documents that nonimmune hydrops associated with placentomegaly may be presenting features in familial WBS. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Trisomy 22pter-q12.3 presenting with hepatic dysfunction variability of cat-eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jezela-Stanek, Aleksandra; Dobrzańska, Anna; Maksym-Gasiorek, Dorota; Trzeciakowski, Wojciech; Gutkowska, Anna; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Gajdulewicz, Maria; Spodar, Krystyna; Czech-Kowalska, Justyna; Krajewska-Walasek, Małgorzata

    2009-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics of two patients with cat-eye syndrome (CES, MIM #115470) resulting from a supernumerary marker chromosome that includes 22pter-q12.3. They both presented a constellation of features typical of CES, including coloboma, auricular malformations, heart and renal anomalies, as well as hepatic dysfunction, which led to severe effects. In one case Pierre Robin sequence was diagnosed which has not been described earlier in this trisomy. Although CES is a well known, but infrequently diagnosed disorder, we draw attention both to its clinical overlaps with other disorders and, in view of the clinical variability being identified within the 22q11 region, to the importance of careful molecular examination of proximal 22q in patients with suggestive clinical signs.

  10. Microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tamura, T.; Omura, N.; Murakami, Y.; Tada, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique (EMV) as a function of vibration frequency, f. The microstructure evolution reveals that at the low frequency of f = 62.5 Hz, the solidified microstructure is coarse and with the increase of vibration frequency to f = 500 Hz, the grain size becomes the finest and further increase of frequency to f = 2000 Hz results in coarsening of microstructures. The refinement mechanism is clarified when considering the significant difference in electrical resistivities of the solid and the liquid in mushy zone, in which both phases coexist and subject to vibration. The frequency-dependent refinement behaviour is revealed when the displacement of the mobile solid and sluggish liquid is taken into account during solidification. In contrast to 3xxx aluminium alloys, no giant compounds have been discerned in the present 7xxx alloy regardless of the solidification condition. The formation of crystalline twin is briefly discussed when considering the vibration condition.

  11. Effect of Fe on Microstructure and Properties of 8xxx Aluminum Conductor Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lei; Liu, Kun; Breton, Francis; -Grant Chen, X.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of Fe contents (0.3-0.7 wt.%) on the microstructure, electrical conductivity, mechanical and creep properties of 8xxx aluminum conductor alloys was investigated. Results revealed that the as-cast microstructure of 8xxx alloys was consisted of equiaxed α-Al grains and secondary Fe-rich intermetallics distributed in the interdendritic region. The extruded microstructure showed partially recrystallized structure for 0.3% Fe alloy but only dynamically recovered structures for 0.5 and 0.7% Fe alloys. With increasing Fe contents, the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were remarkably improved, while the electrical conductivity was slightly decreased. Moreover, the creep resistance was greatly improved, which is attributed to the larger volume fraction of fine intermetallic particles and smaller subgrain size in the higher Fe-containing alloys. The creep threshold stress was found to increase from 24.6 to 33.9 MPa with increasing Fe contents from 0.3 to 0.7%, respectively. The true stress exponent values were close to 3 for all three experimental alloys, indicating that the creep mechanism of 8xxx alloys was controlled by dislocation glide.

  12. Mosaic trisomy 8 detected by fibroblasts cultured of skin

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Ana M; Mora, Lina; Suarez-Obando, Fernando; Moreno, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mosaic trisomy 8 or "Warkany's Syndrome" is a chromosomopathy with an estimated prevalance of 1:25,000 to 1:50,000, whose clinical presentation has a wide phenotypic variability. Case Description: Patient aged 14 years old with antecedents of global retardation of development, moderate cognitive deficit and hypothyroidism of possible congenital origin. Clinical Findings: Physical examination revealed palpebral ptosis, small corneas and corectopia, hypoplasia of the upper maxilla and prognathism, dental crowding, high-arched palate, anomalies of the extremities such as digitalization of the thumbs, clinodactyly and bilateral shortening of the fifth finger, shortening of the right femur, columnar deviation and linear brown blotches that followed Blaschko's lines. Cerebral nuclear magnetic resonance revealed type 1 Chiari's malformation and ventriculomegaly. Although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood (46,XY), based on the finding of cutaneous mosaicism the lesions were biopsied and cytogenetic analysis demonstrated mosaic trisomy 8: mos 47,XY,+8[7]/46,XY[93]. Clinical Relevance: Trisomy 8 is clinically presented as a mosaic, universal cases being unfailingly lethal. In this particular case, cutaneous lesions identified the mosaic in tissue, although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood. The cutaneous mosaicism represented by brown linear blotches which follow Blaschko's lines is a clinical finding that has not previously been described in Warkany's syndrome. PMID:27546932

  13. Maternal Age-Specific Rates for Trisomy 21 and Common Autosomal Trisomies in Fetuses from a Single Diagnostic Center in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jaruthamsophon, Kanoot; Sriplung, Hutcha; Charalsawadi, Chariyawan

    2016-01-01

    To provide maternal age-specific rates for trisomy 21 (T21) and common autosomal trisomies (including trisomies 21, 18 and 13) in fetuses. We retrospectively reviewed prenatal cytogenetic results obtained between 1990 and 2009 in Songklanagarind Hospital, a university teaching hospital, in southern Thailand. Maternal age-specific rates of T21 and common autosomal trisomies were established using different regression models, from which only the fittest models were used for the study. A total of 17,819 records were included in the statistical analysis. The fittest models for predicting rates of T21 and common autosomal trisomies were regression models with 2 parameters (Age and Age2). The rate of T21 ranged between 2.67 per 1,000 fetuses at the age of 34 and 71.06 per 1,000 at the age of 48. The rate of common autosomal trisomies ranged between 4.54 per 1,000 and 99.65 per 1,000 at the same ages. This report provides the first maternal age-specific rates for T21 and common autosomal trisomies fetuses in a Southeast Asian population and the largest case number of fetuses have ever been reported in Asians. PMID:27812158

  14. Characterization of three de novo derivative chromosomes 16 by “Reverse chromosome painting” and molecular analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rack, K. A.; Harris, P. C.; MacCarthy, A. B.; Boone, R.; Raynham, H.; McKinley, M.; Fitchett, M.; Towe, C. M.; Rudd, P.; Armour, J. A. L.; Lindenbaum, R. H.; Buckle, V. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed three de novo chromosome 16 rearrangements—two with a 16p+ chromosome and one a 16q+—none of which could be fully characterized by conventional cytogenetics. In each case, flow karyotypes have been produced, and the aberrant chromosome has been isolated by flow sorting. The origin of the additional material has been ascertained by amplifying and labeling the DNA of the abnormal chromosome by degenerate-oligonucleotide-primer–PCR and hybridizing it in situ to normal metaphase spreads (reverse chromosome painting). Both 16p+ chromosomes contain more than 30 Mb of DNA from the short arm of chromosome 9 (9p21.2-pter), while the 16q+ contains approximately 9 Mb of DNA from 2q37. The breakpoints on chromosome 16 have been localized in each case; the two breakpoints on the short arm are at different points within the terminal band, 16p13.3. The breakpoint on the long arm of chromosome 16 is very close to (within 230 kb of) the 16q telomere. Determination of the regions of monosomy and trisomy allowed the observed phenotypes to be compared with other reported cases involving aneuploidy for these regions. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:8488848

  15. Extreme redundancy of the valve of the fossa ovalis with right heart hypoplasia in a neonate with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Himeshkumar; Cabalka, Allison K

    2006-10-01

    Infants with trisomy 18 often have important cardiovascular malformations. We describe an infant with trisomy 18 who had extreme redundancy of the flap valve of the fossa ovalis along with right heart hypoplasia.

  16. Partial trisomy 2q due to a maternal balanced translocation t(2;22) (q31;p12)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, L.S.; Bleiman, M.; Punnett, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Features consistent among reported patients with 2q duplications due to familial translocations or de novo duplications include pre- and postnatal growth failure, ocular defects such as congenital glaucoma, cardiac defects, micrognathia, urogenital defects, renal defects, connective tissue laxity, neurologic defects, and dermatologic abnormalities. Genotype/phenotype correlations of patients with trisomy 2q due to familial translocations are complicated by the presence of the deletions of the other chromosome involved. We have had the opportunity to observe `pure` trisomy 2q31-qter resulting from adjacent-1 segregation from 46,XX,t(2;22)(q31;p12) in a carrier mother with apparent loss of the 22 NOR region. He was the 2453 gm product of a gestation complicated by gestational diabetes to a 29-year-old G1 P0 mother and a 30-year-old father. At birth, he was noted to have hypotonia, micrognathia, microphthalmia, left cryptorchidism, hypospadias, bilateral clinodactyly of the fifth digits, mild hyperextensibility of the joints, dry skin disorder, and bilateral hydronephrosis by ultrasound. He was treated for hypoglycemia in the nursery and had a vesicostomy at two months for vesicoureteral reflux. A hearing test at two months found moderate hearing loss in the right ear and mild to moderate hearing loss in the left ear. At 3 months he had surgery for a PDA and bilateral glaucoma and was treated for periods of hypothermia and type IV renal tubular acidosis. This patient and others with unbalanced translocations involving the NOR region of an acrocentric chromosome allow for genotype/phenotype correlation of the `pure` trisomic region.

  17. Survival of children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18: A multi-state population-based study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Robert E; Liu, Gang; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Ethen, Mary K; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Powell, Cynthia M; Flood, Timothy J; Mai, Cara T; Wang, Ying; Canfield, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 13 (T13) and trisomy 18 (T18) are among the most prevalent autosomal trisomies. Both are associated with a very high risk of mortality. Numerous instances, however, of long-term survival of children with T13 or T18 have prompted some clinicians to pursue aggressive treatment instead of the traditional approach of palliative care. The purpose of this study is to assess current mortality data for these conditions. This multi-state, population-based study examined data obtained from birth defect surveillance programs in nine states on live-born infants delivered during 1999-2007 with T13 or T18. Information on children's vital status and selected maternal and infant risk factors were obtained using matched birth and death certificates and other data sources. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate age-specific survival probabilities and predictors of survival up to age five. There were 693 children with T13 and 1,113 children with T18 identified from the participating states. Among children with T13, 5-year survival was 9.7%; among children with T18, it was 12.3%. For both trisomies, gestational age was the strongest predictor of mortality. Females and children of non-Hispanic black mothers had the lowest mortality. Omphalocele and congenital heart defects were associated with an increased risk of death for children with T18 but not T13. This study found survival among children with T13 and T18 to be somewhat higher than those previously reported in the literature, consistent with recent studies reporting improved survival following more aggressive medical intervention for these children. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  19. Modeling Chromosomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  20. Molecular characterization of near-complete trisomy 17p syndrome from inverted duplication in association with cryptic deletion of 17pter.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Hun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Seung-Tae; Seo, Jeong Meen; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2014-03-10

    Trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 17 (T17P) is a genomic disorder presenting with growth retardation, motor and mental retardation and constitutional physical anomalies including congenital heart defects. Here we report a case of near-complete T17P of which the genomic dosage aberrations were delineated by chromosomal microarray along with conventional diagnostic modalities. A 9-year-old Korean boy was admitted because of esophageal obstruction. He showed clinical manifestations of T17P, along with atypical features of scoliosis, corpus callosum agenesis, and seizure. Chromosome analyses revealed an inverted duplication of the chromosomal segment between 17p11.2 and 17p13.3. Chromosomal microarray revealed a duplication of the most of the short arm of chromosome 17 (size ~19.09 Mb) along with a cryptic deletion of a small segment of 17p terminal end (17pter) (~261 Kb). This is the first report of molecular characterization of near-complete T17P from inverted duplication in association with 17pter microdeletion. The fine delineation of the extent of genomic aberration by SNP-based microarray could help us better understand the molecular mechanism and genotype-phenotype correlations in T17P syndrome.

  1. Intracellular oxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme defense system, and cell senescence in fibroblasts with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS.

  2. Perturbations of heart development and function in cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Alexis; Letourneau, Audrey; Sartiani, Laura; Del Lungo, Martina; Ronzoni, Flavio; Kuziakiv, Rostyslav; Tohonen, Virpi; Zucchelli, Marco; Santoni, Federico; Guipponi, Michel; Dumevska, Biljana; Hovatta, Outi; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Jaconi, Marisa E

    2015-05-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in approximately 50% of patients with Down syndrome (DS); the mechanisms for this occurrence however remain unknown. In order to understand how these defects evolve in early development in DS, we focused on the earliest stages of cardiogenesis to ascertain perturbations in development leading to CHD. Using a trisomy 21 (T21) sibling human embryonic stem cell (hESC) model of DS, we show that T21-hESC display many significant differences in expression of genes and cell populations associated with mesodermal, and more notably, secondary heart field (SHF) development, in particular a reduced number of ISL1(+) progenitor cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence for two candidate genes located on chromosome 21, ETS2 and ERG, whose overexpression during cardiac commitment likely account for the disruption of SHF development, as revealed by downregulation or overexpression experiments. Additionally, we uncover an abnormal electrophysiological phenotype in functional T21 cardiomyocytes, a result further supported by mRNA expression data acquired using RNA-Seq. These data, in combination, revealed a cardiomyocyte-specific phenotype in T21 cardiomyocytes, likely due to the overexpression of genes such as RYR2, NCX, and L-type Ca(2+) channel. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of CHD. Stem Cells 2015;33:1434-1446.

  3. Towards understanding the tandem mass spectra of protonated oligopeptides. 2: The proline effect in collision-induced dissociation of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp).

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Christian; Suhai, Sándor; Harrison, Alex G; Paizs, Béla

    2011-06-01

    The product ion spectra of proline-containing peptides are commonly dominated by y(n) ions generated by cleavage at the N-terminal side of proline residues. This proline effect is investigated in the current work by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx includes Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp) in an electrospray/quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer and by quantum chemical calculations on protonated Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala. The CID spectra of all investigated peptides show a dominant y(2) ion (Pro-Ala sequence). Our computational results show that the proline effect mainly arises from the particularly low threshold energy for the amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the proline residue, and from the high proton affinity of the proline-containing C-terminal fragment produced by this cleavage. These theoretical results are qualitatively supported by the experimentally observed y(2)/b(3) abundance ratios for protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp). In the post-cleavage phase of fragmentation the N-terminal oxazolone fragment with the Ala-Ala-Xxx sequence and Pro-Ala compete for the ionizing proton for these peptides. As the proton affinity of the oxazolone fragment increases, the y(2)/b(3) abundance ratio decreases.

  4. A coalescence of two syndromes in a girl with terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rearrangements involving chromosome 5p often result in two syndromes, Cri-du-chat (CdC) and Trisomy 5p, caused by a deletion and duplication, respectively. The 5p15.2 has been defined as a critical region for CdC syndrome; however, genotype-phenotype studies allowed isolation of particular characteristics such as speech delay, cat-like cry and mental retardation, caused by distinct deletions of 5p. A varied clinical outcome was also observed in patients with Trisomy 5p. Duplications of 5p10-5p13.1 manifest themselves in a more severe phenotype, while trisomy of regions distal to 5p13 mainly causes mild and indistinct features. Combinations of a terminal deletion and inverted duplication of 5p are infrequent in literature. Consequences of these chromosomal rearrangements differ, depending on size of deletion and duplication in particular cases, although authors mainly describe the deletion as the cause of the observed clinical picture. Case presentation Here we present a 5-month-old Slovenian girl, with de novo terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5p. Our patient presents features of both CdC and Trisomy 5. The most prominent features observed in our patient are a cat-like cry and severe malformations of the right ear. Conclusion The cat-like cry, characteristic of CdC syndrome, is noted in our patient despite the fact that the deletion is not fully consistent with previously defined cat-like cry critical region in this syndrome. Features like dolichocephaly, macrocephaly and ear malformations, associated with duplication of the critical region of Trisomy 5p, are also present, although this region has not been rearranged in our case. Therefore, the true meaning of the described chromosomal rearrangements is discussed. PMID:24517234

  5. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    ., 1988; Van Keuren et al., 1989). Methods based on using region-specific chromosome 21 DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization show promise for the rapid diagnosis of trisomy 21 (Lichter et al., 1988). The continued development of chromosome 21 DNA probes and advances in the technology of molecular cytogenetics will facilitate the study of the genetic organization of chromosome 21 and its role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome.

  6. Trisomy 16 in a Pigtailed Macaque ("M. nemestrina") with Multiple Anomalies and Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppenthal, Gerald C.; Moore, Charleen M.; Best, Robert G.; Walker-Gelatt, Coleen G.; Delio, Patrick J.; Sackett, Gene P.

    2004-01-01

    A female pigtailed macaque ("Macaca nemestrina") with unusual physical characteristics, deficits in learning and cognitive tasks, abnormal social behavior, and abnormal reflexes and motor control was followed from birth until 3 years of age and found to have trisomy 16, which is homologous to trisomy 13 in humans. The animal described here showed…

  7. Morphologic and GATA1 sequencing analysis of hematopoiesis in fetuses with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Sylvia; Bihl, Michel P; Tzankov, Alexandar; Chaffard, Rosemarie; Hirschmann, Petra; Miny, Peter; Kühne, Thomas; Bruder, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    Trisomy 21 alters fetal liver hematopoiesis and, in combination with somatic globin transcription factor 1 (GATA1) mutations, leads to development of transient myeloproliferative disease in newborns. However, little is known about the morphological hematopoietic changes caused by trisomy 21 in the fetus, and to date, the exact onset of GATA1 mutations remains uncertain. Therefore, we analyzed fetal liver hematopoiesis from second trimester pregnancies in trisomy 21 and screened for GATA1 mutations. We examined 57 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded fetal liver specimens (49 harboring trisomy 21 and 8 controls) by immunohistochemistry for CD34, CD61, factor VIII, and glycophorin A. GATA1 exon 2 was sequenced in fetal livers and corresponding nonhematologic tissue. Cell counts of megakaryocytes (P = .022), megakaryocytic precursors (P = .021), and erythroid precursors were higher in trisomy 21 cases. CD34-positive hematopoietic blasts showed no statistically significant differences. No mutation was detected by GATA1 exon 2 sequencing in fetal livers from 12 to 25 weeks of gestation. Our results suggest that GATA1 exon 2 mutations occur late in trisomy 21 fetal hematopoiesis. However, trisomy 21 alone provides a proliferative stimulus of fetal megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. CD34-positive precursor cells are not increased in trisomy 21 fetal livers.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis and fetopathological findings in five fetuses with trisomy 9

    SciTech Connect

    Chitayat, D.; Hodgkinson, K.; Luke, A.

    1995-04-10

    Five male fetuses with trisomy 9 are discussed. Three were detected prenatally and terminated, 1 aborted spontaneously, and the fifth delivered prematurely and died soon after. Multiple congenital abnormalities characteristic of trisomy 9 were detected in all 5 cases and are compared to those of previous reports. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Down syndrome consequent to a cryptic maternal 12p;21q chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.; Wenger, S.L.; Chakravarti, A.

    1995-03-13

    A 9-year-old, mildly mentally retarded girl presented with phenotypic manifestations of Down syndrome. G-banded chromosomal analyses of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the patient and her parents, and skin fibroblasts from the patient, did not detect any abnormality. Molecular analysis of 15 highly polymorphic chromosome 21 dinucleotide repeat markers demonstrated a partial duplication of the Down syndrome critical region (D21S55, subband 21q22.2) of maternal origin in the patient. The segmental trisomy was confirmed by FISH analysis using the cosmid probe D21S55. Further analysis demonstrated that the trisomy was due to segregation of an apparently balanced cryptic translocation from the mother. The patient`s karyotype is 46,XX,-12,tder(12)t(12;21)(p13.1;q22.2)mat. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. DNA-Methylation Patterns in Trisomy 21 Using Cells from Monozygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Sailani, M. Reza; Santoni, Federico A.; Letourneau, Audrey; Borel, Christelle; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Hibaoui, Youssef; Popadin, Konstantin; Bonilla, Ximena; Guipponi, Michel; Gehrig, Corinne; Vannier, Anne; Carre-Pigeon, Frederique; Feki, Anis; Nizetic, Dean; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential in mammalian development. We have hypothesized that methylation differences induced by trisomy 21 (T21) contribute to the phenotypic characteristics and heterogeneity in Down syndrome (DS). In order to determine the methylation differences in T21 without interference of the interindividual genomic variation, we have used fetal skin fibroblasts from monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant for T21. We also used skin fibroblasts from MZ twins concordant for T21, normal MZ twins without T21, and unrelated normal and T21 individuals. Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) revealed 35 differentially methylated promoter regions (DMRs) (Absolute methylation differences = 25%, FDR < 0.001) in MZ twins discordant for T21 that have also been observed in comparison between unrelated normal and T21 individuals. The identified DMRs are enriched for genes involved in embryonic organ morphogenesis (FDR = 1.60 e -03) and include genes of the HOXB and HOXD clusters. These DMRs are maintained in iPS cells generated from this twin pair and are correlated with the gene expression changes. We have also observed an increase in DNA methylation level in the T21 methylome compared to the normal euploid methylome. This observation is concordant with the up regulation of DNA methyltransferase enzymes (DNMT3B and DNMT3L) and down regulation of DNA demethylation enzymes (TET2 and TET3) observed in the iPSC of the T21 versus normal twin. Altogether, the results of this study highlight the epigenetic effects of the extra chromosome 21 in T21 on loci outside of this chromosome that are relevant to DS associated phenotypes. PMID:26317209

  11. Cutaneous manifestations in trisomy 13 mosaicism: A rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Iris; Wohlmuth, Christoph; Rittinger, Olaf; Fischer, Thorsten; Wertaschnigg, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    Trisomy 13 mosaicism is a rare genetic disorder affecting a small minority of all trisomy 13 cases. It occurs when two cell populations that are karyotypically different are present in the same individual and are derived from a single zygote. As a rule, the phenotype is mitigated to a less dysmorphic appearance and longer survival, making genetic counseling a difficult task. Capillary hemangiomas are a common feature of full trisomy 13, seen in 27-56% of all cases. We report on an 18-months-old girl with extensive cutaneous anomalies, mild dysmorphic features, and slight psychomotor delay, without structural defects and provide an up-to-date review of all cases of trisomy 13 mosaicism with skin involvement. To our knowledge, this is the second clinical report of a patient with trisomy 13 mosaicism with hemangiomas and port wine stains, but no structural defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Partial distal 10q trisomy due to de novo amplification: A new case without furrows or ridges in fingers and palms

    PubMed Central

    Rahbarimanesh, Aliakbar; Derakhshandeh-Peykar, Pupak; Barkhordari, Amirhassan; Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal, Reza; Shamizadeh Kalkhoran, Soja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Here we describe a new case of partial distal 10q trisomy in a 6-year-old Iranian girl from healthy parents with mental, growth, and psychomotor retardations. Methods: Additional clinical features include dysmorphic craniofacial features, microcephaly, bilateral hydronephrosis without heart problems, small and rotated low-set ears, bow-shaped mouth, abnormal teeth, short neck, and as a first case reported, fingers with camptodactly (i.e., without any furrows or ridges in the palms and fingers). Results: Cytogenetic analysis (GTG-banding) revealed an unbalanced female karyotype with additional bands at the end of the long arm of chromosome 10, karyotype: 46,XX,dup(10)(q25q26). Conclusion: According to the banding pattern it is most likely that a duplication of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 10 occurred. PMID:26989714

  13. Monosomy 9p24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31{r_arrow}qter: Case report and review of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Steinberger, J.; Mammel, M.C.

    1995-05-22

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 (p24{r_arrow}pter) and partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 5 (q32{r_arrow}qter) were observed in an abnormal boy who died at age 8 weeks of a complex cyanotic cardiac defect. He also had minor anomalies, sagittal craniosynostosis, triphalangeal thumbs, hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum. Two other infants with similar cytogenetic abnormalities were described previously. These patients had severe congenital heart defect, genitourinary anomalies, broad nasal bridge, low hairline, apparently low-set ears, short neck, and triphalangeal thumbs, in common with our patient. We suggest that combined monosomy 9q23,24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31,32{r_arrow}qter may constitute a clinically recognizable syndrome. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Persistent chromosome damage induced by localized radiotherapy for lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslav, A.L.; Stamberg, J.; Shende, A.

    1988-02-01

    A fibroblast culture was established from a lymph node biopsy of a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 9 months after chemotherapy and intensive therapeutic x-irradiation of the area. In contrast with blood and bone marrow, which were chromosomally normal, all cells of the lymph node were chromosomally abnormal, with numerous clones having multiple structural abnormalities. Numerical abnormalities (trisomies and monosomies) were not found. Structural abnormalities included translocations, terminal deletions, and pericentric inversions, with an excess of centromeric breakpoints being the only apparent deviation from a random distribution of breakpoints. None of the rearrangements associated with malignant lymphoma were seen, indicating that the chromosome abnormalities in the lymph stroma were radiation-associated, not disease-associated. These acquired changes may be a cause of additional malignant transformation.

  15. Molecular investigation of a dicentric 13;17 chromosome found in a 21-week gestation fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cockwell, A E; Maloney, V K; Thomas, N S; Smith, E L; Gonda, P; Bass, P; Crolla, J A

    2006-01-01

    We report a 21-week gestation fetus terminated because of multiple congenital abnormalities seen on ultrasound scan, including ventriculomegaly, possible clefting of the hard palate, cervical hemivertebrae, micrognathia, abnormal heart, horseshoe kidney and a 2-vessel umbilical cord. On cytogenetic examination, the fetus was found to have a male karyotype with 45 chromosomes with a dicentric chromosome, which appeared to consist of the long arms of chromosomes 13 and 17. Molecular genetic investigations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) unexpectedly showed that the derivative chromosome contained two interstitial blocks of chromosome 17 short arm sequences, totalling approximately 7 Mb, between the two centromeres. This effectively made the fetus monosomic for approximately 15 Mb of 17p without the concurrent trisomy for another chromosome normally seen following malsegregation of reciprocal translocations. It also illustrates the complexity involved in the formation of some structurally abnormal chromosomes, which can only be resolved by detailed molecular investigations.

  16. [Coarctation of the aorta with aortic arch hypoplasia in newborn with partial trisomy 11q associated to 4q interstitial deletion].

    PubMed

    Palano, G M; Licata, F; Carpinato, C; Sottile, F; Sciuto, R; Mattina, T; Distefano, G

    2010-12-01

    This article reports the case of newborn with multiple dimorphisms (microcephaly, hypertelorism, wide and flat nasal bridge, small nose, long philtrum, microretrognathia, malformed and low-set ears, short neck, redundant nuchal skin, genital anomalies), admitted in the hospital after two days from delivery for torpor, poor food and cyanosis. Babies were affected, at color-Doppler echocardiography, by coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with aortic arch hypoplasia. CoA is often associated to genetic and environmental factors that interact frequently. In this study the anamnestic absence of teratogen noxae and the presence of facial and genital anomalies suggest a genetic study to provide appropriate genetic information to parents. G-banding chromosomic analysis revealed a 46, XX der 4t(4;11) karyotype with partial 11q trisomy confirmed with FISH chromosome painting 4;11 and with FISH subtelomere specific 4(p/q)11(p/q). These techniques showed that derivative chromosome 4 was constituted by chromosome 4 with partial deletion in the q35 region and by 11q21 translocation. This rare anomaly is often inherited by an unbalanced segregation of a balanced translocation, present in one of the two parents. In the present study, the father carried a t(4q;11q) balanced translocation. A CGH-array analysis was executed to the child for the breakpoints definition. As 11q trisomy cases reported in literature are still few, this case can contribute to improve our knowledge on the genotype-phenotype correlation in this rare genetic anomaly.

  17. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  18. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S V; Nadeau, J H; Tanzi, R E; Watkins, P C; Jagadesh, J; Taylor, B A; Haines, J L; Sacchi, N; Gusella, J F

    1988-01-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, we have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS. Images PMID:2901095

  19. Experimental approaches for the detection of chromosomal malsegregation occurring in the germline of mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    Existing and newly proposed methods to detect the induction of heritable aneuploidy are summarized, and their favorable and unfavorable features discussed. Among the tests involving direct chromosomal examination, that involving study of pronuclear chromosome at first cleavage is judged to be the most universally informative and reliable, provided tertiary trisomy can be ruled out. Measurement of post-midterm (fetal) death is proposed as a trisomy prescreen that can be readily combined with a dominant-lethal test. Among the genetic procedures for identifying the results of malsegregation events, direct detection of aneuploids has a number of advantages over complementation methods, in which only a fraction of the products of aneuploid gametes is detectable. Direct detection of aneuploids must, however, be restricted to sex-chromosomes, if postnatal animals are examined. A genetic marker system to detect autosomal trisomies in fetuses is proposed. An examination of experimental parameters that might maximize induction of malsegregation leads to the recommendation to include preleptotene among exposed germ-cell stages. 64 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Increased low-level chromosome 21 mosaicism in older individuals with Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, E.C.; Genovese, M.; Ye, Ling Ling

    1997-01-20

    During a study of the familial aggregation of Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer disease (AD), we observed an increase in mosaicism for disomy 21 in older individuals with DS. In a total of 213 DS subjects who were studied cytogenetically, only 1 of 121 (0.8%) under age 45 exhibited mosaicism, while 14 of 92 (15.2%) who were age 45 or older had mosaicism. Mosaicism in this report connotes {open_quotes}low-level{close_quotes} mosaicism, where all 15 individuals exhibited a modal chromosome number of 47 (i.e., trisomy 21), and at least two cells lacked one of the three chromosomes 21. The occurrence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 15, 17, and X increased with age, and an inverse correlation between chromosome loss and size was also observed. Because older individuals had not been karyotyped at birth, it was not possible to determine whether our observations were due to either increased survival of mosaic individuals or accumulation of disomy 21 cells via increased chromosome loss with aging of the trisomy 21 individual. Using a modeling approach involving life table methods, we obtained results that suggested acquired mosaicism as the predominant mechanism to explain our findings. These results support the hypothesis that as individuals with DS age, there is an increased loss of chromosome 21. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Deletion of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital hypothyroidism and mild mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Anneren, G.; Sidenvall, R.

    1996-08-23

    We report on a girl with a large interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 21 and with mild mental retardation, congenital hypothyroidism, and hyperopia. The deletion [del(21)(q11.1-q22.1)] extends molecularly from marker D21S215 to D21S213. The distal breakpoint is not clearly defined but is situated between markers D21S213 and IFNAR. This patient has the largest deletion of chromosome 21 known without having severe mental retardation or malformations. The deletion does not involve the {open_quotes}Down syndrome chromosome{close_quotes} region, the region of chromosome 21 which in trisomy causes most of the manifestations of Down syndrome. Apparently, the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 21 does not include genes that are responsible for severe clinical effects in the event of either deletion or duplication, since several reported patients with either trisomy or deletion of this region have mild phenotypic abnormalities. Congenital hypothyroidism is much more common in Down syndrome than in the average population. Thus, the congenital hypothyroidism of the present patient might indicate that there is one or several genes on the proximal part of chromosome 21, which might be of importance for the thyroid function. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. How to fold a spin chain: Integrable boundaries of the Heisenberg XXX and Inozemtsev hyperbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa Gomez, Alejandro; MacKay, Niall; Regelskis, Vidas

    2017-04-01

    We present a general method of folding an integrable spin chain, defined on a line, to obtain an integrable open spin chain, defined on a half-line. We illustrate our method through two fundamental models with sl2 Lie algebra symmetry: the Heisenberg XXX and the Inozemtsev hyperbolic spin chains. We obtain new long-range boundary Hamiltonians and demonstrate that they exhibit Yangian symmetries, thus ensuring integrability of the models we obtain. The method presented provides a ;bottom-up; approach for constructing integrable boundaries and can be applied to any spin chain model.

  3. Energies, Wavelengths, and Transition Rates for Ga-Like Ions (Nd XXX-Tb XXXV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Fatma; Attia, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    Energies, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, and line strengths have been calculated for 4s24p-4s4p2 and 4s24p-4s24d transitions in gallium-like ions from Z = 60 to 65, for Nd XXX, Pm XXXI, Sm XXXII, Eu XXXIII, Gd XXXIV, and Tb XXXV using the fully relativistic multiconfi guration Dirac-Fock method. The correlation with the n = 4 complex and the quantum electrodynamic effects have been considered in the calculations. The obtained results have been compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results.

  4. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX chain with triangular boundaries and Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo António, N.; Manojlović, N.; Salom, I.

    2014-12-01

    We implement fully the algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX Heisenberg spin chain in the case when both boundary matrices can be brought to the upper-triangular form. We define the Bethe vectors which yield the strikingly simple expression for the off shell action of the transfer matrix, deriving the spectrum and the relevant Bethe equations. We explore further these results by obtaining the off shell action of the generating function of the Gaudin Hamiltonians on the corresponding Bethe vectors through the so-called quasi-classical limit. Moreover, this action is as simple as it could possibly be, yielding the spectrum and the Bethe equations of the Gaudin model.

  5. 47,Xxx in an adolescent with premature ovarian failure and autoimmune disease

    PubMed

    Holland

    2000-05-01

    Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is often associated with autoimmune disorders. The 47,XXX karyotype has also been associated with POF and other genitourinary abnormalities. Following is a case of a 17 year old with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), POF, 47, XXX and a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA).Case Report: A 17 year old Caucasian female was referred to the Adolescent Health Clinic for evaluation of oligomenorrhea with secondary amenorrhea. Thelarche occurred at 12 years, and menarche at 13 years of age. Since then she had a total of five menstrual periods, spaced 1-15 months apart and lasting 3-5 days. Her last menstrual period was six months prior to presentation. Past medical history was significant for chronic ITP diagnosed seven months prior to presentation, when she developed easy bruising. She was treated with IV gamma globulin and had a moderate response, but relapsed several weeks later. She was started on oral prednisone and had a good response, but continued to relapse whenever steroids were tapered. She was therefore maintained on prednisone 10 mg QOD. There was no family history of irregular menses or autoimmune disease. Physical exam revealed a well-appearing, slightly Cushingoid 17 year old. Physical and cognitive development were age-appropriate. There were no stigmata of Turner Syndrome. The thyroid was normal. Breasts were Tanner 5; public hair was Tanner 3. The external genitalia were normal and appeared well-estrogenized. The remainder of the exam was unremarkable. Pelvic ultrasound demonstrated a normal uterus and ovaries. Laboratory evaluation was significant for elevated gonadotropins and nondetectable estradiol. ANA was positive at 1:320 with a speckled pattern. Blood counts, serologies, complement levels, and coagulation studies were otherwise normal. Cytogenetic studies revealed a 47,XXX karyotype. The patient was placed on an estrogen/norethindrone hormone replacement patch for premature ovarian failure. To date

  6. Evolution of microstructure and precipitates in 2xxx aluminum alloy after severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk-Cieslak, B.; Zdunek, J.; Mizera, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the influence of precipitation on the microstructure development in a 2xxx aluminum alloy subjected to hydrostatic extrusion. A three step reduction of the diameter was performed using hydrostatic extrusion (HE) process: from 20mm (initial state) to 10 mm, 5 mm and 3 mm, which corresponds to the logarithmic deformations ɛ = 1.4, ɛ = 2.8 and ɛ = 3.8 respectively. The microstructure and precipitation analysis before and after deformation was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result of the tests, a very significant influence of precipitation on the degree of refinement and mechanism of microstructure transformation was stated.

  7. Age Hardening Kinetics in 7xxx Type (Al-Mg-Zn) Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vevecka-Priftaj, A.; Lamani, E.; Fjerdingen, J.; Langsrud, Y.; Gjoennes, J.; Hansen, V.

    2007-04-23

    Age hardening in industrial 7xxx alloys at the temperature 100 deg. and 150 deg. C up to 144 hrs, after solid solution treatments at 450 deg. and 550 deg. C, has been followed by measurements of Vickers hardness, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of silicon on phase and kinetic of age hardening zones and precipitates has been studied. High iron and silicon content increase the number of primary particle in the alloy. Size distribution of {eta}'-precipitates has been determined.

  8. Joint Oil Analysis Program Spectrometer Standards VHG Labs Inc. Qualification Report for D19-XXX Series Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-04

    21.9 max. ASTM D445 Viscosity Index, Min 85 ASTM D2270 Trace Sediment 0.005 ml/100 mL Oil max. ASTM D2273 Pour point -12 °C max. ASTM D97 Flash...D4052), viscosity index (ASTM 2270), trace sediment (ASTM D2273), and pour point (ASTM D97). All of the Type D19-XXX spectrometric oil standards...Joint Oil Analysis Program Spectrometer Standards VHG Labs Inc. Qualification Report For D19-XXX Series Standards NF&LCFT REPORT 441/13-015 4

  9. Unusual Turner syndrome mosaic with a triple x cell line (47,X/49,XXX) in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Bradford, Carol M; Tupa, Lynn; Wiese, Debbie; Hurley, Timothy J; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    A 29-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated for low fertility and a midterm abortion. Laboratory testing included karyotyping, which revealed an unusual mosaicism for Turner syndrome with Triple X (47,X/49,XXX). This appears to be the first report of Turner syndrome in a great ape. In humans, Turner syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 3,000 females, with half of those monosomic for the X chromosome. A small proportion is mosaic for a triple X cell line (3-4%). In humans, Turner syndrome is associated with characteristic phenotype including short stature, obesity, a broad chest with widely spaced nipples, webbing of the neck, and anteverted ears. This individual gorilla is significantly shorter in stature than conspecifics and is obese despite normal caloric intake. Individuals with Turner syndrome should also be screened for common health issues, including congenital heart defects, obesity, kidney abnormalities, hypertension, hypothyroidism, and diabetes mellitus. Animals with decreased fertility, multiple miscarriages, fetal losses, unusual phenotypes, or a combination of these symptoms should be evaluated for genetic abnormalities.

  10. Apneas observed in trisomy 18 neonates should be differentiated from epileptic apneas.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Masaharu; Asada, Hideyuki; Matsusawa, Kaname; Hattori, Tetsuo; Kato, Yuichi; Negoro, Tamiko

    2015-03-01

    Many children with trisomy 18 have apneas from the neonatal period. It has been reported that some children with trisomy 18 have epilepsy, including epileptic apneas. However, no previous report has described epileptic apneas in trisomy 18 neonates. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of neonates with trisomy 18 who were born at Anjo Kosei Hospital between July 2004 and October 2013 and investigated whether they had epileptic apneas during the neonatal period and whether antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were effective for treating them. We identified 16 patients with trisomy 18. Nine patients who died within 3 days of birth were excluded. Five of the remaining seven patients had apneas. All five patients underwent electroencephalograms (EEGs) to assess whether they suffered epileptic apneas. Three of the five patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. In two patients, the apneas corresponded to ictal discharges. In one patient, ictal discharges were recorded when she was under mechanical ventilation, but no ictal discharges that corresponded to apneas were recorded after she was extubated. AEDs were effective for treating the apneas and stabilizing the SpO2 in all three patients. Among neonates with trisomy 18 who lived longer than 3 days, three of seven patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. AEDs were useful for treating their epileptic apneas and stabilizing their SpO2. Physicians should keep epileptic apneas in mind when treating apneas in neonates with trisomy 18.

  11. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  12. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  13. Transitions in Care for Infants with Trisomy 13 or 18.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jacquelyn; Taylor, Genevieve; Smith, Melissa; Dotters-Katz, Sarah; Davis, Arlene M; Price, Wayne

    2017-03-16

    Background and Objectives The scope of interventions offered to infants with trisomy 13 (T13) or trisomy 18 (T18) is increasing. We describe the spectrum of care provided, highlighting transitions in care for individual patients. Patients and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort of infants with T13 or T18 born between 2004 and 2015. Initial care was classified as comfort care or intervention using prenatal counseling notes. Transitions in care were identified in the medical record. Results In this study, 25 infants were divided into two groups based on their care: neonates who experienced no transition in care and neonates who experienced at least one transition. Eleven neonates experienced no transition in care with 10 receiving comfort care. Fourteen neonates experienced at least one transition: three transitioned from comfort care to intervention and 11 from intervention to comfort care. The three initially provided comfort care were discharged home with hospice and readmitted. Among the 11 cases who transitioned from intervention to comfort care, 9 transitioned during the birth hospitalization, 6 had no prenatal suspicion for T13 or T18, and 5 experienced elective withdrawal of intensive care. Conclusion The spectrum of care for infants with T13 or T18 illustrates the need for individualized counseling that is on-going, goal directed, collaborative, and responsive.

  14. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  15. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    SciTech Connect

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  16. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions. PMID:27186343

  17. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions.

  18. Atomic structure calculations and identification of EUV and SXR spectral lines in Sr XXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, A. K.; Mohan, Man

    2015-08-01

    We report an extensive theoretical study of atomic data for Sr XXX in a wide range with L-shell electron excitations to the M-shell. We have calculated energy levels, wave-function compositions and lifetimes for lowest 113 fine structure levels and wavelengths of an extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) transitions. We have employed multi-configuration Dirac Fock method (MCDF) approach within the framework of Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian including quantum electrodynamics (QED) and Breit corrections. We have also presented the radiative data for electric and magnetic dipole (E1, M1) and quadrupole (E2, M2) transitions from the ground state. We have made comparisons with available energy levels compiled by NIST and achieve good agreement. But due to inadequate data in the literature, analogous relativistic distorted wave calculations have also been performed using flexible atomic code (FAC) to assess the reliability and accuracy of our results. Additionally, we have provided new atomic data for Sr XXX which is not published elsewhere in the literature and we believe that our results may be beneficial in fusion plasma research and astrophysical investigations and applications.

  19. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  20. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G.

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Opposite Phenotypes of Muscle Strength and Locomotor Function in Mouse Models of Partial Trisomy and Monosomy 21 for the Proximal Hspa13-App Region

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Véronique; Duchon, Arnaud; Romestaing, Caroline; Sahun, Ignasi; Pothion, Stéphanie; Karout, Mona; Borel, Christelle; Dembele, Doulaye; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Messaddeq, Nadia; Sharp, Andrew J.; Roussel, Damien; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Dierssen, Mara; Hérault, Yann

    2015-01-01

    The trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), which causes Down syndrome (DS), is the most common viable human aneuploidy. In contrast to trisomy, the complete monosomy (M21) of Hsa21 is lethal, and only partial monosomy or mosaic monosomy of Hsa21 is seen. Both conditions lead to variable physiological abnormalities with constant intellectual disability, locomotor deficits, and altered muscle tone. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in DS and M21 phenotypes, we created two new mouse models: the Ts3Yah carrying a tandem duplication and the Ms3Yah carrying a deletion of the Hspa13-App interval syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.3. Here we report that the trisomy and the monosomy of this region alter locomotion, muscle strength, mass, and energetic balance. The expression profiling of skeletal muscles revealed global changes in the regulation of genes implicated in energetic metabolism, mitochondrial activity, and biogenesis. These genes are downregulated in Ts3Yah mice and upregulated in Ms3Yah mice. The shift in skeletal muscle metabolism correlates with a change in mitochondrial proliferation without an alteration in the respiratory function. However, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondrial complex I decreased in Ms3Yah mice, while the membrane permeability of Ts3Yah mitochondria slightly increased. Thus, we demonstrated how the Hspa13-App interval controls metabolic and mitochondrial phenotypes in muscles certainly as a consequence of change in dose of Gabpa, Nrip1, and Atp5j. Our results indicate that the copy number variation in the Hspa13-App region has a peripheral impact on locomotor activity by altering muscle function. PMID:25803843

  2. Good response to long-term therapy with growth hormone in a patient with 9p trisomy syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Canton, Ana Pinheiro Machado; Nishi, Mirian Yumie; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Roela, Rosimeire Aparecida; Jorge, Alexander Augusto Lima

    2016-04-01

    The 9p trisomy syndrome is a rare condition, clinically characterized by a wide range of dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, and, in most patients, by short stature. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is still controversial in syndromic disorders, the reason for which it is not currently indicated. Here we report a 7-year-old boy with 9p trisomy syndrome and marked short stature. Results of routine laboratory assessments were normal. IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were both in the normal range (-1.6 and -0.7 SDS, respectively). GH peak in response to oral clonidine stimulation test was 3.5 μg/L, which is considered a normal response. Chromosomal analysis revealed the karyotype 47,XY, + del(9)(pter-q11:) dn. SNP array data indicated absence of mosaicism [arr 9p24.3-p13.1 (203,861-38,787,480) x3]. By the age of 8.3 years, the patient had persistent short stature (-2.9 SDS) with normal growth velocity (4.9 cm/y; -0.7 SDS), not showing spontaneous catch-up. After 5.6 years of rhGH therapy (50 μg/kg/d), height SDS improved from -2.9 to -1.0. This result suggests that rhGH therapy could be considered for patients with 9p trisomy syndrome who present with short stature. The degree of intellectual disability and the potential for social inclusion should be taken into account when recommending this treatment. Additional studies are needed to establish the benefits of height gain in these patients.

  3. Chromosomal localization of glutamate receptor genes: relationship to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological disorders of mice and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, P; Reeves, R H; Jabs, E W; Yang, X; Dackowski, W; Rochelle, J M; Brown, R H; Haines, J L; O'Hara, B F; Uhl, G R

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate may play key roles in neurodegeneration. The mouse Glur-5 gene maps to chromosome 16 between App and Sod-1. The homologous human GLUR5 gene maps to the corresponding region of human chromosome 21, which contains the locus for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This location, and other features, render GLUR5 a possible candidate gene for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, dosage imbalance of GLUR5 may have a role in the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). Further characterization of the murine glutamate receptor family includes mapping of Glur-1 to the same region as neurological mutants spasmodic, shaker-2, tipsy, and vibrator on chromosome 11; Glur-2 near spastic on chromosome 3; Glur-6 near waltzer and Jackson circler on chromosome 10; and Glur-7 near clasper on chromosome 4. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8464923

  4. Galectin-1-asialofetuin interaction is inhibited by peptides containing the tyr-xxx-tyr motif acting on the glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wéber, Edit; Hetényi, Anasztázia; Váczi, Balázs; Szolnoki, Eva; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Tubak, Vilmos; Monostori, Eva; Martinek, Tamás A

    2010-01-25

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a ubiquitous beta-galactoside-binding protein expressed by various normal and pathological tissues, has been implicated in cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases in consequence of its regulatory role in adhesion, cell viability, proliferation, and angiogenesis. The functions of Gal-1 depend on its affinity for beta-galactoside-containing glycoconjugates; accordingly, the inhibition of sugar binding blocks its functions, hence promising potential therapeutic tools. The Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptide motifs have been reported to be glycomimetic sequences, mainly on the basis of their inhibitory effect on the Gal-1-asialofetuin (ASF) interaction. However, the results regarding the efficacy of the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr motif as a glycomimetic inhibitor are still controversial. The present STD and trNOE NMR experiments reveal that the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptides studied do not bind to Gal-1, whereas their binding to ASF is clearly detected. (15)N,(1)H HSQC titrations with (15)N-labeled Gal-1 confirm the absence of any peptide-Gal-1 interaction. These data indicate that the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptides tested in this work are not glycomimetics as they interact with ASF via an unrevealed molecular linkage.

  5. Trisomy 2p: Analysis of unusual phenotypic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, I.W.; Ilyina, H.G.; Gurevich, D.B.

    1995-01-16

    We present three probands with partial trisomies 2p21-23 due to ins(4;2)(q21;p21p23) pat, 2p23-pter due to t(2;4)(p23;q35)mat, and 2p21-pter due to t(2;11)(p21;q23.3)mat. More than 50 cases of partial trisomy 2p have been reviewed and some abnormalities, unusual for most other types of structural autosomal imbalance, have been found in patients with inherited forms of 2p trisomy and in their non-karyotyped sibs. Neural tube defects (anencephaly, occipital encephalocele, and spina bifida) were found in five probands and 4/6 affected non-karyotyped sibs. The only triplicated segment common to all was 2p24. Different forms of {open_quotes}broncho-pulmonary a/hypoplasia{close_quotes} (including two cases of lung agenesis) were described in four patients (overlapping triplicated segment was 2p21-p25). Three patients (with overlapping triplicated segment 2p23-p25) had diaphragmatic hernia. Abnormal rotation of the heart or L-transposition of large vessels (with or without visceral heterotaxia) was found in two infants (overlapping triplicated segment 2p23-p24). In two patients with common triplicated segment 2p22.3-p25, neuroblastoma has been described. The occurrence of all these defects may be explained either by the action of the same gene(s) mapped to 2p24 or by action of some independent factors located in different segments of the short arm. Although the latter hypothesis is much less probable, it can not be rejected at the present time. We propose the existence of a genetic system controlling surveillance of an abnormal embryo to explain the phenotypic differences between patients with the same imbalance within a family. In some {open_quotes}restrictive{close_quotes} combinations the abnormal embryos will die, although in {open_quotes}permissive{close_quotes} combinations they can survive. 47 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Effect of Observational Training of Parents in the Early Stimulation of Trisomy-21 Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa Aparicio

    1988-01-01

    Compared trisomy-21 infants whose parents were trained in vicarious techniques with those whose parents were trained by written instruction. Significant differences in gross motor and language development favored vicariously trained parents. (Author/BB)

  7. Multiple colonic ulcers associated with trisomy 8: serial changes in colonoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Kawasaki, Keisuke; Ito, Shigeki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-10-01

    We report a 54-year-old female patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with trisomy 8, who had multiple colonic ulcers. The patient had been diagnosed as having MDS of refractory cytopenia with trisomy 8 10 years previously. She underwent colonoscopy for abdominal pain, which revealed severe circumferential stenosis with multiple ulcers in the ileocecal region and a discrete excavating ulcer in the transverse colon. The patient had been free from any dermatological, oral, genital or ocular symptoms suggestive of Behçet's disease (BD). A diagnosis of multiple colonic ulcers associated with MDS with trisomy 8 was thus suggested. Follow-up colonoscopies 5 and 6 years later revealed progression of the ileocecal stenosis to a circumferential ulcer, while the ulcer in the transverse colon had not changed. Because our patient lacked extraintestinal symptoms of BD, trisomy 8 was presumed to be responsible for her colonic ulcers.

  8. Prenatal detection of trisomy 21 and 18 from amniotic fluid by quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, T; Findlay, I; Papp, C; Tóth-Pál, E; Marton, T; Nagy, B; Quirke, P; Papp, Z

    1998-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomies is usually performed by cytogenetic analysis on amniotic fluid. This requires lengthy laboratory procedures and high costs, and is unsuitable for large scale screening of pregnant women. An alternative method, which is both rapid and inexpensive and suitable for diagnosing trisomies even from single fetal cells, is the fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using polymorphic small tandem repeats (STRs). In this paper we present the preliminary results of a larger study comparing parallel prenatal diagnoses of trisomies 21 and 18 using cytogenetics with quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using STR markers. The results obtained by the two techniques were concordant in all cases. This is the first study reporting significant numbers of prenatal diagnoses using the quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction. We believe that further studies on greater numbers of samples will determine the absolute reliability of this technique. These results also provide a model for diagnosis of trisomy from single fetal cells isolated from maternal blood. PMID:9507392

  9. Congenital Vascular Malformations of the Liver: An Association With Trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Burdall, Oliver C; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos; Sellars, Maria; Hadzic, Nedim; Davenport, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A link between congenital vascular malformation (CVM) of the liver and trisomy 21 has been suggested. We reviewed all children with trisomy 21 referred for investigation to a specialist pediatric hepatobiliary unit (1985-2015). Forty-five children with trisomy 21 were identified; 7 (15%) had a defined CVMs (4 girls). All such infants were also diagnosed with a range of cardiac defects. CVMs were divided according to the nature of the vascular connection. Group (i) (n = 3): Abnormal venovenous anomaly. This included portocaval shunt and patent ductus venosus (n = 2). Group (ii) (n = 4): Involvement of all 3 vascular systems. Two infants had arterioportal hypertension caused by hepatic arteries feeding into a left portal vein aneurysm within the umbilical fissure. Two infants had more complex hepatic artery to hepatic vein shunts developing early cardiorespiratory failure with progressive jaundice. Our series shows a clear association between cardiac anomalies and CVM in children with trisomy 21.

  10. Double-outlet right ventricle with intact ventricular septum in a foetus with trisomy-18.

    PubMed

    Patel, C R; Muise, K L; Redline, R W

    1999-07-01

    A rare case of double-outlet right ventricle with intact ventricular septum diagnosed by foetal echocardiography at 21 weeks of gestation is described. Amniocentesis revealed trisomy-18. The cardiac diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy.

  11. Further delineation of the phenotype maps for partial trisomy 16q24 and Jacobsen syndrome by a subtle familial translocation t(11;16)(q24.2;q24.1).

    PubMed

    Zahn, Susanne; Ehrbrecht, Antje; Bosse, Kristin; Kalscheuer, Vera; Propping, Peter; Schwanitz, Gesa; Albrecht, Beate; Engels, Hartmut

    2005-11-15

    We report on two cases of distal monosomy 11q and partial trisomy 16q due to a familial subtle translocation detected by FISH subtelomere screening. Exact breakpoint analyses by FISH with panels of BAC probes demonstrated a 9.3-9.5 megabase partial monosomy of 11q24.2-qter and a 4.9-5.4 megabase partial trisomy of 16q24.1-qter. The index patient displayed craniofacial dysmorphisms, mild mental retardation and postnatal growth retardation, muscular hypotonia, mild periventricular leukodystrophy, patent ductus arteriosus, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, inguinal hernia, cryptorchidism, pes equinovarus, and hearing deficiencies. In his mother's cousin who bears the identical unbalanced translocation, mild mental retardation, patent ductus arteriosus, hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, unilateral kidney hypoplasia, pes equinovarus, and hearing deficiencies were reported. Since only four descriptions of cryptic or subtle partial trisomies 16q have been published to date, our patients contribute greatly to the delineation of the phenotype of this genomic imbalance. In contrast to this, terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11 cause a haploinsufficiency disorder (Jacobsen syndrome) in which karyotype-phenotype correlations are already being established. Here, our findings contribute to the refinement of a phenotype map for several Jacobsen syndrome features including abnormal brain imaging, renal malformations, thrombocytopenia/pancytopenia, inguinal hernia, testicular ectopy, pes equinovarus, and hearing deficiency.

  12. Loss of telomeric DNA during aging of normal and trisomy 21 human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, H.; Uchida, I.; Lan Wei; Harley, C.B. ); Schaechter, F.; Cohen, D. ); Xiaoming Zhu; Effros, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The telomere hypothesis of cellular aging proposes that loss of telomeric DNA (TTAGGG) from human chromosomes may ultimately cause cell-cycle exit during replicative senescence. Since lymphocytes have a limited replicative capacity and since blood cells were previously shown to lose telomeric DNA during aging in vivo, the authors wished to determine (a) whether accelerated telomere loss is associated with the premature immunosenescence of lymphocytes in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and (b) whether telomeric DNA is also lost during aging of lymphocytes in vitro. To investigate the effects of aging and trisomy 21 on telomere loss in vivo, genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 140 individuals (age 0--107 years), including 21 DS patients (age 0--45 years). Digestion with restriction enzymes HinfI and RsaI generated terminal restriction fragments (TRFs), which were detected by Southern analysis using a telomere-specific probe ([sup 32]P-(C[sub 3]TA[sub 2])[sub 3]). The rate of telomere loss was calculated from the decrease in mean TRF length, as a function of donor age. DS patients showed a significantly higher rate of telomere loss with donor age (133 [+-] 15 bp/year) compared with age-matched controls (41 [+-] 7.7 bp/year) (P < .0005), suggesting that accelerated telomere loss is a biomarker of premature immunosenescence of DS patients and that it may play a role in this process. Telomere loss during aging in vitro was calculated for lymphocytes from four normal individuals, grown in culture for 10--30 population doublings. The rate of telomere loss was [approximately]120 bp/cell doubling, comparable to that seen in other somatic cells. Moreover, telomere lengths of lymphocytes from centenarians and from older DS patients were similar to those of senescent lymphocytes in culture, which suggests that replicative senescence could partially account for aging of the immune system in DS patients and in elderly individuals. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Expression signature as a biomarker for prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Lovrečić, Luca; Juvan, Peter; Peterlin, Borut

    2013-01-01

    A universal biomarker panel with the potential to predict high-risk pregnancies or adverse pregnancy outcome does not exist. Transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to capture differentially expressed genes (DEG), which can be used as biomarker-diagnostic-predictive tool for various conditions in prenatal setting. In search of biomarker set for predicting high-risk pregnancies, we performed global expression profiling to find DEG in Ts21. Subsequently, we performed targeted validation and diagnostic performance evaluation on a larger group of case and control samples. Initially, transcriptomic profiles of 10 cultivated amniocyte samples with Ts21 and 9 with normal euploid constitution were determined using expression microarrays. Datasets from Ts21 transcriptomic studies from GEO repository were incorporated. DEG were discovered using linear regression modelling and validated using RT-PCR quantification on an independent sample of 16 cases with Ts21 and 32 controls. The classification performance of Ts21 status based on expression profiling was performed using supervised machine learning algorithm and evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation approach. Global gene expression profiling has revealed significant expression changes between normal and Ts21 samples, which in combination with data from previously performed Ts21 transcriptomic studies, were used to generate a multi-gene biomarker for Ts21, comprising of 9 gene expression profiles. In addition to biomarker's high performance in discriminating samples from global expression profiling, we were also able to show its discriminatory performance on a larger sample set 2, validated using RT-PCR experiment (AUC=0.97), while its performance on data from previously published studies reached discriminatory AUC values of 1.00. Our results show that transcriptomic changes might potentially be used to discriminate trisomy of chromosome 21 in the prenatal setting. As expressional alterations reflect both, causal

  14. From pediatric history. Important personalities in relation to some genetic defects - "trisomies".

    PubMed

    Brucknerova, Ingrid; Holomanova, Anna; Mach, Mojmir; Ujhazy, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a short biography of some important physicians and describe the most prominent differences between trisomy 13, 18 and 21. The authors present the most prominent differences between trisomy 13, 18 and 21. The work of many important physicians, geneticists, has helped in the process of recognition of congenital anomalies. This group of famous persons includes Patau, Edwards and Down.

  15. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. MicroRNA-15a and -16-1 act via MYB to elevate fetal hemoglobin expression in human trisomy 13.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Menne, Tobias F; Šćepanović, Danilo; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Ji, Peng; Kim, Jinkuk; Thiru, Prathapan; Orkin, Stuart H; Lander, Eric S; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-01-25

    Many human aneuploidy syndromes have unique phenotypic consequences, but in most instances it is unclear whether these phenotypes are attributable to alterations in the dosage of specific genes. In human trisomy 13, there is delayed switching and persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and elevation of embryonic hemoglobin in newborns. Using partial trisomy cases, we mapped this trait to chromosomal band 13q14; by examining the genes in this region, two microRNAs, miR-15a and -16-1, appear as top candidates for the elevated HbF levels. Indeed, increased expression of these microRNAs in primary human erythroid progenitor cells results in elevated fetal and embryonic hemoglobin gene expression. Moreover, we show that a direct target of these microRNAs, MYB, plays an important role in silencing the fetal and embryonic hemoglobin genes. Thus we demonstrate how the developmental regulation of a clinically important human trait can be better understood through the genetic and functional study of aneuploidy syndromes and suggest that miR-15a, -16-1, and MYB may be important therapeutic targets to increase HbF levels in patients with sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia.

  17. Epidemiology of double aneuploidies involving chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Natalia V; Mutton, David E

    2005-04-01

    The chance of two chromosome abnormalities occurring in one conceptus is very small. However, some authors have suggested that double aneuplodies (DAs) might be more common than the product of their individual frequencies. The nonrandomness of such DA events was considered to be evidence that nondisjunction (NDJ) may be genetically determined. Data collected from the National Down syndrome Cytogenetic Register (NDSCR) in England and Wales and from the literature indicate that the frequencies of all nonmosaic DAs, except for 48,XXY,+21, are lower than expected, probably because of strong intrauterine selection against such pregnancies. Collectively, we identified 52 cases of nonmosaic 48,XXY,+21; 28 cases of 48,XYY,+21; and 14 cases of 48,XXX,+21 in liveborns and 13 cases of 48,XXY,+21; four cases of 48,XYY,+21; and two cases of 48,XXX,+21 after prenatal diagnoses. Among these cases, analysis of the published unbiased cytogenetic surveys of liveborn DS revealed 24 cases of 48,XXY,+21; nine cases of 48,XYY,+21; and seven cases of 48,XXX,+21. These figures are different from the expected proportion of 1:1:1 (P < 0.001), with carriers of XXY overrepresented in the group of carriers of DA. Mechanisms put forth to account for the higher occurrence of 48,XXY,+21 may include greater accessibility of disomic ovum to Y-carrying sperm, and promotion of NDJ in ovum by Y-bearing sperm. 48,XXY,+21 DA was found to be age-dependent, as the proportion of mothers over age 35 (x = 33.0) was increased over the general population. This is in contrast to the apparently age-independent 48,XYY,+21 DA, with a mean maternal age of 24.7 (P < 0.001). Paternal ages were also remarkably different between the groups, with a mean age of 37.9 in 48,XXY,+21 cases and a mean age of 27.9 in 48,XYY,+21 cases (P < 0.01). Maternal age-related factors, rather than genetic predisposition, may play a more important role in the etiology of the most common DA, 48,XXY,+21.

  18. Prenatally detected double trisomy: Klinefelter and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cortés, M; Raga, F; Cuesta, A; Claramunt, R; Bonilla-Musoles, F

    2006-11-01

    Double trisomies are a rare occurrence. We report the first case of a Down and Klinefelter's syndrome (48,XXY,+21) in a fetus that was prenatally diagnosed during the 15th week of pregnancy. Even though the nasal bone was present, and the color-Doppler study of the ductus venosus and the nuchal thickness were normal, the maternal serum test results indicated an increased risk of Down syndrome and consequentially a genetic amniocentesis was performed. A 48,XXY,+21 karyotype was observed and the patient decided to terminate the pregnancy. In this case, we did not find the typical ultrasound (US) signs that would have led us to the chromosomopathy; furthermore, we emphasize the advantages of using biochemical screening which, in our case, were crucial in arriving at the correct diagnosis.

  19. Isolated trisomy 2 in bone marrows of patients with suspected hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Aypar, Umut; Reichard, Kaaren K; Waltman, Lindsey A; Van Dyke, Daniel L

    2014-04-01

    Isolated trisomy 2 in hematopoietic malignancies is rare, having been reported in only eight cases. Of these cases, the majority are older males. The underlying hematologic malignancies range from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The molecular pathogenesis and prognostic significance of isolated trisomy 2 remains unknown. Herein, we report 11 cases of isolated trisomy 2 in hematologic disorders seen in the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory from 1996-2012. The majority were older males between the ages of 63-93 years. The underlying bone marrow pathologic diagnoses ranged from no diagnostic features of malignancy to AML. Our data suggest that isolated trisomy 2 could represent an age-related phenomenon since all 11 cases were age 63 and over. It appears that isolated trisomy 2 harbors little prognostic significance and that, instead, the prognostic significance is driven by the underlying pathologic diagnosis. For example, whereas 3 of the cases with AML survived only 7-10 weeks post-bone marrow biopsy, 1 of the cases without diagnostic features of malignancy survived 10 additional years. Therefore, trisomy 2 as a sole abnormality should not be considered as definitive evidence for a myeloid neoplasm in the absence of diagnostic morphologic criteria.

  20. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed.

  1. Incidence of X and Y Chromosomal Aneuploidy in a Large Child Bearing Population

    PubMed Central

    Kırkızlar, Eser; Hall, Megan P.; Demko, Zachary; Zneimer, Susan M.; Curnow, Kirsten J.; Gross, Susan; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background X&Y chromosomal aneuploidies are among the most common human whole-chromosomal copy number changes, but the population-based incidence and prevalence in the child-bearing population is unclear. Methods This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data leveraged a routine non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) using parental genotyping to estimate the population-based incidence of X&Y chromosome variations in this population referred for NIPT (generally due to advanced maternal age). Results From 141,916 women and 29,336 men, 119 X&Y chromosomal abnormalities (prevalence: 1 in 1,439) were identified. Maternal findings include: 43 cases of 45,X (40 mosaic); 30 cases of 47,XXX (12 mosaic); 3 cases of 46,XX uniparental disomy; 2 cases of 46,XY/46,XX; 23 cases of mosaicism of unknown type; 2 cases of 47,XX,i(X)(q10). Paternal findings include: 2 cases of 47,XXY (1 mosaic); 10 cases of 47,XYY (1 mosaic); 4 partial Y deletions. Conclusions Single chromosome aneuploidy was present in one of every 1,439 individuals considered in this study, showing 47,XXX; 47,XX,i(X)(q10); 47,XYY; 47,XXY, partial Y deletions, and a high level of mosaicism for 45,X. This expands significantly our understanding of X&Y chromosomal variations and fertility issues, and is critical for families and adults affected by these disorders. This current and extensive information on fertility will be beneficial for genetic counseling on prenatal diagnoses as well as for newly diagnosed postnatal cases. PMID:27512996

  2. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  3. Aging effects on the fracture toughness of SiC whisker reinforced 2XXX aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnaparkhi, P. L.; Rack, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of aging (at 150 C) time on the fracture toughness behavior of a 2XXX alloy (Al-3.55Cu-1.29Mg-0.01Fe-trace Mn) reinforced with 5 vol pct F-8 SiC whiskers was investigated by measuring hardness and electrical conductivity followed by fracture toughness tests on center-cracked specimens. The ageing time-hardening response plots showed that, independent of whisker orientation, the initial rapid increase in hardness was followed by a more gradual increase, with a broad hardness peak between 32 and 128 hrs of aging. Coincident with the hardness changes, the electrical conductivity initially decreased, reached a minimum, and then increased at aging times beyond 32 hrs. Examination by SEM indicated that the initial increase in hardness and decrease in conductivity was due to the GPB zone formation, while the subsequent increase in electrical conductivity and decrease in hardness (overaging) was due to S nucleation and growth.

  4. The Master T-Operator for Inhomogeneous XXX Spin Chain and mKP Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodin, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Following the approach of [Alexandrov A., Kazakov V., Leurent S., Tsuboi Z., Zabrodin A., J. High Energy Phys. 2013 (2013), no. 9, 064, 65 pages, arXiv:1112.3310], we show how to construct the master T-operator for the quantum inhomogeneous GL(N) XXX spin chain with twisted boundary conditions. It satisfies the bilinear identity and Hirota equations for the classical mKP hierarchy. We also characterize the class of solutions to the mKP hierarchy that correspond to eigenvalues of the master T-operator and study dynamics of their zeros as functions of the spectral parameter. This implies a remarkable connection between the quantum spin chain and the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider system of particles.

  5. Cri-du-Chat Syndrome Cytogenetically Cryptic Recombination Aneusomy of Chromosome 5: Implications in Recurrence Risk Estimation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Y; Torii, C; Kosaki, R; Yagihashi, T; Sago, H; Hayashi, K; Yasukawa, K; Takahashi, T; Kosaki, K

    2010-01-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome is caused by haploinsufficiency of the genes on the distal part of the short arm of chromosome 5, and characteristic features include microcephaly, developmental delays, and a distinctive high-pitched mewing cry. Most cri-du-chat syndrome cases result from a sporadic de novo deletion that is associated with a low recurrence risk. On rare occasions, however, cri-du-chat syndrome with 5p monosomy can be accompanied by 5q trisomy. This combination is virtually always associated with parental large pericentric inversions. Among previously reported cri-du-chat syndrome cases with 5p monosomy accompanied by 5q trisomy, the aneusomy of chromosome 5 in all but one case was cytogenetically visible using G-banding. When an accompanying 5q trisomy is detected, a significant recurrence risk is expected. We here report on a patient with cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype who initially exhibited a normal karyotype on G-banding but in whom molecular analysis using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a 5p deletion accompanied by a 5q duplication. Parental chromosomal testing led to the identification of a very large pericentric inversion, of which breakpoints resided at the terminal regions of 5p15.31 and 5q35.1. This information was vital for counseling the family regarding the significantly high recurrence risk.

  6. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down Syndrome and acute leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Seip, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Acute leukemia in patients with Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome; DS) may often result in additional karyotypic changes in the number or structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose immunoblast karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient L.E. developed acute lymphocytic leukemia concomitant with the loss of a single copy of chromosome 21. Trisomy 21 in this individual was due to maternal meiosis I nondisjunction. A recombination event resulted in reduction of maternal alleles to homozygosity distal to D21S167. Loss of the paternal chromosomes in the leukemia clone produced uniparental maternal disomy with isodisomy over a 25cM interval. This could, in theory, permit the unopposed expression of one or more homozygous recessive maternal tumor-associated genes, thus providing an explanation for leukemogenesis in this patient. Patient E.H. was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia and consistently displayed tetrasomy 21 in the blast cell population. The DS karyotype probably arose from a mitotic error in which the paternal chromosome was duplicated. DNA polymorphism analysis indicated that the additional chromosome in the leukemia clone was of maternal origin. The presence of equal numbers of maternal and paternal chromosomes in the tetraploid blast clone would not appear to be consistent with the expression of a mutant tumor suppressor gene in this patient. Although tetrasomy 21 could be a non-specific karyotypic abnormality unrelated to leukemogenesis, it is possible that monoblastic leukemia may be a consequence of increased expression of one or more genes on this chromosome.

  7. Normal phenotype with paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, J.L.; Avramopoulos, D. ); Pangalos, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) involving several different chromosomes has been described in several cases of human pathologies. In order to investigate whether UPD for chromosome 21 is associated with abnormal phenotypes, the authors analyzed DNA polymorphisms in DNA from a family with de novo Robertsonian translocation t(21q;21q). The proband was a healthy male with 45 dup(21q) who was ascertained through his trisomy 21 offspring. No phenotypic abnormalities were noted in the physical exam, and his past medical history was unremarkable. The authors obtained genotypes for the proband and his parents' leukocyte DNAs from 17 highly informative short sequence repeat polymorphisms that map in the pericentromeric region and along the entire length of 21q. The order of the markers has been previously determined through the linkage and physical maps of this chromosome. For the nine informative markers there was no maternal allele contribution to the genotype of the proband; in addition, there was always reduction to homozygosity of a paternal allele. These data indicated that there was paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 21 (pUPiD21). The authors conclude that pUPiD21 is not associated with abnormal phenotypes and that there are probably no imprinted genes on chromosome 21. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities in neutron-induced acute myeloid leukemias in CBA/H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Meijne, E.I.M.; Huiskamp, R.

    1996-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) induced in CBA/H mice by 1 MeV fission neutrons have been examined for chromosomal abnormalities by G-band analysis. In common with X-ray- and {alpha}-particle-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice, more than 90% (16/17) of the myeloid leukemias had chromosome 2 abnormalities, in this case, all interstitial deletions. Chromosome 2 breakpoints were not wholly consistent, but clustering in three specific G-band regions was observed. Very distal (H-region) breakpoints were more common in the neutron AMLs than in X-ray- or {alpha}-particle-induced leukemias. These data indicate that neutron-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice are not characterized by a specific chromosome deletion but that a variety of chromosome 2 deletion types are associated with the disease. Trisomy of chromosome 1 (12.5% AMLs) and aneusomy of chromosomes 6 (31% AMLs) and Y (37.5% AMLs) were noted. While chromatid breakage was observed occasionally in neutron-induced AML, no clear indications of persistent chromosomal instability or high levels of stable chromosomal change were apparent. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Asdahl, Peter; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML. Trisomy 8 positive AML is a heterogeneous group and the majority of cases have additional cytogenetic aberrations. Patients with +8 alone differed from patients with +8 other and were associated with older age, FAB M2, and FLT3-ITD aberrations. There were no differences in survival despite the more frequent occurrence of FLT3-ITD in +8 alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-11-10

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order.In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order.

  11. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order. In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  12. Analysis of the sex-chromosome constitution of digynic triploid mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Speirs, S; Kaufman, M H

    1989-01-01

    LT/Sv strain mice regularly ovulate up to 50% of their eggs as primary oocytes, which are fertilisable and give rise to digynic triploid embryos. A similar number of eggs are ovulated as secondary oocytes and, following fertilisation, give rise to normal diploid embryos. Pregnant LT/Sv females were autopsied at about midday on day 10 of gestation, when normal diploid embryos would be expected to possess between 25 and 30 pairs of somites. While a few of the triploid embryos either consisted of disorganised embryonic masses or were resorbing, most were at readily recognisable embryonic stages. Just over half of the embryos recovered were "unturned," while the remainder had "turned" and possessed between 15 and 25 pairs of somites. The triploids were usually readily recognised, owing to their small size and because they often displayed neural tube and cardiac defects. All of the embryos recovered were analysed cytogenetically by G-banding to establish their ploidy and sex-chromosome constitution. The XY:XX sex ratio of the 105 diploid embryos recovered, all of which had "turned," was 1.06:1, while the overall XXY:XXX sex ratio of the 120 triploids was 1:1. Analysis of only the developmentally most advanced triploid embryos (i.e., the 49 that had "turned") revealed that the XXY:XXX sex ratio in this group was 1.13:1, which was not significantly different from the expected ratio of 1:1. The crown-rump lengths of the XY and XX "turned" embryos were almost identical, as were those of the XXY and XXX "turned" embryos, although the triploids were significantly smaller than the diploids. No obvious effect of sex-chromosome constitution on developmental potential was therefore observed in this study in relation to either the digynic triploid or the control diploid embryos.

  13. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  14. A case of premature ovarian failure (POF) in a 31-year-old woman with a 47,XXX karyotype.

    PubMed

    Skałba, Piotr; Cygal, Anna; Gierzyńska, Zuzanna

    2010-01-01

    A case of POF in a 31-year-old woman with karyotype 47,XXX. The aim of the study was to discuss a case of POF in a 31-year-old patient with polysomy 47,XXX. The described karyotype is not usually associated with this characteristic physical phenotype. In some rare cases, menstrual disorders, sterility, secondary amenorrhoea, premature menopause, and low intelligence are found. Our observations revealed the necessity for cytogenetic examination in all women at reproductive age with symptoms of premature ovarian failure. According to the data found in literature, patients with POF and karyotype disorders belong to the risk group of premature death, mostly for cardiological reasons. Raising patient awareness about the risk may have a positive effect on quality of life and regularity of check-ups.

  15. Tc1 mouse model of trisomy-21 dissociates properties of short- and long-term recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jessica H; Wiseman, Frances K; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Harwood, John L; Good, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined memory function in Tc1 mice, a transchromosomic model of Down syndrome (DS). Tc1 mice demonstrated an unusual delay-dependent deficit in recognition memory. More specifically, Tc1 mice showed intact immediate (30sec), impaired short-term (10-min) and intact long-term (24-h) memory for objects. A similar pattern was observed for olfactory stimuli, confirming the generality of the pattern across sensory modalities. The specificity of the behavioural deficits in Tc1 mice was confirmed using APP overexpressing mice that showed the opposite pattern of object memory deficits. In contrast to object memory, Tc1 mice showed no deficit in either immediate or long-term memory for object-in-place information. Similarly, Tc1 mice showed no deficit in short-term memory for object-location information. The latter result indicates that Tc1 mice were able to detect and react to spatial novelty at the same delay interval that was sensitive to an object novelty recognition impairment. These results demonstrate (1) that novelty detection per se and (2) the encoding of visuo-spatial information was not disrupted in adult Tc1 mice. The authors conclude that the task specific nature of the short-term recognition memory deficit suggests that the trisomy of genes on human chromosome 21 in Tc1 mice impacts on (perirhinal) cortical systems supporting short-term object and olfactory recognition memory.

  16. Tc1 mouse model of trisomy-21 dissociates properties of short- and long-term recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jessica H.; Wiseman, Frances K.; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.; Harwood, John L.; Good, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined memory function in Tc1 mice, a transchromosomic model of Down syndrome (DS). Tc1 mice demonstrated an unusual delay-dependent deficit in recognition memory. More specifically, Tc1 mice showed intact immediate (30 sec), impaired short-term (10-min) and intact long-term (24-h) memory for objects. A similar pattern was observed for olfactory stimuli, confirming the generality of the pattern across sensory modalities. The specificity of the behavioural deficits in Tc1 mice was confirmed using APP overexpressing mice that showed the opposite pattern of object memory deficits. In contrast to object memory, Tc1 mice showed no deficit in either immediate or long-term memory for object-in-place information. Similarly, Tc1 mice showed no deficit in short-term memory for object-location information. The latter result indicates that Tc1 mice were able to detect and react to spatial novelty at the same delay interval that was sensitive to an object novelty recognition impairment. These results demonstrate (1) that novelty detection per se and (2) the encoding of visuo-spatial information was not disrupted in adult Tc1 mice. The authors conclude that the task specific nature of the shortterm recognition memory deficit suggests that the trisomy of genes on human chromosome 21 in Tc1 mice impacts on (perirhinal) cortical systems supporting short-term object and olfactory recognition memory. PMID:26868479

  17. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  18. Ultrasound, Echocardiography, MRI, and Genetic Analysis of a Fetus with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Partial 11q Trisomy

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Perea, Yolanda; García-Díaz, Lutgardo; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a serious birth defect with a significant mortality and morbidity. The current and constant progress in ultrasound techniques has led to the improvement of the prenatal diagnosis of this malformation. CDH is a developmental defect whose etiology is heterogeneous and takes place when the pleuroperitoneal folds and septum transversum fail to converge and fuse. Survival depends on the extent of pulmonary hypoplasia and the disease may be potentially worsened by the presence of added congenital defects. 40% of CDH cases are associated with at least one additional anomaly. The ultrasound diagnosis is established with essential signs: loss of uniform echogenicity of lungs and marked mediastinal shift. We report the case of a fetus with isolated CDH diagnosed at 21 weeks of gestation by ultrasound and confirmed by RMI, whose genetic analysis of amniotic fluid cells identified a de novo partial trisomy of the long arm of chromosome 11. Different genetic causes have been associated with CDH. Moreover, it is expectable that the use of new techniques for prenatal diagnosis will reveal novel CNVs associated with CDH and will help us to estimate the recurrence risk for this defect as well as for other associated anomalies. PMID:28352483

  19. Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol-10) supplementation improves oxidative imbalance in children with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Miles, Michael V; Patterson, Bonnie J; Chalfonte-Evans, Melinda L; Horn, Paul S; Hickey, Francis J; Schapiro, Mark B; Steele, Paul E; Tang, Peter H; Hotze, Stephanie L

    2007-12-01

    Endogenous coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, a potent antioxidant, and a potential biomarker for systemic oxidative status. Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with trisomy 21. In this study, 14 children with trisomy 21 had significantly increased (P < 0.0001) plasma ubiquinone-10 (the oxidized component of coenzyme Q10) compared with 12 age- and sex-matched healthy children (historical controls). Also, the mean ratio of ubiquinol-10 (the biochemically reduced component):total coenzyme Q10 was significantly decreased (P < 0.0001). After 3 months of ubiquinol-10 supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) to 10 patients with trisomy 21, the mean ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio increased significantly (P < 0.0001) above baseline values, and 80% of individual ratios were within normal range. No significant or unexpected adverse effects were reported by participants. To our knowledge, this is the first study to indicate that the pro-oxidant state in plasma of children with trisomy 21, as assessed by ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio, may be normalized with ubiquinol-10 supplementation. Further studies are needed to determine whether correction of this oxidant imbalance improves clinical outcomes of children with trisomy 21.

  20. The outcomes of 31 cases of trisomy 13 diagnosed in utero with various management options.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ken; Sasaki, Aiko; Wada, Seiji; Wada, Yuka; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Kosaki, Rika; Ito, Yushi; Sago, Haruhiko

    2017-04-01

    There are few reports on the prognosis of prenatally diagnosed trisomy 13 in relation to postnatal management. The aim of this study was to report on the prenatal and postnatal outcomes and postnatal management of trisomy 13 fetuses that were prenatally diagnosed at our center between 2003 and 2015. The data were retrospectively reviewed from medical records. Of the 31 cases of trisomy 13, 12 patients were diagnosed before 22 weeks of gestation, and 19 were diagnosed at or after 22 weeks of gestation. Nine families opted for termination of the pregnancy, 14 fetuses died, and 8 were born alive. Aggressive treatment was requested in two of the live births, with one patient achieving long-term survival (7 years). The other died during infancy (Day 61). One out of four who received palliative treatment is alive at two years of age with only nutrition supplementation. These three patients who achieved neonatal survival had few structural anomalies. Fetal death and early neonatal death are common in trisomy 13; however, fetuses that receive medical treatment for cases without major ultrasound abnormalities may achieve neonatal survival. Therefore, it is useful to provide comprehensive information, including precise ultrasound findings and treatment options, to parents with trisomy 13 fetuses during genetic counseling.