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Sample records for chronic clostridium difficile

  1. Clostridium difficile

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Abdominal > Clostridium difficile Health Issues ...

  2. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Condition Family HealthSeniors Share ...

  3. Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Scott R.

    2017-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have emerged as one of the principal threats to the health of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Nucleic acid testing for C. difficile toxin genes has eclipsed traditional clinical diagnostics for CDI in sensitivity and is now widespread in clinical use, but preliminary evidence suggests that this may have come at a cost of substantially reduced positive predictive value. The importance of C. difficile colonization is increasingly recognized not only as a source for false positive clinical testing but also as a source of new infections within hospitals and other healthcare environments. In the last five years, several new treatment strategies that capitalize on the increasing understanding of the altered microbiome and host defenses in CDI patients have completed clinical trials, including fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). This article highlights the changing epidemiology, laboratory diagnostics, pathogenesis, and treatment of CDI. PMID:20513554

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  6. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D. Borden; Wilcox, Mark H.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis — the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  7. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  8. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens.

  9. [Clostridium difficile enteritis].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, Antonio; Romero Pizarro, Yolanda; Martínez Arrieta, Félix; Balandín Moreno, Bárbara; Múñez Rubio, Elena; Cuiñas León, Karina; Sánchez Romero, Isabel; Cantos López de Ibargüen, Blanca; Asensio Vegas, Angel

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection of the small intestine is infrequent. We present the first case of C. difficile enteritis (CDE) diagnosed in Spain and provide a review of the literature. A 30-year-old man underwent surgery for recurrence of a retroperitoneal germ cell tumor. Seven days later the patient developed vomiting, diarrhea and, finally, intestinal obstruction due to pseudomembranes caused by CDE. Only 57 cases of CDE have been reported in the literature. The mean age was 52±17 years with a range of 18 to 86 years. Twenty-nine patients (50%) had inflammatory bowel disease. Forty-seven (81%) had a history of colon or small intestine surgery. Mortality was higher in older patients and in those without inflammatory bowel disease. CDE is characterized by high severity and mortality. 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá Hernández, Luis; Reigadas Ramírez, Elena; Bouza Santiago, Emilio

    2017-05-23

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea in industrialized countries and the source of a growing number of cases of diarrhea in the community. The outbreak of the hypervirulent strain belonging to ribotype 027 has increased the incidence and severity of CDI in some countries. Although CDI usually courses as a mild diarrhea it can lead to severe forms such as toxic megacolon or septic shock. One of every 2 episodes of CDI is not diagnosed in Spanish hospitals due to a lack of clinical suspicion or the use of insensitive diagnostic methods. The diagnostic techniques of choice are algorithms based on the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase and molecular detection of the genes of the toxins with or without the direct detection of the toxins. The recommended treatment for CDI depends on the type of infection and the characteristics of the patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Clostridium difficile in the Military Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    USAF) Abstract: Clostridium difficile, a gram - positive , spore-forming rod bacterium, causes diarrheal morbidity, increases hospitalizations and...STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 1. Background Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a gram positive ...component U.S. service members. HL7 data identified 1,505 positive results out of 20,152 tests performed for Clostridium difficile between 2010-2014

  12. Policy development for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection (ARHAI) was created at the height of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This article describes the role of ARHAI in the evaluation of laboratory testing for CDI, a related consultation on the legal requirements for manufacturers of in vitro diagnostic medical devices, a CDI healthcare bundle and surveillance of CDI in children.

  13. The continually evolving Clostridium difficile species.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Michelle D; Stabler, Richard A; Shetty, Nandini; Wren, Brendan W

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming Gram-positive bacterium that causes chronic diarrhea and sometimes life-threatening disease mainly in elderly and hospitalized patients. The reported incidence of C. difficile infection has changed dramatically over the last decade and has been related to the emergence of distinct clonal lineages that appear more transmissible and cause more severe infection. These include PCR ribotypes 027, 017 and more recently 078. Population biology studies using multilocus sequence typing and whole-genome comparisons has helped to define the C. difficile species into four clonal complexes that include PCR ribotypes 027, 017, 078 and 023, as well as a general grouping of most other PCR ribotypes. Further analysis of strains from diverse sources and geographical origins reveal significant microdiversity of clonal complexes and confirms that C. difficile is continuing to evolve. The study of C. difficile represents a real-time global evolutionary experiment where the pathogen is responding to a range of selective pressures created by human activity and practices in healthcare settings. The advent of whole-genome sequencing coupled with phylogeny (phylogeography and phylohistory) will provide unprecedented detail on the local and global emergence and disappearance of C. difficile clones, and facilitate more rational approaches to disease control. This review will highlight the emergence of virulent C. difficile clones and our current understanding of molecular epidemiology of the species.

  14. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. difficile strains are able to form composite biofilms in vitro. C. difficile biofilm formation is a complex process, modulated by several different factors, including cell surface components and regulators. We also reported that bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to high concentrations of vancomycin, the antibiotic of choice for treatment of CDI. Here we summarize our recent findings and discuss the implications of biofilm formation by this anaerobic gut pathogen in disease pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23892245

  15. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  16. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care–associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota’s capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease. PMID:25036699

  17. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Seekatz, Anna M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care-associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota's capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease.

  18. Fidaxomicin: in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2011-12-24

    Fidaxomicin is a first-in-class macrocyclic antibacterial that primarily demonstrates activity against species of clostridia, predominantly Clostridium difficile, while having limited or no activity against normal faecal microflora. Fidaxomicin is minimally absorbed following oral administration and is excreted almost solely in the faeces. Fidaxomicin displayed a high level of antibacterial activity against C. difficile in vitro, with a minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of C. difficile strains of 0.125-0.5 μg/mL, and was ≈2- to 8-fold more active than vancomycin or metronidazole. Fidaxomicin demonstrated a prolonged postantibiotic effect against C. difficile relative to vancomycin and metronidazole. In two randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, oral fidaxomicin 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 days was no less effective than oral vancomycin 125 mg every 6 hours for 10 days in the treatment of C. difficile infection, based on noninferiority analyses of clinical cure rates (primary endpoint). Fidaxomicin therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence, as well as a significantly higher rate of global cure (i.e. sustained clinical response; resolution of diarrhoea without recurrence) compared with vancomycin therapy in the two clinical trials. Fidaxomicin was generally well tolerated in patients with C. difficile infection, with a tolerability profile generally similar to that of vancomycin.

  19. Clostridium difficile infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putsathit, Papanin; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent in ca. 20% of cases of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adults. Diseases caused by this organism range from mild diarrhoea to occasional fatal pseudomembranous colitis. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) has changed notably in the past decade, following epidemics in the early 2000s of PCR ribotype (RT) 027 infection in North America and Europe, where there was an increase in disease severity and mortality. Another major event has been the emergence of RT 078, initially as the predominant ribotype in production animals in the USA and Europe, and then in humans in Europe. Although there have been numerous investigations of the epidemiology of CDI in North America and Europe, limited studies have been undertaken elsewhere, particularly in Asia. Antimicrobial exposure remains the major risk factor for CDI. Given the high prevalence of indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in Asia, it is conceivable that CDI is relatively common among humans and animals. This review describes the level of knowledge in Thailand regarding C. difficile detection methods, prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile, as well as the clinical features of, treatment options for and outcomes of the disease. In addition, antimicrobial usage in livestock in Thailand will be reviewed. A literature search yielded 18 studies mentioning C. difficile in Thailand, a greater number than from any other Asian country. It is possible that the situation in Thailand in relation to CDI may mirror the situation in other developing Asians countries.

  20. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  1. Clostridium difficile binary toxin CDT

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart; Rupnik, Maja; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Binary toxin (CDT) is frequently observed in Clostridium difficile strains associated with increased severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). CDT belongs to the family of binary ADP-ribosylating toxins consisting of two separate toxin components: CDTa, the enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase which modifies actin, and CDTb which binds to host cells and translocates CDTa into the cytosol. CDTb is activated by serine proteases and binds to lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor. ADP-ribosylation induces depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-induced actin depolymerization also produces microtubule-based membrane protrusions which form a network on epithelial cells and increase bacterial adherence. Multiple clinical studies indicate an association between binary toxin genes in C. difficile and increased 30-d CDI mortality independent of PCR ribotype. Further studies including measures of binary toxin in stool, analyses of CDI mortality caused by CDT-producing strains, and examination of the relationship of CDT expression to TcdA and TcdB toxin variants and PCR ribotypes are needed. PMID:24253566

  2. Update on Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Le Monnier, A; Zahar, J-R; Barbut, F

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) occur primarily in hospitalized patients with risk factors such as concomitant or recent use of antibiotics. CDI related additional costs are important for the global population and health-care facilities. CDI epidemiology has changed since 2003: they became more frequent boosted by large outbreaks, more severe, more resistant to antibiotic treatment, and spread to new groups of population without any risk factor. This is partly due to the emergence and worldwide dissemination of new and more virulent C. difficile strains such as the epidemic clone 027/NAP1/BI. The host immune response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of CDI and could also be involved in the occurrence of recurrent or severe forms. New guidelines including new molecular tests (NAAT) have recently clarified and simplified the diagnostic strategies for the microbiological diagnosis of CDI. The CDI incidence was proven to be related to the level of clinical suspicion and the frequency of microbiological screening for C. difficile. The current recommendations for the treatment of CDI mention oral metronidazole as the first line treatment for mild to moderate diarrhea. Oral vancomycin use should be restricted to severe cases. In the absence of consensus, the treatment of multiple recurrences remains a major concern. New and more targeted antibiotics and innovative therapeutic strategies (fecal transplantation, monoclonal antibodies, and vaccination) have emerged as new therapies for CDI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  4. Constipation in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Hameem I; Gopal, K V; Shahnewaz, Jamila; Daw, Hamed A

    2012-07-03

    A patient presented to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath, cough and respiratory distress that slowly worsened over 7-10 days. She had a viral-like illness with runny nose and cough for 1 week, which became productive of yellowish sputum. She was treated with antibiotic and steroid with clinical improvement. Her leucocyte count continued to increase despite discontinuation of both antibiotic and steroid. All culture results returned negative. She did not have any abdominal pain or diarrhoea. Her stool was positive for Clostridium difficile toxin assayed by PCR. A CT of abdomen showed distension of cecum and proximal colon. She was treated with intravenous metronidazole, oral and rectal vancomycin and intravenous immunoglobulin. She developed multi-organ failure and died.

  5. Constipation in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Kawsar, Hameem I; Gopal, K V; Shahnewaz, Jamila; Daw, Hamed A

    2012-01-01

    A patient presented to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath, cough and respiratory distress that slowly worsened over 7–10 days. She had a viral-like illness with runny nose and cough for 1 week, which became productive of yellowish sputum. She was treated with antibiotic and steroid with clinical improvement. Her leucocyte count continued to increase despite discontinuation of both antibiotic and steroid. All culture results returned negative. She did not have any abdominal pain or diarrhoea. Her stool was positive for Clostridium difficile toxin assayed by PCR. A CT of abdomen showed distension of cecum and proximal colon. She was treated with intravenous metronidazole, oral and rectal vancomycin and intravenous immunoglobulin. She developed multi-organ failure and died. PMID:22761206

  6. [Clostridium-difficile-associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, Luis; Cosme, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized patients. The inflammation is produced as a result of a non-specific response to toxins. In the last few years, a hypervirulent strain, NAP1/BI/027, has been reported. Symptoms usually consist of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient who develops diarrhea during antibiotic therapy or 6-8 weeks after treatment. Diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of CD toxin in stool and by colonoscopy in special situations. The treatment of choice is metronidazole or vancomycin. In some patients who do not respond to this therapy or who have complications, subtotal colectomy may be required. Relapse is frequent and must be distinguished from reinfection. Prevention and control in healthcare settings requires careful attention.

  7. Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jashaami, Layth S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the 1970s, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rate of the disease. We reviewed the recent CDI literature in PubMed published before February 28, 2016 that focused on advances in therapy. Despite a large number of studies describing methods for diagnosing the disease, there is currently no definitive test that identifies this infection with certainty, which complicates therapy. Recommended therapy for CDI includes oral metronidazole for mild cases and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for moderate to severe cases, each given for 10 to 14 days. For infection with spore-forming C difficile, this length of treatment may be insufficient to lead to cure; however, continuing antibiotics for longer periods of time may unfavorably alter the microbiome, preventing recovery. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with an increasing failure rate, and the only clear recommended form of metronidazole for treatment of CDI is the intravenous formulation for patients unable to take oral medications. For vancomycin or fidaxomicin treatment of first CDI recurrences, the drug used in the initial bout can be repeated. For second or future recurrences, vancomycin can be given in pulsed or tapered doses. New modalities of treatment, such as bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy, show promise for the treatment of recurrent CDI. PMID:27917075

  8. Management of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Al-Jashaami, Layth S; DuPont, Herbert L

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the 1970s, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rate of the disease. We reviewed the recent CDI literature in PubMed published before February 28, 2016 that focused on advances in therapy. Despite a large number of studies describing methods for diagnosing the disease, there is currently no definitive test that identifies this infection with certainty, which complicates therapy. Recommended therapy for CDI includes oral metronidazole for mild cases and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for moderate to severe cases, each given for 10 to 14 days. For infection with spore-forming C difficile, this length of treatment may be insufficient to lead to cure; however, continuing antibiotics for longer periods of time may unfavorably alter the microbiome, preventing recovery. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with an increasing failure rate, and the only clear recommended form of metronidazole for treatment of CDI is the intravenous formulation for patients unable to take oral medications. For vancomycin or fidaxomicin treatment of first CDI recurrences, the drug used in the initial bout can be repeated. For second or future recurrences, vancomycin can be given in pulsed or tapered doses. New modalities of treatment, such as bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy, show promise for the treatment of recurrent CDI.

  9. Alternative strategies for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martijn P; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2009-03-01

    Although antibiotics are generally effective in achieving symptomatic recovery from Clostridium difficile infection, the disease frequently relapses, partly because antibiotics not only kill C. difficile, but also disrupt colonisation resistance of the gut microflora. Non-antibiotic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the infection include probiotics, deliberate colonisation by non-toxigenic C. difficile strains, toxin-binding agents, active immunisation, passive immunotherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin, monoclonal antibodies or bovine anti-C. difficile whey concentrate, and faecal transplantation. None of these alternative therapies has proven benefit in therapy or prevention, and prospective randomised trials are urgently needed.

  10. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis.

  11. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and other conditions and complications caused by toxin-producing C. difficile . (See the "What is being tested?" section for more on these bacteria .) Conditions resulting from this bacterial infection include pseudomembranous colitis, in which dead tissue, ...

  12. Prevention of Infection Due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher C; Jump, Robin L P; Chopra, Teena

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the foremost nosocomial pathogens. Preventing infection is particularly challenging. Effective prevention efforts typically require a multifaceted bundled approach. A variety of infection control procedures may be advantageous, including strict hand decontamination with soap and water, contact precautions, and using chlorine-containing decontamination agents. Additionally, risk factor reduction can help reduce the burden of disease. The risk factor modification is principally accomplished though antibiotic stewardship programs. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence for prevention is in acute care settings. This review focuses on preventative approaches to reduce the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in healthcare settings.

  13. Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welkon, C J; Long, S S; Thompson, C M; Gilligan, P H

    1985-08-01

    One hundred seven patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 54 other patients with risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease were entered into a bacteriologic study to compare the rate of recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin in feces with occurrence of diarrhea and to investigate potentially protective or permissive relationships of fecal flora. Toxigenic C difficile was recovered from 22% of CF patients and 11% of patients with other diagnoses. Unlike the latter group, the majority (12/15) of CF patients who had cytotoxin recovered had formed stools and no history of diarrhea. Explanations for the lack of symptoms are speculative. Stool flora of CF patients was significantly more likely to include several bacteria with known inhibitory effects on C difficile. Recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin, however, was not associated with the decrease in rate of recovery or the mean bacterial count of any bacterium of fecal flora.

  14. Clostridium difficile: development of a novel candidate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Ginamarie; Shah, Siddhi; Luxemburger, Christine; Pietrobon, Patricia J Freda

    2012-06-19

    Clostridium difficile has become the most frequent hospital-acquired infection in North America and the EU. C. difficile infection (CDI) is present worldwide and disease awareness is increasing. In the US, EU, and Canada, in addition to hospital diagnosed disease, CDI has also been reported with increasing frequency in the community. Hypervirulent strains have increased the morbidity and mortality associated with CDI. Current treatment options are suboptimal. Of all patients treated for CDI, 20% relapse and 65% of those experiencing a second relapse become chronic cases. An association between increased serum levels of IgG antibody against toxin A and asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile provides a rationale for vaccine development. Sanofi Pasteur's C. difficile candidate vaccine is being developed for the prevention of primary disease. The target population is adults at risk of CDI, those with planned hospitalization, long-term care/nursing home residents, and adults with co-morbidities requiring frequent/prolonged antibiotic use.

  15. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, G E

    1998-09-01

    A systematic review of the literature to identify risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection was conducted. Two main outcomes were considered: C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. A qualitative assessment, based on a set of defined and consistently applied criteria, appeared to be the best approach for risk factors other than antibiotic use, as an approach based on meta-analysis would have utilized only the information provided by a minority of the studies. Risk factors for which there was evidence suggestive or consistent with an association with C. difficile diarrhoea were: increasing age (excluding infancy), severity of underlying diseases, non-surgical gastrointestinal procedures, presence of a nasogastric tube, anti-ulcer medications, stay on ITU, duration of hospital stay, duration of antibiotic course, administration of multiple antibiotics. For malignant haematological disorders there was evidence of an association only with C. difficile carriage, but there were no suitable studies to explore a possible association of this risk factor with symptomatic infection. Antibiotic use lent itself to quantitative assessment with meta-analysis using logistic regression. Exposure to an antibiotic was shown to be statistically significantly associated with both C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. The meta-analysis approach enabled the ranking of individual antibiotics in relation to the risk of C. difficile infection, though the 95% confidence intervals were often wide and overlapping. Antibiotics associated with a lower risk of C. difficile diarrhoea should be considered, especially when attempting to control a C. difficile outbreak or when prescribing for a patient with other C. difficile risk factors. This systematic review of the literature enabled the identification of features it would be desirable to consider in future epidemiological studies.

  16. Faecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Dodin, M; Katz, D E

    2014-03-01

    To review the current clinical literature regarding the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for severe and recurrent Clostridium difficile disease (CDAD). Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a gram positive, spore forming bacteria, and an important nosocomial pathogen causing healthcare associated diarrhoea in hospitalized patients in developed and developing countries. During the past several years, CDAD has become more frequent, severe, refractory, and more likely to relapse. It has become apparent that C. difficile is no longer just a nosocomial infection, with a rising rate of infection in populations not previously affected. Standard treatment regimens and new medications exist, but recurrence rates are high. Using PubMed, we conducted a Boolean search with the following medical subject headings (MeSH): Clostridium difficile infection and fecal transplantation or recurrent C. difficile infection. We restricted the search to human studies, published in English, between 2011 through June 1, 2013. There were 104 publications identified. Of those related to FMT, there were 20 clinical reviews, 6 case reports, 3 clinical trials (one, a randomized control trial), and 1 meta-analysis. Since 1958 there have been 36 published reports of FMT for C. difficile infection (CDI) representing 583 patients. Success rates were higher when FMT was administered via colonoscopy (representing the majority of patients, 79.2%). The overall success rate for FMT, regardless of administration method, was 80-98%. Fecal microbiota transplantation attempts to restore the normal microbiome of the colon, and has achieved a cure rate reaching more than 90%. Mounting evidence supports the utility of FMT for severe and recurrent cases of CDI. Barriers that will need to be addressed are patient perceptions and fears, standard protocol development, and further clinical trials. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clostridium difficile Infection: New Insights Into Management

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first described as a cause of diarrhea in 1978 and is now among the leading 3 hospital-acquired infections in the United States, along with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In the past 2 decades, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rates of C difficile infection, all of which are associated with poor outcomes. In addition, several novel risk factors and newer treatment methods are emerging, including fidaxomicin therapy, treatment using monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation, that have shown promise for the treatment of C difficile infection. This review focuses on the changing epidemiology, risk factors, and newer methods for treatment of C difficile infection. PMID:23127735

  18. Clostridium difficile infection and intestinal microbiota interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Van Broeck, J; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile remains the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. Aside from nosocomial C. difficile infection, the bacterium is also increasingly important as a community pathogen. Furthermore, asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile in neonates, adults and animals is also well recognised. The investigation of the gut's microbial communities, in both healthy subjects and patients suffering C. difficile infection (CDI), provides findings and information relevant for developing new successful approaches for its treatment, such as faecal microbiota transplantation, or for the prophylaxis of the infection by modification of the gut microbiota using functional foods and beverages. The analysis of all available data shows new insights into the role of intestinal microbiota in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clostridium difficile infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin LP

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection, the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea, disproportionately affects older adults. The two most important risk factors for developing C. difficile infection are antimicrobial exposure and age >65 years old. Risk factors specific to older adults are frequent interactions with healthcare systems and age-related changes in physiology, including immune senescence and changes to the gut microbiome. Metronidazole and oral vancomcyin are the mainstays of conventional treatment for C. difficile infection. Alternative therapies include fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic, and fectal bacteriotherapy, which offers an excellent therapeutic outcome. Strategies to prevent C. difficile infections include enhanced infection control measures and reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use through stewardship. PMID:24955106

  20. Carbohydrate-based Clostridium difficile vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario A; Ma, Zuchao; Bertolo, Lisa; Jiao, Yuening; Arroyo, Luis; Hodgins, Douglas; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Sagermann, Martin; Sundsmo, John; Chow, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for thousands of deaths each year and a vaccine would be welcomed, especially one that would disrupt bacterial maintenance, colonization and persistence in carriers and convalescent patients. Structural explorations at the University of Guelph (ON, Canada) discovered that C. difficile may express three phosphorylated polysaccharides, named PSI, PSII and PSIII; this review captures our recent efforts to create vaccines based on these glycans, especially PSII, the common antigen that has precipitated immediate attention. The authors describe the design and immunogenicity of vaccines composed of raw polysaccharides and conjugates thereof. So far, it has been observed that anti-PSII antibodies can be raised in farm animals, mice and hamster models; humans and horses carry anti-PSII IgA and IgG antibodies from natural exposure to C. difficile, respectively; phosphate is an indispensable immunogenic epitope and vaccine-induced PSII antibodies recognize PSII on C. difficile outer surface.

  1. Harbingers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Madonia, Phillip N; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Bass, Pat

    2009-01-01

    : Recent research has recognized surrogate markers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Among the most consistently identified markers are the leukocyte count, platelet count, and albumin level. Previous investigators failed to exclude patients with hematologic disorders that may have confounded their results. Therefore, the exclusion of this subset from our study lends it a unique perspective. : We undertook a retrospective review of inpatients at our institution that were diagnosed with nosocomial diarrhea and subsequently had a stool sample sent for C. difficile toxins A and B. Patients with major hematologic disorders were excluded. : A total of 77 C. difficile-positive patients and 91 C. difficile-negative patients were studied. Patients with CDAD had a significantly higher leukocyte and platelet count but a lower albumin level compared with patients without CDAD. : Our results support the conclusion of preceding studies that leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia are reliable clinical predictors for CDAD even after careful exclusion of confounding factors.

  2. Models for the study of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Best, Emma L.; Freeman, Jane; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Models of Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) have been used extensively for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) research. The hamster model of C. difficile infection has been most extensively employed for the study of C. difficile and this has been used in many different areas of research, including the induction of C. difficile, the testing of new treatments, population dynamics and characterization of virulence. Investigations using in vitro models for C. difficile introduced the concept of colonization resistance, evaluated the role of antibiotics in C. difficile development, explored population dynamics and have been useful in the evaluation of C. difficile treatments. Experiments using models have major advantages over clinical studies and have been indispensible in furthering C. difficile research. It is important for future study programs to carefully consider the approach to use and therefore be better placed to inform the design and interpretation of clinical studies. PMID:22555466

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in children with inflammatory bowel disease: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pituch, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease of the gastrointestinal tract that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. Questions about the role of infections in the development and exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease remain unanswered. Among numerous bacteria that have been linked to IBD, the most frequently associated is Clostridium difficile. Clinical symptoms of C. difficile infection and an exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease are often indistinguishable. In cases of diarrhea in patients with IBD and C. difficile infection, antibiotic treatment is recommended. This review attempts to summarize C. difficile infection's epidemiology and clinical features and describes current evidence on treatment of C. difficile infection in children with IBD.

  4. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-14

    AD N o GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE 0 C%" ANNUAL REPORT ! Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson July 14, 1988 Supported by...17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Clostridium difficile Vaccine ...development of vaccines . Improvement of vaccine biotechnology in the area of recombinant DNA studies using Clostridium difficile toxin A as the model, is

  5. Revised nomenclature of Clostridium difficile toxins and associated genes.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Dupuy, Bruno; Fairweather, Neil F; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart; Just, Ingo; Lyerly, David M; Popoff, Michel R; Rood, Julian I; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Thelestam, Monica; Wren, Brendan W; Wilkins, Tracy D; von Eichel-Streiber, Christoph

    2005-02-01

    Several different nomenclatures have been applied to the Clostridium difficile toxins and their associated genes. This paper summarizes the new nomenclature that has been agreed to by the research groups currently active in the field. The revised nomenclature includes C. difficile toxins and other related large clostridial toxins produced by Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium novyi, and corresponding toxin genes, as well as toxin production types of C. difficile strains.

  6. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Janezic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature.

  7. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  8. Clostridium difficile: from obscurity to superbug.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S

    2008-01-01

    According to the UK media and popular press, Clostridium difficile is now a fully fledged member of that notorious but ill-defined group of microorganisms portrayed to the general public as superbugs. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous superbug responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This review tracks the rise in scientific knowledge and public awareness of this organism.

  9. Clostridium difficile infection: Updates in management.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Raseen; Khanna, Sahil

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first identified in 1978 as a diarrhea-causing bacterium in humans. In the last three decades, C. difficile infection (CDI) has reached an epidemic state, both in health care and community settings worldwide. There has been substantial progress in the field of CDI, including identification of novel risk factors, presence of CDI in individuals not considered at risk previously, and treatment options including new drugs, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation. This review discusses epidemiology, novel and traditional risk factors, and updates in management for CDI.

  10. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  11. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified.

  12. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Immunization strategies for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Rebeaud, Fabien; Bachmann, Martin F

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of nosocomial disease in Western countries. The recent emergence of hypervirulent strains resistant to most antibiotics correlates with increasing disease incidence, severity and lethal outcomes. Current treatments rely on metronidazol and vancomycin, but the limited ability of these antibiotics to cure infection and prevent relapse highlights the need for new strategies. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of Clostridium difficile now permits the development of new products specifically targeting the pathogen. Immune-based strategies relying on active vaccination or passive administration of antibody products are the focus of intense research and, today, the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and of two vaccines are evaluated clinically. This review presents recent data, discusses the different strategies and highlights the challenges linked to the development of immunization strategies against this emerging threat.

  14. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  15. [Six years evaluation of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Ercis, Serpil; Ergin, Alper; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile toxin in the stool samples of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea or pseudomembranous colitis, and to relate its presence with the clinical findings of the patients. Between January 1997-April 2003, a total of 726 stool samples were investigated for C. difficile toxin A and/or B by enzyme immunoassay. Of them, 68 (9.4%) were found positive for C. difficile toxin (62 were toxin A, 6 were toxin B). C. difficile associated diarrhea were found to be related mostly with the use of beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (32/68), followed by aminoglycosides (12/68), and cephalosporins (8/68). The ages of the patients were between 1-86 years old (mean: 43.3 years), and 36 (52.9%) of them had an underlying conditions. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic renal failure were the underlying disease in 18, malignancy in 11, and others (diabetes, hepatitis, transplantation, multiple sclerosis) in 7 of the patients. In conclusion, toxin detection and knowledge of the risk factors are the beneficial guidelines for the diagnosis of C. difficile associated diarrhea in the routine setting.

  16. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Roger B; Norman, Keri N; Andrews, Kathleen; Hume, Michael E; Scanlan, Charles M; Callaway, Todd R; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2011-12-01

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer to human beings. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile in chickens and retail poultry meat in Texas. Seven C. difficile isolates were detected in fecal samples of 300 (2.3%) broiler chickens. Three cultivation procedures were evaluated for isolation of C. difficile from poultry meat and detected 1/32 (3.1%), 2/32 (6.2%), and 4/32 (12.5%) for the three procedures, respectively. Chicken and poultry meat isolates were characterized as toxinotype V and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis gel type-NAP7 or NAP7-variant. Susceptibilities to 11 antimicrobial agents in the current study suggested somewhat reduced resistance than reported for other meat or animal toxinotype V isolates.

  17. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  18. Fecal microbiota transplantation in children with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Pierog, Anne; Mencin, Ali; Reilly, Norelle Rizkalla

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium difficile eradication using fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been successful in adults but little information is available in pediatrics. We report 6 pediatric patients with refractory C. difficile cured by FMT with no recurrences to date. Our results demonstrate that FMT can be an effective treatment for refractory C. difficile infection in pediatrics. Long-term safety and efficacy need to be studied.

  19. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  20. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses.

  1. Clostridium difficile spore biology: sporulation, germination, and spore structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Shen, Aimee; Sorg, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming obligate anaerobe and a major nosocomial pathogen of world-wide concern. Due to its strict anaerobic requirements, the infectious and transmissible morphotype is the dormant spore. In susceptible patients, C. difficile spores germinate in the colon to form the vegetative cells that initiate Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). During CDI, C. difficile induces a sporulation pathway that produces more spores; these spores are responsible for the persistence of C. difficile in patients and horizontal transmission between hospitalized patients. While important to the C. difficile lifecycle, the C. difficile spore proteome is poorly conserved when compared to members of the Bacillus genus. Further, recent studies have revealed significant differences between C. difficile and B. subtilis at the level of sporulation, germination and spore coat and exosporium morphogenesis. In this review, the regulation of the sporulation and germination pathways and the morphogenesis of the spore coat and exosporium will be discussed. PMID:24814671

  2. [Selected aspects of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Mehlich, Agnieszka; Górska, Sabina; Gamian, Andrzej; Myc, Andrzej

    2015-05-05

    Clostridium difficile pathogen is a cause of the most frequent nosocomial infection, which is antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Antibiotic treatment causes disruption of the microbiome balance, which makes the gut a friendly environment for the pathogen. It leads to pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon and even death. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is particularly dangerous to elderly patients, leading to the highest mortality rate. C. difficile is equipped with many virulence factors such as toxin A and B, binary toxin CDT, flagellum, S-layer proteins, Cwp66 and GroEL proteins, protease Cwp84, fibronectin-binding protein and the ability to form biofilm and spores. Problems with anti-CDI therapy prompt researchers and clinicians to seek alternative ways of therapy. Identification of immunological epitopes in outer layer proteins and the use of them as antigens for anti-CDI vaccines would be a rational approach to prevent the disease, but unfortunately such vaccines are not available yet. In this article we review the course of the disease, virulence and risk factors. We summarize briefly epidemiological data and the latest achievements in CDI treatment.

  3. Clostridium difficile: An Emerging Pathogen in Children

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Natalia; Crews, Jonathan; DuPont, Herbert L.; Koo, Hoonmo L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is emerging as an important enteric pathogen in children. Historically considered as an asymptomatic colonizer of the gastrointestinal tract, C. difficile infection (CDI) has not been well-studied in pediatric populations. While asymptomatic carriage remains high among infants, recent epidemiological surveillance has demonstrated a rise in the prevalence of CDI in both healthcare and community settings, particularly in children 1-5 years of age. The pathogenesis of pediatric CDI, including the factors underlying the absence of toxin-mediated effects among colonized infants, remains ill-defined. Studies suggest that traditional adult CDI risk factors such as antibiotic and healthcare exposure may not be as important for children who acquire CDI in the community. As recognition of the significant impact of CDI in children increases, the pressing need for deepening our understanding of this disease and identifying optimal therapeutic and preventative strategies is becoming apparent. PMID:22935207

  4. Therapeutic approaches for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jane W; Curry, Scott R

    2013-10-02

    Metronidazole and vancomycin remain the front-line therapies for most Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). However, recurrent CDI occurs in ∼ 25% of patients, causing significant morbidity and mortality and healthcare costs. For this population, traditional antibiotic therapies fail and new treatment options are greatly needed. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved fidaxomicin for CDI treatment. This narrow-spectrum antibiotic preserves the normal gut microbiota and shows promise as a treatment for severe and recurrent CDI. Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines directed against toxin are currently in clinical trials and represent alternative, non-antibiotic therapies. Less traditional therapeutic interventions include bacteriotherapy with non-toxigenic C. difficile and fecal transplant. This commentary will provide an overview of current and forthcoming CDI therapies.

  5. Investigational new treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2015-05-01

    Significant progress has been made by industry and academia in the past two years to address the medical threats posed by Clostridium difficile infection. These developments provide an excellent example of how patient need has driven a surge of innovation in drug discovery. Indeed, only two drugs were approved for the infection in the past 30 years but there are 13 treatment candidates in clinical trials today. What makes the latter number even more remarkable is the diversity in the strategies represented (antibiotics, microbiota supplements, vaccines, antibiotic quenchers and passive immunization). In this review, we provide a snapshot of the current stage of these breakthroughs and argue that there is still room for further innovation in treating C. difficile infection.

  6. [Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Mena-Ribas, Ana; Niubó-Bosh, Jordi; Marín-Arriaza, Mercedes

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in developed countries, and is one of the main aetiologic agents of community diarrhea. The eruption of the hypervirulent strain BI/NAP1/027 has given rise to an increase in the morbidity and mortality of C.difficile infection (CDI). This document aims to review the main clinical pictures of CDI and the laboratory diagnosis, including sampling, transport and storage of specimens, specimen processing, diagnostic procedures, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and molecular characterisation of the isolates. The main purpose of the article is to develop a practical document that provides answers to the main questions that arise in the laboratory diagnosis of CDI.

  7. The Enterotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingmin; Savidge, Tor; Feng, Hanping

    2010-01-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are two large exotoxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). However, our understanding of the specific roles of these toxins in CDI is still evolving. It is now accepted that both toxins are enterotoxic and proinflammatory in the human intestine. Both purified TcdA and TcdB are capable of inducing the pathophysiology of CDI, although most studies have focused on TcdA. C. difficile toxins exert a wide array of biological activities by acting directly on intestinal epithelial cells. Alternatively, the toxins may target immune cells and neurons once the intestinal epithelial barrier is disrupted. The toxins may also act indirectly by stimulating cells to produce chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, neuropeptides and other neuroimmune signals. This review considers the mechanisms of TcdA- and TcdB-induced enterotoxicity, and recent developments in this field. PMID:22069662

  8. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Beyond Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Millan, Braden; Laffin, Michael; Madsen, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been established as standard of care in the treatment of antibiotic refractory Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI). This review examines the current evidence that exists to support the use of FMT in the treatment of human disease beyond C. difficile infection. Beneficial effects of FMT have been described in case series or small prospective trials on a wide spectrum of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic encephalopathy, and neuropsychiatric conditions, and in limiting antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Each of these proposed indications for FMT is associated with an underlying dysbiosis of the gastrointestinal microbiota and generally a clinical response is linked with a restoration of the gut microbiota. The potential of fecal microbial transplantation to alter disease course shows promise but further large-scale studies are necessary to understand limitations as well as how best to utilize this therapy.

  9. The enterotoxicity of Clostridium difficile toxins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingmin; Savidge, Tor; Feng, Hanping

    2010-07-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are two large exotoxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). However, our understanding of the specific roles of these toxins in CDI is still evolving. It is now accepted that both toxins are enterotoxic and proinflammatory in the human intestine. Both purified TcdA and TcdB are capable of inducing the pathophysiology of CDI, although most studies have focused on TcdA. C. difficile toxins exert a wide array of biological activities by acting directly on intestinal epithelial cells. Alternatively, the toxins may target immune cells and neurons once the intestinal epithelial barrier is disrupted. The toxins may also act indirectly by stimulating cells to produce chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, neuropeptides and other neuroimmune signals. This review considers the mechanisms of TcdA- and TcdB-induced enterotoxicity, and recent developments in this field.

  10. Antibodies for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been demonstrated to be effective in the research and clinical environments. Early uncertainties about molecular and treatment modalities now appear to have converged upon the systemic dosing of mixtures of human IgG1. Although multiple examples of high-potency monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) exist, significant difficulties were initially encountered in their discovery. This minireview describes historical and contemporary MAbs and highlights differences between the most potent MAbs, which may offer insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of CDI. PMID:24789799

  11. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    The detection and diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric populations have some unique considerations in comparison to testing in adults. The testing methodologies, including toxigenic culture, cell cytotoxicity, antigen detection, and, more recently, molecular testing, are the same in all age groups. However, limited data exist on the specific performance characteristics in children. In this review, we focus on the challenges of testing in pediatric populations and assess the available data on test performance in these populations. Additionally, a review of the existing guidance for testing is provided. PMID:26912759

  12. Clostridium difficile infection and fecal bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Indya; Shropshire, Kasheena; Ruel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, also called "C. diff," is a gram-positive bacillus associated with nosocomial infections involving diarrhea, most often seen in developing countries. The severity of C. diff-associated diarrhea varies tremendously from mild and self-limiting to fulminant and life-threatening. C. diff has become an extremely important pathogen in community health but can be minimized with attention to proper hygiene. This article presents a case study regarding the treatment and management options of C. diff infection using a recent update of clinical guidelines for patient management.

  13. Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Cade M.; Goudie, Anthony; Garza, Jose M.; Fairbrother, Gerry; Cohen, Mitchell B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the trend, impact, severity and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infections in hospitalized children in the United States. Design A retrospective cohort study utilizing the triennial Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database years: 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006. Setting Hospitalized children in the United States. Participants 10,495,728 nationally weighted hospital discharges and 21,274 with Clostridium difficile infection. Main Exposure Discharge diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection. Outcome measures Trend in cases; impact and severity was measured by length of stay, hospital charges, colectomy rate and death rate. Results There was an increasing trend in cases of Clostridium difficile infection from 3,565 in 1997 to 7,779 in 2006 (p<.001). Clostridium difficile infections had an increased risk of death with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval); 1.20 (1.01–1.43), colectomy; 1.36 (1.04–1.79), longer length of stay; 4.34 (3.97–4.83) and higher charges; 2.12 (1.98–2.26). There was no trend in death, colectomy, length of stay, or charges over the four time periods. The risk of comorbid diagnoses associated with Clostridium difficile infection included inflammatory bowel disease, with an odds ratio of 11.42 (10.16–12.83), and other comorbid diagnoses associated with immunosuppression, or antibiotic administration. Conclusions There is an increasing trend and a significant impact of Clostridium difficile infections on hospitalized children. In contrast to adults, there is no increasing trend in the severity of Clostridium difficile infections in children. Children with medical conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, immunosuppression, or conditions requiring antibiotic administration are at high risk of Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:21199971

  14. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and colitis.

    PubMed

    Gerding, D N; Johnson, S; Peterson, L R; Mulligan, M E; Silva, J

    1995-08-01

    To review and summarize the status of diagnosis, epidemiology, infection control, and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD). A case definition of CDAD should include the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and at least one of the following positive tests: endoscopy revealing pseudomembranes, stool cytotoxicity test for toxin B, stool enzyme immunoassay for toxin A or B, or stool culture for C difficile (preferably with confirmation of organism toxicity if a direct stool toxin test is negative or not done). Testing of asymptomatic patients, including those who are asymptomatic after treatment, is not recommended other than for epidemiologic purposes. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is the only diagnostic test for pseudomembranous colitis, but it is expensive, invasive, and insensitive (51% to 55%) for the diagnosis of CDAD. Stool culture is the most sensitive laboratory test currently in clinical use, but it is not as specific as the cell cytotoxicity assay. C difficile is the most frequently identified cause of nosocomial diarrhea. The majority of C difficile infections are acquired nosocomially, and most patients remain asymptomatic following acquisition. Antimicrobial exposure is the greatest risk factor for patients, especially clindamycin, cephalosporins, and penicillins, although virtually every antimicrobial has been implicated. Cases of CDAD unassociated with prior antimicrobial or antineoplastic use are very rare. Hands of personnel, as well as a variety of environmental sites within institutions, have been found to be contaminated with C difficile, which can persist as spores for many months. Contaminated commodes, bathing tubs, and electronic thermometers have been implicated as sources of C difficile. Symptomatic and asymptomatic infected patients are the major reservoirs and sources for environmental contamination. Both genotypic and phenotypic typing systems for C difficile are available and have enhanced epidemiologic

  15. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-04

    AD-A242 265 AD GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL/FINAL REPORT DTIC LYCJRGUS L. MULDROW F EIECTE JOE JOHNSON ’ N OVI...62770A 62770A871 AA DA314471 (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lycurgus L. Muldrow and Joe... Clostridium difficile Vaccine 06 o2 Recombinant DNA 06 o3 RA 1 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere if n.ece•x••y and itd•entify by 0o/ r ou er).. .... Recombinant

  16. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26–25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association. PMID:27651790

  17. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Delmée, M

    2001-08-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is based on culture and toxin detection in fecal specimens. Culture is performed on a commercially available selective media. C. difficile colony morphology is typical when viewed under a dissecting microscope. Definitive identification is best obtained by gas liquid chromatography. Culture is very sensitive but, when used alone without toxin testing, it leads to low specificity and misdiagnosis of CDAD when high rates of asymptomatic carriage exist. Toxin detection by a tissue culture cytotoxin assay followed by neutralisation with specific antiserum is often considered the standard. However, this approach lacks sensitivity and has not detected up to 30% of patients with confirmed CDAD. Multiple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been introduced by various manufacturers for the detection of toxin A alone or for both toxins A and B. Some of these are designed to give results in less than 1 h. Comparative studies of EIA kits reported that the sensitivity and specificity are slightly lower than cytotoxin assays. Toxigenic culture tests C. difficile isolates for toxin production: colonies isolated on selective media are tested for in-vitro toxin production either by a cytotoxicity assay or by direct EIA. It has higher sensitivity than the cytotoxicity assay and equivalent specificity. In the routine laboratory, culture and toxin detection should be performed on every specimen and, in culture-positive and fecal toxin-negative cases, toxigenic cultures should be performed on isolated colonies.

  19. Current Status of Clostridium difficile Infection Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Fernanda C.; Gould, Carolyn V.; McDonald, L. Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare settings. In addition, populations previously thought to be at low risk are now being identified as having severe CDI. Recent genetic analysis suggests that C. difficile has a highly fluid genome with multiple mechanisms to modify its content and functionality, which can make C. difficile adaptable to environmental changes and potentially lead to the emergence of more virulent strains. In the face of these changes in the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI, surveillance systems are necessary to monitor trends and inform public health actions. PMID:22752867

  20. [Experience with laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Bareková, L; Zálabská, E; Hanovcová, I

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is currently a significant cause of nosocomial diarrhea. For several years, the number of infectious cases in the community has also been increasing. Since the beginning of 2010, quite a large increase in the number of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) has been noted in Pardubice Regional Hospital (PRH). The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate the methods used in the laboratory diagnosis of CDIs in PRH, and to describe the laboratory diagnostic algorithm used here. Samples of stools were taken from symptomatic patients hospitalized or examined in the outpatient departments of PRH from 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2012. For the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B, the dual test based upon the principle enzyme immunoassays C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Techlabo (D-EIA) was used. The system GeneXpert PCR Cepheid (PCR) was used for confirmation of laboratory findings. Since the beginning of 2011, all the GDH-positive samples were cultured. A total of 2,040 samples were examined. The D-EIA test was used for examination of 2,014 samples. Of those, 1,373 (68.2 %) samples were GDH- and toxin A/B-negative. In 359 (17.8 %) samples, both GDH and toxin A/B were detected. The D-EIA sensitivity and specificity for detecting toxigenic strains in stool samples were 21.8% and 97.2%, respectively. The PPV and NPV rates calculated for the populations with prevalence rates of disorders of 5%, 10%, 20% and 50 % were 0.29, 0.46, 0.66, 0.88 and 0.96, 0.92, 0.83, 0.55, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of GDH for the detection of Clostridium difficile in stools were 100.0% and 96.2%, respectively. PCR examination was carried out in 140 samples. Of those, 82 samples were PCR-positive. The gene for the production of toxin B was detected in 47%, the finding suspected for ribotype 027 (gene for toxin B, binary toxin and deletion of tcdC) in 48%. In 5% of the samples, the gene for toxin B and the gene for the binary

  1. Clostridium difficile infection: Evolution, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Briony; Androga, Grace O; Knight, Daniel R; Riley, Thomas V

    2017-04-01

    Over the recent decades, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a global public health threat. Despite growing attention, C. difficile remains a poorly understood pathogen, however, the exquisite sensitivity offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has enabled analysis of the genome of C. difficile, giving us access to massive genomic data on factors such as virulence, evolution, and genetic relatedness within C. difficile groups. NGS has also demonstrated excellence in investigations of outbreaks and disease transmission, in both small and large-scale applications. This review summarizes the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and phylogeny of C. difficile, one of the most important pathogens worldwide in the current antibiotic resistance era.

  2. [Individualized treatment strategies for Clostridium difficile infections].

    PubMed

    Solbach, P; Dersch, P; Bachmann, O

    2017-07-01

    Upon hospitalization, up to 15.5% of patients are already colonized with a toxigenic Clostridium difficile strain (TCD). The rate of asymptomatic colonization is 0-3% in healthy adults and up to 20-40% in hospitalized patients. The incidence and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased during recent years. Mortality lies between 3 and 14%. CDI is generally caused by intestinal dysbiosis, which can be triggered by various factors, including antibiotics or immune suppressants. If CDI occurs, ongoing antibiotic therapy should be discontinued. The choice of treatment is guided by the clinical situation: Mild courses of CDI should be treated with metronidazole. Oral vancomycin is suitable as a first-line therapy of mild CDI occurring during pregnancy and lactation, as well as in cases of intolerance or allergy to metronidazole. Severe courses should be treated with vancomycin. Recurrence should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. Multiple recurrences should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin; if necessary, a vancomycin taper regimen may also be used. An alternative is fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), with healing rates of more than 80%. Bezlotoxumab is the first available monoclonal antibody which neutralizes the C. difficile toxin B, and in combination with an antibiotic significantly reduces the rate of a new C. difficile infection compared to placebo. A better definition of clinical and microbiota-associated risk factors and the ongoing implementation of molecular diagnostics are likely to lead to optimized identification of patients at risk, and an increasing individualization of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches.

  3. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  4. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  5. The effect of probiotics on Clostridium difficile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pochapin, M

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomially acquired intestinal infection in the United States, affecting virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis and up to 20% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Even after receiving antibiotic treatment with either metronidazole or vancomycin, 20% of patients will have recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea. An innovative approach to the problem involves the introduction of competing, nonpathogenic (probiotic) organisms into the intestinal tract to restore microbial balance. The theoretical premise behind this approach is that the protective intestinal microflora is damaged by antibiotic treatment; the initial antibiotic exposure thus leaves the host susceptible to colonization and subsequent infection by Clostridium difficile. A so-called "second-hit" to the intestinal microflora occurs when the infected host is treated with flagyl or vancomycin, further destroying susceptible bacterial flora. Probiotic agents, such as Lactobacillus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii, have been studied for the treatment of Clostridium difficile. We are currently running a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG in combination with standard antibiotics for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Although it is too early to draw statistically significant conclusions, two patterns seem to be emerging: Lactobacillus GG is effective in reducing the 3-wk recurrence rate of Clostridium difficile, and patients feel better when taking Lactobacillus GG, as compared with the placebo, with early disappearance of abdominal cramps and diarrhea. In conclusion, the use of probiotics for the treatment of primary and recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea looks promising. Patients seem to have less recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea and early symptomatic improvement when using the probiotic Lactobacillus GG.

  6. Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barker, H C; Haworth, C S; Williams, D; Roberts, P; Bilton, D

    2008-09-01

    We report three cases of Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) in whom the presenting symptoms were atypical. All three required treatment with systemic steroids, in addition to oral vancomycin and metronidazole to achieve resolution of the colitis. This experience suggests that C. difficile colitis should be considered in individuals with CF presenting with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  7. Clostridium difficile in Ready-to-Eat Salads, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Marwah M.; Brown, Derek J.; Butcher, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Of 40 ready-to-eat salads, 3 (7.5%) were positive for Clostridium difficile by PCR. Two isolates were PCR ribotype 017 (toxin A–, B+), and 1 was PCR ribotype 001. Isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole but variably resistant to other antimicrobial drugs. Ready-to-eat salads may be potential sources for virulent C. difficile. PMID:19402979

  8. Clostridium difficile in ready-to-eat salads, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Marwah M; Brown, Derek J; Butcher, John P; Sutherland, Alistair D

    2009-05-01

    Of 40 ready-to-eat salads, 3 (7.5%) were positive for Clostridium difficile by PCR. Two isolates were PCR ribotype 017 (toxin A-, B+), and 1 was PCR ribotype 001. Isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole but variably resistant to other antimicrobial drugs. Ready-to-eat salads may be potential sources for virulent C. difficile.

  9. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in a hepatology ward.

    PubMed

    Vanjak, Dominique; Girault, Guillaume; Branger, Catherine; Rufat, Pierre; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Fantin, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    During 2001, Clostridium difficile infection was observed in 23 patients hospitalized in a hepatology ward (attack rate, 0.9%). Since strain typing ruled out a clonal dissemination, we performed a case-control study. In addition to antibiotic use as a risk factor, the C. difficile infection rate was higher among patients with autoimmune hepatitis (P<.01).

  10. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  11. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  12. The Risks of Incident and Recurrent Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea in Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Phatharacharukul, Parkpoom; Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Edmonds, Peter J; Mahaparn, Pailin; Bruminhent, Jackrapong

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the risks of incident and recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis. A literature search was performed from inception to February 2015. Studies that reported relative risks, odds ratios, or hazard ratios comparing the risks of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD or ESRD versus those without CKD or ESRD were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Twenty studies (nine case-control, seven cohort, and four cross-sectional studies with 162,218,041 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RRs of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD and ESRD were 1.95 (95% CI 1.81-2.10) and 2.63 (95% CI 2.04-3.38), respectively. When meta-analysis was limited only to cohort and case-control studies with confounder-adjusted analysis, the pooled RRs of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD and ESRD were 1.89 (95% CI 1.75-2.05) and 2.50 (95% CI 1.49-4.17), respectively. The pooled RR of recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD was 2.61 (95% CI 1.53-4.44). Data on the risk of recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea were limited. This meta-analysis demonstrates significantly increased risks of incident and recurrent C. difficile-associated diarrhea in patients with CKD. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in ESRD patients is even higher.

  13. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    PubMed

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Nonantimicrobial drug targets for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; Deaton, Magdalena; DuPont, Herbert L

    2017-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major public health problem worldwide. Treatment has become complicated due to the emergence of strains with increased toxigenicity and sporulation rate, together with rampant antibiotics use that disrupts colonization resistance of the colonic microbiota. As a result, there is a critical need for nonantibiotic treatments. Therapies based on inhibiting the toxins, bacterial structures responsible for colonization, virulence and restoration of the gut microbiota are the most important nonantibiotic targets to combat CDI. This report outlines these targets and how they could become the focus of future therapeutic agents. Inhibiting colonization and virulence factors during CDI will disrupt pathogen persistence and decrease exposure to the inflammatory toxins, allowing the immune system to clear the infection.

  16. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease. PMID:22826646

  17. The role of flagella in Clostridium difficile pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Emma; Minton, Nigel P; Kuehne, Sarah A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is widely publicised as a problem in the health-care system. Disruption of the normal gut microbiota by antibiotic therapy allows C. difficile to colonise the colon. On colonisation, C. difficile produces two toxins that lead to disease, with symptoms ranging from mild-to-severe diarrhoea, to fulminant and often fatal pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). How C. difficile establishes initial colonisation of the host is an area of active investigation. Recently there has been increased research into the role of C. difficile flagella in colonisation and adherence. Novel research has also elucidated a more complex role of flagella in C. difficile virulence pertaining to the regulation of toxin gene expression. This review focuses on new insights into the specific role of C. difficile flagella in colonisation and toxin gene expression.

  18. The Design of a Clostridium difficile Carbohydrate-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile vaccines composed of surface polysaccharides (PSs) have the potential to simultaneously control infection and colonization levels in humans. Hot water-phenol treatment of C. difficile biomass can extricate water-soluble PS-I and PS-II; and water- and phenol-soluble PS-III. C. difficile vaccines based on PS-II have attracted the most attention due its facile purification and ubiquitous expression by C. difficile ribotypes. Anti PS-II antibodies recognize both C. difficile vegetative cell and sporulating preparations and confer protection against C. difficile infection in a mouse model. The design of such an efficacious C. difficile PS-II conjugate vaccine is described here.

  19. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joakim M; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-09-19

    Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Herbert L

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing in frequency and severity in and out of the hospital, with a high probability of recurrence after treatment. The recent literature on CDI was reviewed using PubMed to include recent publications dealing with diagnosis and therapy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and useful diagnostic test for CDI but there are growing concerns of false-positive test results if the rate of CDI is low in the patient population providing samples and/or if the population being studied commonly includes people with C difficile colonization. Recommended therapy of CDI includes oral metronidazole for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases, each given for 10 days. Colectomy is being performed more frequently in patients with fulminant CDI. For treatment of first recurrences the drug used in the first bout can be used again and for second recurrences longer courses of vancomycin often are given in a tapered dose or intermittently to allow gut flora reconstitution, or other treatments including fidaxomicin may be used. Bacteriotherapy with fecal transplantation is playing an increasing role in therapy of recurrent cases. Metagenomic studies of patients with CDI during successful therapy are needed to determine how best to protect the flora from assaults from antibacterial drugs and to develop optimal therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis offer opportunities to prevent CDI, to speed up recovery from CDI, and to eliminate recurrent infection. Humanized monoclonal antitoxin antibodies and active immunization with vaccines against C difficile or its toxins are both in development and appear to be of potential value.

  1. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  2. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin a Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-16

    D’iC FILE COPY • AD I’- GENETIC ENGINEERING OF 0 CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL REPORT Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson August 16, 1990...62770A 1 62770A871 I AA f 348 11. TITLE (kicAld Sowufy 0aiaflcanon) (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL...FIELD GROUP ISU3.GROUP- Clastridlum difficile Vaccine __ 02IRU Recomb in nta ~ 06 1 03 -9 4W .RA-W--I It ABSTRACT (Contin. on ’erser if neconay and

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in an Iranian hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality internationally, yet there are important regional differences in the epidemiology and microbiology of disease. Most reports have come from North America and Europe, with limited information from other regions, including the Middle East. Given the changes in the epidemiology of CDI in developed countries, particularly associated with the dissemination of hypervirulent epidemic clones, an understanding of the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI in diverse regions is warranted. This study involved collection of stool samples from individuals with diarrhea at the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between October 2010 and March 2011. Selective enrichment culture for C. difficile was performed and isolates were characterised using ribotyping, PCR for the detection of tcdA, tcdB and cdtB genes, and tcdC sequence analysis. Findings Clostridium difficile was isolated from 19/89 (21%) stool samples of 17/86 (20%) patients. 13/17 (77%) cases of CDI were hospital-associated. Patients with CDI were significantly older (43 ± 28y) than those with non-CDI diarrhea (24, ± 26y)(P = 0.018). All isolates were toxigenic, and possessed genes encoding for toxins A and B. Six (32%) of 19 isolates also possessed cdtB. Twelve ribotypes were identified. Ribotype 078/toxinotype V was most common, accounting for 4 (21%) of isolates. A single isolate of a different toxinotype V ribotype was identified, as was a toxinotype XXIV isolate. The remaining isolates consisted of 9 different toxinotype 0 ribotypes. Conclusions CDI is an important cause of diarrhea in patients in this hospital. The diversity of ribotypes was striking, and the number of different types suggests the presence of a broad range of strains in the community, the hospital or both. The predominance of toxinotype V strains, which have been associated with community-associated disease and food

  4. The Antimicrobial Stewardship Approach to Combating Clostridium Difficile

    PubMed Central

    Wenzler, Eric; Mulugeta, Surafel G.; Danziger, Larry H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile remains a major public health threat and continues to contribute to excess morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have demonstrated success in combating C. difficile, primarily through antibiotic restrictive strategies. As the incidence and prevalence of C. difficile associate disease continues to increase both in the hospital and community setting, additional stewardship approaches are needed. This manuscript reviews stewardship interventions that have been successful against C. difficile associated disease and proposes future tactics that antimicrobial stewardship programs may employ to develop a more global approach to combat this difficult pathogen. PMID:27025621

  5. Clostridium difficile spore-macrophage interactions: spore survival.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Cofre-Araneda, Glenda; Brito-Silva, Christian; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s) to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host's innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells' ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells.

  6. Clostridium difficile Spore-Macrophage Interactions: Spore Survival

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Cofre-Araneda, Glenda; Brito-Silva, Christian; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s) to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host’s innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells’ ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells. PMID:22952726

  7. Clostridium difficile Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Goudarzi, Hossein; Mehdizadeh Aghdam, Elnaz; Nazeri, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rate of Clostridium difficile infection have increased remarkably in both hospital and community settings during the last two decades. The growth of infection may be caused by multiple factors including inappropriate antibiotic usage, poor standards of environmental cleanliness, changes in infection control practices, large outbreaks of C. difficile infection in hospitals, alteration of circulating strains of C. difficile, and spread of hypervirulent strains. Detection of high-risk populations could be helpful for prompt diagnosis and consequent treatment of patients suffering from C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are recommended antibiotics for the treatment of initial infection. Current treatments for C. difficile infection consist of supportive care, discontinuing the unnecessary antibiotic, and specific antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, novel approaches include fidaxomicin therapy, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation mediated therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown relevant efficacy to overcome C. difficile infection and reduce its recurrence. PMID:24991448

  8. Clostridium difficile infection: molecular pathogenesis and novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rineh, Ardeshir; Kelso, Michael J; Vatansever, Fatma; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile produces toxins A and B, which can cause a spectrum of diseases from pseudomembranous colitis to C. difficile-associated diarrhea. A limited number of C. difficile strains also produce a binary toxin that exhibits ADP ribosyltransferase activity. Here, the structure and the mechanism of action of these toxins as well as their role in disease are reviewed. Nosocomial C. difficile infection is often contracted in hospital when patients treated with antibiotics suffer a disturbance in normal gut microflora. C. difficile spores can persist on dry, inanimate surface for months. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are clinically used for treatment of C. difficile infection but clinical failure and concern about promotion of resistance are motivating the search for novel non-antibiotic therapeutics. Methods for controlling both toxins and spores, replacing gut microflora by probiotics or fecal transplant, and killing bacteria in the anaerobic gut by photodynamic therapy are discussed. PMID:24410618

  9. Dipping into the Clostridium difficile pool: Are alcohol-based dispensers fomites for C difficile?

    PubMed

    Hall, James A; Keul, Ryan R; Shanks, Justin D; Fader, Robert; Herrington, Jon D

    2017-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate alcohol-based dispensers as potential fomites for Clostridium difficile. A convenience sample of 120 alcohol-based dispensers was evaluated for the presence of C difficile either by culture or polymerase chain reaction for C difficile toxin. The results demonstrated that C difficile was not cultured, and C difficile toxin was not detected using polymerase chain reaction; however, gram-positive rods, Clostridium perfringens, Pantoea agglomerans, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Peptostreptococcus, Bacillus spp, and microaerophilic Streptococcus were present within the overflow basins of the alcohol-based dispensers. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection and characterization of Clostridium difficile in retail chicken.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S; Reid-Smith, R J; Avery, B P; Rousseau, J

    2010-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile contamination of retail chicken. Chicken legs, thighs and wings were purchased using a standardized method from retail outlets across Ontario, Canada. Selective culture was used for qualitative and quantitative detection of C. difficile. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 26/203 (12.8%) chicken samples; 10/111 (9.0%) thighs, 13/72 (18%) wings and 3/20 (15%) legs (P = 0.19). All isolates were ribotype 078, a strain that has been associated with food animals and potentially community-associated disease in humans. All positive samples were positive only on enrichment culture. Clostridium difficile could be found relatively commonly in retail chicken meat, albeit at low levels. This is the first study to report C. difficile in chicken meat. Contamination of meat with C. difficile strains implicated in human infections raises concerns about food as a source of C. difficile infection. The relevance of food contamination is completely unclear at this point but food should be investigated as a source of infection.

  11. Antimicrobial stewardship and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Piacenti, Frank J; Leuthner, Kimberly D

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to health care institutions to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics not only to decrease antimicrobial resistance but to prevent the spread and infection of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is increasing rapidly in the United States and is now considered a major public health problem that poses an immediate threat to the health of patients prescribed antibiotics, more so than antimicrobial resistance. Clostridium difficile-associated disease is the result of collateral damage to the normal bacterial flora of the human body, which is an inevitable consequence of any antibiotic use. Antimicrobial stewardship programs such as audit with feedback and antibiotic restriction are designed to help limit Clostridium difficile infections and other hospital-associated organisms by optimizing antimicrobial selection, dosing, de-escalation, and duration of therapy. These programs also incorporate implementation of hospital-wide guidelines, staff education, enforcement of infection-control policies, and the use of electronic medical records when possible to help control antibiotic use. This article reviews the literature on how antimicrobial stewardship programs impact Clostridium difficile rates and discusses experiences in designing, implementing, monitoring, and follow-through of such programs.

  12. Clostridium Difficile, Colitis, and Colonoscopy: Pediatric Perspective.

    PubMed

    McConnie, Randolph; Kastl, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    Review tests available for detection of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) induced disease, including when such tests should be done in children and how they should be interpreted. Multiple tests are available for detecting disease due to C. diff. These include colonoscopy and stool analysis. Colonoscopy with biopsy is the most sensitive test for detecting the presence of colitis. The toxins produced by the C. diff. (toxin A, toxin B, and binary toxin) are the agents that cause injury and disease. Only toxin producing C. diff. Strains will cause disease. Binary toxin by itself is not thought to produce disease. Binary toxin causes disease in humans when present with toxin A and B producing bacteria, and has been implicated with fulminant life threatening disease. Stool analyses vary in sensitivity and specificity depending on the assay used. The presence of toxin producing strains of C diff. in the stool does not equate with disease. The presence of a toxin-producing bacteria or toxins (A or B) only equates with disease if diarrhea or a diseased colon (toxic megacolon, ileus, and sepsis) is present. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), when used in the stool from patients with diarrhea, appears to be the most efficient study to detect the gene that encodes for toxin A and B and thus to diagnose C. diff.-induced disease. Infants have a high carriage rate of C. diff. and are believed not to develop disease from it or its toxins. Infants should not be tested for C. difficile. The NAAT is most specific when done on patients with diarrhea with liquid stools. Testing for C. difficile should only be done on patients with diarrhea. One can assume that a patient who has no diarrhea and is not ill does not have C. diff.-induced disease. Treatment should be limited to patients with diarrhea who test positive for C. diff. toxin (A or B) or toxin-producing bacteria. Direct testing for binary toxin is not commercially available. Binary toxin is only thought to cause disease

  13. Clostridium difficile spore biology: sporulation, germination, and spore structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Shen, Aimee; Sorg, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming obligate anaerobe and a major nosocomial pathogen of worldwide concern. Owing to its strict anaerobic requirements, the infectious and transmissible morphotype is the dormant spore. In susceptible patients, C. difficile spores germinate in the colon to form the vegetative cells that initiate Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). During CDI, C. difficile induces a sporulation pathway that produces more spores; these spores are responsible for the persistence of C. difficile in patients and horizontal transmission between hospitalized patients. Although important to the C. difficile lifecycle, the C. difficile spore proteome is poorly conserved when compared to members of the Bacillus genus. Further, recent studies have revealed significant differences between C. difficile and Bacillus subtilis at the level of sporulation, germination, and spore coat and exosporium morphogenesis. In this review, the regulation of the sporulation and germination pathways and the morphogenesis of the spore coat and exosporium will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  15. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  16. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  17. Clostridium difficile: its disease and toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, D M; Krivan, H C; Wilkins, T D

    1988-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis, a severe, sometimes fatal disease that occurs in adults undergoing antimicrobial therapy. The disease, ironically, has been most effectively treated with antibiotics, although some of the newer methods of treatment such as the replacement of the bowel flora may prove more beneficial for patients who continue to relapse with pseudomembranous colitis. The organism produces two potent exotoxins designated toxin A and toxin B. Toxin A is an enterotoxin believed to be responsible for the diarrhea and mucosal tissue damage which occur during the disease. Toxin B is an extremely potent cytotoxin, but its role in the disease has not been as well studied. There appears to be a cascade of events which result in the expression of the activity of these toxins, and these events, ranging from the recognition of a trisaccharide receptor by toxin A to the synergistic action of the toxins and their possible dissemination in the body, are discussed in this review. The advantages and disadvantages of the various assays, including tissue culture assay, enzyme immunoassay, and latex agglutination, currently used in the clinical diagnosis of the disease also are discussed. PMID:3144429

  18. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  19. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  20. Clostridium difficile colonization in preoperative colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Luo, Yun; Lv, Yinxiang; Huang, Chen; Sheng, Qinsong; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Julian; Jiang, Weiqin; Liu, Lulu; Song, Xiaojun; Tong, Zhou; Chen, Wenbin; Lin, Jianjiang; Tang, Yi-Wei; Jin, Dazhi; Fang, Weijia

    2017-01-02

    The entire process of Clostridium difficile colonization to infection develops in large intestine. However, the real colonization pattern of C. difficile in preoperative colorectal cancer patients has not been studied. In this study, 33 C. difficile strains (16.1%) were isolated from stool samples of 205 preoperative colorectal cancer patients. C. difficile colonization rates in lymph node metastasis patients (22.3%) were significantly higher than lymph node negative patients (10.8%) (OR=2.314, 95%CI=1.023-5.235, P =0.025). Meanwhile, patients positive for stool occult blood had lower C. difficile colonization rates than negative patients (11.5% vs. 24.0%, OR=0.300, 95%CI=0.131-0.685, P =0.019). A total of 16 sequence types were revealed by multilocus sequence typing. Minimum spanning tree and time-space cluster analysis indicated that all C. difficile isolates were epidemiologically unrelated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole. The results suggested that the prevalence of C. difficile colonization is high in preoperative colorectal cancer patients, and the colonization is not acquired in the hospital. Since lymph node metastasis colorectal cancer patients inevitably require adjuvant chemotherapy and C. difficile infection may halt the ongoing treatment, the call for sustained monitoring of C. difficile in those patients is apparently urgent.

  1. Clostridium difficile disease: Diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment update.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lena M; Edmiston, Charles E

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium difficile infections are the leading cause of health care-associated infectious diarrhea, posing a significant risk for both medical and surgical patients. Because of the significant morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infections, knowledge of the epidemiology of C difficile in combination with a high index of suspicion and susceptible patient populations (including surgical, postcolectomy, and inflammatory bowel disease patients) is warranted. C difficile infections present with a wide spectrum of disease, ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis or small bowel enteritis and recurrent C difficile infections. Early implementation of medical and operative treatment strategies for C difficile infections is imperative for optimal patient outcomes. National and international guidelines recommend early operative consultation and total abdominal colectomy with end ileostomy and preservation of rectum. Diverting loop ileostomy and colonic lavage followed by intravenous metronidazole and intracolonic vancomycin administered via the efferent limb of the ileostomy should be considered as an alternative to total colectomy in selected patients. New and emerging strategies for C difficile infection treatment include monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, probiotics, biotherapeutics, and new antibiotics. A successful C difficile prevention and eradication program requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes early disease recognition, implementation of guidelines for monitoring adherence to environmental control, judicious hand hygiene, evidence-based treatment and management strategies, and a focused antibiotic stewardship program. Surgeons are an important part of the clinical team in the management of C difficile infection prevention and treatment.

  2. Clostridium difficile colonization in preoperative colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yinxiang; Huang, Chen; Sheng, Qinsong; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Julian; Jiang, Weiqin; Liu, Lulu; Song, Xiaojun; Tong, Zhou; Chen, Wenbin; Lin, Jianjiang; Tang, Yi-Wei; Jin, Dazhi; Fang, Weijia

    2017-01-01

    The entire process of Clostridium difficile colonization to infection develops in large intestine. However, the real colonization pattern of C. difficile in preoperative colorectal cancer patients has not been studied. In this study, 33 C. difficile strains (16.1%) were isolated from stool samples of 205 preoperative colorectal cancer patients. C. difficile colonization rates in lymph node metastasis patients (22.3%) were significantly higher than lymph node negative patients (10.8%) (OR=2.314, 95%CI=1.023-5.235, P =0.025). Meanwhile, patients positive for stool occult blood had lower C. difficile colonization rates than negative patients (11.5% vs. 24.0%, OR=0.300, 95%CI=0.131-0.685, P =0.019). A total of 16 sequence types were revealed by multilocus sequence typing. Minimum spanning tree and time-space cluster analysis indicated that all C. difficile isolates were epidemiologically unrelated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole. The results suggested that the prevalence of C. difficile colonization is high in preoperative colorectal cancer patients, and the colonization is not acquired in the hospital. Since lymph node metastasis colorectal cancer patients inevitably require adjuvant chemotherapy and C. difficile infection may halt the ongoing treatment, the call for sustained monitoring of C. difficile in those patients is apparently urgent. PMID:28060753

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in the twenty-first century

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Chandrabali

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming gram-positive bacillus, and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial diarrhea and colitis in the industrialized world. With the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile (BI/NAP1/027), the epidemiology of C. difficile infection has rapidly changed in the last decade. C. difficile infection, once thought to be an easy to treat bacterial infection, has evolved into an epidemic that is associated with a high rate of mortality, causing disease in patients thought to be low-risk. In this review, we discuss the changing face of C .difficile infection and the novel treatment and prevention strategies needed to halt this ever growing epidemic. PMID:26038491

  4. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Suvash Chandra; Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Singhakaew, Sombat; Ounjai, Puey; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2016-04-01

    Spores are a potent agent for Clostridium difficile transmission. Therefore, factors inhibiting spores have been of continued interest. In the present study, we investigated the influence of microwave irradiation in addition to conductive heating for C. difficile spore inactivation in aqueous suspension. The spores of 15 C. difficile isolates from different host origins were exposed to conductive heating and microwave irradiation. The complete inhibition of spore viability at 10(7) CFU/ml was encountered following microwave treatment at 800 W for 60 s, but was not observed in the conductive-heated spores at the same time-temperature exposure. The distinct patterns of ultrastructural alterations following microwave and conductive heat treatment were observed and the degree of damages by microwave was in the exposure time-dependent manner. Microwave would therefore be a simple and time-efficient tool to inactivate C. difficile spores, thus reducing the risk of C. difficile transmission.

  5. Clostridium difficile spores: a major threat to the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Barra-Carrasco, Jonathan; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore former and is an important nosocomial and community-acquired pathogenic bacterium. C. difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of infections worldwide with elevated rates of morbidity. Despite the fact that two major virulence factors, the enterotoxin TcdA and the cytotoxin TcdB, are essential in the development of CDI, C. difficile spores are the main vehicle of infection, and persistence and transmission of CDI and are thought to play an essential role in episodes of CDI recurrence and horizontal transmission. Recent research has unmasked several properties of C. difficile's unique strategy to form highly transmissible spores and to persist in the colonic environment. Therefore, the aim of this article is to summarize recent advances in the biological properties of C. difficile spores, which might be clinically relevant to improve the management of CDI in hospital environments.

  6. Immunization using GroEL decreases Clostridium difficile intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Péchiné, Séverine; Hennequin, Claire; Boursier, Céline; Hoys, Sandra; Collignon, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen which is responsible for diarrhea and colitis, particularly after treatment with antibiotics. Clinical signs are mainly due to two toxins, TcdA and TcdB. However, the first step of pathogenesis is the colonization process. We evaluated C. difficile surface proteins as vaccine antigens in the hamster model to prevent intestinal colonization. This vaccination induced a partial protection of hamsters against death after a C. difficile challenge. A proteomic analysis of animal sera allowed us to identify proteins which could be responsible for the protection observed. Among these proteins, we identified the GroEL heat shock protein. To confirm the role of the specific GroEL antibodies in the delayed C. difficile colonization of hamsters, we performed an immunization assay in a mouse model. After intranasal immunization with the recombinant protein GroEL, we observed a lower C. difficile intestinal colonization in the immunized group as compared to the control group.

  7. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review.

  8. Clostridium difficile-associated reactive arthritis in two children.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Helga A; Pron, Benedicte; Mouy, Richard; Wulffraat, Nico M; Prieur, Anne-Marie

    2004-01-01

    In adults, reactive arthritis (ReA) following Clostridium difficile-enterocolitis has been documented. In children, only one case of C. difficile-associated ReA has been reported. We now describe two other cases of ReA associated with C. difficile in children. The characteristics of ReA due to C. difficile appear to be similar in adults and children. Both children show polyarthritis after an episode of diarrhoea with positive stool cultures for C. difficile. Arthritis is asymmetrical with a self-limiting course. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy is sufficient. One case is remarkable because of its prolonged course of ReA despite NSAID therapy, and its association with the presence of HLA-B27 antigen.

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation and emerging treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gens, Krista D; Elshaboury, Ramy H; Holt, Jessica S

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increased incidence and recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection, health care providers are seeking new and alternative treatments to the standard antibiotic therapy. The objective of this article is to present a review on the background, microbiologic efficacy, clinical efficacy, and safety of fecal microbiota transplantation and to provide an overview of emerging treatment options currently under investigation. Emerging treatment options discussed include the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against toxins A and B, C difficile vaccination, and transplantation of nontoxigenic C difficile strains.

  10. Clostridium difficile Infection in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are disproportionately susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the incidence is increasing. There has also been growing recognition of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization in pediatric IBD, which can sometimes be very difficult to distinguish from symptomatic C. difficile–associated disease in this population. In this study, we discuss the current knowledge of C. difficile infection in children with IBD, reviewing epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes that often differ from the adult IBD population, and discuss the complexities and dilemmas of diagnosing and treating CDI in pediatric IBD. PMID:26689599

  11. Toxin synthesis by Clostridium difficile is regulated through quorum signaling.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; DuPont, Herbert L; Norris, Steven J; Kaplan, Heidi B

    2015-02-24

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is dramatically increasing as a cause of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant pathogen, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. Consequently, it produces toxins A and B that directly cause disease. Despite the enormous public health problem posed by this pathogen, the molecular mechanisms that regulate production of the toxins, which are directly responsible for disease, remained largely unknown until now. Here, we show that C. difficile toxin synthesis is regulated by an accessory gene regulator quorum-signaling system, which is mediated through a small (<1,000-Da) thiolactone that can be detected directly in stools of CDI patients. These findings provide direct evidence of the mechanism of regulation of C. difficile toxin synthesis and offer exciting new avenues both for rapid detection of C. difficile infection and development of quorum-signaling-based non-antibiotic therapies to combat this life-threatening emerging pathogen. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common definable cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the United States, with the total cost of treatment estimated between 1 and 4.8 billion U.S. dollars annually. C. difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobe, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. As a result, there is an urgent need for non-antibiotic CDI treatments that preserve the colonic microbiota. C. difficile produces toxins A and B, which are directly responsible for disease. Here, we report that C. difficile regulates its toxin synthesis by quorum signaling, in which a novel signaling peptide activates transcription of the disease-causing toxin genes. This finding provides new therapeutic targets to be harnessed for novel nonantibiotic therapy for C. difficile infections. Copyright © 2015 Darkoh

  12. Vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia following oral vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Yeh, Fang Hao; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-12-01

    An 85 year-old male initially admitted for septic shock due to urinary tract infection experienced Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea during hospitalization and was treated by oral vancomycin. His clinical course was complicated by cytomegalovirus colitis and then vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia, which was cured by uneventfully parenteral piperacillin-tazobactam therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diminished intestinal colonization by Clostridium difficile and immune response in mice after mucosal immunization with surface proteins of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Boureau, Hélène; Gleizes, Aude; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hoys, Sandra; Fattal, Elias; Collignon, Anne

    2007-05-16

    Clostridium difficile pathogenesis is mainly due to toxins A and B. However, the first step of pathogenesis is the colonization process. We evaluated C. difficile surface proteins as vaccine antigens to diminish intestinal colonization in a human flora-associated mouse model. First, we used the flagellar cap protein FliD of C. difficile, in order to test several immunization routes: intranasal, rectal, and intragastric. The rectal route, which is the most efficient, was used to vaccine groups of mice with different antigen combinations. After immunizations, the mice were challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile and a significant statistical difference between the control group and the immunized groups was observed in the colonization levels of C. difficile.

  14. Toxin-positive Clostridium difficile latently infect mouse colonies and protect against highly pathogenic C. difficile.

    PubMed

    Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Chassaing, Benoit; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Mattei, Lisa M; Bushman, Frederic D; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-02-20

    Clostridium difficile is a toxin-producing bacterium and a leading cause of antibiotic-associated disease. The ability of C. difficile to form spores and infect antibiotic-treated persons at low multiplicity of infection (MOI) underlies its large disease burden. However, C. difficile-induced disease might also result from long-harboured C. difficile that blooms in individuals administered antibiotics. Mice purchased from multiple vendors and repeatedly testing negative for this pathogen by quantitative PCR bloomed C. difficile following antibiotic treatment. This endogenous C. difficile strain, herein termed LEM1, which formed spores and produced toxin, was compared with highly pathogenic C. difficile strain VPI10463. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that LEM1 and VPI10463 shared 95% of their genes, including all known virulence genes. In contrast to VPI10463, LEM1 did not induce overt disease when administered to antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice, even at high doses. Rather, blooms of LEM1 correlated with survival following VPI10463 inoculation, and exogenous administration of LEM1 before or shortly following VPI10463 inoculation prevented C. difficile-induced death. Accordingly, despite similar growth properties in vitro, LEM1 strongly outcompeted VPI10463 in mice even at 100-fold lower inocula. These results highlight the difficulty of determining whether individual cases of C. difficile infection resulted from a bloom of endogenous C. difficile or a new exposure to this pathogen. In addition to impacting the design of studies using mouse models of C. difficile-induced disease, this study identified, isolated and characterised an endogenous murine spore-forming C. difficile strain able to decrease colonisation, associated disease and death induced by a pathogenic C. difficile strain. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile/Epi and meridian bioscience illumigene C. difficile assays for detecting Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 strains.

    PubMed

    Androga, Grace O; McGovern, Alan M; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J; Perkins, Timothy T; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 033 (RT033) is found in the gastrointestinal tracts of production animals and, occasionally, humans. The illumigene C. difficile assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) failed to detect any of 52 C. difficile RT033 isolates, while all strains signaled positive for the binary toxin genes but were reported as negative for C. difficile by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi assay (Cepheid).

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from food animals on farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with a spectrum of disease in humans referred to as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) and use of antimicrobials is considered a risk factor for development of disease in humans. Clostridium difficile can also inhabit healthy food animals and transmi...

  17. Recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis in cystic fibrosis: an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Egressy, Katarine; Jansen, Michaelene; Meyer, Keith C

    2013-01-01

    To examine the incidence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including patients who had undergone lung transplantation, and review clinical findings in hospitalized patients with C. difficile colitis. A retrospective chart review was performed to examine the clinical presentation and management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received care at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (UWHC) from 1994 to 2011 and were prospectively identified with C. difficile colitis. Ten cases of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) occurred in patients with CF followed by our Adult CF Center over a period of 17 years, and 4 patients were bilateral lung transplant recipients. Two of the lung transplant recipients had recurrent CDAD that lead to fulminant pancolitis, surgical intervention, and shock. Two patients in the non-transplant group experienced recurrent C. difficile infection that led to fulminant pancolitis with associated systemic inflammatory response syndrome and required colectomy. C. difficile colitis can cause life threatening illness in patients with CF, and symptoms may be subtle and/or atypical and lead to significant delay in diagnosis. Patients with recurrent C. difficile colitis are at high risk of fatal outcome, and empiric therapy should be considered for patients with previous C. difficile colitis even in the absence of disease when broad-spectrum antibiotics are given to treat bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Using a Novel Lysin To Help Control Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Euler, Chad W.; Delaune, Aurelia

    2015-01-01

    As a consequence of excessive antibiotic therapies in hospitalized patients, Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming intestinal pathogen, is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and colitis. Drug treatments for these diseases are often complicated by antibiotic-resistant strains and a high frequency of treatment failures and relapse; therefore, novel nonantibiotic approaches may prove to be more effective. In this study, we recombinantly expressed a prophage lysin identified from a C. difficile strain, CD630, which we named PlyCD. PlyCD was found to have lytic activity against specific C. difficile strains. However, the recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of this protein, PlyCD1–174, displayed significantly greater lytic activity (>4-log kill) and a broader lytic spectrum against C. difficile strains while still retaining a high degree of specificity toward C. difficile versus commensal clostridia and other bacterial species. Our data also indicated that noneffective doses of vancomycin and PlyCD1–174 when combined in vitro could be significantly more bactericidal against C. difficile. In an ex vivo treatment model of mouse colon infection, we found that PlyCD1–174 functioned in the presence of intestinal contents, significantly decreasing colonizing C. difficile compared to controls. Together, these data suggest that PlyCD1–174 has potential as a novel therapeutic for clinical application against C. difficile infection, either alone or in combination with other preexisting treatments to improve their efficacy. PMID:26392484

  19. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Clostridium difficile spore proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Eugenis, Ioannis; Edwards, Adrianne N; Sun, Xingmin; McBride, Shonna M; Ho, David D

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, anaerobic, Gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea, commonly known as C. difficile infection (CDI). C. difficile spores play an important role in the pathogenesis of CDI. Spore proteins, especially those that are surface-bound may play an essential role in the germination, colonization and persistence of C. difficile in the human gut. In our current study, we report the identification of two surface-bound spore proteins, CdeC and CdeM that may be utilized as immunization candidates against C. difficile. These spore proteins are immunogenic in mice and are able to protect mice against challenge with C. difficile UK1, a clinically-relevant 027/B1/NAP1 strain. These spore proteins are also able to afford high levels of protection against challenge with C. difficile 630Δerm in golden Syrian hamsters. This unprecedented study shows the vaccination potential of C. difficile spore exosporium proteins.

  20. Differences of the Fecal Microflora With Clostridium difficile Therapies.

    PubMed

    Louie, Thomas J; Byrne, Brendan; Emery, Judith; Ward, Linda; Krulicki, Wally; Nguyen, David; Wu, Kaiyu; Cannon, Kristine

    2015-05-15

    During treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), patterns of pathogen reduction in relationship to changes in components of the normal microbiota are hypothesized to be predictive of response to treatment and subsequent sustained cure. At a single center, subjects enrolled into phase 2 and 3 C. difficile treatment clinical trials (2003-2008) provided fecal samples to assess killing of C. difficile and changes to components of the microbiome. Quantitative bacterial cultures, measurement of C. difficile toxin titers, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of fecal samples for Bacteroidetes, Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV, and C. difficile were performed. Quantitative bacterial cultures showed a mean log10 C. difficile count (colony-forming units [CFU]) of 6.7 ± 2.0 at study entry; vancomycin treatment consistently reduced C. difficile counts to the limit of detection (2.0 log10 CFU/g), whereas metronidazole was associated with mean C. difficile counts 1.5-2 log10 higher at 10 days of treatment. In patients receiving tolevamer, C. difficile persisted in high counts during treatment; response to treatment was correlated with neutralization of toxin along with persistence of normal microbiota components. However, this was achieved in approximately half of subjects. Both vancomycin and metronidazole further suppressed microbiome components during treatment of CDI. Lactobacilli were observed to be a microbiome component that persisted during treatment of CDI. Differences of pathogen clearance and microbiome perturbation during treatment of CDI appear to explain treatment outcomes. The hypothesis that probiotic microbes could help prevent onset of CDI is supported by the observation of persistence of lactobacilli during and after treatment of CDI. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Clostridium difficile infection worsens the prognosis of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Negrón, María E; Barkema, Herman W; Rioux, Kevin; De Buck, Jeroen; Checkley, Sylvia; Proulx, Marie-Claude; Frolkis, Alexandra; Beck, Paul L; Dieleman, Levinus A; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether C difficile infection is associated with undergoing an emergent colectomy and experiencing postoperative complications. METHODS: The present population-based case-control study identified UC patients admitted to Calgary Health Zone hospitals for a flare between 2000 and 2009. C difficile toxin tests ordered in hospital or 90 days before hospital admission were provided by Calgary Laboratory Services (Calgary, Alberta). Hospital records were reviewed to confirm diagnoses and to extract clinical data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed among individuals tested for C difficile to examine the association between C difficile infection and emergent colectomy and diagnosis of any postoperative complications and, secondarily, an infectious postoperative complication. Estimates were presented as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: C difficile was tested in 278 (58%) UC patients and 6.1% were positive. C difficile infection was associated with an increased risk for emergent colectomy (adjusted OR 3.39 [95% CI 1.02 to 11.23]). Additionally, a preoperative diagnosis of C difficile was significantly associated with the development of postoperative infectious complications (OR 4.76 [95% CI 1.10 to 20.63]). CONCLUSION: C difficile diagnosis worsened the prognosis of UC by increasing the risk of colectomy and postoperative infectious complications following colectomy. Future studies are needed to explore whether early detection and aggressive management of C difficile infection will improve UC outcomes. PMID:25157528

  2. Diverse Temperate Bacteriophage Carriage in Clostridium difficile 027 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nale, Janet Y.; Shan, Jinyu; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Fawley, Warren N.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 can be classified into subtypes, but it unknown if these differ in terms of severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). Genomic studies of C. difficile 027 strains have established that they are rich in mobile genetic elements including prophages. This study combined physiological studies, electron microscopy analysis and molecular biology to determine the potential role of temperate bacteriophages in disease and diversity of C. difficile 027. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced prophages from 91 clinical C. difficile 027 isolates and used transmission electron microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterise the bacteriophages present. We established a correlation between phage morphology and subtype. Morphologically distinct tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae were identified in 63 and three isolates, respectively. Dual phage carriage was observed in four isolates. In addition, there were inducible phage tail-like particles (PT-LPs) in all isolates. The capacity of two antibiotics mitomycin C and norfloxacin to induce prophages was compared and it was shown that they induced specific prophages from C. difficile isolates. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses was designed to examine molecular diversity of C. difficile myoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid gene sequences from eight ribotypes showed that all sequences found in the ribotype 027 isolates were identical and distinct from other C. difficile ribotypes and other bacteria species. Conclusion/Significance A diverse set of temperate bacteriophages are associated with C. difficile 027. The observed correlation between phage carriage and the subtypes suggests that temperate bacteriophages contribute to the diversity of C. difficile 027 and may play a role in severity of disease associated with this ribotype. The capsid gene can be used as a tool to identify C. difficile

  3. Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Activity against Phylogenetically Diverse Clostridium difficile Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Mark D.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Hink, Tiffany; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2015-01-01

    Ceftolozane-tazobactam (C/T) is approved for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections and has varied activity against anaerobic bacteria. Here, we evaluate the activity of C/T against a phylogenetically diverse collection of Clostridium difficile isolates and report uniformly high MICs (≥256 μg/ml) to C/T. PMID:26282409

  4. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  5. Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile: What Works?

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become extremely important because of increases in CDI incidence and severity. Unfortunately CDI prevention efforts are hampered by lack of data to support optimal prevention methods, especially for endemic CDI. Studies are needed to define optimal prevention practices and to investigate novel prevention methods. PMID:20929366

  6. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  7. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate

    PubMed Central

    Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26149988

  8. [Clostridium difficile infecion--diagnostics, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Marta; Wandałowicz, Alicja D; Miigoć, Henryka

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of an antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Frequency of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) increased in the last decade. This study presents current preventive measure i.e. hand washing, disposable gloves. Additionally, the article presents diagnostic methods: detection glutamine dehydrogenase (GDH), toxins A and B, cytotoxicity neutralization test, polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR) i.e. nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and stool culture. Moreover available methods of treatment were presented depending on severity of CDI e.i. metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, rifaximin. Furthermore, the review provides information about alternative methods of treatment in view of new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile and increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including: fuscid acid, bacitracin, probiotics, non-toxigenic strains, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, toxins binders and fecal transplant.

  9. Interspecies Interactions between Clostridium difficile and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Pim T.; van der Peet, Jasper M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Oliveira Paiva, Ana M.; Kostidis, Sarantos; Mayboroda, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facultative anaerobic polymorphic fungus Candida albicans and the strictly anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens residing in the human gut. While a few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, the nature of the interactions between these two microbes has not been studied thus far. In the current study, both chemical and physical interactions between C. albicans and C. difficile were investigated. In the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile was able to grow under aerobic, normally toxic, conditions. This phenomenon was neither linked to adherence of bacteria to hyphae nor to biofilm formation by C. albicans. Conditioned medium of C. difficile inhibited hyphal growth of C. albicans, which is an important virulence factor of the fungus. In addition, it induced hypha-to-yeast conversion. p-Cresol, a fermentation product of tyrosine produced by C. difficile, also induced morphological effects and was identified as an active component of the conditioned medium. This study shows that in the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile can persist and grow under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, p-cresol, produced by C. difficile, is involved in inhibiting hypha formation of C. albicans, directly affecting the biofilm formation and virulence of C. albicans. This study is the first detailed characterization of the interactions between these two gut pathogens. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans and Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens that reside in the human gut. A few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, but none have shown the interaction(s) that these two organisms may or may not have with each other. In this study, we used a wide range of different techniques to better understand this interaction at a macroscopic and microscopic level. We found that in the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile

  10. Effectiveness of hand hygiene for removal of Clostridium difficile spores from hands.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Sarah L; Zapka, Carrie; Kasper, Douglas; Gerber, Robert; McCormack, Robert; Macinga, David; Johnson, Stuart; Sambol, Susan; Fricker, Christopher; Arbogast, James; Gerding, Dale N

    2013-03-01

    This study determined whether surrogate organisms can predict activity against Clostridium difficile spores and compared the efficacy of hand hygiene preparations against C. difficile. Our data suggest that surrogate organisms were not predictive of C. difficile spore removal. Four preparations were significantly more effective than tap water at removing C. difficile.

  11. Reclassification of Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile (Hall and O'Toole 1935) Prévot 1938.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Paul A; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Finegold, Sydney M

    2016-08-01

    The recent proposal by Lawson and Rainey (2015) to restrict the genus Clostridium to Clostridium butyricum and related species has ramifications for the members of the genera that fall outside this clade that should not be considered as Clostridium sensu stricto. One such organism of profound medical importance is Clostridioides difficile that is a major cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and mortality in individuals. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the closest relative of Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii with a 94.7% similarity value and both are located within the family Peptostreptococcaceae that is phylogenetically far removed from C. butyricum and other members of Clostridium sensu stricto. Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii each produce abundant H2 gas when grown in PYG broth and also produce a range of straight and branched chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with C16:0 as a major product. The cell wall peptidoglycan contains meso-DAP as the diagnostic diamino acid. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, novel genus Clostridioides gen. nov. is proposed for Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile gen. nov. comb. nov. and that Clostridium mangenotii be transferred to this genus as Clostridioides mangenotii comb. nov. The type species of Clostridioides is Clostridioides difficile.

  12. Clostridium difficile in Food and Animals: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Van Broeck, J; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-01-01

    Zoonoses are infections or diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans through direct contact, close proximity or the environment. Clostridium difficile is ubiquitous in the environment, and the bacterium is able to colonise the intestinal tract of both animals and humans. Since domestic and food animals frequently test positive for toxigenic C. difficile, even without showing any signs of disease, it seems plausible that C. difficile could be zoonotic. Therefore, animals could play an essential role as carriers of the bacterium. In addition, the presence of the spores in different meats, fish, fruits and vegetables suggests a risk of foodborne transmission. This review summarises the current available data on C. difficile in animals and foods, from when the bacterium was first described up to the present.

  13. Total Synthesis of Five Lipoteichoic acids of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Wouter F J; Gisch, Nicolas; Schwudke, Dominik; Heine, Holger; Bols, Mikael; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2014-10-13

    The emergence of hypervirulent resistant strains have made Clostridium difficile a notorious nosocomial pathogen and has resulted in a renewed interest in preventive strategies, such as vaccines based on (synthetic) cell wall antigens. Recently, the structure of the lipoteichoic acid (LTA) of this species has been elucidated. Additionally, this LTA was found to induce the formation of protective antibodies against C. difficile in rabbits and mice. The LTA from C. difficile is isolated as a microheterogenous mixture, differing in size and composition, impeding any structure-activity relationship studies. To ensure reliable biological results, pure and well-defined synthetic samples are required. In this work the total synthesis of LTAs from C. difficile with defined chain length is described and the initial biological results are presented.

  14. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  15. Outcomes in patients tested for Clostridium difficile toxins

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Chin, David L.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Tang, Jevon; Cohen, Stuart H.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile testing is shifting from toxin detection to C. difficile detection. Yet, up to 60% of patients with C. difficile by culture test negative for toxins and it is unclear if they are infected or carriers. We reviewed medical records for 7,046 inpatients with a C. difficile toxin test from 2005–2009 to determine the duration of diarrhea and rate of complications and mortality among toxin-positive (toxin+) and toxin− patients. Overall, toxin− patients had less severe diarrhea, fewer diarrhea days and lower mortality (P<0.001, all comparisons) than toxin+ patients. One toxin− patient (n=1/6,121; 0.02%) was diagnosed with pseudomembranous colitis but there were no complications such as megacolon or colectomy for fulminant CDI among toxin− patients. These data suggest that C. difficile-attributable complications are rare among patients testing negative for C. difficile toxins and more studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of C. difficile detection in toxin− patients. PMID:23009731

  16. Survey of neuraminidase production by Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium difficile strains from clinical and nonclinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R; Dodin, A

    1985-01-01

    Neuraminidase production was investigated in 57 Clostridium butyricum strains, 16 Clostridium beijerinckii strains, and 25 Clostridium difficile strains. Neuraminidase activity was found only in C. butyricum strains originating from one human newborn with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, two newborns with hemorrhagic colitis, one infected placenta, and one adult with peritonitis, It was concluded that neuraminidase was not a major virulence factor in C. butyricum strains. PMID:4056013

  17. Clostridium-DT(DB): a comprehensive database for potential drug targets of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Ankush; Ezhilarasan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakash Sharma, Om; Pan, Archana

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be one of the most important causes of health care-associated infections currently. The prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection have increased significantly worldwide in the past decade which has led to the increased research interest. Here, using comparative genomics strategy coupled with bioinformatics tools we have identified potential drug targets in C. difficile and determined their three-dimensional structures in order to develop a database, named Clostridium-DT(DB). Currently, the database comprises the potential drug targets with their structural information from three strains of C. difficile, namely hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strain R20291, PCR-ribotype 012 strain 630, and PCR-ribotype 027 strain CD196. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Administered Home Series Fecal "Minitransplants" for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection on a Rectal Remnant.

    PubMed

    Popa, Daniel; Laszlo, Mihaela; Ciobanu, Lidia; Ucenic, Elena; Mihalache, Manuela; Pascu, Oliviu

    2015-12-01

    A fecal microbiota transplant has proved to be an extremely effective method for patients with recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. We present the case of a 65-year-old female patient with multiple Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) relapses on the rectal remnant, post-colectomy for a CDI-related toxic megacolon. The patient also evidenced associated symptomatic Clostridium difficile vaginal infection. She was successfully treated with serial fecal "minitransplants" (self-administered at home) and metronidazole ovules.

  19. Antibacterial effect of Manuka honey on Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Manuka honey originates from the manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium) and its antimicrobial effect has been attributed to a property referred to as Unique Manuka Factor that is absent in other types of honey. Antibacterial activity of Manuka honey has been documented for several bacterial pathogens, however there is no information on Clostridium difficile, an important nosocomial pathogen. In this study we investigated susceptibility of C. difficile to Manuka honey and whether the activity is bactericidal or bacteriostatic. Methods Three C. difficile strains were subjected to the broth dilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for Manuka honey. The agar well diffusion method was also used to investigate sensitivity of the C. difficile strains to Manuka honey. Results The MIC values of the three C. difficile strains were the same (6.25% v/v). Similarly, MBC values of the three C. difficile strains were the same (6.25% v/v). The activity of Manuka honey against all three C. difficile strains was bactericidal. A dose–response relationship was observed between the concentrations of Manuka honey and zones of inhibition formed by the C. difficile strains, in which increasing concentrations of Manuka honey resulted in increasing size of zone of inhibition formed. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed at 50% (v/v) Manuka honey and the growth inhibition persisted over 7 days. Conclusion C. difficile is appreciably susceptible to Manuka honey and this may offer an effective way of treating infections caused by the organism. PMID:23651562

  20. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A.; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na+ concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. PMID:25552581

  1. Clostridium difficile in raw products of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Jöbstl, M; Heuberger, S; Indra, A; Nepf, R; Köfer, J; Wagner, M

    2010-03-31

    Prevalence of Clostridium difficile was examined in Austrian ground meat samples and bactofugates, following an evaluation of enrichment broths. Bactofugation is a centrifugation procedure used at sensitive dairies to lower the concentration of spores in raw milk before heat treatment. Among the five enrichment broths tested, C. difficile moxalactam norfloxacin boullion (CDMN) was the only one that allowed recovery of C. difficile from artificially spiked meat samples. Use of Tween 80 as a detergent in the enrichment of artificially contaminated bactofugates improved recovery of C. difficile. Following the enrichment procedures (meat without the use of TWEEN 80), one hundred ground meat samples and fifty bactofugates were enriched for 10-15days in CDMN and presumed positive colonies were isolated and identified by Gram staining, observation of colony fluorescence and ID 32 A ribotyping. Subsequently PCR ribotyping, PCR-based identification of toxin genes (tcdA, tcdB) and antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing to metronidazole, vancomycin, clindamycin and moxifloxacin were performed. C. difficile was isolated from three (3%) of the one hundred retail ground meat samples. Two C. difficile isolates of the same rare ribotype AI-57 were toxin gene-negative and sensitive to all antibiotics tested. One isolate was assignable to one of the most prevalent clinical ribotypes isolated in Austria and harboured the tcdA and tcdB genes. This isolate was also resistant to clindamycin and moxifloxacin. None of the fifty bactofugates tested were positive for C. difficile. The presence of an isolate of human origin could indicate contamination by human shedders during food processing rather than evidencing zoonotic potential. Bactofugates, although constituting concentrated spore suspensions, were not contaminated with C. difficile spores. This finding excludes raw milk as a major source of food contamination. In conclusion, C. difficile recovery rates found in our study were

  2. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition.

    PubMed

    Engevik, Melinda A; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J; Yacyshyn, Bruce R; Worrell, Roger T

    2015-03-15

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na(+) concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Using expert process to combat Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Isabelle; Achonu, Camille; Volkening, Grace; MacFarlane, Sam; McCreight, Liz; Egan, Cathy; Robertson, Jennifer; Garber, Gary

    2016-12-01

    In 2008, Clostridium difficile rates were increasing in Ontario, Canada, and in response, hospitals were mandated by the Ontario Ministry of Health to publicly report their C difficile infection (CDI) rates. In order to assist hospitals which had ongoing CDI outbreaks, a process of an external infection control resource team (ICRT) was introduced. This article describes the function and process of the ICRT, managed by Public Health Ontario, and reviews the lessons learned over the first 5 years of operation. These lessons may assist other hospitals in managing their own infection prevention and control outbreak.

  4. The prospect for vaccines to prevent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Kelly, Ciarán P

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial infectious diarrhea in the Western world. This article describes the evolving epidemiology of C difficile infection (CDI) in the twenty-first century, evaluates the importance of vaccines against the disease, and defines the roles of both innate and adaptive host immune responses in CDI. The effects of passive immunotherapy and active vaccination against CDI in both humans and animals are also discussed.

  5. [Treating Clostridium difficile infection with faecal transplantation: donor microbiological testing].

    PubMed

    Russello, Giuseppe; Brovarone, Flavia; Bardaro, Marcellino; Carretto, Edoardo

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium difficile associated diseases (CDADs) or C. difficile infections (CDIs) are increasing in incidence, severity and mortality. Among patients with CDIs, those with recurrent disease are less responsive to traditional therapies with commonly used drugs, such as metronidazole and vancomycin. Faecal microbiota transplantation is an old therapeutic procedure that has been recently proposed as a safe and effective treatment for CDI patients non-responsive to antibiotic therapy. In this paper we discuss the microbiological procedures that should be performed on faecal microbiota donors.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Taslim, Hartono

    2009-07-01

    The aging society and the advanced of supportive treatment means that large numbers of elderly patients with risk factors for C difficile enterocolitis will continue to receive care in intensive care unit. Antibiotic resistance and older, sicker patients means that combination antibiotic therapy will become a trend in clinical setting. Age, several co-morbidities, and gastrointestinal surgery appear to be specific risk factors for C difficile infection. Diarrhea which is the only symptom in hospitalized patient should drive us to rethink about the possibility of C difficile infection especially in the elderly patient. Prudent use of antibiotic, infection control are strategies to prevent C difficile infection in clinical setting. Elderly patients who undergo gastrointestinal surgery have an increased rate of C difficile infection because of commonly used nasogastric tube. Gastrointestinal surgical patients typically have preoperative bowel preparation, receive oral preoperative antibiotics that are poorly absorbed, impaired bowel motility secondary to ileus, receive systemic preoperative antibiotics prophylaxis, and have variable lengths of no oral caloric intake during the preoperative period. The continued imprudent use of prolonged postoperative systemic antibiotics for presumed preventive purposes, particularly among the elderly and patients who have nasogastric tubes or other enteric tubes, appears to be a recipe for preventable infections with C difficile.

  7. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Fecal microbiota transplantation, a novel therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Terveer, E M; van Beurden, Y H; Kuijper, E J; Keller, J J

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is caused by a disturbance of the gut microbiota, often resulting from the use of antibiotics. Among a sub group of patients with this disorder, treatment with antibiotics is not effective. They develop a chronic, recurrent infection. Such patients can be treated with a fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), or fecal transplantation. The crucial steps for safe application of fecal transplantation are central donor selection and screening. To optimise safety and to guarantee the availability of donor feces for fecal transplantation, the Nederlandse Donor Feces Bank (Dutch Donor Feces Bank) was established. At this facility, ready-to-use, screened donor feces can be ordered for patients with (recurrent) Clostridium difficile infections, who can then be treated at their own hospital.

  9. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  10. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Friedman, N Deborah; Pollard, James; Stupart, Douglas; Knight, Daniel R; Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; Davey, Elise K; Parry, Louise; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-10-04

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased to epidemic proportions in recent years. The carriage of C. difficile among healthy adults and hospital inpatients has been established. We sought to determine whether C. difficile colonization exists among healthcare workers (HCWs) in our setting. A point prevalence study of stool colonization with C. difficile among doctors, nurses and allied health staff at a large regional teaching hospital in Geelong, Victoria. All participants completed a short questionnaire and all stool specimens were tested by Techlab® C.diff Quik Check enzyme immunoassay followed by enrichment culture. Among 128 healthcare workers, 77% were female, of mean age 43 years, and the majority were nursing staff (73%). Nineteen HCWs (15%) reported diarrhoea, and 12 (9%) had taken antibiotics in the previous six weeks. Over 40% of participants reported having contact with a patient with known or suspected CDI in the 6 weeks before the stool was collected. C. difficile was not isolated from the stool of any participants. Although HCWs are at risk of asymptomatic carriage and could act as a reservoir for transmission in the hospital environment, with the use of a screening test and culture we were unable to identify C. difficile in the stool of our participants in a non-outbreak setting. This may reflect potential colonization resistance of the gut microbiota, or the success of infection prevention strategies at our institution.

  11. Breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Larry K; Gerding, Dale N

    2016-03-01

    This Review summarizes the latest advances in the treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which is now the most common health-care-associated infection in the USA. As traditional, standard CDI antibiotic therapies (metronidazole and vancomycin) are limited by their broad spectrum and further perturbation of the intestinal microbiota, which result in unacceptably high recurrence rates, novel therapeutic strategies for CDI are needed. Emerging CDI therapies are focused on limiting further perturbation of the intestinal microbiota and/or restoring the microbiota to its pre-morbid state, reducing colonization of the intestinal tract by toxigenic strains of C. difficile and bolstering the host immune response against C. difficile toxins. Fidaxomicin is associated with reduced CDI recurrences, and other emerging narrow-spectrum CDI antibiotic therapies might eventually demonstrate a similar benefit. Prevention of intestinal colonization of toxigenic strains of C. difficile can be achieved through restoration of the intestinal microbiota with faecal microbiota transplantation, as well as by colonizing the gut with nontoxigenic C. difficile strains. Finally, emerging immunological therapies, including monoclonal antibodies and vaccines against C. difficile toxins, might protect against CDI and subsequent CDI recurrences. The available clinical data for these emerging therapies, and their relative advantages and disadvantages, are described.

  12. An alkaline phosphatase reporter for use in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Pascual, Ricardo A; Childress, Kevin O; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes severe gastrointestinal disease in humans and other mammals. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to work with and, until recently, few tools were available for genetic manipulation and molecular analyses. Despite the recent advances in the field, there is no simple or cost-effective technique for measuring gene transcription in C. difficile other than direct transcriptional analyses (e.g., quantitative real-time PCR and RNA-seq), which are time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale-up. We describe the development of an in vivo reporter assay that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of C. difficile gene expression. Using the Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase gene, phoZ, we measured expression of C. difficile genes using a colorimetric alkaline phosphatase assay. We show that inducible alkaline phosphatase activity correlates directly with native gene expression. The ability to analyze gene expression using a standard reporter is an important and critically needed tool to study gene regulation and design genetic screens for C. difficile and other anaerobic clostridia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clostridium difficile: How Much do Hospital Staff Know About it?

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Blencowe, Natalie; Pye, Geoff; West, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to determine the awareness of Clostridium difficile infection amongst healthcare professionals. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 132 healthcare professionals (18 consultants, 40 trainee doctors, and 74 nursing staff) in our hospital were randomly surveyed using a questionnaire consisting of 17 questions covering various aspects of C. difficile. RESULTS More than 50% of healthcare professionals correctly identified C. difficile as an anaerobic bacillus. Half of the consultants and one-third of the trainees and nurses were aware that 5% of adults carry C. difficile in the gut. Overall, 80% of doctors and 40% of nursing staff (P = 0.001) were aware of the spectrum of illnesses caused by C. difficile. Seven (39%) consultants, 25 (63%) trainees, and 26 (37%) nurses correctly identified the various predisposing factors for the acquisition of C. difficile infection. Only one-third of doctors and 8% of nursing staff were aware that antibiotic restriction was the single most effective C. difficile infection control measure. In addition, 40% of doctors and 8% of nursing staff were aware that cytotoxin assay is the gold standard diagnostic test. Less than 30% of healthcare professionals were aware of the differences between the most common strain and the strain of C. difficile responsible for recent outbreaks. Only 6 (33%) consultants, 21 (53%) trainees (P = not significant), and 28 (38%) nursing staff were aware that hand washing with soap and water is the most effective way of preventing transmission of C. difficile infection. Results showed that 93% of trainees, 78% of consultants (P = 0.05) and 70% of nurses correctly answered that oral metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Compared to 73% of trainees, only two (11%) consultants (P < 0.0001) and 20 (27%) nursing staff correctly stated that oral vancomycin is the second-line treatment for persistent symptomatic C. difficile infection

  14. Diagnostic trends in Clostridium difficile detection in Finnish microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Rasinperä, Marja; Virolainen, Anni; Mentula, Silja; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2009-12-01

    Due to increased interest directed to Clostridium difficile-associated infections, a questionnaire survey of laboratory diagnostics of toxin-producing C. difficile was conducted in Finland in June 2006. Different aspects pertaining to C. difficile diagnosis, such as requests and criteria used for testing, methods used for its detection, yearly changes in diagnostics since 1996, and the total number of investigations positive for C. difficile in 2005, were asked in the questionnaire, which was sent to 32 clinical microbiology laboratories, including all hospital-affiliated and the relevant private clinical microbiology laboratories in Finland. The situation was updated by phone and email correspondence in September 2008. In June 2006, 28 (88%) laboratories responded to the questionnaire survey; 24 of them reported routinely testing requested stool specimens for C. difficile. Main laboratory methods included toxin detection (21/24; 88%) and/or anaerobic culture (19/24; 79%). In June 2006, 18 (86%) of the 21 laboratories detecting toxins directly from feces, from the isolate, or both used methods for both toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), whereas only one laboratory did so in 1996. By September 2008, all of the 23 laboratories performing diagnostics for C. difficile used methods for both TcdA and TcdB. In 2006, the number of specimens processed per 100,000 population varied remarkably between different hospital districts. In conclusion, culturing C. difficile is common and there has been a favorable shift in toxin detection practice in Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories. However, the variability in diagnostic activity reported in 2006 creates a challenge for national monitoring of the epidemiology of C. difficile and related diseases.

  15. Conventional and alternative treatment approaches for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljarallah, Khalid M.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease continues to be one of the leading health concerns worldwide. C. difficile is considered as a causative agent of nosocomial diarrhea that causes serious infection, which may result in death. The incidences of C. difficile infection (CDI) in developed countries have become increasingly high which may be attributed to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, extensive use of antibiotics, and limited alternative therapies. The available treatment options against CDI are expensive and promote resistance. Therefore, there is urgent need for new approaches to meet these challenges. This review discusses the current understanding of CDI, the existing clinical treatment strategies and future potential options as antidifficile agents based on the available published works. PMID:28293151

  16. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-09-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died.

  17. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-01-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died. PMID:3093537

  18. Lipoprotein CD0873 is a novel adhesin of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Kasendra, Magdalena; Minton, Nigel; Titball, Richard W; Michell, Stephen L

    2014-07-15

    Clostridium difficile is a cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, a healthcare-associated intestinal disease. Colonization of the gut is a critical step in the course of infection. The C. difficile lipoprotein CD0873 was identified as a putative adhesin through a bioinformatics approach. Surface exposure of CD0873 was confirmed and a CD0873 mutant was generated. The CD0873 mutant showed a significant reduction in adherence to Caco-2 cells and wild-type bacteria preincubated with anti-CD0873 antibodies showed significantly decreased adherence to Caco-2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that purified recombinant CD0873 protein alone associates with Caco-2 cells. This is the first definitive identification of a C. difficile adhesin, which now allows work to devise improved measures for preventing and treating disease.

  19. Fatal community-acquired ribotype 002 Clostridium difficile bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Dauby, Nicolas; Libois, Agnès; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Vandenberg, Olivier; Martiny, Delphine

    2017-04-01

    Extra-colonic infections, and especially bacteremia, are infrequent manifestations of Clostridium difficile infection. C. difficile bacteremia is generally health-care associated and polymicrobial. We report the case of a patient on hunger strike that presented a C. difficile colitis and mono-microbial bacteremia on its admission to the hospital. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of stool and blood isolates indicated clonality. The strain was characterized as a ribotype 002, an emerging ribotype previously associated with high fatality rate. The patient received treatment by intra-venous amoxicillin-clavulanate and oral vancomycin but eventually died on the seventh day of admission with concomitant pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Faisal; Seiler, Sondra M.; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence has increased dramatically over the last decade. Recent studies suggest that asymptomatic carriers may be an important reservoir of C. difficile in healthcare settings. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage on admission to the hospital. Methods. Patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital without diarrhea were enrolled from June 2010 through October 2011. Demographic information and healthcare and medication exposures 90 days prior to admission were collected. Stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected within 48 hours of admission and stored at −30°C until cultured. Clostridium difficile isolates were typed and compared with isolates from patients with CDI. Results. A stool/swab specimen was obtained for 259 enrolled subjects on admission. Two hundred four (79%) were not colonized, 40 (15%) had toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), and 15 (6%) had nontoxigenic C. difficile. There were no differences between TCD-colonized and -uncolonized subjects for age (mean, 56 vs 58 years; P = .46), comorbidities, admission from another healthcare facility (33% vs 24%; P = .23), or recent hospitalization (50% vs 50%; P = .43). There were no differences in antimicrobial exposures in the 90 days prior to admission (55% vs 56%; P = .91). Asymptomatic carriers were colonized with strains similar to strains from patients with CDI, but the relative proportions were different. Conclusions. There was a high prevalence of TCD colonization on admission. In contrast to past studies, TCD colonization was not associated with recent antimicrobial or healthcare exposures. Additional investigation is needed to determine the role of asymptomatic TCD carriers on hospital-onset CDI incidence. PMID:24755858

  2. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in relapsing clostridium difficile colitis].

    PubMed

    Ramsauer, Bernhard; König, Christel; Sabelhaus, Tobias; Ockenga, Johann; Otte, Jan-Michel

    2016-05-25

    Since the turn of the millennium there has been an alarming increase in the incidence and severity of clostridium difficile infections. Stopping medication with the triggering antibiotic and switching to a recommended antibiotic leads to healing up in 80%. However, patients who relapse have a 40% risk of an additional relapse and those with 2 or more episodes face a 60% risk. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a new therapeutic option. Up to now there only exist two randomized studies (University of Amsterdam and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston). Data from 16 patients with recurrent clostridium difficile infection who had undergone FMT at a local hospital in the city of Bremen, Germany, were reviewed and compared to the results of the 2 randomized studies. 11 out of 16 patients got cured after the first FMT (68.75%). The remaining 5 patients received a second FMT, with cure in 3 patients. The overall response rate was 14 from 16 patients (87.5%). In comparison to the response rates of the University of Amsterdam (81.3% after the first and 93.8% after the second FMT) and of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (70% after the first and 90% after the second FMT) we received slightly worse results. But, treatment of notably older patients and intensive care patients in our group explain these findings well. Therefore, we advocate a wide use of FMT for the treatment of recurrent clostridium difficile colitis in non-university hospitals.

  3. The development of Clostridium difficile genetic systems.

    PubMed

    Minton, Nigel; Carter, Glen; Herbert, Mike; O'keeffe, Triona; Purdy, Des; Elmore, Mike; Ostrowski, Anna; Pennington, Oliver; Davis, Ian

    2004-04-01

    Clostridum difficile is a major cause of healthcare-associated disease in the western world, and is particularly prominent in the elderly. Its incidence is rising concomitant with increasing longevity. More effective countermeasures are required. However, the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection is poorly understood. The lack of effective genetic tools is a principal reason for this ignorance. For many years, the only tools available for the transfer of genes into C. difficile have been conjugative transposons, such as Tn916, delivered via filter mating from Bacillus subtilis donors. They insert into a preferred site within the genome. Therefore, they may not be employed for classical mutagenesis studies, but can be employed to modulate gene function through the delivery of antisense RNA. Attempts to develop transformation procedures have so far met with little success. However, in recent years the situation has been dramatically improved through the demonstration of efficient conjugative transfer of both replication-proficient and replication-deficient plasmids from Escherichia coli donors. This efficient transfer can only be achieved in certain strains through negation of the indigenous restriction barrier, and is generally most effective when the plasmid employed is based on the replicon of the C. difficile plasmid, pCD6.

  4. Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from wild carnivore species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'Elia, Mirella Lauria; Tostes Teixeira, Erika Procópio; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Kocuvan, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto; Junior, Carlos Augusto Oliveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2014-08-01

    Despite some case reports, the importance of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile for wild carnivores remains unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify C. perfringens and C. difficile strains in stool samples from wild carnivore species in Brazil. A total of 34 stool samples were collected and subjected to C. perfringens and C. difficile isolation. Suggestive colonies of C. perfringens were then analyzed for genes encoding the major C. perfringens toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon and iota) and the beta-2 toxin (cpb2), enterotoxin (cpe) and NetB (netb) genes. C. difficile strains were analyzed by multiplex-PCR for toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and a binary toxin gene (cdtB) and also submitted to a PCR ribotyping. Unthawed aliquots of samples positive for C. difficile isolation were subjected to the detection of A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay (CTA). C. perfringens was isolated from 26 samples (76.5%), all of which were genotyped as type A. The netb gene was not detected, whereas the cpb2 and cpe genes were found in nine and three C. perfringens strains, respectively. C. difficile was isolated from two (5.9%) samples. A non-toxigenic strain was recovered from a non-diarrheic maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Conversely, a toxigenic strain was found in the sample of a diarrheic ocelot (Leopardus pardallis); an unthawed stool sample was also positive for A/B toxins by CTA, indicating a diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in this animal. The present work suggests that wild carnivore species could carry C. difficile strains and that they could be susceptible to C. difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Rupnik, Maja; Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen responsible for pseudomembranous colitis in humans and diarrhoea in several domestic and wild animal species. Despite its known importance, there are few studies about C. difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotypes in Brazil and the actual knowledge is restricted to studies on human isolates. The aim of the study was therefore to compare C. difficile ribotypes isolated from humans and animals in Brazil. Seventy-six C. difficile strains isolated from humans (n = 25), dogs (n = 23), piglets (n = 12), foals (n = 7), calves (n = 7), one cat, and one manned wolf were distributed into 24 different PCR ribotypes. Among toxigenic strains, PCR ribotypes 014/020 and 106 were the most common, accounting for 14 (18.4%) and eight (10.5%) samples, respectively. Fourteen different PCR ribotypes were detected among human isolates, nine of them have also been identified in at least one animal species. PCR ribotype 027 was not detected, whereas 078 were found only in foals. This data suggests a high diversity of PCR ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil and support the discussion of C. difficile as a zoonotic pathogen.

  6. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  7. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'elia, Mirella Lauria; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Leal, Rodrigo Costa; Cavalcanti, Guilherme; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The animal, a 24-month-old male, was referred to the Centro de Reabilitação de Animais Silvestres (CRAS) with a history of having been run over and tibia and fibula fractures. After a surgery to repair the fractures, the ocelot underwent antibiotic therapy with two doses of sodium cefovecin, during which he presented with diarrhea. A stool sample was positive for A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay, and a toxigenic strain of C. difficile was isolated. No other enteropathogens were detected. The association between the history, clinical signs and laboratory exams confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report confirms C. difficile as a potential pathogen for wild felids and suggests that the C. difficile-associated diarrhea should be considered in diarrhea cases, especially when the clinical signs began after antimicrobial use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Hayley; Kohoutova, Darina; Mosse, Charles A.; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Stamati, Ioanna; Deonarain, Mahendra; Battah, Sinan; Ready, Derren; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections. Methods PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29. Results Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2) without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT. Conclusion This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon. PMID:26313448

  9. Heat shock increases conjugation efficiency in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Joseph A; Fagan, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection has increased in incidence and severity over the past decade, and poses a unique threat to human health. However, genetic manipulation of C. difficile remains in its infancy and the bacterium remains relatively poorly characterised. Low-efficiency conjugation is currently the only available method for transfer of plasmid DNA into C. difficile. This is practically limiting and has slowed progress in understanding this important pathogen. Conjugation efficiency varies widely between strains, with important clinically relevant strains such as R20291 being particularly refractory to plasmid transfer. Here we present an optimised conjugation method in which the recipient C. difficile is heat treated prior to conjugation. This significantly improves conjugation efficiency in all C. difficile strains tested including R20291. Conjugation efficiency was also affected by the choice of media on which conjugations were performed, with standard BHI media giving most transconjugant recovery. Using our optimised method greatly increased the ease with which the chromosome of R20291 could be precisely manipulated by homologous recombination. Our method improves on current conjugation protocols and will help speed genetic manipulation of strains otherwise difficult to work with.

  10. Protective efficacy induced by recombinant Clostridium difficile toxin fragments.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Spencer, Janice; Buckley, Anthony; Brettoni, Cecilia; Martinelli, Manuele; Tulli, Lorenza; Marchi, Sara; Luzzi, Enrico; Irvine, June; Candlish, Denise; Veggi, Daniele; Pansegrau, Werner; Fiaschi, Luigi; Savino, Silvana; Swennen, Erwin; Cakici, Osman; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Giraldi, Monica; Baudner, Barbara; D'Urzo, Nunzia; Maione, Domenico; Soriani, Marco; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Douce, Gillian R; Scarselli, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium that can reside in animals and humans. C. difficile infection causes a variety of clinical symptoms, ranging from diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Disease is mediated by TcdA and TcdB, two large enterotoxins released by C. difficile during colonization of the gut. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant toxin fragments to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. The protective efficacies of the most promising candidates were then evaluated in a hamster model of disease. While limited protection was observed with some combinations, coadministration of a cell binding domain fragment of TcdA (TcdA-B1) and the glucosyltransferase moiety of TcdB (TcdB-GT) induced systemic IgGs which neutralized both toxins and protected vaccinated animals from death following challenge with two strains of C. difficile. Further characterization revealed that despite high concentrations of toxin in the gut lumens of vaccinated animals during the acute phase of the disease, pathological damage was minimized. Assessment of gut contents revealed the presence of TcdA and TcdB antibodies, suggesting that systemic vaccination with this pair of recombinant polypeptides can limit the disease caused by toxin production during C. difficile infection.

  11. Bacteriophage-mediated toxin gene regulation in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Govind, Revathi; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Rolfe, Rial D; Dupuy, Bruno; Fralick, Joe A

    2009-12-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as the most important single identifiable cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. Virulent strains of C. difficile produce two large protein toxins, toxin A and toxin B, which are involved in pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of lysogeny by PhiCD119 on C. difficile toxin production. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated a decrease in the expression of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdR, tcdE, and tcdC in PhiCD119 lysogens. During this study we found that repR, a putative repressor gene of PhiCD119, was expressed in C. difficile lysogens and that its product, RepR, could downregulate tcdA::gusA and tcdR::gusA reporter fusions in Escherichia coli. We cloned and purified a recombinant RepR containing a C-terminal six-His tag and documented its binding to the upstream regions of tcdR in C. difficile PaLoc and in repR upstream region in PhiCD119 by gel shift assays. DNA footprinting experiments revealed similarities between the RepR binding sites in tcdR and repR upstream regions. These findings suggest that presence of a CD119-like temperate phage can influence toxin gene regulation in this nosocomially important pathogen.

  12. Protective Efficacy Induced by Recombinant Clostridium difficile Toxin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Spencer, Janice; Buckley, Anthony; Brettoni, Cecilia; Martinelli, Manuele; Tulli, Lorenza; Marchi, Sara; Luzzi, Enrico; Irvine, June; Candlish, Denise; Veggi, Daniele; Pansegrau, Werner; Fiaschi, Luigi; Savino, Silvana; Swennen, Erwin; Cakici, Osman; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Giraldi, Monica; Baudner, Barbara; D'Urzo, Nunzia; Maione, Domenico; Soriani, Marco; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium that can reside in animals and humans. C. difficile infection causes a variety of clinical symptoms, ranging from diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Disease is mediated by TcdA and TcdB, two large enterotoxins released by C. difficile during colonization of the gut. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant toxin fragments to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. The protective efficacies of the most promising candidates were then evaluated in a hamster model of disease. While limited protection was observed with some combinations, coadministration of a cell binding domain fragment of TcdA (TcdA-B1) and the glucosyltransferase moiety of TcdB (TcdB-GT) induced systemic IgGs which neutralized both toxins and protected vaccinated animals from death following challenge with two strains of C. difficile. Further characterization revealed that despite high concentrations of toxin in the gut lumens of vaccinated animals during the acute phase of the disease, pathological damage was minimized. Assessment of gut contents revealed the presence of TcdA and TcdB antibodies, suggesting that systemic vaccination with this pair of recombinant polypeptides can limit the disease caused by toxin production during C. difficile infection. PMID:23716610

  13. Equine hyperimmune serum protects mice against Clostridium difficile spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weiwei; Shin, Kang-Soon; Wang, Shih-Jon; Xiang, Hua; Divers, Thomas; McDonough, Sean; Bowman, James; Rowlands, Anne; Akey, Bruce; Mohamed, Hussni; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium (C.) difficile is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea in horses. Vancomycin and metronidazole have been used as standard treatments but are only moderately effective, which highlights the need for a novel alternative therapy. In the current study, we prepared antiserum of equine origin against both C. difficile toxins A and B as well as whole-cell bacteria. The toxin-neutralizing activities of the antibodies were evaluated in vitro and the prophylactic effects of in vivo passive immunotherapy were demonstrated using a conventional mouse model. The data demonstrated that immunized horses generated antibodies against both toxins A and B that possessed toxin-neutralizing activity. Additionally, mice treated with the antiserum lost less weight without any sign of illness and regained weight back to a normal range more rapidly compared to the control group when challenged orally with 10(7) C. difficile spores 1 day after serum injection. These results indicate that intravenous delivery of hyperimmune serum can protect animals from C. difficile challenge in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, immunotherapy may be a promising prophylactic strategy for preventing C. difficile infection in horses.

  14. Equine hyperimmune serum protects mice against Clostridium difficile spore challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weiwei; Shin, Kang-Soon; Wang, Shih-Jon; Xiang, Hua; Divers, Thomas; McDonough, Sean; Bowman, James; Rowlands, Anne; Akey, Bruce; Mohamed, Hussni

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium (C.) difficile is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea in horses. Vancomycin and metronidazole have been used as standard treatments but are only moderately effective, which highlights the need for a novel alternative therapy. In the current study, we prepared antiserum of equine origin against both C. difficile toxins A and B as well as whole-cell bacteria. The toxin-neutralizing activities of the antibodies were evaluated in vitro and the prophylactic effects of in vivo passive immunotherapy were demonstrated using a conventional mouse model. The data demonstrated that immunized horses generated antibodies against both toxins A and B that possessed toxin-neutralizing activity. Additionally, mice treated with the antiserum lost less weight without any sign of illness and regained weight back to a normal range more rapidly compared to the control group when challenged orally with 107 C. difficile spores 1 day after serum injection. These results indicate that intravenous delivery of hyperimmune serum can protect animals from C. difficile challenge in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, immunotherapy may be a promising prophylactic strategy for preventing C. difficile infection in horses. PMID:24136208

  15. Reprofiled anthelmintics abate hypervirulent stationary-phase Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Janda, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupts the indigenous gut microbiota, which consequently enables toxigenic Clostridium difficile species to proliferate and cause infection. The burden of C. difficile infections was exacerbated with the outbreak of hypervirulent strains that produce copious amounts of enterotoxins and spores. In recent past, membrane-active agents have generated a surge of interest due to their bactericidal property with a low propensity for resistance. In this study, we capitalized on the antimicrobial property and low oral bioavailability of salicylanilide anthelmintics (closantel, rafoxanide, niclosamide, oxyclozanide) to target the gut pathogen. By broth microdilution techniques, we determined the MIC values of the anthelmintics against 16 C. difficile isolates of defined PCR-ribotype. The anthelmintics broadly inhibited C. difficile growth in vitro via a membrane depolarization mechanism. Interestingly, the salicylanilides were bactericidal against logarithmic- and stationary-phase cultures of the BI/NAP1/027 strain 4118. The salicylanilides were poorly active against select gut commensals (Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species), and were non-hemolytic and non-toxic to mammalian cell lines HepG2 and HEK 293T/17 within the range of their in vitro MICs and MBCs. The salicylanilide anthelmintics exhibit desirable properties for repositioning as anti-C. difficile agents. PMID:27633064

  16. A bundle strategy including patient hand hygiene to decrease clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Marian; Feigel, Jody; Douglas, Barbara; Grossberger, Susan; Hensler, Amelia; Hensler, Amelia; Weber, David

    2014-01-01

    Prevention strategies for Clostridium difficile infection traditionally have addressed barrier precautions, environmental disinfection, and health care worker hand hygiene. When applied as a bundle, this approach has been used widely as an evidence-based strategy to prevent hospital-acquired C. difficile infection. Expanding the bundle to include patient hand hygiene is a nurse-driven approach to prevent C. difficile transmission.

  17. High colonization rate and prolonged shedding of Clostridium difficile in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Dolan, Susan A; West, Kelly; Dantes, Raymund B; Epson, Erin; Friedman, Deborah; Littlehorn, Cynthia A; Arms, Lesley E; Walton, Karen; Servetar, Ellen; Frank, Daniel N; Kotter, Cassandra V; Dowell, Elaine; Gould, Carolyn V; Hilden, Joanne M; Todd, James K

    2014-08-01

    Surveillance testing for Clostridium difficile among pediatric oncology patients identified stool colonization in 29% of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms and in 55% of patients with prior C. difficile infection (CDI). A high prevalence of C. difficile colonization and diarrhea complicates the diagnosis of CDI in this population.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, E.; Di Pilato, V.; Della Malva, N.; Meini, S.; Ciraolo, F.; Torricelli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, E; Di Pilato, V; Della Malva, N; Meini, S; Ciraolo, F; Torricelli, F; Rossolini, G M

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. Copyright © 2016 Riccobono et al.

  20. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  1. Cefoperazone-treated Mouse Model of Clinically-relevant Clostridium difficile Strain R20291

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Jenessa A.; Thanissery, Rajani; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Theriot, Casey M.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming enteric pathogen that is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality and consequently poses an urgent threat to public health. Recurrence of a C. difficile infection (CDI) after successful treatment with antibiotics is high, occurring in 20–30% of patients, thus necessitating the discovery of novel therapeutics against this pathogen. Current animal models of CDI result in high mortality rates and thus do not approximate the chronic, insidious disease manifestations seen in humans with CDI. To evaluate therapeutics against C. difficile, a mouse model approximating human disease utilizing a clinically-relevant strain is needed. This protocol outlines the cefoperazone mouse model of CDI using a clinically-relevant and genetically-tractable strain, R20291. Techniques for clinical disease monitoring, C. difficile bacterial enumeration, toxin cytotoxicity, and histopathological changes throughout CDI in a mouse model are detailed in the protocol. Compared to other mouse models of CDI, this model is not uniformly lethal at the dose administered, allowing for the observation of a prolonged clinical course of infection concordant with the human disease. Therefore, this cefoperazone mouse model of CDI proves a valuable experimental platform to assess the effects of novel therapeutics on the amelioration of clinical disease and on the restoration of colonization resistance against C. difficile. PMID:28060346

  2. Manganese superoxide dismutase from human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongfei; Lei, Cheng; Ying, Tianlei; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a human pathogen that causes severe antibiotic-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Herein the MnSODcd from C. difficile was cloned, expressed in Escherichia Coli,and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV/Vis and EPR spectroscopy, and activity assay, et al. The crystal structure of MnSODcd (2.32 Å) reveals a manganese coordination geometry of distorted trigonal bipyramidal, with His111, His197 and Asp193 providing the equatorial ligands and with His56 and a hydroxide or water forming the axial ligands. The catalytic activity of MnSODcd (8,600 U/mg) can be effectively inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol with an IC50 of 75 μM. The affinity investigation between 2-methoxyestradiol and MnSODcd by ITC indicated a binding constant of 8.6 μM with enthalpy changes (ΔH = -4.08 ± 0.03 kcal/mol, ΔS = 9.53 ± 0.02 cal/mol/deg). An inhibitory mechanism of MnSODcd by 2-methoxyestradiol was probed and proposed based on molecular docking models and gel filtration analysis. The 2-methoxyestradiol may bind MnSODcd to interfere with the cross-linking between the two active sites of the dimer enzyme, compromising the SOD activity. These results provide valuable insight into the rational design of MnSODcd inhibitors for potential therapeutics for CDI.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection aggravates colitis in interleukin 10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Na; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Jung Mogg; Im, Jong Pil; Jung, Hyun Chae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection in an interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells isolated from wild type (WT) and IL-10-/-mice were stimulated for 4 h with C. difficile toxin A (200 μg/mL), and gene expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12 and IL-23 was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. WT and IL-10-/- mice (n = 20 each) were exposed to an antibiotic cocktail for three days and then were injected with clindamycin (i.p.). Mice (n = 10 WT, 10 IL-10-/-) were then challenged with oral administration of C. difficile (1 × 105 colony forming units of strain VPI 10463). Animals were monitored daily for 7 d for signs of colitis. Colonic tissue samples were evaluated for cytokine gene expression and histopathologic analysis. RESULTS: C. difficile toxin A treatment induced IFN-γ gene expression to a level that was significantly higher in BDMCs from IL-10-/- compared to those from WT mice (P < 0.05). However, expression of IL-12 and IL-23 was not different among the groups. Following C. difficile administration, mice developed diarrhea and lost weight within 2-3 d. Weight loss was significantly greater in IL-10-/- compared to WT mice (P < 0.05). C. difficile infection induced histopathologic features typical of colitis in both IL-10-/- and WT mice. The histopathologic severity score was significantly higher in the IL-10-/- than in WT mice (mean ± standard error; 5.50 ± 0.53 vs 2.44 ± 0.46; P < 0.05). This was accompanied by a significantly greater increase in IFN-γ gene expression in colonic tissues from IL-10-/- than from WT mice challenged with C. difficile (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that colitis is more severe after C. difficile infection in IL-10-/-mice, and that IFN-γ expression is involved in this process. PMID:25493020

  4. Laboratory detection of Clostridium difficile in piglets in Australia.

    PubMed

    Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Riley, Thomas V

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well-known enteric pathogen of humans and the causative agent of high-morbidity enteritis in piglets aged 1 to 7 days. C. difficile prevalence in Australian piglets is as high as 70%. The current diagnostic assays have been validated only for human infections, and there are no published studies assessing their performance in Australian piglets. We evaluated the suitability of five assays for detecting C. difficile in 157 specimens of piglet feces. The assays included a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LMIA)-PCR for tcdA (illumigene C. difficile; Meridian), a real-time PCR for tcdB (GeneOhm Cdiff; Becton Dickinson), two-component enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for C. difficile glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EIA-GDH) and TcdA/TcdB (EIA-TcdA/TcdB) (C. diff Quik Chek; Alere), and direct culture (DC) (C. difficile chromID agar; bioMérieux). The assays for detection of the organism were compared against enrichment culture (EC), and assays for detection of toxins/toxin genes were compared against EC followed by PCR for toxin genes (toxigenic EC [TEC]). The recovery of C. difficile by EC was 39.5% (n = 62/157), and TEC revealed that 58.1% (n = 36/62) of isolates were positive for at least one toxin gene (tcdA/tcdB). Compared with those for EC/TEC, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were, respectively, as follows: DC, 91.9, 100.0, 100.0, and 95.0%; EIA-GDH, 41.9, 92.6, 78.8, and 71.0%; EIA-TcdA/TcdB, 5.6, 99.2, 66.7, and 77.9%; real-time PCR, 42.9, 96.7, 78.9, and 85.4% and LMIA-PCR, 25.0, 95.9, 64.3, and 81.1%. The performance of the molecular methods was poor, suggesting that the current commercially available assays for diagnosis of C. difficile in humans are not suitable for use in piglets. C. difficile recovery by the DC provides a cost-effective alternative. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of Clostridium difficile treatments: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri M; Butler, Mary; MacDonald, Roderick; Bliss, Donna; Filice, Gregory A; Rector, Thomas S; Wilt, Timothy J

    2011-12-20

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in incidence and severity. The optimal treatment is unknown. To determine whether, among adults with C. difficile infection, treatment with certain antibiotics compared with others results in differences in initial cure, recurrence, and harms. MEDLINE, AMED, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane databases (search dates: inception through August 2011, limited to English-language reports); bibliography review. Randomized, controlled trials of adults with C. difficile infection, independent of outcomes, who were treated with medications available in the United States. Observational studies reporting strain were included. Study design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, quality and strength of evidence as assessed by 2 reviewers, study definitions, and duration of treatment and follow-up. Outcomes included initial cure, recurrence, and treatment harms. 11 trials that included 1463 participants were identified. Three trials compared metronidazole with vancomycin; 8 compared metronidazole or vancomycin with another agent, combined agents, or placebo. Strain was analyzed in 1 trial and 2 cohort studies. No study comparing 2 antimicrobial agents demonstrated a statistically significant difference for initial cure; all comparisons were of low to moderate strength of evidence. Moderate-strength evidence from 1 study demonstrated that recurrence was decreased with fidaxomicin versus vancomycin (15% vs. 25%; difference, -10 percentage points [95% CI, -17 to -3 percentage points]; P=0.005). Subgroup analysis of a single study comparing metronidazole with vancomycin for patients who have severe C. difficile infection showed no difference by intention-to-treat analysis; this was rated as insufficient-strength evidence. Harms, when reported, did not differ between treatments in any study. Definitions of diarrhea, C. difficile infection, initial cure, and relapse varied. Some studies reported insufficient detail to allow assessment of all

  6. Efficacy of decontaminants and disinfectants against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a common nosocomial pathogen transmitted mainly via its spores. These spores can remain viable on contaminated surfaces for several months and are resistant to most commonly used cleaning agents. Thus, effective decontamination of the environment is essential in preventing the transmission of C. difficile in health-care establishments. However, this emphasis on decontamination must also be extended to laboratories due to risk of exposure of staff to potentially virulent strains. Though few cases of laboratory-acquired infection have been reported, the threat of infection by C. difficile in the laboratory is real. Our aim was to test the efficacy of four disinfectants, Actichlor, MicroSol 3+, TriGene Advance and Virkon, and one laboratory decontaminant, Decon 90, against vegetative cells and spores of C. difficile. Five strains were selected for the study: the three most commonly encountered epidemic strains in Scotland, PCR ribotypes 106, 001 and 027, and control strains 630 and VPI 10463. MICs were determined by agar dilution and broth microdilution. All the agents tested inhibited the growth of vegetative cells of the selected strains at concentrations below the recommended working concentrations. Additionally, their effect on spores was determined by exposing the spores of these strains to different concentrations of the agents for different periods of time. For some of the agents, an exposure of 10 min was required for sporicidal activity. Further, only Actichlor was able to bring about a 3 log(10) reduction in spore numbers under clean and dirty conditions. It was also the only agent that decontaminated different hard, non-porous surfaces artificially contaminated with C. difficile spores. However, this too required an exposure time of more than 2 min and up to 10 min. In conclusion, only the chlorine-releasing agent Actichlor was found to be suitable for the elimination of C. difficile spores from the environment, making it the agent

  7. Comparison of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Kimberle C; Dickenson, Roberta A; Wu, Fongman; Andrea, Sarah B

    2011-07-01

    Performance characteristics of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin were compared using fresh stool samples from patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Assays were performed simultaneously and according to the manufacturers' instructions. Patients were included in the study if they exhibited clinical symptoms consistent with CDI. Nonmolecular assays included glutamate dehydrogenase antigen tests, with positive findings followed by the Premier Toxin A and B Enzyme Immunoassay (GDH/EIA), and the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test. Molecular assays (PCR) included the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, and the ProGastro Cd assay. Specimens were considered true positive if results were positive in two or more assays. For each method, the Youden index was calculated and cost-effectiveness was analyzed. Of 81 patients evaluated, 26 (32.1%) were positive for CDI. Sensitivity of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, the ProGastro Cd assay, C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test, and two-step GDH/EIA was 96.2%, 96.2%, 88.5%, 61.5%, and 42.3%, respectively. Specificity of the Xpert C. difficile test was 96.4%, and for the other four assays was 100%. Compared with nonmolecular methods, molecular methods detected 34.7% more positive specimens. Assessment of performance characteristics and cost-effectiveness demonstrated that the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay yielded the best results. While costly, the Xpert C. difficile test required limited processing and yielded rapid results. Because of discordant results, specimen processing, and extraction equipment requirements, the ProGastro Cd assay was the least favored molecular assay. The GDH/EIA method lacked sufficient sensitivity to be recommended. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lactobacillus acidophilus modulates the virulence of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Yun, B; Oh, S; Griffiths, M W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human gastrointestinal tract. This pathogen causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis in animals and humans. Antibiotic-associated diseases may be treated with probiotics, and interest is increasing in such uses of probiotics. This study investigated the effect of Lactobacillus strains on the quorum-sensing signals and toxin production of C. difficile. In addition, an in vivo experiment was designed to assess whether Lactobacillus acidophilus GP1B is able to control C. difficile-associated disease. Autoinducer-2 activity was measured for C. difficile using the Vibrio harveyi coupled bioluminescent assay. Cell extract (10μg/mL) of L. acidophilus GP1B exhibited the highest inhibitory activity among 5 to 40μg/mL cell-extract concentrations. Real-time PCR data indicated decreased transcriptional levels in luxS, tcdA, tcdB, and txeR genes in the presence of 10μg/mL of cell extract of L. acidophilus GP1B. Survival rates at 5d for mice given the pathogen alone with L. acidophilus GP1B cell extract or L. acidophilus GP1B were 10, 70, and 80%, respectively. In addition, the lactic acid-produced L. acidophilus GP1B exhibits an inhibitory effect against the growth of C. difficile. Both the L. acidophilus GP1B and GP1B cell extract have significant antipathogenic effects on C. difficile. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from human jejunum: identification of a reservoir for disease?

    PubMed Central

    Testore, G P; Nardi, F; Babudieri, S; Giuliano, M; Di Rosa, R; Panichi, G

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that the small intestine may represent a reservoir for Clostridium difficile was studied, using segments of human jejunum collected at necropsy. Our results (three of 100 specimens positive for C difficile culture) support the hypothesis that C difficile can be found in human jejunum and that it adheres to the normal mucosa as a resident bacterium. These findings suggest that gastrointestinal disease caused by C difficile has an endogenous origin. PMID:3745477

  10. Detection of A/B toxin and isolation of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from foals.

    PubMed

    Silva, R O S; Ribeiro, M G; Palhares, M S; Borges, A S; Maranhão, R P A; Silva, M X; Lucas, T M; Olivo, G; Lobato, F C F

    2013-11-01

    Toxin detection and screening could contribute to knowledge of the transmission patterns, risk factors and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. To isolate C. difficile and C. perfringens and to detect A/B toxins in faecal samples from diarrhoeic and nondiarrhoeic foals. Cross-sectional observational study. A total of 153 samples from foals were collected: 139 samples from farms and 14 samples from diarrhoeic foals admitted to a veterinary hospital. The A/B toxins were detected by cytotoxicity assay. All suspected colonies of C. perfringens were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for detection of the major toxin genes (α, β, ε and ι) and for detection of β2-, NetB- and enterotoxin-encoding genes. Furthermore, C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. Seven of 153 (4.6%) samples, all from diarrhoeic foals, were positive for C. difficile A/B toxin. Of these, 5 of 14 (35.7%) were from hospitalised foals, and only 2 of 63 (3.2%) diarrhoeic foal samples were from farms (P = 0.002). Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 31 (20.3%) foals, of which 21 of 76 (27.6%) were diarrhoeic and 10 of 76 (13.2%) were nondiarrhoeic, demonstrating a difference between these 2 groups (P = 0.045). Only 4 strains were positive for the β2-encoding gene (cpb2). All C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. The present report highlights the need for laboratory diagnostics to differentiate C. difficile-associated infection in foals from other causes of diarrhoea to facilitate adequate antimicrobial therapy. More studies are needed to clarify the role of C. perfringens as a primary agent of diarrhoea in foals. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  11. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI. PMID:28321156

  12. Novel risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in children.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Maribeth R; Thomsen, Isaac P; Slaughter, James C; Creech, C Buddy; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, has been reported to recur in high rates in adults. The rates and risk factors for recurrent C difficile infection (rCDI) in children have not been well established. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 186 pediatric patients seen at a tertiary care referral center for a 5-year period diagnosed as having a primary C difficile infection. Children with recurrent disease, defined as return of symptoms of C difficile infection and positive testing ≤60 days after the completion of therapy, were compared with children who did not experience an episode of recurrence. Of the 186 pediatric patients included in this study, 41 (22%) experienced rCDI. On univariable analysis, factors significantly associated with rCDI included malignancy, recent hospitalization, recent surgery, antibiotic use, number of antibiotic exposures by class, acid blocker use, immunosuppressant use, and hospital-acquired disease. On multivariable analysis, malignancy (odds ratio [OR] 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-7.85), recent surgery (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.05-5.52), and the number of antibiotic exposures by class (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.75) were significantly associated with recurrent disease in children. The rate of rCDI in children was 22%. Recurrence was significantly associated with the risk factors of malignancy, recent surgery, and the number of antibiotic exposures by class.

  13. Simplified purification method for Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Si-Wu; Xue, Jing; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish the purification method for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) toxin A. METHODS: C. difficile VPI 10463 filtrate was cultured anaerobically by the dialysis bag methods. And then the toxin A was purified by precipitation with 500 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and acid precipitation at pH5.5, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Toyopearl. RESULTS: Purified toxin A exhibited only one band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE) and Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion. The molecular weight of toxin A was estimated to be 550000. The purified toxin A had a protein concentration of 0.881 mg/mL. The minimum lethal dose was 1 × 106 MLD/mL (i.p.mice). The cytotoxic titer was 107 CU/mg. The haemagglutinate activity was at a concentration of 1.72 μg/mL. The ratio of fluid volume (mL) accumulated to the length (cm) of the loop was 2.46. CONCLUSION: The modified method for purification of toxin A of C. difficile was simple and convenient. It may be even more suitable for purification of toxin A on large scales. PMID:15309736

  14. Simplified purification method for Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Fu, Si-Wu; Xue, Jing; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2004-09-15

    To establish the purification method for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) toxin A. C. difficile VPI 10463 filtrate was cultured anaerobically by the dialysis bag methods. And then the toxin A was purified by precipitation with 500 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and acid precipitation at pH 5.5, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Toyopearl. Purified toxin A exhibited only one band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE) and Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion. The molecular weight of toxin A was estimated to be 550,000. The purified toxin A had a protein concentration of 0.881 mg/mL. The minimum lethal dose was 1X10(6) MLD/mL (i.p.mice). The cytotoxic titer was 10(7) CU/mg. The haemagglutinate activity was at a concentration of 1.72 microg/mL. The ratio of fluid volume (mL) accumulated to the length (cm) of the loop was 2.46. The modified method for purification of toxin A of C. difficile was simple and convenient. It may be even more suitable for purification of toxin A on large scales.

  15. Highly Divergent Clostridium difficile Strains Isolated from the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra; Potocnik, Mojca; Zidaric, Valerija; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most important human and animal pathogens. However, the bacterium is ubiquitous and can be isolated from various sources. Here we report the prevalence and characterization of C. difficile in less studied environmental samples, puddle water (n = 104) and soil (n = 79). C. difficile was detected in 14.4% of puddle water and in 36.7% of soil samples. Environmental strains displayed antimicrobial resistance patterns comparable to already published data of human and animal isolates. A total of 480 isolates were grouped into 34 different PCR ribotypes. More than half of these (52.9%; 18 of 34) were already described in humans or animals. However, 14 PCR ribotypes were new in our PCR ribotype library and all but one were non-toxigenic. The multilocus sequence analysis of these new PCR ribotypes revealed that non-toxigenic environmental isolates are phylogenetically distinct and belong to three highly divergent clades, two of which have not been described before. Our data suggest that environment is a potential reservoir of genetically diverse population of C. difficile. PMID:27880843

  16. Colonization Resistance of the Gut Microbiota against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics strongly disrupt the human gut microbiota, which in consequence loses its colonization resistance capacity, allowing infection by opportunistic pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. This bacterium is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a current problem in developed countries, since its incidence and severity have increased during the last years. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains has reduced the efficiency of the standard treatment with antibiotics, leading to a higher rate of relapses. Here, we review recent efforts focused on the impact of antibiotics in the gut microbiome and their relationship with C. difficile colonization, as well as, in the identification of bacteria and mechanisms involved in the protection against C. difficile infection. Since a healthy gut microbiota is able to avoid pathogen colonization, restoration of the gut microbiota seems to be the most promising approach to face C. difficile infection, especially for recurrent cases. Therefore, it would be possible to design probiotics for patients undergoing antimicrobial therapies in order to prevent or fight the expansion of the pathogen in the gut ecosystem. PMID:27025628

  17. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-03-07

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI.

  18. Immune-based treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Ghose-Paul, Chandrabali; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) causes over 500,000 infections per year in the US, with an estimated 15,000 deaths and an estimated cost of $1–3 billion. Moreover, a continual rise in the incidence of severe C. difficile infection (CDI) has been observed worldwide. Currently, standard treatment for CDI is the administration of antibiotics. While effective, these treatments do not prevent and may contribute to a disease recurrence rate of 15–35%. Prevention of recurrence is one of the most challenging aspects in the field. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of C. difficilenow permits the development of immune-based therapies. Antibodies specific for C. difficile toxins have been shown to effectively treat CDI and prevent disease relapse in animal models and in humans. Vaccination has been recognized as the most cost-effective treatment/prevention for CDI. This review will summarize CDI transmission, epidemiology, major virulent factors and highlights the rational and the development of immune-based approaches against this remerging threat. PMID:25668664

  19. Investigation of potentially pathogenic Clostridium difficile contamination in household environs.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Jahangir; Anu, Ananna; Walk, Seth T; Garey, Kevin W

    2014-06-01

    As Clostridium difficile spores are resistant to many household cleaning products, the potential for community household contamination is high. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile from environmental sources from a large urban area. Three to 5 household items or environmental dust was collected from 30 houses in Houston, Texas. A total of 127 environmental samples were collected from shoe bottoms (n = 63), bathroom surfaces (n = 15), house floor dusts (n = 12), or other household surfaces (n = 37). Forty one of 127 samples (32.3%) grew C. difficile. All 41 isolates were positive for toxin A and B genes and no isolate was positive for binary toxin genes. Shoe bottom swab samples had the highest percent of positive samples (25/63; 39.7%) followed by bathroom/toilet surfaces (5/15; 33.3%), house floor dust (4/12; 33.3%), and other surface swabs (7/37; 18.9%). Strains were grouped into 25 different ribotypes, the most prevalent type was 001 (5 strains). In conclusion, a high rate of environmental contamination of C. difficile was observed from community households from a large urban area.

  20. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Rupnik, Maja; Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen responsible for pseudomembranous colitis in humans and diarrhoea in several domestic and wild animal species. Despite its known importance, there are few studies aboutC. difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotypes in Brazil and the actual knowledge is restricted to studies on human isolates. The aim of the study was therefore to compare C. difficileribotypes isolated from humans and animals in Brazil. Seventy-six C. difficile strains isolated from humans (n = 25), dogs (n = 23), piglets (n = 12), foals (n = 7), calves (n = 7), one cat, and one manned wolf were distributed into 24 different PCR ribotypes. Among toxigenic strains, PCR ribotypes 014/020 and 106 were the most common, accounting for 14 (18.4%) and eight (10.5%) samples, respectively. Fourteen different PCR ribotypes were detected among human isolates, nine of them have also been identified in at least one animal species. PCR ribotype 027 was not detected, whereas 078 were found only in foals. This data suggests a high diversity of PCR ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil and support the discussion of C. difficile as a zoonotic pathogen. PMID:26676318

  1. Immune-based treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Song; Ghose-Paul, Chandrabali; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) causes over 500,000 infections per year in the US, with an estimated 15,000 deaths and an estimated cost of $1-3 billion. Moreover, a continual rise in the incidence of severe C. difficile infection (CDI) has been observed worldwide. Currently, standard treatment for CDI is the administration of antibiotics. While effective, these treatments do not prevent and may contribute to a disease recurrence rate of 15-35%. Prevention of recurrence is one of the most challenging aspects in the field. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of C. difficilenow permits the development of immune-based therapies. Antibodies specific for C. difficile toxins have been shown to effectively treat CDI and prevent disease relapse in animal models and in humans. Vaccination has been recognized as the most cost-effective treatment/prevention for CDI. This review will summarize CDI transmission, epidemiology, major virulent factors and highlights the rational and the development of immune-based approaches against this remerging threat.

  2. Clostridium difficile infection prevention: biotherapeutics, immunologics, and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gerding, Dale N

    2012-01-01

    We are in the midst of a resurgence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe for which morbidity and mortality are higher than ever seen. C. difficile has risen in frequency to become the most common healthcare-associated infection pathogen, exceeding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in many hospitals. Protection against CDI is thought to be mediated first by the normal bacterial microbiota, supplemented by an adaptive immune antibody response directed primarily at C. difficile toxins. Treatment of CDI is with antimicrobials that also further disrupt the protective bacterial microbiota leaving the patient susceptible to recurrent CDI. In addition, patients most susceptible to CDI, the advanced elderly, may already have a limited immune response and fail to increase their adaptive immune response with infection. The importance of both of these protective modalities has been demonstrated by 1) the success of fecal microbiota to restore "colonization resistance" for patients with multiple recurrences of CDI, and 2) the marked reduction in CDI recurrences with the use of intravenous monoclonal antibodies directed against toxin A and toxin B as an adjunct to antimicrobial treatment. Anti-toxin vaccines, passive monoclonal anti-toxin antibodies, and non-toxigenic C. difficile (to restore colonization resistance) are already undergoing patient clinical trials. The opportunity to prevent CDI is compelling and future research should focus on understanding the critical elements of the microbiota needed to restore colonization resistance and on development of novel immunologic strategies that include systemic and mucosal vaccines and passive immune modulators.

  3. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Collins, D A; Gasem, M H; Habibie, T H; Arinton, I G; Hendriyanto, P; Hartana, A P; Riley, T V

    2017-07-01

    Clostridium difficile has not been studied in detail in Asia, particularly Southeast Asia. We thus performed a prevalence study across four hospitals in Central Java province, Indonesia. Stool samples were collected from patients with diarrhoea and tested by enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B (C DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE, TechLab). Specimens were cultured and molecular typing was performed. In total, 340 samples were tested, of which 70 (20.6%) were GDH positive, with toxin detected in 19 (5.6%). Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 37 specimens (10.9%), while a further 36 (10.6%) nontoxigenic isolates were identified. The most common strain was ribotype 017 (24.3% of 74 isolates), followed by nontoxigenic types QX 224 (9.5%), and QX 238 and QX 108 (both 8.1%). The high prevalence of C. difficile highlights a need for ongoing surveillance of C. difficile infection in Indonesia.

  4. Host Immunity to Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 017 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Nazila V.; Songane, Mario; Stabler, Richard A.; Elawad, Mamoun; Wren, Brendan W.; Allan, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Multilocus sequence typing indicates that C. difficile strains belong to five distinct genetic clades encompassing several PCR ribotypes (RT). Since their emergence in 2003, hypervirulent RT027 strains have been a major focus of research; in contrast, our current understanding of RT017-mediated disease pathogenesis lags far behind. In this study, we aimed to characterize host immunity to CF5 and M68, two genetically well-defined RT017 strains. Both strains engaged with host Toll-like receptor 2/6 (TLR2/6), TLR2-CD14, and TLR5 to similar extents in a model cell line. Despite this, CF5 mediated significantly greater dendritic cell (DC) interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-27, and IL-10 immunity than M68. Both strains elicited similar IL-1β mRNA levels, and yet only M68 caused a marked increase in secretory IL-1β. A CF5 cocultured-DC cytokine milieu drove an equipotent Th1 and Th17 response, while M68 promoted greater Th17 immunity. Human gastrointestinal ex vivo cytokine responses to both strains were characterized. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile strains mediate overlapping and yet distinct mucosal and DC/T cell immunity. Finally, toxin-driven IL-1β release supports the hypothesis that this cytokine axis is a likely target for therapeutic intervention for C. difficile infection. PMID:25225246

  5. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Roger B; Norman, Keri N; Andrews, Kathleen; Norby, Bo; Hume, Michael E; Scanlan, Charles M; Hardin, Margaret D; Scott, Harvey M

    2011-07-01

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer to human beings. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of C. difficile in pork from sausage manufacturing plants and retail meat in Texas. Twenty-three C. difficile isolates were detected from 243 meat samples (9.5%) from 3 sausage-manufacturing plants and 5 retail meat outlets from 2004 to 2009. Twenty-two isolates were positive for toxins A, B, and binary toxin, and were characterized as toxinotype V, PFGE type-NAP7, or "NAP7-variant." Susceptibilities to 11 antimicrobial agents in the current study were similar to those reported previously for toxinotype V isolates, although the results suggested somewhat reduced resistance than reported for other meat, animal, or human clinical toxinotype V isolates.

  6. Colonization Resistance of the Gut Microbiota against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo

    2015-08-07

    Antibiotics strongly disrupt the human gut microbiota, which in consequence loses its colonization resistance capacity, allowing infection by opportunistic pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. This bacterium is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a current problem in developed countries, since its incidence and severity have increased during the last years. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains has reduced the efficiency of the standard treatment with antibiotics, leading to a higher rate of relapses. Here, we review recent efforts focused on the impact of antibiotics in the gut microbiome and their relationship with C. difficile colonization, as well as, in the identification of bacteria and mechanisms involved in the protection against C. difficile infection. Since a healthy gut microbiota is able to avoid pathogen colonization, restoration of the gut microbiota seems to be the most promising approach to face C. difficile infection, especially for recurrent cases. Therefore, it would be possible to design probiotics for patients undergoing antimicrobial therapies in order to prevent or fight the expansion of the pathogen in the gut ecosystem.

  7. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  8. Clostridium difficile Genotypes in Piglet Populations in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Heinrich; Schmoock, Gernot; Baier, Sylvia; Harlizius, Jürgen; Nienhoff, Hendrik; Brase, Katja; Zimmermann, Stefan; Seyboldt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was isolated from 147 of 201 (73%) rectal swabs of piglets from 15 farms of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia. In 14 farms, 14 to 100% (mean, 78%) of the animals tested were culture positive. The rate of isolation was 68% postpartum, increased to 94% in animals 2 to 14 days of age, and declined to 0% for animals 49 days of age and older. There was no link between isolation and antibiotic treatment or diarrhea of piglets. Strains were assigned to 10 PCR ribotypes, and up to 4 PCR ribotypes were found to be present at the same time on a farm. The closely related PCR ribotypes 078 (55%) and 126 (20%) were most frequently recovered and were present in 13 of the 14 positive farms. The comparison of multilocus VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) analysis (MLVA) data from this study and previously published data on human, porcine, and bovine PCR ribotype 078 isolates from 5 European countries revealed genetic differences between strains of different geographic origin and confirmed the relatedness of human and porcine C. difficile isolates. This study demonstrated that the human-pathogenic PCR ribotypes 078 and 126 are predominant in piglets in Germany. The results suggest that presence of C. difficile is correlated with animal age but not with antibiotic treatment or clinical disease. MLVA indicated that strains of the same geographical origin are often genetically related and corroborated the hypothesis of a close epidemiological connection between human and porcine C. difficile isolates. PMID:24025903

  9. Detection of Clostridium difficile in retail ground meat products in Manitoba

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Monique; Sepehrim, Shadi; Olson, Nancy; Du, Tim; Mulvey, Michael R; Alfa, Michelle J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether Clostridium difficile was present in uncooked retail ground beef and ground pork products sold in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Using an alcohol treatment protocol and inoculation of cultures on C difficile Moxalactam Norfloxacin (CDMN), toxigenic C difficile was found in 6.3% of 48 meat samples. The C difficile isolates belonged to different pulsotypes, all of which had been previously isolated from the stool of Manitoba patients with C difficile disease. Because cooking of meat will not eradicate C difficile spores, this raises a concern regarding potential foodborne transmissibility of this organism. PMID:23450202

  10. Metronidazole-triazole conjugates: activity against Clostridium difficile and parasites.

    PubMed

    Jarrad, Angie M; Karoli, Tomislav; Debnath, Anjan; Tay, Chin Yen; Huang, Johnny X; Kaeslin, Geraldine; Elliott, Alysha G; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela M; Zuegg, Johannes; Eckmann, Lars; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-08-28

    Metronidazole has been used clinically for over 50 years as an antiparasitic and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent effective against anaerobic bacteria. However resistance to metronidazole in parasites and bacteria has been reported, and improved second-generation metronidazole analogues are needed. The copper catalysed Huigsen azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition offers a way to efficiently assemble new libraries of metronidazole analogues. Several new metronidazole-triazole conjugates (Mtz-triazoles) have been identified with excellent broad spectrum antimicrobial and antiparasitic activity targeting Clostridium difficile, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia. Cross resistance to metronidazole was observed against stable metronidazole resistant C. difficile and G. lamblia strains. However for the most potent Mtz-triazoles, the activity remained in a therapeutically relevant window. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  11. Disparate subcellular location of putative sortase substrates in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Johann; Shaw, Helen A; Wren, Brendan W; Fairweather, Neil F

    2017-08-23

    Clostridium difficile is a gastrointestinal pathogen but how the bacterium colonises this niche is still little understood. Sortase enzymes covalently attach specific bacterial proteins to the peptidoglycan cell wall and are often involved in colonisation by pathogens. Here we show C. difficile proteins CD2537 and CD3392 are functional substrates of sortase SrtB. Through manipulation of the C-terminal regions of these proteins we show the SPKTG motif is essential for covalent attachment to the cell wall. Two additional putative substrates, CD0183 which contains an SPSTG motif, and CD2768 which contains an SPQTG motif, are not cleaved or anchored to the cell wall by sortase. Finally, using an in vivo asymmetric cleavage assay, we show that despite containing a conserved SPKTG motif, in the absence of SrtB these proteins are localised to disparate cellular compartments.

  12. Metronidazole-triazole conjugates: Activity against Clostridium difficile and parasites

    PubMed Central

    Jarrad, Angie M.; Karoli, Tomislav; Debnath, Anjan; Tay, Chin Yen; Huang, Johnny X.; Kaeslin, Geraldine; Elliott, Alysha G.; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela M.; Zuegg, Johannes; Eckmann, Lars; Blaskovich, Mark A.T.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole has been used clinically for over 50 years as an antiparasitic and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent effective against anaerobic bacteria. However resistance to metronidazole in parasites and bacteria has been reported, and improved second-generation metronidazole analogues are needed. The copper catalysed Huigsen azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition offers a way to efficiently assemble new libraries of metronidazole analogues. Several new metronidazole-triazole conjugates (Mtz-triazoles) have been identified with excellent broad spectrum antimicrobial and antiparasitic activity targeting Clostridium difficile, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia. Cross resistance to metronidazole was observed against stable metronidazole resistant C. difficile and G. lamblia strains. However for the most potent Mtz-triazoles, the activity remained in a therapeutically relevant window. PMID:26117821

  13. Proline-Dependent Regulation of Clostridium difficile Stickland Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bouillaut, Laurent; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a proteolytic Gram-positive anaerobe, has emerged as a significant nosocomial pathogen. Stickland fermentation reactions are thought to be important for growth of C. difficile and appear to influence toxin production. In Stickland reactions, pairs of amino acids donate and accept electrons, generating ATP and reducing power in the process. Reduction of the electron acceptors proline and glycine requires the d-proline reductase (PR) and the glycine reductase (GR) enzyme complexes, respectively. Addition of proline in the medium increases the level of PR protein but decreases the level of GR. We report the identification of PrdR, a protein that activates transcription of the PR-encoding genes in the presence of proline and negatively regulates the GR-encoding genes. The results suggest that PrdR is a central metabolism regulator that controls preferential utilization of proline and glycine to produce energy via the Stickland reactions. PMID:23222730

  14. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: The importance of the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability. PMID:24966611

  15. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: the importance of the intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-06-21

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability.

  16. Persisting variation in testing and reporting Clostridium difficile cases

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Sejal; Dabrowski, Hannah; Petkar, Hawabibee

    2015-01-01

    Previous evidence suggested a significant variation in the testing algorithms used across the United Kingdom for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and new national guidelines were issued in 2012. The main aim of this paper was to explore if such variation in testing and reporting is still present, to compare the management of CDI cases, and to investigate if there is any significant variation in the antibiotic policies among different hospitals. Using London hospitals as a sample, results show that there is still a wide variation of testing methods and reporting used, making comparisons difficult. It is likely that the overall variability in practices would be greater at a national and, even more, at international level. The relationship between broad-spectrum antibiotics and C. difficile incidence and alternative approaches in antibiotic guidelines may require further studies. PMID:26877769

  17. Clostridium difficile: Changing Epidemiology, Treatment and Infection Prevention Measures.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jane A

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium difficile was first reported as a cause of antibiotic-associated colitis in 1978. In more recent years we have witnessed disturbing trends associated with C. difficile infection (CDI). CDI has become more common, affecting populations previously considered at low risk, more severe with an associated increase in mortality, and more difficult to treat with some patients experiencing multiple relapses and a reduced responsiveness to previously effective antibiotics. These trends have been coincident with the emergence of a new hypervirulent strain responsible for several outbreaks in the last decade. Fortunately, we have also seen promising developments, particularly with regard to testing and treatment. This review discusses recent changes in the epidemiology of CDI and recent developments in the testing, treatment and prevention of CDI.

  18. Challenges and opportunities in the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing in all regions of the world where sought. There is no gold standard for diagnosis of CDI, with available tests having limitations. Prevention of CDI will be seen with antibiotic stewardship, improved disinfection of hospitals and nursing homes, chemo- and immuno-prophylaxis and next generation probiotics. The important therapeutic agents are oral vancomycin and fidaxomicin with metronidazole being used only in mild cases or when oral therapy cannot be given. Current therapy of CDI for 10 days is associated with high rate of recurrence that may be prevented by prolonging initial therapy. Future treatment strategies will focus on drugs that inhibit C. difficile, reduce toxin activity and inflammation in the gut, and improve colonic flora diversity.

  19. ECCMID 2016: addressing the burden of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, Christian; Lyon, Sue

    2016-10-01

    26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID), 9-12th April 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands The European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) is the annual scientific meeting of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology. ECCMID 2016, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, was attended by over 11,600 clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians from more than 120 countries. The Congress offered an essential opportunity to learn more about the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of healthcare-associated infections, especially those caused by Clostridium difficile. Recurrent C. difficile infections have an especially serious adverse impact on patients, their families and healthcare systems across Europe and around the world, and continue to be a cause for concern among ECCMID delegates and their colleagues responsible for managing vulnerable patients in acute hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

  20. Clostridium difficile Infection and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika; Barrett, Terrence A.; Yun, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased in the last decade in the United States adding to the health care burden of the country. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher prevalence of CDI and worse outcomes. In the past, the traditional risk factors for CDI were exposure to antibiotics and hospitalizations in elderly people. Today, it is not uncommon to diagnose CDI in a pregnant women or young adult who has no risk factors. C. difficile can be detected at the initial presentation of IBD, during a relapse or in asymptomatic carriers. It is important to keep a high index of suspicion for CDI in IBD patients and initiate prompt treatment to minimize complications. We summarize here the changing epidemiology, pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical features, and treatment of CDI in IBD. PMID:21915178

  1. Integration of metabolism and virulence in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Bouillaut, Laurent; Dubois, Thomas; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Dupuy, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of the major toxin proteins of the diarrheal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, is dependent on the activity of TcdR, an initiation (sigma) factor of RNA polymerase. The synthesis of TcdR and the activation of toxin gene expression are responsive to multiple components in the bacterium's nutritional environment, such as the presence of certain sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. This review summarizes current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for repression of toxin synthesis when glucose or branched-chain amino acids or proline are in excess and the pathways that lead to synthesis of butyrate, an activator of toxin synthesis. The regulatory proteins implicated in these mechanisms also play key roles in modulating bacterial metabolic pathways, suggesting that C. difficile pathogenesis is intimately connected to the bacterium's metabolic state.

  2. Disease transmission model for community-associated Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Otten, A M; Reid-Smith, R J; Fazil, A; Weese, J S

    2010-06-01

    Participating researchers and public health personnel at a Canadian workshop in 2007, noted considerable gaps in current understanding of community-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI), specifically infection sources and risk factors. A disease transmission model for CA-CDI was requested as an initial step towards a risk assessment, to analyse infection sources and risk factors, addressing priority research areas. The developed model contains eight infection states (susceptible, gastrointestinal exposure, colonized, diseased, deceased, clinically resolved colonized, relapse diseased, and cleared) and notes directional transfers between the states. Most published research used focused on hospital-associated C. difficile infection (HA-CDI) and further studies are needed to substantiate the use of HA-CDI knowledge in the transmission of CA-CDI. The aim was to provide a consistent framework for researchers, and provide a theoretical basis for future quantitative risk assessment of CA-CDI.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and Clostridium difficile in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Yahav, Jacob; Samra, Zmira; Blau, Hannah; Dinari, Gabriel; Chodick, Gabriel; Shmuely, Haim

    2006-12-01

    We describe the prevalence of H. pylori and toxigenic Clostridium difficile (CD) infection and its relationship with gastrointestinal symptoms and pancreatic sufficiency (PS) or insufficiency (PI) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Stool specimens from 30 consecutive patients with CF, aged 1-44, and from 30 healthy similarly aged subjects were tested for the H. pylori antigen by specific monoclonal antibodies and for CD toxins by Tox A/B assay and Tox A assay. CF patients were assessed clinically and tested for specific H. pylori serum antibodies and for mutations. In CF patients, the prevalence of H. pylori antigen was 16.6% (5/30), compared to 30% (9/30) in controls. Of the 26 CF patients with PI, only 2 (7.6%) were infected by H. pylori, compared with 3 of the 4 (75%) patients with PS (P=0.001). H. pylori infection was diagnosed in 3 of 5 (60%) CF patients carrying mild mutations, compared to 1 of 25 (4%) CF patients carrying severe mutations (P=0.01). Fourteen of 30 (46.6%) stool specimens from CF patients tested positive in the ToxA/B assay, and 3 of 14 tested positive for ToxA. No significant differences in antibiotic use, severity of lung disease, PI, chronic abdominal pain, or genotype were found between the two groups. None of the controls was positive for CD toxins. Prevalence of H. pylori infection in CF patients was lower than in similarly aged non-CF controls. CF patients with PI or a history of distal intestinal obstruction syndrome and those carrying mutations associated with a severe phenotype were protected against H. pylori infection. Almost half of the CF patients were asymptomatic carriers of CD producing mostly toxin B. More studies are needed to confirm our results in a larger group of CF patients.

  4. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  5. Novel approaches to treating Clostridium difficile-associated colitis.

    PubMed

    Padua, David; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is being recognized as a growing threat to many health-care systems. Epidemiology data shows that infection rates are soaring and the disease burden is increasing. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, it is becoming evident that novel therapeutics will be required to tackle this disease. These new treatments aim to enhance the intestinal microbial barrier, activate the immune system and neutralize the toxins that mediate this disease. Many of these therapies are still in the beginning stages of investigation, however, in the next few years, more clinical data will become available to help implement many of these exciting new therapeutic approaches.

  6. [Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection treated with faecal microbiota transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fløe, Andreas; Leutscher, Peter

    2014-02-17

    Treatment of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) poses a clinical challenge. Emerging evidence supports the use of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). An 81-year-old man was admitted with a third recurrent episode of CDI within two months. Because of clinical deterioration with development of pancolitis in spite of two weeks of metronidazole and vanco-mycin treatment, FMT was performed using a duodenal tube. The patient recovered completely without further relapse during follow-up. FMT was shown to be an efficient adjuvant treatment of complicated CDI.

  7. [Clostridium difficile isolation in children hospitalized with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Santiago, B; Guerra, L; García-Morín, M; González, E; Gonzálvez, A; Izquierdo, G; Martos, A; Santos, M; Navarro, M; Hernández-Sampelayo, M T; Saavedra-Lozano, J

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial and antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults, and its incidence has substantially risen over the last few years. The prevalence of this infection in children is difficult to assess due to the high rates of colonization in this setting. A one-year retrospective study was conducted on children under 15 years admitted to hospital with acute diarrhea. Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory findings and outcome of children with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were compared to other causes of diarrhea. Risk factors for CDI were identified by multivariate analysis. Two hundred and fifty children with acute diarrhea were identified. A microbiological pathogen was identified in 79 (45.4%) of 174 patients who underwent complete testing: 19 CDI (25.6%, 13 of which were enterotoxin-producing), 21 other bacteria (28.6%), and 34 viruses (45.8%; rotavirus n=31; adenovirus n=3). The estimated incidence of CDI was 3 cases/1,000 admissions, with 68.4% of them occurring in children younger than 2 years. Overall, 15.8% were community-acquired. Compared to other causes of diarrhea, CDI was associated with comorbidity (P<.0001), recent contact with the health-care system (P<.0001) or intensive care unit stay (P=.003) and exposure to antibiotics in the previous month (P<.0001). The clinical course of children with CDI was less symptomatic. There were no clinical differences between Clostridium difficile toxin-producers and non-toxin producers. Comorbidity was identified as the main risk factor associated with CDI (OR 40.02, 95% CI 6.84-232.32; P<.0001). The isolation of Clostridium difficile is common in hospitalized children with diarrhea in our setting. CDI is more frequent in children with comorbidity and recent contact with the health-care system, presenting a mostly oligosymptomatic clinical course. Further studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of this infection in pediatrics, especially the percentage of

  8. The role of Clostridium difficile in the paediatric and neonatal gut - a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lees, E A; Miyajima, F; Pirmohamed, M; Carrol, E D

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen in adults. Its significance in children is less well defined, but cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) appear to be increasingly prevalent in paediatric patients. This review aims to summarize reported Clostridium difficile carriage rates across children of different age groups, appraise the relationship between CDI and factors such as method of delivery, type of infant feed, antibiotic use, and co-morbidities, and review factors affecting the gut microbiome in children and the host immune response to C. difficile. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms 'Clostridium difficile neonates' and 'Clostridium difficile children' were completed, and reference lists of retrieved publications screened for further papers. In total, 88 papers containing relevant data were included. There was large inter-study variation in reported C. difficile carriage rates. There was an association between CDI and recent antibiotic use, and co-morbidities such as immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. C. difficile was also found in stools of children with diarrhoea attributed to other pathogens (e.g. rotavirus). The role of C. difficile in the paediatric gut remains unclear; is it an innocent bystander in diarrhoeal disease caused by other organisms, or a pathogen causing subclinical to severe symptoms? Further investigation of the development of serological and local host response to C. difficile carriage may shed new light on disease mechanisms. Work is underway on defining a framework for diagnosis and management of paediatric CDI.

  9. Diagnostic testing for Clostridium difficile in Italian microbiological laboratories.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Morandi, Matteo; Moro, Maria Luisa; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory diagnosis survey of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was performed in Italy in 2012-2013. Questionnaires from 278 healthcare settings from 15 regions of Italy were collected and analysed. Eighty seven percent of the laboratories declared to routinely perform CDI diagnosis, 99% of them only after the clinician's request. Among the 216 laboratories providing information on the size of the hospitals in which they were located, 65 had more than 500 beds (large hospitals), while 151 had less than 500 beds (small hospitals). The average percentage of positive tests for C. difficile toxins was 12.2%. Almost half of the laboratories (42%) used immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) for Tox A/B as a stand-alone method, while only 34% used an algorithm for CDI as indicated by the European guidelines. A low percentage of laboratories performed molecular assays or C. difficile culture, 25% and 29%, respectively. Most laboratories (161/278) declared to type C. difficile strains, the majority in collaboration with a reference laboratory. Among the 103 C. difficile clinical isolates collected during the study, 31 different PCR-ribotypes were identified. PCR-ribotype 356/607 (27%) was predominant, followed by 018 (12%). These two PCR-ribotypes show 87.5% of similarity in ribotyping profile. PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 represented 8% and 4% of the strains, respectively. Four PCR-ribotypes (027, 033, 078 and 126) were positive for the binary toxin CDT. In particular, PCR-ribotype 033 produces only CDT, and it has recently been associated with symptomatic cases. The majority of strains were multidrug resistant. In particular, all strains PCR-ribotypes 356/607 and 018 were resistant to moxifloxacin, rifampicin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The results obtained highlight the need to raise awareness to the microbiological diagnosis of CDI among clinicians and to implement and harmonize diagnostic methods for CDI in Italian laboratories in the perspective of a future national

  10. Alteration of the intestinal microbiome: fecal microbiota transplant and probiotics for Clostridium difficile and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Broussard, Elizabeth K; Surawicz, Christina M

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasingly common with a high risk of recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. In cases of recurrent C. difficile infection, fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option promoting the restoration of normal gut microbiota. Furthermore, preliminary uncontrolled evidence demonstrates possible benefit of FMT in the management of some cases of inflammatory bowel disease and chronic constipation. In addition to presenting an overview of FMT, we discuss the role of probiotics, a more common approach to modifying the intestinal microbiome. Probiotics have been utilized broadly for many disease processes, including gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and allergic disease settings, although with limited and inconsistent results. Multiple potential areas for research are also identified.

  11. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Hannah; Kaul, Daniel; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection is a healthcare-associated infection resulting in significant morbidity. Although immunosuppression is associated with Clostridium difficile infection acquisition and adverse outcomes, the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients has been little studied in the era of antiretroviral therapy. This study identifies the risk factors for acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients. Methods: A retrospective, propensity score–matched case–control study design was employed, with patients selected from our institution’s outpatient HIV clinic. Clostridium difficile infection cases were defined as having positive stool testing plus an appropriate clinical presentation. The propensity score was generated via multiple logistic regression from year of HIV diagnosis, age at first contact, duration of follow-up, gender, and initial CD4 count. Results: The 46 cases included were matched to a total of 180 controls. Prior antibiotic treatment was a significant predictor of Clostridium difficile infection (odds ratio: 13, 95% confidence interval: 3.49–48.8, p < .001) as was number of hospital admissions in the preceding year (odds ratio: 4.02, confidence interval: 1.81–8.94, p < .001). Having both proton pump inhibitor use and CD4 count <200 cells/µL significantly increased odds of Clostridium difficile infection in the multivariable model (odds ratio: 15.17, confidence interval: 1.31–175.9, p = .021). Conclusion: As in the general population, frequent hospitalizations and exposure to antimicrobials are independent predictors of Clostridium difficile infection acquisition in patients with HIV. Additionally, low CD4 count and proton pump inhibitor use are new potentially modifiable variables that can be targeted for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in future interventional studies. PMID:28348742

  12. A DNA vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, David F.; Rosenberg, Talia; Zaharatos, Jerry; Franco, David; Ho, David D

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen with increasing severity for which host antibody responses provide protection from disease. DNA vaccination has several advantages compared to traditional vaccine methods, however no study has examined this platform against C. difficile toxins. A synthetic gene was created encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of C. difficile toxin A, optimized for expression in human cells. Gene expression was examined in vitro. Mice were inoculated then challenged with parenteral toxin A. Vaccination provided high titer antibodies and protected mice from death. This represents the first report of DNA vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies to Clostridium difficile toxin A. PMID:19464540

  13. Clostridium difficile outbreak in Costa Rica: control actions and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Wong-McClure, Roy A; Guevara-Rodríguez, Moraima; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra; Solano-Chinchilla, Antonio; Marchena-Picado, Margarita; O'Shea, Michele; Badilla-Vargas, Xiomara

    2012-12-01

    To describe interventions implemented during a nosocomial outbreak of Clostridium difficile in a general hospital in Costa Rica from December 2009 to April 2010 in order to achieve outbreak control and the factors determined to be associated with C. difficile infection. Laboratory-confirmed cases of C. difficile were analyzed to describe the outbreak pattern and intervention measures implemented. Cases were selected and recruited in a case-control study. Controls were selected from the same services and time period as the cases. Evaluated exposures included underlying medical conditions and treatments administered before the onset of symptoms. The mean ages in case and control groups were 62.3 and 55.3 years, respectively. Control measures included a hand-hygiene campaign, deep disinfection of hospital surfaces, strict isolation of cases, use of personal protection equipment, and restriction of antibiotic use. The adjusted attributable risks associated with the outbreak were diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-7.7], chronic renal failure (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.5-53.0), and prescribing ceftazidime (OR 33.3, 95% CI 2.9-385.5) and cefotaxime (OR 20.4, 95% CI 6.9-60.3). Timely implementation of control measures resulted in reduced infection transmission and successful control of the outbreak. Conditions associated with C. difficile infection were similar to those found in previously described outbreaks of this bacterium.

  14. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: A critical analysis of the guidance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    A recent report by the Department of Health, Clostridium Difficile Infection: How to deal with the problem - a board to ward approach, is a revised set of guidelines based on best practice and key recommendations for the NHS to ensure the control of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). It takes into account a national framework for clinical governance which did not previously exist, a framework that gives significant weight to infection control as a matter of patient safety, and highlights that all clinicians have a personal responsibility for infection prevention and control. It puts the onus on Trust management and PCTs to ensure that measures are in place to prevent and manage CDI according to best evidence. However, the report fails to explain how these measures will have an impact on finance and resources on an already burdened system. The author explains how much of the report is comparable with the one published in 1994, and highlights many of its limitations within the busy hospital setting. Reducing CDI is achievable, as many hospitals are showing large reductions in their CDI rates. Healthcare workers must be applauded for their success in reducing CDI, but there is more to be done.

  16. Risk factors for recurrence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Traub, Marc; Bachmann, Klaus; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) is one of the most common causes of hospital-acquired diarrhea. Despite increasing incidence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, there are few data on risk factors associated with its relapse. We studied retrospectively possible risk factors for the recurrence of CDAD; 124 patients fulfilled the criteria of CDAD during the study period between January 2006 and July 2009. After successful treatment, recurrence occurred in 20 patients. Nineteen patients (95%, p = 0.029) in the relapse group were on long term proton pump inhibitor therapy compared to 77 patients (74%) in the non-relapse group. There was no statistically significant difference in severity (CRP: p = 0.442, leucocytosis: p = 0.415) and length of hospitalization (p= 0.539) in both studied groups; however, CDAD-relapse was associated with more hospital readmissions and increased health care costs. Proton pump inhibitor therapy may be associated with increased risk of recurrence of CDAD, and represents a relevant, yet correctable risk factor. In patients at risk for CDAD, proton pump inhibitors should be used carefully.

  17. Microevolutionary analysis of Clostridium difficile genomes to investigate transmission

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The control of Clostridium difficile infection is a major international healthcare priority, hindered by a limited understanding of transmission epidemiology for these bacteria. However, transmission studies of bacterial pathogens are rapidly being transformed by the advent of next generation sequencing. Results Here we sequence whole C. difficile genomes from 486 cases arising over four years in Oxfordshire. We show that we can estimate the times back to common ancestors of bacterial lineages with sufficient resolution to distinguish whether direct transmission is plausible or not. Time depths were inferred using a within-host evolutionary rate that we estimated at 1.4 mutations per genome per year based on serially isolated genomes. The subset of plausible transmissions was found to be highly associated with pairs of patients sharing time and space in hospital. Conversely, the large majority of pairs of genomes matched by conventional typing and isolated from patients within a month of each other were too distantly related to be direct transmissions. Conclusions Our results confirm that nosocomial transmission between symptomatic C. difficile cases contributes far less to current rates of infection than has been widely assumed, which clarifies the importance of future research into other transmission routes, such as from asymptomatic carriers. With the costs of DNA sequencing rapidly falling and its use becoming more and more widespread, genomics will revolutionize our understanding of the transmission of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23259504

  18. The microbiota and immune response during Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Erica L; Petri, William A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, spore forming anaerobe that infects the gut when the normal microbiota has been disrupted. C. difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital acquired infection in the United States, and the leading cause of death due to gastroenteritis. Patients suffering from CDI have varying symptoms which range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis and death. The involvement of the immune response to influence disease severity is just beginning to be investigated. There is evidence that the immune response can facilitate either protective or pathogenic phenotypes, suggesting it plays a multifaceted role during CDI. In addition to the immune response, the microbiota is pivotal in dictating the pathogenesis to CDI. A healthy microbiota effectively inhibits infection by restricting the ability of C. difficile to expand in the colon. Thus, understanding which immune mediators and components of the microbiota play beneficial roles during CDI will be important to future therapeutic developments. This review outlines how the microbiota can modulate specific immune mediators, such as IL-23 and others, to influence disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The microbiota and immune response during Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Erica L; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, spore forming anaerobe that infects the gut when the normal microbiota has been disrupted. C. difficile infection (CDI) in the United States is the most common cause of hospital acquired infection, and the leading cause of death due to gastroenteritis. Patients suffering from CDI have varying symptoms which range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis and death. The involvement of the immune response to influence disease severity is just beginning to be investigated. There is evidence that the immune response can facilitate either protective or pathogenic phenotypes, suggesting it plays a multifaceted role during CDI. In addition to the immune response, the microbiota is pivotal in dictating the pathogenesis to CDI. A healthy microbiota effectively inhibits infection by restricting the ability of C. difficile to expand in the colon. Thus, understanding which immune mediators and components of the microbiota play beneficial roles during CDI will be important to future therapeutic developments. This review outlines how the microbiota can modulate specific immune mediators, such as IL-23 and others, to influence disease outcome. PMID:27212111

  20. Advances in the Microbiome: Applications to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Culligan, Eamonn P.; Sleator, Roy D.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 400,000 infections and approximately 29,000 deaths in the United States alone each year. C. difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the developed world, and, in recent years, the emergence of hyper-virulent (mainly ribotypes 027 and 078, sometimes characterised by increased toxin production), epidemic strains and an increase in the number of community-acquired infections has caused further concern. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin is the primary treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI). However, CDI is unique, in that, antibiotic use is also a major risk factor for acquiring CDI or recurrent CDI due to disruption of the normal gut microbiota. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative, non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat or prevent CDI. Here, we review a number of such potential treatments which have emerged from advances in the field of microbiome research. PMID:27657145

  1. Fecal microbiota transplantation for management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vaishnavi, Chetana

    2014-07-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to become a common problem with pronounced medical and economic effects. The recurrence of CDI after treatment with standard antibiotics is becoming more common with the emergence of more resistant strains of C. difficile. As CDI is an antibiotic-associated disease, further treatment with antibiotic is best avoided. As the gut flora is severely disturbed in CDI, approaches that restore the gut microbiota may become good alternative modes of CDI therapies. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the procedure of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy donor individual into a patient for restoration of the normal colonic flora. Thus, FMT helps in the eradication of C. difficile and resolution of clinical symptoms such as diarrhea, cramping, and urgency. Though this approach to treatment is not new, presently, it has become an alternative and promising way of combating infections. The procedure is not in regular use because of the time required to identify a suitable donor, the risk of introducing opportunistic pathogens, and a general patient aversion to the transplant. However, FMT is gaining popularity because of its success rate as a panacea for recurrent attacks of CDI and is being increasingly used in clinical practice. This review describes the rationale, the indications, the results, the techniques, the potential donors, the benefits as well as the complications of fecal microbiota instillation to CDI patients in order to restore the normal gut flora.

  2. Quantifying Transmission of Clostridium difficile within and outside Healthcare Settings.

    PubMed

    Durham, David P; Olsen, Margaret A; Dubberke, Erik R; Galvani, Alison P; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the effect of hospital and community-based transmission and control measures on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we constructed a transmission model within and between hospital, community, and long-term care-facility settings. By parameterizing the model from national databases and calibrating it to C. difficile prevalence and CDI incidence, we found that hospitalized patients with CDI transmit C. difficile at a rate 15 (95% CI 7.2-32) times that of asymptomatic patients. Long-term care facility residents transmit at a rate of 27% (95% CI 13%-51%) that of hospitalized patients, and persons in the community at a rate of 0.1% (95% CI 0.062%-0.2%) that of hospitalized patients. Despite lower transmission rates for asymptomatic carriers and community sources, these transmission routes have a substantial effect on hospital-onset CDI because of the larger reservoir of hospitalized carriers and persons in the community. Asymptomatic carriers and community sources should be accounted for when designing and evaluating control interventions.

  3. Host response to Clostridium difficile infection: Diagnostics and detection.

    PubMed

    Usacheva, Elena A; Jin, Jian-P; Peterson, Lance R

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant healthcare concern worldwide, and C. difficile is recognised as the most frequent aetiological agent of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adult patients. The clinical manifestation of CDI varies from self-limited diarrhoea to life-threatening colitis. Such a broad disease spectrum can be explained by the impact of host factors. Currently, a complex CDI aetiology is widely accepted, acknowledging the interaction between bacteria and the host. C. difficile strains producing clostridial toxins A and B are considered toxigenic and can cause disease; those not producing the toxins are non-pathogenic. A person colonised with a toxigenic strain will not necessarily develop CDI. It is imperative to recognise patients with active disease from those only colonised with this pathogen and to implement appropriate treatment. This can be achieved by diagnostics that rely on host factors specific to CDI. This review will focus on major aspects of CDI pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms, describing host factors in disease progression and assessment of the host response in order to facilitate the development of CDI-specific diagnostics.

  4. Hematologic diseases: High risk of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Dong-Gun; Park, Yeon Joon; Lee, Jong Wook

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and clinical outcome of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea (CDAD) in patients with hematologic disease. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent C. difficile testing in a tertiary hospital in 2011. The incidence and risk factors for CDAD and its clinical course including recurrence and mortality were assessed in patients with hematologic disease and compared with those in patients with nonhematologic disease. RESULTS: About 320 patients were diagnosed with CDAD (144 patients with hematologic disease; 176 with nonhematologic disease). The incidence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease was estimated to be 36.7 cases/10000 patient hospital days, which was higher than the 5.4 cases/10000 patient hospital days in patients with nonhematologic disease. Recurrence of CDAD was more frequent in patients with hematologic disease compared to those with nonhematologic disease (18.8% vs 8.5%, P < 0.01), which was associated with higher re-use of causative antibiotics for CDAD. Mortality due to CDAD did not differ between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that intravenous immunoglobulin was the only significant factor associated with a lower rate of recurrence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence and recurrence of CDAD was higher in patients with hematologic disease than in those with nonhematologic disease. PMID:24914383

  5. Clostridium Difficile Infection and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Is There a Relation?

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) mimics acute coronary syndrome and is accompanied by reversible left ventricular apical ballooning in the absence of angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. It is a transient condition that typically precedes physical or emotional triggers. Case Report: We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented to our institution with symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection. 24 hours after admission, the patient complained of severe, retrosternal chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed diffuse elevation of ST-segment in the chest leads; however, coronary angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Therein, an echocardiography was performed, which revealed apical ballooning and hypercontractile base with global left ventricular hypokinesis. These features were consistent with TCM. The patient was managed conservatively. Repeat echocardiogram 2 weeks later showed resolution of heart failure. Conclusion: To our research, this is the first report of TCM caused by C. difficile infection. Clinicians involved in the care of patients with C. difficile infection must be aware of this complication and should consider TCM in those who develop atypical chest pain. PMID:27583241

  6. Fidaxomicin--the new drug for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vaishnavi, Chetana

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the many aetiological agents of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and is implicated in 15-25 per cent of the cases. The organism is also involved in the exacearbation of inflammatory bowel disease and extracolonic manifestations. Due to increase in the incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI), emergence of hypervirulent strains, and increased frequency of recurrence, the clinical management of the disease has become important. The management of CDI is based on disease severity, and current antibiotic treatment options are limited to vancomycin or metronidazole in the developing countries. this review article briefly describes important aspects of CDI, and the new drug, fidaxomicin, for its treatment. Fidaxomicin is particularly active against C.difficile and acts by inhibition of RNA synthesis. Clinical trials done to compare the efficacy and safety of fidaxomicin with that of vancomycin in treating CDI concluded that fidaxomicin was non-inferior to vancomycin for treatment of CDI and that there was a significant reduction in recurrences. The bactericidal properties of fidaxomicin make it an ideal alternative for CDI treatment. However, fidaxomicin use should be considered taking into account the potential benefits of the drug, along with the medical requirements of the patient, the risks of treatment and the high cost of fidaxomicin compared to other treatment regimens.

  7. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel R.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.; Perkins, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. PMID:26085550

  8. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  9. Present and past perspectives on Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, D A; González-Chávez, A M; González-Hermosillo-Cornejo, D; Franyuti-Kelly, G A; Díaz-Girón-Gidi, A; Vázquez-López, R

    2017-07-03

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive bacillus that has become one of the main hospital-acquired human gastrointestinal infections in recent years. Its incidence is on the rise, involving more virulent strains, affecting new and previously uncontemplated groups of patients, and producing changes in clinical presentation and treatment response that influence disease outcome. Early diagnosis and disease stratification based on the severity of C.difficile infection are essential for therapeutic management and the implementation of containment measures. However, the speed at which new strains with greater pathogenicity are developing is surpassing that of the development of new drugs, making it necessary to validate other therapeutic options. The present article is a review of the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of C.difficile infection, from its first isolation to the present date, that aims to contribute to the preparation of general physicians and specialists, so that patients with this infection receive opportune and quality medical attention. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Falces-Romero, Iker; Troyano-Hernáez, Paloma; García-Bujalance, Silvia; Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Mellado-Peña, María José; García-Rodríguez, Julio

    2017-07-06

    Our main objective was a revision of clinical, microbiological and epidemiological results of Clostridium difficile-associated infection in paediatric patients (2010-2015). We compared the diagnoses performed by detection of toxins in feces and those performed by real-time PCR. This retrospective study included 82 paediatric patients. Detection of toxigenic C. difficile was performed sequentially, in diarrheal feces and under clinical request. A total of 39% of the patients were attended at Haematology-oncology Unit and >50% of them had previously received cephalosporins. Fever associated with diarrhea was more frequent in the group of toxin detection, whereas not receiving specific antibiotic treatment was more frequent in the group of positive PCR, without statistically significant differences. We highlight the presence of C. difficile infection in children under 2years old. A diagnostic testing in selected paediatric patients would be advisable when there is clinical suspicion of infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. The host immune response to Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common infectious cause of healthcare-acquired diarrhoea. Outcomes of C. difficile colonization are varied, from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant colitis and death, due in part to the interplay between the pathogenic virulence factors of the bacterium and the counteractive immune responses of the host. Secreted toxins A and B are the major virulence factors of C. difficile and induce a profound inflammatory response by intoxicating intestinal epithelial cells causing proinflammatory cytokine release. Host cell necrosis, vascular permeability and neutrophil infiltration lead to an elevated white cell count, profuse diarrhoea and in severe cases, dehydration, hypoalbuminaemia and toxic megacolon. Other bacterial virulence factors, including surface layer proteins and flagella proteins, are detected by host cell surface signal molecules that trigger downstream cell-mediated immune pathways. Human studies have identified a role for serum and faecal immunoglobulin levels in protection from disease, but the recent development of a mouse model of CDI has enabled studies into the precise molecular interactions that trigger the immune response during infection. Key effector molecules have been identified that can drive towards a protective anti-inflammatory response or a damaging proinflammatory response. The limitations of current antimicrobial therapies for CDI have led to the development of both active and passive immunotherapies, none of which have, as yet been formally approved for CDI. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of host immune protection against CDI may provide an exciting opportunity for novel therapeutic developments in the future. PMID:25165542

  12. Comparison of ChromID agar and Clostridium difficile selective agar for effective isolation of C. difficile from stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bo-Moon; Lee, Eun Joo

    2014-01-01

    ChromID Clostridium difficile agar (IDCd; bioMérieux SA, France) is a recently developed chromogenic medium for rapid and specific isolation of C. difficile. We compared the performance of IDCd with that of Clostridium difficile Selective Agar (CDSA). A total of 530 fresh stool specimens were collected from patients with clinical signs compatible with C. difficile infection, and cultures for C. difficile were performed on IDCd and CDSA. C. difficile colonies were identified by spore staining, odor, use of an ANI identification test kit (bioMérieux SA), and multiplex PCR for tcdA, tcdB, and tpi. The concordance rate between IDCd and CDSA was 90.6% (480/530). The positivity rates on IDCd on days 1 and 2 (55.6% and 85.0%, respectively) were significantly higher than those on CDSA (19.4% and 75.6%, respectively) (P<0.001 for day 1 and P=0.02 for day 2), but the detection rates on IDCd and CDSA on day 3 were not different (89.4% vs. 82.8%, P=0.0914). On day 3, the recovery rates for non-C. difficile isolates on IDCd and CDSA were 30.2% (160/530) and 22.1% (117/530), respectively (P=0.0075). Clostridium spp. other than C. difficile were the most prevalent non-C. difficile isolates on both media. The culture positivity rates on IDCd and CDSA were not different on day 3 but IDCd may allow for rapid and sensitive detection of C. difficile within 2 days of cultivation.

  13. Genomic study of the Type IVC secretion system in Clostridium difficile: understanding C. difficile evolution via horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Cheng, Ying; Du, Pengcheng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Hongbing; Li, Xianping; Wang, Jing; Han, Na; Qiang, Yujun; Chen, Chen; Lu, Jinxing

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the etiological agent of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacillus that is responsible for ∼20% of antibiotic-related cases of diarrhea and nearly all cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Previous data have shown that a substantial proportion (11%) of the C. difficile genome consists of mobile genetic elements, including seven conjugative transposons. However, the mechanism underlying the formation of a mosaic genome in C. difficile is unknown. The type-IV secretion system (T4SS) is the only secretion system known to transfer DNA segments among bacteria. We searched genome databases to identify a candidate T4SS in C. difficile that could transfer DNA among different C. difficile strains. All T4SS gene clusters in C. difficile are located within genomic islands (GIs), which have variable lengths and structures and are all conjugative transposons. During the horizontal-transfer process of T4SS GIs within the C. difficile population, the excision sites were altered, resulting in different short-tandem repeat sequences among the T4SS GIs, as well as different chromosomal insertion sites and additional regions in the GIs.

  14. [Risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shu; Xu, Xi-wei; Dong, Fang

    2012-07-10

    To explore the risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in children. From December 2010 to March 2011, the hospitalized diarrheal patients under 18 years old at Beijing Children's Hospital were tested for Clostridium difficile. The CDAD(+) patients were selected and their fecal specimens were PCR-positive for tcdA and (or) tcdB genes. And the patients with healthcare facility-associated-CDAD (HCFA-CDAD) were selected from the group of CDAD(+). The CDAD patients were selected and their fecal specimens were PCR-negative for tcdA and (or) tcdB genes. And the 1:3 matched controls per case were selected from those hospitalized patients without diarrhea at the same department with similar diseases during the same period. The potential predictors of CDAD included age, gender, co-morbidities, prior hospitalization, the administration of C. difficile-active antibiotics during prior 24 hours, recent (< 1 month) exposure to antibiotics or acid-blocking medications or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC), etc. Multivariate Logistic regression models were created to identify the independent predictors of CDAD. Among 93 PCR tests, 35 were positive in fecal samples. There were HCFA-CDAD (n = 30) and CDAD(-) (n = 58). Thirty-five CDAD(+) hospitalized patients were compared with 105 controls. According to multivariate analyses, the predictors of CDAD included prior hospitalization (P < 0.01, OR = 0.002), CRP(P = 0.008, OR = 3.465), NSAID (P = 0.015, OR = 13.950) and WBC (P = 0.003, OR = 8.063). The administration of NSAID, elevated CRP and abnormal WBC are significantly associated with CDAD.

  15. A case of toxic megacolon caused by clostridium difficile infection and treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gweon, Tae Geun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kang, Dong Hoon; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Seong, Hyeon Jin; Ban, Tae Hyun; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection. The mortality rate of fulminant C. difficile infection is reported to be as high as 50%. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with recurrent or refractory C. difficile infection. However, there are few published articles on the use of such transplantation for fulminant C. difficile infection. Here, we report on a patient with toxic megacolon complicated by C. difficile infection who was treated successfully with fecal mi-crobiota transplantation. (Gut Liver, 2015;9:247-250).

  16. The potential value of Clostridium difficile vaccine: an economic computer simulation model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Popovich, Michael J; Tian, Ye; Bailey, Rachel R; Ufberg, Paul J; Wiringa, Ann E; Muder, Robert R

    2010-07-19

    Efforts are currently underway to develop a vaccine against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We developed two decision analytic Monte Carlo computer simulation models: (1) an Initial Prevention Model depicting the decision whether to administer C. difficile vaccine to patients at-risk for CDI and (2) a Recurrence Prevention Model depicting the decision whether to administer C. difficile vaccine to prevent CDI recurrence. Our results suggest that a C. difficile vaccine could be cost-effective over a wide range of C. difficile risk, vaccine costs, and vaccine efficacies especially, when being used post-CDI treatment to prevent recurrent disease.

  17. Prevalence and Duration of Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage among Healthy Subjects in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Galdys, Alison L.; Nelson, Jemma S.; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Schlackman, Jessica L.; Pakstis, Diana L.; Pasculle, A. William; Marsh, Jane W.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that 7 to 15% of healthy adults are colonized with toxigenic Clostridium difficile. To investigate the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and duration of C. difficile colonization in asymptomatic persons, we recruited healthy adults from the general population in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Participants provided epidemiological and dietary intake data and submitted stool specimens. The presence of C. difficile in stool specimens was determined by anaerobic culture. Stool specimens yielding C. difficile underwent nucleic acid testing of the tcdA gene segment with a commercial assay; tcdC genotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates. Subjects positive for C. difficile by toxigenic anaerobic culture were asked to submit additional specimens. One hundred six (81%) of 130 subjects submitted specimens, and 7 (6.6%) of those subjects were colonized with C. difficile. Seven distinct tcdC genotypes were observed among the 7 C. difficile-colonized individuals, including tcdC genotype 20, which has been found in uncooked ground pork in this region. Two (33%) out of 6 C. difficile-colonized subjects who submitted additional specimens tested positive for identical C. difficile strains on successive occasions, 1 month apart. The prevalence of C. difficile carriage in this healthy cohort is concordant with prior estimates. C. difficile-colonized individuals may be important reservoirs for C. difficile and may falsely test positive for infections due to C. difficile when evaluated for community-acquired diarrhea caused by other enteric pathogens. PMID:24759727

  18. Prevalence and duration of asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriage among healthy subjects in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Galdys, Alison L; Nelson, Jemma S; Shutt, Kathleen A; Schlackman, Jessica L; Pakstis, Diana L; Pasculle, A William; Marsh, Jane W; Harrison, Lee H; Curry, Scott R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies suggested that 7 to 15% of healthy adults are colonized with toxigenic Clostridium difficile. To investigate the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and duration of C. difficile colonization in asymptomatic persons, we recruited healthy adults from the general population in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Participants provided epidemiological and dietary intake data and submitted stool specimens. The presence of C. difficile in stool specimens was determined by anaerobic culture. Stool specimens yielding C. difficile underwent nucleic acid testing of the tcdA gene segment with a commercial assay; tcdC genotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates. Subjects positive for C. difficile by toxigenic anaerobic culture were asked to submit additional specimens. One hundred six (81%) of 130 subjects submitted specimens, and 7 (6.6%) of those subjects were colonized with C. difficile. Seven distinct tcdC genotypes were observed among the 7 C. difficile-colonized individuals, including tcdC genotype 20, which has been found in uncooked ground pork in this region. Two (33%) out of 6 C. difficile-colonized subjects who submitted additional specimens tested positive for identical C. difficile strains on successive occasions, 1 month apart. The prevalence of C. difficile carriage in this healthy cohort is concordant with prior estimates. C. difficile-colonized individuals may be important reservoirs for C. difficile and may falsely test positive for infections due to C. difficile when evaluated for community-acquired diarrhea caused by other enteric pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  20. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis.

  1. DNA Microarray-Based PCR Ribotyping of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray. PMID:25411174

  2. Oscillating behavior of Clostridium difficile Min proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Makroczyová, Jana; Jamroškovič, Ján; Krascsenitsová, Eva; Labajová, Nad'a; Barák, Imrich

    2016-06-01

    In rod-shaped bacteria, the proper placement of the division septum at the midcell relies, at least partially, on the proteins of the Min system as an inhibitor of cell division. The main principle of Min system function involves the formation of an inhibitor gradient along the cell axis; however, the establishment of this gradient differs between two well-studied gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. While in gram-negative Escherichia coli, the Min system undergoes pole-to-pole oscillation, in gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, proper spatial inhibition is achieved by the preferential attraction of the Min proteins to the cell poles. Nevertheless, when E.coli Min proteins are inserted into B.subtilis cells, they still oscillate, which negatively affects asymmetric septation during sporulation in this organism. Interestingly, homologs of both Min systems were found to be present in various combinations in the genomes of anaerobic and endospore-forming Clostridia, including the pathogenic Clostridium difficile. Here, we have investigated the localization and behavior of C.difficile Min protein homologs and showed that MinDE proteins of C.difficile can oscillate when expressed together in B.subtilis cells. We have also investigated the effects of this oscillation on B.subtilis sporulation, and observed decreased sporulation efficiency in strains harboring the MinDE genes. Additionally, we have evaluated the effects of C.difficile Min protein expression on vegetative division in this heterologous host. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  4. Clostridium difficile Infections after Blunt Trauma: A Different Patient Population?

    PubMed Central

    Vanzant, Erin L.; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Liu, Huazhi; Malik, Seemab; Davis, Ruth; Lanz, Jennifer; Miggins, Makesha V.; Gentile, Lori F.; Cuenca, Angela; Cuenca, Alex G.; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A.; Ang, Darwin N.; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated infection (CDI) has changed, and it is evident that susceptibility is related not only to exposures and bacterial potency, but host factors as well. Several small studies have suggested that CDI after trauma is associated with a different patient phenotype. The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the epidemiologic factors associated with C. difficile in blunt trauma patients without traumatic brain injury using the Trauma-Related Database as a part of the “Inflammation and Host Response to Injury” (Glue Grant) and the University of Florida Integrated Data Repository. Methods: Previously recorded baseline characteristics, clinical data, and outcomes were compared between groups (67 C. difficile and 384 uncomplicated, 813 intermediate, and 761 complicated non-C. difficile patients) as defined by the Glue Grant on admission and at days seven and 14. Results: The majority of CDI patients experienced complicated or intermediate clinical courses. The mean ages of all cohorts were less than 65 y and CDI patients were significantly older than uncomplicated patients without CDI. The CDI patients had increased days in the hospital and on the ventilator, as well as significantly higher new injury severity scores (NISS), and a greater percentage of patients with NISS >34 points compared with non-CDI patients. They also had greater Marshall and Denver multiple organ dysfunction scores than non-CDI uncomplicated patients, and greater creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, neutrophil count, lactic acid, and PiO2:FiO2 compared with all non-CDI cohorts on admission. In addition, the CDI patients had higher glucose concentrations and base deficit from uncomplicated patients and greater leukocytosis than complicated patients on admission. Several of these changes persisted to days seven and 14. Conclusion: Analysis of severe blunt trauma patients with C. difficile, as compared with non

  5. Guidance for the Efficacy Evaluation of Products with Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile (June 2014)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides an update to the Agency’s interim guidance for the efficacy evaluation of antimicrobial pesticides that are labeled for treating hard non-porous surfaces in healthcare settings contaminated with spores of Clostridium difficile.

  6. John G. Bartlett: Contributions to the discovery of Clostridium difficile antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Sherwood L

    2014-09-15

    In 1975 John Bartlett began trials investigating the problem of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. His work led the discovery of Clostridium difficile and he identified it as the leading cause of hospital-associated infections.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Temperate Clostridium difficile Phage phiCDIF1296T

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Johannes; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile contains many integrated and extrachromosomal genetic elements. In this study, we determined, annotated, and analyzed the complete genome of the C. difficile bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. To our knowledge, this represents the largest genome (131 kb) of a temperate C. difficile phage recognized so far. PMID:26294621

  8. Genome Sequence of a Toxin-Positive Clostridium difficile Strain Isolated from Murine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Mattei, Lisa M.; Edwards, Adrianne N.; McBride, Shonna M.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gewirtz, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herein, we report the genome sequence of a Clostridium difficile strain isolated from the feces of antibiotic-treated C57BL/6 mice. We have named this strain, which differs considerably from those of the previously sequenced C. difficile strains, LEM1. PMID:28385835

  9. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Michele M.; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  10. Survey of Clostridium difficile in retail seafood in College Station, Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America with the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  11. Effect of hospital disinfectants on spores of clinical Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thaís Gonçalves; Barbosa, Thaís Flecher; Teixeira, Felipe Lopes; Ferreira, Eliane de Oliveira; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto; de Paula, Geraldo Renato

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sporicidal activity of hospital disinfectants against spores of two Brazilian Clostridium difficile ribotypes and the BI/NAP1/027. Our results showed that CloroRio(®) and Cidex Opa(®) were the most efficient agents for eliminating spores of C difficile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multicenter Evaluation of a New Screening Test That Detects Clostridium difficile in Fecal Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L.; Keller, S. F.; Lyerly, D. M.; Carman, R. J.; Genheimer, C. W.; Gleaves, C. A.; Kohlhepp, S. J.; Young, S.; Perez, S.; Ye, K.

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes approximately 25% of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrheas and most cases of pseudomembranous colitis. We evaluated C. DIFF CHEK, a new screening test that detects glutamate dehydrogenase of C. difficile. Our results showed that this test was comparable to PCR in sensitivity and specificity and outperformed bacterial culture. PMID:15297543

  13. Clostridium difficile infection in the hospitalized pediatric population: increasing trend in disease incidence.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Pant, Chaitanya; Anderson, Michael P; Donskey, Curtis J; Sferra, Thomas J

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection continues to increase in hospitalized pediatric patients, we evaluated data from a United States national inpatient database. For the period of 2003 to 2009, we found an increasing trend in the incidence of C. difficile infection. These data suggest greater effort be given to prevent and treat this infection in children.

  14. Multicenter evaluation of a new screening test that detects Clostridium difficile in fecal specimens.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Keller, S F; Lyerly, D M; Carman, R J; Genheimer, C W; Gleaves, C A; Kohlhepp, S J; Young, S; Perez, S; Ye, K

    2004-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes approximately 25% of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrheas and most cases of pseudomembranous colitis. We evaluated C. DIFF CHEK, a new screening test that detects glutamate dehydrogenase of C. difficile. Our results showed that this test was comparable to PCR in sensitivity and specificity and outperformed bacterial culture.

  15. Bezlotoxumab for Prevention of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H; Gerding, Dale N; Poxton, Ian R; Kelly, Ciaran; Nathan, Richard; Birch, Thomas; Cornely, Oliver A; Rahav, Galia; Bouza, Emilio; Lee, Christine; Jenkin, Grant; Jensen, Werner; Kim, You-Sun; Yoshida, Junichi; Gabryelski, Lori; Pedley, Alison; Eves, Karen; Tipping, Robert; Guris, Dalya; Kartsonis, Nicholas; Dorr, Mary-Beth

    2017-01-26

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Recurrences are common after antibiotic therapy. Actoxumab and bezlotoxumab are human monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins A and B, respectively. We conducted two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials, MODIFY I and MODIFY II, involving 2655 adults receiving oral standard-of-care antibiotics for primary or recurrent C. difficile infection. Participants received an infusion of bezlotoxumab (10 mg per kilogram of body weight), actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab (10 mg per kilogram each), or placebo; actoxumab alone (10 mg per kilogram) was given in MODIFY I but discontinued after a planned interim analysis. The primary end point was recurrent infection (new episode after initial clinical cure) within 12 weeks after infusion in the modified intention-to-treat population. In both trials, the rate of recurrent C. difficile infection was significantly lower with bezlotoxumab alone than with placebo (MODIFY I: 17% [67 of 386] vs. 28% [109 of 395]; adjusted difference, -10.1 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -15.9 to -4.3; P<0.001; MODIFY II: 16% [62 of 395] vs. 26% [97 of 378]; adjusted difference, -9.9 percentage points; 95% CI, -15.5 to -4.3; P<0.001) and was significantly lower with actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab than with placebo (MODIFY I: 16% [61 of 383] vs. 28% [109 of 395]; adjusted difference, -11.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -17.4 to -5.9; P<0.001; MODIFY II: 15% [58 of 390] vs. 26% [97 of 378]; adjusted difference, -10.7 percentage points; 95% CI, -16.4 to -5.1; P<0.001). In prespecified subgroup analyses (combined data set), rates of recurrent infection were lower in both groups that received bezlotoxumab than in the placebo group in subpopulations at high risk for recurrent infection or for an adverse outcome. The rates of initial clinical cure were 80% with bezlotoxumab alone, 73% with actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab, and 80

  16. Clostridium difficile PCR Cycle Threshold Predicts Free Toxin.

    PubMed

    Senchyna, Fiona; Gaur, Rajiv L; Gombar, Saurabh; Truong, Cynthia Y; Schroeder, Lee F; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-09-01

    There is no stand-alone Clostridium difficile diagnostic that can sensitively and rapidly detect fecal free toxins. We investigated the performance of the C. difficile PCR cycle threshold (CT ) for predicting free toxin status. Consecutive stool samples (n = 312) positive for toxigenic C. difficile by the GeneXpert C. difficile/Epi tcdB PCR assay were tested with the rapid membrane C. Diff Quik Chek Complete immunoassay (RMEIA). RMEIA toxin-negative samples were tested with the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and tgcBIOMICS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using RMEIA alone or in combination with CCNA and/or ELISA as the reference method, the accuracy of CT was measured at different CT cutoffs. Using RMEIA as the reference method, a CT cutoff of 26.35 detected toxin-positive samples with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.2% to 98.9%), 65.9% (95% CI, 59.0% to 72.2%), 57.4% (95% CI, 52.7% to 62%), and 97.1% (95% CI, 92.8% to 98.9), respectively. Inclusion of CCNA in the reference method improved CT specificity to 78.0% (95% CI, 70.7% to 84.2%). Intercartridge lot CT variability measured as the average coefficient of variation was 2.8% (95% CI, 1.2% to 3.2%). Standardizing the input stool volume did not improve CT toxin specificity. The median CT values were not significantly different between stool samples with Bristol scores of 5, 6, and 7, between pediatric and adult samples, or between presumptive 027 and non-027 strains. In addition to sensitively detecting toxigenic C. difficile in stool, on-demand PCR may also be used to accurately predict toxin-negative stool samples, thus providing additional results in PCR-positive stool samples to guide therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  18. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  19. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  20. Fecal microbiota transplantation in relapsing Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Rohlke, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection rates are Climbing in frequency and severity, and the spectrum of susceptible patients is expanding beyond the traditional scope of hospitalized patients receiving antibiotics. Fecal microbiota transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as an effective and safe intervention in patients with recurrent disease, likely due to the restoration of a disrupted microbiome. Cure rates of > 90% are being consistently reported from multiple centers. Transplantation can be provided through a variety of methodologies, either to the lower proximal, lower distal, or upper gastrointestinal tract. This review summarizes reported results, factors in donor selection, appropriate patient criteria, and the various preparations and mechanisms of fecal microbiota transplant delivery available to clinicians and patients. PMID:23152734

  1. Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection: From Colonization to Cure

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Kelsey; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Alonso, Carolyn D.; Kelly, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly prevalent, dangerous and challenging to prevent and manage. Despite intense national and international attention the incidence of primary and of recurrent CDI (PCDI and RCDI, respectively) have risen rapidly throughout the past decade. Of major concern is the increase in cases of RCDI resulting in substantial morbidity, morality and economic burden. RCDI management remains challenging as there is no uniformly effective therapy, no firm consensus on optimal treatment, and reliable data regarding RCDI-specific treatment options is scant. Novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed to rapidly, accurately, and effectively identify and treat patients with, or at-risk for, RCDI. In this review we consider the factors implicated in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of RCDI, evaluate current management options for RCDI and explore novel and emerging therapies. PMID:25930686

  2. Fecal microbiota transplantation in treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, William R

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an increasingly common and severe international health problem. Customary treatment of this infection, usually with antibiotics, is often ineffective and its recurrence is common. In recent years the treatment of recurrent or refractory CDI by the transfer of stool from an uninfected person, so called fecal "microbiota transplantation" has become recognized as effective and generally safe. The effectiveness of this novel treatment is incompletely defined but is likely to be due to its correction of the intestinal dysbiosis that characterizes the disease. Practical methods for the administration of the transplantation have been described. This review summarizes the current reported experiences with fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment for CDI. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. RNA-based control mechanisms of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Soutourina, Olga

    2017-02-16

    Clostridium difficile (CD)-associated diarrhoea is currently the most prevalent nosocomial diarrhoea worldwide. Many characteristics of CD pathogenicity remain poorly understood. Recent data strongly indicate the importance of an RNA network for the control of gene expression in CD. More than 200 regulatory RNAs have been identified by deep sequencing and targeted approaches, including Hfq-dependent trans riboregulators, cis-antisense RNAs, CRISPR RNAs, and c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches. These regulatory RNAs are involved in the control of major processes in the CD infection cycle, for example motility, biofilm formation, adhesion, sporulation, stress response, and defence against bacteriophages. We will discuss recent advances in elucidation of the original features of RNA-based mechanisms in this important enteropathogen. This knowledge may pave the way for further discoveries in this emergent field.

  4. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Kerstens, Jeroen; de Gheldere, Charles; Vanclooster, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM) secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and are widely regarded as obsolete. Subtotal or total colectomy with end ileostomy is currently considered the procedure of choice. After presenting our case, we discuss the literature available on the subject to argue that the scarce evidence on the optimal surgical treatment for TM is primarily based on TM associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and that there might be a rationale for considering minimally invasive procedures like blowhole colostomy for CDI-associated TM. PMID:28097034

  5. Refinement of the hamster model of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Douce, Gillian; Goulding, David

    2010-01-01

    The Golden Syrian hamster is widely regarded as the most relevant small animal model of Clostridium difficile disease as oral infection of animals pre-treated with antibiotics reproduces many of the symptoms observed in man. These include diarrhoea, histological damage, colonisation of the large bowel and sporulation of the organism at the terminal stage of the disease. However, infection results in a fatal outcome, which in the past has been used as an experimental endpoint. More recently, attempts have been made to refine the model to maximise the scientific data generated whilst minimising animal suffering. This has been achieved using a combination of qualitative and quantitative measurements taken during the course of the infection and at post-mortem. This has allowed timing of experiments to be optimised to ensure appropriate monitoring of animals during the acute phase of infection and provides opportunities to establish appropriate humane endpoints to these experiments.

  6. [Diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in the elderly: new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pareja-Sierra, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Infection due to Clostridium difficile is currently the main cause of hospital acquired gastrointestinal disease. Its prevalence in the elderly population is higher due to there being many associated risk factors in this age group, such as comorbidity, frequent exposure to the healthcare or residential home setting, immunosenescence, greater consumption of antibiotics, and antiacids. The diagnostic techniques have notably improved in the last few years, which could also account for an increase in its diagnosis. The new expert consensus recommendations propose stratifying the clinical situation of the patient in order to choose the treatment option. Therapeutic options have recently been included in the new Clinical Guidelines, such as flidaxomicin or fecal transplants, with encouraging results, particularly for the control of frequent recurrences.

  7. Clostridium difficile Infection in Children: Current State and Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Tamma, Pranita D.; Sandora, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in children has increased over the past decade. In recent years, new and intriguing data on pediatric CDI have emerged. Community-onset infections are increasingly recognized, even in children who have not previously received antibiotics. A hypervirulent strain is responsible for up to 20% of pediatric CDI cases. Unique risk factors for CDI in children have been identified. Advances in diagnostic testing strategies, including the use of nucleic acid amplification tests, have raised new questions about the optimal approach to diagnosing CDI in children. Novel therapeutic options are available for adult patients with CDI, raising questions about the use of these agents in children. Updated recommendations about infection prevention and control measures are now available. We summarize these recent developments in pediatric CDI in this review and also highlight remaining knowledge gaps that should be addressed in future research efforts. PMID:23687578

  8. Predictors of Clostridium difficile colitis infections in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    RICCIARDI, R.; HARRIMAN, K.; BAXTER, N. N.; HARTMAN, L. K.; TOWN, R. J.; VIRNIG, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Hospital-level predictors of high rates of ‘Clostridium difficile-associated disease’ (CDAD) were evaluated in over 2300 hospitals across California, Arizona, and Minnesota. American Hospital Association data were used to determine hospital characteristics associated with high rates of CDAD. Significant correlations were found between hospital rates of CDAD, common infections and other identified pathogens. Hospitals in urban areas had higher average rates of CDAD; yet, irrespective of geographic location, hospital rates of CDAD were associated with other infections. In addition, hospitals with ‘high CDAD’ rates had slower turnover of beds and were more likely to offer transplant services. These results reveal large differences in rates of CDAD across regions. Hospitals with high rates of CDAD have high rates of other common infections, suggesting a need for broad infection control policies. PMID:17686193

  9. Clostridium difficile surveillance: harnessing new technologies to control transmission.

    PubMed

    Eyre, David W; Walker, A Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium difficile surveillance allows outbreaks of cases clustered in time and space to be identified and further transmission prevented. Traditionally, manual detection of groups of cases diagnosed in the same ward or hospital, often followed by retrospective reference laboratory genotyping, has been used to identify outbreaks. However, integrated healthcare databases offer the prospect of automated real-time outbreak detection based on statistically robust methods, and accounting for contacts between cases, including those distant to the ward of diagnosis. Complementary to this, rapid benchtop whole genome sequencing, and other highly discriminatory genotyping, has the potential to distinguish which cases are part of an outbreak with high precision and in clinically relevant timescales. These new technologies are likely to shape future surveillance.

  10. Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H; Chalmers, James D; Nord, Carl E; Freeman, Jane; Bouza, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Europe has increased markedly since 2000. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a strong association between cephalosporin use and CDI, and many national programmes on CDI control have focused on reducing cephalosporin usage. Despite reductions in cephalosporin use, however, rates of CDI have continued to rise. This review examines the potential association of CDI with cephalosporins, and considers other factors that influence CDI risk. EUCLID (the EUropean, multicentre, prospective biannual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalized patients with Diarrhoea) reported an increase in the annual incidence of CDI from 6.6 to 7.3 cases per 10 000 patient bed-days from 2011-12 to 2012-13, respectively. While CDI incidence and cephalosporin usage varied widely across countries studied, there was no clear association between overall cephalosporin prescribing (or the use of any particular cephalosporin) and CDI incidence. Moreover, variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cephalosporins of the same generation make categorization by generation insufficient for predicting impact on gut microbiota. A multitude of additional factors can affect the risk of CDI. Antibiotic choice is an important consideration; however, CDI risk is associated with a range of antibiotic classes. Prescription of multiple antibiotics and a long duration of treatment are key risk factors for CDI, and risk also differs across patient populations. We propose that all of these are factors that should be taken into account when selecting an antibiotic, rather than focusing on the exclusion of individual drug classes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  11. Rheological properties of erythrocytes in patients infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Czepiel, Jacek; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Biesiada, Grażyna; Sobczyk-Krupiarz, Iwona; Jałowiecka, Izabela; Świstek, Magdalena; Perucki, William; Teległów, Aneta; Marchewka, Jakub; Dąbrowski, Zbigniew; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-12-04

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a bacterial infection of the digestive tract. Acute infections are accompanied by increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). To date, there have been no studies of the rheological properties of blood during the course of digestive tract infections. The aim of our study was to examine the effects of CDI on red blood cell (RBC) rheology, specifically RBC deformability, RBC aggregation, and plasma viscosity. In addition, the activity of glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in RBC was studied. Our study group included 20 patients with CDI, 20 healthy persons comprised the control group. We examined the effects of CDI on the rheology of RBCs, their deformability and aggregation, using a Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LORCA). Plasma viscosity was determined using a capillary tube plasma viscosymeter. Moreover, we estimated the activity of AChE and G6PD in RBC using spectrophotometric method. A statistically significant increase was found in the aggregation index, viscosity and activity of G6PD whereas the amount of time to reach half of maximum aggregation (t½) and the amplitude of aggregation (AMP) both showed statistically significantly decreases among patients with CDI compared to the control group. We also observed that the Elongation Index (EI) was decreased when shear stress values were low, between 0.3 Pa and 0.58 Pa, whereas EI was increased for shear stress in the range of 1.13-59.97 Pa. These observations were statistically significant. We report for the first time that acute infection of the gastrointestinal tract with Clostridium difficile is associated with abnormalities in rheological properties of blood, increased serum viscosity as well as increased aggregation of RBCs, which correlated with severity of inflammation. These abnormalities may be an additional mechanism causing increased incidence of VTE in CDI.

  12. Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark H.; Chalmers, James D.; Nord, Carl E.; Freeman, Jane; Bouza, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Europe has increased markedly since 2000. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a strong association between cephalosporin use and CDI, and many national programmes on CDI control have focused on reducing cephalosporin usage. Despite reductions in cephalosporin use, however, rates of CDI have continued to rise. This review examines the potential association of CDI with cephalosporins, and considers other factors that influence CDI risk. EUCLID (the EUropean, multicentre, prospective biannual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalized patients with Diarrhoea) reported an increase in the annual incidence of CDI from 6.6 to 7.3 cases per 10 000 patient bed-days from 2011–12 to 2012–13, respectively. While CDI incidence and cephalosporin usage varied widely across countries studied, there was no clear association between overall cephalosporin prescribing (or the use of any particular cephalosporin) and CDI incidence. Moreover, variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cephalosporins of the same generation make categorization by generation insufficient for predicting impact on gut microbiota. A multitude of additional factors can affect the risk of CDI. Antibiotic choice is an important consideration; however, CDI risk is associated with a range of antibiotic classes. Prescription of multiple antibiotics and a long duration of treatment are key risk factors for CDI, and risk also differs across patient populations. We propose that all of these are factors that should be taken into account when selecting an antibiotic, rather than focusing on the exclusion of individual drug classes. PMID:27659735

  13. What is the current role of algorithmic approaches for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection?

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H; Planche, Tim; Fang, Ferric C; Gilligan, Peter

    2010-12-01

    With the recognition of several serious outbreaks of Clostridium difficile infection in the industrialized world coupled with the development of new testing technologies for detection of this organism, there has been renewed interest in the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection. Two factors seem to have driven much of this interest. First, the recognition that immunoassays for detection of C. difficile toxins A and B, for many years the most widely used tests for C. difficile infection diagnosis, were perhaps not as sensitive as previously believed at a time when attributed deaths to C. difficile infections were showing a remarkable rise. Second, the availability of FDA-approved commercial and laboratory-developed PCR assays which could detect toxigenic strains of C. difficile provided a novel and promising testing approach for diagnosing this infection. In this point-counterpoint on the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection, we have asked two experts in C. difficile infection diagnosis, Ferric Fang, who has recently published two articles in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology advocating the use of PCR as a standalone test (see this author's references 12 and 28), and Mark Wilcox, who played a key role in developing the IDSA/SHEA guidelines on Clostridium difficile infection (see Wilcox and Planche's reference 1), along with his colleague, Tim Planche, to address the following question: what is the current role of algorithmic approaches to the diagnosis of C. difficile infection?

  14. What Is the Current Role of Algorithmic Approaches for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection?▿

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With the recognition of several serious outbreaks of Clostridium difficile infection in the industrialized world coupled with the development of new testing technologies for detection of this organism, there has been renewed interest in the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection. Two factors seem to have driven much of this interest. First, the recognition that immunoassays for detection of C. difficile toxins A and B, for many years the most widely used tests for C. difficile infection diagnosis, were perhaps not as sensitive as previously believed at a time when attributed deaths to C. difficile infections were showing a remarkable rise. Second, the availability of FDA-approved commercial and laboratory-developed PCR assays which could detect toxigenic strains of C. difficile provided a novel and promising testing approach for diagnosing this infection. In this point-counterpoint on the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection, we have asked two experts in C. difficile infection diagnosis, Ferric Fang, who has recently published two articles in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology advocating the use of PCR as a standalone test (see this author's references 12 and 28), and Mark Wilcox, who played a key role in developing the IDSA/SHEA guidelines on Clostridium difficile infection (see Wilcox and Planche's reference 1), along with his colleague, Tim Planche, to address the following question: what is the current role of algorithmic approaches to the diagnosis of C. difficile infection? PMID:20980568

  15. Structural insight into the Clostridium difficile ethanolamine utilisation microcompartment.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Alison C; Tuck, Laura R; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Lewis, Richard J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen.

  16. Control of Clostridium difficile Physiopathology in Response to Cysteine Availability

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Thomas; Dancer-Thibonnier, Marie; Monot, Marc; Hamiot, Audrey; Bouillaut, Laurent; Soutourina, Olga; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is linked to its ability to produce two toxins: TcdA and TcdB. The level of toxin synthesis is influenced by environmental signals, such as phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugars, biotin, and amino acids, especially cysteine. To understand the molecular mechanisms of cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production, we reconstructed the sulfur metabolism pathways of C. difficile strain 630 in silico and validated some of them by testing C. difficile growth in the presence of various sulfur sources. High levels of sulfide and pyruvate were produced in the presence of 10 mM cysteine, indicating that cysteine is actively catabolized by cysteine desulfhydrases. Using a transcriptomic approach, we analyzed cysteine-dependent control of gene expression and showed that cysteine modulates the expression of genes involved in cysteine metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, fermentation, energy metabolism, iron acquisition, and the stress response. Additionally, a sigma factor (SigL) and global regulators (CcpA, CodY, and Fur) were tested to elucidate their roles in the cysteine-dependent regulation of toxin production. Among these regulators, only sigL inactivation resulted in the derepression of toxin gene expression in the presence of cysteine. Interestingly, the sigL mutant produced less pyruvate and H2S than the wild-type strain. Unlike cysteine, the addition of 10 mM pyruvate to the medium for a short time during the growth of the wild-type and sigL mutant strains reduced expression of the toxin genes, indicating that cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production is mainly due to the accumulation of cysteine by-products during growth. Finally, we showed that the effect of pyruvate on toxin gene expression is mediated at least in part by the two-component system CD2602-CD2601. PMID:27297391

  17. Survival of Clostridium difficile spores at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Torres, J Antonio; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile's presence has been reported in meat products stored typically at low temperatures. This study evaluated the viability in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) of spores from epidemic C. difficile strain R20291 (4.6 log CFU/ml) and M120 (7.8 log CFU/ml). Viability was assessed during 4 months at -80 °C, -20 °C, 4 °C (refrigeration), and 23 °C (room temperature), and after 10 freeze (-20 °C)/thaw (+23 °C) cycles. Although spore viability decreased, significant viability was still observed after 4 months at -20 °C, i.e., 3.5 and 3.9 log CFU/ml and -80 °C, i.e., 6.0 and 6.1 log CFU/ml for strains R20291 and M120, respectively. The same trend was observed for M120 at 4 °C and 23 °C, while for R20291 the viability change was non-significant at 4 °C but increased significantly at 23 °C (p > 0.05). After 10 freeze-thaw cycles, viability of both strains decreased but a significant fraction remained viable (4.3 and 6.3 log CFU/ml for strain R20291 and M120, respectively). Strikingly, both strains showed higher viability in a meat model than in PBS. A small but significant decrease (p < 0.05) from 6.7 to 6.3 log CFU/ml in M120 viability was observed after 2-month storage in the meat model while the decrease from an initial 3.4 log CFU/ml observed for R20291 was non-significant (p = 0.12). In summary, C. difficile spores can survive low-temperature conditions for up to 4 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clostridium difficile infection in children hospitalized due to diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Dulęba, K; Pawłowska, M; Wietlicka-Piszcz, M

    2014-02-01

    The frequency of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI)-related hospitalizations is increasing. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of CDI among children hospitalized with diarrhea, risk factors or predictors for severe CDI, the prevalence of NAP1, and to compare the course of CDI depending on bacteria toxicity profile. A retrospective analysis of case records of 64 children (age range 3 months-16 years, median age 2.12 years) with CDI as defined by diarrheal disease and positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test (Xpert C. difficile) was conducted. Modified national adult guidelines were used to assess the severity of CDI. CDIs represented 2.7 % of patients with diarrhea (13.5 cases per 1,000 admissions). Thirty-three CDIs (52 %) were community-associated. Antibacterial use preceded CDI in 61 patients (95 %). Seventeen cases (27 %) were binary toxin-positive (CDT+), 13 of which were NAP1 (20.5 %). Over 75 % of CDIs with NAP1 was hospital-acquired, and more often proceeded with generalized infection (p < 0.05). Risk factors for severe CDI (34 %) included NAP1 [odds ratio (OR), 4.85; 95 % confidence interval (Cl), 1.23, 21.86) and co-morbidities (OR, 4.25; 95 % Cl, 1.34, 14.38). Diarrhea ≥10 stools daily was associated with severe CDI (p = 0.01). Recurrence occurred in three patients (4.5 %). There was no mortality. C. difficile is an important factor of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children. Co-morbidities and NAP1 predispose to severe CDI.

  19. Clostridium difficile colitis in children following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosen, J B; Schecter, M G; Heinle, J S; McKenzie, E D; Morales, D L; Dishop, M K; Danziger-Isakov, L; Mallory, G B; Elidemir, O

    2010-08-01

    Risk factors for Clostridium difficile diarrhea are antibiotic exposure, hospitalization, extreme ages, and immunodeficiency. Patients with CF have a high rate of colonization with C. difficile. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients at Texas Children's Hospital who underwent lung transplantation since the inception of our program in October 2002 until October 2008. There were 78 pediatric lung transplants performed at our institution during the study period. Four patients developed six total episodes of CDC for an overall incidence of 5.4%. CF was the underlying diagnosis in all four patients, leading to an incidence of 8.9% in patients with CF. Two patients developed colitis within the first four months following transplant, and the other two patients developed colitis more than three yr after transplantation. All four patients required hospitalization, and three patients were managed medically while one patient underwent diverting ileostomy. One experienced renal insufficiency and subsequently expired. Overall survival was 75% among patients with CDC following lung transplantation. CDC causes significant morbidity and mortality in children with CF who have undergone lung transplantation.

  20. Management of inflammatory bowel disease with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    D’Aoust, Julie; Battat, Robert; Bessissow, Talat

    2017-01-01

    AIM To address the management of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) in the setting of suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-flare. METHODS A systematic search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases by independent reviewers identified 70 articles including a total of 932141 IBD patients or IBD-related hospitalizations. RESULTS In those with IBD, CDI is associated with increased morbidity, including subsequent escalation in IBD medical therapy, urgent colectomy and increased hospitalization, as well as excess mortality. Vancomycin-containing regimens are effective first-line therapies for CDI in IBD inpatients. No prospective data exists with regards to the safety or efficacy of initiating or maintaining corticosteroid, immunomodulator, or biologic therapy to treat IBD in the setting of CDI. Corticosteroid use is a risk factor for the development of CDI, while immunomodulators and biologics are not. CONCLUSION Strong recommendations regarding when to initiate IBD specific therapy in those with CDI are precluded by a lack of evidence. However, based on expert opinion and observational data, initiation or resumption of immunosuppressive therapy after 48-72 h of targeted antibiotic treatment for CDI may be considered. PMID:28785153

  1. Fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection: benefits and barriers.

    PubMed

    Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Cohen, Mitchell B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased worldwide in the past two decades. A principal function of the gut microbiota is to protect the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Increasingly, the gut microbiota have been shown to influence susceptibility to other genetic and environmentally acquired conditions. Transplantation of healthy donor fecal material in patients with CDI may re-establish the normal composition of the gut microbiota and has been shown to be effective in recurrent CDI. We intend to review the most recent data on fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and critically discuss potential advantages and handicaps of this new therapeutic approach. Evidence from case series and only one randomized clinical trial suggests that FMT is able to restore the wide diversity of microflora, improve C. difficile-related symptoms and prevent CDI recurrence. FMT is a promising treatment option for serious and recurrent CDI, and current evidence (although weak) demonstrates consistent and excellent efficacy in clinical outcomes. However, many questions should be answered before it may be recommended as routine standard treatment. Mechanisms of action need to be better understood. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to determine long-lasting effects (including the association with autoimmune diseases).

  2. Ridinilazole: a novel therapy for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Richard J; Tillotson, Glenn; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Garey, Kevin W; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea. Recurrent CDI increases disease morbidity and mortality, posing a high burden to patients and a growing economic burden to the healthcare system. Thus, there exists a significant unmet and increasing medical need for new therapies for CDI. This review aims to provide a concise summary of CDI in general and a specific update on ridinilazole (formerly SMT19969), a novel antibacterial currently under development for the treatment of CDI. Owing to its highly targeted spectrum of activity and ability to spare the normal gut microbiota, ridinilazole provides significant advantages over metronidazole and vancomycin, the mainstay antibiotics for CDI. Ridinilazole is bactericidal against C. difficile and exhibits a prolonged post-antibiotic effect. Furthermore, treatment with ridinilazole results in decreased toxin production. A phase 1 trial demonstrated that oral ridinilazole is well tolerated and specifically targets clostridia whilst sparing other faecal bacteria. Phase 2 and 3 trials will hopefully further our understanding of the clinical utility of ridinilazole for the treatment of CDI.

  3. [Treatment of refractory or recurrent Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo

    2012-08-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased over the past decades. It is related to the emergence of hypervirulent strains and increased use of antibiotics. The incidence of refractory CDI to standard therapies and the risk for recurrent CDI are also increasing. Current guidelines recommend the first recurrence to be treated with the same agent used for the initial episode. However, data are lacking to support any particular treatment strategy for severe refractory CDI or cases with multiple recurrence. Treatments currently available for CDI are inadequate to prevent recurrence. Widely used method for managing a subsequent recurrence involves tapering followed by pulsed doses of vancomycin. Other potentially effective strategies for recurrent CDI are use of other antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, nitazoxanide, rifaximin, tigecycline, and teicoplanin. There are efforts to recover gut microflora and to optimize immune response to CDI. These include use of probiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation, intravenous immunoglobulin, monoclonal antibodies directed against C. difficile toxins, and active vaccination. However treatment of patients with refractory CDI and those with multiple CDI recurrences is based on limited clinical evidence, and there is an ongoing need for continued research to improve the outcomes these patients.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of equine and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Båverud, V; Gunnarsson, A; Karlsson, M; Franklin, A

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 Clostridium difficile isolates, 36 of them from horse feces and 14 from environmental sites, was determined by broth microdilution. The antimicrobial agents tested were avilamycin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, spiramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC 16 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (MIC >/=32 microg/ml), spiramycin (MIC > 16 microg/ml), and virginiamycin (MIC 8-16 microg/ml) were higher for 18 isolates. Those were mainly isolated from horses at animal hospitals and further from environmental sites at a stud farm. In contrast, all isolates, except one, from healthy foals had low MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, and oxytetracycline. The isolates from soil in public parks had also low MICs of these antimicrobial agents. Broth microdilution appeared both reliable and reproducible for susceptibility testing of C. difficile. The method was also readily performed and the MIC endpoints were easily read.

  5. Proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anne; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Crossett, Ben; Nagy, Judit; Brown, Katherine; Fairweather, Neil

    2005-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that causes disease of the large intestine, particularly after treatment with antibiotics. The bacterium produces two toxins (A and B) that are responsible for the pathology of the disease. In addition, a number of bacterial virulence factors associated with adhesion to the gut have previously been identified, including the cell wall protein Cwp66, the high-molecular weight surface layer protein (HMW-SLP) and the flagella. As the genome sequence predicts many other cell wall associated proteins, we have investigated the diversity of proteins in cell wall extracts, with the aim of identifying further virulence factors. We have used a number of methods to remove the proteins associated with the cell wall of C. difficile. Two of the resulting extracts, obtained using low pH glycine treatment and lysozyme digestion of the cell wall, have been analysed in detail by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. One hundred and nineteen spots, comprising 49 different proteins, have been identified. The two surface layer proteins (SLPs) are the most abundant proteins, and we have also found components of the flagellum. Interestingly, we have also determined that a number of paralogs of the HMW-SLP are expressed, and these could represent targets for further investigation as virulence factors.

  6. Portrait Toxigenic Clostridium difficile assay, an isothermal amplification assay detects toxigenic C. difficile in clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Denys, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    The Portrait Toxigenic Clostridium difficile assay is a rapid, qualitative assay for the detection of the tcdB gene of C. difficile in stool specimens from patients suspected of C. difficile infections, and received 510(k) clearance by the US FDA in March 2012. The Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile assay combines novel blocked-primer-mediated helicase-dependent multiplex amplification (bpHDA) technology and chip-based detection in an automated sample-to-result format. The assay requires minimal sample preparation and results are available within 90 min. In a multicenter evaluation, the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile assay had a sensitivity of 98.2% and specificity of 92.8% compared with toxigenic culture. A comparative study between the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile assay and three FDA-cleared molecular assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile exhibited a high degree of agreement (93.8-97.5%). The Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile assay provides a simple, cost-effective method with broad applicability to panel-based approaches, potentially simplifying workflow.

  7. Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile as confirmatory tests in a multistep algorithm for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Luis; Reigadas, Elena; Marín, Mercedes; Fernández-Chico, Antonia; Catalán, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    We compared two multistep diagnostic algorithms based on C. Diff Quik Chek Complete and, as confirmatory tests, GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 87.2%, 99.7%, 97.1%, and 98.3%, respectively, for the GenomEra-based algorithm and 89.7%, 99.4%, 95.5%, and 98.6%, respectively, for the Xpert-based algorithm. GenomEra represents an alternative to Xpert as a confirmatory test of a multistep algorithm for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) diagnosis.

  8. Dissemination of Clostridium difficile in food and the environment: Significant sources of C. difficile community-acquired infection?

    PubMed

    Warriner, K; Xu, C; Habash, M; Sultan, S; Weese, S J

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is a significant pathogen with over 300 000 cases reported in North America annually. Previously, it was thought that C. difficile was primarily a clinically associated infection. However, through the use of whole genome sequencing it has been revealed that the majority of cases are community acquired. The source of community-acquired C. difficile infections (CDI) is open to debate with foodborne being one route considered. Clostridium difficile fits the criteria of a foodborne pathogen with respect to being commonly encountered in a diverse range of foods that includes meat, seafood and fresh produce. However, no foodborne illness outbreaks have been directly linked to C. difficile there is also no conclusive evidence that its spores can germinate in food matrices. This does not exclude food as a potential vehicle but it is likely that the pathogen is also acquired through zoonosis and the environment. The most significant factor that defines susceptibility to CDI is the host microbiome and functioning immune system. In this respect, effective control can be exercised by reducing the environmental burden of C. difficile along with boosting the host defences against the virulent enteric pathogen. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation via nasogastric tube for recurrent clostridium difficile infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kronman, Matthew P; Nielson, Heather J; Adler, Amanda L; Giefer, Matthew J; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Singh, Namita; Zerr, Danielle M; Suskind, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a safe and effective therapy for adults with recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis, but data regarding FMT in children are limited and focus on colonoscopic administration of FMT. We present 10 consecutive children who received FMT via nasogastric tube for treatment of recurrent C difficile infection. Median age was 5.4 years, and 30% were receiving simultaneous immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 44 days, and 90% of patients resolved their C difficile infection; one patient relapsed 2 months later after receiving antibiotics. FMT via nasogastric tube appears safe, well tolerated, and effective in treating pediatric recurrent C difficile colitis.

  10. A DNA vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, David F; Rosenberg, Talia; Zaharatos, Jerry; Franco, David; Ho, David D

    2009-06-02

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen with increasing severity for which host antibody responses provide protection from disease. DNA vaccination has several advantages compared to traditional vaccine methods, however no study has examined this platform against C. difficile toxins. A synthetic gene was created encoding the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of C. difficile toxin A, optimized for expression in human cells. Gene expression was examined in vitro. Mice were inoculated and then challenged with parenteral toxin A. Vaccination provided high titer antibodies and protected mice from death. This represents the first report of DNA vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies to C. difficile toxin A.

  11. Faecal microbiota transplantation for severe Clostridium difficile infection in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Gardiner, Bradley; Kwong, Jason C; Ward, Peter; Testro, Adam G; Charles, Patrick G P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a case of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) used for severe binary toxin-positive Clostridium difficile infection in an intensive care setting. The patient was admitted to the ICU of a tertiary hospital and failed traditional maximal pharmacological management. Adjunctive therapy with FMT given through gastroscopy resulted in resolution of the C. difficile-related symptoms. Although there is a growing experience with FMT for recurrent C. difficile infection, published evidence in severe disease is very limited. In a landscape of increasingly severe C. difficile infection, adjunctive FMT may be considered a useful early treatment option.

  12. The relationship between patient functional status and environmental contamination by Clostridium difficile: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Blakney, Rebekah; Gudnadottir, Unnur; Warrack, Simone; O'Horo, John C.; Anderson, Michael; Sethi, Ajay; Schmitz, Michelle; Wang, Jennifer; Duster, Megan; Ide, Emma; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Limited data exist on patient factors related to environmental contamination with Clostridium difficile. Methods We evaluated the association between the functional status of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) and environmental contamination with C. difficile. Results Contamination of patient rooms was frequent and higher functional status was associated with contaminated surfaces remote from the bed. All but one environmental isolates matched the corresponding patient's stool isolate for the seven patients tested. Conclusion Functional status is a factor that influences environmental contamination with C. difficile. Future studies should evaluate strategies to reduce contamination in CDI patient rooms, taking into account the patient's functional status. PMID:25869819

  13. The relationship between patient functional status and environmental contamination by Clostridium difficile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Blakney, Rebekah; Gudnadottir, Unnur; Warrack, Simone; O'Horo, John C; Anderson, Michael; Sethi, Ajay; Schmitz, Michelle; Wang, Jennifer; Duster, Megan; Ide, Emma; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-08-01

    Limited data exist on patient factors related to environmental contamination with Clostridium difficile. We evaluated the association between the functional status of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) and environmental contamination with C. difficile. Contamination of patient rooms was frequent and higher functional status was associated with contaminated surfaces remote from the bed. All but one environmental isolates matched the corresponding patient's stool isolate for the seven patients tested. Functional status is a factor that influences environmental contamination with C. difficile. Future studies should evaluate strategies to reduce contamination in CDI patient rooms, taking into account the patient's functional status.

  14. Evolution of Testing Algorithms at a University Hospital for Detection of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Culbreath, Karissa; Ager, Edward; Nemeyer, Ronald J.; Kerr, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We present the evolution of testing algorithms at our institution in which the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete immunochromatographic cartridge assay determines the presence of both glutamate dehydrogenase and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B as a primary screen for C. difficile infection and indeterminate results (glutamate dehydrogenase positive, toxin A and B negative) are confirmed by the GeneXpert C. difficile PCR assay. This two-step algorithm is a cost-effective method for highly sensitive detection of toxigenic C. difficile. PMID:22718938

  15. Manual curation and reannotation of the genomes of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm and Clostridium difficile 630.

    PubMed

    Dannheim, Henning; Riedel, Thomas; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Chibani, Cynthia Maria; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Overmann, Jörg; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2017-01-09

    We resequenced the genome of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm (DSM 28645), a model strain commonly used for the generation of insertion mutants. The genome sequence was obtained by a combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology. Detailed manual curation and comparison to the previously published genomic sequence revealed sequence differences including inverted regions and the presence of plasmid pCD630. Manual curation of our previously deposited genome sequence of the parental strain 630 (DSM 27543) led to an improved genome sequence. In addition, the sequence of the transposon Tn5397 was completely identified. We manually revised the current manual annotation of the initial sequence of strain 630 and modified either gene names, gene product names or assigned EC numbers of 57 % of genes. The number of hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins was reduced by 152. This annotation was used as a template to annotate the most recent genome sequences of the strains 630Δerm and 630. Based on the genomic analysis, several new metabolic features of C. difficile are proposed and could be supported by literature and subsequent experiments.

  16. Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene Clostridium difficile nucleic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Karen C; Buchan, Blake W; Tan, Sokha; Stamper, Paul D; Riebe, Katherine M; Pancholi, Preeti; Kelly, Cheryl; Rao, Arundhati; Fader, Robert; Cavagnolo, Robert; Watson, Wendy; Goering, Richard V; Trevino, Ernest A; Weissfeld, Alice S; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2013-12-01

    The Verigene Clostridium difficile Nucleic Acid test (Verigene CDF test) (Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL) is a multiplex qualitative PCR assay that utilizes a nanoparticle-based array hybridization method to detect C. difficile tcdA and tcdB in fecal specimens. In addition, the assay detects binary toxin gene sequences and the single base pair deletion at nucleotide 117 (Δ 117) in tcdC to provide a presumptive identification of the epidemic strain 027/NAP1/BI (referred to here as ribotype 027). This study compared the Verigene CDF test with anaerobic direct and enriched toxigenic culture on stool specimens from symptomatic patients among five geographically diverse laboratories within the United States. The Verigene CDF test was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the reference methods performed by a central laboratory included direct culture onto cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) and enriched culture using cycloserine cefoxitin mannitol broth with taurocholate and lysozyme. Recovered isolates were identified as C. difficile using gas liquid chromatography and were tested for toxin using a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay. Strains belonging to ribotype 027 were determined by PCR ribotyping and bidirectional sequencing for Δ 117 in tcdC. A total of 1,875 specimens were evaluable. Of these, 275 specimens (14.7%) were culture positive by either direct or enriched culture methods. Compared to direct culture alone, the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Verigene CDF test were 98.7%, 87.5%, 42%, and 99.9%, respectively. Compared to combined direct and enriched culture results, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of the Verigene CDF test were 90.9%, 92.5%, 67.6%, and 98.3%, respectively. Of the 250 concordantly culture-positive specimens, 59 (23.6%) were flagged as "hypervirulent"; 53 were confirmed as ribotype

  17. Acute appendicitis in the setting of Clostridium difficile colitis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Thomas A; Rajappannair, Lakshmi; Dalton, Arthur B; Bandi, Ram; Myers, Joseph P; Kefalas, Costas H

    2007-08-01

    A 72-year-old man was hospitalized for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was treated with oral prednisone and 7 days of moxifloxacin. Five days after completing the antibiotic course, he developed watery diarrhea and diffuse, crampy abdominal pain. On presentation he was afebrile, and abdominal examination revealed diffuse tenderness without peritoneal signs. Stool tested positive for Clostridium difficile toxin A by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Despite starting oral metronidazole, the patient developed a fever of 101.2 degrees F 36 hours after his initial episode of diarrhea, 12 hours after admission. His abdominal pain intensified and became localized to the right and left lower quadrants. Computed tomography scan revealed both a thickened cecal wall and an edematous appendix with ileocecal stranding consistent with appendicitis. Appendectomy was performed, and the appendix was found to be suppurative in appearance and nonperforated. The cecum had mild edema and erythema, whereas the colon and rectum were grossly unaffected. Pathology examination revealed exudative material in the appendiceal lumen and a diffuse transmural inflammatory cell infiltrate. The patient had an uneventful recovery and continued to improve on oral metronidazole. Although Clostridium difficile colitis and appendicitis are each very common independently, C. difficile as an etiology of appendicitis is exceedingly rare. A review of the literature revealed 2 prior cases. We speculate that this association is underdiagnosed, because milder cases might respond to antibiotic therapy alone, and severe cases might involve the entire colon and require total colectomy. In each scenario, the involvement of the appendix might be overlooked.

  18. Adherence of Clostridium difficile spores to Caco-2 cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2012-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causative agent of the majority of antibiotic associated diarrhoea cases. C. difficile spores are recognized as the persistent and infectious morphotype as well as the vehicle of transmission of CDI. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how C. difficile spores interact with the host's epithelial surfaces. In this context, we have characterized the ability of C. difficile spores to adhere to human Caco-2 cells. Despite the similarities in spore-surface hydrophobicity between spores of C. difficile and Clostridium perfringens (another enteric pathogen that also sporulates in the gut), spores of C. difficile adhere better to Caco-2 cells. Adherence to Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced when C. difficile spores were treated with trypsin. Sonication of C. difficile spores altered the ultrastructure of the outermost exosporium-like structure, releasing two protein species of ~40 kDa and significantly reduced spore hydrophobicity and adherence to Caco-2 cells. Using a trifunctional cross-linker, we were able to co-immunoprecipitate four protein species from the surface of Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that C. difficile spores adhere to human intestinal enterocyte-like cells through spore- and enterocytic-surface-specific ligand(s) and/or receptor(s).

  19. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  20. Stool C. difficile toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... test detects harmful substances produced by the bacterium Clostridium difficile ( C difficile) . This infection is a common ... toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin Images Clostridium difficile organism References Beavis KG, Charnot-Katsikas A. ...

  1. Clonal Spread of a Clostridium difficile Strain with a Complete Set of Toxin A, Toxin B, and Binary Toxin Genes among Polish Patients with Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Pituch, Hanna; Kreft, Deborah; Obuch-Woszczatyński, Piotr; Wultańska, Dorota; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja; Łuczak, Mirosław; van Belkum, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Clinically relevant Clostridium difficile strains usually produce toxins A and B. Some C. difficile strains can produce an additional binary toxin. We report clonality among five strains carrying all toxin genes from Polish patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In another strain, possible recombination between binary toxin genes is documented. PMID:15635019

  2. Performance of chromID Clostridium difficile agar compared with BBL C. difficile selective agar for detection of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Bong; Chang, Jiyoung; Shin, Sang Hyun; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new chromogenic medium for detection of Clostridium difficile, chromID C. difficile agar (CDIF; bioMérieux, France), by comparison with BBL C. difficile Selective Agar (CDSA; Becton Dickinson and Company, USA). After heat pre-treatment (80℃, 5 min), 185 diarrheal stool samples were inoculated onto the two media types and incubated anaerobically for 24 hr and 48 hr for CDIF and for 48 hr and 72 hr for CDSA. All typical colonies on each medium were examined by Gram staining, and the gram-positive rods confirmed to contain the tpi gene by PCR were identified as C. difficile. C. difficile was recovered from 36 samples by using a combination of the two media. The sensitivity with CDIF 48 hr was highest (100%) and was significantly higher than that with CDIF 24 hr (58.3%; P<0.001), because samples with a low burden of C. difficile tended to require prolonged incubation up to 48 hr (P<0.001). The specificity of CDIF 24 hr and CDIF 48 hr (99.3% and 90.6%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of CDSA 48 hr and CDSA 72 hr (72.5% and 67.1%, respectively; P<0.001). CDIF was effective for detecting C. difficile in heat-pretreated stool specimens, thus reducing unnecessary testing for toxin production in non-C. difficile isolates and turnaround time.

  3. Clostridium perfringens type A netF and netE positive and Clostridium difficile co-infection in two adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Oliveira Junior, Carlos Augusto; Pierezan, Felipe; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report two cases of Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium difficile co-infection in adult dogs. Both animals were positive for A/B toxin. Toxigenic C. difficile and C. perfringens type A positive for NetE and NetF-encoding genes were isolated. This report reinforces the necessity of studying a possible synergism of C. difficile and C. perfringens in enteric disorders.

  4. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in Uncooked Ground Meat Products from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jane W.; Schlackman, Jessica L.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile in retail meat samples has varied widely. The food supply may be a source for C. difficile infections. A total of 102 ground meat and sausage samples from 3 grocers in Pittsburgh, PA, were cultured for C. difficile. Brand A pork sausages were resampled between May 2011 and January 2012. Two out of 102 (2.0%) meat products initially sampled were positive for C. difficile; both were pork sausage from brand A from the same processing facility (facility A). On subsequent sampling of brand A products, 10/19 samples from processing facility A and 1/10 samples from 3 other facilities were positive for C. difficile. The isolates recovered were inferred ribotype 078, comprising 6 genotypes. The prevalence of C. difficile in retail meat may not be as high as previously reported in North America. When contamination occurs, it may be related to events at processing facilities. PMID:22504814

  5. Clostridium difficile Drug Pipeline: Challenges in Discovery and Development of New Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade Clostridium difficile has become a bacterial pathogen of global significance. Epidemic strains have spread throughout hospitals, while community acquired infections and other sources ensure a constant inoculation of spores into hospitals. In response to the increasing medical burden, a new C. difficile antibiotic, fidaxomicin, was approved in 2011 for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. Rudimentary fecal transplants are also being trialed as effective treatments. Despite these advances, therapies that are more effective against C. difficile spores and less damaging to the resident gastrointestinal microbiome and that reduce recurrent disease are still desperately needed. However, bringing a new treatment for C. difficile infection to market involves particular challenges. This review covers the current drug discovery pipeline, including both small molecule and biologic therapies, and highlights the challenges associated with in vitro and in vivo models of C. difficile infection for drug screening and lead optimization. PMID:25760275

  6. Role of the intestinal microbiota in resistance to colonization by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Britton, Robert A; Young, Vincent B

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotic-associated infection with the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and increased health care costs. C difficile infection follows disruption of the indigenous gut microbiota by antibiotics. Antibiotics create an environment within the intestine that promotes C difficile spore germination, vegetative growth, and toxin production, leading to epithelial damage and colitis. Studies of patients with C difficile infection and animal models have shown that the indigenous microbiota can inhibit expansion and persistence of C difficile. Although the specific mechanisms of these processes are not known, they are likely to interfere with key aspects of the pathogen's physiology, including spore germination and competitive growth. Increasing our understanding of how the intestinal microbiota manage C difficile could lead to better means of controlling this important nosocomial pathogen. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunization of hamsters against Clostridium difficile infection using the Cwp84 protease as an antigen.

    PubMed

    Péchiné, Séverine; Denève, Cécile; Le Monnier, Alban; Hoys, Sandra; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen responsible for diarrhoea and colitis, particularly after antibiotic treatment. We evaluated the C. difficile protease Cwp84, found to be associated with the S-layer proteins, as a vaccine antigen to limit the C. difficile intestinal colonization and therefore the development of the infection in a clindamycin-treated hamster model. First, we evaluated the immune response and the animal protection against death induced by several immunization routes: rectal, intragastric and subcutaneous. Antibody production was variable according to the immunization routes. In addition, serum Cwp84 antibody titres did not always correlate with animal protection after challenge with a toxigenic C. difficile strain. The best survival rate was observed with the rectal route of immunization. Then, in a second assay, we selected this immunization route to perform a larger immunization assay including a Cwp84 immunized group and a control group. Clostridium difficile intestinal colonization and survival rate, as well as the immune response were examined. Clostridium difficile hamster challenge resulted in a 26% weaker and slower C. difficile intestinal colonization in the immunized group. Furthermore, hamster survival in the Cwp84 immunized group was 33% greater than that of the control group, with a significant statistical difference.

  8. Kinetic Evidence for the Presence of Putative Germination Receptors in Clostridium difficile Spores▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Norma; Liggins, Marc; Abel-Santos, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium that causes Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD). Intestinal microflora keeps C. difficile in the spore state and prevents colonization. Following antimicrobial treatment, the microflora is disrupted, and C. difficile spores germinate in the intestines. The resulting vegetative cells are believed to fill empty niches left by the depleted microbial community and establish infection. Thus, germination of C. difficile spores is the first required step in CDAD. Interestingly, C. difficile genes encode most known spore-specific protein necessary for germination, except for germination (Ger) receptors. Even though C. difficile Ger receptors have not been identified, taurocholate (a bile salt) and glycine (an amino acid) have been shown to be required for spore germination. Furthermore, chenodeoxycholate, another bile salt, can inhibit taurocholate-induced C. difficile spore germination. In the present study, we examined C. difficile spore germination kinetics to determine whether taurocholate acts as a specific germinant that activates unknown germination receptors or acts nonspecifically by disrupting spores' membranes. Kinetic analysis of C. difficile spore germination suggested the presence of distinct receptors for taurocholate and glycine. Furthermore, taurocholate, glycine, and chenodeoxycholate seem to bind to C. difficile spores through a complex mechanism, where both receptor homo- and heterocomplexes are formed. The kinetic data also point to an ordered sequential progression of binding where taurocholate must be recognized first before detection of glycine can take place. Finally, comparing calculated kinetic parameters with intestinal concentrations of the two germinants suggests a mechanism for the preferential germination of C. difficile spores in antibiotic-treated individuals. PMID:20562307

  9. Clostridium difficile from food and surface samples in a Belgian nursing home: an unlikely source of contamination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Brach, P; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the contamination of foods and surfaces with Clostridium difficile in a single nursing home. C. difficile PCR-ribotype 078 was found in one food sample and in none of the tested surfaces. These results indicate that food and surfaces are an unlikely source of C. difficile infection in this setting.

  10. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    PubMed

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G; Laning, Michelle L; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F; Knight, Katherine L; Gerding, Dale N; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  11. Spore Formation and Toxin Production in Clostridium difficile Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G.; Laning, Michelle L.; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F.; Knight, Katherine L.; Gerding, Dale N.; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection. PMID:24498186

  12. Pathway to Prevention of Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Johnson, Stuart; Maziade, Pierre-Jean; McFarland, Lynne V; Trick, William; Dresser, Linda; Millette, Mathieu; Mazloum, Hadi; Low, Donald E

    2015-05-15

    To address the significant morbidity and mortality rates associated with nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), a series of recommendations and a pathway to prevention were developed. An expert panel of infectious disease (ID) specialists participated in a modified Delphi process with specific objectives: (1) conduct a review for CDAD and prevention; (2) develop statements based upon panel members' opinions; (3) hold a panel meeting during the 2012 IDWeek; and (4) review the final recommendations and prevention pathway prior to submission for publication. The panel voted on (1) antibiotic stewardship (7 of 8 panelists); (2) reduction of other potentially modifiable risk factors (variable); (3) utilization of specific probiotics to prevent C. difficile overgrowth (8/8); (4) staff education regarding CDAD preventive measures (8/8); (5) appropriate hand hygiene for everyone (7/8); (6) environmental cleaning (8/8); (7) medical equipment disinfection (7/8); (8) early detection of CDAD in symptomatic patients (7/8); (9) usage of protective clothing/gloves (8/8); (10) proper measures during outbreak (8/8); and (11) surveillance to monitor efficacy data of preventive measures (8/8). The panel members agreed with 11 of 17 recommendations presented. The additional recommendations by the panel were proton pump inhibitor use as a risk factor and the use of adjunctive therapy with specific probiotic, as it was approved by Health Canada for the risk reduction of CDAD in hospitalized patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Role of microbiota and innate immunity in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bibbò, Stefano; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection represents a burdensome clinical issue whose epidemiology is increasing worldwide. The pathogenesis is not yet completely known. Recent observations suggest that the alteration of the intestinal microbiota and impaired innate immunity may play a leading role in the development of recurrent infection. Various factors can cause dysbiosis. The causes most involved in the process are antibiotics, NSAIDs, acid suppressing therapies, and age. Gut microbiota impairment can favor Clostridium difficile infection through several mechanisms, such as the alteration of fermentative metabolism (especially SCFAs), the alteration of bile acid metabolism, and the imbalance of antimicrobial substances production. These factors alter the intestinal homeostasis promoting the development of an ecological niche for Clostridium difficile and of the modulation of immune response. Moreover, the intestinal dysbiosis can promote a proinflammatory environment, whereas Clostridium difficile itself modulates the innate immunity through both toxin-dependent and toxin-independent mechanisms. In this narrative review, we discuss how the intestinal microbiota modifications and the modulation of innate immune response can lead to and exacerbate Clostridium difficile infection.

  14. Role of Microbiota and Innate Immunity in Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bibbò, Stefano; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection represents a burdensome clinical issue whose epidemiology is increasing worldwide. The pathogenesis is not yet completely known. Recent observations suggest that the alteration of the intestinal microbiota and impaired innate immunity may play a leading role in the development of recurrent infection. Various factors can cause dysbiosis. The causes most involved in the process are antibiotics, NSAIDs, acid suppressing therapies, and age. Gut microbiota impairment can favor Clostridium difficile infection through several mechanisms, such as the alteration of fermentative metabolism (especially SCFAs), the alteration of bile acid metabolism, and the imbalance of antimicrobial substances production. These factors alter the intestinal homeostasis promoting the development of an ecological niche for Clostridium difficile and of the modulation of immune response. Moreover, the intestinal dysbiosis can promote a proinflammatory environment, whereas Clostridium difficile itself modulates the innate immunity through both toxin-dependent and toxin-independent mechanisms. In this narrative review, we discuss how the intestinal microbiota modifications and the modulation of innate immune response can lead to and exacerbate Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:24995345

  15. Clostridium difficile Colonization in Early Infancy Is Accompanied by Changes in Intestinal Microbiota Composition▿

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Clotilde; Levenez, Florence; Fouqueray, Charlène; Doré, Joël; Collignon, Anne; Lepage, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major enteric pathogen responsible for antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Host susceptibility to C. difficile infections results partly from inability of the intestinal microbiota to resist C. difficile colonization. During early infancy, asymptomatic colonization by C. difficile is common and the intestinal microbiota shows low complexity. Thus, we investigated the potential relationship between the microbiota composition and the implantation of C. difficile in infant gut. Fecal samples from 53 infants, ages 0 to 13 months, 27 negative and 26 positive for C. difficile, were studied. Dominant microbiota profiles were assessed by PCR-temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). Bacterial signatures of the intestinal microbiota associated with colonization by C. difficile were deciphered using principal component analysis (PCA). Resulting bands of interest in TTGE profiles were excised, sequenced, and analyzed by nucleotide BLAST (NCBI). While global biodiversity was not affected, interclass PCA on instrumental variables highlighted significant differences in dominant bacterial species between C. difficile-colonized and noncolonized infants (P = 0.017). Four bands were specifically associated with the presence or absence of C. difficile: 16S rRNA gene sequences related to Ruminococcus gnavus and Klebsiella pneumoniae for colonized infants and to Bifidobacterium longum for noncolonized infants. We demonstrated that the presence of C. difficile in the intestinal microbiota of infants was associated with changes in this ecosystem's composition. These results suggest that the composition of the gut microbiota might be crucial in the colonization process, although the chronology of events remains to be determined. PMID:21177896

  16. Clostridium difficile infection in inflammatory bowel disease: challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying M; Stone, Christian D

    2017-04-01

    The problem of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has reached epidemic proportions, particularly in industrialized nations. The pathophysiology, disease course and the potential complications are well appreciated in the general hospitalized patient. However, when CDI occurs in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a number of distinct differences in the diagnosis and clinical management of the infection in this population should be appreciated by gastroenterologists, hospitalists and other care providers. This review highlights the unique aspects of CDI when it occurs in IBD patients with an emphasis on the challenge of distinguishing persistent infection from exacerbation of underlying chronic colitis. An understanding of how CDI may differ in presentation and how management should be altered can prevent serious and life-threatening complications.

  17. Comparative genomic and phenomic analysis of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium sordellii, two related pathogens with differing host tissue preference.

    PubMed

    Scaria, Joy; Suzuki, Haruo; Ptak, Christopher P; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Zhu, Yongzhang; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2015-06-10

    Clostridium difficile and C. sordellii are two anaerobic, spore forming, gram positive pathogens with a broad host range and the ability to cause lethal infections. Despite strong similarities between the two Clostridial strains, differences in their host tissue preference place C. difficile infections in the gastrointestinal tract and C. sordellii infections in soft tissues. In this study, to improve our understanding of C. sordellii and C. difficile virulence and pathogenesis, we have performed a comparative genomic and phenomic analysis of the two. The global phenomes of C. difficile and C. sordellii were compared using Biolog Phenotype microarrays. When compared to C. difficile, C. sordellii was found to better utilize more complex sources of carbon and nitrogen, including peptides. Phenotype microarray comparison also revealed that C. sordellii was better able to grow in acidic pH conditions. Using next generation sequencing technology, we determined the draft genome of C. sordellii strain 8483 and performed comparative genome analysis with C. difficile and other Clostridial genomes. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of several enzymes, including the urease gene cluster, specific to the C. sordellii genome that confer the ability of expanded peptide utilization and survival in acidic pH. The identified phenotypes of C. sordellii might be important in causing wound and vaginal infections respectively. Proteins involved in the metabolic differences between C. sordellii and C. difficile should be targets for further studies aimed at understanding C. difficile and C. sordellii infection site specificity and pathogenesis.

  18. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-11-03

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection.

  19. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  20. Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Lee, Wen-Ying; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

  1. Fecal microbiota transplant for Clostridium difficile infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tauxe, William M.; Haydek, John P.; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Neish, Emma; Newman, Kira L.; Ward, Angela; Dhere, Tanvi; Kraft, Colleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to describe the safety of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among older adults. Methods: We performed a case review of all FMT recipients aged 65 or older treated at Emory University Hospital, a tertiary care and referral center for Georgia and surrounding states. Results: CDI resolved in 27 (87%) of 31 respondents, including three individuals who received multiple FMTs. Among four whose CDI was not resolved at follow up, three respondents did well initially before CDI recurred, and one individual never eradicated his CDI despite repeating FMT. During the study, five deaths and eight serious adverse events requiring hospitalization were reported within the study group during the follow-up period. Fecal transplant was not a causative factor in these events. The most common adverse event reported in 4 (13%) of 31 respondents was subjective worsening of arthritis. Conclusion: FMT is a generally safe and effective treatment option for older adults with CDI. PMID:27134658

  2. The appendix may protect against Clostridium difficile recurrence.

    PubMed

    Im, Gene Y; Modayil, Rani J; Lin, Cheng T; Geier, Steven J; Katz, Douglas S; Feuerman, Martin; Grendell, James H

    2011-12-01

    Several risk factors have been identified for the development of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) that alter host immunity and disrupt colonic flora. Although the function of the appendix has been debated, its active, gut-associated lymphoid tissue and biofilm production indicate potential roles in recovery from initial CDI and protection against recurrent CDI. We investigated whether the presence or absence of an appendix is associated with CDI recurrence. We reviewed the medical records of adult inpatients with CDI who were admitted to a tertiary-care teaching hospital from 2005 to 2007 to identify those with and without an appendix. The primary dependent variable for statistical analysis was CDI recurrence. In a multivariate analysis of 11 clinical variables, the presence of an appendix was associated inversely with CDI recurrence (P < .0001; adjusted relative risk, .398). Age older than 60 years also was associated with CDI recurrence (P = .0280; adjusted relative risk, 2.44). The presence of an appendix has a significant and independent, inverse association with CDI recurrence, but this finding requires validation in a prospective study. Assessing the presence or absence of an appendix might be useful in predicting CDI recurrence. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of Clostridium difficile infection surveillance systems in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Kola, Axel; Wiuff, Camilla; Akerlund, Thomas; van Benthem, Birgit H; Coignard, Bruno; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Weitzel-Kage, Doris; Suetens, Carl; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-21

    To develop a European surveillance protocol for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), existing national CDI surveillance systems were assessed in 2011. A web-based electronic form was provided for all national coordinators of the European CDI Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net). Of 35 national coordinators approached, 33 from 31 European countries replied. Surveillance of CDI was in place in 14 of the 31 countries, comprising 18 different nationwide systems. Three of 14 countries with CDI surveillance used public health notification of cases as the route of reporting, and in another three, reporting was limited to public health notification of cases of severe CDI. The CDI definitions published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were widely used, but there were differing definitions to distinguish between community- and healthcare-associated cases. All CDI surveillance systems except one reported annual national CDI rates (calculated as number of cases per patient-days). Only four surveillance systems regularly integrated microbiological data (typing and susceptibility testing results). Surveillance methods varied considerably between countries, which emphasises the need for a harmonised European protocol to allow consistent monitoring of the CDI epidemiology at European level. The results of this survey were used to develop a harmonised EU-wide hospital-based CDI surveillance protocol. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  4. Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Surawicz, Christina M; Brandt, Lawrence J; Binion, David G; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Curry, Scott R; Gilligan, Peter H; McFarland, Lynne V; Mellow, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of hospital-associated gastrointestinal illness and places a high burden on our health-care system. Patients with CDI typically have extended lengths-of-stay in hospitals, and CDI is a frequent cause of large hospital outbreaks of disease. This guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with CDI as well as for the prevention and control of outbreaks while supplementing previously published guidelines. New molecular diagnostic stool tests will likely replace current enzyme immunoassay tests. We suggest treatment of patients be stratified depending on whether they have mild-to-moderate, severe, or complicated disease. Therapy with metronidazole remains the choice for mild-to-moderate disease but may not be adequate for patients with severe or complicated disease. We propose a classification of disease severity to guide therapy that is useful for clinicians. We review current treatment options for patients with recurrent CDI and recommendations for the control and prevention of outbreaks of CDI.

  5. Clostridium difficile infection: current, forgotten and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity, and is now among the most common nosocomial infections. Several agents are available for the initial treatment of CDI, some of which are rarely used, and none of which is clearly superior for initial clinical cure. Fidaxomicin appears to offer a benefit in terms of preventing recurrent disease, although the cost-benefit ratio is debated. Recurrent CDI is a major challenge, occurring after 15-30% of initial episodes. The treatment of recurrent CDI is difficult, with sparse evidence available to support any particular agent. Fecal microbiota therapy, also known as 'stool transplantation', appears to be highly effective, although availability is currently limited, and the regulatory environment is in flux. Synthetic stool products and an orally available fecal microbiota therapy product are both under investigation, which may address the problem of availability. As with most infectious diseases, an effective vaccine would be a welcome addition to our armamentarium, but none is currently available.

  6. Patient Perspectives on Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium Difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; De Wolfe, Travis J; Van Hoof, Sarah; Blakney, Rebekah; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a severe and increasingly frequent healthcare-associated infection that develops after disruption of the gut microbiota. Immunocompromised, hospitalized patients have an increased likelihood of acquiring CDI, leading to lengthened hospital stays, increased medical fees, and higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Treatment of CDI is challenging because of limited treatment options and a 19-20% recurrence rate. Thus, there is a need for effective, affordable and safe treatments for CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the transplantation of donor stool into the intestine of a CDI patient to restore the structure and function of the gut microbiota and eradicate CDI. Recently, FMT has become an attractive alternative treatment for CDI due to its overwhelming success rate. However, the patient perspective on the effect of CDI and the role of FMT in that context is lacking. We undertook a patient survey to gather qualitative and quantitative data on the short-term social, physical, emotional outcomes for patients with CDI who have undergone FMT. We found in all patients interviewed that the social implications of CDI were generally more severe than the emotional and physical aspects. Future studies should consider evaluating these important patient-centered factors as outcomes. Moreover, patients are willing to undergo FMT as treatment for CDI.

  7. Structural Insights into Substrate Recognition by Clostridium difficile Sortase

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jui-Chieh; Fei, Chun-Hsien; Lo, Yen-Chen; Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Chang, Jyun-Cyuan; Nix, Jay C.; Chang, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Lee-Wei; Huang, I-Hsiu; Wang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Sortases function as cysteine transpeptidases that catalyze the covalent attachment of virulence-associated surface proteins into the cell wall peptidoglycan in Gram-positive bacteria. The substrate proteins targeted by sortase enzymes have a cell wall sorting signal (CWSS) located at the C-terminus. Up to date, it is still not well understood how sortases with structural resemblance among different classes and diverse species of bacteria achieve substrate specificity. In this study, we focus on elucidating the molecular basis for specific recognition of peptide substrate PPKTG by Clostridium difficile sortase B (Cd-SrtB). Combining structural studies, biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulations, we have constructed a computational model of Cd-SrtBΔN26–PPKTG complex and have validated the model by site-directed mutagensis studies and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay. Furthermore, we have revealed that the fourth amino acid in the N-terminal direction from cleavage site of PPKTG forms specific interaction with Cd-SrtB and plays an essential role in configuring the peptide to allow more efficient substrate-specific cleavage by Cd-SrtB. PMID:27921010

  8. Thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients with severe clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Eric M; Moses, Maggie C; Park, Lawrence P; Woods, Christopher W; Arepally, Gowthami M

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea and colitis. The incidence and prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia as related to mode of acquisition (hospital vs. community), NAP1/027 strain, and disease severity has not been examined. We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of all adult inpatients from 2013 to 2014 diagnosed with CDI during their hospitalization to document the incidence/prevalence of thrombocytopenia and associated outcomes. Severe disease was defined by a composite endpoint of inpatient death, death within 30 days of discharge, presence of septic shock, or need for colectomy during hospitalization. Of the 533 patients diagnosed with CDI, moderate thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 10(9)/L at time of CDI diagnosis) was present in 15 % of the total cohort and incident thrombocytopenia developed in 3 % of patients after admission. Thrombocytopenia was more common in hospital-acquired disease and associated with increased length of stay, but was not associated with treatment failure. Those with moderate thrombocytopenia were more likely to have severe disease, after controlling for white blood cell count, albumin, and creatinine. Moderate thrombocytopenia is associated with poor prognosis and is a potential risk stratification tool for severe CDI.

  9. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  10. WSES guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile infection in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Malangoni, Mark A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Griffiths, Ewen A; Di Bella, Stefano; McFarland, Lynne V; Eltringham, Ian; Shelat, Vishal G; Velmahos, George C; Kelly, Ciarán P; Khanna, Sahil; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Alrahmani, Layan; Ansaloni, Luca; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Barbut, Frédéric; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Bhangu, Aneel; Biffl, Walter L; Brecher, Stephen M; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Caínzos, Miguel A; Canterbury, Laura A; Catena, Fausto; Chan, Shirley; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Clanton, Jesse; Coccolini, Federico; Cocuz, Maria Elena; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H; Cui, Yunfeng; Czepiel, Jacek; Das, Koray; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dumitru, Irina Magdalena; Eckert, Catherine; Eckmann, Christian; Eiland, Edward H; Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Faro, Mario; Ferrada, Paula; Forrester, Joseph Derek; Fraga, Gustavo P; Frossard, Jean Louis; Galeiras, Rita; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Gorrepati, Venkata; Ahmed, Mohamed Hassan; Herzog, Torsten; Humphrey, Felicia; Kim, Jae Il; Isik, Arda; Ivatury, Rao; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Juang, Paul; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kim, Peter K; Kluger, Yoram; Ko, Wen Chien; LaBarbera, Francis D; Lee, Jae Gil; Leppaniemi, Ari; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Marwah, Sanjay; Mazuski, John E; Metan, Gokhan; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick Alan; Nord, Carl Erik; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Petrosillo, Nicola; Portela, Francisco; Puri, Basant K; Ray, Arnab; Raza, Mansoor; Rems, Miran; Sakakushev, Boris E; Sganga, Gabriele; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Stewart, David B; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean Francois; To, Kathleen B; Tranà, Cristian; Uhl, Waldemar; Urbánek, Libor; van Goor, Harry; Vassallo, Angela; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Caproli, Emanuele; Viale, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease in many countries worldwide. The incidence of CDI has also increased in surgical patients. Optimization of management of C difficile, has therefore become increasingly urgent. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts prepared evidenced-based World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for management of CDI in surgical patients.

  11. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is not evenly distributed in Hesse, Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Mardjan; Bettge-Weller, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-isolates associated with CDI in different healthcare facilities in Hesse were analysed. The most common ribotypes were 001 (31.1%) and 027 (27.0%). The proportion of ribotype 027 among regional C. difficile-isolates was 10.8% in North Hesse, 17.2% in Middle Hesse, and 33.5% in the Rhine-Main Metropolitan Area. In the latter region, ribotype 027 was the most prevalent ribotype.

  12. Characterization of Clostridium difficile isolates from human fecal samples and retail meat from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Jyotika B; Very, Katherine J; Williams, Jen L; Hegarty, John P; Stewart, David B; Lumadue, Jeanne; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2014-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and characterize C. difficile isolates from human stool and retail grocery meat samples. Human stool samples (n=317) were obtained from a clinical laboratory and meat samples (n=303) were collected from 8 retail grocery stores from October 2011 through September 2012 from Centre County of Pennsylvania and were examined for C. difficile. C. difficile was isolated from 16.7% of stool samples (n=317) and 6.9%, 11.5%, 14.5%, and 7.8% of beef (n=72), pork (n=78), turkey (n=76), and chicken (n=77) samples, respectively. Six different toxin gene profiles were detected in all human and meat isolates of C. difficile based on the presence or absence of toxin genes tcdA, tcdB, and cdtA and cdtB. Interestingly, 75.6% of the human C. difficile isolates lacked any deletion in the tcdC gene (139-bp), whereas a 39-bp deletion was observed in 61.3% of the C. difficile strains isolated from meat samples. C. difficile from meat samples were more susceptible to clindamycin, moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and metronidazole than C. difficile isolates from human samples. Twenty-five different ribotypes were identified in human and meat C. difficile isolates. In conclusion, significant genotypic and phenotypic differences were observed between human and meat isolates of C. difficile; however, a few C. difficile isolates from meat-in particular ribotypes 078, PA01, PA05, PA16, and PA22 with unique profiles (toxin gene, tcdC gene size and antimicrobial resistance profiles)-were similar to human C. difficile isolates.

  13. High Variability in Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Across Hospitals After Colorectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Hensley, Bradley J; Iannuzzi, James C; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection is associated with adverse patient outcomes and high medical costs. The incidence and severity of C. difficile has been rising in both medical and surgical patients. Our aim was to assess risk factors and variation associated with the development of nosocomial C. difficile colitis among patients undergoing colorectal resection. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study included segmental colectomy and proctectomy cases in New York State from 2005 to 2013. The study cohort included 150,878 colorectal resections. Patients with a documented previous history of C. difficile infection or residence outside of New York State were excluded. A diagnosis of C. difficile colitis either during the index hospital stay or on readmission within 30 days was the main measure. C. difficile colitis occurred in 3323 patients (2.2%). Unadjusted C. difficile colitis rates ranged from 0% to 11.3% among surgeons and 0% to 6.8% among hospitals. After controlling for patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics using mixed-effects multivariable analysis, significant unexplained variation in C. difficile rates remained present across hospitals but not surgeons. Patient factors explained only 24% of the total hospital-level variation, and known surgeon and hospital-level characteristics explained an additional 8% of the total hospital-level variation. Therefore, ≈70% of the hospital variation in C. difficile infection rates remained unexplained by captured patient, surgeon, and hospital factors. Furthermore, there was an ≈5-fold difference in adjusted C. difficile rates across hospitals. A limited set of hospital and surgeon characteristics was available. Colorectal surgery patients appear to be at high risk for C. difficile infection, and alarming variation in nosocomial C. difficile infection rates currently exists among hospitals after colorectal resection. Given the high morbidity and cost associated with C. difficile colitis

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Virulence of Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bohyun; Oh, Seunghan; Song, Minyu; Hong, Young-Shick; Park, Sungsu; Park, Dong-June; Griffiths, Mansel W; Oh, Sejong

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most prevalent cause of health-care-associated infections. CDI-related health-care costs and deaths are both increasing annually on a global scale. C. difficile have been reported in food products in Canada, Europe, and the United States; however, the systematic transmission of C. difficile between humans and animals is yet to be understood. Because of the limitations of current therapeutic options, there is a need for the development of new patient treatments. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major catechin compound found in green tea extracts and exhibits antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. This study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of EGCG on the expression of virulence genes in C. difficile and in C. difficile-associated diseases by inhibition of quorum sensing. The protein expression of autoinducer-2 (AI-2) was evaluated by AI-2 activity. EGCG at various concentrations had an inhibitory effect on AI-2 production, especially at 10 μg/mL. EGCG also significantly repressed the transcription of virulence genes, including luxS and tcdA, and prolonged the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with C. difficile. Furthermore, treatment with EGCG effectively protected C. difficile-infected mice from C. difficile-induced death. Histological analysis of the colon and cecum of these mice revealed that EGCG protected tissues of the lower intestinal tract from damage. EGCG exerted growth-inhibitory and bactericidal activities on C. difficile in C. difficile-infected mice. Our results suggest that EGCG has significant antipathogenic effects on C. difficile and can be used to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated diseases or C. difficile infections. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Viral co-infections are common and are associated with higher bacterial burden in children with clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    El Feghaly, Rana E; Stauber, Jennifer L; Tarr, Phillip I; Haslam, David B

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infections in children are increasing. In this cohort study, we enrolled 62 children with diarrhea and C difficile. We performed polymerase chain reaction assays to detect viral agents of gastroenteritis and quantify C difficile burden. Fifteen (24%) children diagnosed as having C difficile infection had a concomitant viral co-infection. These patients tended to be younger and had a higher C difficile bacterial burden than children with no viral co-infections (median difference = 565,957 cfu/mL; P = 0.011), but were clinically indistinguishable. The contribution of viral co-infection to C difficile disease in children warrants future investigation.

  16. Prophage Carriage and Diversity within Clinically Relevant Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V.; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Nale, Janet Y.; Hargreaves, Katherine R.

    2012-01-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation. PMID:22706062

  17. Prophage carriage and diversity within clinically relevant strains of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V; Hickenbotham, Peter T; Nale, Janet Y; Hargreaves, Katherine R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2012-09-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation.

  18. Underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile across Europe: the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID).

    PubMed

    Davies, Kerrie A; Longshaw, Christopher M; Davis, Georgina L; Bouza, Emilio; Barbut, Frédéric; Barna, Zsuzsanna; Delmée, Michel; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Ivanova, Kate; Kuijper, Ed; Macovei, Ioana S; Mentula, Silja; Mastrantonio, Paola; von Müller, Lutz; Oleastro, Mónica; Petinaki, Efthymia; Pituch, Hanna; Norén, Torbjörn; Nováková, Elena; Nyč, Otakar; Rupnik, Maja; Schmid, Daniela; Wilcox, Mark H

    2014-12-01

    Variations in testing for Clostridium difficile infection can hinder patients' care, increase the risk of transmission, and skew epidemiological data. We aimed to measure the underdiagnosis of C difficile infection across Europe. We did a questionnaire-based study at 482 participating hospitals across 20 European countries. Hospitals were questioned about their methods and testing policy for C difficile infection during the periods September, 2011, to August, 2012, and September, 2012, to August, 2013. On one day in winter, 2012-13 (December, 2012, or January, 2013), and summer, 2013 (July or August), every hospital sent all diarrhoeal samples submitted to their microbiology laboratory to a national coordinating laboratory for standardised testing of C difficile infection. Our primary outcome measures were the rates of testing for and cases of C difficile infection per 10 000 patient bed-days. Results of local and national C difficile infection testing were compared with each other. If the result was positive at the national laboratory but negative at the local hospital, the result was classified as undiagnosed C difficile infection. We compared differences in proportions with the Mann-Whitney test, or McNemar's test if data were matched. During the study period, participating hospitals reported a mean of 65·8 tests (country range 4·6-223·3) for C difficile infection per 10 000 patient-bed days and a mean of 7·0 cases (country range 0·7-28·7) of C difficile infection per 10 000 patient-bed days. Only two-fifths of hospitals reported using optimum methods for testing of C difficile infection (defined by European guidelines), although the number of participating hospitals using optimum methods increased during the study period, from 152 (32%) of 468 in 2011-12 to 205 (48%) of 428 in 2012-13. Across all 482 European hospitals on the two sampling days, 148 (23%) of 641 samples positive for C difficile infection (as determined by the national laboratory

  19. Therapy for Clostridium difficile infection - any news beyond Metronidazole and Vancomycin?

    PubMed

    Manthey, C F; Eckmann, L; Fuhrmann, V

    2017-08-11

    Infections with Clostridium difficile (CDI) represent a major burden for the health care system. Treatment is generally by antibiotic therapy with metronidazole and vancomycin, but efficacy remains suboptimal. Areas covered: This review discusses established and emerging treatment options for CDI, and current therapeutic guidelines, taking into account disease severity and risk of relapse. Expert commentary: New therapeutic approaches, including antibodies and new classes of antibiotics, and new measures for preventing infection with vaccines are under development in phase II/III clinical trials. We performed a systematic literature review using the search terms 'Clostridium difficile' and 'treatment'.

  20. Nosocomial diarrhea: evaluation and treatment of causes other than Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Polage, Christopher R; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-10-01

    Diarrhea is common among hospitalized patients but the causes are distinct from those of diarrhea in the community. We review existing data about the epidemiology of nosocomial diarrhea and summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of diarrhea. Clinicians should recognize that most cases of nosocomial diarrhea have a noninfectious etiology, including medications, underlying illness, and enteral feeding. Apart from Clostridium difficile, the frequency of infectious causes such as norovirus and toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides fragilis remains largely undefined and test availability is limited. Here we provide a practical approach to the evaluation and management of nosocomial diarrhea when tests for C. difficile are negative.

  1. More than 50% of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Pet Dogs in Flagstaff, USA, Carry Toxigenic Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Nathan E.; Sidak-Loftis, Lindsay C.; Sahl, Jason W.; Vazquez, Adam J.; Wiggins, Kristin B.; Gillece, John D.; Hicks, Nathan D.; Schupp, James M.; Busch, Joseph D.; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile is well documented, yet recent studies have highlighted the importance of community acquired infections and identified community associated reservoirs for this pathogen. Multiple studies have implicated companion pets and farm animals as possible sources of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans. To explore the potential role of pet dogs in human C. difficile infections we systematically collected canine fecal samples (n = 197) in Flagstaff, AZ. Additionally, nineteen fecal samples were collected at a local veterinary clinic from diarrheic dogs. We used these combined samples to investigate important questions regarding C. difficile colonization in pet canines: 1) What is the prevalence and diversity of C. difficile in this companion pet population, and 2) Do C. difficile isolates collected from canines genetically overlap with isolates that cause disease in humans? We used a two-step sequence typing approach, including multilocus sequence typing to determine the overall genetic diversity of C. difficile present in Flagstaff canines, and whole-genome sequencing to assess the fine-scale diversity patterns within identical multilocus sequence types from isolates obtained within and among multiple canine hosts. We detected C. difficile in 17% of the canine fecal samples with 10% containing toxigenic strains that are known to cause human disease. Sequencing analyses revealed similar genotypes in dogs and humans. These findings suggest that companion pets are a potential source of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans. PMID:27723795

  2. Clostridium difficile infection in the Lao People's Democratic Republic: first isolation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Elaine; Roberts, Tamalee; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Riley, Thomas V; Newton, Paul N; Dance, David A B

    2017-09-21

    Current knowledge of the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Asia, and in particular the Greater Mekong Subregion, is very limited. Only a few studies from Thailand and Vietnam have been reported from the region with variable testing methods and results, and no studies from Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). Therefore we investigated the presence of C. difficile in a single centre in the Lao PDR and determined the ribotypes present. Seventy unformed stool samples from hospital inpatients at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, were tested for the presence of C. difficile using selective differential agar and confirmed by latex agglutination. C. difficile isolates were further characterised by ribotyping and toxin gene detection. C. difficile was isolated from five of the 70 patients, and five different ribotypes were identified (014, 017, 020, QX 107 and QX 574). This is the first isolation of C. difficile from human stool samples in the Lao PDR. These results will add to the limited amount of data on C. difficile in the region. In addition, we hope this information will alert clinicians to the presence of C. difficile in the country and will help inform future investigations into the epidemiology and diagnosis of C. difficile in Lao PDR.

  3. Molecular characterization of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric ward in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Habibian, Roya; Parvin, Neda; Doosti, Abbas; Famouri, Fatemeh; Eshraghi, Ali; Hafizi, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial acquired antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. It is a significant financial burden on modern healthcare resources. This study aimed to assess the molecular characterization of C. difficile strains isolated from children under 5 years old suffered from nosocomial diarrhea. One hundred diarrheic and 130 non-diarrheic fecal samples were collected from pediatrics less than 5 years old. Samples were cultured and C. difficile isolates were subjected to the PCR technique to study the distribution of ribotypes of C. difficile using P3 and P5 primers. Fifty-two out of 100 samples (52 %) were positive for C. difficile. The prevalence of bacterium in healthy children was 4.61 %. Total prevalence of C. difficile in diarrheic girls and boys were 48.9 and 54.7 %, respectively. Thirteen to twenty-four month age children had the highest prevalence of C. difficile. The most commonly detected ribotypes in the C. difficile isolates of Iranian pediatrics were RT027 (11.52 %), R1 (9.61 %) and R13 (7.68 %). The ribotypes of all of the six bacterial isolates of healthy children was not diagnosed. According to the presence of C. difficile and R27 ribotype, a continued genotype surveillance of this bacterium is necessary to monitor changes in the prevalence of certain strains and to identify the emergence of new strains that could affect future vaccine strategies.

  4. Outcomes and Risk Factors Associated with Clostridium difficile Diarrhea in Hospitalized Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Larentis, Daniela Zilio; Rosa, Regis Goulart; Dos Santos, Rodrigo Pires; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2015-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed over time. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk of infection and factors associated with poor prognosis. Objective. To evaluate factors associated with C. difficile infection and with poor prognosis in those with documented C. difficile colitis. Methods. A retrospective case-control study of 75 patients with documented C. difficile colitis and 75 controls with hospital-acquired diarrhea of other causes. Stepwise multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with C. difficile infection among patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea. Results. Previous antibiotic treatment (odds ratio (OR), 13.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.40-126.90), abdominal distension (OR, 3.85; 95% CI, 1.35-10.98), and fecal leukocytes (OR, 8.79; 95% CI, 1.41-54.61) are considered as predictors of C. difficile colitis; anorexia was negatively associated with C. difficile infection (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.03-0.66). Enteral tube feeding was independently associated with a composite outcome that included in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admission, and treatment failure (OR, 3.75; 95%CI, 1.24-11.29). Conclusions. Previous antibiotic use and presence of fecal leukocytes in patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea are associated with C. difficile colitis and enteral tube support with complications associated with C. difficile colitis.

  5. Bacterial probiotics as an aid in the control of Clostridium difficile disease in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Paulo H E; Madson, Darin M; Ramirez, Alejandro; Rowe, Eric W; Songer, J Glenn

    2016-02-01

    Although Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common disease in swine, there is a lack of prevention strategies. The objectives of this study were to evaluate: i) the effectiveness of Lactobacillus spp. and ii) non-toxigenic C. difficile (NTCD) as prevention for the development of CDI in piglets. Cesarean-derived piglets (N = 150) were randomly assigned to 6 groups: GROUP 1 - negative control (n = 10); GROUP 2 - NTCD only (n = 13); GROUP 3 - Lactobacillus spp. only (n = 14); GROUP 4 - positive control (challenged with toxigenic C. difficile strain) (n = 35); GROUP 5 - NTCD and challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile strain (n = 34); and GROUP 6 - Lactobacillus spp. and challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile strain (n = 44). Piglets which received NTCD showed lower prevalence of toxin-positive feces, mesocolonic edema, and microscopic lesions compared with positive control piglets. Administration of Lactobacillus spp. did not reveal clear benefits.

  6. Clostridium difficile and cystic fibrosis: management strategies and the role of faecal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dunwoody, Roisin; Steel, Alan; Landy, Jonathan; Simmonds, Nicholas

    2017-03-14

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial infection that colonises the gut in susceptible hosts. It is associated with exposure to healthcare settings and antibiotic use. It could be assumed that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are a high-risk group for C.difficile. However, despite high carriage rates, CF patients have low rates of active disease. There are guidelines for the treatment of C.difficile, however little is published specific to treating C.difficile in CF. This article provides an overview of the current management strategies for C.difficile in CF, including a description of the first faecal transplantation in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Clostridium difficile Infection in a Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Bejan J; Morison, Doree Gardner; Kraft, Colleen S; Dhere, Tanvi

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection has been associated with negative outcomes in the general population and in pregnant patients. Fecal microbiota transplant has become the standard for treatment of recurrent as well as refractory C difficile infection. We present a case of a 28-year-old pregnant woman who presented with recurrent C difficile infection despite treatment with vancomycin and fidaxomicin and underwent a successful fecal microbiota transplant through colonoscopy at 18 weeks of gestation. She no longer required antibiotics for the remainder of her pregnancy to treat C difficile and had a term vaginal delivery at 39 weeks of gestation. Our pregnant patient tolerated and responded to a fecal microbiota transplant for treatment of recurrent C difficile infection. Future large-scale studies are needed to determine the efficacy, safety, and long-term effects of manipulating the microbiome in pregnant patients and the neonates.

  8. Synthetic Lipoteichoic Acid Glycans Are Potential Vaccine Candidates to Protect from Clostridium difficile Infections.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Felix; Martin, Christopher E; Wegner, Erik; Mattner, Jochen; Baek, Ju Yuel; Pereira, Claney L; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-08-18

    Infections with Clostridium difficile increasingly cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bacterial surface glycans including lipoteichoic acid (LTA) were identified as auspicious vaccine antigens to prevent colonization. Here, we report on the potential of synthetic LTA glycans as vaccine candidates. We identified LTA-specific antibodies in the blood of C. difficile patients. Therefore, we evaluated the immunogenicity of a semi-synthetic LTA-CRM197 glycoconjugate. The conjugate elicited LTA-specific antibodies in mice that recognized natural LTA epitopes on the surface of C. difficile bacteria and inhibited intestinal colonization of C. difficile in mice in vivo. Our findings underscore the promise of synthetic LTA glycans as C. difficile vaccine candidates.

  9. Stool therapy may become a preferred treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile?

    PubMed

    Vyas, Dinesh; L'esperance, Heidi E; Vyas, Arpita

    2013-08-07

    Fecal enemas were first reported to successfully treat life threatening enterocolitis in 1958, but fecal therapy to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection has remained esoteric and not well investigated until recently. In the past few years, systematic reviews of case series and case reports of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent C. difficile infection have become available and validate use of fecal transplant for C. difficile enterocolitis. Methods of fecal transplant reported in the literature include: nasogastric tube, gastroscope, duodenal tube, colonoscopy, rectal tube, and fecal enemas administered at home; no method has been shown to be superior. A recent randomized study published in New England Journal of Medicine found fecal transplant to be superior to oral vancomycin alone in treatment of recurrent C. difficile enterocolitis. The significance of this trial cannot be underestimated as it lends credibility to the idea of intentionally using microbes to combat disease, providing an alternative to the older paradigm of disease eradication through use of antimicrobials.

  10. In vivo lysogenization of a Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD119

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Revathi; Fralick, Joe A.; Rolfe, Rial D.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen identified as the cause of antibiotic associated diarrhea and colitis. In this study, we have documented the lysogeny of a C. difficile bacteriophage in hamsters during C. difficile infection. The lysogens isolated from the hamsters were toxin typed and their phage integration site was confirmed by PCR. Through toxin ELISA it was found that the toxin production in the in vivo isolated lysogens was affected due to ΦCD119 lysogenization as in the case of in vitro isolated ΦCD119 lysogens. Together our findings indicate that a baceriophage can lysogenize its C. difficile host even during the infection process and highlights the importance of lysogeny of C. difficile phages as an evolutionary adaptation for survival. PMID:21664468

  11. Bacterial probiotics as an aid in the control of Clostridium difficile disease in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Paulo H. E.; Madson, Darin M.; Ramirez, Alejandro; Rowe, Eric W.; Songer, J. Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Although Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common disease in swine, there is a lack of prevention strategies. The objectives of this study were to evaluate: i) the effectiveness of Lactobacillus spp. and ii) non-toxigenic C. difficile (NTCD) as prevention for the development of CDI in piglets. Cesarean-derived piglets (N = 150) were randomly assigned to 6 groups: GROUP 1 — negative control (n = 10); GROUP 2 — NTCD only (n = 13); GROUP 3 — Lactobacillus spp. only (n = 14); GROUP 4 — positive control (challenged with toxigenic C. difficile strain) (n = 35); GROUP 5 — NTCD and challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile strain (n = 34); and GROUP 6 — Lactobacillus spp. and challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile strain (n = 44). Piglets which received NTCD showed lower prevalence of toxin-positive feces, mesocolonic edema, and microscopic lesions compared with positive control piglets. Administration of Lactobacillus spp. did not reveal clear benefits. PMID:26834271

  12. Laboratory identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated on Clostridium difficile selective medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Cristina; Warszawski, Nathalie; Korsak, Nicolas; Taminiau, Bernard; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Daube, Georges

    2016-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in the bacterium, the methodology for Clostridium difficile recovery has not yet been standardized. Cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose taurocholate (CCFT) has historically been the most used medium for C. difficile isolation from human, animal, environmental, and food samples, and presumptive identification is usually based on colony morphologies. However, CCFT is not totally selective. This study describes the recovery of 24 bacteria species belonging to 10 different genera other than C. difficile, present in the environment and foods of a retirement establishment that were not inhibited in the C. difficile selective medium. These findings provide insight for further environmental and food studies as well as for the isolation of C. difficile on supplemented CCFT.

  13. Severe Clostridium difficile-associated colitis in young patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, J; Lerner, A; Augarten, A; Wilschanski, M; Kerem, E; Ephros, M A

    1998-01-01

    We report four patients with cystic fibrosis and fulminant Clostridium difficile-associated colitis: two died, and one required hemicolectomy. Three of four patients carried the N1303K mutation. Severe and fatal C. difficile colitis can occur in cystic fibrosis patients, possibly with a genotype-specific predilection (i.e., N1303K/other). Because cystic fibrosis patients may have a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, disease caused by C. difficile must be considered when these patients have acute abdominal pain, diarrhea, or severe leukocytosis.

  14. Interaction between the intestinal microbiota and host in Clostridium difficile colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Robert A.; Young, Vincent B.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become one of the most prevalent and costly nosocomial infections. In spite of the importance of CDI, our knowledge of the pathogenesis of this infection is still rudimentary. Although previous use of antibiotics is generally considered to be the sine qua non of CDI, the mechanisms by which antibiotics render the host susceptible to C. difficile are not well defined. In this review we will explore what is known about how the indigenous microbiota acts in concert with the host to prevent colonization and virulence of C. difficile and how antibiotic administration disturbs host–microbiota homeostasis, leading to CDI. PMID:22595318

  15. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from hospitalized patients without antibiotic-associated diarrhea or colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Varki, N M; Aquino, T I

    1982-01-01

    Stool samples from 100 hospitalized patients and 21 healthy adults, obtained between March and June 1980, were cultured on a special selective medium containing cefoxitin and cycloserine to detect Clostridium difficile. This organism was isolated from 13 of the hospitalized patients and from 1 healthy subject. None of the patients with positive cultures had received antimicrobial therapy in the 3 preceding months. The observed rate of C. difficile isolation from adults not suffering from antibiotic-associated diarrhea or colitis is higher than previously reported. C. difficile culture is not recommended as a substitute for toxin assay in the evaluation of patients with intestinal disorders after antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:7153315

  16. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in cooked beef sold in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kouassi, Kra Athanase; Dadie, Adjéhi Thomas; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Loukou, Yao Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef sold in the streets in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 395 kidney and flesh samples of cooked beef were collected from vendors at Abidjan and subjected to C. difficile and C. perfringens isolation and identification by using biochemical tests, API 20A system and PCR detection. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for confirmed isolates. Our results showed the prevalence of 12.4% for C. difficile (11.04% in kidney and 13.45% in flesh) and 5.06% for C. perfringens (2.32% in kidney and 7.17% in flesh). Metronidazole and vancomycin remained the most potent antimicrobial agents against C. difficile while metronidazole and penicillin G were the most potent agents against C. perfringens. The resistance rates to tetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol and erythromycin against C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates ranged from 2.05% to 8.16% and from 20% to 50%, respectively. Among all antimicrobial agents tested against C. difficile, percentages of resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid as well as to gentamicin and cefotaxime were the highest. Eight resistant phenotypes were defined for C. difficile isolates and eleven resistant phenotypes for C. perfringens isolates. Clindamycin/gentamicin/cefotaxime/ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. difficile (55.10% of isolates) while norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. perfringens (20% of isolates). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Jordan G; Eppes, Stephen C; Klein, Joel D

    2003-05-01

    This retrospective cohort analysis examined the risk factors, symptoms, and severity of disease associated with C. difficile in pediatric inpatients. Risk factors for a C. difficile-positive test were an oncologic diagnosis, diarrhea of more than 2 days' duration, and gastrointestinal symptoms, especially abdominal pain. Over a 3.5-year period, there was a total of 22 C. difficile-positive patients, and most had mild, self-limiting diarrheal illness. No cases of C. difficile diarrhea were identified. Seventy-eight percent of the C. difficile-positive patients were found to have alternate risk factors for diarrhea. Our data indicate that C. difficile rarely causes severe diarrhea in pediatric inpatients and that C. difficile testing should be limited to patients with severe prolonged diarrhea and abdominal pain.

  18. Persistence of Clostridium difficile RT 237 infection in a Western Australian piggery.

    PubMed

    Moono, Peter; Putsathit, Papanin; Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Hampson, David J; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with healthcare-related infections in humans, and is an emerging pathogen in food animal species. There is potential for transmission of C. difficile from animals or animal products to humans. This study aimed to determine if C. difficile RT 237 had persisted in a Western Australian piggery or if there had been a temporal change in C. difficile diversity. C. difficile carriage in litters with and without diarrhea was investigated, as was the acquisition of C. difficile over time using cohort surveys. Rectal swabs were obtained from piglets aged 1-10 days to determine prevalence of C. difficile carriage and samples were obtained from 20 piglets on days 1, 7, 13, 20, and 42 of life to determine duration of shedding. Isolation of C. difficile from feces was achieved by selective enrichment culture. All isolates were characterized by standard molecular typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates (n = 29). Diarrheic piglets were more likely to shed C. difficile than the non-diseased (p = 0.0124, χ2). In the cohort study, C. difficile was isolated from 40% samples on day 1, 50% on day 7, 20% on day 13, and 0% on days 20 and 42. All isolates were RT 237 and no antimicrobial resistance was detected. The decline of shedding of C. difficile to zero has public health implications because slaughter age pigs have a low likelihood of spreading C. difficile to consumers via pig meat.

  19. Post-Surgical Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Southern, William N.; Rahmani, Rabin; Aroniadis, Olga; Khorshidi, Igal; Thanjan, Andy; Ibrahim, Christopher; Brandt, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Abdominal surgery is thought to be a risk factor for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). The aims of this study were to discern pre-operative factors associated with post-surgical CDAD, examine outcomes after post-surgical CDAD, and compare outcomes of post-surgical vs. medical CDAD. Methods Data from 3904 patients who had abdominal surgery at Montefiore Medical Center were extracted from Montefiore's clinical information system. Cases of 30-day post-surgical CDAD were identified. Pre-operative factors associated with developing post-surgical CDAD were identified using logistic regression. Medical patients and surgical patients with post-surgical CDAD were compared for demographic and clinical characteristics, CDAD recurrence and 90-day post-infection mortality. Results The rate of 30-day post-surgical CDAD was 1.2%. After adjustment for age and co-morbidities, factors significantly associated with post-surgical CDAD were: antibiotic use (OR: 1.94), proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use (OR: 2.32), prior hospitalization (OR: 2.27), and low serum albumin (OR: 2.05). In comparison with medical patients with CDAD, post-surgical patients with CDAD were significantly more likely to have received antibiotics (98.0% vs. 85.2%), less likely to have received a PPI (38.8% vs. 58.3%), or have had a prior hospitalization (42.9% vs. 67.1%). Post-surgical patients with CDAD had decreased risk of mortality when compared with medical patients with CDAD (HR 0.36). Conclusions CDAD is an infrequent complication after abdominal surgery. Several avoidable pre-operative exposures (e.g., antibiotic and PPI use) were identified that increase the risk of post-surgical CDAD. Post-surgical CDAD is associated with decreased risk of mortality when compared with CDAD on the medical service. PMID:20116817

  20. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among Medicare patients in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Zilberberg, Marya D.; Shorr, Andrew F.; Jesdale, William M.; Tjia, Jennifer; Lapane, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We explored the epidemiology and outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) recurrence among Medicare patients in a nursing home (NH) whose CDI originated in acute care hospitals. We conducted a retrospective, population-based matched cohort combining Medicare claims with Minimum Data Set 3.0, including all hospitalized patients age ≥65 years transferred to an NH after hospitalization with CDI 1/2011-11/2012. Incident CDI was defined as ICD-9-CM code 008.45 with no others in prior 60 days. CDI recurrence was defined as (within 60 days of last day of CDI treatment): oral metronidazole, oral vancomycin, or fidaxomicin for ≥3 days in part D file; or an ICD-9-CM code for CDI (008.45) during a rehospitalization. Cox proportional hazards and linear models, adjusted for age, gender, race, and comorbidities, examined mortality within 60 days and excess hospital days and costs, in patients with recurrent CDI compared to those without. Among 14,472 survivors of index CDI hospitalization discharged to an NH, 4775 suffered a recurrence. Demographics and clinical characteristics at baseline were similar, as was the risk of death (24.2% with vs 24.4% without). Median number of hospitalizations was 2 (IQR 1–3) among those with and 0 (IQR 0–1) among those without recurrence. Adjusted excess hospital days per patient were 20.3 (95% CI 19.1–21.4) and Medicare reimbursements $12,043 (95% CI $11,469–$12,617) in the group with a recurrence. Although recurrent CDI did not increase the risk of death, it was associated with a far higher risk of rehospitalization, excess hospital days, and costs to Medicare. PMID:28272217

  1. Clostridium difficile infection increases mortality risk in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janet T; Kelly, Rosemary F; Hertz, Marshall I; Dunitz, Jordan M; Shumway, Sara J

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and associated mortality in solid organ transplant recipients is rising, but data are scarce in lung transplant recipients. We aimed to characterize CDI and its effect on mortality in a large cohort of lung transplant recipients. Lung transplant recipients were identified from our transplant database from 2000 to 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios for CDI and death after adjusting for potential confounders identified from bivariate analysis. We identified 388 patients (196 female, 192 male), with a median age of 56 years (range, 8-75 years), during the study period. CDI developed after transplant in 89 (22.9%), with 27 (7.0%) developing CDI during the initial hospitalization at a mean diagnosis of 12.7 ± 11.4 days. Incidence varied widely each year (median, 24%; range, 5%-32%), with the highest rates in 2007 to 2008. Post-operative length of stay was identified as a significant predictor of CDI (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.03). Early CDI was an independent significant predictor of death (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.14-3.36) as well as CDI anytime after transplant (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.02-2.52). CDI rates varied widely from 2000 through 2011, with the highest rates in 2007 to 2008. Lung transplant recipients who developed CDI had a higher risk of death, especially when CDI occurred in the first 6 months after transplant. © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  2. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri; Reich, Jon; Gezahegn, Selome; Greer, Nancy; Shaukat, Aasma; MacDonald, Roderick; Rutks, Indy; Wilt, Timothy J

    2015-05-05

    The role of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is not well-known. To assess the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and harms of FMT for CDI. MEDLINE (1980 to January 2015), Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov, followed by hand-searching references from systematic reviews and identified studies. Any study of FMT to treat adult patients with CDI; case reports were only used to report harms. Data were extracted by 1 author and verified by another; 2 authors independently assessed risk of bias and strength of evidence. Two randomized, controlled trials (RCTs); 28 case-series studies; and 5 case reports were included. Two RCTs and 21 case-series studies (516 patients receiving FMT) reported using FMT for patients with recurrent CDI. A high proportion of treated patients had symptom resolution; however, the role of previous antimicrobials is unclear. One RCT comparing FMT with 2 control groups (n = 43) reported resolution of symptoms in 81%, 31%, and 23% of the FMT, vancomycin, or vancomycin-plus-bowel lavage groups, respectively (P < 0.001 for both control groups vs. FMT). An RCT comparing FMT route (n = 20) reported no difference between groups (60% in the nasogastric tube group and 80% in the colonoscopy group; P = 0.63). Across all studies for recurrent CDI, symptom resolution was seen in 85% of cases. In 7 case-series studies of patients with refractory CDI, symptom resolution ranged from 0% to 100%. Among 7 patients treated with FMT for initial CDI, results were mixed. Most studies were uncontrolled case-series studies; only 2 RCTs were available for analysis. Fecal microbiota transplantation may have a substantial effect with few short-term adverse events for recurrent CDI. Evidence is insufficient on FMT for refractory or initial CDI treatment and on whether effects vary by donor, preparation, or delivery method. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  3. Cost analysis of hospitalized Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD).

    PubMed

    Hübner, Claudia; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Muhr, Michaela; Claus, Franziska; Leesch, Henning; Kramer, Axel; Flessa, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Die Clostridium-difficile-assoziierte Diarrhö (CDAD) bedingt hohe finanzielle Belastungen für Gesundheitssysteme weltweit. Wie bei allen nosokomial erworbenen Infektionen ist ein verlängerter Krankenhausaufenthalt der wesentliche Kostentreiber. Bisherige Kostenstudien beziehen sich nur auf Krankenhausabrechnungsdaten vor Einführung des DRG-Entgeltsystems und den Vergleich von Verweildauer zu nicht infizierten Patienten. Eine Erhebung tatsächlicher Kosten steht bislang aus. Methode: Anhand einer retrospektiven Analyse wurden Daten der Universitätsmedizin Greifswald von Patienten mit einer stationär behandelten CDAD über einen 1-Jahres-Zeitraum ausgewertet. Über eine Identifizierung von CDAD-relevanten Behandlungsprozessen wurden die Kosten von Hygienemaßnahmen, Arzneimittel und Labor sowie Erlösausfälle bedingt durch Bettensperrungen und Verweildauerverlängerungen berechnet. Ergebnisse: 19 Patienten wurden in die Analyse eingeschlossen. Im Durchschnitt fallen pro CDADPatient zusätzliche Gesamtkosten in Höhe von 5.262,96 € an. Erlösausfälle aufgrund der verlängerten Verweildauer stellen mit 2.555,59 € pro Fall den höchsten Anteil dar, gefolgt von den Erlösausfällen aufgrund von Bettensperrungen während der Isolierung mit 2.413,08 € pro Fall. Insgesamt ergeben diese Opportunitätskosten einen Anteil von 94,41% an den Gesamtkosten. Die Kosten für Hygienemaßnahmen (253,98 €), Arzneimittel (22,88 €) und Labor (17,44 €) sind dem gegenüber gering.Schlussfolgerung: Die CDAD führt zu deutlichen Mehrkosten für das Krankenhaus. Unsere Erhebung der tatsächlichen Kosten bestätigt bisherige Studienergebnisse.

  4. Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Patients With Recurrent Clostridium Difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Stefan; Fischer, Anne; Ehlermann, Philipp; Frank, Thorsten; Tueffers, Kester; Sturm, Andreas; Link, Alexander; Demir, Muenevver; Siebenhaar, Arno; Storr, Martin; Glueck, Thomas; Siegel, Erhard; Solbach, Philip; Goeser, Felix; Koelbel, Christian B.; Lohse, Ansgar; Luebbert, Christoph; Kandzi, Ulrich; Maier, Matthias; Schuerle, Stefanie; Lerch, Markus M.; Tacke, Daniela; Cornely, Oliver A.; Stallmach, Andreas; Vehreschild, Maria

    2016-09-05

    The clinical effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (rCDI) has been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. To assess the current status of FMT in Germany with respect to active centers, local standards, clinical effectiveness and safety, the MicroTrans Registry (NCT02681068) was established. In a long-term retrospective multicenter observational study by the German Clinical Microbiome Study Group (GCMSG), primary and secondary cure on day 30 and 90, as well as occurrence of treatment-related adverse events were assessed. In addition to patient demographic data, we provide an overview of the FMT procedures and techniques used at different centers. Overall, 133 eligible patients from 33 centers were included, of which 64.7% were female (n = 86). The mean age was 75 years (interquartile range: 59.5-81.5). Administration via the duodenal route (n = 59; 44.4%) was the most frequently applied option, followed by colonic (n = 55; 41.1%), capsule (n = 13; 9.8%), and gastric administration (n = 4; 3.0%). Primary cure on day 30 and 90 was achieved in 84.2% (n = 101/120) and 78.3% (n = 72/92) of patients, respectively. Including re-treatment, secondary response was achieved in 87.5% (d 30; n = 105/120) and 85.9% (d 90; n = 79/92), respectively. Treatment- elated adverse events were documented in 16 patients (12.0%). FMT is a safe and effective treatment option for rCDI. However, FMT is currently available only in few centers in Germany, and treatment options vary from one center to another.

  5. Economic healthcare costs of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ghantoji, S S; Sail, K; Lairson, D R; DuPont, H L; Garey, K W

    2010-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalised patients. CDI increases patient healthcare costs due to extended hospitalisation, re-hospitalisation, laboratory tests and medications. However, the economic costs of CDI on healthcare systems remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review to summarise available studies aimed at defining the economic healthcare costs of CDI. We conducted a literature search for peer-reviewed studies that investigated costs associated with CDI (1980 to present). Thirteen studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. CDI costs in 2008 US dollars were calculated using the consumer price index. The total and incremental costs for primary and recurrent CDI were estimated. Of the 13, 10 were from the USA and one each from Canada, UK, and Ireland. In US-based studies incremental cost estimates ranged from $2,871 to $4,846 per case for primary CDI and from $13,655 to $18,067 per case for recurrent CDI. US-based studies in special populations (subjects with irritable bowel disease, surgical inpatients, and patients treated in the intensive care unit) showed an incremental cost range from $6,242 to $90,664. Non-US-based studies showed an estimated incremental cost of $5,243 to $8,570 per case for primary CDI and $13,655 per case for recurrent CDI. Economic healthcare costs of CDI were high for primary and recurrent cases. The high cost associated with CDI justifies the use of additional resources for CDI prevention and control. Copyright (c) 2009 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional characterization of Clostridium difficile spore coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Permpoonpattana, Patima; Phetcharaburanin, Jutarop; Mikelsone, Anna; Dembek, Marcin; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Marie-Clémence; La Ragione, Roberto; Brisson, Alain R; Fairweather, Neil; Hong, Huynh A; Cutting, Simon M

    2013-04-01

    Spores of Clostridium difficile play a key role in the dissemination of this important human pathogen, and until recently little has been known of their functional characteristics. Genes encoding six spore coat proteins (cotA, cotB, cotCB, cotD, cotE, and sodA) were disrupted by ClosTron insertional mutagenesis. Mutation of one gene, cotA, presented a major structural defect in spore assembly, with a clear misassembly of the outermost layers of the spore coat. The CotA protein is most probably subject to posttranslational modification and could play a key role in stabilizing the spore coat. Surprisingly, mutation of the other spore coat genes did not affect the integrity of the spore, although for the cotD, cotE, and sodA mutants, enzyme activity was reduced or abolished. This could imply that these enzymatic proteins are located in the exosporium or alternatively that they are structurally redundant. Of the spore coat proteins predicted to carry enzymatic activity, three were confirmed to be enzymes using both in vivo and in vitro methods, the latter using recombinant expressed proteins. These were a manganese catalase, encoded by cotD, a superoxide dismutase (SOD), encoded by sodA, and a bifunctional enzyme with peroxiredoxin and chitinase activity, encoded by cotE. These enzymes being exposed on the spore surface would play a role in coat polymerization and detoxification of H2O2. Two additional proteins, CotF (a tyrosine-rich protein and potential substrate for SodA) and CotG (a putative manganese catalase) were shown to be located at the spore surface.

  7. Functional Characterization of Clostridium difficile Spore Coat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Permpoonpattana, Patima; Phetcharaburanin, Jutarop; Mikelsone, Anna; Dembek, Marcin; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Marie-Clémence; La Ragione, Roberto; Brisson, Alain R.; Fairweather, Neil; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Spores of Clostridium difficile play a key role in the dissemination of this important human pathogen, and until recently little has been known of their functional characteristics. Genes encoding six spore coat proteins (cotA, cotB, cotCB, cotD, cotE, and sodA) were disrupted by ClosTron insertional mutagenesis. Mutation of one gene, cotA, presented a major structural defect in spore assembly, with a clear misassembly of the outermost layers of the spore coat. The CotA protein is most probably subject to posttranslational modification and could play a key role in stabilizing the spore coat. Surprisingly, mutation of the other spore coat genes did not affect the integrity of the spore, although for the cotD, cotE, and sodA mutants, enzyme activity was reduced or abolished. This could imply that these enzymatic proteins are located in the exosporium or alternatively that they are structurally redundant. Of the spore coat proteins predicted to carry enzymatic activity, three were confirmed to be enzymes using both in vivo and in vitro methods, the latter using recombinant expressed proteins. These were a manganese catalase, encoded by cotD, a superoxide dismutase (SOD), encoded by sodA, and a bifunctional enzyme with peroxiredoxin and chitinase activity, encoded by cotE. These enzymes being exposed on the spore surface would play a role in coat polymerization and detoxification of H2O2. Two additional proteins, CotF (a tyrosine-rich protein and potential substrate for SodA) and CotG (a putative manganese catalase) were shown to be located at the spore surface. PMID:23335421

  8. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile Infection: The Ochsner Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arnab; Smith, Robert; Breaux, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) accounts for 20%-30% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is the most commonly recognized cause of infectious diarrhea in healthcare settings. The incidence of CDI is rising, while the effectiveness of antibiotics for treatment decreases with recurrent episodes. The use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for cure of CDI has been reported since 1958, and the worldwide cure rate is reported to be 93%. We report our experience with FMT for the treatment of CDI. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing FMT for CDI at Ochsner Clinic Foundation from August 2012 to November 2013. FMT was administered via colonoscopy for patients with recurrent or severe CDI. Stool donors were screened for infections in the majority of cases. Results FMT was performed in 20 CDI patients. The 16 female and 4 male patients ranged in age from 27 to 89 years (mean 62 years). The average duration of illness from diagnosis to treatment was 49.6 weeks, based on available data. Only 3 donors were unscreened for infectious pathogens. Nine donors were related to the recipients by blood; most of the other donors were spouses. The average length of follow-up after FMT was 3 months. No recurrences of CDI after treatment have been documented. Adverse events reported after treatment included abdominal cramping, bloating, flatulence, and nausea that resolved. Conclusion Although the US Food and Drug Administration currently considers FMT an experimental therapy, we demonstrate that FMT is safe, well tolerated, and effective for recurrent and severe CDI. PMID:25598718

  9. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation.

    PubMed

    Norman, K N; Harvey, R B; Scott, H M; Hume, M E; Andrews, K; Brawley, A D

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile (Cd) among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Results are based on 131 Cd isolates from 1008 swine fecal samples and pork trim samples (overall prevalence of 13%). The prevalence (number positive/number tested in production type) of Cd was different between the groups (P

  10. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from a Phase 2 clinical trial of cadazolid and vancomycin in C. difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gerding, D N; Hecht, D W; Louie, T; Nord, C E; Talbot, G H; Cornely, O A; Buitrago, M; Best, E; Sambol, S; Osmolski, J R; Kracker, H; Locher, H H; Charef, P; Wilcox, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile isolates to cadazolid, a novel antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Ribotyping and susceptibilities were determined for C. difficile isolates from a multicentre, double-blind, Phase 2 study of oral cadazolid in patients with C. difficile infection (NCT01222702, ClinicalTrials.gov; EudraCT 2010-020941-29, European Clinical Trials Database). Patients were randomized to receive 250, 500 or 1000 mg of cadazolid twice daily or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily, for 10 days. MICs of cadazolid, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, linezolid and moxifloxacin were determined at baseline for all patients and post-baseline for patients with clinical failure or recurrence, using the agar dilution method. Seventy-eight of 84 patients had an evaluable toxigenic C. difficile isolate at baseline. The most frequent PCR ribotype was 027 (15.4%). Cadazolid MICs for baseline isolates (including epidemic strain 027) ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 mg/L. Baseline cadazolid MICs were similar to those of fidaxomicin and lower than those of vancomycin, linezolid and moxifloxacin. For each clinical outcome group (clinical cure, clinical failure, sustained clinical response and clinical failure or recurrence), the baseline cadazolid MIC range was 0.06-0.25 mg/L. Mean (min-max) cadazolid faecal concentration (μg/g) on day 5 was 884 (101-2710), 1706 (204-4230) and 3226 (1481-12 600) for the doses 250, 500 and 1000 mg, respectively. For all cadazolid doses, the faecal concentration was in excess of several thousand-fold the MIC90 for C. difficile. The MIC of cadazolid for all C. difficile isolates, including epidemic strains, was low and in the same narrow range regardless of treatment outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  11. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from a Phase 2 clinical trial of cadazolid and vancomycin in C. difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, D. N.; Hecht, D. W.; Louie, T.; Nord, C. E.; Talbot, G. H.; Cornely, O. A.; Buitrago, M.; Best, E.; Sambol, S.; Osmolski, J. R.; Kracker, H.; Locher, H. H.; Charef, P.; Wilcox, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile isolates to cadazolid, a novel antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Methods Ribotyping and susceptibilities were determined for C. difficile isolates from a multicentre, double-blind, Phase 2 study of oral cadazolid in patients with C. difficile infection (NCT01222702, ClinicalTrials.gov; EudraCT 2010-020941-29, European Clinical Trials Database). Patients were randomized to receive 250, 500 or 1000 mg of cadazolid twice daily or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily, for 10 days. MICs of cadazolid, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, linezolid and moxifloxacin were determined at baseline for all patients and post-baseline for patients with clinical failure or recurrence, using the agar dilution method. Results Seventy-eight of 84 patients had an evaluable toxigenic C. difficile isolate at baseline. The most frequent PCR ribotype was 027 (15.4%). Cadazolid MICs for baseline isolates (including epidemic strain 027) ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 mg/L. Baseline cadazolid MICs were similar to those of fidaxomicin and lower than those of vancomycin, linezolid and moxifloxacin. For each clinical outcome group (clinical cure, clinical failure, sustained clinical response and clinical failure or recurrence), the baseline cadazolid MIC range was 0.06–0.25 mg/L. Mean (min–max) cadazolid faecal concentration (μg/g) on day 5 was 884 (101–2710), 1706 (204–4230) and 3226 (1481–12 600) for the doses 250, 500 and 1000 mg, respectively. Conclusions For all cadazolid doses, the faecal concentration was in excess of several thousand-fold the MIC90 for C. difficile. The MIC of cadazolid for all C. difficile isolates, including epidemic strains, was low and in the same narrow range regardless of treatment outcome. PMID:26433782

  12. Development and Evaluation of an Ovine Antibody-Based Platform for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, April; McGlashan, Joanna; Al-Abdulla, Ibrahim; Ling, Roger; Denton, Harriet; Green, Steve; Coxon, Ruth; Landon, John

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of Clostridium difficile is a major problem as a hospital-associated infection which can cause severe, recurrent diarrhea. The currently available antibiotics are not effective in all cases and alternative treatments are required. In the present study, an ovine antibody-based platform for passive immunotherapy of C. difficile infection is described. Antibodies with high toxin-neutralizing titers were generated against C. difficile toxins A and B and were shown to neutralize three sequence variants of these toxins (toxinotypes) which are prevalent in human C. difficile infection. Passive immunization of hamsters with a mixture of toxin A and B antibodies protected them from a challenge with C. difficile spores in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to both toxins A and B were required for protection. The administration of toxin A and B antibodies up to 24 h postchallenge was found to reduce significantly the onset of C. difficile infection compared to nonimmunized controls. Protection from infection was also demonstrated with key disease isolates (ribotypes 027 and 078), which are members of the hypervirulent C. difficile clade. The ribotype 027 and 078 strains also have the capacity to produce an active binary toxin and these data suggest that neutralization of this toxin is unnecessary for the management of infection induced by these strains. In summary, the data suggest that ovine toxin A and B antibodies may be effective in the treatment of C. difficile infection; their potential use for the management of severe, fulminant cases is discussed. PMID:22144483

  13. Carvacrol and trans-Cinnamaldehyde Reduce Clostridium difficile Toxin Production and Cytotoxicity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Flock, Genevieve; Bouillaut, Laurent; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen that causes a serious toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. Reducing C. difficile toxin production could significantly minimize its pathogenicity and improve disease outcomes in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of two, food-grade, plant-derived compounds, namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and carvacrol (CR) in reducing C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro. Three hypervirulent C. difficile isolates were grown with or without the sub-inhibitory concentrations of TC or CR, and the culture supernatant and the bacterial pellet were collected for total toxin quantitation, Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and RT-qPCR analysis of toxin-encoding genes. The effect of CR and TC on a codY mutant and wild type C. difficile was also investigated. Carvacrol and TC substantially reduced C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity on Vero cells. The plant compounds also significantly down-regulated toxin production genes. Carvacrol and TC did not inhibit toxin production in the codY mutant of C. difficile, suggesting a potential codY-mediated anti-toxigenic mechanism of the plant compounds. The antitoxigenic concentrations of CR and TC did not inhibit the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. Our results suggest that CR and TC could potentially be used to control C. difficile, and warrant future studies in vivo. PMID:24625665

  14. High prevalence of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in public space lawns in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Moono, Peter; Lim, Su Chen; Riley, Thomas V.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well-established hospital pathogen. Recently, it has been detected increasingly in patients without hospital contact. Given this rise in community associated infections with C. difficile, we hypothesized that the environment could play an important role in transmission of spores outside the hospital. Lawn samples (311) collected in public spaces in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia, from February to June 2016 were cultured for C. difficile. C. difficile was isolated from the samples by direct and enrichment culture, and characterized by standard molecular methods using toxin gene PCR and ribotyping. The overall prevalence of C. difficile was 59%, new lawn (≤4 months old) was twice as likely as old lawn (>4 months old) to test positive (OR = 2.3; 95%CI 1.16–4.57, p = 0.015) and 35 C. difficile ribotypes were identified with toxigenic ribotype 014/020 (39%) predominating. The highest viable count from lawn soil samples was 1200 CFU/g. These results show that lawns in Perth, Western Australia, harbor toxigenic C. difficile, an important finding. The source of lawn contamination is likely related to modern practice of producing “roll-out” lawn. Further work should focus on identifying specific management practices that lead to C. difficile contamination of lawn to inform prevention and control measures. PMID:28145453

  15. Carvacrol and trans-cinnamaldehyde reduce Clostridium difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Flock, Genevieve; Bouillaut, Laurent; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-03-12

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen that causes a serious toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. Reducing C. difficile toxin production could significantly minimize its pathogenicity and improve disease outcomes in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of two, food-grade, plant-derived compounds, namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and carvacrol (CR) in reducing C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro. Three hypervirulent C. difficile isolates were grown with or without the sub-inhibitory concentrations of TC or CR, and the culture supernatant and the bacterial pellet were collected for total toxin quantitation, Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and RT-qPCR analysis of toxin-encoding genes. The effect of CR and TC on a codY mutant and wild type C. difficile was also investigated. Carvacrol and TC substantially reduced C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity on Vero cells. The plant compounds also significantly down-regulated toxin production genes. Carvacrol and TC did not inhibit toxin production in the codY mutant of C. difficile, suggesting a potential codY-mediated anti-toxigenic mechanism of the plant compounds. The antitoxigenic concentrations of CR and TC did not inhibit the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. Our results suggest that CR and TC could potentially be used to control C. difficile, and warrant future studies in vivo.

  16. Does Alkaline Colonic pH Predispose to Clostridium difficile Infection?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Purba; Yakubov, Stanley; Tin, Kevin; Zea, Diego; Garankina, Olga; Ghitan, Monica; Chapnick, Edward K; Homel, Peter; Lin, Yu Shia; Koegel, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile caused nearly 500,000 infections and was associated with approximately 29,000 deaths in 2011, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. C. difficile is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and, often, severe illness in healthcare facilities, as well as the community. Our objective was to determine whether alkaline colonic pH predisposes to colonization and infection with C. difficile. A total of 228 patients with diarrhea and/or abdominal pain, leukocytosis, and fever were included. Stool pH was measured, and C. difficile antigen and toxin in stool were detected. Of 228 patients, 30 (13.2%) tested positive for C. difficile (antigen+/toxin+) and 171 (75%) were C. difficile negative (antigen-/toxin-). Of 171 patients who tested negative, 93 (54.4%) had stool pH >7.0 and 78 (45.6%) had pH ≤7.0. Among the 30 patients who tested positive, 26 (86.7%) had stool pH >7.0 (P = 0.002). Among the 27 colonized patients (antigen+/toxin-), 12 (44.4%) had stool pH >7.0 (P = 0.34). For all patients with stool pH ≤7.0, 96% tested negative for C. difficile infection (P = 0.002). A strong association between C. difficile infection and alkaline stool pH was found.

  17. The first case of antibiotic-associated colitis by Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea.

    PubMed

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Song, Hyun Joo; Kim, Seong-Eun; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Miae; Hwang, Yusun; Kim, Heejung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a common causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) ranges from mild diarrhea to life threatening PMC. Recently, a highly virulent strain of C. difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 was found in North America, Europe, and Japan. A 52-yr-old woman with anti-tuberculosis medication and neurogenic bladder due to traffic accident experienced five episodes of C. difficile PMC after taking antibiotics for pneumonia along with septic shock and acute renal failure. She was readmitted to the intensive care unit and treated with oral vancomycin with refractory of oral metronidazole, inotropics and probiotics for over 60 days. C. difficile isolated both at the first and the last admission was identified as C. difficile ribotype 027 by ribotyping, toxinotyping, and tcdC gene sequencing, which turned out the same pathogen as the epidemic hypervirulent B1/NAP1 strain. This is the first case of C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea. After discharge, she was maintained on probiotics and rifaximin for 3 weeks. She had no relapse for 6 months.

  18. The role of immunoglobulin for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Horo, John; Safdar, Nasia

    2009-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common infectious cause of nosocomial healthcare-associated diarrhea. The increasing prevalence of C difficile, spread in the community, virulence and frequent relapse has created an urgent need to identify new effective treatments for C. difficile infection. Among these, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used for cases of severe C. difficile infection. We undertook a systematic review to examine the published literature pertaining to the use of immunoglobulin for C. difficile infection. Four retrospective studies and five case reports that addressed the use of IVIG for the treatment of C. difficile infection were identified. One study on the use of oral immunoglobulin was identified. Although overall there appear to be benefits to using IVIG in recurrent severe disease, the small sample sizes and lack of control groups in three of the four studies do not allow recommendations to be made regarding the use of immunoglobulin in C. difficile infection. Further research is urgently needed to clarify the role of immunoglobulin--intravenous or oral--for the treatment of C. difficile infection.

  19. Newly Identified Bacteriolytic Enzymes That Target a Wide Range of Clinical Isolates of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Krunal K.; Paskaleva, Elena E.; Wu, Xia; Grover, Navdeep; Mundra, Ruchir V.; Chen, Kevin; Zhang, Yongrong; Yang, Zhiyong; Feng, Hanping; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Kane, Ravi S.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major cause of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients, with increasing mortality rate and annual healthcare costs exceeding $3 billion. Since C. difficile infections are associated with the use of antibiotics, there is an urgent need to develop treatments that can inactivate the bacterium selectively without affecting commensal microflora. Lytic enzymes from bacteria and bacteriophages show promise as highly selective and effective antimicrobial agents. These enzymes often have a modular structure, consisting of a catalytic domain and a binding domain. In the current work, using consensus catalytic domain and cell-wall binding domain sequences as probes, we analyzed in silico the genome of C. difficile, as well as phages infecting C. difficile. We identified two genes encoding cell lytic enzymes with possible activity against C. difficile. We cloned the genes in a suitable expression vector, expressed and purified the protein products, and tested enzyme activity in vitro. These newly identified enzymes were found to be active against C. difficile cells in a dose-dependent manner. We achieved a more than 4-log reduction in the number of viable bacteria within 5 h of application. Moreover, we found that the enzymes were active against a wide range of C. difficile clinical isolates. We also characterized the biocatalytic mechanism by identifying the specific bonds cleaved by these enzymes within the cell wall peptidoglycan. These results suggest a new approach to combating the growing healthcare problem associated with C. difficile infections. PMID:27260850

  20. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile colonization among hospitalised adults; risk factors and impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Behar, Laura; Chadwick, David; Dunne, Angela; Jones, Christopher I; Proctor, Claire; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Sharratt, Paula; Stanley, Philip; Whiley, Angela; Wilks, Mark; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2017-07-01

    To establish risk factors for Clostridium difficile colonization among hospitalized patients in England. Patients admitted to elderly medicine wards at three acute hospitals in England were recruited to a prospective observational study. Participants were asked to provide a stool sample as soon as possible after enrolment and then weekly during their hospital stay. Samples were cultured for C. difficile before ribotyping and toxin detection by PCR. A multivariable logistic regression model of risk factors for C. difficile colonization was fitted from univariable risk factors significant at the p < 0.05 level. 410/727 participants submitted ≥1 stool sample and 40 (9.8%) carried toxigenic C. difficile in the first sample taken. Ribotype 106 was identified three times and seven other ribotypes twice. No ribotype 027 strains were identified. Independent predictors of colonization were previous C. difficile infection (OR 4.53 (95% C.I. 1.33-15.48) and malnutrition (MUST score ≥2) (OR 3.29 (95% C.I. 1.47-7.35)). Although C. difficile colonised patients experienced higher 90-day mortality, colonization was not an independent risk for death. In a non-epidemic setting patients who have previously had CDI and have a MUST score of ≥2 are at increased risk of C. difficile colonization and could be targeted for active surveillance to prevent C. difficile transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of risk factors influencing Clostridium difficile prevalence in middle-size dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Bandelj, Petra; Blagus, Rok; Briski, France; Frlic, Olga; Vergles Rataj, Aleksandra; Rupnik, Maja; Ocepek, Matjaz; Vengust, Modest

    2016-03-12

    Farm animals have been suggested to play an important role in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the community. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with C. difficile dissemination in family dairy farms, which are the most common farming model in the European Union. Environmental samples and fecal samples from cows and calves were collected repeatedly over a 1 year period on 20 mid-size family dairy farms. Clostridium difficile was detected in cattle feces on all farms using qPCR. The average prevalence between farms was 10% (0-44.4%) and 35.7% (3.7-66.7%) in cows and calves, respectively. Bacterial culture yielded 103 C. difficile isolates from cattle and 61 from the environment. Most C. difficile isolates were PCR-ribotype 033. A univariate mixed effect model analysis of risk factors associated dietary changes with increasing C. difficile prevalence in cows (P = 0.0004); and dietary changes (P = 0.004), breeding Simmental cattle (P = 0.001), mastitis (P = 0.003) and antibiotic treatment (P = 0.003) in calves. Multivariate analysis of risk factors found that dietary changes in cows (P = 0.0001) and calves (P = 0.002) increase C. difficile prevalence; mastitis was identified as a risk factor in calves (P = 0.001). This study shows that C. difficile is common on dairy farms and that shedding is more influenced by farm management than environmental factors. Based on molecular typing of C. difficile isolates, it could also be concluded that family dairy farms are currently not contributing to increased CDI incidence.

  2. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Loss of Clostridium difficile Colonization in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Dubberke, Erik R; Reske, Kimberly A; Seiler, Sondra; Hink, Tiffany; Kwon, Jennie H; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2015-08-01

    Asymptomatic colonization may contribute to Clostridium difficile transmission. Few data identify which patients are at risk for colonization. We performed a prospective cohort study of C. difficile colonization and risk factors for C. difficile acquisition and loss in hospitalized patients. Patients admitted to medical or surgical wards at a tertiary care hospital were enrolled; interviews and chart review were performed to determine patient demographics, C. difficile infection (CDI) history, medications, and health care exposures. Stool samples/rectal swabs were collected at enrollment and discharge; stool samples from clinical laboratory tests were also included. Samples were cultured for C. difficile, and the isolates were tested for toxins A and B and ribotyped. Chi-square tests and univariate logistic regression were used for the analyses. Two hundred thirty-five patients were enrolled. Of the patients, 21% were colonized with C. difficile (toxigenic and nontoxigenic) at admission and 24% at discharge. Ribotype 027 accounted for 6% of the strains at admission and 12% at discharge. Of the patients colonized at admission, 78% were also colonized at discharge. Cephalosporin use was associated with C. difficile acquisition (47% of patients who acquired C. difficile versus 25% of patients who did not; P = 0.03). β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations were associated with a loss of C. difficile colonization (36% of patients who lost C. difficile colonization versus 8% of patients colonized at both admission and discharge; P = 0.04), as was metronidazole (27% versus 3%; P = 0.03). Antibiotic use affects the epidemiology of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, including acquisition and loss, and it requires additional study. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Loss of Clostridium difficile Colonization in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reske, Kimberly A.; Seiler, Sondra; Hink, Tiffany; Kwon, Jennie H.

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic colonization may contribute to Clostridium difficile transmission. Few data identify which patients are at risk for colonization. We performed a prospective cohort study of C. difficile colonization and risk factors for C. difficile acquisition and loss in hospitalized patients. Patients admitted to medical or surgical wards at a tertiary care hospital were enrolled; interviews and chart review were performed to determine patient demographics, C. difficile infection (CDI) history, medications, and health care exposures. Stool samples/rectal swabs were collected at enrollment and discharge; stool samples from clinical laboratory tests were also included. Samples were cultured for C. difficile, and the isolates were tested for toxins A and B and ribotyped. Chi-square tests and univariate logistic regression were used for the analyses. Two hundred thirty-five patients were enrolled. Of the patients, 21% were colonized with C. difficile (toxigenic and nontoxigenic) at admission and 24% at discharge. Ribotype 027 accounted for 6% of the strains at admission and 12% at discharge. Of the patients colonized at admission, 78% were also colonized at discharge. Cephalosporin use was associated with C. difficile acquisition (47% of patients who acquired C. difficile versus 25% of patients who did not; P = 0.03). β-lactam–β-lactamase inhibitor combinations were associated with a loss of C. difficile colonization (36% of patients who lost C. difficile colonization versus 8% of patients colonized at both admission and discharge; P = 0.04), as was metronidazole (27% versus 3%; P = 0.03). Antibiotic use affects the epidemiology of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, including acquisition and loss, and it requires additional study. PMID:25987626

  4. A Simulation-Based Assessment of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Michael A.; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Khader, Karim; Ray, Willy; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Toth, Damon; Sablay, Theodore; Borotkanics, Robert J.; Gerding, Dale N.; Samore, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is one of the most common and important nosocomial pathogens, causing severe gastrointestinal disease in hospitalized patients. Although "bundled" interventions have been proposed and promoted, optimal control strategies remain unknown. Methods We designed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection, which included components such as: patients and health care workers, and their interactions; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. We then introduced six interventions, alone and "bundled" together: aggressive C. difficile testing; empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; improved adherence to hand hygiene and contact precautions; improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and improved environmental cleaning. All interventions were tested using values representing base-case, typical intervention, and optimal intervention scenarios. Findings In the base-case scenario, C. difficile infection rates ranged from 8–21 cases/10,000 patient-days, with a case detection fraction between 32%–50%. Implementing the "bundle" at typical intervention levels had a large impact on C. difficile acquisition and infection rates, although intensifying the intervention to optimal levels had much less additional impact. Most of the impact came from improved hand hygiene and empiric isolation and treatment of suspected C. difficile cases. Conclusion A "bundled" intervention is likely to reduce nosocomial C. difficile infection rates, even under typical implementation conditions. Real-world implementation of the "bundle" should focus on those components of the intervention that are likely to produce the greatest impact on C. difficile infection rates, such as hand hygiene and empiric isolation and

  5. Severe anaphylaxis caused by orally administered vancomycin to a patient with Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bossé, D; Lemire, C; Ruel, J; Cantin, A M; Ménard, F; Valiquette, L

    2013-04-01

    We report the first case of anaphylaxis to oral vancomycin in a cystic fibrosis patient with severe and relapsing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) refractory to metronidazole. The patient's colitis has been successfully treated with a combination of intravenous metronidazole and tigecycline.

  6. Clostridium difficile ribotype diversity at six health care institutions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Waslawski, Sheila; Lo, Eugene S; Ewing, Sarah A; Young, Vincent B; Aronoff, David M; Sharp, Susan E; Novak-Weekley, Susan M; Crist, Arthur E; Dunne, W Michael; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Johnson, Michelle; Brecher, Stephen M; Newton, Duane W; Walk, Seth T

    2013-06-01

    Capillary-based PCR ribotyping was used to quantify the presence/absence and relative abundance of 98 Clostridium difficile ribotypes from clinical cases of disease at health care institutions in six states of the United States. Regionally important ribotypes were identified, and institutions in close proximity did not necessarily share more ribotype diversity than institutions that were farther apart.

  7. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  8. Active surveillance for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using stool specimens submitted for testing for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Francois, Jeannette; Blash, Stephanie; Patel, Gopi; Jenkins, Stephen G; LaBombardi, Vincent; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Srinivasan, Arjun; Calfee, David P

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance to identify asymptomatic carriers of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is a recommended strategy for CRE control in healthcare facilities. Active surveillance using stool specimens tested for Clostridium difficile is a relatively low-cost strategy to detect CRE carriers. Further evaluation of this and other risk factor-based active surveillance strategies is warranted.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clostridium difficile Type Strain DSM 1296T

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Wittmann, Johannes; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete genome of the Clostridium difficile type strain DSM 1296T. A combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of one chromosome and two extrachromosomal elements, the bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T and a putative plasmid-like structure harboring genes of another bacteriophage. PMID:26450746

  10. Clostridium difficile Infection in the Department of Defense (DOD): 2007-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Edwards JR, Cohen J, et al. Effect of nucleic acid amplification testing on population-based incidence rates of Clostridium difficile infection. Clin...Comorbidity Burden among CDI Patients............................................................. 14 Previous Antibiotic and Gastric Acid Inhibitor...23 Previous Antibiotic and Gastric Acid Inhibitor Use

  11. Glycan arrays containing synthetic Clostridium difficile lipoteichoic acid oligomers as tools toward a carbohydrate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher E; Broecker, Felix; Eller, Steffen; Oberli, Matthias A; Anish, Chakkumkal; Pereira, Claney L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2013-08-18

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of severe nosocomial infections. Cell-surface carbohydrate antigens are promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the first total synthesis of oligomers of the lipoteichoic acid antigen repeating unit. Synthetic glycan microarrays revealed anti-glycan antibodies in the blood of patients that help to define epitopes for vaccine development.

  12. Constructing identities in the media: newspaper coverage analysis of a major UK Clostridium difficile outbreak.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Emma; Johnston, Bridget; Corlett, Joanne; Kearney, Nora

    2014-07-01

    To examine how a major Clostridium difficile outbreak in the UK was represented in the media. Clostridium difficile is a serious health care-associated infection with significant global prevalence. As major outbreaks have continued to occur worldwide over the last few decades, it has also resulted in increasing media coverage. Newspaper journalists are, however, frequently criticized for sensationalized and inaccurate reporting and alarming the public. Despite such criticisms, nothing is known about how the media frame Clostridium difficile related coverage. Qualitative interpretive descriptive study. An interpretive analysis of newspaper articles from the national press that reported about the outbreak from the first day of coverage over 3 weeks (12 June-3 July 2008). Twenty-eight newspaper articles were included in the study from tabloids, broadsheets, a regional and a Sunday newspaper. Monster and war metaphors were frequently adopted to portray the severity of Clostridium difficile and the impact it can have on patient safety. In addition, the positioning of the affected patients, their families, healthcare professionals and the Government produced representations of victims, villains and heroes. This subsequently evoked notions of vulnerability, blame and conflict. The media are and will remain critical convectors of public information and, as such, are hugely influential in risk perceptions and responses. Rather than simply dismissing media coverage, further understanding around how such stories in specific contexts are constructed and represented is needed so that it can help inform future communication and management strategies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  14. Key Advantages of a Targeted Incident Reporting System for Severe and Critical Clostridium difficile Infection Incidents.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Hibak; Lemieux, Camille; Hota, Susy

    2017-01-01

    There is little guidance on how to design and implement an incident reporting system (IRS) targeted at one of the most common types of adverse events in hospitals: hospital-associated infections. In this article, we describe an IRS for severe and critical Clostridium difficile infection incidents and highlight its key advantages.

  15. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in pork and retail meat in Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  16. Implementing automated surveillance for tracking Clostridium difficile infection at multiple healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Dubberke, Erik R; Nyazee, Humaa A; Yokoe, Deborah S; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Stevenson, Kurt B; Mangino, Julie E; Khan, Yosef M; Fraser, Victoria J

    2012-03-01

    Automated surveillance using electronically available data has been found to be accurate and save time. An automated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) surveillance algorithm was validated at 4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epicenter hospitals. Electronic surveillance was highly sensitive, specific, and showed good to excellent agreement for hospital-onset; community-onset, study facility-associated; indeterminate; and recurrent CDI.

  17. Pathogenesis of postantibiotic diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile: an in vitro study in the rabbit intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Guandalini, S; Fasano, A; Migliavacca, M; Verga, M C; Mastrantonio Gianfrilli, P; Ferrara, A; Alessio, M; Malamisura, B; Galati, P; Pantosti, A

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the pathophysiological changes leading to postantibiotic diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile and its cytotoxin, oral ampicillin was given to rabbits, and jejunal, ileal, and caecal segments of those that developed diarrhoea were investigated in vitro. The rabbits that, in response to treatment, harboured Clostridium difficile in their colonic lumen were studied, and the results expressed according to the presence or absence of Clostridium difficile and/or its cytotoxin. Thus, we refer to either CD+ or CD- segments. The influx of glucose, phenylalanine, glycylphenylalanine, and lysine across the brush border of jejunum and ileum of CD+ segments was severely impaired, while only slightly blunted in CD-. No significant change was detected in the influx of glutamic acid in the jejunum of all treated animals and in the CD- ilea. Morphologic damage in ileum and caecum of CD+ was also more evident than in CD-. Transepithelial ion transport across short circuited ileal mucosa (CD+ and CD-) revealed secretory changes in Cl net transport that were more marked in CD-. We conclude that: (1) Clostridium difficile may also colonise the upper intestinal tract, where it induces morphological and functional damage, severely impairing nutrient absorption; and (2) the ileum contributes to the diarrhoea caused by CD even when the micro-organism is confined to the more distal gut by showing moderate impairment of nutrient absorption and marked electrolyte secretion. PMID:3396947

  18. Genome Resequencing of the Virulent and Multidrug-Resistant Reference Strain Clostridium difficile 630

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Abt, Birte; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the complete genome of the virulent and multidrug-resistant pathogen Clostridium difficile strain 630. A combination of single-molecule real-time and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of an additional rRNA gene cluster, additional tRNAs, and the absence of a transposon in comparison to the published and reannotated genome sequence. PMID:25858846

  19. A cfr-like gene cfr(C) conferring linezolid resistance is common in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Candela, Thomas; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Nguyen, Tiep Khac; Lambert, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    Clostridium difficile T10 and Clostridium bolteae 90B3 were co-resistant to phenicols, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, pleuromutilins and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) and harbored an unreported cfr-like determinant that may alter the 23S rRNA by m(8)A2503 methylation. The cfr-like cfr(C) gene was cloned in C. difficile 630Δerm in which it conferred PhLOPSA resistance. In C. bolteae 90B3: (i) qRT-PCR analysis indicated that cfr(C) was similarly expressed in the absence or presence of either chloramphenicol or clindamycin or linezolid; and (ii) cfr(C) was part of a putative 24 kb-transposon, which generated a detectable circular intermediate. An element differing by a single nucleotide was found in C. difficile DA00203 from GenBank data, consistent with a recent horizontal transfer. In silico analysis showed cfr(C) in 19 out of 274 C. difficile genomes. This gene was also detected by PCR analysis in 9 out of 80 C. difficile from our laboratory strain collection according to resistance to linezolid and florfenicol. The fact that cfr(C) was mainly confined in C. difficile within polymorphic environments indicates this microorganism is a reservoir for PhLOPSA resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. A rare case intractable diarrhea secondary to Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    John, Santhosh Gheevarghese; Dominguez, Cristian; Chandiramani, Vijay; Vemulappalli, Tejo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 63 Final Diagnosis: Cytomegalo virus (CMV) infection Symptoms: Diarrhea Medication:— Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Coinfection with cytomegalovirus in a patient with Clostridium difficile persistent diarrhea and colitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Case Report: A 63-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip, status post surgical resection and currently on chemoradiation presented with intractable diarrhea and abdominal pain. Initial workup showed Clostridium difficile diarrhea with pancolitis. Diarrhea persisted despite being on antibiotics and bacteriological cure for C. difficile. Further noninvasive work up revealed associated cytomegalovirus infection, and patient had a dramatic response to ganciclovir without any relapse. Conclusions: Physicians should be cognizant about other causes of diarrhea and colitis in immunocompromised patient when treatment for primary diagnosis fails to resolve their symptoms. PMID:24298304

  1. Decreased Cure and Increased Recurrence Rates for Clostridium difficile Infection Caused by the Epidemic C. difficile BI Strain

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Laurica A.; Sambol, Susan P.; Cheknis, Adam; Nagaro, Kristin; Kean, Yin; Sears, Pamela S.; Babakhani, Farah; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. An epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile designated by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) as group BI has caused multiple outbreaks of severe C. difficile infection (CDI). The treatment response of patients infected with this strain is uncertain. Methods. Clostridium difficile isolates were collected from 2 phase 3 clinical trials comparing fidaxomicin to vancomycin and typed using REA. Clinical cure and recurrence outcomes were analyzed by strain type of the infecting organism, BI and non-BI, using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. From 999 patients, 719 isolates were available for typing (356 fidaxomicin treated and 363 vancomycin treated). BI was the most common REA group (34% of isolates). Patients infected with BI had lower cure rates (86.6%; 214 of 247) than those infected with non-BI strains (94.3%; 445 of 472) (P < .001). The cure rate difference between the BI and non-BI patients was significant for both vancomycin (P = .02) and fidaxomicin (P = .007). BI patients had a recurrence rate of 27.4% (51 of 186), compared with a recurrence rate of 16.6% (66 of 397) in non-BI patients (P = .002). By multivariate analysis, BI infection was statistically significant as a risk factor for reduced cure (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], .27–.85; P = .030) and for increased recurrence (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01–2.45; P = .046). Conclusions. The clinical cure rate of patients infected with the epidemic BI C. difficile strain is lower than the cure rate of those infected with non-BI strains whether treated with fidaxomicin or vancomycin. Similarly, the CDI recurrence rate is increased in patients with the BI strain compared with patients with other C. difficile strains. PMID:22523271

  2. Non-inferiority of pulsed xenon UV light versus bleach for reducing environmental Clostridium difficile contamination on high-touch surfaces in Clostridium difficile infection isolation rooms

    PubMed Central

    Ghantoji, Shashank S.; Stibich, Mark; Stachowiak, Julie; Cantu, Sherry; Adachi, Javier A.; Raad, Issam I.

    2015-01-01

    The standard for Clostridium difficile surface decontamination is bleach solution at a concentration of 10 % of sodium hypochlorite. Pulsed xenon UV light (PX-UV) is a means of quickly producing germicidal UV that has been shown to be effective in reducing environmental contamination by C. difficile spores. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether PX-UV was equivalent to bleach for decontamination of surfaces in C. difficile infection isolation rooms. High-touch surfaces in rooms previously occupied by C. difficile infected patients were sampled after discharge but before and after cleaning using either bleach or non-bleach cleaning followed by 15 min of PX-UV treatment. A total of 298 samples were collected by using a moistened wipe specifically designed for the removal of spores. Prior to disinfection, the mean contamination level was 2.39 c.f.u. for bleach rooms and 22.97 for UV rooms. After disinfection, the mean level of contamination for bleach was 0.71 c.f.u. (P = 0.1380), and 1.19 c.f.u. (P = 0.0017) for PX-UV disinfected rooms. The difference in final contamination levels between the two cleaning protocols was not significantly different (P = 0.9838). PX-UV disinfection appears to be at least equivalent to bleach in the ability to decrease environmental contamination with C. difficile spores. Larger studies are needed to validate this conclusion. PMID:25627208

  3. Non-inferiority of pulsed xenon UV light versus bleach for reducing environmental Clostridium difficile contamination on high-touch surfaces in Clostridium difficile infection isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Ghantoji, Shashank S; Stibich, Mark; Stachowiak, Julie; Cantu, Sherry; Adachi, Javier A; Raad, Issam I; Chemaly, Roy F

    2015-02-01

    The standard for Clostridium difficile surface decontamination is bleach solution at a concentration of 10 % of sodium hypochlorite. Pulsed xenon UV light (PX-UV) is a means of quickly producing germicidal UV that has been shown to be effective in reducing environmental contamination by C. difficile spores. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether PX-UV was equivalent to bleach for decontamination of surfaces in C. difficile infection isolation rooms. High-touch surfaces in rooms previously occupied by C. difficile infected patients were sampled after discharge but before and after cleaning using either bleach or non-bleach cleaning followed by 15 min of PX-UV treatment. A total of 298 samples were collected by using a moistened wipe specifically designed for the removal of spores. Prior to disinfection, the mean contamination level was 2.39 c.f.u. for bleach rooms and 22.97 for UV rooms. After disinfection, the mean level of contamination for bleach was 0.71 c.f.u. (P = 0.1380), and 1.19 c.f.u. (P = 0.0017) for PX-UV disinfected rooms. The difference in final contamination levels between the two cleaning protocols was not significantly different (P = 0.9838). PX-UV disinfection appears to be at least equivalent to bleach in the ability to decrease environmental contamination with C. difficile spores. Larger studies are needed to validate this conclusion.

  4. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infection and IBD, and we also touch upon the role of specific pathogens, particularly C. difficile, as causative agents of IBD. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms activated by C. difficile that contribute to the development and exacerbation of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23320050

  5. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin). Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. PMID:27536153

  6. Atypical presentation of Clostridium difficile colitis in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Binkovitz, L A; Allen, E; Bloom, D; Long, F; Hammond, S; Buonomo, C; Donnelly, L F

    1999-02-01

    This report describes the unusual presentation of Clostridium difficile colitis in five patients with cystic fibrosis and the role of CT in first suggesting the correct diagnosis in this group of patients. Because of the absence of watery diarrhea and the presence of abdominal bloating and decreased stooling, cystic fibrosis patients with C. difficile colitis will be treated for stool impaction, meconium ileus equivalent, or distal intestinal obstruction syndrome. CT of the abdomen, performed in these five patients because of their lack of improvement after standard therapy for stool impaction, showed an extensive pancolitis later confirmed to be caused by C. difficile infection. In patients with cystic fibrosis, imaging findings of a pancolitis should raise the possibility of C. difficile colitis despite the lack of watery diarrhea. Anticlostridial treatment can be initiated before bacteriologic confirmation is obtained.

  7. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Caroline; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material. PMID:27025623

  8. Fecal microbiota transplantation for refractory Clostridium difficile colitis in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Moraco, R J; Mehta, A K; Lyon, G M; Kraft, C S

    2014-02-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been shown to be safe and efficacious in individuals with refractory Clostridium difficile. It has not been widely studied in individuals with immunosuppression due to concerns about infectious complications. We describe two solid organ transplant recipients, one lung and one renal, in this case report that both had resolution of their diarrhea caused by C. difficile after FMT. Both recipients required two FMTs to achieve resolution of their symptoms and neither had infectious complications. Immunosuppressed individuals are at high risk for acquisition of C. difficile and close monitoring for infectious complications after FMT is necessary, but should not preclude its use in patients with refractory disease due to C. difficile. Sequential FMT may be used to achieve cure in these patients with damaged microbiota from antibiotic use and immunosuppression. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Microbial and metabolic interactions between the gastrointestinal tract and Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics disturb the gastrointestinal tract microbiota and in turn reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. The mechanism for this loss of colonization resistance is still unknown but likely reflects structural (microbial) and functional (metabolic) changes to the gastrointestinal tract. Members of the gut microbial community shape intestinal metabolism that provides nutrients and ultimately supports host immunity. This review will discuss how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this impacts bacterial metabolism in the gut. It will also explore the chemical requirements for C. difficile germination, growth, toxin production and sporulation. Many of the metabolites that influence C. difficile physiology are products of gut microbial metabolism including bile acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. To restore colonization resistance against C. difficile after antibiotics a targeted approach restoring both the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract is needed.

  10. Use of probiotics in prevention and treatment of patients with Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ollech, Jacob E; Shen, Nicole T; Crawford, Carl V; Ringel, Yehuda

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, gram positive, sporulating, toxin-producing bacillus which causes a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from an asymptomatic carrier state to toxic megacolon and fulminant disease. Infection with C. difficile is an expensive and pervasive health care burden. The current theory regarding the development of C. difficile infection (CDI) suggests that disruption of the structure and/or function of an individual's normal intestinal microbiota enables colonization by C. difficile, and in the absence of an effective immune response, the bacteria causes illness. In this article we discuss the role of the colonic microbiota in the development of CDI and the potential role of probiotics in preventing and treating CDI. We review the evidence from in vitro laboratory and pre-clinical studies, as well as evidence from clinical studies and discuss the current recommendations for the use of probiotics for CDI in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Molecular basis of early stages of Clostridium difficile infection: germination and colonization.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) occur when antibiotic therapy disrupts the gastrointestinal flora, favoring infected C. difficile spores to germinate, outgrow, colonize and produce toxins. During CDI, C. difficile vegetative cells initiate the process of sporulation allowing a fraction of the spores to remain adhered to the intestinal surfaces. These spores, which are unaffected by antibiotic therapy commonly used for CDIs, then germinate, outgrow and recolonize the host's GI tract causing relapse of CDI. Consequently, the germination and colonization processes can be considered as the earliest and most essential steps for the development as well as relapse of CDI. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the molecular basis involved in C. difficile spore germination and colonization.

  12. Microbial and metabolic interactions between the gastrointestinal tract and Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics disturb the gastrointestinal tract microbiota and in turn reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. The mechanism for this loss of colonization resistance is still unknown but likely reflects structural (microbial) and functional (metabolic) changes to the gastrointestinal tract. Members of the gut microbial community shape intestinal metabolism that provides nutrients and ultimately supports host immunity. This review will discuss how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this impacts bacterial metabolism in the gut. It will also explore the chemical requirements for C. difficile germination, growth, toxin production and sporulation. Many of the metabolites that influence C. difficile physiology are products of gut microbial metabolism including bile acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. To restore colonization resistance against C. difficile after antibiotics a targeted approach restoring both the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract is needed. PMID:24335555

  13. Lack of Clostridium difficile infection in patients treated with rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Neff, Guy W; Jones, Michael; Jonas, Mark; Ravinuthala, Ravi; Novick, David; Kaiser, Tiffany E; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in patients who received rifaximin for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Medical charts of patients who received rifaximin for the treatment of HE were reviewed. The number of patients who developed diarrhea during treatment with rifaximin and results of latex agglutination assays to detect C. difficile in stool samples were analyzed. A total of 211 patients received rifaximin for HE. Of these, 152 were treated in a university practice and 59 were treated in community practices. The mean dose of rifaximin was 1055 mg/d (range, 600 to 1600 mg/d) for a mean duration of 250 days (range, 180 to 385 d). Eighteen patients developed diarrhea during rifaximin treatment. None of these patients tested positive for C. difficile. This study demonstrates that treatment of HE with the safe, nonsystemic, gut-selective antibiotic rifaximin was not associated with the development of C. difficile infection.

  14. Toxicity assessment of Clostridium difficile toxins in rodent models and protection of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Rustandi, Richard R; Lancaster, Catherine; Hong, Laura G; Thiriot, David S; Xie, Jinfu; Secore, Susan; Kristopeit, Adam; Wang, Sheng-Ching; Heinrichs, Jon H

    2016-03-04

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, also known as C. difficile associated diarrhea. The two major toxins, toxin A and toxin B are produced by most C. difficile bacteria, but some strains, such as BI/NAP1/027 isolates, produce a third toxin called binary toxin. The precise biological role of binary toxin is not clear but it has been shown to be a cytotoxin for Vero cells. We evaluated the toxicity of these toxins in mice and hamsters and found that binary toxin causes death in both animals similar to toxins A and B. Furthermore, immunization of mice with mutant toxoids of all three toxins provided protection upon challenge with native toxins. These results support the concept that binary toxin contributes to the pathogenicity of C. difficile and provide a method for monitoring the toxicity of binary toxin components in vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in adults.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Richard L; Suda, Katie J; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is recognized as a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review. The aim of this review is to investigate the efficacy and safety of antibiotic therapy for C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD), or C. difficile infection (CDI), being synonymous terms. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Trials Register from inception to 26 January 2017. We also searched clinicaltrials.gov and clinicaltrialsregister.eu for ongoing trials. Only randomised controlled trials assessing antibiotic treatment for CDI were included in the review. Three authors independently assessed abstracts and full text articles for inclusion and extracted data. The risk of bias was independently rated by two authors. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). We pooled data using a fixed-effect model, except where significant heterogeneity was detected, at which time a random-effects model was used. The following outcomes were sought: sustained symptomatic cure (defined as initial symptomatic response and no recurrence of CDI), sustained bacteriologic cure, adverse reactions to the intervention, death and cost. Twenty-two studies (3215 participants) were included. The majority of studies enrolled patients with mild to moderate CDI who could tolerate oral antibiotics. Sixteen of the included studies excluded patients with severe CDI and few patients with severe CDI were included in the other six studies. Twelve different antibiotics were investigated: vancomycin, metronidazole, fusidic acid, nitazoxanide, teicoplanin, rifampin, rifaximin, bacitracin, cadazolid, LFF517, surotomycin and fidaxomicin. Most of the studies were active comparator studies comparing vancomycin with other antibiotics. One small study compared vancomycin to placebo. There were no other studies that

  16. Human Clostridium difficile infection: inhibition of NHE3 and microbiota profile

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Engevik, Kristen A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Wang, Jiang; Hassett, Daniel J.; Darien, Benjamin; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is principally responsible for hospital acquired, antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis and represents a significant financial burden on our healthcare system. Little is known about C. difficile proliferation requirements, and a better understanding of these parameters is critical for development of new therapeutic targets. In cell lines, C. difficile toxin B has been shown to inhibit Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) and loss of NHE3 in mice results in an altered intestinal environment coupled with a transformed gut microbiota composition. However, this has yet to be established in vivo in humans. We hypothesize that C. difficile toxin inhibits NHE3, resulting in alteration of the intestinal environment and gut microbiota. Our results demonstrate that CDI patient biopsy specimens have decreased NHE3 expression and CDI stool has elevated Na+ and is more alkaline compared with stool from healthy individuals. CDI stool microbiota have increased Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria and decreased Firmicutes phyla compared with healthy subjects. In vitro, C. difficile grows optimally in the presence of elevated Na+ and alkaline pH, conditions that correlate to changes observed in CDI patients. To confirm that inhibition of NHE3 was specific to C. difficile, human intestinal organoids (HIOs) were injected with C. difficile or healthy and CDI stool supernatant. Injection of C. difficile and CDI stool decreased NHE3 mRNA and protein expression compared with healthy stool and control HIOs. Together these data demonstrate that C. difficile inhibits NHE3 in vivo, which creates an altered environment favored by C. difficile. PMID:25552580

  17. Human Clostridium difficile infection: inhibition of NHE3 and microbiota profile.

    PubMed

    Engevik, Melinda A; Engevik, Kristen A; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Wang, Jiang; Hassett, Daniel J; Darien, Benjamin; Yacyshyn, Bruce R; Worrell, Roger T

    2015-03-15

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is principally responsible for hospital acquired, antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis and represents a significant financial burden on our healthcare system. Little is known about C. difficile proliferation requirements, and a better understanding of these parameters is critical for development of new therapeutic targets. In cell lines, C. difficile toxin B has been shown to inhibit Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) and loss of NHE3 in mice results in an altered intestinal environment coupled with a transformed gut microbiota composition. However, this has yet to be established in vivo in humans. We hypothesize that C. difficile toxin inhibits NHE3, resulting in alteration of the intestinal environment and gut microbiota. Our results demonstrate that CDI patient biopsy specimens have decreased NHE3 expression and CDI stool has elevated Na(+) and is more alkaline compared with stool from healthy individuals. CDI stool microbiota have increased Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria and decreased Firmicutes phyla compared with healthy subjects. In vitro, C. difficile grows optimally in the presence of elevated Na(+) and alkaline pH, conditions that correlate to changes observed in CDI patients. To confirm that inhibition of NHE3 was specific to C. difficile, human intestinal organoids (HIOs) were injected with C. difficile or healthy and CDI stool supernatant. Injection of C. difficile and CDI stool decreased NHE3 mRNA and protein expression compared with healthy stool and control HIOs. Together these data demonstrate that C. difficile inhibits NHE3 in vivo, which creates an altered environment favored by C. difficile.

  18. Association of Clostridium difficile ribotype 078 with detectable toxin in human stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Derek J; McKenna, James P; Stevenson, Mike; Weaver, Jeremy; Gilliland, Carol; Watt, Alison; Coyle, Peter V

    2015-11-01

    Using a Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) immunoassay and a sensitive C. difficile toxin A/B immunoassay, human stool specimens from patients with diarrhoea (n = 1085) were classified as either GDH positive/toxin negative, or GDH positive/toxin positive. Overall, 528/725 (73%) of the GDH-positive/toxin-negative specimens contained viable C. difficile, and 433/528 (82%) of these C. difficile isolates were PCR positive for the toxin gene pathogenicity locus. Overall, 867/1078 (80%) of the GDH-positive specimens contained viable C. difficile, and 433/725 (60%) of the GDH-positive/toxin-negative specimens contained a toxigenic C. difficile strain. The diversity of toxigenic C. difficile ribotypes isolated from toxin-negative specimens (n = 433) and toxin-positive specimens (n = 339) was significantly different (P < 0.0001). Specifically, the presence of ribotype 078 strains was very strongly associated (P < 0.0001) with detection of toxin in clinical specimens using a sensitive toxin immunoassay. Specimens positive for ribotype 078 were almost twice as likely to be toxin positive as opposed to toxin negative (risk ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.64-2.19). In contrast, other circulating ribotypes were seen with similar frequency in specimens with and without detectable toxin. This supports the view that ribotype 078 strains may be more virulent than other common ribotypes in terms of toxin production.

  19. Function of the CRISPR-Cas System of the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Boudry, Pierre; Semenova, Ekaterina; Monot, Marc; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Lopatina, Anna; Sekulovic, Ognjen; Ospina-Bedoya, Maicol; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Severinov, Konstantin; Dupuy, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile is the cause of most frequently occurring nosocomial diarrhea worldwide. As an enteropathogen, C. difficile must be exposed to multiple exogenous genetic elements in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to foreign genetic invaders. Our recent data revealed active expression and processing of CRISPR RNAs from multiple type I-B CRISPR arrays in C. difficile reference strain 630. Here, we demonstrate active expression of CRISPR arrays in strain R20291, an epidemic C. difficile strain. Through genome sequencing and host range analysis of several new C. difficile phages and plasmid conjugation experiments, we provide evidence of defensive function of the CRISPR-Cas system in both C. difficile strains. We further demonstrate that C. difficile Cas proteins are capable of interference in a heterologous host, Escherichia coli. These data set the stage for mechanistic and physiological analyses of CRISPR-Cas-mediated interactions of important global human pathogen with its genetic parasites. PMID:26330515

  20. Auranofin disrupts selenium metabolism in Clostridium difficile by forming a stable Au-Se adduct.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Rosario, Sarah; Cowart, Darin; Myers, Andrew; Tarrien, Rebecca; Levine, Rodney L; Scott, Robert A; Self, William Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen whose incidence and importance are on the rise. Previous work in our laboratory characterized the central role of selenoenzyme-dependent Stickland reactions in C. difficile metabolism. In this work we have identified, using mass spectrometry, a stable complex formed upon reaction of auranofin (a gold-containing drug) with selenide in vitro. X-ray absorption spectroscopy supports the structure that we proposed on the basis of mass-spectrometric data. Auranofin potently inhibits the growth of C. difficile but does not similarly affect other clostridia that do not utilize selenoproteins to obtain energy. Moreover, auranofin inhibits the incorporation of radioisotope selenium ((75)Se) in selenoproteins in both Escherichia coli, the prokaryotic model for selenoprotein synthesis, and C. difficile without impacting total protein synthesis. Auranofin blocks the uptake of selenium and results in the accumulation of the auranofin-selenide adduct in the culture medium. Addition of selenium in the form of selenite or L-selenocysteine to the growth medium significantly reduces the inhibitory action of auranofin on the growth of C. difficile. On the basis of these results, we propose that formation of this complex and the subsequent deficiency in available selenium for selenoprotein synthesis is the mechanism by which auranofin inhibits C. difficile growth. This study demonstrates that targeting selenium metabolism provides a new avenue for antimicrobial development against C. difficile and other selenium-dependent pathogens.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Eliminates Clostridium difficile in a Murine Model of Relapsing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Theriot, Casey M.; Molloy, Caitlyn T.; Wozniak, Katherine L.; Bergin, Ingrid L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is of particular concern among health care-associated infections. The role of the microbiota in disease recovery is apparent given the success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent CDI. Here, we present a murine model of CDI relapse to further define the microbiota recovery following FMT. Cefoperazone-treated mice were infected with C. difficile 630 spores and treated with vancomycin after development of clinical disease. Vancomycin treatment suppressed both C. difficile colonization and cytotoxin titers. However, C. difficile counts increased within 7 days of completing treatment, accompanied by relapse of clinical signs. The administration of FMT immediately after vancomycin cleared C. difficile and decreased cytotoxicity within 1 week. The effects of FMT on the gut microbiota community were detectable in recipients 1-day posttransplant. Conversely, mice not treated with FMT remained persistently colonized with high levels of C. difficile, and the gut microbiota in these mice persisted at low diversity. These results suggest that full recovery of colonization resistance against C. difficile requires the restoration of a specific community structure. PMID:26169276

  2. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  3. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Eliminates Clostridium difficile in a Murine Model of Relapsing Disease.

    PubMed

    Seekatz, Anna M; Theriot, Casey M; Molloy, Caitlyn T; Wozniak, Katherine L; Bergin, Ingrid L; Young, Vincent B

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is of particular concern among health care-associated infections. The role of the microbiota in disease recovery is apparent given the success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent CDI. Here, we present a murine model of CDI relapse to further define the microbiota recovery following FMT. Cefoperazone-treated mice were infected with C. difficile 630 spores and treated with vancomycin after development of clinical disease. Vancomycin treatment suppressed both C. difficile colonization and cytotoxin titers. However, C. difficile counts increased within 7 days of completing treatment, accompanied by relapse of clinical signs. The administration of FMT immediately after vancomycin cleared C. difficile and decreased cytotoxicity within 1 week. The effects of FMT on the gut microbiota community were detectable in recipients 1-day posttransplant. Conversely, mice not treated with FMT remained persistently colonized with high levels of C. difficile, and the gut microbiota in these mice persisted at low diversity. These results suggest that full recovery of colonization resistance against C. difficile requires the restoration of a specific community structure. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from two Korean hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Kil; Selasi, Gati Noble; Na, Seok Hyeon; Kwon, Hyo Il; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Lee, Hae Sook; Song, Kyung Eun; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Je Chul

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the main etiological agents causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This study investigated the genetic diversity of 70 toxigenic C. difficile isolates from two Korean hospitals by employing toxinotyping, ribotyping, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Toxin gene amplification resulted in 68 A⁺B⁺ and two A-B+ isolates. Most isolates (95.7–100%) were susceptible to daptomycin, metronidazole, and vancomycin. Seventy C. difficile isolates were classified into five toxinotypes, 19 ribotypes, 16 sequence types (STs), and 33 arbitrary pulsotypes. All C. difficile isolates of ribotype 018 (n = 38) were classified into ST17, which was the most prevalent ST in both hospitals. However, C. difficile isolates of ST17 (ribotype 018) exhibited pulsotypes that differed by hospital. ST2 (ribotype 014/020), 8 (ribotypes 002), 17 (ribotype 018), and 35 (ribotypes 015) were detected in both hospitals, whereas other STs were unique to each hospital. Statistical comparison of the different typing methods revealed that ribotyping and PFGE were highly predictive of STs. In conclusion, our epidemiological study indicates that C. difficile infections in both hospitals are associated with the persistence of endemic clones coupled with the emergence of many unique clones. A combination of MLST with PFGE or ribotyping could be useful for monitoring epidemic C. difficile strains and the emergence of new clones in hospitals. PMID:28355266

  5. Tracking Inhibitory Alterations during Interstrain Clostridium difficile Interactions by Monitoring Cell Envelope Capacitance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Global threats arising from the increasing use of antibiotics coupled with the high recurrence rates of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections (CDI) after standard antibiotic treatments highlight the role of commensal probiotic microorganisms, including nontoxigenic C. difficile (NTCD) strains in preventing CDI due to highly toxigenic C. difficile (HTCD) strains. However, optimization of the inhibitory permutations due to commensal interactions in the microbiota requires probes capable of monitoring phenotypic alterations to C. difficile cells. Herein, by monitoring the field screening behavior of the C. difficile cell envelope with respect to cytoplasmic polarization, we demonstrate that inhibition of the host-cell colonization ability of HTCD due to the S-layer alterations occurring after its co-culture with NTCD can be quantitatively tracked on the basis of the capacitance of the cell envelope of co-cultured HTCD. Furthermore, it is shown that effective inhibition requires the dynamic contact of HTCD cells with freshly secreted extracellular factors from NTCD because contact with the cell-free supernatant causes only mild inhibition. We envision a rapid method for screening the inhibitory permutations to arrest C. difficile colonization by routinely probing alterations in the HTCD dielectrophoretic frequency response due to variations in the capacitance of its cell envelope. PMID:27547818

  6. Proteases and sonication specifically remove the exosporium layer of spores of Clostridium difficile strain 630.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Cortés, Karina; Barra-Carrasco, Jonathan; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium difficile spores are the means through which this anaerobic pathogen may persist in hospital surfaces and in the host. There is a lack of knowledge in the proteins that localize to the surface of C. difficile spores primarily due to the lack of established methods to efficiently separate the outermost layer, the exosporium. In this work, we propose methods to remove the exosporium layer of C. difficile spores through either protease digestion or sonication treatment leaving the spore coat structure intact. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs show that the treatment of C. difficile spores with sarkosyl and proteinase K (SPk) completely removed the exosporium, while trypsin and sonication removed most of the exosporium but left a thin exosporium layer attached to the spore coat. Measurement of hydrophobicity of C. difficile spores shows that complete removal of the exosporium by SPk yields spores with an hydrophobicity of ~1% (i.e., percentage of the spores in the organic phase), while treatments with trypsin or sonication, which leave a thin layer of exosporium, yield spores with an hydrophobicity of ~10%. Removal of the exosporium increased C. difficile spore's ability to form colonies. These exosporium extraction methods should aid in further research to identify proteins localized on the spore surfaces of C. difficile that might play a role on the initial stages of infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial efficacy of copper surfaces against spores and vegetative cells of Clostridium difficile: the germination theory.

    PubMed

    Wheeldon, L J; Worthington, T; Lambert, P A; Hilton, A C; Lowden, C J; Elliott, T S J

    2008-09-01

    Persistent contamination of surfaces by spores of Clostridium difficile is a major factor influencing the spread of C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) in the clinical setting. In recent years, the antimicrobial efficacy of metal surfaces has been investigated against microorganisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study compared the survival of C. difficile on stainless steel, a metal contact surface widely used in hospitals, and copper surfaces. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed using a carrier test method against dormant spores, germinating spores and vegetative cells of C. difficile (NCTC 11204 and ribotype 027) over a 3 h period in the presence and absence of organic matter. Copper metal eliminated all vegetative cells of C. difficile within 30 min, compared with stainless steel which demonstrated no antimicrobial activity (P < 0.05). Copper significantly reduced the viability of spores of C. difficile exposed to the germinant (sodium taurocholate) in aerobic conditions within 60 min (P < 0.05) while achieving a >or=2.5 log reduction (99.8% reduction) at 3 h. Organic material did not reduce the antimicrobial efficacy of the copper surface (P > 0.05). The use of copper surfaces within the clinical environment and application of a germination solution in infection control procedures may offer a novel way forward in eliminating C. difficile from contaminated surfaces and reducing CDAD.

  8. Prevalence of human norovirus and Clostridium difficile coinfections in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Stokely, Janelle N; Niendorf, Sandra; Taube, Stefan; Hoehne, Marina; Young, Vincent B; Rogers, Mary AM; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human norovirus (HuNoV) and Clostridium difficile are common causes of infectious gastroenteritis in adults in the US. However, limited information is available regarding HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections. Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections among adult patients in a hospital setting and disease symptomatology. Study design and setting For a cross-sectional analysis, 384 fecal samples were tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins from patients (n=290), whom the provider suspected of C. difficile infections. Subsequent testing was then performed for HuNoV genogroups I and II. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to determine symptoms more frequently associated with coinfections. Results The final cohort consisted of the following outcome groups: C. difficile (n=196), C. difficile + HuNoV coinfection (n=40), HuNoV only (n=12), and neither (n=136). Coinfected patients were more likely to develop nausea, gas, and abdominal pain and were more likely to seek treatment in the winter season compared with individuals not infected or infected with either pathogen alone. Conclusion Our study revealed that patients with coinfection are more likely to experience certain gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular abdominal pain, suggesting an increased severity of disease symptomatology in coinfected patients. PMID:27418856

  9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Clostridium difficile flagellar protein FliC.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Eugenis, Ioannis; Sun, Xingmin; Edwards, Adrianne N; McBride, Shonna M; Pride, David T; Kelly, Ciarán P; Ho, David D

    2016-02-03

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive bacillus and is the leading cause of toxin-mediated nosocomial diarrhea following antibiotic use. C. difficile flagella play a role in colonization, adherence, biofilm formation, and toxin production, which might contribute to the overall virulence of certain strains. Human and animal studies indicate that anti-flagella immune responses may play a role in protection against colonization by C. difficile and subsequent disease outcome. Here we report that recombinant C. difficile flagellin (FliC) is immunogenic and protective in a murine model of C. difficile infection (CDI) against a clinical C. difficile strain, UK1. Passive protection experiments using anti-FliC polyclonal serum in mice suggest this protection to be antibody-mediated. FliC immunization also was able to afford partial protection against CDI and death in hamsters following challenge with C. difficile 630Δerm. Additionally, immunization against FliC does not have an adverse effect on the normal gut flora of vaccinated hamsters as evidenced by comparing the fecal microbiome of vaccinated and control hamsters. Therefore, the use of FliC as a vaccine candidate against CDI warrants further testing.

  10. Zoonotic potential of the Clostridium difficile RT078 family in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Bo-Yang; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Wu, Ying-Chen; Lan, Po-Han; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Hung, Yuan-Pin; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. We have previously demonstrated that in southern Taiwan, severe C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) cases were due to the C. difficile RT 126 strain infection, indicating the arrival of an epidemic C. difficile clone in southern Taiwan. RT126 has a close genetic relationship with RT078. However, the RT078 family is the predominant strain of C. difficile in animals worldwide, particularly in swine. In this study, we surveyed C. difficile strains isolated from swine at several farms in Taiwan from August 2011 to March 2015. We found that all swine strains, namely RT078 (32.5%, 37 of 114), RT126 (28.9%, 33 of 114) and RT127 (37.7%, 43 of 114), belonged to the toxigenic RT078 family. All strains had high gyrA mutation rate (57.9%, 66/114), which was linked to quinolone resistance. Notably, Rep-PCR revealed that 3 RT078 animal strains had the same fingerprint as human RT078 clinical isolates; their phylogenic relationship was closely related to the whole gene sequences of tcdB, thus suggesting zoonotic potential for C. difficile infection in Taiwan.

  11. Prevalence and Genotypic Characteristics of Clostridium difficile in a Closed and Integrated Human and Swine Population▿

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Keri N.; Scott, H. Morgan; Harvey, Roger B.; Norby, Bo; Hume, Michael E.; Andrews, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an apparent rise in the number of cases attributed to community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection has led researchers to explore additional sources of infection. The finding of C. difficile in food animals and retail meat has raised concern about potential food-borne and occupational exposures. The objective of this study was to compare C. difficile isolated from a closed population of healthy individuals consisting of both humans and swine in order to investigate possible food safety and occupational risks for exposure. Using a multistep enrichment isolation technique, we identified 11.8% of the human wastewater samples and 8.6% of the swine samples that were positive for C. difficile. The prevalences of C. difficile in swine production groups differed significantly (P < 0.05); however, the prevalences in the two human occupational group cohorts did not differ significantly (P = 0.81). The majority of the human and swine isolates were similar based on multiple typing methods. The similarity in C. difficile prevalence in the human group cohorts suggests a low occupational hazard, while a greatly decreased prevalence of C. difficile in later-stage swine production groups suggests a diminished risk for food-borne exposure. The similarity of strains in the two host species suggests the possibility of a common environmental source for healthy individuals in a community setting. PMID:21724899

  12. Comparison of five cultural procedures for isolation of Clostridium difficile from stools.

    PubMed Central

    Marler, L M; Siders, J A; Wolters, L C; Pettigrew, Y; Skitt, B L; Allen, S D

    1992-01-01

    Several procedures have been described for the culture of Clostridium difficile from stool specimens. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of five of these methods for the isolation of C. difficile from feces of patients suspected of having C. difficile-associated illness. A total of 564 stool specimens were cultured by using heat shock, ethanol treatment (ET), and direct plating on Carr-Scarborough cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA) with horse blood (C/S medium), BBL CCFA medium, and Remel C. difficile agar. Cytotoxin assays were performed on all specimens. A total of 113 specimens (20%) were positive for C. difficile by one or more methods. The numbers of positive cultures by using heat shock, ET, and direct plating on C/S medium, BBL CCFA medium, and Remel C. difficile agar were 79 (70%), 89 (79%), 91 (81%), 79 (70%), and 52 (46%), respectively. We concluded that ET and direct plating on C/S medium were the most effective procedures for isolating C. difficile from stool specimens and found significant variation in the performance of modified CCFA from different manufacturers. PMID:1537928

  13. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment. PMID:25501371

  14. Modulation of Toxin Production by the Flagellar Regulon in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Annie; Hussack, Greg; Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Foote, Simon; Carrillo, Catherine D.; Tanha, Jamshid

    2012-01-01

    We show in this study that toxin production in Clostridium difficile is altered in cells which can no longer form flagellar filaments. The impact of inactivation of fliC, CD0240, fliF, fliG, fliM, and flhB-fliR flagellar genes upon toxin levels in culture supernatants was assessed using cell-based cytotoxicity assay, proteomics, immunoassay, and immunoblotting approaches. Each of these showed that toxin levels in supernatants were significantly increased in a fliC mutant compared to that in the C. difficile 630 parent strain. In contrast, the toxin levels in supernatants secreted from other flagellar mutants were significantly reduced compared with that in the parental C. difficile 630 strain. Transcriptional analysis of the pathogenicity locus genes (tcdR, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdA) revealed a significant increase of all four genes in the fliC mutant strain, while transcription of all four genes was significantly reduced in fliM, fliF, fliG, and flhB-fliR mutants. These results demonstrate that toxin transcription in C. difficile is modulated by the flagellar regulon. More significantly, mutant strains showed a corresponding change in virulence compared to the 630 parent strain when tested in a hamster model of C. difficile infection. This is the first demonstration of differential flagellum-related transcriptional regulation of toxin production in C. difficile and provides evidence for elaborate regulatory networks for virulence genes in C. difficile. PMID:22851750

  15. Prevalence and genotypic characteristics of Clostridium difficile in a closed and integrated human and swine population.

    PubMed

    Norman, Keri N; Scott, H Morgan; Harvey, Roger B; Norby, Bo; Hume, Michael E; Andrews, Kathleen

    2011-08-15

    Recently, an apparent rise in the number of cases attributed to community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection has led researchers to explore additional sources of infection. The finding of C. difficile in food animals and retail meat has raised concern about potential food-borne and occupational exposures. The objective of this study was to compare C. difficile isolated from a closed population of healthy individuals consisting of both humans and swine in order to investigate possible food safety and occupational risks for exposure. Using a multistep enrichment isolation technique, we identified 11.8% of the human wastewater samples and 8.6% of the swine samples that were positive for C. difficile. The prevalences of C. difficile in swine production groups differed significantly (P < 0.05); however, the prevalences in the two human occupational group cohorts did not differ significantly (P = 0.81). The majority of the human and swine isolates were similar based on multiple typing methods. The similarity in C. difficile prevalence in the human group cohorts suggests a low occupational hazard, while a greatly decreased prevalence of C. difficile in later-stage swine production groups suggests a diminished risk for food-borne exposure. The similarity of strains in the two host species suggests the possibility of a common environmental source for healthy individuals in a community setting.

  16. Dietary Zinc Alters the Microbiota and Decreases Resistance to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zackular, Joseph P.; Moore, Jessica L.; Jordan, Ashley T.; Juttukonda, Lillian J.; Noto, Michael J.; Nicholson, Maribeth R.; Crews, Jonathan D.; Semler, Matthew W.; Zhang, Yaofang; Ware, Lorraine B.; Washington, M. Kay; Chazin, Walter J.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most commonly reported nosocomial pathogen in the United States and is an urgent public health concern worldwide1. Over the past decade, incidence, severity, and costs associated with C. difficile infection (CDI) have increased dramatically2. CDI is most commonly initiated by antibiotic-mediated disruption of the gut microbiota; however, non-antibiotic associated CDI cases are well documented and on the rise3,4. This suggests that unexplored environmental, nutrient, and host factors likely influence CDI. Here we show that excess dietary zinc (Zn) significantly alters the gut microbiota and in turn reduces the threshold of antibiotics needed to confer susceptibility to C. difficile infection. In mice colonized with C. difficile, excess dietary Zn severely exacerbates C. difficile-associated disease by increasing toxin activity and altering the host immune response. In addition, we show that the Zn binding S100 protein calprotectin is antimicrobial against C. difficile and an essential component of the innate immune response to CDI. Together, these data suggest that nutrient Zn levels play a key role in determining susceptibility to CDI and severity of disease, and that calprotectin-mediated metal limitation is an important factor in the host immune response to C. difficile. PMID:27668938

  17. Clostridium difficile contamination of public tap water distribution system during a waterborne outbreak in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kotila, Saara M; Pitkänen, Tarja; Brazier, Jon; Eerola, Erkki; Jalava, Jari; Kuusi, Markku; Könönen, Eija; Laine, Janne; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Vuento, Risto; Virolainen, Anni

    2013-07-01

    In November through December 2007, the drinking water distribution system in the town of Nokia, Finland, was contaminated with treated sewage effluent that resulted in a large gastroenteritis outbreak in the community. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the contaminated water in this outbreak was also a potential source of Clostridium difficile infections. Samples from the contaminated tap water and treated sewage effluent were collected. Stool samples from a portion of patients that fell ill during the outbreak were examined for C. difficile. PCR ribotyping was performed on toxin positive C. difficile isolates and the genetic profiles of the water and patient isolates were compared. Twelve toxin-positive C. difficile isolates were found in water samples: five from contaminated tap water and seven from treated sewage effluent. Among these, four and five distinct PCR ribotype profiles were identified, respectively. Four PCR ribotype profiles were found among nine human faecal C. difficile isolates. Two isolates, one from tap water and one from a patient, had an indistinguishable PCR ribotype profile. Our findings demonstrate for the first time C. difficile contamination of a tap water distribution system and waterborne transmission of toxigenic C. difficile seems possible.

  18. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  19. The Ecology and Pathobiology of Clostridium difficile Infections: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.; Haslam, David B.; Lanzas, Cristina; Bobo, Linda D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a well recognized pathogen of humans and animals. Although C. difficile was first identified over 70 years ago, much remains unknown in regards to the primary source of human acquisition and its pathobiology. These deficits in our knowledge have been intensified by dramatic increases in both the frequency and severity of disease in humans over the last decade. The changes in C. difficile epidemiology might be due to the emergence of a hypervirulent stain of C. difficile, aging of the population, altered risk of developing infection with newer medications, and/or increased exposure to C. difficile outside of hospitals. In recent years there have been numerous reports documenting C. difficile contamination of various foods, and reports of similarities between strains that infect animals and strains that infect humans as well. The purposes of this review are to highlight the many challenges to diagnosing, treating, and preventing C. difficile infection in humans, and to stress that collaboration between human and veterinary researchers is needed to control this pathogen. PMID:21223531

  20. Successful therapy of Clostridium difficile infection with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Koziel, J; Dieterich, W; Haziri, D; Wirtz, S; Glowczyk, I; Konturek, K; Neurath, M F; Zopf, Y

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea and represents an important burden for healthcare worldwide. Symptoms of severe CDI include watery, foul-smelling diarrhea, peripheral leucocytosis, increased C-reactive protein (CRP), acute renal failure, hypotension and pseudomembranous colitis. Recent studies indicate that the main cause of CDI is dysbiosis, an imbalance in the normal gut microbiota. The restoration of a healthy gut microbiota composition via fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) recently became more popular. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of FMT on the healing of CDI and to analyze the changes in the level of pro-inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Eighteen patients with CDI were included in our study (6 males and 12 females) with recurrent and/or severe CDI. The FMT was performed in 17 patients using colonoscopy, including 16 patients receiving a one-time FMT and 1 patient who needed 2 additional FMTs. One patient was treated with a single round of FMT using push-and-pull enteroscopy. In all CDI patients, before and 3 weeks after FMT, the following parameters were analyzed: C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin, and plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). In addition, the plasma level of LL-37, a cathelicidine peptide was assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) before and 3 months after FMT. Finally, in 7 patients a microbiome analysis was performed by sequencing of 16SrRNA in stool probes obtained before and 3 weeks after FMT. The healing rate of CDI was 94%. In all successfully treated patients no recurrent CDI was observed during follow-up (16 months). The serum level of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12) significantly decreased after FMT. Similarly, CRP and fecal calprotectin normalized after FMT. 3 months after FMT a significant

  1. The Spore Differentiation Pathway in the Enteric Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fátima C.; Saujet, Laure; Tomé, Ana R.; Serrano, Mónica; Monot, Marc; Couture-Tosi, Evelyne; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2013-01-01

    Endosporulation is an ancient bacterial developmental program that culminates with the differentiation of a highly resistant endospore. In the model organism Bacillus subtilis, gene expression in the forespore and in the mother cell, the two cells that participate in endospore development, is governed by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma subunits. σF in the forespore, and σE in the mother cell control early stages of development and are replaced, at later stages, by σG and σK, respectively. Starting with σF, the activation of the sigma factors is sequential, requires the preceding factor, and involves cell-cell signaling pathways that operate at key morphological stages. Here, we have studied the function and regulation of the sporulation sigma factors in the intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile, an obligate anaerobe in which the endospores are central to the infectious cycle. The morphological characterization of mutants for the sporulation sigma factors, in parallel with use of a fluorescence reporter for single cell analysis of gene expression, unraveled important deviations from the B. subtilis paradigm. While the main periods of activity of the sigma factors are conserved, we show that the activity of σE is partially independent of σF, that σG activity is not dependent on σE, and that the activity of σK does not require σG. We also show that σK is not strictly required for heat resistant spore formation. In all, our results indicate reduced temporal segregation between the activities of the early and late sigma factors, and reduced requirement for the σF-to-σE, σE-to-σG, and σG-to-σK cell-cell signaling pathways. Nevertheless, our results support the view that the top level of the endosporulation network is conserved in evolution, with the sigma factors acting as the key regulators of the pathway, established some 2.5 billion years ago upon its emergence at the base of the Firmicutes Phylum. PMID:24098139

  2. Changes of poultry faecal microbiota associated with Clostridium difficile colonisation.

    PubMed

    Skraban, Jure; Dzeroski, Saso; Zenko, Bernard; Tusar, Livija; Rupnik, Maja

    2013-08-30

    Bacterial, fungal and archaeal microbiota was analysed in 143 chicken faecal samples from a single poultry farm. After DHPLC (denaturing high performance liquid chromatography) 15 bacterial groups, 10 fungal groups and a single archaeal species were differentiated. Samples were grouped into two clusters with significantly different frequencies of C. difficile positive and negative samples in each cluster. Acidaminococcus intestini, described here for the first time as a part of poultry faecal microbiota, was significantly more likely present in C. difficile negative samples, while presence/absence of some other microorganisms (Enterococcus cecorum, Lactobacillus galinarum, Moniliella sp. and Trichosporon asahii) was close to significance. Two other groups not reported previously for poultry, Coprobacillus sp. and Turicibacter sp. did not differ significantly between C. difficile positive and negative samples. Differences in microbiota diversity depend on animal age, but not on the presence of C. difficile. With machine learning (WEKA J48) we have defined specific combinations of microbial groups predictive for C. difficile colonisation. Microbial groups associated with C. difficile colonisation in poultry are different than those reported for humans and include bacteria as well as fungi. Also with this approach A. intestini was found to be most strongly related to C. difficile negative samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature.

  4. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance and Reduced Susceptibility in Clostridium difficile: Potential Consequences for Induction, Treatment, and Recurrence of C. difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Simon D.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a substantial burden on healthcare systems and is likely to remain so given our reliance on antimicrobial therapies to treat bacterial infections, especially in an aging population in whom multiple co-morbidities are common. Antimicrobial agents are a key component in the aetiology of CDI, both in the establishment of the infection and also in its treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarise the role of antimicrobial agents in primary and recurrent CDI; assessing why certain antimicrobial classes may predispose to the induction of CDI according to a balance between antimicrobial activity against the gut microflora and C. difficile. Considering these aspects of CDI is important in both the prevention of the infection and in the development of new antimicrobial treatments. PMID:27025625

  6. Clinical impact of switching conventional enzyme immunoassay with nucleic acid amplification test for suspected Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven W; Kanatani, Meganne; Humphries, Romney M; Uslan, Daniel Z

    2013-04-01

    The impact of a new Clostridium difficile nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) on antibiotic utilization in patients with suspected C difficile infection was assessed. This single-center, cross-sectional study of 270 patients demonstrated that the use of NAAT decreased antibiotic expenditure by reducing prolonged empiric days of therapy in these patients.

  7. Beyond the Hawthorne effect: reduction of Clostridium difficile environmental contamination through active intervention to improve cleaning practices.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Dubert M; Carling, Philip C; Jury, Lucy A; Ponnada, Suresh; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Donskey, Curtis J

    2013-05-01

    Education and passive observation resulted in a significant improvement in housekeeper disinfection of nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile spores artificially inoculated onto surfaces in C. difficile infection rooms. A further significant reduction occurred with direct supervision and real-time feedback, suggesting that optimal disinfection is achieved by working closely with housekeepers.

  8. Usefulness of Adjunctive Fecal Calprotectin and Serum Procalcitonin in Individuals Positive for Clostridium difficile Toxin Gene by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Romina; Eastmond, Jennifer; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In 54/64 subjects with nosocomial diarrhea, fecal calprotectin levels correlated with the results of stool samples tested for Clostridium difficile toxin gene by PCR. Fecal calprotectin levels can be used as an adjunctive measure to PCR to support the diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:26354814

  9. A Review of the Safety and Efficacy of Vaccines as Prophylaxis for Clostridium difficile Infections.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Mackenzie; Bragg, Amanda; Fahim, Germin; Shah, Monica; Hermes-DeSantis, Evelyn R

    2017-09-02

    This review aims to evaluate the literature on the safety and efficacy of novel toxoid vaccines for the prophylaxis of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in healthy adults. Literature searches for clinical trials were performed through MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Web of Science using the keywords bacterial vaccines, Clostridium difficile, and vaccine. English-language clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and/or safety of Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccines that were completed and had results posted on ClinicalTrials.gov or in a published journal article were included. Six clinical trials were included. The vaccines were associated with mild self-reported adverse reactions, most commonly injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, and minimal serious adverse events. Five clinical trials found marked increases in antibody production in vaccinated participants following each dose of the vaccine. Clinical trials evaluating C. difficile toxoid vaccines have shown them to be well tolerated and relatively safe. Surrogate markers of efficacy (seroconversion and geometric mean antibody levels) have shown significant immune responses to a vaccination series in healthy adults, indicating that they have the potential to be used as prophylaxis for CDI. However, more research is needed to determine the clinical benefits of the vaccines.

  10. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Buffie, Charlie G; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R; McKenney, Peter T; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Jenq, Robert R; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R; Toussaint, Nora C; Xavier, Joao B; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-01-08

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  11. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  12. Molecular Characterization of a Clostridium difficile Bacteriophage and Its Cloned Biologically Active Endolysin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Gasson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in both frequency and severity, with the emergence of new highly virulent strains highlighting the need for more rapid and effective methods of control. Here, we show that bacteriophage endolysin can be used to inhibit and kill C. difficile. The genome sequence of a novel bacteriophage that is active against C. difficile was determined, and the bacteriophage endolysin gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The partially purified endolysin was active against 30 diverse strains of C. difficile, and importantly, this group included strains of the major epidemic ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1). In contrast, a range of commensal species that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, including several representatives of the clostridium-like Firmicutes, were insensitive to the endolysin. This endolysin provides a platform for the generation of both therapeutic and detection systems to combat the C. difficile problem. To investigate a method for the protected delivery and production of the lysin in the gastrointestinal tract, we demonstrated the expression of active CD27L endolysin in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. PMID:18708505

  13. TcdC Does Not Significantly Repress Toxin Expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Dennis; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Kuijper, Ed J.; Corver, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB), the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR) and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC). The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC) and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested. PMID:22912837

  14. Clostridium difficile in faeces from healthy dogs and dogs with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to evaluate the faecal occurrence and characterization of Clostridium difficile in clinically healthy dogs (N = 50) and in dogs with diarrhea (N = 20) in the Stockholm-Uppsala region of Sweden. Findings Clostridium difficile was isolated from 2/50 healthy dogs and from 2/20 diarrheic dogs. Isolates from healthy dogs were negative for toxin A and B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. Both isolates from diarrheic dogs were positive for toxin B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. The C. difficile isolates from healthy dogs had PCR ribotype 009 (SE-type 6) and 010 (SE-type 3) whereas both isolates from dogs with diarrhoea had the toxigenic ribotype 014 (SE-type 21). One of the isolates from healthy dogs was initially resistant to metronidazole. Conclusions This study revealed presence of toxigenic C. difficile in faecal samples of diarrheic dogs and low number of non- toxigenic isolates in healthy dogs from Uppsala-Stockholm region in Sweden. However, more comprehensive studies are warranted to investigate the role of C. difficile in gastrointestinal disease in dogs. PMID:23497714

  15. Presence of Clostridium difficile in pig faecal samples and wild animal species associated with pig farms.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Lasheras, S; Bolea, R; Mainar-Jaime, R C; Kuijper, E; Sevilla, E; Martín-Burriel, I; Chirino-Trejo, M

    2017-02-01

    To determine the presence of Clostridium difficile on fattening pig farms in north-eastern Spain. Twenty-seven farms were sampled. Pools of pig faecal samples (n = 210), samples of intestinal content from common